WorldWideScience

Sample records for abolishes cognitive deficits

  1. Inhibition of mTOR by Rapamycin Abolishes Cognitive Deficits and Reduces Amyloid-β Levels in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Patricia; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Hart, Matthew J.; Debnath, Jayanta; Gorostiza, Olivia; Bredesen, Dale; Richardson, Arlan; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Background Reduced TOR signaling has been shown to significantly increase lifespan in a variety of organisms [1], [2], [3], [4]. It was recently demonstrated that long-term treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway[5], or ablation of the mTOR target p70S6K[6] extends lifespan in mice, possibly by delaying aging. Whether inhibition of the mTOR pathway would delay or prevent age-associated disease such as AD remained to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings We used rapamycin administration and behavioral tools in a mouse model of AD as well as standard biochemical and immunohistochemical measures in brain tissue to provide answers for this question. Here we show that long-term inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin prevented AD-like cognitive deficits and lowered levels of Aβ42, a major toxic species in AD[7], in the PDAPP transgenic mouse model. These data indicate that inhibition of the mTOR pathway can reduce Aβ42 levels in vivo and block or delay AD in mice. As expected from the inhibition of mTOR, autophagy was increased in neurons of rapamycin-treated transgenic, but not in non-transgenic, PDAPP mice, suggesting that the reduction in Aβ and the improvement in cognitive function are due in part to increased autophagy, possibly as a response to high levels of Aβ. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin, an intervention that extends lifespan in mice, can slow or block AD progression in a transgenic mouse model of the disease. Rapamycin, already used in clinical settings, may be a potentially effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of AD. PMID:20376313

  2. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin abolishes cognitive deficits and reduces amyloid-beta levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Patricia; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Hart, Matthew J; Debnath, Jayanta; Gorostiza, Olivia; Bredesen, Dale; Richardson, Arlan; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica

    2010-04-01

    Reduced TOR signaling has been shown to significantly increase lifespan in a variety of organisms [1], [2], [3], [4]. It was recently demonstrated that long-term treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway[5], or ablation of the mTOR target p70S6K[6] extends lifespan in mice, possibly by delaying aging. Whether inhibition of the mTOR pathway would delay or prevent age-associated disease such as AD remained to be determined. We used rapamycin administration and behavioral tools in a mouse model of AD as well as standard biochemical and immunohistochemical measures in brain tissue to provide answers for this question. Here we show that long-term inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin prevented AD-like cognitive deficits and lowered levels of Abeta(42), a major toxic species in AD[7], in the PDAPP transgenic mouse model. These data indicate that inhibition of the mTOR pathway can reduce Abeta(42) levels in vivo and block or delay AD in mice. As expected from the inhibition of mTOR, autophagy was increased in neurons of rapamycin-treated transgenic, but not in non-transgenic, PDAPP mice, suggesting that the reduction in Abeta and the improvement in cognitive function are due in part to increased autophagy, possibly as a response to high levels of Abeta. Our data suggest that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin, an intervention that extends lifespan in mice, can slow or block AD progression in a transgenic mouse model of the disease. Rapamycin, already used in clinical settings, may be a potentially effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of AD.

  3. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin abolishes cognitive deficits and reduces amyloid-beta levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Spilman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reduced TOR signaling has been shown to significantly increase lifespan in a variety of organisms [1], [2], [3], [4]. It was recently demonstrated that long-term treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway[5], or ablation of the mTOR target p70S6K[6] extends lifespan in mice, possibly by delaying aging. Whether inhibition of the mTOR pathway would delay or prevent age-associated disease such as AD remained to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used rapamycin administration and behavioral tools in a mouse model of AD as well as standard biochemical and immunohistochemical measures in brain tissue to provide answers for this question. Here we show that long-term inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin prevented AD-like cognitive deficits and lowered levels of Abeta(42, a major toxic species in AD[7], in the PDAPP transgenic mouse model. These data indicate that inhibition of the mTOR pathway can reduce Abeta(42 levels in vivo and block or delay AD in mice. As expected from the inhibition of mTOR, autophagy was increased in neurons of rapamycin-treated transgenic, but not in non-transgenic, PDAPP mice, suggesting that the reduction in Abeta and the improvement in cognitive function are due in part to increased autophagy, possibly as a response to high levels of Abeta. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin, an intervention that extends lifespan in mice, can slow or block AD progression in a transgenic mouse model of the disease. Rapamycin, already used in clinical settings, may be a potentially effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of AD.

  4. Autism: cognitive deficit or cognitive style?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happé

    1999-06-01

    Autism is a developmental disorder characterized by impaired social and communicative development, and restricted interests and activities. This article will argue that we can discover more about developmental disorders such as autism through demonstrations of task success than through examples of task failure. Even in exploring and explaining what people with autism find difficult, such as social interaction, demonstration of competence on contrasting tasks has been crucial to defining the nature of the specific deficit. Deficit accounts of autism cannot explain, however, the assets seen in this disorder; for example, savant skills in maths, music and drawing, and islets of ability in visuospatial tests and rote memory. An alternative account, reviewed here, suggests that autism is characterized by a cognitive style biased towards local rather than global information processing - termed 'weak central coherence'. Evidence that weak coherence might also characterize the relatives of people with autism, and form part of the extended phenotype of this largely genetic disorder, is discussed. This review concludes by considering some outstanding questions concerning the specific cognitive mechanism for coherence and the neural basis of individual differences in this aspect of information processing.

  5. Cognitive Deficits in the Pathogenesis of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, M.

    1983-01-01

    Reports empirical findings indicating that autistic children have a basic cognitive deficit that is not a secondary consequence of social withdrawal. The precise nature of the deficit is discussed, as are studies of autistic children's general intelligence, language abnormalities, and social impairments. (RH)

  6. Social-Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Daniela; Kirsch, Peter

    Patients with schizophrenia not only suffer from prototypical psychotic symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations and from cognitive deficits, but also from tremendous deficits in social functioning. However, little is known about the interplay between the cognitive and the social-cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Our chapter gives an overview on behavioral, as well as functional imaging studies on social cognition in schizophrenia. Main findings on cognitive and motivational deficits in schizophrenia are reviewed and introduced within the context of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia. The reviewed findings suggest that disturbed "social brain" functioning in schizophrenia, depending on the specific context, can either lead to a neglect of the emotions and intentions of others or to the false attribution of these emotions and intentions in an emotionally neutral social content. We integrate these findings with the current knowledge about aberrant dopaminergic firing in schizophrenia by presenting a comprehensive model explaining core symptoms of the disorder. The main implication of the presented model is that neither cognitive-motivational, nor social-cognitive deficits alone cause schizophrenia symptoms, but that symptoms only emerge by the interplay of disturbed social brain functioning with aberrant dopaminergic firing.

  7. Cognitive deficits in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob; Knorr, Ulla; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unipolar depressive disorder may present with cognitive deficits in the remitted state, and the aim of the present study was to investigate whether cognitive deficits within specific cognitive domains are present....

  8. Cognitive deficits in patients with brain tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chao; BAO Wei-min; YANG Bo-jie; XIE Rong; CAO Xiao-yun; LUAN Shi-hai; MAO Ying

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the present status and progress of clinical research on the cognitive effects caused by different types of brain tumors and common treatments.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English from 1990 to Febuary 2012.Research terms were "cognitive deficits" or "cognitive dysfunction".Study selection Articals including any information about brain tumor related cognitive deficits were selected.Results It is widely accepted that brain tumors and related treatments can impair cognitive function across manydomains,and can impact on patients' quality of life.Tumor localization,lateralization,surgery,drugs,radiotherapy and chemotherapy are all thought to be important factors in this process.However,some conflicting findings regarding brain tumor-related cognitive deficits have been reported.It can be difficult to determine the mechanism of these treatments,such as chemotherapy,antibiotics,antiepileptics,and steroids.Future research is needed to clarify these potential treatment effects.Conclusions Cognitive function is important for patients with brain tumor.Much more focus has been paid on this field.It should be regarded as an important prognostic index for the patients with brain tumor,and neuropsychological tests should be used in regular examinations.

  9. Cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Jønsson, A; Andresen, Jesper Graubæk

    2012-01-01

    Objectives - Although disease load in multiple sclerosis (MS) often is based on T2 lesion volumes, the changes in T2 of normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) are rarely considered. By means of magnetic resonance, (MR) we retrospectively investigated whether T2 changes in NABT explain part...... Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). Voxel-wise T2 estimates and total T2 lesion volume were tested for correlations with eight cognitive domains, a general cognitive dysfunction factor (CDF), and the two clinical scales. Results - We found distinct...

  10. Depression and cognitive deficits in geriatric schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Emily; Serper, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Past reports have found patients with comorbid depression and schizophrenia spectrum disorders exhibit greater deficits in memory and attention compared to schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients without depressive symptoms. However, in contrast to younger schizophrenia patients, the few past studies using cognitive screens to examine the relationship between depression and cognition in inpatient geriatric schizophrenia have found that depressive symptomatology was associated with relatively enhanced cognitive performance. In the current study we examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits in geriatric schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients (n=71; mean age=63.7) on an acute psychiatric inpatient service. Patients completed a battery of cognitive tests assessing memory, attention and global cognition. Symptom severity was assessed via the PANSS and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. Results revealed that geriatric patients' depression severity predicted enhancement of their attentional and verbal memory performance. Patients' global cognitive functioning and adaptive functioning were not associated with their depression severity. Contrary to patterns typically seen in younger patients and non-patient groups, increasing depression severity is associated with enhancement of memory and attention in geriatric schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients. Also, diverging from younger samples, depression severity was unassociated with patients adaptive and global cognitive functioning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequency of Cognitive Deficits in Neurofibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and severity of specific cognitive deficits in 81 children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, ages 8 to 16 years, compared to 49 unaffected sibling controls, were assessed in a study at the University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

  12. Can we predict cognitive deficits based on cognitive complaints?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Małgorzata Szepietowska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine whether the intensity of cognitive complaints can, in conjunction with other selected variables, predict the general level of cognitive functions evaluated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA test. Current reports do not show clear conclusions on this subject. Some data indicate that cognitive complaints have a predictive value for low scores in standardised tasks, suggesting cognitive dysfunction (e.g. mild cognitive impairment. Other data, however, do not support the predictive role of complaints, and show no relationship to exist between the complaints and the results of cognitive tests. Material and methods: The study included 118 adults (58 women and 60 men. We used the MoCA test, a self-report questionnaire assessing the intensity of cognitive complaints (Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cognitive Impairment – PROCOG and Dysexecutive Questionnaire/Self – DEX-S, and selected subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R PL. On the basis of the results from the MoCA test, two separate groups were created, one comprising respondents with lower results, and one – those who obtained scores indicating a normal level of cognitive function. We compared these groups according to the severity of the complaints and the results obtained with the other methods. Logistic regression analysis was performed taking into account the independent variables (gender, age, result in PROCOG, DEX-S, and neurological condition and the dependent variable (dichotomized result in MoCA. Results: Groups with different levels of performance in MoCA differed in regards of some cognitive abilities and the severity of complaints related to semantic memory, anxiety associated with a sense of deficit and loss of skills, but provided similar self-assessments regarding the efficiency of episodic memory, long-term memory, social skills and executive functions. The severity of complaints does not allow

  13. [Treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Part 2: Pharmacological strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Ely, D; Pfueller, U; Mundt, C; Müller, U; Weisbrod, M

    2010-05-01

    Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are a clinically relevant symptom dimension and one of the best predictors for functional outcome. Pharmacological treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is still a challenge. The objective of this article is to present a detailed review of the literature on strategies for the pharmacological treatment of cognitive deficits. It is not clear whether first-generation antipsychotics have a genuine positive influence on cognition. There is only sparse evidence for the positive effect of second-generation antipsychotics on cognitive processes. Furthermore it is not evident that second-generation antipsychotics are more beneficial than first-generation antipsychotics in the treatment of cognitive deficits. The add-on use of substances which directly influence cognitive processes, so-called cognition-enhancing drugs is more promising.

  14. A Multiple Deficit Model of Reading Disability and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Searching for Shared Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Shanahan, Michelle A.; Santerre-Lemmon, Laura E.; Barnard, Holly D.; Willcutt, Erik G.; DeFries, John C.; Olson, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study tests a multiple cognitive deficit model of reading disability (RD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and their comorbidity. Methods: A structural equation model (SEM) of multiple cognitive risk factors and symptom outcome variables was constructed. The model included phonological awareness as a unique…

  15. Cognitive mapping deficits in schizophrenia: A critical overview

    OpenAIRE

    Anushree Bose; Sri Mahavir Agarwal; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Ganesan Venkatasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal deficits are an established feature of schizophrenia and are complementary with recent evidences of marked allocentric processing deficits being reported in this disorder. By “Cognitive mapping” we intend to refer to the concepts from the seminal works of O’Keefe and Nadel (1978) that led to the development of cognitive map theory of hippocampal function. In this review, we summarize emerging evidences and issues that indicate that “Cognitive mapping deficits” form one of the impo...

  16. Perceived cognitive deficits, emotional distress and disability following whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael J L; Hall, Erin; Bartolacci, Rosita; Sullivan, Maureen E; Adams, Heather

    2002-01-01

    To describe the pattern of perceived cognitive deficits in patients with whiplash injury, to examine the relation between perceived cognitive deficits and disability, and to examine the determinants of perceived cognitive deficits in patients with whiplash injury. A total of 81 individuals participated in the study. There were 29 patients (13 men, 16 women) with a diagnosis of whiplash, grade I or II. Patients with work-related soft-tissue injuries (n=24) and nonclinical controls (n=28) were included as comparison groups. Participants completed measures of perceived cognitive deficits, pain severity, depression, anxiety and pain-related disability. Both patient groups scored significantly higher than the nonpatient control group on the measure of perceived cognitive deficits, but did not differ significantly from each other. Perceptions of cognitive deficits were significantly correlated with pain-related disability. A hierarchical regression examining the relative contribution of anxiety, depression and pain showed that only anxiety and depression contributed significant unique variance to the prediction of perceived cognitive deficits. The potential benefits of focusing interventions on the management of anxiety and depression in the rehabilitation of patients with whiplash injuries are discussed.

  17. Cognitive control deficits associated with antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, Joshua D; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R; Hiatt Racer, Kristina D; Newman, Joseph P

    2012-07-01

    Antisociality has been linked to a variety of executive functioning deficits, including poor cognitive control. Surprisingly, cognitive control deficits are rarely found in psychopathic individuals, despite their notoriously severe and persistent antisocial behavior. In fact, primary (low-anxious) psychopathic individuals display superior performance on cognitive control-type tasks under certain circumstances. To clarify these seemingly contradictory findings, we administered a response competition (i.e., flanker) task to incarcerated offenders, who were assessed for Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) symptoms and psychopathy. As hypothesized, APD related to poorer accuracy, especially on incongruent trials. Contrary to expectation, however, the same pattern of results was found in psychopathy. Additional analyses indicated that these effects of APD and psychopathy were associated with overlapping variance. The findings suggest that psychopathy and APD symptoms are both associated with deficits in cognitive control, and that this deficit relates to general antisociality as opposed to a specific antisocial syndrome.

  18. Common Cognitive Deficits in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism: Working Memory and Visual-Motor Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Julia A.; Decker, Scott L.; Allen, Ryan A.; Roberts, Alycia M.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in working memory (WM) are characteristic features of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and autism. However, few studies have investigated cognitive deficits using a wide range of cognitive measures. We compared children with ADHD ("n" = 49) and autism ("n" = 33) with a demographically matched…

  19. Oculomotor Performance Identifies Underlying Cognitive Deficits in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Irene M.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Yasui, Enami; Luna, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the cognitive control in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder through the use of oculomotor tests reveal that this group showed susceptibility to peripheral distractors and deficits in response inhibition. All subjects were found to have intact sensorimotor function and working memory.

  20. Amusia and cognitive deficits after stroke: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkämö, Teppo; Tervaniemi, Mari; Soinila, Seppo; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M; Laine, Matti; Hietanen, Marja

    2009-07-01

    We studied the relationship between musical and cognitive deficits by testing middle cerebral arterial (MCA) stroke patients (n= 53) with a shortened version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Results showed that amusic patients (n= 32) had more severe cognitive deficits, especially in working memory and executive functioning, than did non-amusic patients (n= 21), and the severity of amusia also correlated with attention deficits. These findings thus suggest that domain-general attention, executive, and working memory processes are associated with amusia after stroke.

  1. Awareness of deficits in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Stokholm, Jette; Gade, Anders

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated impaired awareness of cognitive deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Very few studies have addressed this topic, and methodological inconsistencies make the comparison of previous studies difficult. From a prospective...

  2. Awareness of deficits in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Stokholm, Jette; Gade, Anders

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated impaired awareness of cognitive deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Very few studies have addressed this topic, and methodological inconsistencies make the comparison of previous studies difficult. From a prospective...

  3. Premorbid cognitive deficits in young relatives of schizophrenia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matcheri S Keshavan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia are thought to be stable trait markers that predate the illness and manifest in relatives of patients. Adolescence is the age of maximum vulnerability to the onset of schizophrenia and may be an opportune “window” to observe neurocognitive impairments close to but prior to the onset of psychosis. We reviewed the extant studies assessing neurocognitive deficits in young relatives at high risk (HR for schizophrenia and their relation to brain structural alterations. We also provide some additional data pertaining to the relation of these deficits to psychopathology and brain structural alterations from the Pittsburgh Risk Evaluation Program (PREP. Cognitive deficits are noted in the HR population, which are more severe in first-degree relatives compared to second-degree relatives and primarily involve psychomotor speed, memory, attention, reasoning, and social-cognition. Reduced general intelligence is also noted, although its relationship to these specific domains is underexplored. Premorbid cognitive deficits may be related to brain structural and functional abnormalities, underlining the neurobiological basis of this illness. Cognitive impairments might predict later emergence of psychopathology in at-risk subjects and may be targets of early remediation and preventive strategies. Although evidence for neurocognitive deficits in young relatives abounds, further studies on their structural underpinnings and on their candidate status as endophenotypes are needed.

  4. Neurocognitive and social cognition deficits in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kułakowska, Dorota

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the article the authors present a set of the actual concepts explaining problems of cognitive functions and social cognition currently observed in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN. It is possible; through the neuroimaging research, to get better understanding of the brain specifics in these individuals. Even though, the AN remains a disease with very complex and multifactorial etiology which remains a huge medical challenge. Currently, popular is the view that takes into consideration the integrating role of the insula and subcortical structures (such as hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus in the regulation of cognitive and emotional processes in people suffering from AN. There is still an open problem, however, of the selection of therapeutic interventions targeting these deficits. The second part of the article presents the attempt to describe deficits in neurocognitive and social cognition in people with AN occurring prior to illness, during and after the recovery. Particular attention has been paid to the most frequently described in the literature – neuro- cognitive deficits such as rigidity of thinking, weak central coherence, and deficits in social cognition, including mental processes of perception and expression of emotions, disorders of the theory of mind (ToM and empathy. The results of previous studies, their scarcity in Poland, do not give a satisfactory answer to the question whether the above mentioned disorders are a feature of endophenotype or condition in an episode of the disease. Research point to the more permanent nature, which may be more resistant to therapeutic modifications.

  5. Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits in Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive and behavioral features of Sturge-Weber syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, and neurofibromatosis are summarized by a literature review (113 references at the New York University, New York.

  6. Awareness of cognitive deficits in older adults with epilepsy and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galioto, Rachel; Thamilavel, Selvan; Blum, Andrew S; Tremont, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    A significant portion of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) experience limited awareness of cognitive deficits. Although older adults with epilepsy have comparable cognitive deficits to individuals with MCI, little is known about awareness of cognitive deficit in epilepsy. This study compared deficit awareness in epilepsy and MCI and examined its relationship with neuropsychological performance. Sixty-two older adults (31 epilepsy, 31 MCI) completed neuropsychological testing and the Cognitive Difficulties Scale (CDS), a self-report measure of everyday cognitive skills. Informants completed the CDS only. Cognitive domain scores were created. CDS composite scores were created by summing attention-concentration and language and delayed memory factors. Awareness was defined as the difference between patient and informant CDS scores, with limited awareness defined as greater informant complaints. Neuropsychological performance was similar between groups for all domains except that MCI participants had worse delayed memory, t(60) = 2.49, p .05). Epilepsy informant CDS scores were related to poorer immediate memory (r = -.41, p = .02). MCI informant CDS scores were related to worse delayed memory (r = -.41, p = .02). Limited awareness was found in 29.0% of epilepsy and 61.3% of MCI participants. Awareness was not related to cognition in epilepsy but was related to worse delayed memory (r = -.41, p = .02) for MCI participants. Older adults with epilepsy and MCI had similar cognitive deficits with the exception of greater impairment in delayed memory for MCI patients. There was less awareness of deficit in the MCI group, suggesting that delayed memory may be a critical factor for deficit awareness. Results argue against executive dysfunction as a major contributor to deficit awareness.

  7. Cognitive Deficits in Adults with ADHD Go beyond Comorbidity Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Katiane L.; Guimaraes-da-Silva, Paula O.; Grevet, Eugenio H.; Victor, Marcelo M.; Salgado, Carlos A. I.; Vitola, Eduardo S.; Mota, Nina R.; Fischer, Aline G.; Contini, Veronica; Picon, Felipe A.; Karam, Rafael G.; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Rohde, Luis A.; Bau, Claiton H. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study addresses if deficits in cognitive, attention, and inhibitory control performance in adults with ADHD are better explained by the disorder itself or by comorbid conditions. Method Adult patients with ADHD ("n" = 352) and controls ("n" = 94) were evaluated in the ADHD program of a tertiary hospital. The…

  8. Depression and Helplessness-Induced Cognitive Deficits in the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, Kevin J.; And Others

    To explore the effects of depression and learned helplessness on cognitive task deficits, 66 community-residing elderly adults were categorized as depressed or nondepressed based on Beck Depression Inventory scores. After a pre-test battery measuring short-term memory and components of crystallized/fluid intelligence, the subjects responded to a…

  9. Cognitive Deficits in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Surgical Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daren C.; Sandoval-Garcia, Carolina; Rocque, Brandon G.; Wilbrand, Stephanie M.; Mitchell, Carol C.; Hermann, Bruce P.; Dempsey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by vessel disease in stroke-related cognition dysfunction is unclear. We assessed the impact of significant atherosclerotic disease on cognition—even in patients asymptomatic for stroke. We hypothesized that patients would perform poorly relative to controls, but that symptomatic/asymptomatic status (history of stroke/transient ischemic attack) would have no effect. Fifty-two carotid endarterectomy candidates with >60% carotid stenosis and 17 controls underwent a 60-min neuropsychological test protocol. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients showed deficits in executive function, delayed verbal recall, and general knowledge. Patients symptomatic for stroke also performed worse on tests of language and motor/visuomotor ability. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients differed in working memory and language task performance. Although all patients showed deficits in executive function and memory, only symptomatic patients showed additional deficits in language and motor function. Cognitive abnormalities in patients viewed as “asymptomatic” for stroke underscore the need for early identification and treatment. PMID:26663810

  10. Suicidal behaviours in affective disorders: a deficit of cognitive inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Devantoy, Stéphane; Gorwood, Philip; Annweiler, Cédric; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Le Gall, Didier; Beauchet, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Suicide has been related to affective disorders. We hypothesized that suicide could be associated with cognitive inhibition deficit. Our study aimed to systematically review all published articles that examined the relation between cognitive inhibition deficit and suicidal behaviours (that is, suicide attempt or suicidal ideation) in patients with affective disorders. We performed an English and French MEDLINE and EMBASE search, ranging from 1970 to 2010, indexed under the MeSH terms of suicide, neuropsychology, neuropsychological tests, and executive function, combined with the following title and abstract terms: neuropsychological functions, executive functioning, and executive performance. Among the 164 selected studies, 9 observational studies met the selection criteria and were included in the final analysis. The number of participants ranged from 57 to 244 (28% to 66%, respectively, were men). Executive dysfunction was more frequently found among patients with suicidal behaviours. In particular, higher cognitive inhibition deficit was observed in depressed subjects with suicide behaviours, compared with depressed subjects without any suicidal behaviour. The results of the meta-analysis showed a higher impairment in inhibition score, according to the number of perseverations in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (Cohen d = 0.68) than in inhibition according to the time needed to perform the Trail-Making Test part B (d = 0.01) among patients with suicidal behaviour, compared with patients with no suicidal behaviour. This systematic review and meta-analysis showed a positive association between cognitive inhibition deficit and suicide attempts in patients with affective disorders. Future research should examine whether cognitive inhibition deficit precedes the suicidal behaviour.

  11. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Cognitive Deficits and Affective Disorder in Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Ransome

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a tandem repeat expansion encoding a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. HD involves progressive psychiatric, cognitive, and motor symptoms, the selective pathogenesis of which remains to be mechanistically elucidated. There are a range of different brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and striatum, known to be affected in HD, with evidence for hippocampal dysfunction accumulating in recent years. In this review we will focus on hippocampal abnormalities, in particular, deficits of adult neurogenesis. We will discuss potential molecular mechanisms mediating disrupted hippocampal neurogenesis, and how this deficit of cellular plasticity may in turn contribute to specific cognitive and affective symptoms that are prominent in HD. The generation of transgenic animal models of HD has greatly facilitated our understanding of disease mechanisms at molecular, cellular, and systems levels. Transgenic HD mice have been found to show progressive behavioral changes, including affective, cognitive, and motor abnormalities. The discovery, in multiple transgenic lines of HD mice, that adult hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity is disrupted, may help explain specific aspects of cognitive and affective dysfunction. Furthermore, these mouse models have provided insight into potential molecular mediators of adult neurogenesis deficits, such as disrupted serotonergic and neurotrophin signaling. Finally, a number of environmental and pharmacological interventions which are known to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been found to have beneficial affective and cognitive effects in mouse models, suggesting common molecular targets which may have therapeutic utility for HD and related diseases.

  12. Cognitive rehabilitation for memory deficits after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Nair, Roshan; Cogger, Heather; Worthington, Esme; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2016-09-01

    Memory problems are a common cognitive complaint following stroke and can potentially affect ability to complete functional activities. Cognitive rehabilitation programmes either attempt to retrain lost or poor memory functions, or teach patients strategies to cope with them.Some studies have reported positive results of cognitive rehabilitation for memory problems, but the results obtained from previous systematic reviews have been less positive and they have reported inconclusive evidence. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2000 and most recently updated in 2007. To determine whether participants who have received cognitive rehabilitation for memory problems following a stroke have better outcomes than those given no treatment or a placebo control.The outcomes of interest were subjective and objective assessments of memory function, functional ability, mood, and quality of life. We considered the immediate and long-term outcomes of memory rehabilitation. We used a comprehensive electronic search strategy to identify controlled studies indexed in the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 19 May 2016) and in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL2016, Issue 5), MEDLINE (2005 to 7 March 2016), EMBASE 2005 to 7 March 2016), CINAHL (2005 to 5 February 2016), AMED (2005 to 7 March 2016), PsycINFO (2005 to 7 March 2016), and nine other databases and registries. Start dates for the electronic databases coincided with the last search for the previous review. We handsearched reference lists of primary studies meeting the inclusion criteria and review articles to identify further eligible studies. We selected randomised controlled trials in which cognitive rehabilitation for memory problems was compared to a control condition. We included studies where more than 75% of the participants had experienced a stroke, or if separate data were available from those with stroke in mixed aetiology studies. Two review authors

  13. Cognitive Deficits as a Mediator of Poor Occupational Function in Remitted Major Depressive Disorder Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Young Sup; Rosenblat, Joshua D.; Kakar, Ron; Bahk, Won-Myong; McIntyre, Roger S.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients have been described in numerous studies. However, few reports have aimed to describe cognitive deficits in the remitted state of MDD and the mediational effect of cognitive deficits on occupational outcome. The aim of the current review is to synthesize the literature on the mediating and moderating effects of specific domains of cognition on occupational impairment among people with remitted MDD. In addition, predictors of cognit...

  14. [Developmental coordination disorder: relations between deficits in movement and cognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Julia; Petermann, F

    2010-01-01

    Different studies confirm that children with developmental coordination disorders (DCD) feature additionally cognitive deficits in areas of visual perception, memory and processing speed. The aim of the present study was to explore, whether or not children suffering from DCD have specific performance profiles in the WISC-IV. For this purpose, the WISC-IV results of 40 children with DCD (diagnosed using the Movement ABC-2), mean age 7,60, were compared with a control group matched according to age und gender. The children in the clinical group offered a homogenous performance profile, scoring below average in each of the four indices (verbal comprehension, perception reasoning, working memory and processing speed) and general IQ. Therefore, in clinical practice the WISC-IV is an appropriate instrument to detect cognitive deficits that can appear in conjunction with DCD.

  15. Structural deficits and cognitive impairment in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Di; Chen, Pei-Chin; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Hsu, Nai-Wen; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Lin, Wei-Ming; Lin, Ching-Po; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-07-22

    Chronic neuropsychological sequelae may occur in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). The impact of structural abnormalities on the clinical performance of patients with TBM is unknown. This study applied the Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to determine if gray matter deficits in TBM are associated with acute presentations and chronic cognitive impairment. Seventeen patients with TBM who discontinued their anti-TB therapy for more than six months, and 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Differences in gray matter volume (GMV) between patients and healthy controls were investigated using DARTEL-VBM to determine structural abnormalities. Disease severity during the acute stage was scored by clinical profiles and conventional imaging findings. Correlations among chronic structural deficits, cognitive impairment, and initial disease severity were assessed. The patients with TBM had worse neuropsychological subtest performances than the healthy controls. Compared to the controls, the patients showed smaller GMVs in the right thalamus, right caudate nucleus, right superior and middle temporal gyrus, right precuneus, and left putamen (p superior temporal gyrus, right precuneus, left putamen, and right caudate nucleus (p < 0.05) were further associated with worse cognitive function. More severe initial disease also correlated with smaller GMVs in the right caudate nucleus (p < 0.05). Multiple domain cognitive impairment may persist in patients with chronic TBM even after appropriate treatment. Worse initial disease severity may contribute to the vulnerability of brain tissue to damage, with subsequent neuropsychological consequences.

  16. Neurally dissociable cognitive components of reading deficits in subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukrina, Olga; Barrett, A M; Alexander, Edward J; Yao, Bing; Graves, William W

    2015-01-01

    According to cognitive models of reading, words are processed by interacting orthographic (spelling), phonological (sound), and semantic (meaning) information. Despite extensive study of the neural basis of reading in healthy participants, little group data exist on patients with reading deficits from focal brain damage pointing to critical neural systems for reading. Here, we report on one such study. We have performed neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging on 11 patients with left-hemisphere stroke (word choices to a target based on meaning), phonology (matching word choices to a target based on rhyming), and orthography (a two-alternative forced choice of the most plausible non-word). They also read aloud pseudowords and words with high or low levels of usage frequency, imageability, and spelling-sound consistency. As predicted by the cognitive model, when averaged across patients, the influence of semantics was most salient for low-frequency, low-consistency words, when phonological decoding is especially difficult. Qualitative subtraction analyses revealed lesion sites specific to phonological processing. These areas were consistent with those shown previously to activate for phonology in healthy participants, including supramarginal, posterior superior temporal, middle temporal, inferior frontal gyri, and underlying white matter. Notable divergence between this analysis and previous functional imaging is the association of lesions in the mid-fusiform gyrus and anterior temporal lobe with phonological reading deficits. This study represents progress toward identifying brain lesion-deficit relationships in the cognitive components of reading. Such correspondences are expected to help not only better understand the neural mechanisms of reading, but may also help tailor reading therapy to individual neurocognitive deficit profiles.

  17. Cognitive control in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dramsdahl, Margaretha; Westerhausen, René; Haavik, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the ability of adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to direct their attention and exert cognitive control in a forced instruction dichotic listening (DL) task. The performance of 29 adults with ADHD was compared with 58......-forced condition), or to focus and report either the right- or left-ear syllable (forced-right and forced-left condition). This procedure is presumed to tap distinct cognitive processes: perception (non-forced condition), orienting of attention (forced-right condition), and cognitive control (forced-left condition......). Adults with ADHD did not show significant impairment in the conditions tapping perception and attention orientation, but were significantly impaired in their ability to report the left-ear syllable during the forced-left instruction condition, whereas the control group showed the expected left...

  18. Mild cognitive deficits in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemensma, Jitske; Andela, Cornelie D; Biermasz, Nienke R; Romijn, Johannes A; Pereira, Alberto M

    2016-01-01

    The brain is a major target organ for cortisol considering its high density of glucocorticoid receptors. Several states of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal dysregulation point towards impairments in cognitive functioning. However, there is a very limited body of research on the effects of hypocortisolism on cognitive functioning. To evaluate cognitive functioning in patients with hypocortisolism (i.e., primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI)) and to examine the possible effect of postponing early-morning hydrocortisone intake on cognitive functioning. Thirty-one patients with PAI on regular morning hydrocortisone intake and 31 healthy matched controls underwent nine neuropsychological tests, evaluating memory and executive functioning. In addition, the effect of normal timing and postponement of morning hydrocortisone intake on neuropsychological tests were assessed in an additional 29 patients with PAI. Compared to controls, patients with PAI performed worse on auditory and visual memory tasks (all P ≤ 0.024) and executive functioning tasks (all P ≤ 0.012). In contrast, patients performed better on a concentration and an attention task (both P<0.05). Postponement of hydrocortisone intake in the morning did not affect the outcomes of neuropsychological tests. Patients on long-term hydrocortisone replacement for PAI show mild cognitive deficits compared to controls. There was no effect of postponement of regular hydrocortisone intake on cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive Deficits and Positively Biased Self-Perceptions in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Julia D.; Tomb, Meghan; Hoza, Betsy; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Hurt, Elizabeth A.; Vaughn, Aaron J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relation between cognitive deficits and positive bias in a sample of 272 children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; 7-12 years old). Results indicated that children with ADHD with and without biased self-perceptions exhibit differences in specific cognitive deficits (executive processes,…

  20. Concurrent cognitive processing and letter sequence transcription deficits in stutterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, W G

    1990-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that men who stutter transcribe rapidly presented sequences of letters more slowly and less accurately than nonstutterer controls. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the transcription deficit is not limited to task conditions that demand concurrent monitoring and responding. This was evidenced by comparable deficits on a successive response condition that required subjects to write letters after the presentation was complete. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that the deficit is not due to a difficulty by stutterers in parsing streams of stimulus information internally. Their performance did not differentially improve when letters were grouped with brief pauses, nor with experience in transcribing preparsed letter sequences. This experiment also demonstrated that the phenomenon is generalizable to women. In related testing, stutterers were slower than controls in writing internally generated sequences of letters, those of the alphabet forwards and backwards, but not in writing the same two letters, A and B, repetitively nor in the cognitively more demanding task of writing numbers backwards by three's. These results parallel those obtained with finger tapping of same versus unique sequences by stutterers and were interpreted as being consistent with the idea that while stutterers are not generally slower motorically than nonstutterers, they experience difficulty when required to organize and carry out tasks with new multiple response transitions. The two experiments have replicated and extended, under different conditions, the earlier findings of a letter sequence transcription deficit in stutterers, but the nature of the interference still remains to be clarified.

  1. Cognitive deficits in geriatric depression: clinical correlates and implications for current and future treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Alexopoulos, George S

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the cognitive deficits commonly associated with geriatric depression and describe their clinical significance. The complex relationship between geriatric depression and dementia is summarized and possible shared mechanisms discussed. Evidence regarding whether the cognitive deficits in depression may be mitigated with medication or with computerized cognitive remediation is presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Converging on a core cognitive deficit: the impact of various neurodevelopment insults on cognitive control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kally C O'Reilly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial effort and immense need, the treatment options for major neuropsychiatric illnesses like schizophrenia are limited and largely ineffective at improving the most debilitating cognitive symptoms that are central to mental illness. These symptoms include cognitive control deficits, the inability to selectively use information that is currently relevant and ignore what is currently irrelevant. Contemporary attempts to accelerate progress are in part founded on an effort to reconceptualize neuropsychiatric illness as a disorder of neural development. This neurodevelopmental framework emphasizes abnormal neural circuits on the one hand, and on the other, it suggests there are therapeutic opportunities to exploit the developmental processes of excitatory neuron pruning, inhibitory neuron proliferation, elaboration of myelination, and other circuit refinements that extend through adolescence and into early adulthood. We have crafted a preclinical research program aimed at cognition failures that may be relevant to mental illness. By working with a variety of neurodevelopmental rodent models we strive to identify a common pathophysiology that underlies cognitive control failure as well as a common strategy for improving cognition in the face of neural circuit abnormalities. Here we review our work to characterize cognitive control deficits in rats with a neonatal ventral hippocampus lesion and rats that were exposed to Methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM in utero. We review our findings as they pertain to early developmental processes, including neurogenesis, as well as the power of cognitive experience to refine neural circuit function within the mature and maturing brain’s cognitive circuitry.

  3. Effect of herbal medicine on Poststroke cognitive deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-kyu Kim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim of study was to evaluate the effect of Herbal medicine on post stroke cognitive deficit. Methods : All groups were treated with acupunture treatment, moxa treatment, herbal medicines, physical and occupational therapy for 4 weeks, additionally cardiotonic pills(CP were taken in the cardiotonic pills group. The effect of treatment was assessed using Verval fluency, MMSE-KC, Word List Immediate Recall test. Statistical significance was achived if the probability was less than 5%(p,0.05. Results : Verval fluency, MMSE-KC, Word List Immediate Recall test scores increased in both group. MMSEKC, Word List Immediate Recall test scores were significantly increased in the CP group. Verval fluency, MMSE-KC, Word List Immediate Recall test scores were significantly increased in the control group. In the Verval fluency, MMSE-KC, Word List Immediate Recall test of the CP group more increased compared to the control group. There were no significant differences between two groups. In the CP group, the scores of the infarction group more increased compared to the hemorrhage group. Conclusions : According to the these results, herbal medicines are effective to improve post stroke cognitive-deficit. Futher studies are needed to know cardiotonic pills in the ischemic stroke.

  4. Cognitive Deficits in Breast Cancer Survivors After Chemotherapy and Hormonal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Vance, David E; Triebel, Kristen L; Meneses, Karen M

    2015-12-01

    Adjuvant treatments, specifically chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, have dramatically increased breast cancer survival, resulting in increased attention to the residual effects of treatment. Breast cancer survivors (BCS) frequently report that cognitive deficits are a particular source of distress, interfering with many aspects of quality of life. The literature on neuropsychological performance measures in BCS supports the reality of subtle cognitive deficits after both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. This premise is supported by recent imaging studies, which reveal anatomical changes after chemotherapy as well as changes in patterns of neural activation while performing cognitive tasks. This review suggests that, even when performance on neuropsychological performance measures is within normal limits, BCS may be using increased cognitive resources in the face of reduced cognitive reserve. Potential interventions for cognitive deficits after adjuvant therapy include prescriptions for healthy living, pharmacotherapy, complementary therapy, and cognitive remediation therapy directed toward specific cognitive deficits or a combination of several strategies.

  5. Novel Dopamine Therapeutics for Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnsten, Amy F T; Girgis, Ragy R; Gray, David L; Mailman, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by profound cognitive deficits that are not alleviated by currently available medications. Many of these cognitive deficits involve dysfunction of the newly evolved, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). The brains of patients with schizophrenia show evidence of dlPFC pyramidal cell dendritic atrophy, likely reductions in cortical dopamine, and possible changes in dopamine D1 receptors (D1R). It has been appreciated for decades that optimal levels of dopamine are essential for dlPFC working memory function, with many beneficial actions arising from D1R stimulation. D1R are concentrated on dendritic spines in the primate dlPFC, where their stimulation produces an inverted-U dose response on dlPFC neuronal firing and cognitive performance during working memory tasks. Research in both academia and the pharmaceutical industry has led to the development of selective D1 agonists, e.g., the first full D1 agonist, dihydrexidine, which at low doses improved working memory in monkeys. Dihydrexidine has begun to be tested in patients with schizophrenia or schizotypal disorder. Initial results are encouraging, but studies are limited by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. These data, however, have spurred efforts toward the discovery and development of improved or novel new compounds, including D1 agonists with better pharmacokinetics, functionally selective D1 ligands, and D1R positive allosteric modulators. One or several of these approaches should allow optimization of the beneficial effects of D1R stimulation in the dlPFC that can be translated into clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive deficits in Korean women treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi Sook; Cimprich, Bernadine

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive deficits have been reported as detrimental side effects in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer patients and survivors. Korean women treated for breast cancer may experience unrecognized cognitive deficits related to their treatment. However, no research has examined cognitive test performance in chemotherapy-treated Korean breast cancer survivors. The objectives of this study were 2-fold: (1) to examine differences in occurrence and severity of cognitive deficits in Korean women treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer as compared with a control group of women without breast cancer and (2) to examine the relationship of selected demographic and cultural factors with cognitive test performance. Sixty-four Korean women, 32 women treated for localized breast cancer and 32 healthy controls, were enrolled. Breast cancer participants were assessed with established cognitive measures within 4 months after chemotherapy, and healthy controls, within 6 months after negative screening mammography. The breast cancer group showed a significantly higher occurrence and greater severity of cognitive deficits than controls did. Importantly, older age, less education, greater collectivist tendency, and greater childrearing burden were reliably associated with poorer attention and working memory test performance. Cognitive deficits were found in chemotherapy-treated Korean women with moderate to large effect sizes compared with controls. Cultural characteristics contributed to worse cognitive performance. Healthcare providers should recognize that Korean women may be highly vulnerable to cognitive deficits. Cultural factors also need to be considered when assessing cognitive function and designing therapeutic interventions to counteract negative cognitive outcomes.

  7. Deficits in cognitive control, timing and reward sensitivity appear to be dissociable in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, Patrick; Weusten, Juliette; van Dijk, Sarai; van Belle, Janna; Durston, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Recent neurobiological models of ADHD suggest that deficits in different neurobiological pathways may independently lead to symptoms of this disorder. At least three independent pathways may be involved: a dorsal frontostriatal pathway involved in cognitive control, a ventral frontostriatal pathway involved in reward processing and a frontocerebellar pathway related to temporal processing. Importantly, we and others have suggested that disruptions in these three pathways should lead to separable deficits at the cognitive level. Furthermore, if these truly represent separate biological pathways to ADHD, these cognitive deficits should segregate between individuals with ADHD. The present study tests these hypotheses in a sample of children, adolescents and young adults with ADHD and controls. 149 Subjects participated in a short computerized battery assessing cognitive control, timing and reward sensitivity. We used Principal Component Analysis to find independent components underlying the variance in the data. The segregation of deficits between individuals was tested using Loglinear Analysis. We found four components, three of which were predicted by the model: Cognitive control, reward sensitivity and timing. Furthermore, 80% of subjects with ADHD that had a deficit were deficient on only one component. Loglinear Analysis statistically confirmed the independent segregation of deficits between individuals. We therefore conclude that cognitive control, timing and reward sensitivity were separable at a cognitive level and that deficits on these components segregated between individuals with ADHD. These results support a neurobiological framework of separate biological pathways to ADHD with separable cognitive deficits.

  8. Attention and Other Cognitive Deficits in Aphasia: Presence and Relation to Language and Communication Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to further elucidate the relationship between cognition and aphasia, with a focus on attention. It was hypothesized that individuals with aphasia would display variable deficit patterns on tests of attention and other cognitive functions and that their attention deficits, particularly those of complex attention…

  9. Deficits in cognitive control, timing and reward sensitivity appear to be dissociable in ADHD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick de Zeeuw

    Full Text Available Recent neurobiological models of ADHD suggest that deficits in different neurobiological pathways may independently lead to symptoms of this disorder. At least three independent pathways may be involved: a dorsal frontostriatal pathway involved in cognitive control, a ventral frontostriatal pathway involved in reward processing and a frontocerebellar pathway related to temporal processing. Importantly, we and others have suggested that disruptions in these three pathways should lead to separable deficits at the cognitive level. Furthermore, if these truly represent separate biological pathways to ADHD, these cognitive deficits should segregate between individuals with ADHD. The present study tests these hypotheses in a sample of children, adolescents and young adults with ADHD and controls. 149 Subjects participated in a short computerized battery assessing cognitive control, timing and reward sensitivity. We used Principal Component Analysis to find independent components underlying the variance in the data. The segregation of deficits between individuals was tested using Loglinear Analysis. We found four components, three of which were predicted by the model: Cognitive control, reward sensitivity and timing. Furthermore, 80% of subjects with ADHD that had a deficit were deficient on only one component. Loglinear Analysis statistically confirmed the independent segregation of deficits between individuals. We therefore conclude that cognitive control, timing and reward sensitivity were separable at a cognitive level and that deficits on these components segregated between individuals with ADHD. These results support a neurobiological framework of separate biological pathways to ADHD with separable cognitive deficits.

  10. Self-Instructional Cognitive Training to Reduce Impulsive Cognitive Style in Children with Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Flores, Gladys Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Children with attention deficit with hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have an impulsive, rigid and field-dependent cognitive style. This study examines whether self-instructional cognitive training reduces impulsive cognitive style in children diagnosed with this disorder. Method: The subjects were 10 children between the ages of 6 and…

  11. Beyond epistemological deficits: Incorporating flexible epistemological views into fine-grained cognitive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ayush

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have argued against deficit-based explanations of students' troubles with mathematical sense-making, pointing instead to factors such as epistemology: students' beliefs about the nature of knowledge and learning can hinder them from activating and integrating productive knowledge they have. But such explanations run the risk of substituting an epistemological deficit for a concepts/skills deficit. Our analysis of an undergraduate engineering major avoids this "deficit trap" by incorporating multiple, context-dependent epistemological stances into his cognitive dynamics.

  12. Cerebrolysin Ameloriates Cognitive Deficits in Type III Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy, Gehan S; Nassar, Noha N; Mansour, Hanaa A; Abdallah, Dalaal M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrolysin (CBL), a mixture of several active peptide fragments and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is currently used in the management of cognitive alterations in patients with dementia. Since Cognitive decline as well as increased dementia are strongly associated with diabetes and previous studies addressed the protective effect of BDNF in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes; hence this work aimed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of CBL in modulating the complications of hyperglycaemia experimentally induced by streptozotocin (STZ) on the rat brain hippocampus. To this end, male adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into (i) vehicle- (ii) CBL- and (iii) STZ diabetic-control as well as (iv) STZ+CBL groups. Diabetes was confirmed by hyperglycemia and elevated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c%), which were associated by weight loss, elevated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and decreased insulin growth factor (IGF)-1β in the serum. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia caused learning and memory impairments that corroborated degenerative changes, neuronal loss and expression of caspase (Casp)-3 in the hippocampal area of STZ-diabetic rats. Behavioral deficits were associated by decreased hippocampal glutamate (GLU), glycine, serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine. Moreover, diabetic rats showed an increase in hippocampal nitric oxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances versus decreased non-protein sulfhydryls. Though CBL did not affect STZ-induced hyperglycemia, it partly improved body weight as well as HbA1c%. Such effects were associated by enhancement in both learning and memory as well as apparent normal cellularity in CA1and CA3 areas and reduced Casp-3 expression. CBL improved serum TNF-α and IGF-1β, GLU and 5-HT as well as hampering oxidative biomarkers. In conclusion, CBL possesses neuroprotection against diabetes-associated cerebral neurodegeneration and cognitive decline via anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and

  13. Selective cognitive empathy deficit in adolescents with restrictive anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderoni S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sara Calderoni,1 Pamela Fantozzi,1 Sandra Maestro,1 Elena Brunori,1 Antonio Narzisi,1 Giulia Balboni,2 Filippo Muratori1,31Department of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation, 2Department of Surgery, Medical, Molecular and Critical Area Pathology, University of Pisa, 3Department of Developmental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyBackground: A growing, but conflicting body of literature suggests altered empathic abilities in subjects with anorexia nervosa-restricting type (AN-R. This study aims to characterize the cognitive and affective empathic profiles of adolescents with purely AN-R.Methods: As part of a standardized clinical and research protocol, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI, a valid and reliable self-reported instrument to measure empathy, was administered to 32 female adolescents with AN-R and in 41 healthy controls (HC comparisons, matched for age and gender. Correlational analyses were performed to evaluate the links between empathy scores and psychopathological measures.Results: Patients scored significantly lower than HC on cognitive empathy (CE, while they did not differ from controls on affective empathy (AE. The deficit in CE was not related to either disease severity nor was it related to associated psychopathology.Conclusion: These results, albeit preliminary, suggest that a dysfunctional pattern of CE capacity may be a stable trait of AN-R that should be taken into account not only for the clinical management, but also in preventive and therapeutic intervention.Keywords: anorexia nervosa-restricting type, cognitive empathy, affective empathy, female adolescents, Interpersonal Reactivity Index

  14. Cerebrolysin Ameloriates Cognitive Deficits in Type III Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan S Georgy

    Full Text Available Cerebrolysin (CBL, a mixture of several active peptide fragments and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is currently used in the management of cognitive alterations in patients with dementia. Since Cognitive decline as well as increased dementia are strongly associated with diabetes and previous studies addressed the protective effect of BDNF in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes; hence this work aimed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of CBL in modulating the complications of hyperglycaemia experimentally induced by streptozotocin (STZ on the rat brain hippocampus. To this end, male adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into (i vehicle- (ii CBL- and (iii STZ diabetic-control as well as (iv STZ+CBL groups. Diabetes was confirmed by hyperglycemia and elevated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c%, which were associated by weight loss, elevated tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and decreased insulin growth factor (IGF-1β in the serum. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia caused learning and memory impairments that corroborated degenerative changes, neuronal loss and expression of caspase (Casp-3 in the hippocampal area of STZ-diabetic rats. Behavioral deficits were associated by decreased hippocampal glutamate (GLU, glycine, serotonin (5-HT and dopamine. Moreover, diabetic rats showed an increase in hippocampal nitric oxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances versus decreased non-protein sulfhydryls. Though CBL did not affect STZ-induced hyperglycemia, it partly improved body weight as well as HbA1c%. Such effects were associated by enhancement in both learning and memory as well as apparent normal cellularity in CA1and CA3 areas and reduced Casp-3 expression. CBL improved serum TNF-α and IGF-1β, GLU and 5-HT as well as hampering oxidative biomarkers. In conclusion, CBL possesses neuroprotection against diabetes-associated cerebral neurodegeneration and cognitive decline via anti

  15. Comparison of montreal cognitive assessment and mini-mental state examination in evaluating cognitive domain deficit following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kwok Chu Wong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cognitive deficits are common after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH, and clinical evaluation is important for their management. Our hypothesis was that the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCa is superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE in screening for cognitive domain deficit in aSAH patients. METHODS: We carried out a prospective observational and diagnostic accuracy study on Hong Kong aSAH patients aged 21 to 75 years who had been admitted within 96 hours of ictus. The domain-specific neuropsychological assessment battery, the MoCA and MMSE were administered 2-4 weeks and 1 year after ictus. A cognitive domain deficit was defined as a cognitive domain z score <-1.65 (below the fifth percentile. Cognitive impairment was defined as two or more cognitive domain deficits. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov of the US National Institutes of Health (NCT01038193. RESULTS: Both the MoCA and the MMSE were successful in differentiating between patients with and without cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment at both assessment periods. At 1 year post-ictus, the MoCA produced higher area under the curve scores for cognitive impairment than the MMSE (MoCA, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97 versus MMSE, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83, p = 0.009. INTERPRETATION: Cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment in patients with aSAH can be screened with the MoCA in both the subacute and chronic phases.

  16. Subjective deficits of attention, cognition and depression in patients with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarian, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Delazer, Margarete; Hingerl, Katharina; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Patients with narcolepsy often complain about attention deficits in everyday situations. In comparison with these subjective complaints, deficits in objective testing are subtler. The present study assessed the relationships between subjective complaints, objectively measured cognitive performance, disease-related variables, and mood. A total of 51 patients with narcolepsy and 35 healthy controls responded to questionnaires regarding subjectively perceived attention deficits, sleepiness, anxiety and depression. Moreover, they performed an extensive neuropsychological assessment tapping into attention, executive functions, and memory. Patients rated their level of attention in everyday situations to be relatively poor. In an objective assessment of cognitive functioning, they showed only slight attention and executive function deficits. The subjective ratings of attention deficits significantly correlated with ratings of momentary sleepiness, anxiety, and depression, but not with objectively measured cognitive performance. Momentary sleepiness and depression predicted almost 39% of the variance in the ratings of subjectively perceived attention deficits. The present study showed that sleepiness and depression, more than objective cognitive deficits, might play a role in the subjectively perceived attention deficits of patients with narcolepsy. The results suggested that when counselling and treating patients with narcolepsy, clinicians should pay attention to potential depression because subjective cognitive complaints may not relate to objective cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards a Crossmodal Exploration of Cognitive Deficits in Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Maurage

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Face-voice integration has been extensively explored among healthy participants during the last decades. Nevertheless, while binding alterations constitute a core feature of many psychiatric diseases and have been thoroughly investigated in schizophrenia and autism, these crossmodal processes have been little explored in other psychiatric populations, and notably in addictions. As an illustration, alcohol-dependence is associated with a wide range of psychological, cognitive and cerebral consequences, among which affective disturbances hold a crucial position. Indeed, it has been shown during the last decade that alcohol-dependent individuals present important emotional impairments, particularly in the decoding of affective faces and voices. In view of the role they play in the development and maintenance of alcohol-dependence, it appears crucial to deepen the understanding of these deficits, and notably to determine their evolution in more ecological settings. Indeed, these decoding deficits have up to now been exclusively explored in unimodal studies (i.e. focusing on one sensorial modality while in real life situations, emotional stimulations are most often multimodal. The central objective of the present paper is thus to present recent studies using an integrative approach combining behavioural, electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques to explore the audio-visual integration of emotional stimuli in alcohol-dependence. These results, clearly showing that alcohol-dependence leads to altered crossmodal processing of affective faces and voices, constitute a first step towards a multidisciplinary exploration of crossmodal processing in psychiatry, extending to other stimulations, sensorial modalities and populations. Finally, the fundamental and clinical implications of this research perspective will also be underlined.

  18. Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Individuals: A Compensation for Cognitive Deficits or a Question of Personality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Larissa J; Wunderli, Michael D; Vonmoos, Matthias; Römmelt, Andreas T; Baumgartner, Markus R; Seifritz, Erich; Schaub, Michael P; Quednow, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing bioethical debate on pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) in healthy individuals is often legitimated by the assumption that PCE will widely spread and become desirable for the general public in the near future. This assumption was questioned as PCE is not equally save and effective in everyone. Additionally, it was supposed that the willingness to use PCE is strongly personality-dependent likely preventing a broad PCE epidemic. Thus, we investigated whether the cognitive performance and personality of healthy individuals with regular nonmedical methylphenidate (MPH) use for PCE differ from stimulant-naïve controls. Twenty-five healthy individuals using MPH for PCE were compared with 39 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls regarding cognitive performance and personality assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery including social cognition, prosocial behavior, decision-making, impulsivity, and personality questionnaires. Substance use was assessed through self-report in an interview and quantitative hair and urine analyses. Recently abstinent PCE users showed no cognitive impairment but superior strategic thinking and decision-making. Furthermore, PCE users displayed higher levels of trait impulsivity, novelty seeking, and Machiavellianism combined with lower levels of social reward dependence and cognitive empathy. Finally, PCE users reported a smaller social network and exhibited less prosocial behavior in social interaction tasks. In conclusion, the assumption that PCE use will soon become epidemic is not supported by the present findings as PCE users showed a highly specific personality profile that shares a number of features with illegal stimulant users. Lastly, regular MPH use for PCE is not necessarily associated with cognitive deficits.

  19. Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Individuals: A Compensation for Cognitive Deficits or a Question of Personality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa J Maier

    Full Text Available The ongoing bioethical debate on pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE in healthy individuals is often legitimated by the assumption that PCE will widely spread and become desirable for the general public in the near future. This assumption was questioned as PCE is not equally save and effective in everyone. Additionally, it was supposed that the willingness to use PCE is strongly personality-dependent likely preventing a broad PCE epidemic. Thus, we investigated whether the cognitive performance and personality of healthy individuals with regular nonmedical methylphenidate (MPH use for PCE differ from stimulant-naïve controls. Twenty-five healthy individuals using MPH for PCE were compared with 39 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls regarding cognitive performance and personality assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery including social cognition, prosocial behavior, decision-making, impulsivity, and personality questionnaires. Substance use was assessed through self-report in an interview and quantitative hair and urine analyses. Recently abstinent PCE users showed no cognitive impairment but superior strategic thinking and decision-making. Furthermore, PCE users displayed higher levels of trait impulsivity, novelty seeking, and Machiavellianism combined with lower levels of social reward dependence and cognitive empathy. Finally, PCE users reported a smaller social network and exhibited less prosocial behavior in social interaction tasks. In conclusion, the assumption that PCE use will soon become epidemic is not supported by the present findings as PCE users showed a highly specific personality profile that shares a number of features with illegal stimulant users. Lastly, regular MPH use for PCE is not necessarily associated with cognitive deficits.

  20. Profile of cognitive deficits and associations with depressive symptoms and intelligence in chronic early-onset schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2013-01-01

    -onset schizophrenia patients, assess the potential associations with depressive symptom severity, and examine whether cognitive deficits within several domains reflect intelligence impairments. This study compared attention, visual-construction, aspects of visual and verbal memory, and executive functions in chronic......-onset schizophrenia, significant deficits were observed in all specific cognitive functions. The profile of cognitive deficits was jagged, and visual-construction, attention, and one aspect of verbal memory (verbal stories recall) were differentially impaired. Deficits of visual recall, visual recognition...

  1. Emotion Perception or Social Cognitive Complexity: What Drives Face Processing Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer A; Creighton, Sarah E; Rutherford, M D

    2016-02-01

    Some, but not all, relevant studies have revealed face processing deficits among those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In particular, deficits are revealed in face processing tasks that involve emotion perception. The current study examined whether either deficits in processing emotional expression or deficits in processing social cognitive complexity drive face processing deficits in ASD. We tested adults with and without ASD on a battery of face processing tasks that varied with respect to emotional expression processing and social cognitive complexity. Results revealed significant group differences on tasks involving emotional expression processing, but typical performance on a non-emotional but socially complex task. These results support an emotion processing rather than a social complexity explanation for face processing deficits in ASD.

  2. Cognitive heterogeneity in adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A systematic analysis of neuropsychological measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, J.C.; Onnink, A.M.H.; Klein, M.; Dammers, J.; Harneit, A.; Schulten, T.; Hulzen, K.J.E. van; Kan, C.C.; Slaats-Willemse, D.I.E.; Buitelaar, J.; Franke, B.; Hoogman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in childhood is associated with impaired functioning in multiple cognitive domains: executive functioning (EF), reward and timing. Similar impairments have been described for adults with persistent ADHD, but an extensive investigation of neuropsycholog

  3. Cognitive heterogeneity in adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A systematic analysis of neuropsychological measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, J.C.; Onnink, A.M.H.; Klein, M.; Dammers, J.; Harneit, A.; Schulten, T.; Hulzen, K.J.E. van; Kan, C.C.; Slaats-Willemse, D.I.E.; Buitelaar, J.; Franke, B.; Hoogman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in childhood is associated with impaired functioning in multiple cognitive domains: executive functioning (EF), reward and timing. Similar impairments have been described for adults with persistent ADHD, but an extensive investigation of

  4. Number Processing and Heterogeneity of Developmental Dyscalculia: Subtypes with Different Cognitive Profiles and Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagerlund, Kenny; Träff, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated if developmental dyscalculia (DD) in children with different profiles of mathematical deficits has the same or different cognitive origins. The defective approximate number system hypothesis and the access deficit hypothesis were tested using two different groups of children with DD (11-13 years old): a group with…

  5. Musical, visual and cognitive deficits after middle cerebral artery infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Rosemann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The perception of music can be impaired after a stroke. This dysfunction is called amusia and amusia patients often also show deficits in visual abilities, language, memory, learning, and attention. The current study investigated whether deficits in music perception are selective for musical input or generalize to other perceptual abilities. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in working memory or attention account for impairments in music perception. Twenty stroke patients with small infarctions in the supply area of the middle cerebral artery were investigated with tests for music and visual perception, categorization, neglect, working memory and attention. Two amusia patients with selective deficits in music perception and pronounced lesions were identified. Working memory and attention deficits were highly correlated across the patient group but no correlation with musical abilities was obtained. Lesion analysis revealed that lesions in small areas of the putamen and globus pallidus were connected to a rhythm perception deficit. We conclude that neither a general perceptual deficit nor a minor domain general deficit can account for impairments in the music perception task. But we find support for the modular organization of the music perception network with brain areas specialized for musical functions as musical deficits were not correlated to any other impairment.

  6. Environmental enrichment improves cognitive deficits in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR): relevance for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Pandolfo, Pablo; Savoldi, Robson; Prediger, Rui Daniel S; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2009-10-01

    The interaction between genes and environment seems to be relevant for the development of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric diseases. The occurrence of ADHD is typically associated with poor academic performance, probably reflecting learning difficulties and/or cognitive impulsiveness. The inbred Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) strain has often been considered as an animal model of ADHD, since they 'naturally' display the main ADHD symptomatology. Although pharmacological agents improve SHR's cognitive deficits, little is known about the involvement of environmental factors in SHR disabilities and to what extent 'protective' non-pharmacological factors may be considered as strategy for ADHD prevention. Here we investigated whether the rearing environment during neurodevelopment may counteract later cognitive deficits presented by adult SHR. Wistar (WIS) rats were also used to investigate whether the putative effects of environmental enrichment depend on a specific genetic background. The animals were reared in enriched environment (EE) or standard environment (SE) from the post-natal day 21 until 3 months of age (adulthood) and tested for cognitive and non-cognitive phenotypes. EE improved SHR's performance in open field habituation, water maze spatial reference, social and object recognition tasks, while non-cognitive traits, such as nociception and hypertension, were not affected by EE. Response of WIS rats was generally not affected by the present EE. These results show that the general low cognitive performance presented by SHR rats strongly depends on the rearing environment and they may suggest modifications of the familial environment as a putative preventive strategy to cope with ADHD.

  7. Emotion recognition deficits exist in mild cognitive impairment, but only in the amnestic subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCade, Donna; Savage, Greg; Guastella, Adam; Lewis, Simon J G; Naismith, Sharon L

    2013-09-01

    Emotion recognition is impaired in dementia and there is some initial evidence to suggest that milder deficits may be present in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients, an "at risk" population for transition to dementia. In this study, we investigated the emotion recognition profile of MCI subgroups. Results show emotion recognition deficits exist for the amnestic subtype with impairment in multiple domains, with an emotion-specific deficit for anger recognition. Impaired emotion recognition in aMCI was independent of patient mood and cognitive deficits. The study is the first to examine the nonamnestic subtype. No emotion recognition deficits were found. This finding is surprising given the association between the nonamnestic subtype and frontal systems dysfunction. Impaired emotion recognition could be related to the selective pathophysiology in neural pathways, particularly the temporal lobe and connected limbic and prefrontal regions, implicated in both aMCI and emotion processing. These findings may have implications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management.

  8. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  9. Odor identification deficits identify Parkinson’s disease patients with poor cognitive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholdt, Malene Flensborg; Borghammer, Per; Larsen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a prodromal and prevalent nonmotor symptom of Parkinson's disease. Unlike olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, it is believed to be unrelated to cognitive impairment. However, recent research has implicated cholinergic denervation in Parkinson's disease hyposmia ...... patients with Parkinson's disease and support the notion of more severe cognitive deficits in this group. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society...

  10. Motor and cognitive impairment after stroke : A common bond or a simultaneous deficit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, S.M.M.; Mark, R.E.; Sitskoorn, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The prevalence of both motor deficit and cognitive impairment after stroke is high and persistent. Motor impairment, especially paresis, is often more obvious to both patients and their carers while cognitive problems can also have devastating effects on quality of life. The

  11. Disrupted reward circuits is associated with cognitive deficits and depression severity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Yin, Yingying; He, Cancan; Ye, Qing; Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Zhang, Haisan; Lv, Luxian; Zhang, Hongxing; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that major depressive disorder (MDD) patients show blunted activity responses to reward-related tasks. However, whether abnormal reward circuits affect cognition and depression in MDD patients remains unclear. Seventy-five drug-naive MDD patients and 42 cognitively normal (CN) subjects underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The bilateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) were selected as seeds to construct reward circuits across all subjects. A multivariate linear regression analysis was employed to investigate the neural substrates of cognitive function and depression severity on the reward circuits in MDD patients. The common pathway underlying cognitive deficits and depression was identified with conjunction analysis. Compared with CN subjects, MDD patients showed decreased reward network connectivity that was primarily located in the prefrontal-striatal regions. Importantly, distinct and common neural pathways underlying cognition and depression were identified, implying the independent and synergistic effects of cognitive deficits and depression severity on reward circuits. This study demonstrated that disrupted topological organization within reward circuits was significantly associated with cognitive deficits and depression severity in MDD patients. These findings suggest that in addition to antidepressant treatment, normalized reward circuits should be a focus and a target for improving depression and cognitive deficits in MDD patients.

  12. Utility of cognitive neuropsychological assessment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Klaus W; Hauser, Joachim; Lange, Katharina M; Makulska-Gertruda, Ewelina; Takano, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    The present review addresses the question of whether and how neuropsychological tests assessing cognition in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can contribute to clinical and scientific issues concerning ADHD. Neuropsychological studies have shown various though inconsistent cognitive deficits in patients with ADHD. While patients with ADHD, at group level, may differ from healthy participants in regard to cognitive functioning, there is no distinct psychometric cognitive test or profile allowing an individual diagnosis of ADHD or the identification of subtypes according to DSM. Psychometric neuropsychological tests may provide a precise description of the cognitive problems in individual patients and offer specific information for individualized treatment planning. In addition, neuropsychological assessment may contribute to neuroscientific research by providing endophenotypes or biological markers of ADHD. Cognitive neuropsychological assessment appears to be at present of limited clinical use and confined to individual descriptions.

  13. Olfactory Deficits in MCI as Predictor of Improved Cognition on Donepezil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    analyses we will count donepezil dropouts with subsequent time -point assessments handled as planned originally under the intent-to-treat principle...Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale- Cognitive subscale variants in mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease: change over time and the effect...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0142 TITLE: “Olfactory Deficits in MCI as Predictor of Improved Cognition on Donepezil” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr

  14. Oxytocin, Dopamine, and the Amygdala: A Neurofunctional Model of Social Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenfeld, Andrew J.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Jarskog, L Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, the social cognitive impairment in schizophrenia has been underappreciated and remains essentially untreated. Deficits in emotional processing, social perception and knowledge, theory of mind, and attributional bias may contribute to functional social cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. The amygdala has been implicated as a key component of social cognitive circuitry in both animal and human studies. In addition, structural and functional studies of schizophrenia reproduci...

  15. A controlled study of cognitive deficits in children with chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tager, F A; Fallon, B A; Keilp, J; Rissenberg, M; Jones, C R; Liebowitz, M R

    2001-01-01

    Although neurologic Lyme disease is known to cause cognitive dysfunction in adults, little is known about its long-term sequelae in children. Twenty children with a history of new-onset cognitive complaints after Lyme disease were compared with 20 matched healthy control subjects. Each child was assessed with measures of cognition and psychopathology. Children with Lyme disease had significantly more cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Cognitive deficits were still found after controlling for anxiety, depression, and fatigue. Lyme disease in children may be accompanied by long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances, resulting in psychosocial and academic impairments. Areas for further study are discussed.

  16. Premorbid cognitive deficits in young relatives of schizophrenia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Shreedhar R Kulkarni; Tejas Bhojraj; Alan Francis; Vaibhav Diwadkar; Montrose, Debra M.; Larry Seidman; John Sweeney

    2010-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia are thought to be stable trait markers that predate the illness and manifest in relatives of patients. Adolescence is the age of maximum vulnerability to the onset of schizophrenia and may be an opportune “window” to observe neurocognitive impairments close to but prior to the onset of psychosis. We reviewed the extant studies assessing neurocognitive deficits in young relatives at high risk (HR) for schizophrenia and their relation to brai...

  17. Do the generalised cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia indicate a rapidly-ageing brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Dragovic

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The nature and pattern of cognitive deficits (CD in schizophrenia and whether the deficits are generalised or domain specific continues to be debated vigorously. We ascertained the pattern of CD in schizophrenia using a novel statistical approach by comparing the similarity of cognitive profiles of patients and healthy individuals. Methods: In a consecutive sample of 78 patients with schizophrenia, performance on six cognitive domains (verbal memory, working memory, motor speed, processing speed, verbal fluency and executive functions was measured using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS. The similarity of cognitive profile between patients and two groups of healthy controls (age-matched and older adults who were in the age group of 70-79 was evaluated using a special purpose-built macro. Results: Cognitive performance profiles in various domains of patients with schizophrenia and age-matched controls were markedly similar in shape, but differed in the overall performance, with patients performing significantly below the healthy controls. However, when the cognitive profiles of patients with schizophrenia were compared to those of older adult controls, the profiles remained similar whilst the overall difference in performance vanished. Conclusions: Cognitive deficit in schizophrenia appears to be generalised. Resemblance of cognitive profiles between patients with schizophrenia and older adult controls provides some support for the accelerated ageing hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  18. Nicotine ameliorates schizophrenia-like cognitive deficits induced by maternal LPS exposure: a study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Waterhouse

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal exposure to infectious agents is a predisposing factor for schizophrenia with associated cognitive deficits in offspring. A high incidence of smoking in these individuals in adulthood might be, at least in part, due to the cognitive-enhancing effects of nicotine. Here, we have used prenatal exposure to maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS, bacterial endotoxin at different time points as a model for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia to determine whether nicotine reverses any associated impairments. Pregnant rats were treated subcutaneously with LPS (0.5 mg/kg at one of three neurodevelopmental time periods [gestation days (GD 10-11, 15-16, 18-19]. Cognitive assessment in male offspring commenced in early adulthood [postnatal day (PND 60] and included: prepulse inhibition (PPI, latent inhibition (LI and delayed non-matching to sample (DNMTS. Following PND 100, daily nicotine injections (0.6 mg/kg, subcutaneously were administered, and animals were re-tested in the same tasks (PND 110. Only maternal LPS exposure early during fetal neurodevelopment (GD 10-11 resulted in deficits in all tests compared to animals that had been prenatally exposed to saline at the same gestational time point. Repeated nicotine treatment led to global (PPI and selective (LI improvements in performance. Early but not later prenatal LPS exposure induced consistent deficits in cognitive tests with relevance for schizophrenia. Nicotine reversed the LPS-induced deficits in selective attention (LI and induced a global enhancement of sensorimotor gating (PPI.

  19. Characterization of cognitive deficits in mice with an alternating hemiplegia-linked mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S; Dachtler, James; Roder, John C; Clapcote, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is a prominent feature in a range of different movement disorders. Children with Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood are prone to developmental delay, with deficits in cognitive functioning becoming progressively more evident as they grow older. Heterozygous mutations of the ATP1A3 gene, encoding the Na+,K+-ATPase α3 subunit, have been identified as the primary cause of Alternating Hemiplegia. Heterozygous Myshkin mice have an amino acid change (I810N) in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 that is also found in Alternating Hemiplegia. To investigate whether Myshkin mice exhibit learning and memory deficits resembling the cognitive impairments of patients with Alternating Hemiplegia, we subjected them to a range of behavioral tests that interrogate various cognitive domains. Myshkin mice showed impairments in spatial memory, spatial habituation, locomotor habituation, object recognition, social recognition, and trace fear conditioning, as well as in the visible platform version of the Morris water maze. Increasing the duration of training ameliorated the deficit in social recognition but not in spatial habituation. The deficits of Myshkin mice in all of the learning and memory tests used are consistent with the cognitive impairment of the vast majority of AHC patients. These mice could thus help advance our understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms influencing cognitive impairment in patients with ATP1A3-related disorders.

  20. Cognitive deficits and social functioning in schizophrenia : A clinical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Marije; Kiers, Henk A.L.; Bouma, A; van Zomeren, Ed H.; Withaar, Frederiec; Arends, J; van den Bosch, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Impaired social functioning is one of the diagnostic features of schizophrenia. Cognitive functioning is also often impaired in several domains. Meta-analysis has shown a predictive value of cognition for a variety of domains related to social functioning (Green, Kern, Braff, & Mintz, 2000). The sig

  1. Cognitive Complaints of Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Weisbrod, Matthias; Lange, Klaus W.; Tucha, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Executive dysfunction of adults with ADHD is often associated with poor self-awareness of problems, such as in emotional competence, emotional recognition, and driving competence. However, with regard to cognitive functioning, little is known about how adults with ADHD evaluate their own cognitive p

  2. Cognitive Complaints of Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Weisbrod, Matthias; Lange, Klaus W.; Tucha, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Executive dysfunction of adults with ADHD is often associated with poor self-awareness of problems, such as in emotional competence, emotional recognition, and driving competence. However, with regard to cognitive functioning, little is known about how adults with ADHD evaluate their own cognitive

  3. Spatial but not verbal cognitive deficits at age 3 years in persistently antisocial individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Adrian; Yaralian, Pauline S; Reynolds, Chandra; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly shown verbal intelligence deficits in adolescent antisocial individuals, but it is not known whether these deficits are in place prior to kindergarten or, alternatively, whether they are acquired throughout childhood. This study assesses whether cognitive deficits occur as early as age 3 years and whether they are specific to persistently antisocial individuals. Verbal and spatial abilities were assessed at ages 3 and 11 years in 330 male and female children, while antisocial behavior was assessed at ages 8 and 17 years. Persistently antisocial individuals (N = 47) had spatial deficits in the absence of verbal deficits at age 3 years compared to comparisons (N = 133), and also spatial and verbal deficits at age 11 years. Age 3 spatial deficits were independent of social adversity, early hyperactivity, poor test motivation, poor test comprehension, and social discomfort during testing, and they were found in females as well as males. Findings suggest that early spatial deficits contribute to persistent antisocial behavior whereas verbal deficits are developmentally acquired. An early-starter model is proposed whereby early spatial impairments interfere with early bonding and attachment, reflect disrupted right hemisphere affect regulation and expression, and predispose to later persistent antisocial behavior.

  4. Ursolic acid improves domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dong-mei [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Jun, E-mail: lu-jun75@163.com [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Yan-qiu [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zheng, Yuan-lin, E-mail: ylzheng@xznu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, Bin [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Cheng, Wei [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Zi-feng; Li, Meng-qiu [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2013-09-01

    Our previous findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is the mechanism underlying cognitive deficits induced by domoic acid (DA). Ursolic acid (UA), a natural triterpenoid compound, possesses many important biological functions. Evidence shows that UA can activate PI3K/Akt signaling and suppress Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) activity. FoxO1 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here we investigate whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in DA-treated mice and whether UA inhibits DA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through regulating the PI3K/Akt and FoxO1 signaling pathways. Our results showed that FoxO1 knockdown reversed the mitochondrial abnormalities and cognitive deficits induced by DA in mice through decreasing HO-1 expression. Mechanistically, FoxO1 activation was associated with oxidative stress-induced JNK activation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through promoting Akt phosphorylation and FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in the hippocampus of DA-treated mice. LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling, significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of DA/UA mice, which weakened UA actions. These results suggest that UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for the prevention and therapy of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic brain disorders. - Highlights: • Ursolic acid (UA) is a naturally triterpenoid compound. • UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits. • Mechanistically, UA activates PI3K/Akt signaling and suppresses FoxO1 activity. • UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for anti-excitotoxic brain disorders.

  5. Cognitive computer training in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus no intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida; Leckman, J. F.; Lindschou, Jane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention and impulsivity and/or hyperactivity and a range of cognitive dysfunctions. Pharmacological treatment may be beneficial; however, many affected individuals...... continue to have difficulties with cognitive functions despite medical treatment, and up to 30 % do not respond to pharmacological treatment. Inadequate medical compliance and the long-term effects of treatment make it necessary to explore nonpharmacological and supplementary treatments for ADHD. Treatment...... of cognition, mostly on the working memory or attention but with poor generalization of training on other cognitive functions and functional outcome. Children with ADHD have a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is important that cognitive training target multiple cognitive functions. METHODS...

  6. Evaluating cognitive and motivational accounts of greater reinforcement effects among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Fosco, Whitney D.; Hawk, Larry W.; Rosch, Keri S.; Bubnik, Michelle G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is associated with cognitive deficits and dysregulated motivation. Reinforcement improves cognitive performance, often to a greater degree among children with ADHD compared to typically-developing controls. The current study tests the degree to which cognitive (individual differences in baseline cognition) and/or motivational (individual differences in Sensitivity to Reward; SR) processes can account for diagnostic group differences in reinf...

  7. Static and Dynamic Cognitive Deficits in Childhood Preceding Adult Schizophrenia: A 30-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberg, Abraham; Caspi, Avshalom; Harrington, HonaLee; Houts, Renate; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Murray, Robin M.; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Premorbid cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are well documented and have been interpreted as supporting a neurodevelopmental etiological model. The authors investigated the following three unresolved questions about premorbid cognitive deficits: What is their developmental course? Do all premorbid cognitive deficits follow the same course? Are premorbid cognitive deficits specific to schizophrenia or shared by other psychiatric disorders? Methods Participants were members of a representative cohort of 1,037 males and females born between 1972 and 1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand. Cohort members underwent follow-up evaluations at specific intervals from age 3 to 32 years, with a 96% retention rate. Cognitive development was analyzed and compared in children who later developed schizophrenia or recurrent depression as well as in healthy comparison subjects. Results Children who developed adult schizophrenia exhibited developmental deficits (i.e., static cognitive impairments that emerge early and remain stable) on tests indexing verbal and visual knowledge acquisition, reasoning, and conceptualization. In addition, these children exhibited developmental lags (i.e., growth that is slower relative to healthy comparison subjects) on tests indexing processing speed, attention, visual-spatial problem solving ability, and working memory. These two premorbid cognitive patterns were not observed in children who later developed recurrent depression. Conclusions These findings suggest that the origins of schizophrenia include two interrelated developmental processes evident from childhood to early adolescence (ages 7–13 years). Children who will grow up to develop adult schizophrenia enter primary school struggling with verbal reasoning and lag further behind their peers in working memory, attention, and processing speed as they get older. PMID:20048021

  8. Amusia and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Nie, Xueqing; Wu, Daxing; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Pin; Lu, Xuejing

    2014-08-01

    The current study explored the music perception ability of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and its relationship with other cognitive abilities and psychotic symptom severity. The persons with schizophrenia performed significantly worse than the control group on the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) (pmusic perception ability of persons with schizophrenia was related to other cognitive abilities (attention, verbal memory, spatial memory, and executive function) and the severity of psychotic symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mangiferin regulates cognitive deficits and heme oxygenase-1 induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanyan; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Chengjie; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Yi; Wu, Jian; Wen, Xiangru; Liang, Chen; Ma, Kai; Li, Lei; Zhang, Xunbao; Shao, Xiaoping; Sun, Yafeng; Du, Yang; Song, Yuanjian

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce neuroinflammation, ultimately leading to cognitive deficits. Mangiferin, a natural glucoxilxanthone, is known to possess various biological activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mangiferin on LPS-induced cognitive deficits and explore the underlying mechanisms. Brain injury was induced in mice via intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg) for five consecutive days. Mangiferin was orally pretreatmented (50mg/kg) for seven days and then treatmented (50mg/kg) for five days after LPS injection. The Morris water maze was used to detect changes in cognitive function. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting were respectively performed to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that mangiferin can ameliorate cognitive deficits. Moreover, mangiferin decreased LPS-induced IL-6 production and increase HO-1 in the hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that mangiferin attenuates LPS-induced cognitive deficits, which may be potentially linked to modulating HO-1 in the hippocampus.

  10. Cognitive complaints of adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Weisbrod, Matthias; Lange, Klaus W; Tucha, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Executive dysfunction of adults with ADHD is often associated with poor self-awareness of problems, such as in emotional competence, emotional recognition, and driving competence. However, with regard to cognitive functioning, little is known about how adults with ADHD evaluate their own cognitive performance. A total of 77 adults with ADHD and 116 healthy adults were assessed with self-report scales measuring several aspects of cognition. Significance and effect sizes as well as the proportion of patients perceiving impairments were calculated. Further analysis was carried out on the frequency of patients perceiving various types of impairments. Adults with ADHD perceived themselves to have significant and severe dysfunction in all areas of cognition assessed as a group. Furthermore, the majority of patients reported multiple impairments in attention, memory and executive functioning. The present study demonstrated that adults with ADHD are aware of problems in cognitive functioning as shown by considerable perceived neuropsychological impairment in the majority of patients. Patients with ADHD tended to report cognitive impairments in multiple domains rather than impairments in specific functions.

  11. Cognitive deficits in the elderly: interactive theories and a study of environmental effects on psychometric intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestrari, R; Godino, A

    1997-08-01

    Problems related to psychometric measures of intelligence are discussed with regard to both the general characteristics and metric properties (validity, reliability and sensibility) of mental tests, and interindividual differences (cultural background, education, life contents and age-cohorts). Currently used standard intelligence tests explore the structure of intelligence only in part, so a distinction must be made between true actual intelligence, potential inheritance of intelligence, and psychometrical or scored intelligence. The correct use of intelligence testing, however, does provide some relevant and objective information regarding the evolution of cognitive structure during adulthood and in relationship to aging. Cognitive performance in the elderly follows a downward curve that is not explained as a result of aging on physiological responses (i.e., reaction time delay, signal-noise ratio in the CNS, degenerative loss of cortical cells, etc.). Biologically based theories of intelligence cannot explain the large individual differences in cognitive abilities observed in subjects who have very similar physical characteristics. Cognitive approaches to intelligence enable us to better understand the causal factors of the cognitive deficits in the elderly, and an interactive model permits us to fully integrate both the individual differences in cognitive abilities and the large consistency in performances. We compared the cognitive performances of two groups of elderly subjects, ranging in age from 65 to 97 years; we observed some statistically significant effects on cognitive deficit that could be explained as fully deriving from emotional and extra-cognitive responses to environmental changes.

  12. Subtle deficits of cognitive theory of mind in unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christiane; Neuhaus, Kathrin; Lehmann, Anja; Krüger, Katja; Dziobek, Isabel; Heekeren, Hauke R; Heinz, Andreas; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Alterations of theory of mind (ToM) and empathy were implicated in the formation of psychotic experiences, and deficits in psychosocial functioning of schizophrenia patients. Inspired by concepts of neurocognitive endophenotypes, the existence of a distinct, potentially neurobiologically based social-cognitive vulnerability marker for schizophrenia is a matter of ongoing debate. The fact that previous research on social-cognitive deficits in individuals at risk yielded contradictory results may partly be due to an insufficient differentiation between qualitative aspects of ToM. Thirty-four unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (21 parents, 8 siblings, 5 children; f/m: 30/4; mean age: 48.1 ± 12.7 years) and 34 controls subjects (f/m: 25/9; mean age: 45.9 ± 10.9 years) completed the 'Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition'-a video-based ToM test-and an empathy questionnaire (Interpersonal Reactivity Index, IRI). Outcome parameters comprised (1) 'cognitive' versus 'emotional' ToM, (2) error counts representing 'undermentalizing' versus 'overmentalizing', (3) empathic abilities and (4) non-social neurocognition. MANCOVA showed impairments in cognitive but not emotional ToM in the relatives' group, when age, gender and neurocognition were controlled for. Relatives showed elevated error counts for 'undermentalizing' but not for 'overmentalizing'. No alterations were detected in self-rated dimensions of empathy. Of all measures of ToM and empathy, only the IRI subscale 'fantasy' was associated with measures of psychotic risk, i.e. a history of subclinical delusional ideation. The present study confirmed subtle deficits in cognitive, but not emotional ToM in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients, which were not explained by global cognitive deficits. Findings corroborate the assumption of distinct social-cognitive abilities as an intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia.

  13. Diet-Induced Cognitive Deficits: The Role of Fat and Sugar, Potential Mechanisms and Nutritional Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E. Beilharz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is of vital importance to understand how the foods which are making us fat also act to impair cognition. In this review, we compare the effects of acute and chronic exposure to high-energy diets on cognition and examine the relative contributions of fat (saturated and polyunsaturated and sugar to these deficits. Hippocampal-dependent memory appears to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of high-energy diets and these deficits can occur rapidly and prior to weight gain. More chronic diet exposure seems necessary however to impair other sorts of memory. Many potential mechanisms have been proposed to underlie diet-induced cognitive decline and we will focus on inflammation and the neurotrophic factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Finally, given supplementation of diets with omega-3 and curcumin has been shown to have positive effects on cognitive function in healthy ageing humans and in disease states, we will discuss how these nutritional interventions may attenuate diet-induced cognitive decline. We hope this approach will provide important insights into the causes of diet-induced cognitive deficits, and inform the development of novel therapeutics to prevent or ameliorate such memory impairments.

  14. Social cognition and neurocognitive deficits in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliksted, Vibeke Fuglsang; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Weed, Ethan;

    2014-01-01

    -episode schizophrenia. Researchers have speculated about social cognitive subgroups since patients with schizophrenia appear to be a very heterogeneous group. METHODS: Patients with a recent diagnosis of first-episode schizophrenia were tested regarding theory of mind, social perception, neurocognition, IQ...... symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Complex aspects of social cognition explained 24% of the variance in the patient group. The other principal components consisted mainly of aspects of simple perception of theory of mind. Neurocognition and clinical symptoms only explained a minor proportion of the variance......, and clinical symptoms. RESULTS: Data from 36 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 36 one to one matched healthy controls were analysed. Principal component analysis in the patient group was used to examine the variance contributed by different aspects of social cognition, neurocognition, and clinical...

  15. The Turner Syndrome: Cognitive Deficits, Affective Discrimination, and Behavior Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Elizabeth; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The study attemped to link cognitive and social problems seen in girls with Turner syndrome by assessing the girls' ability to process affective cues. Seventeen 9- to 17-year-old girls diagnosed with Turner syndrome were compared to a matched control group on a task which required interpretation of affective intention from facial expression.…

  16. Cognitive deficits in adult patients with brain tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Klein, M.

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive function, with survival and response on brain imaging, is increasingly regarded as an important outcome measure in patients with brain tumours. This measure provides us with information on a patient's clinical situation and adverse treatment effects. Radiotherapy has been regarded as the m

  17. Long-term cognitive deficits accompanied by reduced neurogenesis after soman poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Jousma, E.; Boom, T.M. van den; Kuijpers, W.C.; Smit, A.B.; Lucassen, P.J.; Helden, H.P.M. van

    2009-01-01

    To date, treatment of organophosphate (OP) poisoning shows several shortcomings, and OP-victims might suffer from lasting cognitive deficits and sleep–wake disturbances. In the present study, long-term effects of soman poisoning on learning ability, memory and neurogenesis were investigated in rats,

  18. Cognitive heterogeneity in adult Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder: a systematic analysis of neuropsychological measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mostert, Jeanette C.; Onnink, A. Marten H.; Klein, Marieke; Dammers, Janneke; Harneit, Anais; Schulten, Theresa; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Kan, Cornelis C.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara; Hoogman, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in childhood is associated with impaired functioning in multiple cognitive domains: executive functioning (EF), reward and timing. Similar impairments have been described for adults with persistent ADHD, but an extensive investigation of neuropsychological functioning in a large sample of adult patients is currently lacking. We systematically examined neuropsychological performance on tasks measuring EF, delay discounting, time estimation and ...

  19. Teacher Beliefs and Responses toward Student Misbehavior: Influence of Cognitive Skill Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Susan Crandall; DiPerna, James Clyde

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether having knowledge of student cognitive skill deficits changes teacher beliefs and responses in regard to classroom misbehavior. Teachers (N = 272) were randomly assigned to an experimental or control condition. Although teachers in both conditions read the same vignette describing a student's misbehavior, the…

  20. Mild cognitive impairment and deficits in instrumental activities of daily living: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jekel, K.; Damian, M.; Wattmo, C.; Hausner, L.; Bullock, R.; Connelly, P.J.; Dubois, B.; Eriksdotter, M.; Ewers, M.; Graessel, E.; Kramberger, M.G.; Law, E.; Mecocci, P.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Nygard, L.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Orgogozo, J.M.; Pasquier, F.; Peres, K.; Salmon, E.; Sikkes, S.A.; Sobow, T.; Spiegel, R.; Tsolaki, M.; Winblad, B.; Frolich, L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a growing body of evidence that subtle deficits in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) may be present in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, it is not clear if there are IADL domains that are consistently affected across patients with MCI. In this systematic r

  1. Understanding Cognitive Deficits in Parkinson's Disease: Lessons from Preclinical Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Nicola; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Fisone, Gilberto; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been, until recently, mainly defined by the presence of characteristic motor symptoms, such as rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia/akinesia, and postural instability. Accordingly, pharmacological and surgical treatments have so far addressed these motor disturbances, leaving nonmotor, cognitive deficits an unmet…

  2. Sensation-to-cognition cortical streams in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, Susana; Hoekzema, E; Castellanos, Francisco X; García-García, David; Lage-Castellanos, Agustín; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Martínez, Kenia; Desco, Manuel; Sepulcre, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine whether functional connectivity streams that link sensory, attentional, and higher-order cognitive circuits are atypical in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We applied a graph-theory method to the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 120

  3. Motor, emotional and cognitive deficits in adult BACHD mice : A model for Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abada, Yah-se K.; Schreiber, Rudy; Ellenbroek, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by progressive motor dysfunction, emotional disturbances and cognitive deficits. It is a genetic disease caused by an elongation of the polyglutamine repeats in the huntingtin gene. Whereas HD is a complex disorder, previous studies in mice model

  4. Long-term cognitive deficits accompanied by reduced neurogenesis after soman poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Jousma, E.; Boom, T.M. van den; Kuijpers, W.C.; Smit, A.B.; Lucassen, P.J.; Helden, H.P.M. van

    2009-01-01

    To date, treatment of organophosphate (OP) poisoning shows several shortcomings, and OP-victims might suffer from lasting cognitive deficits and sleep–wake disturbances. In the present study, long-term effects of soman poisoning on learning ability, memory and neurogenesis were investigated in rats,

  5. Long-term cognitive deficits accompanied by reduced neurogenesis after soman poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Jousma, E.; van den Boom, T.M.; Kuijpers, W.C.; Smit, A.B.; Lucassen, P.J.; van Helden, H.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    To date, treatment of organophosphate (OP) poisoning shows several shortcomings, and OP-victims might suffer from lasting cognitive deficits and sleep-wake disturbances. In the present study, long-term effects of soman poisoning on learning ability, memory and neurogenesis were investigated in rats,

  6. Cognitive deficits and morphological cerebral changes in a random sample of social drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, H

    1985-01-01

    A random sample of 200 men and 200 women taken from the general population as well as subsamples of 31 male and 17 female excessive social drinkers were investigated with neuropsychological tests and computed tomography of the brain. Relatively high alcohol intake per drinking occasion did not give evidence of cognitive deficits or morphological cerebral changes. However, in males, mild cognitive deficits and morphological cerebral changes as a result of high recent alcohol intake, particularly during the 24-hr period prior to the investigation, were observed. When excluding acute effects of recent alcohol intake, mild cognitive deficits but not morphological cerebral changes that are apparently due to long-term excessive social drinking were observed in males. In females there was no association between the drinking variables and cognitive deficits or morphological cerebral changes, probably due to their less advanced drinking habits. It is suggested that future risk evaluations and estimations of safe alcohol intake should take into consideration the potential risk for brain damage due to excessive social drinking. However, it is premature to make any definite statements about safe alcohol intake and the risk for brain damage in social drinkers from the general population.

  7. Odor identification deficits identify Parkinson’s disease patients with poor cognitive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholdt, Malene Flensborg; Borghammer, Per; Larsen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    and linked it to verbal memory. This research hypothesized that severe odor identification deficits may identify patients with Parkinson's disease at risk for cognitive impairment. The current study tested this hypothesis by comparing 24 functionally anosmic, nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease...

  8. How Effectively Do Parents Discern Their Children's Cognitive Deficits at a Preschool Age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chun Chen

    2007-10-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that parents' initial concerns about their children's multiple or speech developmental problems were relatively highly correlated with cognitive deficits. It is recommended that clinicians should guide parents to voice and organize their concerns regarding the perception of their children's developmental progress, and further precisely analyze and utilize significant information.

  9. Cognitive heterogeneity in adult Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder: a systematic analysis of neuropsychological measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mostert, Jeanette C.; Onnink, A. Marten H.; Klein, Marieke; Dammers, Janneke; Harneit, Anais; Schulten, Theresa; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Kan, Cornelis C; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara; Hoogman, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in childhood is associated with impaired functioning in multiple cognitive domains: executive functioning (EF), reward and timing. Similar impairments have been described for adults with persistent ADHD, but an extensive investigation of neuropsychological functioning in a large sample of adult patients is currently lacking. We systematically examined neuropsychological performance on tasks measuring EF, delay discounting, time estimation and ...

  10. Mitochondria-Targeted Peptide Reverses Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cognitive Deficits in Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Mingqiang; Hao, Shuangying; Jia, Ming; Ji, Muhuo; Qiu, Lili; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and long-term cognitive impairments. Its pathophysiology remains to be determined and an effective pharmacologic treatment is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-31 on mitochondrial function and cognitive deficits in SAE mice. C57BL/6 male mice were randomly divided into sham, sham + SS-31, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and CLP + SS-31 groups. Peptide SS-31 (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administrated immediately after operation and afterwards once daily for six consecutive days. Surviving mice were subjected to behavioral tests and the hippocampus was collected for biochemical analysis 7 days after operation. The results showed that CLP resulted in high mortality rate and cognitive deficits, representative characteristics of SAE. A physiological mechanistic investigation revealed that mitochondrial function of hippocampus was severely impaired, coupled with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, triggering neuronal apoptosis and inflammation. Notably, administration of peptide SS-31 protected the integrity of mitochondria, reversed the mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibited the apoptosis resulting from the release of cytochrome c, diminished the response of inflammation, and ultimately reversed the behavior deficits in the SAE mice. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that daily treatment with mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-31 reduces mortality rate and ameliorates cognitive deficits, which is possibly through a mechanism of reversing mitochondrial dysfunction and partial inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and inflammation in the hippocampus of the SAE mice.

  11. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  12. Treatment of acquired cognitive-communicative deficits in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringle-Bartels, J; Story, T B

    1993-01-01

    This article argues that pediatric cognitive rehabilitation is different from rehabilitation for adults; that available theoretical perspectives (Piaget, information processing theory, Luria, and learning theory), are both necessary for and seriously underutilized in planning and conducting pediatric therapy; and that the recognition of such theoretical perspectives would significantly alter clinical pediatric practice. This article then suggests an approach to a theory-based clinical pediatric practice and provides examples.

  13. Cognitive deficits of executive functions and decision-making in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Winand H; Johansen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The nature of cognitive deficits in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by contradictory findings in terms of specific neuropsychological deficits. Selective impairments have been suggested to involve visuospatial memory, set shifting, decision-making and response inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate cognitive deficits in decision-making and executive functioning in OCD. It was hypothesized that the OCD patients would be less accurate in their responses compared to the healthy controls in rational decision-making on a version of the Cambridge gambling task (CGT) and on the color-word interference test and on a version of the Tower of Hanoi test (tower test) of executive functioning. Thirteen participants with OCD were compared to a group of healthy controls (n = 13) matched for age, gender, education and verbal IQ. Results revealed significant differences between the OCD group and the healthy control group on quality of decision-making on the CGT and for achievement score on the tower test. On these two tasks the OCD group performed worse than the healthy control group. The symptom-dimension analysis revealed performance differences where safety checking patients were impaired on the tower test compared to contamination patients. Results are discussed in the framework of cognition and emotion processing and findings implicate that OCD models should address, specifically, the interaction between cognition and emotion. Here the emotional disruption hypothesis is forwarded to account for the dysfunctional behaviors in OCD. Further implications regarding methodological and inhibitory factors affecting cognitive information processing are highlighted.

  14. Self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yeon-Jeong; Joo, Yo-Han; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia in order to shed light on the clinical correlates of subjective cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Seventy outpatients with schizophrenia were evaluated. Patients' self-perceived cognitive deficits, internalized stigma, and subjective quality of life were assessed using the Scale to Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia (SSTICS), the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI), and the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale Revision 4 (SQLS-R4), respectively. Correlation and regression analyses controlling for the severity of symptoms of schizophrenia were performed, and a mediation analysis was conducted to examine the hypothesis that internalized stigma mediates the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and subjective quality of life. Pearson's partial correlation analysis showed significant correlations among the SSTICS, ISMI, and SQLS-R4 scores (Pquality of life. The present study indicates that self-perceived cognitive deficits are significantly associated with internalized stigma and quality of life. Furthermore, internalized stigma was identified as a partial mediator of the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and quality of life. These findings suggest that clinicians should be aware that patients with schizophrenia experience significantly greater self-stigma when they suffer subjective cognitive deficits, and that this may further compromise their quality of life.

  15. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells attenuate cognitive deficits in an endothelin-1 rat model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, S A; Fink, K D; Crane, A; Matyas, J; Dey, N D; Matchynski, J J; Thibo, T; Reinke, T; Kippe, J; Hoffman, C; Sandstrom, M; Rossignol, J; Dunbar, G L

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and permanent disability in the United States, often producing long-term cognitive impairments, which are not easily recapitulated in animal models. The goals of this study were to assess whether: (1) the endothelin-1 (ET-1) model of chronic stroke produced discernable cognitive deficits; (2) a spatial operant reversal task (SORT) would accurately measure memory deficits in this model; and (3) bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) could reduce any observed deficits. Rats were given unilateral intracerebral injections of vehicle or ET-1, a stroke-inducing agent, near the middle cerebral artery. Seven days later, they were given intrastriatal injections of BMMSCs or vehicle, near the ischemic penumbra. The cognitive abilities of the rats were assessed on a novel SORT, which was designed to efficiently distinguish cognitive deficits from potential motoric confounds. Rats given ET-1 had significantly more cognitive errors at six weeks post-stroke on the SORT, and that these deficits were attenuated by BMMSC transplants. These findings indicate that: (1) the ET-1 model produces chronic cognitive deficits; (2) the SORT efficiently measures cognitive deficits that are not confounded by motoric impairment; and (3) BMMSCs may be a viable treatment for stroke-induced cognitive dysfunction.

  16. Cognitive Training in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida

    Background: Many individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continue to experience impaired cognitive functions despite medical treatment. Inadequate medical compliance and uncertain long-term effects of treatment make it necessary to explore supplementary treatments for ADHD...... attention, while the active placebo had significant, beneficial effects on working memory, both with large effect sizes. In the second trial, we found no significant differences on our primary or secondary outcome measures indicating no effects on sustained attention, ADHD symptoms or executive functions....... Lately, several trials have shown that training with cognitive computer programs can reduce severity of symptoms and improve cognitive functions. Method: This dissertation investigates the effects of cognitive training conducted at home in children and adolescents with ADHD. The effect of cognitive...

  17. Social Cognition Deficits and Associations with Drinking History in Alcoholic Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmas, Mary M.; Ruiz, Susan Mosher; Gansler, David A.; Sawyer, Kayle S.; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    . These findings extend into the social cognition domain, previous literature demonstrating the presence of cognitive deficits in alcoholism, their association with alcoholism severity, and variability by gender. Moreover, because impairments in social cognition can persist despite extended abstinence, they have important implications for relapse prevention. PMID:25581654

  18. The cognitive deficits associated with second-hand smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Jonathan; Heffernan, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS), also known as “passive smoking,” refers to a situation where a non-smoker inhales another person’s smoke either by sidestream or by mainstream exposure to tobacco smoke. Previous research has suggested that not only is prolonged exposure to SHS associated with a range of health-related problems similar to those found in smokers (1, 2) but is also linked to detrimental effects upon cognitive performance in children, adolescents, and adults. For example, chi...

  19. Subclinical naming errors in mild cognitive impairment: A semantic deficit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra F. Willers

    Full Text Available Abstract Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is the transitional stage between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Impairments in semantic memory have been demonstrated to be a critical factor in early AD. The Boston Naming Test (BNT is a straightforward method of examining semantic or visuo-perceptual processing and therefore represents a potential diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to examine naming ability and identify error types in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. Methods: Twenty aMCI patients, twenty AD patients and twenty-one normal controls, matched by age, sex and education level were evaluated. As part of a further neuropsychological evaluation, all subjects performed the BNT. A comprehensive classification of error types was devised in order to compare performance and ascertain semantic or perceptual origin of errors. Results: AD patients obtained significantly lower total scores on the BNT than aMCI patients and controls. aMCI patients did not obtain significant differences in total scores, but showed significantly higher semantic errors compared to controls. Conclusion: This study reveals that semantic processing is impaired during confrontation naming in aMCI.

  20. A cognitive psychometric model for the psychodiagnostic assessment of memory-related deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory E; Satalich, Timothy A; Shankle, W Rodman; Batchelder, William H

    2016-03-01

    Clinical tests used for psychodiagnostic purposes, such as the well-known Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale: Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), include a free-recall task. The free-recall task taps into latent cognitive processes associated with learning and memory components of human cognition, any of which might be impaired with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A Hidden Markov model of free recall is developed to measure latent cognitive processes used during the free-recall task. In return, these cognitive measurements give us insight into the degree to which normal cognitive functions are differentially impaired by medical conditions, such as AD and related disorders. The model is used to analyze the free-recall data obtained from healthy elderly participants, participants diagnosed as having mild cognitive impairment, and participants diagnosed with early AD. The model is specified hierarchically to handle item differences because of the serial position curve in free recall, as well as within-group individual differences in participants' recall abilities. Bayesian hierarchical inference is used to estimate the model. The model analysis suggests that the impaired patients have the following: (1) long-term memory encoding deficits, (2) short-term memory (STM) retrieval deficits for all but very short time intervals, (3) poorer transfer into long-term memory for items successfully retrieved from STM, and (4) poorer retention of items encoded into long-term memory after longer delays. Yet, impaired patients appear to have no deficit in immediate recall of encoded words in long-term memory or for very short time intervals in STM.

  1. Cognitive deficits in familial Alzheimer's disease associated with M239V mutation of presenilin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Marcon, Gabriella; Giaccone, Giorgio; Confaloni, Anna Maria; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    The neuropsychological assessment of non-demented subjects with gene mutation of familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) provides a model for exploring the early cognitive features of the disease. We evaluated 1 patient and 6 non-demented subjects belonging to a family with AD with M239V mutation of the presenilin 2 gene, aiming to verify the contribution of specific cognitive patterns to the characterization of familial AD. One patient, 3 non-demented subjects with M239V mutation and 3 subjects without mutation from the same family underwent neuropsychological testing. The patient's cognitive profile was characterized by anosognosia, visuospatial agnosia, apraxia and fluent aphasia. Of the 3 non-demented subjects with mutation, 1 showed no deficits, another constructive apraxia and the third spatial perception and memory deficits. The 3 subjects without mutation showed normal abilities. The cognitive deficits of the non-demented subjects with mutations indicate focal dysfunction of the posterior cortical areas, resembling the more extended parieto-occipito-temporal dysfunction of the demented patient. Such grading of visuospatial, praxis, and language impairments highlights a distinctive pattern related to the M239V mutation of the presenilin 2 gene.

  2. Specific cognitive deficits are common in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Kihlgren, Margareta; Melin, Lennart; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar

    2004-03-01

    A neuropsychological assessment was conducted to study cognition, with emphasis on memory, information processing/learning ability, and executive functions in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A group of 20 boys with DMD, aged 7 to 14 years (mean age 9 years 5 months, SD 2 years 2 months), was contrasted with 17 normally developing age-matched comparison individuals, using specific neuropsychological tests (Block Span, Digit Span, Story Recall, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Rey Complex Figure Test, Spatial Learning Test, Verbal Fluency, Trail Making Test, Tower of London, Memory for Faces, and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices). The DMD group performed significantly worse on all aspects of memory, learning, and executive functions. There was no significant difference in general intellectual ability between the two groups. Analyses of group differences indicate that problems in short-term memory are the most apparent, suggesting specific cognitive deficits. The differences between the groups were similar for both verbal-auditory and visuospatial tests, thus contradicting the idea that cognitive deficits are related to type of stimulus presented. It is concluded from this study that short-term memory deficits might play a critical role in the cognitive impairment and intellectual development seen in those with DMD.

  3. The Outcome of a Social Cognitive Training for Mainstream Adolescents with Social Communication Deficits in a Chinese Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy Y. S.; Crooke, Pamela J.; Lui, Aster L. Y.; Kan, Peggy P. K.; Mark, Yuen-mai; van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Tong, Michael C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The use of cognitive-based strategies for improving social communication behaviours for individuals who have solid language and cognition is an important question. This study investigated the outcome of teaching Social Thinking®, a framework based in social-cognition, to Chinese adolescents with social communication deficits. Thirty-nine students…

  4. Deficit

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    UCL's former provost, Sir Derek Roberts, has been drafted in for a year to run the college. UCL is expected to have a 6 million pounds deficit this year and up to a 10 million pounds deficit next year. Sir Christopher Llewellyn-Smith took over at UCL nearly 4 years ago and decided then that the finanical situation was serious enough to warrant a reduction in the vast expansion policy undertaken by his predecessor (1 page).

  5. Simultaneous object perception deficits are related to reduced visual processing speed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rizzo, Adriana L; Bublak, Peter; Redel, Petra; Grimmer, Timo; Müller, Hermann J; Sorg, Christian; Finke, Kathrin

    2017-07-01

    Simultanagnosia, an impairment in simultaneous object perception, has been attributed to deficits in visual attention and, specifically, to processing speed. Increasing visual attention deficits manifest over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), where the first changes are present already in its symptomatic predementia phase: amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). In this study, we examined whether patients with aMCI due to AD show simultaneous object perception deficits and whether and how these deficits relate to visual attention. Sixteen AD patients with aMCI and 16 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls were assessed with a simultaneous perception task, with shapes presented in an adjacent, embedded, or overlapping manner, under free viewing without temporal constraints. We used a parametric assessment of visual attention based on the Theory of Visual Attention. Results show that patients make significantly more errors than controls when identifying overlapping shapes, which correlate with reduced processing speed. Our findings suggest simultaneous object perception deficits in very early AD, and a visual processing speed reduction underlying these deficits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive rehabilitation training in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy and cognitive deficits: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Fabi, Alessandra; Giannarelli, Diana; Cantelmi, Tonino

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this pilot observational study was to evaluate effect of cognitive rehabilitation training (RehabTr) on cognitive performances in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) and cognitive disturbances. Medical inclusion criteria: patients (M/F) ≥ 18 years ≤ 75 with symptomatic seizures due to primary brain tumors or brain metastases in stable treatment with antiepileptic drugs; previous surgical resection or biopsy; >70 Karnofsky Performance Status; stable oncological disease. Eligible patients recruited from 100 consecutive patients with BTRE at first visit to our Center from 2011 to 2012. All recruited patients were administered battery of neuropsychological tests exploring various cognitive domains. Patients considered to have a neuropsychological deficit were those with at least one test score for a given domain indicative of impairment. Thirty patients out of 100 showed cognitive deficits, and were offered participation in RehabTr, of which 16 accepted (5 low grade glioma, 4 high grade glioma, 2 glioblastoma, 2 meningioma and 3 metastases) and 14 declined for various reasons. The RehabTr consisted of one weekly individual session of 1 h, for a total of 10 weeks, carried out by a trained psychologist. The functions trained were: memory, attention, visuo-spatial functions, language and reasoning by means of Training NeuroPsicologico (TNP(®)) software. To evaluate the effect of the RehabTr, the same battery of tests was administered directly after cognitive rehabilitation (T1), and at six-month follow-up (T2). Statistical analysis with Student T test for paired data showed that short-term verbal memory, episodic memory, fluency and long term visuo-spatial memory improved immediately after the T1 and remained stable at T2. At final follow-up all patients showed an improvement in at least one domain that had been lower than normal at baseline. Our results demonstrated a positive effect of rehabilitative training at different times, and, for

  7. Variability in Depressive Symptoms of Cognitive Deficit and Cognitive Bias During the First 2 Years After Diagnosis in Australian Men With Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Christopher F; Bitsika, Vicki; Christie, David R H

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and contribution to total depression of the depressive symptoms of cognitive deficit and cognitive bias in prostate cancer (PCa) patients were compared from cohorts sampled during the first 2 years after diagnosis. Survey data were collected from 394 patients with PCa, including background information, treatments, and disease status, plus total scores of depression and scores for subscales of the depressive symptoms of cognitive bias and cognitive deficit via the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. The sample was divided into eight 3-monthly time-since-diagnosis cohorts and according to depression severity. Mean scores for the depressive symptoms of cognitive deficit were significantly higher than those for cognitive bias for the whole sample, but the contribution of cognitive bias to total depression was stronger than that for cognitive deficit. When divided according to overall depression severity, patients with clinically significant depression showed reversed patterns of association between the two subsets of cognitive symptoms of depression and total depression compared with those patients who reported less severe depression. Differences in the incidence and contribution of these two different aspects of the cognitive symptoms of depression for patients with more severe depression argue for consideration of them when assessing and diagnosing depression in patients with PCa. Treatment requirements are also different between the two types of cognitive symptoms of depression, and several suggestions for matching treatment to illness via a personalized medicine approach are discussed.

  8. Effects of nicotine on cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Josette G; Kongs, Susan; Allensworth, Diana; Martin, Laura; Tregellas, Jason; Sullivan, Bernadette; Zerbe, Gary; Freedman, Robert

    2004-07-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a pathophysiological role for nicotinic receptors in schizophrenia. Activation by nicotine alters physiological dysfunctions, such as eye movement and sensory gating abnormalities, but effects on neuropsychological performance are just beginning to be investigated. Nicotine-induced desensitization and the well-known tachyphylaxis of nicotinic receptors may confound such efforts. In all, 20 schizophrenics, 10 smokers, and 10 nonsmokers were assessed following the administration of nicotine gum and placebo gum. The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status was administered. Nicotine affected only the Attention Index; there were no effects on learning and memory, language, or visuospatial/constructional abilities. Attentional function was increased in nonsmokers, but decreased in nicotine-abstinent smokers after nicotine administration. The effects of nicotine in schizophrenia do not extend to all areas of cognition. Effects on attention may be severely limited by tachyphylaxis, such that decremented performance occurs in smokers, while modest effects may be achieved in nonsmokers. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group

  9. Levetiracetam might act as an efficacious drug to attenuate cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a homologue of piracetam with an a-ethyl side-chain substitution and it is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antiepileptic drug. Recently, several studies have found that levetiracetam was able to reduce seizure frequency in epileptic seizures patients without affecting their cognitive functions. In the present review, the effects of levetiracetam on cognitive improvement were summarized in epileptic seizures patients with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-grade glioma (HGG) patients and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. In addition, levetiracetam was observed to improve the cognitive deficits in normal aged animals and the transgenic animal models with AD, suggesting that levetiracetam may be a better choice for the prevention or treatment of AD.

  10. Social cognition deficits and psychopathic traits in young people seeking mental health treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita van Zwieten

    Full Text Available Antisocial behaviours and psychopathic traits place an individual at risk for criminality, mental illness, substance dependence, and psychosocial dysfunction. Social cognition deficits appear to be associated with psychopathic traits and are believed to contribute to interpersonal dysfunction. Most research investigating the relationship of these traits with social cognition has been conducted either in children or adult forensic settings. We investigated whether psychopathic traits were associated with social cognition in 91 young people presenting for mental healthcare (aged between 15 and 25 years. Participants completed symptom severity measures, neuropsychological tests, the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test of social cognition (RMET, and the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD to assess psychopathic personality traits. Correlation analyses showed poorer social cognition was associated with greater psychopathic traits (r = -.36, p = .01. Interestingly, social cognition performance predicted unique variance in concurrent psychopathic personality traits above gender, IQ sustained attention, and working memory performance. These findings suggest that social cognitive impairments are associated with psychopathic tendencies in young people presenting for community mental healthcare. Research is needed to establish the directionality of this relationship and to determine whether social cognition training is an effective treatment amongst young people with psychopathic tendencies.

  11. Resting fMRI measures are associated with cognitive deficits in schizophrenia assessed by the MATRICS consensus cognitive battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Bustillo, Juan; Du, Yuhui; Yu, Qingbao; Jones, Thomas R.; Jiang, Tianzi; Calhoun, Vince D.; Sui, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The cognitive deficits of schizophrenia are largely resistant to current treatment, and are thus a life-long burden to patients. The MATRICS consensus cognitive battery (MCCB) provides a reliable and valid assessment of cognition across a comprehensive set of cognitive domains for schizophrenia. In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity associated with MCCB has not yet been examined. In this paper, the interrelationships between MCCB and the abnormalities seen in two types of functional measures from resting-state fMRI—fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) and functional network connectivity (FNC) maps were investigated in data from 47 schizophrenia patients and 50 age-matched healthy controls. First, the fALFF maps were generated and decomposed by independent component analysis (ICA), and then the component showing the highest correlation with MCCB composite scores was selected. Second, the whole brain was separated into functional networks by group ICA, and the FNC maps were calculated. The FNC strengths with most significant correlations with MCCB were displayed and spatially overlapped with the fALFF component of interest. It demonstrated increased cognitive performance associated with higher fALFF values (intensity of regional spontaneous brain activity) in prefrontal regions, inferior parietal lobe (IPL) but lower ALFF values in thalamus, striatum, and superior temporal gyrus (STG). Interestingly, the FNC showing significant correlations with MCCB were in well agreement with the activated regions with highest z-values in fALFF component. Our results support the view that functional deficits in distributed cortico-striato-thalamic circuits and inferior parietal lobe may account for several aspects of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.

  12. Cognitive deficits at age 22 years associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Frodi; Weihe, Pál; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    methylmercury exposure was assessed in terms of the mercury concentration in cord blood and maternal hair. Clinical examinations of 847 cohort members at age 22 years were carried out in 2008-2009 using a panel of neuropsychological tests that reflected major functional domains. Subjects with neurological...... and psychiatric diagnoses were excluded from the data analysis, thus leaving 814 subjects. Multiple regression analysis included covariates previously identified for adjustment. Deficits in Boston Naming Test (BNT) and other tests of verbal performance were significantly associated with the cord-blood mercury...... to about 2.2 IQ points at a 10-fold increased prenatal methylmercury exposure. Thus, although the cognitive deficits observed were smaller than at examinations at younger ages, maternal diets with contaminated seafood were associated with adverse effects in this birth cohort at age 22 years. The deficits...

  13. The allusive cognitive deficit in paranoia: the case for mental time travel or cognitive self-projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, R

    2010-08-01

    Delusional beliefs are characteristic of psychosis and, of the delusions, the paranoid delusion is the single most common type associated with psychosis. The many years of research focused on neurocognition in schizophrenia, using standardized neurocognitive tests, have failed to find conclusive cognitive deficits in relation to positive symptoms. However, UK-based psychological research has identified sociocognitive anomalies in relation to paranoid thinking in the form of theory of mind (ToM), causal reasoning and threat-related processing anomalies. Drawing from recent neuroscientific research on the default mode network, this paper asserts that the common theme running through the psychological tests that are sensitive to the cognitive impairment of paranoia is the need to cognitively project the self through time, referred to as mental time travel. Such an understanding of the cognitive roots of paranoid ideation provides a synthesis between psychological and biological accounts of psychosis while also retaining the powerful argument that understanding abnormal thinking must start with models of normal cognition. This is the core theme running through the cognitive psychological literature of psychiatric disorders that enables research from this area to inform psychological therapy.

  14. Cognitive deficits in patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Correa Miotto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the most frequent causes of brain damage. Cognitive deficits reported in the literature after moderate to severe TBI include memory, language, executive functions, attention and information processing speed impairments. However, systematic studies on patients with mild TBI are scarce although neuropsychological changes are present. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cognitive functioning of patients with mild to moderate TBI. METHOD: We evaluated 12 patients with mild to moderate TBI using a comprehensive protocol (PN01 of neuropsychological tests. RESULTS: There were significant deficits of episodic memory including immediate and delayed verbal memory recall, verbal recognition, immediate and delayed visual memory recall, naming, verbal fluency and information processing speed. CONCLUSION: These results emphasize the importance of comprehensive neuropsychological assessments even in cases of mild TBI in order to identify impaired and preserved functions providing adequate managing including rehabilitation programs for each case.

  15. GHB-Induced Cognitive Deficits During Adolescence and the Role of NMDA Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, R; Wu, L-C; Reddy, K; Sircar, D; Basak, A K

    2011-03-01

    We have earlier reported that γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) disrupts the acquisition of spatial learning and memory in adolescent rats. GHB is known to interact with several neurotransmitter systems that have been implicated in cognitive functioning. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NR) -type of glutamate receptor is considered to be an important target for spatial learning and memory. Molecular mechanisms governing the neuroadptations following repeated GHB treatment in adolecent rats remain unknown. We examined the role of NMDA receptor in adolescent GHB-induced cognitive deficit. Adolescent rats were administered with GHB on 6 consecutive days, and surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits levels were measured. GHB significantly decreased NR1 levels in the frontal cortex. Adolescent GHB also significantly reduced cortical NR2A subunit levels. Our findings support the hypothesis that adolescent GHB-induced cogntive deficits are associated with neuroadaptations in glutamatergic transmission, particulaly NR functioning in the frontal cortex.

  16. Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia: an updated metanalysis of the scientific evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioravanti Mario

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is an update of a previous meta-analysis published in 2005. Methods It includes the data published up to march 2010 for a total of 247 papers and 18,300 cases. Cognitive deficits are examined in 5 different domains: Memory functioning (128 studies, Global cognitive functioning (131 studies, Language (70 studies, Executive function (67 studies, Attention (76 studies. Only controlled studies were included: patients vs. normal subjects. Results Results evidence that in all domains and in all different analyses performed within each domain, patients show a significant reduction of cognitive efficiency with respect to normal subjects. The between studies heterogeneity is very high in almost all domains. There are various sources of this heterogeneity (age, sex, sample size, type of patients, and type of measurement which contribute to the high degree of not-overlapping information offered by the single studies. Conclusions Our results, based on the current scientific evidence, confirm the previous findings that there is a generalized impairment of various cognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia when compared to normal cases. The modalities with which these results are obtained have not changed over the years and the more recent studies do not modify the high heterogeneity previously found between the studies. This reduces the methodological quality of the results. In order to improve the methodological quality of the studies performed in the field of cognitive deficits of patients with schizophrenia, various factors should be taken into account and better managed in designing future studies.

  17. Cognitive and neuropsychological characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder children receiving stimulant medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, M G; Bowers, T G

    1993-12-01

    10 children receiving stimulant medication for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder were compared to normal children on cognitive and neuropsychological dimensions in a pilot study. When compared with 10 normal children the ADHD children showed significant differences on cognitive measures, including the Wechsler Developmental Index, the Bender Visual-motor Gestalt Test, and the Benton Revised Visual Retention Test. Elevated levels of polyspike EEG activity were also noted for these children. Analysis suggested that ADHD children receiving stimulant medications may have persisting neuropsychological difficulty. Further research on the neuropsychological correlates of ADHD seems warranted.

  18. Emotional face recognition deficit in amnestic patients with mild cognitive impairment: behavioral and electrophysiological evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Yang L; Zhao X; Wang L; Yu L; Song M; Wang X.

    2015-01-01

    Linlin Yang, Xiaochuan Zhao, Lan Wang, Lulu Yu, Mei Song, Xueyi Wang Department of Mental Health, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei Medical University Institute of Mental Health, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been conceptualized as a transitional stage between healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Thus, understanding emotional face recognition deficit in patients with amnestic...

  19. Neurally-dissociable cognitive components of reading deficits in subacute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eBoukrina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available According to cognitive models of reading, words are processed by interacting orthographic (spelling, phonological (sound and semantic (meaning information. Despite extensive study of the neural basis of reading in healthy participants, little group data exist on patients with reading deficits from focal brain damage pointing to critical neural systems for reading. Here we report on one such study. We have performed neuropsychological testing and MRI on 11 patients with left-hemisphere stroke (<= 5 weeks post stroke. Patients completed tasks assessing cognitive components of reading such as semantics (matching picture or word choices to a target based on meaning, phonology (matching word choices to a target based on rhyming, and orthography (a two-alternative forced choice of the most plausible nonword. They also read aloud pseudowords and words with high or low levels of usage frequency, imageability, and spelling-sound consistency. As predicted by the cognitive model, when averaged across patients, the influence of semantics was most salient for low-frequency, low-consistency words, when phonological decoding is especially difficult. Qualitative subtraction analyses revealed lesion sites specific to phonological processing. These areas were consistent with those shown previously to activate for phonology in healthy participants, including supramarginal, posterior superior temporal, middle temporal, inferior frontal gyri, and underlying white matter. Notable divergence between this analysis and previous functional imaging is the association of lesions in the mid-fusiform gyrus and anterior temporal lobe with phonological reading deficits. This study represents progress toward identifying brain lesion-deficit relationships in the cognitive components of reading. Such correspondences are expected to help not only better understand the neural mechanisms of reading, but may also help tailor reading therapy to individual neurocognitive deficit

  20. The cognitive-energetic model: an empirical approach to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, J

    2000-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood psychiatric disorder which when carefully defined, affects around 1% of the childhood population [Swanson JM, Sergeant JA, Taylor E, Sonuga-Barke EJS, Jensen PS, Canwell DP. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and hyperkinetic disorder. Lancet 1998;351:429-433]. The primary symptoms: distractibility, impulsivity and overactivity vary in degree and association in such children, which led DSM IV to propose three subgroups. Only one of these subgroups, the combined subtype: deficits in all three areas, meets the ICD-10 criteria. Since the other two subtypes are used extensively in North America (but not in Europe), widely different results between centres are to be expected and have been reported. Central to the ADHD syndrome is the idea of an attention deficit. In order to investigate attention, it is necessary to define what one means by this term and to operationalize it in such a manner that others can test and replicate findings. We have advocated the use of a cognitive-energetic model [Sanders, AF. Towards a model of stress and performance. Acta Psychologica 1983;53: 61-97]. The cognitive-energetic model of ADHD approaches the ADHD deficiency at three distinct levels. First, a lower set of cognitive processes: encoding, central processing and response organisation is postulated. Study of these processes has indicated that there are no deficits of processing at encoding or central processing but are present in motor organisation [Sergeant JA, van der Meere JJ. Convergence of approaches in localizing the hyperactivity deficit. In Lahey BB, Kazdin AE, editors. Advancements in clinical child psychology, vol. 13. New York: Plenum press, 1990. p. 207-45; Sergeant, JA, van der Meere JJ. Additive factor methodology applied to psychopathology with special reference to hyperactivity. Acta Psychologica 1990;74:277-295]. A second level of the cognitive-energetic model consists of the energetic pools

  1. The abolishment of anesthesia-induced cognitive impairment by timely protection of mitochondria in the developing rat brain: the importance of free oxygen radicals and mitochondrial integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo, A; Starr, JA; Sanchez; Lunardi, N; DiGruccio, MR; Ori, C; Erisir, A; Trimmer, P; Bennett, J; Jevtovic-Todorovic

    2011-01-01

    Early exposure to general anesthesia (GA) causes developmental neuroapoptosis in the mammalian brain and long-term cognitive impairment. Recent evidence suggests that GA also causes functional and morphological impairment of the immature neuronal mitochondria. Injured mitochondria could be a significant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which, if not scavenged in timely fashion, may cause excessive lipid peroxidation and damage of cellular membranes. We examined whether early exposure to GA results in ROS upregulation and whether mitochondrial protection and ROS scavenging prevent GA-induced pathomorphological and behavioral impairments. We exposed 7-day-old rats to GA with or without either EUK-134, a synthetic ROS scavenger, or R(+) pramipexole (PPX), a synthetic aminobenzothiazol derivative that restores mitochondrial integrity. We found that GA causes extensive ROS upregulation and lipid peroxidation, as well as mitochondrial injury and neuronal loss in the subiculum. As compared to rats given only GA, those also given PPX or EUK-134 had significantly downregulated lipid peroxidation, preserved mitochondrial integrity, and significantly less neuronal loss. The subiculum is highly intertwined with the hippocampal CA1 region, anterior thalamic nuclei, and both entorhinal and cingulate cortices; hence, it is important in cognitive development. We found that PPX or EUK-134 co-treatment completely prevented GA-induced cognitive impairment. Because mitochondria are vulnerable to GA-induced developmental neurotoxicity, they could be an important therapeutic target for adjuvant therapy aimed at improving the safety of commonly used GAs. PMID:22198380

  2. Modeling neurodevelopmental cognitive deficits in tasks with cross-species translational validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Z A; Powell, S B; Young, J W

    2016-01-01

    Numerous psychiatric disorders whose cognitive dysfunction links to functional outcome have neurodevelopmental origins including schizophrenia, autism and bipolar disorder. Treatments are needed for these cognitive deficits, which require development using animal models. Models of neurodevelopmental disorders are as varied and diverse as the disorders themselves, recreating some but not all aspects of the disorder. This variety may in part underlie why purported procognitive treatments translated from these models have failed to restore functioning in the targeted patient populations. Further complications arise from environmental factors used in these models that can contribute to numerous disorders, perhaps only impacting specific domains, while diagnostic boundaries define individual disorders, limiting translational efficacy. The Research Domain Criteria project seeks to 'develop new ways to classify mental disorders based on behavioral dimensions and neurobiological measures' in hopes of facilitating translational research by remaining agnostic toward diagnostic borders derived from clinical presentation in humans. Models could therefore recreate biosignatures of cognitive dysfunction irrespective of disease state. This review highlights work within the field of neurodevelopmental models of psychiatric disorders tested in cross-species translational cognitive paradigms that directly inform this newly developing research strategy. By expounding on this approach, the hopes are that a fuller understanding of each model may be attainable in terms of the cognitive profile elicited by each manipulation. Hence, conclusions may begin to be drawn on the nature of cognitive neuropathology on neurodevelopmental and other disorders, increasing the chances of procognitive treatment development for individuals affected in specific cognitive domains.

  3. Cognitive training at a young age attenuates deficits in the zQ175 mouse model of HD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C.P. Curtin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s Disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. In these experiments, we tested if operant training at an early age affected adult cognitive deficits in the zQ175 KI Het (zQ175 mouse model of HD. In Experiment 1 we trained zQ175 mice in a fixed-ratio/progressive ratio (FR/PR task to assay learning and motivational deficits. We found pronounced deficits in response rates and task engagement in naïve adult zQ175 mice (32-33 weeks age, while deficits in zQ175 mice trained from 6-7 weeks age were either absent or less severe. When those mice were re-tested as adults, FR/PR performance deficits were absent or otherwise less severe than deficits observed in naïve adult zQ175 relative to wild type (WT mice. In Experiment 2, we used a Go/No-go operant task to assess the effects of early cognitive testing on response inhibition deficits in zQ175 mice. We found that zQ175 mice that began testing at 7-8 weeks did not exhibit deficits in Go/No-go testing, but when re-tested at 28-29 weeks age exhibited an initial impairment that diminished with training. These transient deficits were nonetheless mild relative to deficits observed among adult zQ175 mice without prior testing experience. In Experiment 3 we trained mice in a two-choice visual discrimination test to evaluate cognitive flexibility. As in prior experiments, we found performance deficits were mild or absent in mice that started training at 6-9 weeks of age, while deficits in naive mice exposed to training at 28-29 weeks were severe. Re-testing mice at 28-29 weeks age, were previously trained starting at 6-9 weeks, revealed that deficits in learning and cognitive flexibility were absent or reduced relative to effects observed in naive adults. In Experiment 4, we tested working memory deficits with a delayed non-match to position (DNMTP test. Mice with prior experience exhibited mild working memory deficits, with males

  4. Performances on a cognitive theory of mind task: specific decline or general cognitive deficits? Evidence from normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliss, Rafika; Lemerre, Marion; Mollard, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Compromised theory of mind (ToM) can be explained either by a failure to implement specific representational capacities (mental state representations) or by more general executive selection demands. In older adult populations, evidence supporting affected executive functioning and cognitive ToM in normal aging are reported. However, links between these two functions remain unclear. In the present paper, we address these shortcomings by using a specific task of ToM and classical executive tasks. We studied, using an original cognitive ToM task, the effect of age on ToM performances, in link with the progressive executive decline. 96 elderly participants were recruited. They were asked to perform a cognitive ToM task, and 5 executive tests (Stroop test and Hayling Sentence Completion Test to appreciate inhibitory process, Trail Making Test and Verbal Fluency for shifting assessment and backward span dedicated to estimate working memory capacity). The results show changes in cognitive ToM performance according to executive demands. Correlational studies indicate a significant relationship between ToM performance and the selected executive measures. Regression analyzes demonstrates that level of vocabulary and age as the best predictors of ToM performance. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that ToM deficits are related to age-related domain-general decline rather than as to a breakdown in specialized representational system. The implications of these findings for the nature of social cognition tests in normal aging are also discussed.

  5. Involvement of Neuroinflammation during Brain Development in Social Cognitive Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yutaka; Chiba, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Development of social cognition, a unique and high-order function, depends on brain maturation from childhood to adulthood in humans. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia have similar social cognitive deficits, although age of onset in each disorder is different. Pathogenesis of these disorders is complex and contains several features, including genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors, and sites of abnormalities in the brain. Although several hypotheses have been postulated, they seem to be insufficient to explain how brain alterations associated with symptoms in these disorders develop at distinct developmental stages. Development of ASD appears to be related to cerebellar dysfunction and subsequent thalamic hyperactivation in early childhood. By contrast, schizophrenia seems to be triggered by thalamic hyperactivation in late adolescence, whereas hippocampal aberration has been possibly initiated in childhood. One of the possible culprits is metal homeostasis disturbances that can induce dysfunction of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Thalamic hyperactivation is thought to be induced by microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and abnormalities of intracerebral environment. Consequently, it is likely that the thalamic hyperactivation triggers dysregulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for lower brain regions related to social cognition. In this review, we summarize the brain aberration in ASD and schizophrenia and provide a possible mechanism underlying social cognitive deficits in these disorders based on their distinct ages of onset. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. [Neuropsychological aspects of delusional disorders. Characteristic attributional style or cognitive deficit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bömmer, I; Brüne, M

    2007-07-01

    "Pure" delusional disorders are clinically rare, and the neuropsychology of such disorders is poorly understood. Whereas "deficit" models suggest a cognitive impairment accounting for the incorrigible fixation of false beliefs, cognitive models propose the existence of a characteristic attributional style in patients to stabilise a fragile self. The cognitive flexibility and attributional style of 21 patients diagnosed with delusional disorder according to ICD-10 were compared with a group of healthy controls paralleled for age, sex, education, and intelligence. Patients with delusional disorders made more errors and more perseverative errors in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test compared with controls. However, these differences were only significant in patients with a comorbid depression. In contrast to earlier studies, patients with delusional disorders did not attribute negative events to external or personal causes more often than healthy controls, but partly tended to show a depressive attributional style. Our results do not support either a cognitive deficit in patients with delusional disorders or a characteristic attributional style. In terms of treatment recommendations, a thorough diagnosis of comorbid depressive disorders in patients with delusional disorders is warranted.

  7. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Relationship of Physical Activity with Depression and Cognitive Deficit in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo T, R S; Tribess, Sheilla; Sasaki, Jeffer Eidi; Meneguci, Joilson; Martins, Cristiane A; Freitas, Ismael F; Romo-Perez, Vicente; Virtuoso, Jair S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of physical activity with depression and cognition deficit, separately and combined, in Brazilian older adults. We analyzed data from 622 older adults. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, while cognitive deficit was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to assess associations of depression and cognitive deficit with sociodemographic, health, and behavioral variables. Prevalence of physical inactivity (physical activity/ week), depression, and cognitive deficit were 35.7%, 37.4%, and 16.7%. Physical inactivity was associated with depression (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.14-2.94) and with depression and cognitive deficit combined (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 2.01-8.91). Physically inactive participants were also more likely to present limitations in orientation and language functions. Physical inactivity was associated with depression and also with depression and cognitive deficit combined in older adults.

  8. Association of Social Frailty With Both Cognitive and Physical Deficits Among Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Doi, Takehiko; Makizako, Hyuma; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Makino, Keitaro; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    Our objective was to investigate the association between social frailty and cognitive and physical function among older adults. This was a cross-sectional study. We examined community-dwelling adults in Japan. Participants comprised 4425 older Japanese people from the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology-Study of Geriatric Syndromes. Social frailty was defined by using responses to 5 questions (going out less frequently, rarely visiting friends, feeling unhelpful to friends or family, living alone, and not talking with someone every day). Participants showing none of these components were considered nonfrail; those showing 1 component were considered prefrail; and those showing 2 or more components were considered frail. To screen for cognitive deficits, we assessed memory, attention, executive function, and processing speed. Having 2 or more tests with age-adjusted scores of at least 1.5 standard deviations below the reference threshold was sufficient to be characterized as cognitively deficient. To screen for physical function deficits, we assessed walking speed (social frailty was the following: nonfrailty, 64.1% (N = 2835); social prefrailty, 24.8% (N = 1097); social frailty, 11.1% (N = 493; P for trend social frailty groups; physical function (gait speed and grip strength) also varied between social frailty groups (all Ps for trend social nonfrailty, social frailty was independently associated with each cognitive deficit (odds ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.13-2.30) and deficits in physical function (odds ratio = 1.99, 95% confidence interval 1.57-2.52) after adjusting for covariates. This study revealed that social frailty is associated with both cognitive and physical function among Japanese older adults. And social frailty status was also negatively associated with physical function. Further studies are needed to elucidate if a casual association exists between social frailty and cognitive and physical function. Copyright

  9. Aprotinin decreases the incidence of cognitive deficit following CABG and cardiopulmonary bypass: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic C

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Cognitive deficit after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) has a high prevalence and is persistent. Meta-analysis of clinical trials demonstrates a decreased incidence of stroke after CABG when aprotinin is administrated perioperatively. We hypothesized that aprotinin administration would decrease the incidence of cognitive deficit after CABG. METHODS: Thirty-six ASA III-IV patients undergoing elective CABG were included in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded pilot study. Eighteen patients received aprotinin 2 x 10(6) KIU (loading dose), 2 x 10(6) KIU (added to circuit prime) and a continuous infusion of 5 x 10(5) KIU.hr(-1). A battery of cognitive tests was administered to patients and spouses (n = 18) the day before surgery, four days and six weeks postoperatively. RESULTS: Four days postoperatively new cognitive deficit (defined by a change in one or more cognitive domains using the Reliable Change Index method) was present in ten (58%) patients in the aprotinin group compared to 17 (94%) in the placebo group [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.62, P = 0.005); (P = 0.01)]. Six weeks postoperatively, four (23%) patients in the aprotinin group had cognitive deficit compared to ten (55%) in the placebo group (95% CI 0.80-0.16, P = 0.005); (P = 0.05). CONCLUSION: In this prospective pilot study, the incidence of cognitive deficit after CABG and cardiopulmonary bypass is decreased by the administration of high-dose aprotinin.

  10. Cortisol Response Mediates HIV-1-Related Cognitive Deficits Among Injecting Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. Ownby

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cortisol response is an important measure of the endocrine activity to environmental challenges and has been related to cognitive function and mood. Previous studies have shown that the cortisol response to stress is dysregulated in persons with HIV-1 infection. Since cortisol is neurotoxic and its levels have been related to cognitive dysfunction in various disorders, it is possible that neuroendocrine dysregulation may also be related to cognitive dysfunction in individuals with HIV-1 infection. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the cortisol response to an alpha adrenergic challenge, cold pressor, is related to cognitive function in HIV-infected injecting drug abusers. We used growth curve modeling to study the relationship of cold pressor challenge stimulated cortisol response to scores on the modified HIV Dementia Scale (mHDS. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of HIV-1 infection on the HDS score directly and indirectly via pattern of cortisol response. The analysis showed that HIV-1 infection was directly related to mHDS performance and that it also influenced scores on the mHDS by way of individuals’ pattern of cortisol response. Cortisol response to α-adrenergic challenge thus may mediate cognitive deficits in individuals with HIV-1 infection. These findings further emphasize the importance of understanding the role of stress in the cognitive problems associated with HIV-1 infection.

  11. Executive functions and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia: Comparisons between probands, parents and controls in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairment is said to be a core feature of schizophrenia. Executive function is an important cognitive domain. Aim: This study was undertaken to assess cognitive impairment among Indian patients with schizophrenia (Sz or schizoaffective disorder (SzA, compared with their parents and unaffected individuals (controls. Settings and Design: Executive functions as measured by Trail-making Test (TMT, of patients and their parents were compared with controls. The patients were recruited from the Outpatients′ Department (OPD of a government hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients diagnosed as Sz or SzA (n=172 and their parents (n=196: families n=132, 119 fathers and 77 mothers participated. We also included 120 persons with no history of psychiatric illness. Cognitive function was assessed with the TMT. The Information Score of the Post Graduate Institute Battery of Brain Dysfunction test, developed in India for Indian subjects was used as a proxy for general fixed knowledge. Statistical Analysis: Logistic and linear regression was used to compare cognitive deficits of cases, parents and controls. Results: Cases and their parents took significantly more time than controls on Part B of the TMT. There were no statistically significant differences between cases and parents on any of the TMT parameters. Using regression analysis, the most significant correlates of all TMT parameters among cases were with occurrence of auditory hallucinations and current age. Conclusion: Cases, as well as their parents showed more cognitive impairment than controls on the TMT.

  12. Mount Everest: a space analogue for speech monitoring of cognitive deficits and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Philip; Morey, Angie; Hochstadt, Jesse; Larson, Mara; Mather, Sandra

    2005-06-01

    In deep-space missions, the basal ganglia and hippocampus, subcortical structures of the brain that play critical roles in motor activity, cognition, and memory, will be vulnerable to damage from cosmic rays. These metabolically active structures are also sensitive to damage arising from the low oxygen content of air at extreme altitudes. We have, therefore, used Mount Everest as an analogue for deep space, where astronauts will be subject to danger and stress as well as neural damage. We can ethically obtain data because our climber-subjects already intend to climb Mt. Everest. We record speech and test cognitive and linguistic performance before, during, and after exposure to hypoxic conditions. From these data we have derived and validated computer-implemented acoustic voice measures that track slight as well as profound cognitive impairment. Vowel duration and speech motor sequencing errors increase as climbers ascend, reflecting degraded basal ganglia activity. These metrics detect deficits in language comprehension and the ability to change plans in changing circumstances. Preliminary analyses also reveal memory deficits reflecting hippocampal damage. Our speech metrics are unobtrusive and do not reveal the content of a verbal message; they could be derived automatically, allowing space crews to detect subtle motor and cognitive deficits and invoke countermeasures before performance is profoundly impaired. In future work we will be validating the voice metrics of stress in collaboration with the Dinges NSBRI laboratory study of task-induced stress. Our procedures can also be applied in general aviation and in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, and other neurological disorders.

  13. Contextual recognition memory deficits in major depression are suppressed by cognitive support at encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Márcio Silveira; Balardin, Joana Bisol; Caldieraro, Marco Antônio Knob; Fleck, Marcelo Pio; Argimon, Irani; Luz, Clarice; Bromberg, Elke

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the effect of cognitive support (an associative orienting instruction at encoding) on contextual memory in depressed patients. Seventeen patients (age 20-40 years, 14 women) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 22 healthy controls matched for age, gender and education completed a recognition memory task for item (object) and context (location), with or without an incidental binding cue at encoding. In addition, participants completed the vocabulary subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS III) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Salivary samples were collected at 7 AM, 4 PM and 10 PM on the day of testing for cortisol and DHEA level measurement. Depressed patients showed a deficit in contextual memory in the absence of a binding cue but did not differ from healthy controls in item memory or when a binding cue was present. Cortisol and cortisol/DHEA ratios were lower in depressed patients compared to healthy controls and correlated with memory deficits. Contextual memory deficits in MDD patients can be reduced by providing cognitive support at encoding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Neuroscience-Based Cognitive Skill Training on Growth of Cognitive Deficits Associated with Learning Disabilities in Children Grades 2-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtzon, Sarah Abitbol

    2012-01-01

    Working memory, executive functions, and cognitive processes associated with specific academic areas, are empirically identified as being the core underlying cognitive deficits in students with specific learning disabilities. Using Hebb's theory of neuroplasticity and the principle of automaticity as theoretical bases, this experimental study…

  15. Experimental 'jet lag' inhibits adult neurogenesis and produces long-term cognitive deficits in female hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Gibson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian disruptions through frequent transmeridian travel, rotating shift work, and poor sleep hygiene are associated with an array of physical and mental health maladies, including marked deficits in human cognitive function. Despite anecdotal and correlational reports suggesting a negative impact of circadian disruptions on brain function, this possibility has not been experimentally examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated whether experimental 'jet lag' (i.e., phase advances of the light:dark cycle negatively impacts learning and memory and whether any deficits observed are associated with reductions in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Because insults to circadian timing alter circulating glucocorticoid and sex steroid concentrations, both of which influence neurogenesis and learning/memory, we assessed the contribution of these endocrine factors to any observed alterations. Circadian disruption resulted in pronounced deficits in learning and memory paralleled by marked reductions in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Significantly, deficits in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory were not only seen during the period of the circadian disruption, but also persisted well after the cessation of jet lag, suggesting long-lasting negative consequences on brain function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these findings support the view that circadian disruptions suppress hippocampal neurogenesis via a glucocorticoid-independent mechanism, imposing pronounced and persistent impairments on learning and memory.

  16. Cognitive Functioning in Children with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with and without Comorbid Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, Angela; Kikas, Eve

    2007-01-01

    This study attempted to determine whether children with the combined subtype of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impairments in cognitive functioning and motor skills. The specific effect of the comorbidity of learning disabilities (LD) was also investigated. A battery of cognitive tests was administered to 26 children with a…

  17. Deep sleep and parietal cortex gene expression changes are related to cognitive deficits with age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Buechel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related cognitive deficits negatively affect quality of life and can presage serious neurodegenerative disorders. Despite sleep disruption's well-recognized negative influence on cognition, and its prevalence with age, surprisingly few studies have tested sleep's relationship to cognitive aging. METHODOLOGY: We measured sleep stages in young adult and aged F344 rats during inactive (enhanced sleep and active (enhanced wake periods. Animals were behaviorally characterized on the Morris water maze and gene expression profiles of their parietal cortices were taken. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Water maze performance was impaired, and inactive period deep sleep was decreased with age. However, increased deep sleep during the active period was most strongly correlated to maze performance. Transcriptional profiles were strongly associated with behavior and age, and were validated against prior studies. Bioinformatic analysis revealed increased translation and decreased myelin/neuronal pathways. CONCLUSIONS: The F344 rat appears to serve as a reasonable model for some common sleep architecture and cognitive changes seen with age in humans, including the cognitively disrupting influence of active period deep sleep. Microarray analysis suggests that the processes engaged by this sleep are consistent with its function. Thus, active period deep sleep appears temporally misaligned but mechanistically intact, leading to the following: first, aged brain tissue appears capable of generating the slow waves necessary for deep sleep, albeit at a weaker intensity than in young. Second, this activity, presented during the active period, seems disruptive rather than beneficial to cognition. Third, this active period deep sleep may be a cognitively pathologic attempt to recover age-related loss of inactive period deep sleep. Finally, therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing active period deep sleep (e.g., by promoting active period wakefulness and/or inactive

  18. Cognitive deficit and depressive symptoms in a community group of elderly people: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Silberman

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the number and proportion of old people increases worldwide, health professionals and systems should be made aware and prepared to deal with their problems. Cognitive deficit and symptoms of depression are commom among the elderly, and may occur in relation to various risk factors such as health conditions and psychosocial variables. In order to study cognitive deficit and the presence of signs and symptoms of depression, 62 elderly community subjects enrolled at a Community Health Unit in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil, were interviewed. They were evaluated by means of the Mini Mental State Exam, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression rating scale, and a questionnaire on health conditions, living arrangements and social variables. Higher levels of symptoms of depression were observed among subjects exposed to major risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases (diabetes and coronary disease, while impaired cognitive performance was seen among individuals who could not count on the presence of a confidant (social network variable. The results suggest that the early identification of major risk groups among old people can help to prevent institutionalization and keep individuals in the community.

  19. Cognitive deficit and depressive symptoms in a community group of elderly people: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silberman Claudia

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the number and proportion of old people increases worldwide, health professionals and systems should be made aware and prepared to deal with their problems. Cognitive deficit and symptoms of depression are commom among the elderly, and may occur in relation to various risk factors such as health conditions and psychosocial variables. In order to study cognitive deficit and the presence of signs and symptoms of depression, 62 elderly community subjects enrolled at a Community Health Unit in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil, were interviewed. They were evaluated by means of the Mini Mental State Exam, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression rating scale, and a questionnaire on health conditions, living arrangements and social variables. Higher levels of symptoms of depression were observed among subjects exposed to major risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases (diabetes and coronary disease, while impaired cognitive performance was seen among individuals who could not count on the presence of a confidant (social network variable. The results suggest that the early identification of major risk groups among old people can help to prevent institutionalization and keep individuals in the community.

  20. Characterizing Cognitive Deficits and Dementia in an Aging Urban Population in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid rise in the population of older adults in India will lead to the need for increased health care services related to diagnosis, management, and long-term care for those with dementia and cognitive impairment. A direct approach for service provision through memory clinics can be an effective, successful, and sustaining means of delivering specialized health care services. We have established a memory clinic in Mumbai, India by employing the diverse clinical skills available in Indian academic institutions, diagnostic and research expertise of clinicians and psychologists, and the support of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Our project involved recruitment of patients, clinical and neuropsychological assessment, and standardized diagnostic procedures, demonstrating the feasibility of using research methods to develop a memory clinic. In this paper, we describe the development of a community-based memory clinic in urban India, including linguistic and cultural factors and present detailed results, including diagnostic characterization, on 194 subjects with various stages of cognitive deficits. Our findings support the feasibility of developing a memory clinic in a public hospital and successful use of research diagnostic criteria to categorize cognitive deficits observed in this population, which may be used to inform the development of other such clinics.

  1. Emotion recognition and cognitive empathy deficits in adolescent offenders revealed by context-sensitive tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz eGonzalez-Gadea

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotion recognition and empathy abilities require the integration of contextual information in real-life scenarios. Previous reports have explored these domains in adolescent offenders (AOs but have not used tasks that replicate everyday situations. In this study we included ecological measures with different levels of contextual dependence to evaluate emotion recognition and empathy in AOs relative to non-offenders, controlling for the effect of demographic variables. We also explored the influence of fluid intelligence (FI and executive functions (EFs in the prediction of relevant deficits in these domains. Our results showed that AOs exhibit deficits in context-sensitive measures of emotion recognition and cognitive empathy. Difficulties in these tasks were neither explained by demographic variables nor predicted by FI or EFs. However, performance on measures that included simpler stimuli or could be solved by explicit knowledge was either only partially affected by demographic variables or preserved in AOs. These findings indicate that AOs show contextual social-cognition impairments which are relatively independent of basic cognitive functioning and demographic variables.

  2. University Students With Poor Reading Comprehension: The Hidden Cognitive Processing Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K; Das, J P

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-matched controls with no comprehension difficulties participated in the study. The participants were assessed on three verbal working memory tasks that varied in terms of their processing demands and on the Das-Naglieri Cognitive Assessment System, which was used to operationalize intelligence. The results indicated first that the differences between poor and skilled comprehenders on working memory were amplified as the processing demands of the tasks increased. In addition, although poor comprehenders as a group had average intelligence, they experienced significant difficulties in simultaneous and successive processing. Considering that working memory and general cognitive ability are highly correlated processes, these findings suggest that the observed differences between poor and skilled comprehenders are likely a result of a deficient information processing system. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  3. Cognitive Deficits Underlying Error Behavior on a Naturalistic Task after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Mary Hendry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available People with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI often make errors on everyday tasks that compromise their safety and independence. Such errors potentially arise from the breakdown or failure of multiple cognitive processes. This study aimed to investigate cognitive deficits underlying error behavior on a home-based version of the Cooking Task (HBCT following TBI. Participants included 45 adults (9 females, 36 males with severe TBI aged 18-64 years (M = 37.91, SD = 13.43. Participants were administered the HBCT in their home kitchens, with audiovisual recordings taken to enable scoring of total errors and error subtypes (Omissions, Additions, Estimations, Substitutions, Commentary/Questions, Dangerous Behavior, Goal Achievement. Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Trail Making Test, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Digit Span, Zoo Map test, Modified Stroop Test and Hayling Sentence Completion Test. After controlling for cooking experience, greater Omissions and Estimation errors, lack of goal achievement and longer completion time were significantly associated with poorer attention, memory and executive functioning. These findings indicate that errors on naturalistic tasks arise from deficits in multiple cognitive domains. Assessment of error behavior in a real life setting provides insight into individuals’ functional abilities which can guide rehabilitation planning and lifestyle support.

  4. Cognitive Deficits Underlying Error Behavior on a Naturalistic Task after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Kathryn; Ownsworth, Tamara; Beadle, Elizabeth; Chevignard, Mathilde P.; Fleming, Jennifer; Griffin, Janelle; Shum, David H. K.

    2016-01-01

    People with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often make errors on everyday tasks that compromise their safety and independence. Such errors potentially arise from the breakdown or failure of multiple cognitive processes. This study aimed to investigate cognitive deficits underlying error behavior on a home-based version of the Cooking Task (HBCT) following TBI. Participants included 45 adults (9 females, 36 males) with severe TBI aged 18–64 years (M = 37.91, SD = 13.43). Participants were administered the HBCT in their home kitchens, with audiovisual recordings taken to enable scoring of total errors and error subtypes (Omissions, Additions, Estimations, Substitutions, Commentary/Questions, Dangerous Behavior, Goal Achievement). Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Trail Making Test, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Digit Span, Zoo Map test, Modified Stroop Test, and Hayling Sentence Completion Test. After controlling for cooking experience, greater Omissions and Estimation errors, lack of goal achievement, and longer completion time were significantly associated with poorer attention, memory, and executive functioning. These findings indicate that errors on naturalistic tasks arise from deficits in multiple cognitive domains. Assessment of error behavior in a real life setting provides insight into individuals' functional abilities which can guide rehabilitation planning and lifestyle support. PMID:27790099

  5. Cognitive Deficits Associated with Nav1.1 Alterations: Involvement of Neuronal Firing Dynamics and Oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C Bender

    Full Text Available Brain oscillations play a critical role in information processing and may, therefore, be essential to uncovering the mechanisms of cognitive impairment in neurological disease. In Dravet syndrome (DS, a mutation in SCN1A, coding for the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1, is associated with severe cognitive impairment and seizures. While seizure frequency and severity do not correlate with the extent of impairment, the slowing of brain rhythms may be involved. Here we investigate the role of Nav1.1 on brain rhythms and cognition using RNA interference. We demonstrate that knockdown of Nav1.1 impairs fast- and burst-firing properties of neurons in the medial septum in vivo. The proportion of neurons that fired phase-locked to hippocampal theta oscillations was reduced, and medial septal regulation of theta rhythm was disrupted. During a working memory task, this deficit was characterized by a decrease in theta frequency and was negatively correlated with performance. These findings suggest a fundamental role for Nav1.1 in facilitating fast-firing properties in neurons, highlight the importance of precise temporal control of theta frequency for working memory, and imply that Nav1.1 deficits may disrupt information processing in DS via a dysregulation of brain rhythms.

  6. Characteristics of cognitive deficits and writing skills of Polish adults with developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Katarzyna Maria; Łockiewicz, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Marta; Pąchalska, Maria

    2014-07-01

    The present study was aimed at analysing cognitive deficits of dyslexic adults, and examining their written language skills in comparison with their peers. Our results confirm the presence of a certain profile of symptoms in adult dyslexics. We noticed deficits in: phonological (verbal) short-term memory, phonological awareness, rapid automatised naming (speed, self-corrections), visual perception and control, and visual-motor coordination. Moreover, the dyslexic participants, as compared with their nondyslexic peers, produced more word structure errors whilst writing an essay. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the length of the essay, the number of linguistic and punctuation errors, the number of adjectives, and stylistic devices.

  7. Striatum morphometry is associated with cognitive control deficits and symptom severity in internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxi; Yuan, Kai; Yin, Junsen; Feng, Dan; Bi, Yanzhi; Li, Yangding; Yu, Dahua; Jin, Chenwang; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD), identified in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) Section III as a condition warranting more clinical research, may be associated with impaired cognitive control. Previous IGD-related studies had revealed structural abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex, an important part of prefrontal-striatal circuits, which play critical roles in cognitive control. However, little is known about the relationship between the striatal nuclei (caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens) volumes and cognitive control deficit in individuals with IGD. Twenty-seven adolescents with IGD and 30 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. The volume differences of the striatum were assessed by measuring subcortical volume in FreeSurfer. Meanwhile, the Stroop task was used to detect cognitive control deficits. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between striatal volumes and performance in the Stroop task as well as severity in IGD. Relative to controls, the IGD committed more incongruent condition response errors during the Stroop task and showed increased volumes of dorsal striatum (caudate) and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). In addition, caudate volume was correlated with Stroop task performance and nucleus accumbens (NAc) volume was associated with the internet addiction test (IAT) score in the IGD group. The increased volumes of the right caudate and NAc and their association with behavioral characteristics (i.e., cognitive control and severity) in IGD were detected in the present study. Our findings suggest that the striatum may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of IGD.

  8. Phosphodiesterase: an interface connecting cognitive deficits to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Han-Ting; Li, Yun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the only known enzymes to degrade intracellular cyclic AMP and/or cyclic GMP. The PDE superfamily consists of 11 families (PDE1- PDE11), each of which has 1 to 4 subtypes. Some of the subtypes may have multiple splice variants (e.g. PDE4D1-PDE4D11), leading to a total of more than 100 known proteins to date. Growing attention has been paid to the potential of PDEs as therapeutic targets for mood disorders and/or diseases affecting cognitive activity by controlling the rate of hydrolysis of the two aforementioned second messengers in recent years. The loss of cognitive functions is one of the major complaints most patients with CNS diseases face; it has an even more prominent negative impact on the quality of daily life. Cognitive dysfunction is usually a prognosis in patients suffering from neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, including depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. This review will focus on the contributions of PDEs to the interface between cognitive deficits and neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. It is expected to make for the understanding and discovery that selective PDE inhibitors have the therapeutic potential for cognitive dysfunctions associated with neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Deficits of cognitive restructuring in major depressive disorder: Measured by textual micro-counseling dialogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nengzhi; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Wencai; Zhang, Jianxin

    2016-04-30

    Cognitive restructuring is an important strategy in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). The present study aimed to observe cognitive restructuring in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients using textual micro-counseling dialogue situations. A set of textual micro-counseling dialogues was used to trigger cognitive restructuring in 25 MDD patients and 27 healthy adults. The participants read descriptions ("problems") and explanations ("solutions") for psychologically distressing situations. High-, low-, and zero-restructuring solutions were randomly matched to the problems. The participants evaluated the adaptability and emotional valence of the problems and the insightfulness, adaptability, novelty, and emotional valence of the solutions. Insightfulness ratings for high-restructuring solutions were significantly higher relative to those of low-restructuring solutions in healthy adults, while adaptability ratings for low-restructuring solutions were significantly higher relative to those of high-restructuring solutions in MDD patients. Insightfulness ratings for the solutions were significantly predicted by novelty and adaptability in healthy adults and emotional valence in MDD patients. Lower insightfulness in high-restructuring solutions and higher adaptability in low-restructuring solutions in MDD patients may reflect deficits in cognitive control.

  10. Smaller than expected cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients from the population-representative ABC catchment cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennertz, Leonhard; An der Heiden, Wolfram; Kronacher, Regina; Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Maier, Wolfgang; Häfner, Heinz; Wagner, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Most neuropsychological studies on schizophrenia suffer from sample selection bias, with male and chronic patients being overrepresented. This probably leads to an overestimation of cognitive impairments. The present study aimed to provide a less biased estimate of cognitive functions in schizophrenia using a population-representative catchment area sample. Schizophrenia patients (N = 89) from the prospective Mannheim ABC cohort were assessed 14 years after disease onset and first diagnosis, using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. A healthy control group (N = 90) was carefully matched according to age, gender, and geographic region (city, rural surrounds). The present sample was representative for the initial ABC cohort. In the comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, the schizophrenia patients were only moderately impaired as compared to the healthy control group (d = 0.56 for a general cognitive index, d = 0.42 for verbal memory, d = 0.61 for executive functions, d = 0.69 for attention). Only 33 % of the schizophrenia patients scored one standard deviation unit below the healthy control group in the general cognitive index. Neuropsychological performance did not correlate with measures of the clinical course including age at onset, number of hospital admissions, and time in paid work. Thus, in this population-representative sample of schizophrenia patients, neuropsychological deficits were less pronounced than expected from meta-analyses. In agreement with other epidemiological studies, this suggests a less devastating picture of cognition in schizophrenia.

  11. Reward modulation of cognitive function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study on the role of striatal dopamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, E.; Holstein, M. van; Hoogman, M.; Onnink, M.; Kan, C.; Franke, B.; Buitelaar, J.; Cools, R.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by impairments in cognitive control, such as task-switching deficits. We investigated whether such problems, and their remediation by medication, reflect abnormal reward motivation and associated striatal dopamine transmission in ADHD.

  12. Self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin YJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeon-Jeong Shin,1,2 Yo-Han Joo,1 Jong-Hoon Kim1–3 1Neuroscience Research Institute, 2Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Gachon Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology, 3Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea Background: We investigated self-perceived cognitive deficits and their relationship with internalized stigma and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia in order to shed light on the clinical correlates of subjective cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.Methods: Seventy outpatients with schizophrenia were evaluated. Patients’ self-perceived cognitive deficits, internalized stigma, and subjective quality of life were assessed using the Scale to Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia (SSTICS, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI, and the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale Revision 4 (SQLS-R4, respectively. Correlation and regression analyses controlling for the severity of symptoms of schizophrenia were performed, and a mediation analysis was conducted to examine the hypothesis that internalized stigma mediates the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and subjective quality of life.Results: Pearson’s partial correlation analysis showed significant correlations among the SSTICS, ISMI, and SQLS-R4 scores (P<0.01. Multiple regression analysis showed that the SSTICS and ISMI scores significantly predicted the SQLS-R4 score (P<0.01. Mediation analysis revealed that the strength of the association between the SSTICS and SQLS-R4 scores decreased from β=0.74 (P<0.01 to β=0.56 (P<0.01, when the ISMI score was statistically controlled. The Sobel test revealed that this difference was significant (P<0.01, indicating that internalized stigma partially mediated the relationship between self-perceived cognitive deficits and quality of life.Conclusion: The present study indicates that self

  13. Ages and Stages Questionnaire used to measure cognitive deficit in children born extremely preterm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klamer, Anja; Lando, Ane; Pinborg, Anja

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To validate the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) and to measure average cognitive deficit in children born extremely preterm. METHODS: Parents of 30 term children aged 36-42 mo completed the ASQ and the children underwent the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence......--Revised. In a second study, the ASQ was obtained in 22 children born extremely preterm and 19 term children at the age of 35-44 mo. RESULTS: The overall ASQ score correlated significantly with IQ (p=0.007). The children born extremely preterm had an ASQ score of -1.06 SD below the score of the term children (p=0...

  14. Cognitive deficits following exposure to pneumococcal meningitis: an event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihara Michael

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis (PM is a severe and life-threatening disease that is associated with cognitive impairment including learning difficulties, cognitive slowness, short-term memory deficits and poor academic performance. There are limited data on cognitive outcomes following exposure to PM from Africa mainly due to lack of culturally appropriate tools. We report cognitive processes of exposed children as measured by auditory and visual event-related potentials. Methods Sixty-five children (32 male, mean 8.4 years, SD 3.0 years aged between 4-15 years with a history of PM and an age-matched control group of 93 children (46 male; mean 8.4 years, SD 2.7 years were recruited from a well-demarcated study area in Kilifi. In the present study, both baseline to peak and peak-to-peak amplitude differences are reported. Results Children with a history of pneumococcal meningitis had significantly longer auditory P1 and P3a latencies and smaller P1 amplitudes compared to unexposed children. In the visual paradigm, children with PM seemingly lacked a novelty P3a component around 350 ms where control children had a maximum, and showed a lack of stimulus differentiation at Nc. Further, children with exposure to PM had smaller peak to peak amplitude (N2-P1 compared to unexposed children. Conclusion The results suggest that children with a history of PM process novelty differently than do unexposed children, with slower latencies and reduced or absent components. This pattern suggests poorer auditory attention and/or cognitive slowness and poorer visual attention orienting, possibly due to disruption in the functions of the lateral prefrontal and superior temporal cortices. ERPs may be useful for assessment of the development of perceptual-cognitive functions in post brain-injury in African children by providing an alternate way of assessing cognitive development in patient groups for whom more typical standardized neuropsychological

  15. [The histaminergic system: a target for innovative treatments of cognitive deficits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawaj, Mouhammad; Burban, Aude; Davenas, Elisabeth; Gbahou, Florence; Faucard, Raphaël; Morisset, Séverine; Arrang, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The central effects of histamine are mediated by H(1), H(2) and H(3) receptors. The H(3) receptor inhibits histamine release in brain. Therefore, H(3) receptor inverse agonists, by suppressing this brake, enhance histamine neuron activity. The histaminergic system plays a major role in cognition and H(3) receptor inverse agonists are expected to be a potential therapeutics for cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease (AD). They are eagerly awaited inasmuch as other treatments of the disease, such as tacrine or memantine, also enhance, through different mechanisms, histaminergic neurotransmission. An important loss of histaminergic neurons has been observed in AD. In contrast, levels of the histamine metabolite in the CSF of AD patients show that their global activity is decreased by only 25%. This indicates that activating histamine neurons in AD can be envisaged.

  16. Cognitive deficit and poverty in the first 5 years of childhood in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Jena D; Tofail, Fahmida; Huda, Syed N; Alam, Dewan S; Ridout, Deborah A; Attanasio, Orazio; Grantham-McGregor, Sally M

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to determine the timing and size of the cognitive deficit associated with poverty in the first 5 years of life and to examine the role of parental characteristics, pre- and postnatal growth, and stimulation in the home in Bangladeshi children. We hypothesized that the effect of poverty on cognition begins in infancy and is mainly mediated by these factors. We enrolled 2853 singletons, a subsample from a pregnancy supplementation trial in a poor rural area. We assessed mental development at 7, 18, and 64 months; anthropometry at birth, 12, 24, and 64 months; home stimulation at 18 and 64 months; and family's socioeconomic background. In multiple regression analyses, we examined the effect of poverty at birth on IQ at 64 months and the extent that other factors mediated the effect. A mean cognitive deficit of 0.2 (95% confidence interval -0.4 to -0.02) z scores between the first and fifth wealth quintiles was apparent at 7 months and increased to 1.2 (95% confidence interval -1.3 to -1.0) z scores of IQ by 64 months. Parental education, pre- and postnatal growth in length, and home stimulation mediated 86% of the effects of poverty on IQ and had independent effects. Growth in the first 2 years had larger effects than later growth. Home stimulation had effects throughout the period. Effects of poverty on children's cognition are mostly mediated through parental education, birth size, growth in the first 24 months, and home stimulation in the first 5 years. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Complexin 1 knockout mice exhibit marked deficits in social behaviours but appear to be cognitively normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Cheney J G; Kyd, Rachel J; Morton, A Jennifer

    2007-10-01

    Complexins are presynaptic proteins that modulate neurotransmitter release. Abnormal expression of complexin 1 (Cplx1) is seen in several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders in which disturbed social behaviour is commonplace. These include Parkinsons's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, major depressive illness and bipolar disorder. We wondered whether changes in Cplx1 expression contribute to the psychiatric components of the diseases in which Cplx1 is dysregulated. To investigate this, we examined the cognitive and social behaviours of complexin 1 knockout mice (Cplx1(-/-)) mice. Cplx1(-/-) mice have a profound ataxia that limits their ability to perform co-ordinated motor tasks. Nevertheless, when we taught juvenile Cplx1(-/-) mice to swim, they showed no evidence of cognitive impairment in the two-choice swim tank. In contrast, although olfactory discrimination in Cplx1(-/-) mice was normal, Cplx1(-/-) mice failed in the social transmission of food preference task, another cognitive paradigm. This was due to abnormal social interactions rather than cognitive impairments, increased anxiety or neophobia. When we tested social behaviour directly, Cplx1(-/-) mice failed to demonstrate a preference for social novelty. Further, in a resident-intruder paradigm, male Cplx1(-/-) mice failed to show the aggressive behaviour that is typical of wild-type males towards an intruder mouse. Together our results show that in addition to the severe motor and exploratory deficits already described, Cplx1(-/-) mice have pronounced deficits in social behaviours. Abnormalities in complexin 1 levels in the brain may therefore contribute to the psycho-social aspects of human diseases in which this protein is dysregulated.

  18. The association between cognitive deficits and prefrontal hemodynamic responses during performance of working memory task in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Itakura, Masashi; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia-associated cognitive deficits are resistant to treatment and thus pose a lifelong burden. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) provides reliable and valid assessments across cognitive domains. However, because the prefrontal functional abnormalities specifically associated with the level of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia have not been examined, we explored this relationship. Patients with schizophrenia (N=87) and matched healthy controls (N=50) participated in the study. Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured the hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal and superior temporal cortical surface areas during a working memory task. Correlation analyses revealed a relationship between the hemodynamics and the BACS composite and domain scores. Hemodynamic responses of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left frontopolar cortex (FPC) in the higher-level-of-cognitive-function schizophrenia group were weaker than the responses of the controls but similar to those of the lower-level-of-cognitive-function schizophrenia group. However, hemodynamic responses in the right DLPFC, bilateral ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC), and right temporal regions decreased with increasing cognitive deficits. In addition, the hemodynamic response correlated positively with the level of cognitive function (BACS composite scores) in the right DLPFC, bilateral VLPFC, right FPC, and bilateral temporal regions in schizophrenia. The correlation was driven by all BACS domains. Our results suggest that the linked functional deficits in the right DLPFC, bilateral VLPFC, right FPC, and bilateral temporal regions may be related to BACS-measured cognitive impairments in schizophrenia and show that linking the neurocognitive deficits and brain abnormalities can increase our understanding of schizophrenia pathophysiology.

  19. Cognitive heterogeneity in adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A systematic analysis of neuropsychological measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Jeanette C; Onnink, A Marten H; Klein, Marieke; Dammers, Janneke; Harneit, Anais; Schulten, Theresa; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Kan, Cornelis C; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Buitelaar, Jan K; Franke, Barbara; Hoogman, Martine

    2015-11-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in childhood is associated with impaired functioning in multiple cognitive domains: executive functioning (EF), reward and timing. Similar impairments have been described for adults with persistent ADHD, but an extensive investigation of neuropsychological functioning in a large sample of adult patients is currently lacking. We systematically examined neuropsychological performance on tasks measuring EF, delay discounting, time estimation and response variability using univariate ANCOVA's comparing patients with persistent ADHD (N=133, 42% male, mean age 36) and healthy adults (N=132, 40% male, mean age 36). In addition, we tested which combination of variables provided the highest accuracy in predicting ADHD diagnosis. We also estimated for each individual the severity of neuropsychological dysfunctioning. Lastly, we investigated potential effects of stimulant medication and a history of comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) on performance. Compared to healthy adults, patients with ADHD showed impaired EF, were more impulsive, and more variable in responding. However, effect sizes were small to moderate (range: 0.05-0.70) and 11% of patients did not show neuropsychological dysfunctioning. The best fitting model predicting ADHD included measures from distinct cognitive domains (82.1% specificity, 64.9% sensitivity). Furthermore, patients receiving stimulant medication or with a history of MDD were not distinctively impaired. To conclude, while adults with ADHD as a group are impaired on several cognitive domains, the results confirm that adult ADHD is neuropsychologically heterogeneous. This provides a starting point to investigate individual differences in terms of impaired cognitive pathways.

  20. Inhibition of inflammation by astaxanthin alleviates cognition deficits in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Xiaotong; Chen, Jing; Wen, Xiangru; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yonghai; Tang, Renxian; Zheng, Kuiyang; Song, Yuanjian

    2015-11-01

    Neurons in the hippocampal and cortical functional regions are more susceptible to damage induced by hyperglycemia, which can result in severe spatial learning and memory impairment. Neuroprotection ameliorates cognitive impairment induced by hyperglycemia in diabetic encephalopathy (DE). Astaxanthin has been widely studied in diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications due to its hypoglycemic, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects. However, whether astaxanthin can alleviate cognition deficits induced by DE and its precise mechanisms remain undetermined. In this study, DE was induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 150 mg/kg) in ICR mice. We observed the effect of astaxanthin on cognition and investigated its potential mechanisms in DE mice. Results showed that astaxanthin treatment significantly decreased the latency and enhanced the distance and time spent in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, neuronal survival was significantly increased in the hippocampal CA3 region and the frontal cortex following treatment with astaxanthin. Meanwhile, immunoblotting was used to observe the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) p65 and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The results indicated that astaxanthin could inhibit NF-κB nuclear translocation and downregulate TNF-α expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall, the present study implied that astaxanthin could improve cognition by protecting neurons against inflammation injury potentially through inhibiting the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and down-regulating TNF-α.

  1. The Causes of Errors in Clinical Reasoning: Cognitive Biases, Knowledge Deficits, and Dual Process Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoffrey R; Monteiro, Sandra D; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ilgen, Jonathan S; Schmidt, Henk G; Mamede, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary theories of clinical reasoning espouse a dual processing model, which consists of a rapid, intuitive component (Type 1) and a slower, logical and analytical component (Type 2). Although the general consensus is that this dual processing model is a valid representation of clinical reasoning, the causes of diagnostic errors remain unclear. Cognitive theories about human memory propose that such errors may arise from both Type 1 and Type 2 reasoning. Errors in Type 1 reasoning may be a consequence of the associative nature of memory, which can lead to cognitive biases. However, the literature indicates that, with increasing expertise (and knowledge), the likelihood of errors decreases. Errors in Type 2 reasoning may result from the limited capacity of working memory, which constrains computational processes. In this article, the authors review the medical literature to answer two substantial questions that arise from this work: (1) To what extent do diagnostic errors originate in Type 1 (intuitive) processes versus in Type 2 (analytical) processes? (2) To what extent are errors a consequence of cognitive biases versus a consequence of knowledge deficits?The literature suggests that both Type 1 and Type 2 processes contribute to errors. Although it is possible to experimentally induce cognitive biases, particularly availability bias, the extent to which these biases actually contribute to diagnostic errors is not well established. Educational strategies directed at the recognition of biases are ineffective in reducing errors; conversely, strategies focused on the reorganization of knowledge to reduce errors have small but consistent benefits.

  2. Garlic extract attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficit in obese-insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Supakul, Luerat; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the obese-insulin resistant condition has been shown to affect cognitive as well as brain mitochondrial functions. Garlic extract has exerted a potent antioxidant effect. However, the effects of garlic extract on the brain of obese-insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. We hypothesized that garlic extract improves cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats induced by long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or HFD for 16 weeks (n = 24/group). At week 12, rats in each dietary group received either vehicle or garlic extract (250 and 500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 28 days. Learning and memory behaviors, metabolic parameters, and brain mitochondrial function were determined at the end of treatment. HFD led to increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, indicating the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD rats had cognitive deficit and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. HFD rats treated with both doses of garlic extract had decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma cholesterol, and MDA levels. Garlic extract also improved cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function, which were impaired in obese-insulin resistant rats caused by HFD consumption.

  3. Canonical correlation analysis of synchronous neural interactions and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Lewis, Scott M.; Riley McCarten, J.; Leuthold, Arthur C.; Hemmy, Laura S.; McPherson, Susan E.; Rottunda, Susan J.; Rubins, David M.; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2012-10-01

    In previous work (Georgopoulos et al 2007 J. Neural Eng. 4 349-55) we reported on the use of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) synchronous neural interactions (SNI) as a functional biomarker in Alzheimer's dementia (AD) diagnosis. Here we report on the application of canonical correlation analysis to investigate the relations between SNI and cognitive neuropsychological (NP) domains in AD patients. First, we performed individual correlations between each SNI and each NP, which provided an initial link between SNI and specific cognitive tests. Next, we performed factor analysis on each set, followed by a canonical correlation analysis between the derived SNI and NP factors. This last analysis optimally associated the entire MEG signal with cognitive function. The results revealed that SNI as a whole were mostly associated with memory and language, and, slightly less, executive function, processing speed and visuospatial abilities, thus differentiating functions subserved by the frontoparietal and the temporal cortices. These findings provide a direct interpretation of the information carried by the SNI and set the basis for identifying specific neural disease phenotypes according to cognitive deficits.

  4. Could language deficits really differentiate Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from mild Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantali, E; Economidis, D; Tsolaki, M

    2013-01-01

    Naming abilities seem to be affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, though MCI individuals tend to exhibit greater impairments in category fluency. In this study we: (1) detect language deficits of amnestic MCIs (aMCIs) and mild AD (mAD) participants and present their language performance (the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination - BDAE scores) according to educational level, (2) study the diagnostic value of language deficits according to the cognitive state of the participants. One hundred nineteen participants, 38 normal controls (NC), 28 aMCIs and 53 mADs, were recruited randomly as outpatients of 2 clinical departments and administered clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging assessment. Language abilities were assessed by the adapted Greek edition of the BDAE (2nd edition). Our results indicate that verbal fluency, auditory, reading comprehension and narrative ability are the main language abilities to be affected in mADs, although they are almost intact in NCs and less vulnerable in aMCIs. Narrative ability seems to be significantly impaired in mADs but not so in aMCIs. Six language subtests of the BDAE assess safely the above deficits. This brief version of the BDAE discriminated mADs from the other 2 groups 92.5% of the time, NCs 86.8% and aMCI 67.9% of the time in order to save time and to be accurate in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Deficits in social cognition in first episode psychosis: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Kristin M; Bartholomeusz, Cali F; Penn, David L

    2016-12-01

    Individuals with chronic schizophrenia (SCZ) consistently show impairments in social cognition (SC) that are associated with functional decline, and work suggests that similar associations exist in first-episode psychosis (FEP). The goal of the current article is to review and synthesize the current body of work examining SC in FEP. Secondary aims are to examine the relationship between SC and symptoms, and change in SC over time in FEP. Literature is reviewed from four key SC domains: emotion processing (EP), theory of mind (ToM), social perception (SP), and attributional style (AS). Targeted searches of PsycINFO and Google Scholar were conducted to identify relevant manuscripts. Data from 48 relevant studies (6 longitudinal) were reviewed and integrated. (1) FEP individuals show consistent deficits in SC compared to healthy controls, most consistently in EP (particularly, fear and sadness recognition) and ToM compared to SP and AS, (2) individuals with FEP and SCZ show comparable SC deficits, (3) some evidence indicates SC deficits in FEP are associated with negative and positive symptoms, and (4) SC appears to be stable over time in FEP. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Gliovascular disruption and cognitive deficits in a mouse model with features of small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Philip R; Searcy, James L; Salvadores, Natalia; Scullion, Gillian; Chen, Guiquan; Lawson, Greig; Scott, Fiona; Bastin, Mark E; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Rajesh; Wood, Emma R; Smith, Colin; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Horsburgh, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major cause of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia. The pathophysiology of SVD is not well understood and is hampered by a limited range of relevant animal models. Here, we describe gliovascular alterations and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of sustained cerebral hypoperfusion with features of SVD (microinfarcts, hemorrhage, white matter disruption) induced by bilateral common carotid stenosis. Multiple features of SVD were determined on T2-weighted and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans and confirmed by pathologic assessment. These features, which were absent in sham controls, included multiple T2-hyperintense infarcts and T2-hypointense hemosiderin-like regions in subcortical nuclei plus increased cerebral atrophy compared with controls. Fractional anisotropy was also significantly reduced in several white matter structures including the corpus callosum. Investigation of gliovascular changes revealed a marked increase in microvessel diameter, vascular wall disruption, fibrinoid necrosis, hemorrhage, and blood-brain barrier alterations. Widespread reactive gliosis, including displacement of the astrocytic water channel, aquaporin 4, was observed. Hypoperfused mice also demonstrated deficits in spatial working and reference memory tasks. Overall, gliovascular disruption is a prominent feature of this mouse, which could provide a useful model for early-phase testing of potential SVD treatment strategies.

  7. Association of White Matter With Core Cognitive Deficits in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochunov, Peter; Coyle, Thomas R; Rowland, Laura M; Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M; Kelly, Sinead; Du, Xiaoming; Sampath, Hemalatha; Bruce, Heather; Chiappelli, Joshua; Ryan, Meghann; Fisseha, Feven; Savransky, Anya; Adhikari, Bhim; Chen, Shuo; Paciga, Sara A; Whelan, Christopher D; Xie, Zhiyong; Hyde, Craig L; Chen, Xing; Schubert, Christian R; O'Donnell, Patricio; Hong, L Elliot

    2017-09-01

    Efforts to remediate the multiple cognitive function impairments in schizophrenia should consider white matter as one of the underlying neural mechanisms. To determine whether altered structural brain connectivity is responsible for 2 of the core cognitive deficits in schizophrenia- reduced information processing speed and impaired working memory. This cross-sectional study design took place in outpatient clinics from August 1, 2004, to August 31, 2015. Participants included 166 patients with schizophrenia and 213 healthy control individuals. These participants were from 3 independent cohorts, each of which had its own healthy control group. No participant had current or past neurological conditions or major medical conditions. Patients were diagnosed with either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder as defined by the DSM-IV. Controls had no Axis I psychiatric disorder. Mediation analyses and structural equation modeling were used to analyze the associations among processing speed, working memory, and white matter microstructures. Whole-brain and regional diffusion tensor imaging fractional anisotropy were used to measure white matter microstructures. Of the study participants, the 166 patients with schizophrenia had a mean (SD) age of 38.2 (13.3) years and the 213 healthy controls had a mean (SD) age of 39.2 (14.0) years. There were significantly more male patients than controls in each of the 3 cohorts (117 [70%] vs 91 [43%]), but there were no significant differences in sex composition among the 3 cohorts. Patients had significantly reduced processing speed (Cohen d = 1.24; P = 6.91 × 10-30) and working memory deficits (Cohen d = 0.83; P = 1.10 × 10-14) as well as a significant whole-brain fractional anisotropy deficit (Cohen d = 0.63; P = 2.20 × 10-9). In schizophrenia, working memory deficit was mostly accounted for by processing speed deficit, but this deficit remained when accounting for working memory (Cohen d

  8. Atorvastatin Prevents Cognitive Deficits Induced by Intracerebroventricular Amyloid-β1-40 Administration in Mice: Involvement of Glutamatergic and Antioxidant Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Wagner C; dos Santos, Vanessa Valgas; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Dal-Cim, Tharine A; de Oliveira, Karen A; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Claudia B N; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Viola, Giordano Gubert; Tasca, Carla I

    2015-07-01

    Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into specific encephalic structures has been pointed as an important event related to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and associated with activation of glial cells, neuroinflammation, oxidative responses, and cognitive deficits. Aβ-induced pro-oxidative damage may regulate the activity of glutamate transporters, leading to reduced glutamate uptake and, as a consequence, excitotoxic events. Herein, we evaluated the effects of the pretreatment of atorvastatin, a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, on behavioral and biochemical alterations induced by a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of aggregated Aβ1-40 in mice. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was administered through seven consecutive days before Aβ1-40 administration. Aβ1-40 caused significant cognitive impairment in the object-place recognition task (2 weeks after the i.c.v. injection) and this phenomenon was abolished by atorvastatin pretreatment. Ex vivo evaluation of glutamate uptake into hippocampal and cerebral cortices slices showed atorvastatin, and Aβ1-40 decreased hippocampal and cortical Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake. However, Aβ1-40 increased Na(+)-independent glutamate uptake and it was prevented by atorvastatin in prefrontal cortex slices. Moreover, Aβ1-40 treatment significantly increased the cerebrocortical activities of glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase and these events were blunted by atorvastatin pretreatment. Reduced or oxidized glutathione levels were not altered by Aβ1-40 and/or atorvastatin treatment. These results extend the notion of the protective action of atorvastatin against neuronal toxicity induced by Aβ1-40 demonstrating that a pretreatment with atorvastatin prevents the spatial learning and memory deficits induced by Aβ in rodents and promotes changes in glutamatergic and antioxidant systems mainly in prefrontal cortex.

  9. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant medications as cognitive enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokat, Claire; Scheithauer, Mindy

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses, and the escalation of stimulant prescriptions, has raised concern about diversion and abuse of stimulants, as well as the ethics of using these drugs as "cognitive enhancers."Such concern appears misplaced in the face of substantial evidence that stimulant drugs do not improve the academic performance of ADHD-diagnosed students. Moreover, numerous studies have found little or no benefit of stimulants on neuropsychological tests of ADHD-diagnosed as well as normal, individuals. This paper examines the apparent paradox: why don't drugs that improve "attention," produce better academic outcomes in ADHD-diagnosed students? We found that stimulant drugs significantly improved impairment of episodic memory in ADHD-diagnosed undergraduate students. Nevertheless, we also found consistent academic deficits between ADHD students and their non-ADHD counterparts, regardless of whether or not they used stimulant medications. We reviewed the current literature on the behavioral effects of stimulants, to try to find an explanation for these conflicting phenomena. Across a variety of behavioral tasks, stimulants have been shown to reduce emotional reactions to frustration, improve the ability to detect errors, and increase effortful behavior. However, all of these effects would presumably enhance academic performance. On the other hand, the drugs were also found to promote "risky behavior" and to increase susceptibility to environmental distraction. Such negative effects, including the use of drugs to promote wakefulness for last minute study, might explain the lack of academic benefit in the "real world," despite their cognitive potential. Like many drugs, stimulants influence behavior in multiple ways, depending on the environmental contingencies. Depending on the circumstances, stimulants may, or may not, enhance cognition.

  10. Intra-regional and inter-regional abnormalities and cognitive control deficits in young adult smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dan; Yuan, Kai; Li, Yangding; Cai, Chenxi; Yin, Junsen; Bi, Yanzhi; Cheng, Jiadong; Guan, Yanyan; Shi, Sha; Yu, Dahua; Jin, Chenwang; Lu, Xiaoqi; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Tobacco use during later adolescence and young adulthood may cause serious neurophysiological changes; rationally, it is extremely important to study the relationship between brain dysfunction and behavioral performances in young adult smokers. Previous resting state studies investigated the neural mechanisms in smokers. Unfortunately, few studies focused on spontaneous activity differences between young adult smokers and nonsmokers from both intra-regional and inter-regional levels, less is known about the association between resting state abnormalities and behavioral deficits. Therefore, we used fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) and resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) to investigate the resting state spontaneous activity differences between young adult smokers and nonsmokers. A correlation analysis was carried out to assess the relationship between neuroimaging findings and clinical information (pack-years, cigarette dependence, age of onset and craving score) as well as cognitive control deficits measured by the Stroop task. Consistent with previous addiction findings, our results revealed the resting state abnormalities within frontostriatal circuits, i.e., enhanced spontaneous activity of the caudate and reduced functional strength between the caudate and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in young adult smokers. Moreover, the fALFF values of the caudate were correlated with craving and RSFC strength between the caudate and ACC was associated with the cognitive control impairments in young adult smokers. Our findings could lead to a better understanding of intrinsic functional architecture of baseline brain activity in young smokers by providing regional and brain circuit spontaneous neuronal activity properties as well as their association with cognitive control impairments.

  11. 16p11.2 Deletion mice display cognitive deficits in touchscreen learning and novelty recognition tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Freeman C.; Sarvi, Michael S.; Foley, Gillian M.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal 16p11.2 deletion syndrome frequently presents with intellectual disabilities, speech delays, and autism. Here we investigated the Dolmetsch line of 16p11.2 heterozygous (+/−) mice on a range of cognitive tasks with different neuroanatomical substrates. Robust novel object recognition deficits were replicated in two cohorts of 16p11.2+/− mice, confirming previous findings. A similarly robust deficit in object location memory was discovered in +/−, indicating impaired spatial novelty recognition. Generalizability of novelty recognition deficits in +/− mice extended to preference for social novelty. Robust learning deficits and cognitive inflexibility were detected using Bussey–Saksida touchscreen operant chambers. During acquisition of pairwise visual discrimination, +/− mice required significantly more training trials to reach criterion than wild-type littermates (+/+), and made more errors and correction errors than +/+. In the reversal phase, all +/+ reached criterion, whereas most +/− failed to reach criterion by the 30-d cutoff. Contextual and cued fear conditioning were normal in +/−. These cognitive phenotypes may be relevant to some aspects of cognitive impairments in humans with 16p11.2 deletion, and support the use of 16p11.2+/− mice as a model system for discovering treatments for cognitive impairments in 16p11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:26572653

  12. Cognition in anxious children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a comparison with clinical and normal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Arlene

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognition in children with anxiety disorders (ANX and comorbid Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD has received little attention, potentially impacting clinical and academic interventions in this highly disabled group. This study examined several cognitive features relative to children with either pure condition and to normal controls. Methods One hundred and eight children ages 8–12 and parents were diagnosed by semi-structured parent interview and teacher report as having: ANX (any anxiety disorder except OCD or PTSD; n = 52, ADHD (n = 21, or ANX + ADHD (n = 35. All completed measures of academic ability, emotional perception, and working memory. Clinical subjects were compared to 35 normal controls from local schools. Results Groups did not differ significantly on age, gender, or estimated IQ. On analyses of variance, groups differed on academic functioning (Wide Range Achievement Test, p Conclusion Though requiring replication, findings suggest that ANX + ADHD relates to greater cognitive and academic vulnerability than ANX, but may relate to reduced perception of anger.

  13. Cognitive deficits are associated with unemployment in adults with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Maureen; Jordan, Lori; Pruthi, Sumit; Day, Matthew; Covert, Brittany; Merriweather, Brenda; Rodeghier, Mark; DeBaun, Michael; Kassim, Adetola

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 25-60% of adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) are unemployed. Factors contributing to the high unemployment rate in this population are not well studied. With the known risk of cognitive deficits associated with SCD, we tested the hypothesis that unemployment is related to decrements in intellectual functioning. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 50 adults with sickle cell anemia who completed cognitive testing, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV, as part of standard care. Employment status was recorded at the time of testing. Medical variables examined as possible risk factors for unemployment included disease phenotype, cerebral infarction, and pain frequency. The mean age of the sample was 30.7 years (range = 19-59); 56% were women. Almost half of the cohort (44%) were unemployed. In a multivariate logistic regression model, lower IQ scores (odds ratio = 0.88; p = .002, 95% confidence interval, CI [0.82, 0.96]) and lower educational attainment (odds ratio = 0.13; p = .012, 95% CI [0.03, 0.65]) were associated with increasing odds of unemployment. The results suggest that cognitive impairment in adults with sickle cell anemia may contribute to the risk of unemployment. Helping these individuals access vocational rehabilitation services may be an important component of multidisciplinary care.

  14. Sleep and cognitive problems in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hae Kook Lee, Jong-Hyun Jeong, Na-Young Kim, Min-hyeon Park, Tae-Won Kim, Ho-Jun Seo, Hyun-Kook Lim, Seung-Chul Hong, Jin-Hee Han Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea Objectives: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is characterized by inattentive and impulsive behavior. Many ADHD patients reportedly have cognitive dysfunction and sleep problems, including longer sleep latency, lower sleep efficiency, and shorter total sleep time. The purpose of this study was to examine neurocognitive functions and nocturnal sleep parameters in patients with ADHD, using a cognitive function test and actigraphy.Methods: Subjects included 37 male patients with ADHD and 32 controls (7–12 years of age. For each participant, we determined intelligence quotient (IQ and administered the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT and 72-hour actigraphy. The relationships between sleep parameters and cognitive functions were assessed.Results: ADHD patients significantly differed from controls in several cognitive functions and sleep variables. In the MFFT, response error rate (P<0.001 and error counts (P=0.003 were significantly increased in ADHD patients compared with control children. MFFT response latency was significantly shorter in ADHD patients than in controls (P<0.001. In addition, sleep latency (P=0.01, wake after sleep onset (WASO (P<0.001, and fragmentation index (P<0.001 were evaluated by actigraphy and found to be significantly increased in patients with ADHD compared with controls. However, no significant differences in total sleep time or sleep efficiency were observed. WASO and response error rates were positively correlated in patients with ADHD (rho =0.52, P=0.012. Furthermore, fragmentation index sleep variables were significantly positively correlated with response error (rho =0.44, P=0.008 and response latency rates (rho =0.4, P=0.018 in the MFFT. Reaction error rate was significantly

  15. The effects of cognitive – behaviour and dance – movement based group therapy for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanić Petek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hiperactive disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common diorders diagnosed in childhood that has an important influence on the learning and social abililities of the child. The basic principle in the treatment of children with ADHD is a multidimensional approach, the most efficient psychosocial treatments are the cognitive behavioural approaches. In the existent work we wanted to evaluate the effects of group treatment based on the principles of the cognitive behavioural a...

  16. Cognitive Training and Work Therapy for the Treatment of Verbal Learning and Memory Deficits in Veterans With Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Morris D; Vissicchio, Nicholas A; Weinstein, Andrea J

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the efficacy of cognitive training for verbal learning and memory deficits in a population of older veterans with alcohol use disorders. Veterans with alcohol use disorders, who were in outpatient treatment at VA facilities and in early-phase recovery (N = 31), were randomized to receive a three-month trial of daily cognitive training plus work therapy (n = 15) or work therapy alone (n = 16), along with treatment as usual. Participants completed assessments at baseline and at three- and six-month follow-ups; the Hopkins Verbal Learning Task (HVLT) was the primary outcome measure. Participants were primarily male (97%) and in their mid-50s (M = 55.16, SD = 5.16) and had been sober for 1.64 (SD = 2.81) months. Study retention was excellent (91% at three-month follow-up) and adherence to treatment in both conditions was very good. On average, participants in the cognitive training condition had more than 41 hours of cognitive training, and both conditions had more than 230 hours of productive activity. HVLT results at three-month follow-up revealed significant condition effects favoring cognitive training for verbal learning (HVLT Trial-3 T-score, p learning compared with a premorbid estimate of verbal IQ. At three-month follow-up there was a significant reduction in the number of participants in the cognitive training condition with clinically significant verbal memory deficits (p learning deficits, which was not sustained at six-month follow-up. This National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded pilot study demonstrates that cognitive training within the context of another activating intervention (work therapy) may have efficacy in remediating verbal learning and memory deficits in patients with alcohol use disorder. Findings indicate a large effect for cognitive training in this pilot study, which suggests that further research is warranted. This study is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT 01410110).

  17. Disability in major depression related to self-rated and objectively-measured cognitive deficits: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Elizabeth M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although major depression (MD is associated with high levels of disability, the relationships between cognitive dysfunction and self-rated disability are poorly understood. This study examined the relationships between self-rated disability in persons with MD and both self-rated and objectively-measured cognitive functioning. Methods Twenty-one persons with MD and 21 control participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and z-scores representing deviations from control performance were calculated and averaged across the domains of psychomotor speed, initial learning, memory retention and executive function. Self-ratings of cognitive deficits (SRCDs were reported on a 6-point scale for overall rating of cognitive change, speed of thinking, concentration, and short-term memory. Disability scores for self-rated physical, mental-health and functional (ie. days out of role disability were computed from the Brief-Disability Questionnaire and the SF-12 'mental component' subscale. Results Persons with MD had a mean age of 53.9 years (SD = 11.0, 76% female and had moderate to high depression severity (mean HDRS 21.7, sd = 4.4. As expected, depression severity was a strong predictor of physical (r = 0.7, p Conclusion While depression severity is associated with disability, the contributions of both self-rated and objectively-measured cognitive deficits are substantial and contribute uniquely and differentially to various forms of disability. Efforts directed at reducing cognitive deficits in depression may have the potential to reduce disability.

  18. Cognitive rehabilitation of attention deficits in traumatic brain injury using action video games: A controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Vakili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the utility and efficacy of a novel eight-week cognitive rehabilitation programme developed to remediate attention deficits in adults who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI, incorporating the use of both action video game playing and a compensatory skills programme. Thirty-one male TBI patients, aged 18–65 years, were recruited from 2 Australian brain injury units and allocated to either a treatment or waitlist (treatment as usual control group. Results showed improvements in the treatment group, but not the waitlist control group, for performance on the immediate trained task (i.e. the video game and in non-trained measures of attention and quality of life. Neither group showed changes to executive behaviours or self-efficacy. The strengths and limitations of the study are discussed, as are the potential applications and future implications of the research.

  19. Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Hou

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes substantial public health care burdens. Intensive efforts have been made to find effective and safe disease-modifying treatment and symptomatic intervention alternatives against AD. Smart Soup (SS, a Chinese medicine formula composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (AT, Poria cum Radix Pini (PRP and Radix Polygalae (RP, is a typical prescription against memory deficits. Here, we assessed the efficacy of SS against AD. Oral administration of SS ameliorated the cognitive impairment of AD transgenic mice, with reduced Aβ levels, retarded Aβ amyloidosis and reduced Aβ-induced gliosis and neuronal loss in the brains of AD mice. Consistently, SS treatment reduced amyloid-related locomotor dysfunctions and premature death of AD transgenic Drosophila. Mechanistic studies showed that RP reduced Aβ generation, whereas AT and PRP exerted neuroprotective effects against Aβ. Taken together, our study indicates that SS could be effective against AD, providing a practical therapeutic strategy against the disease.

  20. Negative attention bias and processing deficits during the cognitive reappraisal of unpleasant emotions in HIV+ women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Roger C; Tartar, Jaime L; Widmayer, Susan; Rosselli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in emotional processing may be attributed to HIV disease or comorbid psychiatric disorders. Electrocortical markers of emotional attention, i.e., amplitude of the P2 and late positive potential (LPP), were compared between 26 HIV+ women and 25 healthy controls during an emotional regulation paradigm. HIV+ women showed early attention bias to negative stimuli indexed by greater P2 amplitude. In contrast, compared with the passive viewing of unpleasant images, HIV+ women demonstrated attenuation of the early and late LPP during positive reappraisal. This interaction remained significant after adjusting for individual differences in apathy, anxiety, and depression. Post hoc analyses implicated time since HIV diagnosis with LPP attenuation during positive reappraisal. Advancing HIV disease may disrupt neural generators associated with the cognitive reappraisal of emotions independent of psychiatric function.

  1. Inhibitor of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP reverses cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase is a neuron-specific phosphatase that regulates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR trafficking, as well as ERK1/2, p38, Fyn, and Pyk2 activity. STEP is overactive in several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The increase in STEP activity likely disrupts synaptic function and contributes to the cognitive deficits in AD. AD mice lacking STEP have restored levels of glutamate receptors on synaptosomal membranes and improved cognitive function, results that suggest STEP as a novel therapeutic target for AD. Here we describe the first large-scale effort to identify and characterize small-molecule STEP inhibitors. We identified the benzopentathiepin 8-(trifluoromethyl-1,2,3,4,5-benzopentathiepin-6-amine hydrochloride (known as TC-2153 as an inhibitor of STEP with an IC50 of 24.6 nM. TC-2153 represents a novel class of PTP inhibitors based upon a cyclic polysulfide pharmacophore that forms a reversible covalent bond with the catalytic cysteine in STEP. In cell-based secondary assays, TC-2153 increased tyrosine phosphorylation of STEP substrates ERK1/2, Pyk2, and GluN2B, and exhibited no toxicity in cortical cultures. Validation and specificity experiments performed in wild-type (WT and STEP knockout (KO cortical cells and in vivo in WT and STEP KO mice suggest specificity of inhibitors towards STEP compared to highly homologous tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, TC-2153 improved cognitive function in several cognitive tasks in 6- and 12-mo-old triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD mice, with no change in beta amyloid and phospho-tau levels.

  2. Anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease: association with patient characteristics, psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwa, Yukiko; Kitabayashi, Yurinosuke; Narumoto, Jin; Nakamura, Kaeko; Ueda, Hideki; Fukui, Kenji

    2005-12-01

    Anosognosia is one of the major problems in the treatment and care of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The aim of the study was to determine the patient characteristics, psychiatric symptoms, and cognitive deficits associated with anosognosia, because these are currently poorly understood. Eighty-four patients who met the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disease and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria for probable AD were examined for anosognosia based on the difference between questionnaire scores of the patient and their caregiver. The relationship of anosognosia with patient characteristics (age, age at onset, duration of illness, education, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), Hyogo Activities of Daily Living Scale (HADLS)), psychiatric symptoms (Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)), and cognitive function (Digit Span, Word Fluency Test, Trail Making Test, Stroop Test, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices Test) were studied. Anosognosia showed positive correlations with age, age at onset, duration of illness, CDR, HADLS, and NPI disinhibition, and negative correlations with MMSE and GDS. Regarding cognitive function, only Part III of the Stroop Test was a predictor of anosognosia. The severity of anosognosia increased with disease progression and with a later age at onset. Subjective complaints of depression requiring self-monitoring of mood tended to decrease and, in contrast, inhibition of socially unsuitable behavior became more difficult as anosognosia worsened. Regarding cognitive function, anosognosia appeared to be associated with response inhibition impairment. Both disinhibition, as a psychiatric symptom, and response inhibition impairment are known to be correlated with disturbance of orbitofrontal function, which therefore may be associated with anosognosia.

  3. Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine C Price

    Full Text Available This prospective investigation examined: 1 processing speed and working memory relative to other cognitive domains in non-demented medically managed idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and 2 the predictive role of cortical/subcortical gray thickness/volume and white matter fractional anisotropy on processing speed and working memory.Participants completed a neuropsychological protocol, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, brain MRI, and fasting blood draw to rule out vascular contributors. Within group a priori anatomical contributors included bilateral frontal thickness, caudate nuclei volume, and prefrontal white matter fractional anisotropy.Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 40; Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-3 and non-Parkinson's disease 'control' peers (n = 40 matched on demographics, general cognition, comorbidity, and imaging/blood vascular metrics. Cognitively, individuals with Parkinson's disease were significantly more impaired than controls on tests of processing speed, secondary deficits on working memory, with subtle impairments in memory, abstract reasoning, and visuoperceptual/spatial abilities. Anatomically, Parkinson's disease individuals were not statistically different in cortical gray thickness or subcortical gray volumes with the exception of the putamen. Tract Based Spatial Statistics showed reduced prefrontal fractional anisotropy for Parkinson's disease relative to controls. Within Parkinson's disease, prefrontal fractional anisotropy and caudate nucleus volume partially explained processing speed. For controls, only prefrontal white matter was a significant contributor to processing speed. There were no significant anatomical predictors of working memory for either group.Caudate nuclei volume and prefrontal fractional anisotropy, not frontal gray matter thickness, showed unique and combined significance for processing speed in Parkinson's disease. Findings underscore the relevance for examining gray-white matter interactions

  4. Levothyroxine replacement therapy with vitamin E supplementation prevents oxidative stress and cognitive deficit in experimental hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tianrong; Zhong, Mingkui; Zhong, Xing; Zhang, Yanqing; Zhu, Defa

    2013-04-01

    Hypothyroidism has a variety of adverse effects on cognitive function. The treatment of levothyroxine alone cannot restore cognitive defects of hypothyroid patients. Antioxidant vitamin E supplementation could be useful in disturbances which are associated with oxidative stress and could effectively slow the progression of Alzheimer disease. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress status of the serum and hippocampus in hypothyroidism and to examine the effects of levothyroxine replacement therapy with vitamin E supplementation on cognitive deficit. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: control group, PTU group, PTU + Vit E group, PTU + L-T4 group, and PTU + L-T4 + Vit E group. Serum and hippocampus malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined using the thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances method. Serum and hippocampus superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were determined by measuring its ability to inhibit the photoreduction of nitroblue tetrazolium. Learning and memory was assessed by Morris water maze test. In the present study, we found that the rats of PTU + Vit E group spent less time to find the platform on days 2, 3, 4, and 5 than the PTU group. Moreover, the rats of PTU + L-T4 + Vit E group spent less time to find the platform on days 4 and 5 than the PTU + L-T4 group. The time spent in the target quadrants was measured in the probe test and no difference was observed in all groups. Oxidative damage has been observed in the serum and hippocampus of hypothyroidism rat. SOD levels of serum and hippocampus tissue were significantly increased and MDA levels were significantly decreased in the PTU + Vit E and PTU + L-T4 + Vit E groups than the PTU and PTU + L-T4 groups. Therefore, these findings indicate that levothyroxine replacement therapy with vitamin E supplementation may ameliorate cognitive deficit in PTU-induced hypothyroidism through the decrease of oxidative stress status.

  5. Autism-relevant social abnormalities and cognitive deficits in engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Brielmaier

    Full Text Available ENGRAILED 2 (En2, a homeobox transcription factor, functions as a patterning gene in the early development and connectivity of rodent hindbrain and cerebellum, and regulates neurogenesis and development of monoaminergic pathways. To further understand the neurobiological functions of En2, we conducted neuroanatomical expression profiling of En2 wildtype mice. RTQPCR assays demonstrated that En2 is expressed in adult brain structures including the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus and brainstem. Human genetic studies indicate that EN2 is associated with autism. To determine the consequences of En2 mutations on mouse behaviors, including outcomes potentially relevant to autism, we conducted comprehensive phenotyping of social, communication, repetitive, and cognitive behaviors. En2 null mutants exhibited robust deficits in reciprocal social interactions as juveniles and adults, and absence of sociability in adults, replicated in two independent cohorts. Fear conditioning and water maze learning were impaired in En2 null mutants. High immobility in the forced swim test, reduced prepulse inhibition, mild motor coordination impairments and reduced grip strength were detected in En2 null mutants. No genotype differences were found on measures of ultrasonic vocalizations in social contexts, and no stereotyped or repetitive behaviors were observed. Developmental milestones, general health, olfactory abilities, exploratory locomotor activity, anxiety-like behaviors and pain responses did not differ across genotypes, indicating that the behavioral abnormalities detected in En2 null mutants were not attributable to physical or procedural confounds. Our findings provide new insight into the role of En2 in complex behaviors and suggest that disturbances in En2 signaling may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders marked by social and cognitive deficits, including autism spectrum disorders.

  6. Environmental enrichment mitigates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowsky, Joanna L; Melnikova, Tatiana; Fadale, Daniel J; Xu, Guilian M; Slunt, Hilda H; Gonzales, Victoria; Younkin, Linda H; Younkin, Steven G; Borchelt, David R; Savonenko, Alena V

    2005-05-25

    Epidemiological studies suggest that individuals with greater education or more cognitively demanding occupations have diminished risk of developing dementia. We wanted to test whether this effect could be recapitulated in rodents using environmental enrichment, a paradigm well documented to attenuate behavioral deficits induced by various pathological insults. Here, we demonstrate that learning and memory deficits observed in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease can be ameliorated by enrichment. Female transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and/or presenilin-1 and nontransgenic controls were placed into enriched or standard cages at 2 months of age and tested for cognitive behavior after 6 months of differential housing. Enrichment significantly improved performance of all genotypes in the radial water maze and in the classic and repeated-reversal versions of the Morris water maze. However, enrichment did not benefit all genotypes equally. Mice overproducing amyloid-beta (Abeta), particularly those with amyloid deposits, showed weaker memory for the platform location in the classic Morris water maze and learned new platform positions in the repeated-reversals task less quickly than their nontransgenic cagemates. Nonetheless, enrichment normalized the performance of Abeta-overproducing mice to the level of standard-housed nontransgenic mice. Moreover, this functional preservation occurred despite increased neuritic plaque burden in the hippocampus of double-transgenic animals and elevated steady-state Abeta levels, because both endogenous and transgene-derived Abeta are increased in enriched animals. These results demonstrate that the generation of Abeta in vivo and its impact on the function of the nervous system can be strongly modulated by environmental factors.

  7. Cognition and the compassion deficit: the social psychology of helping behaviour in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses compassion failure and compassion deficits in health care, using two major reports by Robert Francis in the UK as a point of reference. Francis enquired into events at the Mid Staffordshire Hospital between 2005 and 2009, events that unequivocally warrant the description 'appalling care'. These events prompted an intense national debate, along with proposals for significant changes in the regulation of nursing and nurse education. The circumstances are specific to the UK, but the issues are international. I suggest that social psychology provides numerous hints about the mechanisms that might have been involved at Mid Staffs and about the reasons why outsiders are blind to these mechanisms. However, there have been few references to social psychology in the post-Francis debate (the Francis Report itself makes no reference to it at all). It is an enormously valuable resource, and it has been overlooked. Drawing on the social psychology literature, I express scepticism about the idea that there was a compassion deficit among the Mid Staff nurses - the assumption that the appalling care had something to do with the character, attitudes, and values of nurses - and argue that the Francis Report's emphasis on a 'culture of compassion and caring in nurse recruitment, training and education' is misconceived. It was not a 'failure of compassion' that led to the events in Mid Staffs but an interlocking set of contextual factors that are known to affect social cognition. These factors cannot be corrected or compensated for by teaching ethics, empathy, and compassion to student nurses.

  8. Critical role of acetylation in tau-mediated neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sang-Won; Chen, Xu; Tracy, Tara E; Li, Yaqiao; Zhou, Yungui; Wang, Chao; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Minami, S Sakura; Defensor, Erwin; Mok, Sue Ann; Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Schilling, Birgit; Cong, Xin; Ellerby, Lisa; Gibson, Bradford W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Gestwicki, Jason; Masliah, Eliezer; Verdin, Eric; Gan, Li

    2015-10-01

    Tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases in which tau fibrils accumulate. Recent evidence supports soluble tau species as the major toxic species. How soluble tau accumulates and causes neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we identify tau acetylation at Lys174 (K174) as an early change in AD brains and a critical determinant in tau homeostasis and toxicity in mice. The acetyl-mimicking mutant K174Q slows tau turnover and induces cognitive deficits in vivo. Acetyltransferase p300-induced tau acetylation is inhibited by salsalate and salicylate, which enhance tau turnover and reduce tau levels. In the PS19 transgenic mouse model of FTD, administration of salsalate after disease onset inhibited p300 activity, lowered levels of total tau and tau acetylated at K174, rescued tau-induced memory deficits and prevented hippocampal atrophy. The tau-lowering and protective effects of salsalate were diminished in neurons expressing K174Q tau. Targeting tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy against human tauopathies.

  9. Cognitive Decline in Patients with Chronic Hydrocephalus and Normal Aging: ‘Growing into Deficits'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlijn H. de Beer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: To explore the theory of ‘growing into deficits', a concept known from developmental neurology, in a series of cases with chronic hydrocephalus (CH. Methods: Patients were selected from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort and underwent extensive dementia screening. Results: Twelve patients with CH were selected, in whom Alzheimer's disease was considered unlikely, based on biomarker information and follow-up. Mean Mini-Mental State Examination score was 24 (range 7-30. Most patients were functioning on a level of mild dementia [Clinical Dementia Rating score of 0.5 in 8/11 (66.7% patients]. On neuropsychological examination, memory and executive functions, as well as processing speed were most frequently impaired. Conclusion: In our opinion, the theory of ‘growing into deficits' shows a parallel with the clinical course of CH and normal aging when Alzheimer's disease was considered very unlikely, because most of these patients were functioning well for a very large part of their lives. The altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics might make the brain more vulnerable to aging-related changes, leading to a faster cognitive decline in CH patients compared to healthy subjects, especially in case of concomitant brain damage such as traumatic brain injury or meningitis.

  10. Piracetam improves cognitive deficits caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Liao, Yun; Zheng, Min; Zeng, Fan-Dian; Guo, Lian-Jun

    2008-06-01

    Piracetam is the derivate of gamma-aminobutyric acid, which improves the cognition,memory,consciousness, and is widely applied in the clinical treatment of brain dysfunction. In the present experiments, we study the effects of piracetam on chronic cerebral hypoperfused rats and observe its influence on amino acids, synaptic plasticity in the Perforant path-CA3 pathway and apoptosis in vivo. Cerebral hypoperfusion for 30 days by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries induced marked amnesic effects along with neuron damage, including: (1) spatial learning and memory deficits shown by longer escape latency and shorter time spent in the target quadrant; (2) significant neuronal loss and nuclei condensation in the cortex and hippocampus especially in CA1 region; (3) lower induction rate of long term potentiation, overexpression of BAX and P53 protein, and lower content of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in hippocampus. Oral administration of piracetam (600 mg/kg, once per day for 30 days) markedly improved the memory impairment, increased the amino acid content in hippocampus, and attenuated neuronal damage. The ability of piracetam to attenuate memory deficits and neuronal damage after hypoperfusion may be beneficial in cerebrovascular type dementia.

  11. Voxel-based analysis of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment: correlates with cognitive and motor deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook Hui; Park, Jun Sung; Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Sang Won; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung Tae; Han, Seol-Heui; Na, Duk L

    2011-10-01

    Patients with small vessel disease show high-signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images that represent ischemic cell damage. However, despite a similar degree of ischemic change, the amount and the severity of clinical presentations may vary. We investigated the clinical correlations of ischemic changes using voxel-based morphometric analyses of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty-seven MCI and 34 dementia patients were included who all had significant small vessel disease on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In all patients, neuropsychological tests, a rating on the Pyramidal and Extrapyramidal scale (PEPS) for motor deficits, and 3-Tesla MRI including DTI scans were performed. Voxel-based analysis of the fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity maps were computed. Cognitive scores correlated with the DTI abnormalities in supratentorial areas with regional specificity according to each cognitive test. Unexpectedly, cognitive deficits in most neuropsychological tests, even in some frontal tasks, were associated with disruption of posterior white matter integrities. Motor deficits correlated with both supra- and infratentorial lesions. Our findings suggest that in patients with small vessel disease who show cognitive and motor impairments, a specific distribution of fiber tract damage is more related with clinical deficits than is the severity of the total ischemia. © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. 16p11.2 Deletion Mice Display Cognitive Deficits in Touchscreen Learning and Novelty Recognition Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Lewis, Freeman C.; Sarvi, Michael S.; Foley, Gillian M.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal 16p11.2 deletion syndrome frequently presents with intellectual disabilities, speech delays, and autism. Here we investigated the Dolmetsch line of 16p11.2 heterozygous (+/-) mice on a range of cognitive tasks with different neuroanatomical substrates. Robust novel object recognition deficits were replicated in two cohorts of 16p11.2…

  13. 16p11.2 Deletion Mice Display Cognitive Deficits in Touchscreen Learning and Novelty Recognition Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Lewis, Freeman C.; Sarvi, Michael S.; Foley, Gillian M.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal 16p11.2 deletion syndrome frequently presents with intellectual disabilities, speech delays, and autism. Here we investigated the Dolmetsch line of 16p11.2 heterozygous (+/-) mice on a range of cognitive tasks with different neuroanatomical substrates. Robust novel object recognition deficits were replicated in two cohorts of 16p11.2…

  14. High Suicide Risk after the Development of Cognitive and Working Memory Deficits Caused by Cannabis, Cocaine and Ecstasy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo; Tatarelli, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of attempted suicide by a 30-year-old man who had significant cognitive deficits that developed after at least three years of polysubstance use with cannabis, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") and cocaine. The patient reported increasing difficulties in his professional and interpersonal life which may have been…

  15. An Integrative, Cognitive-Behavioral, Systemic Approach to Working with Students Diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, Margaret Ann; Lambie, Glenn W.; Walter, Sara Meghan

    2007-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent diagnostic disorder for many students, which correlates with negative academic, social, and personal consequences. This article presents an integrative, cognitive-behavioral, systemic approach that offers behaviorally based interventions for professional school counselors to support…

  16. Spelling Difficulties in School-Aged Girls with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Behavioral, Psycholinguistic, Cognitive, and Graphomotor Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg Johnels, Jakob; Kopp, Svenny; Gillberg, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Writing difficulties are common among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the nature of these difficulties has not been well studied. Here we relate behavioral, psycholinguistic, cognitive (memory/executive), and graphomotor measures to spelling skills in school-age girls with ADHD (n = 30) and an age-matched group…

  17. Prevalence and profile of cognitive deficits in a cohort of first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Høj; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard;

    medication, which can affect the results on specific domains such as processing speed. As part of the PECANS project (Pan European Collaboration on Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia) the aim of the present study is to establish the prevalence and profile of cognitive deficits in a cohort of first......Background and Aims: Cognitive deficits are considered a core feature of schizophrenia with prevalence estimates ranging from ca. 75-85 %. These deficits are present in the early phase of the illness; however in most first-episode schizophrenia studies the patients are receiving antipsychotic......-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients, without the potential confounding effects associated with medication and chronicity. Methods: The overall design of the PECANS project is a 2-year longitudinal case-control study with assessment at baseline and follow-ups after 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 and 2 years. Sixty...

  18. Response to Algarabel et al., 2012 "Recognition memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment". Reconsidering claims of familiarity disruptions in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migo, E M; Westerberg, C E

    2014-01-01

    There is some debate over the relative impairment of recollection and familiarity in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). A recent publication by Algarabel et al. (2012, Recognition memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment, Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 19, 608-619) claims to undermine previous studies reporting preserved familiarity in patients with MCI. Here, we respond to their main criticisms, concluding that they are not sufficiently supported by the data presented. The role of recollection and familiarity in MCI remains unresolved and further work will be required to disentangle the mixed literature.

  19. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P

    2015-01-01

    We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension $F_{max} = c^2/4G$ represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  20. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz P. Da̧browski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax=c4/4G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  1. Facilitative effects of bi-hemispheric tDCS in cognitive deficits of Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jorge; Gonçalves, Oscar F; Carvalho, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily characterized by motor symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, stiffness, slowness and impaired equilibrium. Although the motor symptoms have been the focus in PD, slight cognitive deficits are commonly found in non-demented and non-depressed PD patients, even in early stages of the disease, which have been linked to the subsequent development of pathological dementia. Thus, strongly reducing the quality of life (QoL). Both levodopa therapy and deep brain stimulation (DBS) have yield controversial results concerning the cognitive symptoms amelioration in PD patients. That does not seems to be the case with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), although better stimulation parameters are needed. Therefore we hypothesize that simultaneously delivering cathodal tDCS (or ctDCS), over the right prefrontal cortex delivered with anodal tDCS (or atDCS) to left prefrontal cortex could be potentially beneficial for PD patients, either by mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity and by increases in the extracellular dopamine levels over the striatum.

  2. Estrogen receptor ligands counteract cognitive deficits caused by androgen deprivation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Grassi, Daniela; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2011-04-01

    Androgen deprivation causes impairment of cognitive tasks in rodents and humans, and this deficit can be reverted by androgen replacement therapy. Part of the effects of androgens in the male may be mediated by their local metabolism to estradiol or 3-alpha androstanediol within the brain and the consequent activation of estrogen receptors. In this study we have assessed whether the administration of estradiol benzoate, the estrogen receptor β selective agonist diarylpropionitrile or the estrogen receptor α selective agonist propyl pyrazole triol affect performance of androgen-deprived male Wistar rats in the cross-maze test. In addition, we tested the effect of raloxifene and tamoxifen, two selective estrogen receptor modulators used in clinical practice. The behavior of the rats was assessed 2 weeks after orchidectomy or sham surgery. Orchidectomy impaired acquisition in the cross-maze test. Estradiol benzoate and the selective estrogen receptor β agonist significantly improved acquisition in the cross-maze test compared to orchidectomized animals injected with vehicle. Raloxifene and tamoxifen at a dose of 1mg/kg, but not at doses of 0.5 or 2mg/kg, also improved acquisition of orchidectomized animals. Our findings suggest that estrogenic compounds with affinity for estrogen receptor β and selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, may represent good candidates to promote cognitive performance in androgen-deprived males.

  3. Oligodendrocyte and interneuron density in hippocampal subfields in schizophrenia and association of oligodendrocyte number with cognitive deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eFalkai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In schizophrenia, previous stereological post-mortem investigations of anterior, posterior, and total hippocampal subfields showed no alterations in total neuron number but did show decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in CA4, an area that corresponds to the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus. However, these investigations identified oligodendrocytes only on the basis of morphological criteria in Nissl staining and did not assess alterations of interneurons with immunohistochemical markers. Moreover, the association of findings in the posterior hippocampus with cognitive deficits remains unknown.On the basis of the available clinical records, we compared patients with definite and possible cognitive dysfunction; nine patients had evidence in their records of either definite (n=4 or possible (n=5 cognitive dysfunction. Additionally, we assessed the density of two oligodendrocyte subpopulations immunostained by the oligodendrocyte transcription factors Olig1 and Olig2 and of interneurons immunolabeled by parvalbumin. We investigated posterior hippocampal subregions in the post-mortem brains of the same schizophrenia patients (n=10 and healthy controls (n=10 we examined in our previously published stereological studies. Our stereological studies found that patients with definite cognitive deficits had decreased total / Nissl-stained oligodendrocyte numbers in the left (p=0.014 and right (p=0.050 CA4, left CA2/3 (p=0.050, left CA1 (p=0.027, and left (p=0.050 and right (p=0.014 subiculum of the anterior part of the hippocampus compared to patients with possible cognitive deficits. In the present study, we found no significant influence of definite cognitive deficits in the posterior part of the hippocampus, whereas in the entire hippocampus schizophrenia patients with definite cognitive deficits showed decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in the left (p=0.050 and right (p=0.050 dentate gyrus and left CA2/3 (p=0.050. We did not find significant

  4. Cognitive deficit and depressive symptoms in a community group of elderly people: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Silberman

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the number and proportion of old people increases worldwide, health professionals and systems should be made aware and prepared to deal with their problems. Cognitive deficit and symptoms of depression are commom among the elderly, and may occur in relation to various risk factors such as health conditions and psychosocial variables. In order to study cognitive deficit and the presence of signs and symptoms of depression, 62 elderly community subjects enrolled at a Community Health Unit in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil, were interviewed. They were evaluated by means of the Mini Mental State Exam, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression rating scale, and a questionnaire on health conditions, living arrangements and social variables. Higher levels of symptoms of depression were observed among subjects exposed to major risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases (diabetes and coronary disease, while impaired cognitive performance was seen among individuals who could not count on the presence of a confidant (social network variable. The results suggest that the early identification of major risk groups among old people can help to prevent institutionalization and keep individuals in the community.Com o objetivo de avaliar déficit cognitivo e presença de sinais e sintomas depressivos, 62 idosos registrados numa Unidade de Saúde Comunitária em Porto Alegre/RS foram entrevistados em suas casas. Foram avaliados pelo Mini Exame do Estado Mental (Mini Mental State, pela escala de Montgomery-Asberg, e por um questionário sobre condições de saúde, moradia e outras variáveis de vínculos sociais. Níveis mais altos de sintomas depressivos foram observados entre os idosos expostos a fatores de risco maiores para doença cérebro-vascular (diabete e doença coronariana, enquanto que pior desempenho cognitivo foi encontrado nos sujeitos que não contavam com um confidente (variável da rede social. Os resultados sugeriram que a identificação precoce dos

  5. Impact of Statins on Cognitive Deficits in Adult Male Rodents after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of statin treatment on cognitive decline is controversial, and the effect of statins on cognitive deficits in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI has yet to be investigated. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the effect of statins on cognitive deficits in adult male rodents after TBI. After identifying eligible studies by searching four electronic databases on February 28, 2014, we assessed study quality, evaluated the efficacy of statin treatment, and performed stratified metaregression and metaregression to assess the influence of study design on statin efficacy. Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria from a total of 183 publications. The overall methodological quality of these studies was poor. Meta-analysis showed that statins exert statistically significant positive effects on cognitive performance after TBI. Stratified analysis showed that atorvastatin has the greatest effect on acquisition memory, simvastatin has the greatest effect on retention memory, and statin effects on acquisition memory are higher in closed head injury models. Metaregression analysis further showed that that animal species, study quality, and anesthetic agent impact statin effects on retention memory. We conclude that statins might reduce cognitive deficits after TBI. However, additional well-designed and well-reported animal studies are needed to inform further clinical study.

  6. Reduced Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Integrity Links Neonatal Complications and Adult Cognitive Deficits After Premature Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Michel J; Scheef, Lukas; Bäuml, Josef; Meng, Chun; Daamen, Marcel; Baumann, Nicole; Zimmer, Claus; Teipel, Stefan; Bartmann, Peter; Boecker, Henning; Wolke, Dieter; Wohlschläger, Afra; Sorg, Christian

    2017-07-15

    Prematurely born individuals have an increased risk for long-term neurocognitive impairments. In animal models, development of the cholinergic basal forebrain (cBF) is selectively vulnerable to adverse effects of perinatal stressors, and impaired cBF integrity results in lasting cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that cBF integrity is impaired in prematurely born individuals and mediates adult cognitive impairments associated with prematurity. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based volumetric assessments of a cytoarchitectonically defined cBF region of interest to determine differences in cBF integrity between 99 adults who were born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight and 106 term-born control subjects from the same birth cohort. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived cBF volumes were studied in relation to neonatal clinical complications after delivery and intelligence measures (IQ) in adulthood. In adults who were born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight, cBF volumes were significantly reduced compared with term-born adults (-4.5% [F1,202 = 11.82, p = .001]). Lower cBF volume in adults who were born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight was specifically associated with both neonatal complications (rpart,92 = -.35, p premature birth and links neonatal complications with long-term cognitive outcome. Data suggest that cholinergic system abnormalities may play a relevant role for long-term neurocognitive impairments associated with premature delivery. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD stimulant medications as cognitive enhancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Diane Advokat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent increases in ADHD diagnoses, and the escalation of stimulant prescriptions, have raised concern about diversion and abuse of stimulants, as well as the ethics of using these drugs as ‘cognitive enhancers.’ Such concern appears misplaced in the face of substantial evidence that stimulant drugs do not improve the academic performance of ADHD-diagnosed students. Moreover, numerous studies have found little or no benefit of stimulants on neuropsychological tests of ADHD-diagnosed as well as normal, individuals. This paper examines the apparent paradox: why don’t drugs that improve ‘attention,’ produce better academic outcomes in ADHD-diagnosed students? We found that stimulant drugs significantly improved impairment of episodic memory in ADHD-diagnosed undergraduate students. Nevertheless, we also found consistent academic deficits between ADHD students and their nonADHD counterparts, regardless of whether or not they used stimulant medications. We reviewed the current literature on the behavioral effects of stimulants, to try to find an explanation for these conflicting phenomena. Across a variety of behavioral tasks, stimulants have been shown to reduce emotional reactions to frustration, improve the ability to detect errors, and increase effortful behavior. However, all of these effects would presumably enhance academic performance. On the other hand, the drugs were also found to promote ‘risky behavior’ and to increase susceptibility to environmental distraction. Such negative effects, including the use of drugs to promote wakefulness for last minute study, might explain the lack of academic benefit in the ‘real world,’ despite their cognitive potential. Like many drugs, stimulants influence behavior in multiple ways, depending on the environmental contingencies. Depending on the circumstances, stimulants may, or may not, enhance cognition.

  8. Salidroside ameliorates arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits by regulating Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Chen, Tong; Chang, Xiayun; Zhou, Rui; Luo, Fen; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Yang, Ying; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua; Ma, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was increasingly serious nowadays. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether salidroside (Sal) could alleviate arthritis-induced cognition deficits and examine the relationship between the impairment and Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by the injection of chicken type II collagen (CII), complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Arthritic lesions of CIA rats were assessed by arthritis index score, swelling of paws and histological analysis. Cognitive deficits symptoms of CIA rats were monitored through Morris water maze test. The contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in hippocampus and serum were significantly reduced with salidroside (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg) treatment compared with those in the CIA group. In parallel, we demonstrated that the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα, p-IKKα and p-IKKβ were enhanced accompanying the investigation arthritis-induced cognition deficits, which were remarkably down-regulated by salidroside and confirmed by the results obtained from western blot and immunohistochemistry. LC-MS/MS results ascertained that Sal could enter into the blood and brain tissues to exhibit the protective effect on arthritis-induced cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, it was assumed that Sal might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits through the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling.

  9. Social cognition impairments after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Associations with deficits in interpersonal behaviour, apathy, and impaired self-awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buunk, Anne M; Spikman, Jacoba M; Veenstra, Wencke S; van Laar, Peter Jan; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; van Dijk, J Marc C; Meiners, Linda C; Groen, Rob J M

    2017-08-01

    Behavioural disturbances are frequently found after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Social cognition impairments have been suggested as a possible underlying mechanism for behavioural problems. Also, aSAH is likely to result in damage affecting frontal-subcortical circuits underlying social cognition. Therefore, we aimed to investigate social cognition after aSAH and its associations with behavioural problems (deficits in interpersonal behaviour, apathy, and impaired self-awareness) and focal as well as diffuse brain damage. 88 aSAH patients (in the subacute phase post-aSAH) and 60 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls participated. Tasks for emotion recognition, Theory of Mind (ToM), and empathy as well as questionnaires were used. Cortical infarctions in frontal and non-frontal areas on MRI, aneurysm circulation and aSAH-related events were taken into account. Compared to healthy controls, aSAH patients performed significantly worse on tasks for emotion recognition, ToM and empathy. Poor performance on ToM and emotion recognition was associated with proxy-ratings indicating impaired interpersonal behaviour and apathy and with indications of impaired self-awareness. No associations were found between deficits in social cognition and frontal or non-frontal cortical lesions on MRI. Also, aneurysm circulation and aSAH-related events such as hydrocephalus, vasospasm, and treatment method did not explain why and how social cognitive deficits did occur after aSAH. In conclusion, emotion recognition, ToM and empathy were clearly impaired in aSAH patients and these deficits were related to apathy and deficits in interpersonal behaviour as reported by proxies and to impaired self-awareness. This association strengthens the assumption of impaired social cognition as an underlying construct of behavioural problems after aSAH. Consequently, social cognition tests and proxy-ratings should be used in clinical practice, irrespective of lesion location on

  10. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Childhood Is Associated with Cognitive Test Profiles in the Geriatric Population but Not with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ivanchak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of ADHD in the aging population and its relationship to late-life cognitive decline has not been studied previously. To address this gap in our understanding, the Wender-Utah ADHD Rating scale (WURS was administered to 310 geriatric subjects with cognitive status ranging from normal cognition to mild cognitive impairment to overt dementia. The frequency of WURS-positive ADHD in this sample was 4.4%. WURS scores were not related to cognitive diagnoses, but did show nonlinear associations with tasks requiring sustained attention. The frequency of ADHD appears stable across generations and does not appear to be associated with MCI or dementia diagnoses. The association of attentional processing deficits and WURS scores in geriatric subjects could suggest that such traits remain stable throughout life. Caution should be considered when interpreting cognitive test profiles in the aging population that exhibit signs and symptoms of ADHD, as attentional deficits may not necessarily imply the existence of an underlying neurodegenerative disease state.

  11. Cluster analysis of cognitive deficits may mark heterogeneity in schizophrenia in terms of outcome and response to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elsa; Mérette, Chantal; Jomphe, Valérie; Émond, Claudia; Rouleau, Nancie; Bouchard, Roch-Hugo; Roy, Marc-André; Paccalet, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are central to schizophrenia, but their clinical utility for tagging heterogeneity in lifetime outcome and response to treatment is not conclusive. By exploiting four cognitive domains consistently showing large deficits in studies, we tested whether cluster analysis would define separate subsets of patients and then whether the disease heterogeneity marked by these clusters would be related to lifetime outcome and response to treatment. A total of 112 schizophrenia patients completed a neuropsychological evaluation. The PANSS, GAF-S and GAF-F were rated at the onset and endpoint of the illness trajectory. A blind judgment of the lifetime response to treatment was made. The first cluster presented near-normal cognitive performance. Two other clusters of severely impaired patients were identified: one generally impaired in the four cognitive domains and another selectively impaired in visual episodic memory and processing speed, each relating to a different lifetime evolution of disease and treatment response. Although the two impaired clusters were clinically indistinguishable in symptom severity and functioning at disease onset, patients with selective cognitive impairments demonstrated better improvement at outcome, whereas the generally impaired patients were more likely to be treatment refractory. The findings have implications for the management of patients and for clinical trials since particular combinations of cognitive deficits in patients would influence their treatment response. PMID:24173295

  12. Lack of association between mutation size and cognitive/behavior deficits in fragile X males: A brief report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, G.S. [SUNY/Health Science Center and Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Carpenter, N. [Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States); Simensen, R. [Greenwood Genetics Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Previously, researchers reported molecular-neurobehavioral or molecular-cognitive associations in individuals with fra(X) (fragile X) mutation. However, not all investigators have noted molecular-behavioral relationships. Consequently, we examined prospectively 30 fra(X) males age 3-15 years from four testing sites to determine whether there was a relationship between mutation size and degree of either cognitive or adaptive behavior deficit. To measure cognitive abilities, all individuals were administered the Stanford-Binet (4th edition) IQ test. To evaluate adaptive behavior (DQ) skills, all individuals were assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. To determine fra(X) status, genomic DNA from all individuals was extracted and digested with EcoRI and EagI restriction enzymes. Southern blots were prepared and hybridized with the pE5.1 probe. The Pearson correlation coefficient between full mutation size and composite IQ score revealed a non-significant, near-zero association (r = 0.06; P > .76). The Pearson coefficient between mutation size and DQ also showed a non-significant, near-zero association (r = 0.06; P >.73). We conclude that while fra(X) mutation produces cognitive and behavior deficits in males who inherit the defective gene, there is no relationship between mutation size and degree of deficit. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Insight into dopamine-dependent planning deficits in Parkinson's disease: A sharing of cognitive & sensory resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieruccini-Faria, F; Jones, J A; Almeida, Q J

    2016-03-24

    Cognitive and sensorimotor processes are both needed for successful planning of footsteps during complex gait situations, but the interaction between these factors during motor planning, as well as their response to dopaminergic treatment is poorly understood in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we evaluated walking and gaze behaviors of individuals with PD while planning an approach toward an obstacle to be stepped over. The obstacle clearance task was completed both ON and OFF dopaminergic medication by individuals with Parkinson's disease (n=20) and compared to healthy age-matched control participants (n=19), as well as with and without an auditory digit monitoring dual task. In this novel protocol of synchronized gaze and gait data collection, each trial was split into an early and late phase prior to the obstacle, providing a unique opportunity to examine dopamine-dependent planning deficits in PD. Interestingly, only patients in the OFF medication state showed greater deceleration in the late phase (i.e., just before the obstacle) (F(1,37)=45.42, pphase) with the additional demands of a dual task (F(2,74)=3.49, p=0.035). Only gait deceleration between approaching phases improved with dopaminergic treatment (F(1,18)=59.20; pplanned for the obstacle more so in the early phase (pphase or condition suggesting that the deceleration and increased variability when approaching an obstacle is the result of a greater demand for online sensory feedback that cannot be compensated for with visual strategies. We conclude that dopamine influences planning by limiting sensorimotor processing capacity, especially in the presence of increased cognitive demand in PD.

  14. Beneficial effects of asiaticoside on cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xing; Huang, Renbin; Zhang, Shijun; Wei, Ling; Zhuo, Lang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tang, Aicun; Huang, Quanfang

    2013-06-01

    The effect of asiaticoside isolated from Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides (AHS) on the promotion of cognition in senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP) was evaluated. Six-month old male SAMP8 mice were orally administered 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg AHS daily for three months. SAMR1 mice were used as a "normal aging" control. The results showed that treatment with AHS significantly improved learning and memory abilities in behavioral tests. AHS-treated mice showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower lipid oxidation in serum compared with untreated SAMP8 mice. Mechanistically, studies showed that AHS markedly reduced the content and deposition of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) by inhibiting the expression of mRNA for amyloid protein precursor, β-site amyloid cleaving enzyme-1 and cathepsin B and promoting the expression of mRNA for neprilysin and insulin degrading enzyme. In addition, AHS significantly increased the expression of plasticity-related proteins including postsynaptic density-95, phosphor-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, phospho-calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II, phospho-protein kinase A Catalyticβ subunit, protein kinase Cγ subunit, phospho-CREB and brain derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, AHS increased the levels of acetylcholine (Ach), but decreased cholinesterase (AchE) activity. These results demonstrated that AHS administration may prevent spatial learning and memory decline by scavenging free radicals, up-regulating the activity of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the level of Aβ, ameliorating dysfunction in synaptic plasticity, and reversing abnormal changes in Ach level and AchE activity. Thus, AHS should be developed as a new drug to prevent age-related cognitive deficits.

  15. Cognitive-motivational deficits in ADHD: development of a classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Kar, Bhoomika R; Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    The classification systems developed so far to detect attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) do not have high sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a classification system based on several neuropsychological tests that measure cognitive-motivational functions that are specifically impaired in ADHD children. A total of 240 (120 ADHD children and 120 healthy controls) children in the age range of 6-9 years and 32 Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) children (aged 9 years) participated in the study. Stop-Signal, Task-Switching, Attentional Network, and Choice Delay tests were administered to all the participants. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that percentage choice of long-delay reward best classified the ADHD children from healthy controls. Single parameters were not helpful in making a differential classification of ADHD with ODD. Multinominal logistic regression (MLR) was performed with multiple parameters (data fusion) that produced improved overall classification accuracy. A combination of stop-signal reaction time, posterror-slowing, mean delay, switch cost, and percentage choice of long-delay reward produced an overall classification accuracy of 97.8%; with internal validation, the overall accuracy was 92.2%. Combining parameters from different tests of control functions not only enabled us to accurately classify ADHD children from healthy controls but also in making a differential classification with ODD. These results have implications for the theories of ADHD.

  16. Insulin Signaling Misregulation underlies Circadian and Cognitive Deficits in a Drosophila Fragile X Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monyak, Rachel E.; Emerson, Danielle; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Chambers, Daniel B.; Rosenfelt, Cory; Langer, Steven; Hinchey, Paul; Choi, Catherine H.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Sehgal, Amita; McBride, Sean M.J.; Jongens, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an undertreated neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ and a wide range of other symptoms including disordered sleep and autism. Although FXS is the most prevalent inherited cause of intellectual disability, its mechanistic underpinnings are not well understood. Using Drosophila as a model of FXS, we showed that select expression of dfmr1 in the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) of the brain was sufficient to restore normal circadian behavior and to rescue the memory deficits in the fragile X mutant fly. Examination of the insulin-signaling (IS) pathway revealed elevated levels of Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2) in the IPCs and elevated IS in the dfmr1 mutant brain. Consistent with a causal role for elevated IS in dfmr1 mutant phenotypes, expression of dfmr1 specifically in the IPCs reduced IS, and genetic reduction of the insulin pathway also led to amelioration of circadian and memory defects. Furthermore we showed that treatment with the FDA approved drug metformin also rescued memory. Finally, we showed that reduction of IS is required at different time points to rescue circadian behavior and memory. Our results indicate that insulin misregulation underlies the circadian and cognitive phenotypes displayed by the Drosophila fragile X model, and thus reveal a metabolic pathway that can be targeted by new and already approved drugs to treat fragile X patients. PMID:27090306

  17. Chronic behavioral and cognitive deficits in a rat survival model of paraoxon toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Phillips, Kristin; Huang, Beverly; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds, including paraoxon (POX), are similar to nerve agents such as sarin. There is a growing concern that OP agents could be weaponized to cause mass civilian causalities. We have developed a rodent survival model of POX toxicity that is being used to evaluate chronic morbidity and to screen for medical countermeasures against severe OP exposure. It is well known that the survivors of nerve gas and chronic OP exposure exhibit neurobehavioral deficits such as mood changes, depression, and memory impairments. In this study we investigated whether animals surviving severe POX exposure exhibited long-term neurological impairments. POX exposure produced overt signs of cholinergic toxicity. Rats were rescued using an optimized atropine, 2-PAM and diazepam therapy. Surviving rats were studied using established behavioral assays for identifying symptoms of depression and memory impairment 3-months after POX exposure. In the forced swim test, POX rats exhibited increased immobility time indicative of a despair-like state. In the sucrose preference test, POX rats consumed significantly less sucrose water indicating anhedonia-like condition. POX rats also displayed increased anxiety as characterized by significantly lower performance in the open arm of the elevated plus maze. Further, when tested with a novel object recognition paradigm, POX rats exhibited a negative discrimination ratio indicative of impaired recognition memory. The results indicate that this model of survival from severe POX exposure can be employed to study some of the molecular bases for OP-induced chronic behavioral and cognitive comorbidities and develop therapies for their treatment.

  18. Phospholipid dysregulation contributes to ApoE4-associated cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Zhong, Minghao; Elder, Gregory A; Sano, Mary; Holtzman, David M; Gandy, Sam; Cardozo, Christopher; Haroutunian, Vahram; Robakis, Nikolaos K; Cai, Dongming

    2015-09-22

    The apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for developing sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms underlying the pathogenic nature of ApoE4 are not well understood. In this study, we have found that ApoE proteins are critical determinants of brain phospholipid homeostasis and that the ApoE4 isoform is dysfunctional in this process. We have found that the levels of phosphoinositol biphosphate (PIP2) are reduced in postmortem human brain tissues of ApoE4 carriers, in the brains of ApoE4 knock-in (KI) mice, and in primary neurons expressing ApoE4 alleles compared with those levels in ApoE3 counterparts. These changes are secondary to increased expression of a PIP2-degrading enzyme, the phosphoinositol phosphatase synaptojanin 1 (synj1), in ApoE4 carriers. Genetic reduction of synj1 in ApoE4 KI mouse models restores PIP2 levels and, more important, rescues AD-related cognitive deficits in these mice. Further studies indicate that ApoE4 behaves similar to ApoE null conditions, which fails to degrade synj1 mRNA efficiently, unlike ApoE3 does. These data suggest a loss of function of ApoE4 genotype. Together, our data uncover a previously unidentified mechanism that links ApoE4-induced phospholipid changes to the pathogenic nature of ApoE4 in AD.

  19. Caffeine regulates frontocorticostriatal dopamine transporter density and improves attention and cognitive deficits in an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Pablo; Machado, Nuno J; Köfalvi, Attila; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2013-04-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely involves dopaminergic dysfunction in the frontal cortex and striatum, resulting in cognitive and motor abnormalities. Since both adenosine and dopamine modulation systems are tightly intertwined, we tested if caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) attenuated the behavioral and neurochemical changes in adolescent spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, a validated ADHD animal model) compared to their control strain (Wistar Kyoto rats, WKY). SHR were hyperactive and had poorer performance in the attentional set-shifting and Y-maze paradigms and also displayed increased dopamine transporter (DAT) density and increased dopamine uptake in frontocortical and striatal terminals compared with WKY rats. Chronic caffeine treatment was devoid of effects in WKY rats while it improved memory and attention deficits and also normalized dopaminergic function in SHR. Additionally, we provide the first direct demonstration for the presence of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) in frontocortical nerve terminals, whose density was increased in SHR. These findings underscore the potential for caffeine treatment to normalize frontocortical dopaminergic function and to abrogate attention and cognitive changes characteristic of ADHD.

  20. Verbal Fluency Deficits Co-Occur with Memory Deficits in Geriatric Patients at Risk for Dementia: Implications for the Concept of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Cottingham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the notion that patients at high risk for progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD display relatively isolated memory deficits by assessing the relationship between memory and fluency performances in a sample of 92 geriatric subjects with cognitive complaints and normal to mild clinical presentations. Patient groups were formed on the basis of memory test scores. Patients with normal memory scores also performed normally on fluency tests, and their fluency scores were significantly higher than those of patients with low memory performances. Patients falling between these two groups in memory abilities also displayed intermediate level fluency performances. Whereas the normal memory group performed at equivalent levels on semantic and phonemic fluency tasks, both the impaired memory group and the intermediate group displayed relatively greater weaknesses in semantic fluency. This pattern is similar to that seen in AD. Since the impaired memory patients meet criteria for Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment, these findings suggest that memory deficits in “pre-clinical” AD are likely to be accompanied by fluency weaknesses, with semantic fluency weaknesses predominating.

  1. Fingolimod protects against neonatal white matter damage and long-term cognitive deficits caused by hyperoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdar, Meray; Herz, Josephine; Kempe, Karina; Lumpe, Katharina; Reinboth, Barbara S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Hou, Xinlin; Herrmann, Ralf; Hadamitzky, Martin; Heumann, Rolf; Hansen, Wiebke; Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Bendix, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral white matter injury is a leading cause of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants involving cognitive deficits in later life. Despite increasing knowledge about the pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury, therapeutic options are limited. In the adult demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulating substance fingolimod (FTY720) has beneficial effects. Herein, we evaluated the neuroprotective potential of FTY720 in a neonatal model of oxygen-toxicity, which is associated with hypomyelination and impaired neuro-cognitive outcome. A single dose of FTY720 (1mg/kg) at the onset of neonatal hyperoxia (24h 80% oxygen on postnatal day 6) resulted in improvement of neuro-cognitive development persisting into adulthood. This was associated with reduced microstructural white matter abnormalities 4 months after the insult. In search of the underlying mechanisms potential non-classical (i.e. lymphocyte-independent) pathways were analysed shortly after the insult, comprising modulation of oxidative stress and local inflammatory responses as well as myelination, oligodendrocyte degeneration and maturation. Treatment with FTY720 reduced hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress, microglia activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In vivo and in vitro analyses further revealed that oxygen-induced hypomyelination is restored to control levels, which was accompanied by reduced oligodendrocyte degeneration and enhanced maturation. Furthermore, hyperoxia-induced elevation of S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) protein expression on in vitro cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells was reduced by activated FTY720 and protection from degeneration is abrogated after selective S1P1 blockade. Finally, FTY720s' classical mode of action (i.e. retention of immune cells within peripheral lymphoid organs) was analysed demonstrating that FTY720 diminished circulating lymphocyte counts independent from hyperoxia

  2. Grey matter changes associated with deficit awareness in mild cognitive impairment: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew H; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Flicker, Leon; Garrido, Griselda J; Greenop, Kathryn R; Foster, Jonathan K; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2014-01-01

    Reduced awareness of cognitive deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is associated with poorer outcomes although little is known about the anatomical correlates of this. We examined the association of insight and grey matter volume using a voxel-based morphometry approach in 65 volunteers with MCI and 55 healthy age-matched controls. Participants with MCI had multiple areas of subtle grey matter volume loss compared with controls, although these did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. These were predominantly in the temporal and anterior portions of the brain. Individuals with MCI did not differ from each other on a number of demographic and cognitive variables according to level of insight. Reduced awareness of cognitive deficits was associated with few differences in grey matter volume apart from a subtle loss of grey matter in the medial frontal gyri. Given the modest nature of these findings, the routine assessment of insight in non-clinical populations of individuals with MCI is therefore not supported. Prospective data in larger samples, however, would be helpful to clarify this further and determine if impaired insight predicts brain atrophy and cognitive decline.

  3. Asiaticoside attenuates diabetes-induced cognition deficits by regulating PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhujun; Yu, Haiyang; Chen, She; Ma, Chunhua; Ma, Xiao; Xu, Lixing; Ma, Zhanqiang; Qu, Rong; Ma, Shiping

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes-associated cognitive dysfunction, referred as "diabetic encephalopathy", has been confirmed in a great deal of literature. Current evidence support that oxidative stress, inflammation, energy metabolism imbalance, and aberrant insulin signaling are associated with cognition deficits induced by diabetes. The present study explore the effect of asiaticoside on the cognition behaviors, synapses, and oxidative stress in diabetic rats. Asiaticoside could markedly ameliorate the performance in the Morris Water Maze (decreased latency time and path length, and increased time spent in the target quadrant), which was correlated with its capabilities of suppressing oxidative stress, restoring Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and protecting hippocampal synapses. In vitro, asiaticoside could up-regulate synaptic proteins expression via modulating Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Protein Kinase B(AKT)/Nuclear Factor -kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated inflammatory pathway in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with high glucose chronically. In conclusion, asiaticoside had beneficial effects on the prevention and treatment of diabetes-associated cognitive deficits, which was involved in oxidative stress, PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway and synaptic function in the development of cognitive decline induced by diabetes.

  4. Administration of lidocaine to prevent cognitive deficit in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and valve plasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Valiollah; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood

    2017-02-01

    The administration of lidocaine to maintain cognitive function following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and valve plasty is a controversial concept in terms of its effectiveness. We performed a systematic review to determine the effectiveness of treatment with lidocaine in preventing the occurrence of cognitive deficit after cardiac surgery. Area covered: To review the current literature on the subject, we searched the PubMed database and the Cochrane Library database (up to May 2015) and compiled a list of retrieved articles. Our final review includes only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared lidocaine to a control (placebo) following CABG and valve plasty. Statistical analysis of the odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to determine the overall effectiveness of lidocaine for the prevention of cognitive deficit with both procedures. The Mantel-Haenszel method was used to pool data of the outcomes of cognitive deficit occurrence into fixed-effect model meta-analyses. Five RCTs were included in this study, with a total of 688 patients. Perioperative administration of lidocaine in patients undergoing cardiac surgery reduced occurrence of cognitive deficit (OR 0.583 [95% CI 0.438-0.777]; Z = -3.680; P = 0.00; I(2) = 52%). No significant difference in the early occurrence of cognitive deficit was revealed in patients after cardiac surgery (OR 0.909 [95% CI 0.600-1.376]; Z = -0.451; P = 0.652; I(2) = 11%). Expert commentary: Cognitive deficit associated with cardiac surgery is a common postoperative event. Lidocaine is contributed to a significantly reduced occurrence of cognitive deficit. Cognitive deficit management is recommended.

  5. Translational aspects of the novel object recognition task in rats abstinent following sub-chronic treatment with phencyclidine (PCP: effects of modafinil and relevance to cognitive deficits in schizophrenia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Redrobe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Phencyclidine (PCP induces a behavioural syndrome in rodents that bears remarkable similarities to some of the core symptoms observed in schizophrenic patients, among those cognitive deficits. The successful alleviation of cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia (CIAS has become a major focus of research efforts as they remain largely untreated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of selected antipsychotic and cognition enhancing drugs, namely haloperidol, risperidone, donepezil, and modafinil in an animal model widely used in preclinical schizophrenia research. To this end, the novel object recognition (NOR task was applied to rats abstinent following sub-chronic treatment with PCP. Rats were administered either PCP (5 mg/kg, i.p. or vehicle twice a day for 7 days, followed by a 7-day washout period, before testing in NOR. Upon testing, vehicle-treated rats successfully discriminated between novel and familiar objects, an effect abolished in rats that had previously been exposed to PCP-treatment. Acute treatment with modafinil (64 mg/kg, p.o. ameliorated the PCP-induced deficit in novel object exploration, whereas haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, s.c., risperidone (0.2 mg/kg, i.p. and donepezil (3 mg/kg, p.o. were without significant effect. Given the negligible efficacy of haloperidol and risperidone, and the contradictory data with donepezil to treat CIAS in the clinic, together with the promising preliminary pro-cognitive effects of modafinil in certain subsets of schizophrenic patients, the sub-chronic PCP-NOR abstinence paradigm may represent an attractive option for the identification of potential novel treatments for CIAS.

  6. Awareness of cognitive deficits and clinical competence in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: their relevance in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambina, G; Bonazzi, A; Valbusa, V; Condoleo, M T; Bortolami, O; Broggio, E; Sala, F; Moretto, G; Moro, V

    2014-03-01

    Awareness of cognitive deficits and clinical competence were investigated in 79 mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease patients. Awareness was assessed by the anosognosia questionnaire for dementia, and clinical competence by specific neuropsychological tests such as trail making test-A, Babcock story recall test, semantic and phonemic verbal fluency. The findings show that 66 % of the patients were aware of memory deficits, while the 34 % were unaware. Deficit in awareness correlated with lower scores on the Mini Mental State Examination test that, in the score range from 24.51 to 30 and from 19.50 to 24.50, appeared to be a significant predictor of level of awareness. None of the AD patients had fully preserved clinical competence, only 7 patients (9 %) had partially preserved clinical competence and 72 patients (91 %) had completely lost clinical competence. All the patients with partially preserved clinical competence (9 %) were aware of their memory deficit. The study indicates that neuropsychological tests used for the assessment of executive functions are not suitable for investigating clinical competence. Therefore, additional and specific tools for the evaluation of clinical competence are necessary. Indeed, these might allow clinicians to identify AD patients who, despite their deficits in selected functions, retain their autonomy of choice as well as recognize those patients who should proceed to the nomination of a legal representative.

  7. Depression in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): The Mediating Role of Cognitive-Behavioral Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Laura E; Zvorsky, Ivori; Safren, Steven A

    2013-12-01

    Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for depressive disorders but little is known about the potential cognitive and behavioral mechanisms of risk that could shape treatment. This study evaluated the degree to which cognitive-behavioral constructs associated with depression and its treatment-dysfunctional attitudes and cognitive-behavioral avoidance-accounted for variance in depressive symptoms and disorder in adults with ADHD. 77 adults clinically diagnosed with ADHD completed self-report questionnaires, diagnostic interviews, and clinician-administered symptom rating scales. Statistical mediation analysis was employed and indirect effects assessed using bootstrap analysis and bias-corrected confidence intervals. Controlling for recent negative life events, dysfunctional attitudes and cognitive-behavioral avoidance fully accounted for the variance between ADHD symptoms and depressive symptoms. Each independent variable partially mediated the other in accounting for depression symptoms suggesting overlapping and unique variance. Cognitive-behavioral avoidance, however, was more strongly related to meeting diagnostic criteria for a depressive disorder than were dysfunctional attitudes. Processes that are targeted in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for depression were associated with symptoms in adults with ADHD. Current CBT approaches for ADHD incorporate active coping skills and cognitive restructuring and such approaches could be further tailored to address the ADHD-depression comorbidity.

  8. Cognitive Deficits, Changes in Synaptic Function, and Brain Pathology in a Mouse Model of Normal Aging(1,2,3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wu, Tiffany; Hanson, Jesse E; Alam, Nazia M; Solanoy, Hilda; Ngu, Hai; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Lin, Han H; Dominguez, Sara L; Reeder, Jens; Tom, Jennifer; Steiner, Pascal; Foreman, Oded; Prusky, Glen T; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly

    2015-09-01

    Age is the main risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Yet, cognitive decline in aged rodents has been less well studied, possibly due to concomitant changes in sensory or locomotor function that can complicate cognitive tests. We tested mice that were 3, 11, and 23 months old in cognitive, sensory, and motor measures, and postmortem measures of gliosis and neural activity (c-Fos). Hippocampal synaptic function was also examined. While age-related impairments were detectable in tests of spatial memory, greater age-dependent effects were observed in tests of associative learning [active avoidance (AA)]. Gross visual function was largely normal, but startle responses to acoustic stimuli decreased with increased age, possibly due to hearing impairments. Therefore, a novel AA variant in which light alone served as the conditioning stimuli was used. Age-related deficits were again observed. Mild changes in vision, as measured by optokinetic responses, were detected in 19- versus 4-month-old mice, but these were not correlated to AA performance. Thus, deficits in hearing or vision are unlikely to account for the observed deficits in cognitive measures. Increased gliosis was observed in the hippocampal formation at older ages. Age-related changes in neural function and plasticity were observed with decreased c-Fos in the dentate gyrus, and decreased synaptic strength and paired-pulse facilitation in CA1 slices. This work, which carefully outlines age-dependent impairments in cognitive and synaptic function, c-Fos activity, and gliosis during normal aging in the mouse, suggests robust translational measures that will facilitate further study of the biology of aging.

  9. Reduction of BDNF expression in Fmr1 knockout mice worsens cognitive deficits but improves hyperactivity and sensorimotor deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uutela, M; Lindholm, J; Louhivuori, V; Wei, H; Louhivuori, L M; Pertovaara, A; Akerman, K; Castrén, E; Castrén, M L

    2012-07-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability and a well-characterized form of autism spectrum disorder. As brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in the pathophysiology of FXS we examined the effects of reduced BDNF expression on the behavioral phenotype of an animal model of FXS, Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, crossed with mice carrying a deletion of one copy of the Bdnf gene (Bdnf(+/-)). Fmr1 KO mice showed age-dependent alterations in hippocampal BDNF expression that declined after the age of 4 months compared to wild-type controls. Mild deficits in water maze learning in Bdnf(+/-) and Fmr1 KO mice were exaggerated and contextual fear learning significantly impaired in double transgenics. Reduced BDNF expression did not alter basal nociceptive responses or central hypersensitivity in Fmr1 KO mice. Paradoxically, the locomotor hyperactivity and deficits in sensorimotor learning and startle responses characteristic of Fmr1 KO mice were ameliorated by reducing BNDF, suggesting changes in simultaneously and in parallel working hippocampus-dependent and striatum-dependent systems. Furthermore, the obesity normally seen in Bdnf(+/-) mice was eliminated by the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP). Reduced BDNF decreased the survival of newborn cells in the ventral part of the hippocampus both in the presence and absence of FMRP. Since a short neurite phenotype characteristic of newborn cells lacking FMRP was not found in cells derived from double mutant mice, changes in neuronal maturation likely contributed to the behavioral phenotype. Our results show that the absence of FMRP modifies the diverse effects of BDNF on the FXS phenotype. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  10. Relationships among cognitive deficits and component skills of reading in younger and older students with developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heeyoung; Lombardino, Linda J

    2013-09-01

    Processing speed deficits along with phonological awareness deficits have been identified as risk factors for dyslexia. This study was designed to examine the behavioral profiles of two groups, a younger (6-8 years) and an older (10-15 years) group of dyslexic children for the purposes of (1) evaluating the degree to which phonological awareness and processing speed deficits occur in the two developmental cohorts; (2) determining the strength of relationships between the groups' respective mean scores on cognitive tasks of phonological awareness and processing speed and their scores on component skills of reading; and (3) evaluating the degree to which phonological awareness and processing speed serve as concurrent predictors of component reading skills for each group. The mean scaled scores for both groups were similar on all but one processing speed task. The older group was significantly more depressed on a visual matching test of attention, scanning, and speed. Correlations between reading skills and the cognitive constructs were very similar for both age-groups. Neither of the two phonological awareness tasks correlated with either of the two processing speed tasks or with any of the three measures of reading. One of the two processing speed measures served as a concurrent predictor of word- and text-level reading in the younger, however, only the rapid naming measure functioned as a concurrent predictor of word reading in the older group. Conversely, phonological processing measures did not serve as concurrent predictors for word-level or text-level reading in either of the groups. Descriptive analyses of individual subjects' deficits in the domains of phonological awareness and processing speed revealed that (1) both linguistic and nonlinguistic processing speed deficits in the younger dyslexic children occurred at higher rates than deficits in phonological awareness and (2) cognitive deficits within and across these two domains were greater in the older

  11. Emotional face recognition deficit in amnestic patients with mild cognitive impairment: behavioral and electrophysiological evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Linlin Yang, Xiaochuan Zhao, Lan Wang, Lulu Yu, Mei Song, Xueyi Wang Department of Mental Health, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei Medical University Institute of Mental Health, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI has been conceptualized as a transitional stage between healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Thus, understanding emotional face recognition deficit in patients with amnestic MCI could be useful in determining progression of amnestic MCI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the features of emotional face processing in amnestic MCI by using event-related potentials (ERPs. Patients with amnestic MCI and healthy controls performed a face recognition task, giving old/new responses to previously studied and novel faces with different emotional messages as the stimulus material. Using the learning-recognition paradigm, the experiments were divided into two steps, ie, a learning phase and a test phase. ERPs were analyzed on electroencephalographic recordings. The behavior data indicated high emotion classification accuracy for patients with amnestic MCI and for healthy controls. The mean percentage of correct classifications was 81.19% for patients with amnestic MCI and 96.46% for controls. Our ERP data suggest that patients with amnestic MCI were still be able to undertake personalizing processing for negative faces, but not for neutral or positive faces, in the early frontal processing stage. In the early time window, no differences in frontal old/new effect were found between patients with amnestic MCI and normal controls. However, in the late time window, the three types of stimuli did not elicit any old/new parietal effects in patients with amnestic MCI, suggesting their recollection was impaired. This impairment may be closely associated with amnestic MCI disease. We conclude from our data that face recognition processing and emotional memory is

  12. Mori Folium and Mori Fructus Mixture Attenuates High-Fat Diet-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Geun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a global health problem, contributing to various diseases including diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and dementia. Increasing evidence suggests that obesity can also cause neuronal damage, long-term memory loss, and cognitive impairment. The leaves and the fruits of Morus alba L., containing active phytochemicals, have been shown to possess antiobesity and hypolipidemic properties. Thus, in the present study, we assessed their effects on cognitive functioning in mice fed a high-fat diet by performing immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against c-Fos, synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density protein 95 and a behavioral test. C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet for 21 weeks exhibited increased body weight, but mice coadministered an optimized Mori Folium and Mori Fructus extract mixture (2 : 1; MFE for the final 12 weeks exhibited significant body weight loss. Additionally, obese mice exhibited not only reduced neural activity, but also decreased presynaptic and postsynaptic activities, while MFE-treated mice exhibited recovery of these activities. Finally, cognitive deficits induced by the high-fat diet were recovered by cotreatment with MFE in the novel object recognition test. Our findings suggest that the antiobesity effects of MFE resulted in recovery of the cognitive deficits induced by the high-fat diet by regulation of neural and synaptic activities.

  13. Cognitive and fine motor deficits in a pediatric sickle cell disease cohort of mixed ethnic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Luise; Lobitz, Stephan; Koustenis, Elisabeth; Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Hernáiz Driever, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is an important feature of pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) and may lead to cognitive and motor impairment. Our cross-sectional study examined the incidence and severity of these impairments in a pediatric cohort without clinical cerebrovascular events from Berlin of mixed ethnic origin. Thirty-two SCD patients (mean age 11.14 years, range 7.0-17.25 years; males 14) were evaluated for full-scale intelligence (IQ) (German version WISC-III), fine motor function (digital writing tablet), and executive function (planning, attention, working memory, and visual-spatial abilities) with the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT) program and the Tower of London (ToL). Data on clinical risk factors were retrieved from medical records. Full-scale IQ of patients was preserved, whereas performance IQ was significantly reduced (91.19 (SD 12.17) d = 0.7, p = 0.007). SCD patients scored significantly lower than healthy peers when tested for executive and fine motor functions, e.g., planning time in the ToL (6.73 s (SD 3.21) vs. 5.9 s in healthy peers (SD 2.33), d = 0.5, p = origin exhibited inferior executive abilities and reduced fine motor skills. Our study is limited by the small size of our cohort as well as the lack for control of sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors modulating higher functions but highlights the need for early screening, prevention, and specific interventions for these deficits.

  14. Role of nicotine on cognitive and behavioral deficits in sepsis-surviving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Franco B; Prediger, Rui D; Silva, Mônica V; de Sousa, João Batista; Carneiro, Fabiana P; Gasbarri, Antonella; Tomaz, Carlos; Queiroz, Amadeu J; Martins, Natália T; Ferreira, Vania M

    2013-04-24

    Sepsis and its complications are important causes of mortality in intensive care units and sepsis survivors may present long-term cognitive and emotional impairments, including memory deficits and anxiety symptoms. In the present study, we investigated whether repeated nicotine administration can affect the behavioral changes in sepsis-surviving rats. Male Wistar rats were divided in two groups: sham-operated and experimental sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The animals were injected subcutaneously with nicotine (0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle once a day during 1 week before and/or 1 week after sepsis induction. Thirty minutes after the last administration (i.e., 7 days after surgery), the animals were tested in the open field, elevated plus-maze and step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. The repeated nicotine treatment did not affect the survival rate in the sepsis group (50%). Moreover, no significant changes on locomotor activity were observed in the sepsis group while the treatment with nicotine during 1 week after surgery reduced the locomotion of sepsis-surviving rats in the open field. It is important to note that both schedules of nicotine treatment (prior and/or after CLP) improved the sepsis-induced anxiogenic-like responses. Interestingly, nicotine was able to improve short- and long-term inhibitory avoidance memory impairments, observed in sepsis survivors, only when administered during 2 consecutive weeks (i.e., prior and after CLP). Taken together, these results indicate that repeated nicotine administration does not alter the survival rate in rats submitted to CLP and provide new evidence that nicotine can improve long-lasting memory impairments and anxiogenic-like responses in sepsis-surviving animals.

  15. Cognitive deficits in interleukin-10-deficient mice after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richwine, Amy F.; Sparkman, Nathan L.; Dilger, Ryan N.; Buchanan, Jessica B.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is important for regulating inflammation but whether it protects against infection-related deficits in cognitive function is unknown. Therefore, the current study evaluated sickness behavior, hippocampal-dependent matching-to-place performance and several inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins in wild type (IL-10+/+) and IL-10-deficient (IL-10−/−) mice after i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Additionally, morphology of dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the dorsal CA1 hippocampus was assessed. Treatment with LPS increased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) mRNA in all brain areas examined including the hippocampus, in both IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice but the increase was largest in IL-10−/− mice. Plasma IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα were also higher in IL-10−/− mice compared to IL-10+/+ mice after LPS. Consistent with increased inflammatory cytokines in IL-10−/− mice after LPS treatment, were a more lengthy sickness behavior syndrome and a more prominent reduction in hippocampal levels of nerve growth factor mRNA; brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA was reduced similarly in both genotypes after LPS. In a test of hippocampal-dependent learning and memory that required mice to integrate new information with previously learned information and switch strategies to master a task, IL-10−/− mice were found to be less efficient after LPS than were similarly treated wild type mice. LPS did not affect morphology of dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the dorsal CA1 hippocampus in either genotype. Taken together the results are interpreted to suggest that during peripheral infection IL-10 inhibits sickness behavior and tribulations in hippocampal-dependent working memory via its propensity to mitigate inflammation. We conclude that IL-10 is critical for maintaining normal neuro-immune communication during infection. PMID:19272439

  16. The alteration of autophagy and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats with natural aging-dependent cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Feng, Linjing; Li, Junnan; Lan, Xiaoxin; A, Lixiang; Lv, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Li

    2017-09-15

    The present study was aim to explore aging-dependent changes in hippocampal autophagy and apoptosis in a natural aging rat model from adult to old stages and to discover a suitable age for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Wistar rats at 5, 18 and 24months of age were used to mimic the adulthood, initial old, and old phases, respectively. The learning and cognitive ability of the rats was detected by the Morris water maze test. Morphological changes in the hippocampus were observed. Expressions of apoptosis and autophagy-related proteins were examined by Western blot. The adult group (5months) exhibited high levels of autophagy related p-ULK p-ULK-1/ULK-1 ratio, Beclin-1, LC3II and cell survival, maintaining normal learning and cognitive function and integrated hippocampal morphology. The initial old group (18 months) presented a reduced number of neurons and cognitive deficits, and exhibited high levels of apoptosis related Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, Caspase-3 activation and autophagy related p-ULK p-ULK-1/ULK-1 ratio, Beclin-1, LC3II compared to the adult group. The old group (24 months) exhibited a high level of apoptosis related Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, Caspase-3 activation and a low level of autophagy related p-ULK p-ULK-1/ULK-1 ratio, Beclin-1, LC3II compared to its younger group, as well as significant neuronal death and cognitive deficits. The degree of autophagy was generally consistent with its negative regulator, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis, in all groups. Our data suggest that cognitive deficits are first observed in the initial old stage. The levels of autophagy and apoptosis tend to be opposite in the adult and old phases. High levels of autophagy and apoptosis coexist in the initial old stage. Our study indicates that up-regulation of autophagy in the initial old phase to anti-cognitive deficits must be further evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of erythropoietin on cognition in affective disorders - Associations with baseline deficits and change in subjective cognitive complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Caroline Vintergaard; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars V

    2016-01-01

    impairment predicted treatment-efficacy. Pearson correlations were used to assess associations between objective and subjective cognition, quality of life and socio-occupational capacity. EPO improved speed of complex cognitive processing across affective disorders at weeks 9 and 14 (p≤0.05). In EPO......-efficacy and (III) if cognitive improvement correlates with better subjective cognitive function, quality of life and socio-occupational capacity. Patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder were randomized to eight weekly EPO (N=40) or saline (N=39) infusions. Cognition, mood, quality of life and socio...... improvement correlated with reduced cognitive complaints but not with quality of life or socio-occupational function. As the analyses were performed post-hoc, findings are only hypothesis-generating. In conclusion, pro-cognitive effects of EPO occurred across affective disorders. Neuropsychological screening...

  18. Metacognition-augmented cognitive remediation training reduces jumping to conclusions and overconfidence but not neurocognitive deficits in psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen eMoritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with schizophrenia display neurocognitive deficits (e.g. memory deficits as well as inflated cognitive biases (e.g. jumping to conclusions. Both cognitive domains are implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder and are known to compromise functional outcome. At present, there is a dearth of effective treatment options.A total of 90 patients with schizophrenia were recruited online (a diagnosis of schizophrenia had been confirmed in a large subgroup during a previous hospital admission. Subsequent to a baseline assessment encompassing psychopathology, self-reported cognition as well as objective memory and reasoning tests, patients were randomized to one of three conditions: standard cognitive remediation (mybraintraining, metacognition-augmented cognition remediation (CR condition (variant of mybraintraining which encouraged patients to reduce speed of decision-making and attenuate response confidence when they made high-confidence judgements and hasty incorrect decisions and a waitlist control group. Patients were retested after six weeks and again three months after the second assessment. Groups did not differ on psychopathology and neurocognitive parameters at any timepoint. However, at follow-up the metacognitive-augmented CR group displayed a significant reduction on jumping to conclusions and overconfidence. Treatment adherence correlated with a reduction of depression; gains in the training exercises from the standard mybraintraining condition were correlated with improved objective memory performance. The study suggests that metacognition-augmented CR may ameliorate cognitive biases but not neurocognition. The study ties in well with prior research showing that neurocognitive dysfunctions are rather resistant to change; the failure to detect significant improvement of CR or metacognition-augmented CR on psychopathology and neurocognition over time may partly be attributed to a number of methodological

  19. Dynamic balance in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and its relationship with cognitive functions and cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Michal; Schwabova, Jaroslava Paulasova; Hlavka, Zdenek; Ptacek, Radek; Surman, Craig BH

    2017-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is linked to the presence of motor deficiencies, including balance deficits. The cerebellum serves as an integrative structure for balance control and is also involved in cognition, including timing and anticipatory regulation. Cerebellar development may be delayed in children and adolescents with ADHD, and inconsistent reaction time is commonly seen in ADHD. We hypothesized that dynamic balance deficits would be present in children with ADHD and they would correlate with attention and cerebellar functions. Methods Sixty-two children with ADHD and no other neurological conditions and 62 typically developing (TD) children were examined with five trials of the Phyaction Balance Board, an electronic balancing platform. Cerebellar clinical symptoms were evaluated using an international ataxia rating scale. Conners’ Continuous Performance Test was used to evaluate patterns of reaction. Results Children with ADHD had poorer performance on balancing tasks, compared to TD children (Peffect size of the difference between the groups increased continuously from the first to the last trial. Balance score in both groups was related to the variation in the reaction time, including reaction time standard error (r =0.25; P=0.0409, respectively, r =0.31; P=0.0131) and Variability of Standard Error (r =0.28; P=0.0252, respectively, r =0.41; Pdeficits and impaired cognitive functioning could reflect a common cerebellar dysfunction in ADHD children. PMID:28356743

  20. Sleep Disturbance and Cognitive Deficits in Bipolar Disorder: Toward An Integrated Examination of Disorder Maintenance and Functional Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Elaine M.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is frequently associated with a number of poor outcomes including, but not limited to, a significant impairment in the ability to return to premorbid levels of occupational and psychosocial functioning, often despite the remission of mood symptoms. Sleep disturbance is an oft-reported residual symptom of manic and depressive episodes that has likewise been associated with the onset of manic episodes. Also present during affective episodes as well as the inter-episode periods are reports of deficits in cognitive functioning, which many reports have shown to play an important role in this persistent disability. Despite the presence of deficits in these two domains of functioning during affective episodes as well as the inter-episode phase, there has been no evaluation of the degree to which these systems may interact to maintain such high rates of functional disability. The aim of this review is to examine evidence for the study of the relationship between sleep disturbance and cognitive impairments in bipolar disorder as well as the ways in which deficits in these domains may work together to maintain functional impairment. PMID:23123569

  1. The communicative impairment as a core feature of schizophrenia: Frequency of pragmatic deficit, cognitive substrates, and relation with quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambini, Valentina; Arcara, Giorgio; Bechi, Margherita; Buonocore, Mariachiara; Cavallaro, Roberto; Bosia, Marta

    2016-11-01

    Impairments in specific aspects of pragmatic competence, supporting the use of language in context, are largely documented in schizophrenia and might represent an indicator of poor outcome. Yet pragmatics is rarely included in clinical settings. This paper aims to promote a clinical consideration of pragmatics as a target of assessment and intervention. We investigated the frequency of the pragmatic deficit, its cognitive substrates, and the relation with quality of life. Pragmatic abilities were compared in a sample of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls based on a comprehensive pragmatic test (APACS). We assessed also for psychopathology, cognition, social cognition, and quality of life. We explored the co-occurrence of deficits in different domains, and we used multiple regressions to investigate the effect of cognition and social cognition on pragmatics, and of pragmatics on quality of life. Pragmatic abilities, especially comprehending discourse and non-literal meanings, were compromised in schizophrenia, with 77% of patients falling below cutoff. Pragmatic deficit co-occurred with cognitive or socio-cognitive deficits in approximately 30% of cases. Multiple regression analysis confirmed the interplay of cognition and social cognition in pragmatic behavior. Quality of life was predicted by symptoms and by pragmatic abilities. The high frequency of impairment suggests that the pragmatic deficit is a core feature of schizophrenia, associated with quality of life. Cognitive and socio-cognitive abilities might represent necessary though not sufficient building blocks for the acquisition of pragmatic abilities throughout development. Therefore, a more precise incorporation of pragmatics in the description of the pathology is of high clinical and translational relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potentiation of M1 Muscarinic Receptor Reverses Plasticity Deficits and Negative and Cognitive Symptoms in a Schizophrenia Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, A; Rook, J M; Dickerson, J W; Roop, G N; Morrison, R D; Jalan-Sakrikar, N; Lamsal, A; Noetzel, M J; Poslusney, M S; Wood, M R; Melancon, B J; Stauffer, S R; Xiang, Z; Daniels, J S; Niswender, C M; Jones, C K; Lindsley, C W; Conn, P J

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficits in signaling of the M1 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and also display impaired cortical long-term depression (LTD). We report that selective activation of the M1 mAChR subtype induces LTD in PFC and that this response is completely lost after repeated administration of phencyclidine (PCP), a mouse model of schizophrenia. Furthermore, discovery of a novel, systemically active M1 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), VU0453595, allowed us to evaluate the impact of selective potentiation of M1 on induction of LTD and behavioral deficits in PCP-treated mice. Interestingly, VU0453595 fully restored impaired LTD as well as deficits in cognitive function and social interaction in these mice. These results provide critical new insights into synaptic changes that may contribute to behavioral deficits in this mouse model and support a role for selective M1 PAMs as a novel approach for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  3. mTOR and autophagy in normal brain aging and caloric restriction ameliorating age-related cognition deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengying; Chu, Xiaolei; Yin, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Hairui; Niu, Yanmei; Fu, Li

    2014-05-01

    Defect of autophagy is common to many neurodegenerative disorders because it serves as a major degradation pathway for the clearance of various aggregate-prone proteins. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which is recognized as the most important negative regulator of autophagy, is also involved in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of mTOR and its dependent autophagy in normal brain during aging remains unknown. Furthermore, caloric restriction (CR) is frequently used as a tool to study mechanisms behind aging and age-associated diseases because CR can prevent age-related diseases and prolong lifespan in several model organisms. Inhibiting mTOR and promoting autophagy activity play roles in aging delayed by CR. However, whether CR can ameliorate age-related cognition deficits by inhibiting mTOR and activate autophagy in hippocampus needs to be further investigated. Here we showed a decline of autophagic degradation in mice hippocampus in correlation with age-dependent cognitive dysfunction, whereas the activity of mTOR and its upstream brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling was decreased with aging. In addition, facilitating the mTOR pathway successfully declines and sustains autophagic degradation with aging in hippocampus by CR treatment and is involved in CR by ameliorating age-related cognitive deficits.

  4. Auditory and cognitive deficits associated with acquired amusia after stroke: a magnetoencephalography and neuropsychological follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppo Särkämö

    Full Text Available Acquired amusia is a common disorder after damage to the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. However, its neurocognitive mechanisms, especially the relative contribution of perceptual and cognitive factors, are still unclear. We studied cognitive and auditory processing in the amusic brain by performing neuropsychological testing as well as magnetoencephalography (MEG measurements of frequency and duration discrimination using magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm recordings. Fifty-three patients with a left (n = 24 or right (n = 29 hemisphere MCA stroke (MRI verified were investigated 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after the stroke. Amusia was evaluated using the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA. We found that amusia caused by right hemisphere damage (RHD, especially to temporal and frontal areas, was more severe than amusia caused by left hemisphere damage (LHD. Furthermore, the severity of amusia was found to correlate with weaker frequency MMNm responses only in amusic RHD patients. Additionally, within the RHD subgroup, the amusic patients who had damage to the auditory cortex (AC showed worse recovery on the MBEA as well as weaker MMNm responses throughout the 6-month follow-up than the non-amusic patients or the amusic patients without AC damage. Furthermore, the amusic patients both with and without AC damage performed worse than the non-amusic patients on tests of working memory, attention, and cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest domain-general cognitive deficits to be the primary mechanism underlying amusia without AC damage whereas amusia with AC damage is associated with both auditory and cognitive deficits.

  5. Effect of exercise-induced neurogenesis on cognitive function deficit in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-04-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is strongly correlated with progressive cognitive decline in neurological diseases, such as vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease. Exercise can enhance learning and memory, and delay age-related cognitive decline. However, exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis in experimental animals submitted to CCH has not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate whether hippocampal neurogenesis induced by exercise can improve cognitive deficit in a rat model of VaD. Male Wistar rats (age, 8 weeks; weight, 292±3.05 g; n=12-13/group) were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2VO) or sham‑surgery and each group was then subdivided randomly into no exercise and treadmill exercise groups. Exercise groups performed treadmill exercise daily at 15 m/min for 30 min for 4 weeks from the third to the seventh week after 2VO. It was demonstrated that the number of neural progenitor cells and mature neurons in the subgranular zone of 2VO rats was increased by exercise, and cognitive impairment in 2VO rats was attenuated by treadmill exercise. In addition, mature brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampus were increased in the exercise groups. Thus the present study suggests that exercise delays cognitive decline by the enhancing neurogenesis and increasing BDNF expression in the context of VaD.

  6. Sodium channel cleavage is associated with aberrant neuronal activity and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Brian F; Leiser, Steven C; Ling, Huai-Ping; Nagy, Reka; Breysse, Nathalie; Zhang, Xiaohong; Hazra, Anupam; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D; Wood, Andrew; Pangalos, Menelas N; Reinhart, Peter H; Chin, Jeannie

    2013-04-17

    BACE1 is the rate-limiting enzyme that cleaves amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the amyloid β peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1, which is elevated in AD patients and APP transgenic mice, also cleaves the β2-subunit of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navβ2). Although increased BACE1 levels are associated with Navβ2 cleavage in AD patients, whether Navβ2 cleavage occurs in APP mice had not yet been examined. Such a finding would be of interest because of its potential impact on neuronal activity: previous studies demonstrated that BACE1-overexpressing mice exhibit excessive cleavage of Navβ2 and reduced sodium current density, but the phenotype associated with loss of function mutations in either Navβ-subunits or pore-forming α-subunits is epilepsy. Because mounting evidence suggests that epileptiform activity may play an important role in the development of AD-related cognitive deficits, we examined whether enhanced cleavage of Navβ2 occurs in APP transgenic mice, and whether it is associated with aberrant neuronal activity and cognitive deficits. We found increased levels of BACE1 expression and Navβ2 cleavage fragments in cortical lysates from APP transgenic mice, as well as associated alterations in Nav1.1α expression and localization. Both pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons exhibited evidence of increased Navβ2 cleavage. Moreover, the magnitude of alterations in sodium channel subunits was associated with aberrant EEG activity and impairments in the Morris water maze. Together, these results suggest that altered processing of voltage-gated sodium channels may contribute to aberrant neuronal activity and cognitive deficits in AD.

  7. Cognitive Deficits in Chronic Stroke Patients: Neuropsychological Assessment, Depression, and Self-Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne E. Nakling

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Following stroke, clinicians are challenged to detect and untangle symptoms of cognitive dysfunction and mood disorders. Additionally, they need to evaluate the informative value of self-reports to identify patients in need of further attendance. Aims: To examine the association between neuropsychological measures, symptoms of depression, and self-reported cognitive function. Methods: One-hundred and five chronic stroke patients underwent assessment covering 6 cognitive domains and answered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Memory and Thinking Scale from the Stroke Impact Scale 1 year after stroke. Age and gender difference in cognitive impairment were examined; linear regression was used to predict depression scores. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were used to validate self-reported functioning against performance on cognitive tests. Results: Cognitive impairment was observed in 60% of the patients in at least 1 cognitive domain. Cognitive performance was associated with symptoms of depression as well as with self-reported cognitive function. The final analyses revealed low sensitivity and specificity for the Memory and Thinking subscale from the Stroke Impact Scale. Conclusion: Cognitive impairment occurs frequently even in patients in a chronic phase after stroke and predicts symptoms of depression. Using the Stroke Impact Scale, clinicians should be aware of low sensitivity of self-reported cognitive function.

  8. Cognitive computer training in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus no intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida; Leckman, James F; Lindschou, Jane

    2015-01-01

    continue to have difficulties with cognitive functions despite medical treatment, and up to 30 % do not respond to pharmacological treatment. Inadequate medical compliance and the long-term effects of treatment make it necessary to explore nonpharmacological and supplementary treatments for ADHD. Treatment...... of cognition, mostly on the working memory or attention but with poor generalization of training on other cognitive functions and functional outcome. Children with ADHD have a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is important that cognitive training target multiple cognitive functions. METHODS....../DESIGN: This multicenter randomized clinical superiority trial aims to investigate the effect of "ACTIVATE™," a computer program designed to improve a range of cognitive skills and ADHD symptoms. A total of 122 children with ADHD, aged 6 to 13 years, will be randomized to an intervention or a control group...

  9. 阅读障碍的主要认知损伤%The Maj or Cognitive Deficits of Dyslexia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄雅洁; 杨震; 汪明

    2016-01-01

    对字母语言和非字母语言阅读障碍的认知缺陷的研究发现,语音意识缺陷均表现在两类语言中,但二者所存在的问题又有明显的不同。对字母语言而言,阅读障碍的根源问题是语音技能和快速自动命名缺陷;而对汉语来说,阅读障碍的主要缺陷则集中在正字法知识技能、快速命名、序列内隐记忆等方面。我国相关研究领域还存在很多不足和缺乏,应该建立完整的汉语阅读障碍理论和研究体系。%Researches on cognitive deficits of dyslexia in alphabetic languages and non-alphabetic languages claim that def-icits of phonological skills exist in both kinds of languages,while these deficits are apparently quite different from each other. Findings on dyslexic alphabetic readers suggest that the nature of dyslexia lies in deficits of phonological skills and rapid auto-matic naming.Chinese dyslexia,however,has different manifestations with reading disorders in alphabetic languages.The main deficits of Chinese reading disorders include orthographic skills deficiency,slower rapid automatic naming speed,and less implicit sequence learning.In China,studies in these fields are relatively scarce and insufficient;therefore,a comprehensive system of theory and research on Chinese dyslexia remains to be constructed.

  10. Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) signaling modulates intermittent hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and cognitive deficits in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Deepti; Ramesh, Vijay; Li, Richard C; Schally, Andrew V; Gozal, David

    2013-11-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, such as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), leads to degenerative changes in the hippocampus, and is associated with spatial learning deficits in adult mice. In both patients and murine models of OSA, the disease is associated with suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion, which is actively involved in the growth, development, and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work showed that exogenous GH therapy attenuated neurocognitive deficits elicited by IH during sleep in rats. Here, we show that administration of the Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 attenuates IH-induced neurocognitive deficits, anxiety, and depression in mice along with reduction in oxidative stress markers such as MDA and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and increases in hypoxia inducible factor-1α DNA binding and up-regulation of insulin growth factor-1 and erythropoietin expression. In contrast, treatment with a GHRH antagonist (MIA-602) during intermittent hypoxia did not affect any of the IH-induced deleterious effects in mice. Thus, exogenous GHRH administered as the formulation of a GHRH agonist may provide a viable therapeutic intervention to protect IH-vulnerable brain regions from OSA-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. Sleep apnea, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH), is associated with substantial cognitive and behavioral deficits. Here, we show that administration of a GHRH agonist (JI-34) reduces oxidative stress, increases both HIF-1α nuclear binding and downstream expression of IGF1 and erythropoietin (EPO) in hippocampus and cortex, and markedly attenuates water maze performance deficits in mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia during sleep.

  11. Cognitive deficits in the rat chronic mild stress model for depression: relation to anhedonic-like responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kim; Andreasen T., Jesper; Bouzinova, Elena V.

    2009-01-01

    in consumption of a sucrose solution, indicating an anhedonic-like state. The remaining rats did not reduce their sucrose intake, but appeared resilient to the stress-induced effects on sucrose intake. Cognitive profiling of the CMS rats revealed that chronic stress had a negative effect on performance...... in the spontaneous alternation test, possibly reflecting a deficit in working memory. This effect was independent of whether the stressed rats were anhedonic-like or stress-resilient as measured by their sucrose intake. CMS did not influence performance in passive avoidance and auditory cued fear conditioning......The chronic mild stress (CMS) protocol is widely used to evoke depressive-like behaviours in laboratory rats. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of chronic stress on cognitive performance. About 70% of rats exposed to 7 weeks of chronic mild stress showed a gradual reduction...

  12. Cognitive Inhibitory Control and Arithmetic Word Problem Solving in Children with Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigem Sabagh-Sabbagh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A sample of 30 subjects, 10 with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder(ADHD and 20 non-ADHD children, statistically controlled byage, gender, academic grades and normal full scale intelligence quotient,was selected. To measure cognitive inhibitory control, a math problem solving ability test containing four problems for each level with verbal and numerical irrelevant content was administered. ADHD children exhibited significantly inferior performance in choosing correct answers (p = 0.011 with a large effect size (d = 1.00 and a significantly superior number of irrelevant answers (p = 0.004 with a very large effect size. In conclusion ADHD children showed a cognitive inhibitory control disorder, measured by math problem solving ability.

  13. Measuring Specific, Rather than Generalized, Cognitive Deficits and Maximizing Between-Group Effect Size in Studies of Cognition and Cognitive Change

    OpenAIRE

    Silverstein, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    While cognitive impairment in schizophrenia is easy to demonstrate, it has been much more difficult to measure a specific cognitive process unconfounded by the influence of other cognitive processes and noncognitive factors (eg, sedation, low motivation) that affect test scores. With the recent interest in the identification of neurophysiology-linked cognitive probes for clinical trials, the issue of isolating specific cognitive processes has taken on increased importance. Recent advances in ...

  14. Are There Any Connections between Language Deficits and Cognitive Slowing in Alzheimer's Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Schecker; Carsten Kochler; Klaus Schmidtke; Reinhold Rauh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speech disorders already occur in the early phases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As a possible cause, problems of executive processes are discussed. Cognitive slowing is also repeatedly addressed. Aims: Are there any connections between cognitive slowing and speech disorders in AD? And is there a relationship between cognitive slowing and executive processes? Methods: The data of 72 healthy controls and 52 AD patients were examined with regard to their language performance and thei...

  15. Assessing Social-Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia With the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test

    OpenAIRE

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Pogue-Geile, Michael F.; Newhill, Christina E.; Hogarty, Gerard E.; Matcheri S Keshavan

    2008-01-01

    The emotion management subscale of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) has recently been recommended by the National Institute of Mental Health Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia committee as the sole measure of social cognition for trials of cognitive enhancement in schizophrenia, yet the psychometric properties of this subscale and the larger instrument in schizophrenia patients have not been thoroughly examined. This research ...

  16. Cognitive computer training in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus no intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida; Leckman, James F; Lindschou, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    /DESIGN: This multicenter randomized clinical superiority trial aims to investigate the effect of "ACTIVATE™," a computer program designed to improve a range of cognitive skills and ADHD symptoms. A total of 122 children with ADHD, aged 6 to 13 years, will be randomized to an intervention or a control group...... of training and in a 12- and 24-week follow-up. DISCUSSION: Results of this trial will provide useful information on the effectiveness of computer training focusing on several cognitive functions. Cognitive training has the potential to reduce cognitive dysfunctions and to become a new treatment option, which...

  17. Comprehensive treatments for social cognitive deficits in schizophrenia: A critical review and effect-size analysis of controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Matthew M; Gagen, Emily; Rocha, Nuno B F; Machado, Sergio; Penn, David L

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia have targeted social cognitive deficits. A critical literature review and effect-size (ES) analysis was conducted to investigate the efficacy of comprehensive programs of social cognitive training in schizophrenia. Results revealed 16 controlled studies consisting of seven models of comprehensive treatment with only three of these treatment models investigated in more than one study. The effects of social cognitive training were reported in 11/15 studies that included facial affect recognition skills (ES=.84) and 10/13 studies that included theory-of-mind (ES=.70) as outcomes. Less than half (4/9) of studies that measured attributional style as an outcome reported effects of treatment, but effect sizes across studies were significant (ESs=.30-.52). The effect sizes for symptoms were modest, but, with the exception of positive symptoms, significant (ESs=.32-.40). The majority of trials were randomized (13/16), selected active control conditions (11/16) and included at least 30 participants (12/16). Concerns for this area of research include the absence of blinded outcome raters in more than 50% of trials and low rates of utilization of procedures for maintaining treatment fidelity. These findings provide preliminary support for the broader use of comprehensive social cognitive training procedures as a psychosocial intervention for schizophrenia.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, improves learning and memory in high-fat diet-induced cognitive deficits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev; Ramagiri, Shruti

    2015-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome is increasingly recognized for its effects on cognitive health. Recent studies have highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in metabolic syndrome and cognitive functions. The present study was designed to investigate the possible therapeutic role of a HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), in cognitive impairment associated with metabolic syndrome. To ascertain the mechanisms involved, we fed mice with high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 weeks and examined changes in behavioral and biochemical/oxidative stress markers. Mice subjected to HFD exhibited characteristic features of metabolic disorder, viz., hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Moreover, these mice showed severe deficits in learning and memory as assessed by the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tasks along with elevated oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in brain homogenates. The observed changes occurred concurrently with reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In contrast, the mice treated with the HDAC inhibitor, TSA (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), showed a significant and dose-dependent reduction in serum glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol along with improvement in HDL-cholesterol levels and learning and memory performance. TSA treatment also results in alleviation of oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. Moreover, TSA significantly augmented the BDNF levels in HFD-fed mice. Thus, based upon these observations, it may be suggested that HDAC inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy to combat cognitive impairment associated with metabolic syndrome.

  19. A Comparison of the Relation of Depression, and Cognitive, Motor and Functional Deficits in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ghaffari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim and background: One of the most important psychological disorders after stroke is depression, which leads to reduced quality of life, optimal rehabilitation failure, loss of cognitive tasks and decrease in the recovery process. In this research, relation between patterns of depression and cognitive, motor and function deficits in people with chronic stroke was studied. Methods and materials: In a pilot cross-sectional study, 40 patients with chronic stroke (more than 6 months were enrolled. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory, cognition (attention test TMT-A & B and Wechsler memory, motor (Motorcity index, basic activities of daily living (Barthel scale and instrumental activities of daily living (Lawton scale were evaluated. Results: The results of the study revealed a significant positive correlation between post stroke depression and verbal memory (r=0.440،P<.05, attention (r=0.615،P<.05, motor function(r-0.368،P<.05, independence in basic activities of daily living (r=0.781،P<.05 and instrumental activities of daily living (r=0.741, P<.05. Conclusion: According to the findings, further studies of factors affecting post stroke depression (PSD clinical and practical aspects are necessary. Cognitive rehabilitation programs with motor rehabilitation can decrease depression and gain independence in activities of daily living and more participation in society activities.

  20. Sluggish cognitive tempo predicts a different pattern of impairment in the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, predominantly inattentive type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Caryn L; Mann, Miranda

    2002-03-01

    Compared 2 groups of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/IA)--those with high scores on a composite measure of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) and those without--using a large, school-based sample of children for which previous comparisons between ADHD subtypes have been reported. Although the 2 groups did not differ on level of attention or learning problems, high-SCT ADHD/IA children were rated by teachers as showing less externalizing behavior and higher levels of unhappiness, anxiety/depression, withdrawn behavior, and social dysfunction. Thus, SCT identifies a more homogeneous subgroup of ADHD/IA children who are, relative to the entire Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994) diagnosed ADHD/IA group, more similar to those classified in previous research as "attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity." These results support a reconsideration of SCT symptoms as a component of diagnostic criteria for a category of nonhyperactive attention deficit disorder.

  1. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of cognitive control and neurosensory deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Andrew R; Hanlon, Faith M; Dodd, Andrew B; Ling, Josef M; Klimaj, Stefan D; Meier, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury patients (mTBI) frequently report symptoms of increased distractability and sensory disturbances during mutisensory stimulation. These common post-concussive symptoms could putatively result from dysfunction within the cognitive control network (CCN; top-down) or from unisensory cortex (bottom-up) itself. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and high-resolution structural data were therefore prospectively collected during a multisensory (audio-visual) cognitive control task from 46 mTBI patients within 3 weeks of injury and 46 matched healthy controls (HC), with a subset of participants returning at 4 months. Multisensory stimuli were presented at two frequencies to manipulate cognitive and perceptual load. Patients self-reported more cognitive, emotional, somatic, vestibular and visual symptoms relative to HC, which improved, but did not entirely resolve, over the 4 month follow-up period. There were no group differences in behavior or functional activation during cognitive control (incongruent--congruent trials). In contrast, patients exhibited abnormal activation within different regions of visual cortex that depended on whether attention was focused on auditory or visual information streams. Patients also exhibited increased activation within bilateral inferior parietal lobules during higher cognitive/perceptual loads, suggesting a compensatory mechanism to achieve similar levels of behavioral performance. Functional abnormalities within the visual cortex and inferior parietal lobules were only partially resolved at 4 months post-injury, suggesting that neural abnormalities may take longer to resolve than behavioral measures used in most clinical settings. In summary, current results indicate that abnormalities within unisensory cortex (particularly visual areas) following mTBI, which likely contribute to deficits commonly reported during multisensory stimulation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Metacognition-augmented cognitive remediation training reduces jumping to conclusions and overconfidence but not neurocognitive deficits in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Thoering, Teresa; Kühn, Simone; Willenborg, Bastian; Westermann, Stefan; Nagel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with schizophrenia display neurocognitive deficits (e.g., memory impairment) as well as inflated cognitive biases (e.g., jumping to conclusions). Both cognitive domains are implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder and are known to compromise functional outcome. At present, there is a dearth of effective treatment options. A total of 90 patients with schizophrenia were recruited online (a diagnosis of schizophrenia had been confirmed in a large subgroup during a previous hospital admission). Subsequent to a baseline assessment encompassing psychopathology, self-reported cognition as well as objective memory and reasoning tests, patients were randomized to one of three conditions: standard cognitive remediation (mybraintraining), metacognition-augmented cognition remediation (CR) condition (variant of mybraintraining which encouraged patients to reduce speed of decision-making and attenuate response confidence when participants made high-confidence judgements and hasty incorrect decisions) and a waitlist control group. Patients were retested after 6 weeks and again 3 months after the second assessment. Groups did not differ on psychopathology and neurocognitive parameters at any timepoint. However, at follow-up the metacognitive-augmented CR group displayed a significant reduction on jumping to conclusions and overconfidence. Treatment adherence correlated with a reduction of depression; gains in the training exercises from the standard mybraintraining condition were correlated with improved objective memory performance. The study suggests that metacognition-augmented CR may ameliorate cognitive biases but not neurocognition. The study ties in well with prior research showing that neurocognitive dysfunctions are rather resistant to change; the failure to detect significant improvement of CR or metacognition-augmented CR on psychopathology and neurocognition over time may partly be attributed to a number of methodological limitations of

  3. Designing websites for persons with cognitive deficits: Design and usability of a psychoeducational intervention for persons with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Armando J; Sinkule, Jennifer; Haas, Gretchen L; Spring, Michael B; Litschge, Christine M; Newhill, Christina E; Ganguli, Rohan; Anderson, Carol M

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the design elements that influence the ability of persons with severe mental illness (SMI) and cognitive deficits to use a website, and to use this knowledge to design a web-based telehealth application to deliver a psychoeducation program to persons with schizophrenia and their families. Usability testing was conducted with 98 persons with SMI. First, individual website design elements were tested. Based on these results, theoretical website design models were used to create several alternative websites. These designs were tested for their ability to facilitate use by persons with SMI. The final website design is presented. The results indicate that commonly prescribed design models and guidelines produce websites that are poorly suited and confusing to persons with SMI. Our findings suggest an alternative model that should be considered when designing websites and other telehealth interventions for this population. Implications for future studies addressing the characteristics of accessible designs for persons with SMI and cognitive deficits are discussed.

  4. Scientific biography, cognitive deficits, and laboratory practice. James McKeen Cattell and early American experimental psychology, 1880-1904.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Michael M

    2010-09-01

    Despite widespread interest in individual life histories, few biographies of scientists make use of insights derived from psychology, another discipline that studies people, their thoughts, and their actions. This essay argues that recent theoretical work in psychology and tools developed for clinical psychological practice can help biographical historians of science create and present fuller portraits of their subjects' characters and temperaments and more nuanced analyses of how these traits helped shape their subjects' scientific work. To illustrate this thesis, the essay examines the early career of James McKeen Cattell--an influential late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century experimental psychologist--through a lens offered by psychology and argues that Cattell's actual laboratory practices derived from an "accommodation" to a long-standing "cognitive deficit." These practices in turn enabled Cattell to achieve more precise experimental results than could any of his contemporaries; and their students readily adopted them, along with their behavioral implications. The essay concludes that, in some ways, American psychology's early twentieth-century move toward a behavioral understanding of psychological phenomena can be traced to Cattell's personal cognitive deficit. It closes by reviewing several "remaining general questions" that this thesis suggests.

  5. RhoA-ROCK Inhibition Reverses Synaptic Remodeling and Motor and Cognitive Deficits Caused by Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulherkar, Shalaka; Firozi, Karen; Huang, Wei; Uddin, Mohammad Danish; Grill, Raymond J; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Robertson, Claudia; Tolias, Kimberley F

    2017-09-06

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes extensive neural damage, often resulting in long-term cognitive impairments. Unfortunately, effective treatments for TBI remain elusive. The RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target since it is activated by TBI and can promote the retraction of dendritic spines/synapses, which are critical for information processing and memory storage. To test this hypothesis, RhoA-ROCK signaling was blocked by RhoA deletion from postnatal neurons or treatment with the ROCK inhibitor fasudil. We found that TBI impairs both motor and cognitive performance and inhibiting RhoA-ROCK signaling alleviates these deficits. Moreover, RhoA-ROCK inhibition prevents TBI-induced spine remodeling and mature spine loss. These data argue that TBI elicits pathological spine remodeling that contributes to behavioral deficits by altering synaptic connections, and RhoA-ROCK inhibition enhances functional recovery by blocking this detrimental effect. As fasudil has been safely used in humans, our results suggest that it could be repurposed to treat TBI.

  6. Distinguishing between autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder by using behavioral checklists, cognitive assessments, and neuropsychological test battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Naomi; Ishitobi, Makoto; Arai, Sumiyoshi; Kawamura, Kaori; Asano, Mizuki; Inohara, Keisuke; Narimoto, Tadamasa; Wada, Yuji; Hiratani, Michio; Kosaka, Hirotaka

    2014-12-01

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) share many common symptoms, including attention deficit, behavioral problems, and difficulties with social skills. The aim of this study was to distinguish between ASD and ADHD by identifying the characteristic features of both the disorders, by using multidimensional assessments, including screening behavioral checklists, cognitive assessments, and comprehensive neurological battery. After screening for comorbid disorders, we carefully selected age-, sex-, IQ-, and socio-economic status-matched children with typical development (TD). In the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children, a lower score was observed for the ASD group than for the TD group in Picture concept, which is a subscale of perceptual reasoning. A lower score was shown by the ADHD group than by the TD group in the spatial working memory test in the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB(®)). Although ASD and ADHD have many similar symptoms, they can be differentiated by focusing on the behavioral and cognitive characteristics of executive function.

  7. Cognitive and socio-emotional deficits in platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Thi Hong Nguyen

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF is a potent mitogen. Extensive in vivo studies of PDGF and its receptor (PDGFR genes have reported that PDGF plays an important role in embryogenesis and development of the central nervous system (CNS. Furthermore, PDGF and the β subunit of the PDGF receptor (PDGFR-β have been reported to be associated with schizophrenia and autism. However, no study has reported on the effects of PDGF deletion on mice behavior. Here we generated novel mutant mice (PDGFR-β KO in which PDGFR-β was conditionally deleted in CNS neurons using the Cre/loxP system. Mice without the Cre transgene but with floxed PDGFR-β were used as controls. Both groups of mice reached adulthood without any apparent anatomical defects. These mice were further examined by conducting several behavioral tests for spatial memory, social interaction, conditioning, prepulse inhibition, and forced swimming. The test results indicated that the PDGFR-β KO mice show deficits in all of these areas. Furthermore, an immunohistochemical study of the PDGFR-β KO mice brain indicated that the number of parvalbumin (calcium-binding protein-positive (i.e., putatively γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons was low in the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex. Neurophysiological studies indicated that sensory-evoked gamma oscillation was low in the PDGFR-β KO mice, consistent with the observed reduction in the number of parvalbumin-positive neurons. These results suggest that PDGFR-β plays an important role in cognitive and socioemotional functions, and that deficits in this receptor may partly underlie the cognitive and socioemotional deficits observed in schizophrenic and autistic patients.

  8. ELEVATED LEVELS OF KYNURENIC ACID DURING GESTATION PRODUCE NEUROCHEMICAL, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND COGNITIVE DEFICITS IN ADULTHOOD: IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Michelle L.; Bortz, David M.; Pocivavsek, Ana; Fredericks, Peter J.; Jørgensen, Christinna V.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Leuner, Benedetta; Schwarcz, Robert; Bruno, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous negative modulator of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs), are elevated in the brains of patients with schizophrenia (SZ). We reported that increases of brain KYNA in rats, through dietary exposure to its precursor kynurenine from embryonic day (ED)15 to postnatal day (PD) 21, result in neurochemical and cognitive deficits in adulthood. The present experiments focused on the effects of prenatal exposure to elevated kynurenine on measures of prefrontal excitability known to be impaired in SZ. Pregnant dams were fed a mash containing kynurenine (100 mg/day; progeny = EKYNs) from ED15 until ED22. Controls were fed an unadulterated mash (progeny = ECONs). The dietary loading procedure elevated maternal and fetal plasma kynurenine (2223% and 693% above controls, respectively) and increased fetal KYNA (forebrain; 500% above controls) on ED21. Elevations in forebrain KYNA disappeared after termination of the loading (PD2), but KYNA levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were unexpectedly increased again when measured in adults (PD56-80; 75% above controls). We also observed changes in several markers of prefrontal excitability, including expression of the α7nAChR (22% and 17% reductions at PD2 and PD56-80), expression of mGluR2 (31% and 24% reductions at ED21 and PD56-80), dendritic spine density (11–14% decrease at PD56-80), subsensitive mesolimbic stimulation of glutamate release in PFC, and reversal/extra-dimensional shift deficits in the prefrontally-mediated set-shifting task. These results highlight the deleterious impact of elevated KYNA levels during sensitive periods of early development, which model the pathophysiological and cognitive deficits seen in SZ. PMID:25446576

  9. Combined uridine and choline administration improves cognitive deficits in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, N.M.W.J. de; Kiliaan, A.J.; Wilde, M.C. de; Broersen, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    Rationale. Hypertension is considered a risk factor for the development of cognitive disorders, because of its negative effects on cerebral vasculature and blood flow. Genetically induced hypertension in rats has been associated with a range of cognitive impairments. Therefore, spontaneously hyperte

  10. Combined uridine and choline administration improves cognitive deficits in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, N.M.W.J. de; Kiliaan, A.J.; Wilde, M.C. de; Broersen, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    Rationale. Hypertension is considered a risk factor for the development of cognitive disorders, because of its negative effects on cerebral vasculature and blood flow. Genetically induced hypertension in rats has been associated with a range of cognitive impairments. Therefore, spontaneously hyperte

  11. Reward modulation of cognitive function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study on the role of striatal dopamine

    OpenAIRE

    Aarts, Esther; van Holstein, Mieke; Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Kan, Cornelis; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by impairments in cognitive control, such as task-switching deficits. We investigated whether such problems, and their remediation by medication, reflect abnormal reward motivation and associated striatal dopamine transmission in ADHD. We used functional genetic neuroimaging to assess the effects of dopaminergic medication and reward motivation on task-switching and striatal BOLD signal in 23 adults with ADHD, ON and OFF methylphe...

  12. Social Cognition Impairments in Relation to General Cognitive Deficits, Injury Severity, and Prefrontal Lesions in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spikman, Jacoba M.; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Milders, Maarten V.; Veenstra, Wencke S.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2012-01-01

    Impairments in social behavior are frequently found in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients and are associated with an unfavorable outcome with regard to return to work and social reintegration. Neuropsychological tests measuring aspects of social cognition are thought to be sens

  13. A description of a cognitive rehabilitation programme evaluated in brain tumour patients with mild to moderate cognitive deficits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehring, K.; Aaronson, N.K.; Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Sitskoorn, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This series of articles for rehabilitation in practice aims to cover a knowledge element of the rehabilitation medicine curriculum. Nevertheless they are intended to be of interest to a multidisciplinary audience. The competency addressed in this article is cognitive rehabilitation.Background: There

  14. Cognitive deficits and levels of IQ in adolescent onset schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pagsberg, A Katrine; Hemmingsen, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    of attention, executive functions, reaction time, and memory in the schizophrenic and psychotic adolescent groups. However, analyses of WISC-III factor profiles suggested that early onset schizophrenia patients may have more global IQ deficits than non-organic, non-affective psychoses when examined recently...

  15. Editorial: Understanding developmental dyslexia: linking perceptual and cognitive deficits to reading processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoccolotti, P.; de Jong, P.F.; Spinelli, D.

    The problem of causation has proven particularly elusive in the case of developmental dyslexia (DD). The field has been dominated by very general hypotheses, such as the idea that DD is caused by a phonological deficit and/or an impairment of the magnocellular pathway. Results are contrasting and

  16. Binge-like ingestion of a combination of an energy drink and alcohol leads to cognitive deficits and motivational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tatiane T; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alcohol with an energy drink (ED) is believed to contribute to risky alcohol-drinking behaviors, such as binge drinking. However, the long-term effects on cognition and reward function that are caused by the repeated binge-like ingestion of alcohol and EDs are still poorly known. The present study examined the effects of a history of repeated exposure to alcohol and/or an ED on short-term memory and alcohol-seeking behavior. Male Wistar rats were given daily intragastric administration of alcohol (3.4g/kg) combined or not with an ED (10.71ml/kg) for 6 consecutive days. The rats were tested for locomotion 15min after the first intragastric treatment. Short-term memory was assessed in the novel object recognition and social discrimination tests 2-3days after the last intragastric administration. The rewarding effect of alcohol was tested 1-3weeks following the last intragastric administration in a conditioned place preference paradigm. The acute binge-like ingestion of alcohol decreased locomotor activity, whereas the combination of alcohol and an ED increased locomotion in the first minutes of assessment. Alcohol exposure produced cognitive deficits in both the object recognition and social discrimination tests, and adding the ED to the alcohol solution did not modify these effects. The combination of alcohol and the ED increased alcohol-induced conditioned place preference. Thus, a history of binge-like alcohol exposure combined with the ED caused subsequent cognitive deficits and increased alcohol seeking behavior, and such behavioral effects might contribute to the progression to alcohol abuse disorders.

  17. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Motor Preparation Deficits in a Visual Cued Spatial Attention Task in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhadze, Estate M; Tasman, Allan; Sokhadze, Guela E; El-Baz, Ayman S; Casanova, Manuel F

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities in motor skills have been regarded as part of the symptomatology characterizing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It has been estimated that 80 % of subjects with autism display "motor dyspraxia" or clumsiness that are not readily identified in a routine neurological examination. In this study we used behavioral measures, event-related potentials (ERP), and lateralized readiness potential (LRP) to study cognitive and motor preparation deficits contributing to the dyspraxia of autism. A modified Posner cueing task was used to analyze motor preparation abnormalities in children with autism and in typically developing children (N = 30/per group). In this task, subjects engage in preparing motor response based on a visual cue, and then execute a motor movement based on the subsequent imperative stimulus. The experimental conditions, such as the validity of the cue and the spatial location of the target stimuli were manipulated to influence motor response selection, preparation, and execution. Reaction time and accuracy benefited from validly cued targets in both groups, while main effects of target spatial position were more obvious in the autism group. The main ERP findings were prolonged and more negative early frontal potentials in the ASD in incongruent trials in both types of spatial location. The LRP amplitude was larger in incongruent trials and had stronger effect in the children with ASD. These effects were better expressed at the earlier stages of LRP, specifically those related to response selection, and showed difficulties at the cognitive phase of stimulus processing rather that at the motor execution stage. The LRP measures at different stages reflect the chronology of cognitive aspects of movement preparation and are sensitive to manipulations of cue correctness, thus representing very useful biomarker in autism dyspraxia research. Future studies may use more advance and diverse manipulations of movement preparation demands in testing more

  18. Cognitive biases toward Internet game-related pictures and executive deficits in individuals with an Internet game addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhe Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cue-related go/no-go switching task provides an experimental approach to study individual's flexibility in changing situations. Because Internet addiction disorder (IAD belongs to the compulsive-impulsive spectrum of disorders, it should present cognitive bias and executive functioning deficit characteristics of some of these types of disorders. Until now, no studies have been reported on cognitive bias and executive function involving mental flexibility and response inhibition in IAD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 46 subjects who met the criteria of the modified Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire for Internet addiction (YDQ were recruited as an Internet game addiction (IGA group, along with 46 healthy control individuals. All participants performed the Internet game-shifting task. Using hit rate, RT, d' and C as the dependent measures, a three-way ANOVA (group × target × condition was performed. For hit rate, a significant effect of group, type of target and condition were found. The group-target interaction effect was significant. For RT, significant effects were revealed for group and type of target. The group-target interaction effect was significant. Comparisons of the means revealed that the slowing down of IGA relative to NIA was more pronounced when the target stimuli were neutral as opposed to Internet game-related pictures. In addition, the group-condition interaction effect was significant. For d', significant effects of group, type of target and condition were found. The group-target interaction effect was significant. For C, the type of target produced a significant effect. There was a positive correlation between the length of the addiction (number of years and the severity of the cognitive bias. CONCLUSIONS: IGA present cognitive biases towards information related to Internet gaming. These biases, as well as poor executive functioning skills (lower mental flexibility and response inhibition, might be

  19. Childhood abuse and neglect may induce deficits in cognitive precursors of psychosis in high-risk children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Nicolas; Paccalet, Thomas; Gilbert, Elsa; Moreau, Isabel; Mérette, Chantal; Gingras, Nathalie; Rouleau, Nancie; Maziade, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Millions of children are born to parents affected by major psychoses. Cognitive dysfunctions seen in patients are already detectable in these children. In parallel, childhood maltreatment increases the risk of adult psychoses through unknown mechanisms. We investigated whether high-risk offspring exposed to abuse/neglect displayed more cognitive precursors of adult psychoses in childhood and adolescence than nonexposed offspring. We used a stepwise selection strategy from a 25-year follow-up of 48 densely affected kindreds including 1500 adults (405 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) to select high-risk offspring aged 6-22 years for inclusion in our study. All offspring were assessed for childhood trauma from direct interviews with the offspring, parents and relatives and from the review of lifetime medical records of parents and children and administered a neuropsychological battery including IQ and 4 of the most impaired neuropsychological domains in psychoses. Our study included 66 high-risk offspring. Those who were exposed to abuse/neglect had significantly lower IQ (effect size [ES] = 0.61) than nonexposed offspring and displayed poorer cognitive performance in visual episodic memory (ES = 0.67) and in executive functions of initiation (ES = 1.01). Moreover, exposed offspring presented more combinations of cognitive deficits that were associated with lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores. Exposure to abuse/neglect was not assessed in the control group, thus the study could not test whether the effect of childhood maltreatment occurred only in a high-risk setting and not in the general population. In high-risk youths, maltreatment in childhood/adolescence may negatively impact cognitive domains known to be impaired in adults with psychoses, suggesting an early mediating effect in the association between abuse/neglect and adult psychoses. This finding provides a target for future developmental and preventive research.

  20. Cognitive deficits in children with neurofibromatosis Type I: from recognition to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Krab (Lianne)

    2008-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Over the past few years, mouse models have significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in genetic disorders. Moreover, several preclinical studies in mouse models of for instance Neurofibromatosis type 1 (N

  1. Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure and Genetic Predisposition to Cognitive Deficit at Age 8 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julvez, Jordi; Smith, George Davey; Golding, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive consequences at school age associated with prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure may need to take into account nutritional and sociodemographic cofactors as well as relevant genetic polymorphisms....

  2. Season-independent cognitive deficits in seasonal affective disorder and their relation to depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær; Stenbæk, Dea Siggaard; Ozenne, Brice

    2017-01-01

    with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), to study depression-related cognition, longitudinally. Twenty-nine medication-free individuals diagnosed with winter-SAD and 30 demographically matched healthy controls with no seasonality symptoms completed the Letter-number Sequencing task (LNS), the Symbol Digit...... Modalities Test (SDMT) and the Simple Reaction Time (SRT) twice; in summer and in winter. Compared to controls, SAD individuals showed significant season-independent impairments in tasks measuring working memory (LNS), cognitive processing speed (SDMT) and motor speed (SRT). In SAD individuals, cognitive...... processing speed was significantly negatively associated with the seasonal change in SAD depressive symptoms. We present novel evidence that in SAD individuals, working memory, cognitive processing- and motor speed is not only impaired in the winter but also in the summer. This suggests that certain...

  3. The heterogeneity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and conduct problems: Cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Tommie; Brocki, Karin C; Bohlin, Gunilla; Granqvist, Pehr; Eninger, Lilianne

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the contributions of several important domains of functioning to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and conduct problems. Specifically, we investigated whether cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment made independent and specific contributions to these externalizing behaviour problems from a multiple pathways perspective. The study included laboratory measures of cognitive inhibition and disorganized attachment in 184 typically developing children (M age = 6 years, 10 months, SD = 1.7). Parental ratings provided measures of emotion regulation, emotionality, and externalizing behaviour problems. Results revealed that cognitive inhibition, regulation of positive emotion, and positive emotionality were independently and specifically related to ADHD symptoms. Disorganized attachment and negative emotionality formed independent and specific relations to conduct problems. Our findings support the multiple pathways perspective on ADHD, with poor regulation of positive emotion and high positive emotionality making distinct contributions to ADHD symptoms. More specifically, our results support the proposal of a temperamentally based pathway to ADHD symptoms. The findings also indicate that disorganized attachment and negative emotionality constitute pathways specific to conduct problems rather than to ADHD symptoms.

  4. Cognitive deficits are a matter of emotional context: inflexible strategy use mediates context-specific learning impairments in OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetsche, Ulrike; Rief, Winfried; Westermann, Stefan; Exner, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the interplay between cognitive deficits and emotional context in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and social phobia (SP). Specifically, this study examines whether the inflexible use of efficient learning strategies in an emotional context underlies impairments in probabilistic classification learning (PCL) in OCD, and whether PCL impairments are specific to OCD. Twenty-three participants with OCD, 30 participants with SP and 30 healthy controls completed a neutral and an OCD-specific PCL task. OCD participants failed to adopt efficient learning strategies and showed fewer beneficial strategy switches than controls only in an OCD-specific context, but not in a neutral context. Additionally, OCD participants did not show any explicit memory impairments. Number of beneficial strategy switches in the OCD-specific task mediated the difference in PCL performance between OCD and control participants. Individuals with SP were impaired in both PCL tasks. In contrast to neuropsychological models postulating general cognitive impairments in OCD, the present findings suggest that it is the interaction between cognition and emotion that is impaired in OCD. Specifically, activated disorder-specific fears may impair the flexible adoption of efficient learning strategies and compromise otherwise unimpaired PCL. Impairments in PCL are not specific to OCD.

  5. Body mass index, cognitive deficit and depressive symptoms in high cardiovascular risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lucas da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract To evaluate the relationship of obesity, cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms in patients with high cardiovascular risk. Methods: A sample of 93 patients aged 50 years or older was selected from the Center of Dyslipidemia and High Cardiovascular Risk from Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA. Patients with stroke were excluded. For cognitive evaluation, the MMSE (Mini Mental State Examination was used. A score of 24 or less was considered as cognitive impairment, and for those who had 4 years or less of education, the cutoff point was 17. The GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale was also used, with the cutoff of 6 for presence of depressive symptoms. Results: Obese patients showed lower mean MMSE scores compared to non-obese patients (p=0.0012. Additionally, for every one point increase in BMI above 30 there was a 27% increase in the chances of the patient having cognitive impairment. The obese patients presented 31% chance of having cognitive impairment compared with overweight subjects. Conclusions: Our findings corroborated the association between obesity and cognitive impairment in high cardiovascular risk patients. This association however, was not observed for depressive symptoms.

  6. Deficits in cognitive function and achievement in Mexican first-graders with low blood lead concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Canfield, Richard L; López, Patricia; Rosado, Jorge L; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Cebrián, Mariano E; Rico, Javier Alatorre; Ronquillo, Dolores; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2006-03-01

    Elevated blood lead levels in children are associated with lower scores on tests of cognitive functioning. Recent studies have reported inverse relations between lifetime exposure and intellectual functioning at blood lead concentrations below 10 microg/dL, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) level of concern. We report associations between blood lead and cognitive performance for first-grade Mexican children living near a metal foundry. Using a cross-sectional design, we examined the relation between children's concurrent blood lead concentrations (mean (SD) 11.4 microg/dL (6.1)) and their performance on 14 tests of global or specific cognitive functions. The blood lead-cognition relations were modeled using both linear and nonlinear methods. After adjustment for covariates, a higher blood lead level was associated with poorer cognitive performance on several cognitive tests. Segmented linear regressions revealed significant effects of lead but only for the segments defined by a concurrent blood lead concentration below 10-14 microg/dL. One implication of these findings is that at the age of 7 years, even in the absence of information on lead exposure in infancy and early childhood, a test result with blood lead < 10 microg/dL should not be considered safe. Together with other recent findings, these results add to the empirical base of support available for evaluating the adequacy of current screening guidelines and for motivating efforts at primary prevention of childhood lead exposure.

  7. Alien Hand Sign and Other Cognitive Deficits following Ruptured Aneurysm of the Anterior Communicating Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Parkin

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a right-handed patient who suffered a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA which was clipped successfully. Computerized tomography indicated a low density area in the genu of the corpus callosum and the infero-lateral aspect of the left frontal lobe. On recovery the patient's most notable deficit was the “alien hand sign” whereby the left hand would frequently interfere with the actions of the right hand. Problems in response initiation were also evident. There was significant memory loss and performance was impaired on some tests of frontal lobe function. Discussion centres on the functional locus of the alien hand sign but other aspects of the patient's deficits are also considered.

  8. Mindfulness based cognitive therapy versus treatment as usual in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, L.; Kan, C C; Carpentier, P.J.; Sizoo, B.B.; Hepark, S.; Grutters, J.P.; Donders, R.; Buitelaar, J; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often present with a lifelong pattern of core symptoms that is associated with impairments of functioning in daily life. This has a substantial personal and economic impact. In clinical practice there is a high need for additional or alternative interventions for existing treatments, usually consisting of pharmacotherapy and/or psycho-education. Although previous studies show preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of ...

  9. Reading Comprehension in Children with ADHD: Cognitive Underpinnings of the Centrality Deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Amanda C.; Keenan, Janice M.; Betjemann, Rebecca S.; Willcutt, Erik; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reading comprehension in children with ADHD by assessing their ability to build a coherent mental representation that allows them to recall central and peripheral information. We compared children with ADHD (mean age 9.78) to word reading-matched controls (mean age 9.89) on their ability to retell a passage. We found that even though children with ADHD recalled more central than peripheral information, they showed their greatest deficit, relative to controls, on central informatio...

  10. Assessing social-cognitive deficits in schizophrenia with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M; Greeno, Catherine G; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Newhill, Christina E; Hogarty, Gerard E; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2010-03-01

    The emotion management subscale of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) has recently been recommended by the National Institute of Mental Health Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia committee as the sole measure of social cognition for trials of cognitive enhancement in schizophrenia, yet the psychometric properties of this subscale and the larger instrument in schizophrenia patients have not been thoroughly examined. This research presents a psychometric investigation of the MSCEIT in a sample of 64 early course outpatients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or schizophreniform disorder. Results demonstrated that the MSCEIT possesses adequate internal consistency reliability among its branch and total scales and that patients' branch and overall test performance was significantly below normative levels. Estimates of discriminant and concurrent validity indicated that the MSCEIT diverged from measures of neurocognitive functioning and psychopathology, but was only modestly related with objective measures of functional outcome. Convergent validity estimates suggested that, contrary to expectations, the MSCEIT did not correlate with a behavioral measure of social cognition. Finally, exploratory factor analyses suggested the possibility of a shift in the latent structure of emotional intelligence in schizophrenia, compared with studies with healthy individuals. These findings support the use of the MSCEIT as a reliable and potentially valid method of assessing the emotional components of social cognition in schizophrenia, but also point to a need for additional measurement development efforts to assess broader social-cognitive domains that may exhibit stronger relations with functional outcome. Further investigation is warranted to examine the instrument's latent factor structure and convergence with other measures of social cognition.

  11. [Neuropsychological treatment of cognitive deficits in substance abuse disorders, affective disorders, anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders - current status and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschert, V C; Zwanzger, P; Brunnauer, A

    2015-05-01

    Neuropsychological treatment represents a promising therapeutic approach in the amelioration of cognitive deficits in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Cognitive impairment constitutes a core feature that often persists beyond psychopathological symptoms having a significant impact on psychosocial functioning. However, research interest and evidence of efficacy vary considerably between disease groups. Although neuropsychological treatment is frequently used in clinical practice, there are, with the exception of schizophrenia, relatively few studies on its effectiveness.

  12. Are There Any Connections between Language Deficits and Cognitive Slowing in Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecker, Michael; Kochler, Carsten; Schmidtke, Klaus; Rauh, Reinhold

    2014-09-01

    Speech disorders already occur in the early phases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As a possible cause, problems of executive processes are discussed. Cognitive slowing is also repeatedly addressed. Are there any connections between cognitive slowing and speech disorders in AD? And is there a relationship between cognitive slowing and executive processes? The data of 72 healthy controls and 52 AD patients were examined with regard to their language performance and their response times in a computerized Stroop paradigm. The AD patients showed significantly worse results in all language tests as well as much longer reaction times in all Stroop conditions, especially in the interference condition (Stroop 3). Speech errors and response times correlated with severity (MMSE), and the speech errors correlated with the reaction times in Stroop 3 (interference condition, which reflects the processing time of executive processes). The most interesting question now is: How are language processing and executive processing time (Stroop 3) related?

  13. Beyond Stimulus Deprivation: Iron Deficiency and Cognitive Deficits in Post-Institutionalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doom, Jenalee R.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kroupina, Maria G.; Frenn, Kristin; Fuglestad, Anita J.

    2014-01-01

    Children adopted from institutions have been studied as models of the impact of stimulus deprivation on cognitive development (Nelson et al., 2011), but these children may also suffer from micronutrient deficiencies (Fuglestad et al., 2008). The contributions of iron deficiency (ID) and duration of deprivation on cognitive functioning in children adopted from institutions between 17 and 36 months of age were examined. ID was assessed in 55 children soon after adoption, and cognitive functioning was evaluated 11–14.6 months post-adoption when the children averaged 37.4 months old (SD = 4.9). ID at adoption and longer duration of institutional care independently predicted lower IQ scores and executive function (EF) performance. IQ did not mediate the association between ID and EF. PMID:24597672

  14. Social cognitive and neurocognitive deficits in inpatients with unilateral thalamic lesions — pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkos E

    2015-04-01

    criteria was a minimum score of 23/30 in MMSE. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, patients revealed significantly lower scores in CVLT, GML-DR, and VFT. Furthermore, compared to healthy controls, patients showed significantly delayed recognition of “happiness” in EmoDiff40 and significantly worse performance on Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, revised version II. Neuropsychological assessment demonstrated some statistically significant deficits in learning and remembering both verbal and visual material, long-term information storing, problem solving, and executive functions such as verbal fluency. Conclusion: Patients at early stage of unilateral thalamic stroke showed both neurocognitive and social cognitive deficits. Further research is needed to increase understanding about diagnosis, early treatment, and prognosis of patients with thalamic lesions. Keywords: social cognitive deficits, neurocognitive deficits, thalamic stroke, posterior, inferolateral, paramedian

  15. Assessing schizophrenia-relevant cognitive and social deficits in mice: a selection of mouse behavioral tasks and potential therapeutic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wen-Sung; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Wong, Wan-Rong; Pei, Ju-Chun; Chen, Ya-Shan; Hung, Wei-Li

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders are generally diagnosed based on a collection of symptoms defined by a combination of an individual's feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. Many of these disorders are characterized by specific cognitive and social deficits. Although it is nearly impossible to recapitulate the full phenotypic spectrum of schizophrenia in mice, mouse models play an indispensable role in understanding the pathogenesis of this disorder and the development of new therapeutics. Genetic mouse models of schizophrenia and mouse behavioral tests provide a feasible approach for elucidating causal relationships between susceptibility gene(s) and schizophrenia-related symptoms. There has been a proliferation of studies characterizing basic behavioral phenotypes in mice. Since there is no way to completely model human psychiatric symptoms in mice, the major role of behavioral tests is to provide insights into underlying affected circuitry and pathophysiology. Given that the recovery of cognitive and social abilities significantly benefits functional outcomes, there has been an increasing interest in characterizing cognitive and social functions in mutant mice; however, these functions are not easy to measure. In this review, a selection of conventional behavioral tasks was briefly described and three specific behavioral tasks aimed at characterizing social communication, attentional function, and choice behavior in mice were highlighted. The choice of specific behavioral tasks during experimental planning should take into consideration a variety of factors, including their validity, reliability, sensitivity, utility, and specificity. Based upon the hypothetical hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated signaling pathways in the involvement of cognitive and social impairments in schizophrenia, three NMDAR-related compounds/drugs, D-serine, sarcosine, and D-cycloserine, are discussed as an example.

  16. GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors contribute to the beneficial effects of hydrogen sulfide on cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Jian; Zhao, Ying; Yu, Bin; Xu, Guo-Gang; Wang, Wei; Zhan, Jin-Qiong; Tang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Ting; Wei, Bo

    2016-10-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of clinical dementia. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is implicated with the pathology of AD, and exogenous H2S attenuates spatial memory impairments in AD animal models. However, the molecular mechanism by which H2S improves cognition in AD has not been fully explored. Here, we report that chronic administration of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a H2S donor) elevated hippocampal H2S levels and enhanced hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and novel object recognition in amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin-1 (PS1) transgenic mice. In parallel with these behavioral results, treating transgenic mice with NaHS reversed impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), which is deemed as the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. At the molecular level, we found that treatment with NaHS did not affect the expression of the GluN1 and GluN2A subunits of NMDA receptor (NMDAR), but did prevent the downregulation of GluN2B subunit and restored its synaptic abundance, response and downstream signaling in the hippocampus in transgenic mice. Moreover, applying Ro 25-6981, a specific GluN2B antagonist, abolished the beneficial effects of NaHS on cognitive performance and hippocampal LTP in transgenic mice. Collectively, our results indicate that H2S can reverse cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits in AD model mice by restoring surface GluN2B expression and the function of GluN2B-containing NMDARs.

  17. Psychophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, M S; Vedovelli, K; Giacobbo, B L; de Souza, C E B; Ferrari, P; de Lima Argimon, I I; Walz, J C; Kapczinski, F; Bromberg, E

    2015-02-12

    The progressive loss of memory and autonomy of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients, together with their characteristic behavioral and psychological symptoms, subjects their family caregivers to chronic stress. Several studies indicate that these caregivers are predisposed to cognitive impairments, but the physiological correlates of these alterations remain to be elucidated. Analyze the effects of chronic stress of family caregivers of AD patients on cognition, cortisol/DHEA ratios and BDNF levels and investigate the relation between these variables. Seventeen family caregivers (64.83 ± 3.64 years) of patients with AD and eighteen non-caregivers (58.29 ± 3.16 years) completed stress, depression and anxiety inventories. Exclusion criteria were current neurological disorders, major unstable medical illnesses, use of medications that could interfere with cognitive or HPA axis function and dementia. Attention, working memory and executive function were assessed with Digit Span and Trail Making tests, and declarative memory was analyzed with the Logical Memory test. Saliva was collected at 8 AM and 10 PM and its cortisol and DHEA levels determined by radioimmunoassay. Serum BDNF levels were measured by sandwich-ELISA. Results were analyzed with independent samples t test, covariance analysis and linear regressions. The statistical significance was set at pmemory and executive function tests. Caregivers also had higher cortisol/DHEA ratios and lower BDNF levels than non-caregivers. Cortisol/DHEA ratios, especially at 10 PM, were negatively related with all cognitive tasks in which caregivers showed impaired performance. On the other hand, the only cognitive task that related with the BDNF level was digit span. This study showed that caregivers' cognitive impairment is related with alterations on cortisol/DHEA ratios, and that chronic stress experienced by these subjects has the potential to alter their BDNF levels. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Brain networks disconnection in early multiple sclerosis cognitive deficits: an anatomofunctional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louapre, Céline; Perlbarg, Vincent; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Urbanski, Marika; Benali, Habib; Assouad, Rana; Galanaud, Damien; Freeman, Léorah; Bodini, Benedetta; Papeix, Caroline; Tourbah, Ayman; Lubetzki, Catherine; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Stankoff, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    Severe cognitive impairment involving multiple cognitive domains can occur early during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated resting state functional connectivity changes in large-scale brain networks and related structural damage underlying cognitive dysfunction in patients with early MS. Patients with relapsing MS (3-5 years disease duration) were prospectively assigned to two groups based on a standardized neuropsychological evaluation: (1) cognitively impaired group (CI group, n = 15), with abnormal performances in at least 3 tests; (2) cognitively preserved group (CP group, n = 20) with normal performances in all tests. Patients and age-matched healthy controls underwent a multimodal 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including anatomical T1 and T2 images, diffusion imaging and resting state functional MRI. Structural MRI analysis revealed that CI patients had a higher white matter lesion load compared to CP and a more severe atrophy in gray matter regions highly connected to networks involved in cognition. Functional connectivity measured by integration was increased in CP patients versus controls in attentional networks (ATT), while integration was decreased in CI patients compared to CP both in the default mode network (DMN) and ATT. An anatomofunctional study within the DMN revealed that functional connectivity was mostly altered between the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in CI patients compared to CP and controls. In a multilinear regression model, functional correlation between MPFC and PCC was best predicted by PCC atrophy. Disconnection in the DMN and ATT networks may deprive the brain of compensatory mechanisms required to face widespread structural damage.

  19. Synergistic effects of GSK-3β and HDAC inhibitors in intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced cognitive deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest the importance of combined treatment of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition in various in vitro and in vivo models of neurological diseases. Lithium chloride (LiCl) and valproate (VPA), two well-known mood stabilizers, have been reported to act through GSK-3β and HDAC inhibition, respectively. The present study was designed to investigate the potential of low-dose combination of LiCl and VPA in intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ)-induced cognitive deficits in rats. STZ was injected twice (3 mg/kg ICV) on alternate days (day 1 and day 3) in rats. The ICV-STZ-treated rats received LiCl (60 mg/kg, i.p.), VPA (200 mg/kg, i.p.), and combination of both LiCl (60 mg/kg, i.p.) and VPA (200 mg/kg, i.p.) drugs for a period of 3 weeks. The ICV-STZ administration results in significant memory impairment, elevated oxidative-nitrosative stress, and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Using a battery of behavioral and biochemical tests, we observed that co-treatment of both drugs showed synergistic effect in improving the spatial learning and memory impairment as well as significantly attenuated the oxidative stress markers in STZ-treated rats as compared to either drug alone. Moreover, the combination of both drugs reversed the hyperinsulinemic brain condition and improved the BDNF levels in STZ-treated rats. Based upon these results, it could be suggested that a low-dose combination of LiCl and VPA produces synergistic and more consistent neuroprotective effects in ICV-STZ-induced cognitive deficits in rats.

  20. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Ameliorates Mild Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Cognitive and Sensorimotor Deficits and Neuroinflammation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Wen; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Kai-Yun; Wu, John Chung-Che; Hoffer, Barry J.; Greig, Nigel H.; Li, Yazhou; Lai, Jing-Huei; Chang, Cheng-Fu; Lin, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a major public health issue, representing 75–90% of all cases of TBI. In clinical settings, mTBI, which is defined as a Glascow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13–15, can lead to various physical, cognitive, emotional, and psychological-related symptoms. To date, there are no pharmaceutical-based therapies to manage the development of the pathological deficits associated with mTBI. In this study, the neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin similar to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), was investigated after its steady-state subcutaneous administration, focusing on behavior after mTBI in an in vivo animal model. The mTBI rat model was generated by a mild controlled cortical impact (mCCI) and used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of GIP. We used the Morris water maze and novel object recognition tests, which are tasks for spatial and recognition memory, respectively, to identify the putative therapeutic effects of GIP on cognitive function. Further, beam walking and the adhesive removal tests were used to evaluate locomotor activity and somatosensory functions in rats with and without GIP administration after mCCI lesion. Lastly, we used immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and Western blot analyses to evaluate the inflammatory markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), and bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X (BMX) in animals with mTBI. GIP was well tolerated and ameliorated mTBI-induced memory impairments, poor balance, and sensorimotor deficits after initiation in the post-injury period. In addition, GIP mitigated mTBI-induced neuroinflammatory changes on GFAP, APP, and BMX protein levels. These findings suggest GIP has significant benefits in managing mTBI-related symptoms and represents a novel strategy for mTBI treatment. PMID:26972789

  1. Deficits in narrative discourse elicited by visual stimuli are already present in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Cláudia; Coutinho, Gabriel; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Assunção, Naima; Teldeschi, Alina; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mattos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Language batteries used to assess the skills of elderly individuals, such as naming and semantic verbal fluency, present some limitations in differentiating healthy controls from patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI). Deficits in narrative discourse occur early in dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the narrative discourse abilities of a-MCI patients are poorly documented. The present study sought to propose and evaluate parameters for investigating narrative discourse in these populations. After a pilot study of 30 healthy subjects who served as a preliminary investigation of macro- and micro-linguistic aspects, 77 individuals (patients with AD and a-MCI and a control group) were evaluated. The experimental task required the participants to narrate a story based on a sequence of actions visually presented. The Control and AD groups differed in all parameters except narrative time and the total number of words recalled. The a-MCI group displayed mild discursive difficulties that were characterized as an intermediate stage between the Control and AD groups' performances. The a-MCI and Control groups differed from the AD group with respect to global coherence, discourse type and referential cohesion. The a-MCI and AD groups were similar to one another but differed from the Control group with respect to the type of words recalled, the repetition of words in the same sentence, the narrative structure and the inclusion of irrelevant propositions in the narrative. The narrative parameter that best distinguished the three groups was the speech effectiveness index. The proposed task was able to reveal differences between healthy controls and groups with cognitive decline. According to our findings, patients with a-MCI already present narrative deficits that are characterized by mild discursive difficulties that are less severe than those found in patients with AD. PMID:26074814

  2. Modeling psychotic and cognitive symptoms of affective disorders: Disrupted latent inhibition and reversal learning deficits in highly stress reactive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapman, A; Heinzmann, J-M; Holsboer, F; Landgraf, R; Touma, C

    2010-09-01

    Increased stress reactivity has repeatedly been reported in patients suffering from psychiatric diseases including schizophrenia and major depression. These disorders also have other symptoms in common, such as cognitive deficits and psychotic-like behavior. We have therefore investigated if increased stress reactivity is associated with these phenotypic endpoints in an animal model of affective disorders. The stress reactivity mouse model used in this study consists of three CD-1-derived mouse lines, that have been selectively bred for high (HR), intermediate (IR) or low (LR) stress reactivity. Male mice from these three breeding lines were subjected to a reversal learning task and latent inhibition (Li) was assessed using a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. Furthermore, as the dopaminergic system is involved in both Li and reversal learning, the dopamine 1 receptor (D1R), dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) and dopamine transporter (DAT) mRNA expression levels were assessed in relevant brain areas of these animals. The results demonstrate that HR mice show perseveration in the reversal learning task and have disrupted Li. Furthermore, compared to LR mice, HR mice have decreased D2R mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area, as well as decreased D1R mRNA levels in the cingulate cortex, and an increased expression of D2R mRNA in the nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the HR mice display cognitive deficits associated with psychotic-like behavior, similar to those observed in patients suffering from schizophrenia and major depression and could be utilized in the search for better treatment strategies for these symptoms of psychiatric disorders.

  3. Deficits in narrative discourse elicited by visual stimuli are already present in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia eDrummond

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Language batteries used to assess the skills of elderly individuals, such as naming and semantic verbal fluency, present some limitations in differentiating healthy controls from patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI. Deficits in narrative discourse occur early in dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and the narrative discourse abilities of a-MCI patients are poorly documented. The present study sought to propose and evaluate parameters for investigating narrative discourse in these populations. After a pilot study of 30 healthy subjects who served as a preliminary investigation of macro- and microlinguistic aspects, 77 individuals (patients with AD and a-MCI and a control group were evaluated. The experimental task required the participants to narrate a story based on a sequence of actions visually presented. The Control and AD groups differed in all parameters except narrative time and the total number of words recalled. The a-MCI group displayed mild discursive difficulties that were characterized as an intermediate stage between the Control and AD groups’ performances. The a-MCI and Control groups differed from the AD group with respect to global coherence, discourse type and referential cohesion. The a-MCI and AD groups were similar to one another but differed from the Control group with respect to the type of words recalled, the repetition of words in the same sentence, the narrative structure and the inclusion of irrelevant propositions in the narrative. The narrative parameter that best distinguished the three groups was the speech effectiveness index. The proposed task was able to reveal differences between healthy controls and groups with cognitive decline. According to our findings, patients with a-MCI already present narrative deficits that are characterized by mild discursive difficulties that are less severe than those found in patients with AD.

  4. Pyk2 modulates hippocampal excitatory synapses and contributes to cognitive deficits in a Huntington’s disease model

    KAUST Repository

    Giralt, Albert

    2017-05-30

    The structure and function of spines and excitatory synapses are under the dynamic control of multiple signalling networks. Although tyrosine phosphorylation is involved, its regulation and importance are not well understood. Here we study the role of Pyk2, a non-receptor calcium-dependent protein-tyrosine kinase highly expressed in the hippocampus. Hippocampal-related learning and CA1 long-term potentiation are severely impaired in Pyk2-deficient mice and are associated with alterations in NMDA receptors, PSD-95 and dendritic spines. In cultured hippocampal neurons, Pyk2 has autophosphorylation-dependent and -independent roles in determining PSD-95 enrichment and spines density. Pyk2 levels are decreased in the hippocampus of individuals with Huntington and in the R6/1 mouse model of the disease. Normalizing Pyk2 levels in the hippocampus of R6/1 mice rescues memory deficits, spines pathology and PSD-95 localization. Our results reveal a role for Pyk2 in spine structure and synaptic function, and suggest that its deficit contributes to Huntington’s disease cognitive impairments.

  5. Uncovering a clinical portrait of sluggish cognitive tempo within an evaluation for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen P; Ciesielski, Heather A; Rood, Jennifer E; Froehlich, Tanya E; Garner, Annie A; Tamm, Leanne; Epstein, Jeffery N

    2016-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning scientific literature examining the sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) construct, very little is known about the clinical presentation of SCT. In clinical cases where SCT is suspected, it is critical to carefully assess not only for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) but also for other comorbidities that may account for the SCT-related behaviors, especially internalizing symptoms and sleep problems. The current case study provides a clinical description of SCT in a 7-year-old girl, offering a real-life portrait of SCT while also providing an opportunity to qualitatively differentiate between SCT and ADHD, other psychopathologies (e.g. depression, anxiety), and potentially related domains of functioning (e.g. sleep, executive functioning [EF]). "Jessica" was described by herself, parents, and teacher as being much slower than her peers in completing schoolwork, despite standardized testing showing Jessica to have above average intelligence and academic achievement. Jessica's parents completed rating scales indicating high levels of SCT symptoms and daytime sleepiness, as well as mildly elevated EF deficits. More research is needed to determine how to best conceptualize, assess, and treat SCT, and Jessica's case underscores the importance of further work in this area.

  6. Frontal Metabolite Concentration Deficits in Opiate Dependence Relate to Substance Use, Cognition, and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Donna E; Durazzo, Timothy C; Schmidt, Thomas P; Abé, Christoph; Guydish, Joseph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in opiate dependence showed abnormalities in neuronal viability and glutamate concentration in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Metabolite levels in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and their neuropsychological correlates have not been investigated in opiate dependence. Methods Single-volume proton MRS at 4 Tesla and neuropsychological testing were conducted in 21 opiate-dependent individuals (OD) on buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Results were compared to 28 controls (CON) and 35 alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC), commonly investigated treatment-seekers providing context for OD evaluation. Metabolite concentrations were measured from ACC, DLPFC, OFC and parieto-occipital cortical (POC) regions. Results Compared to CON, OD had lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), creatine +phosphocreatine (Cr) and myo-Inositol (mI) in the DLPFC and lower NAA, Cr, and mI in the ACC. OD, ALC, and CON were equivalent on metabolite levels in the POC and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration did not differ between groups in any region. In OD, prefrontal metabolite deficits in ACC Glu as well as DLPFC NAA and choline containing metabolites (Cho) correlated with poorer working memory, executive and visuospatial functioning; metabolite deficits in DLPFC Glu and ACC GABA and Cr correlated with substance use measures. In the OFC of OD, Glu and choline-containing metabolites were elevated and lower Cr concentration related to higher nonplanning impulsivity. Compared to 3 week abstinent ALC, OD had significant DLPFC metabolite deficits. Conclusion The anterior frontal metabolite profile of OD differed significantly from that of CON and ALC. The frontal lobe metabolite abnormalities in OD and their neuropsychological correlates may play a role in treatment outcome and could be explored as specific targets for improved OD treatment. PMID:27695638

  7. Cognitive deficits and levels of IQ in adolescent onset schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pagsberg, A Katrine; Hemmingsen, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    of intelligence, executive functions, memory, attention and processing speed was global or specific. First-episode psychotic adolescents (N = 39) between the ages 11 and 17 years were included, 18 of whom were diagnosed with schizophrenia, and 21 with other non-organic, non-affective psychoses, using ICD-10...... of attention, executive functions, reaction time, and memory in the schizophrenic and psychotic adolescent groups. However, analyses of WISC-III factor profiles suggested that early onset schizophrenia patients may have more global IQ deficits than non-organic, non-affective psychoses when examined recently...

  8. Houttuynia cordata Improves Cognitive Deficits in Cholinergic Dysfunction Alzheimer's Disease-Like Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Eugene; Kim, Hyo Geun; Park, Hanbyeol; Kang, Min Seo; Lee, Bongyong; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a result of dementia of diverse causes, such as cholinergic dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (Saururaceae) has long been used as a traditional herbal medicine. It has biological activities including protective effects against amyloid beta (Aβ) toxicity, via regulation of calcium homeostasis, in rat hippocampal cells. To extend previous reports, we investigated the effects of water extracts of H. cordata herb (HCW) on tauopathies, also involving calcium influx. We then confirmed the effects of HCW in improving memory impairment and neuronal damage in mice with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. We also investigated the effects of HCW against scopolamine-induced cholinergic dysfunction in mice. In primary neuronal cells, HCW inhibited the phosphorylation of tau by regulating p25/p35 expression in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In mice with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, HCW improved cognitive impairment, as assessed with behavioral tasks, such as novel object recognition, Y-maze, and passive avoidance tasks. HCW also inhibited the degeneration of neurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, HCW, which had an IC50 value of 79.7 μg/ml for acetylcholinesterase inhibition, ameliorated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment significantly in Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These results indicate that HCW improved cognitive impairment, due to cholinergic dysfunction, with inhibitory effects against tauopathies and cholinergic antagonists, suggesting that HCW may be an interesting candidate to investigate for the treatment of AD.

  9. Beyond Stimulus Deprivation: Iron Deficiency and Cognitive Deficits in Postinstitutionalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doom, Jenalee R.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kroupina, Maria G.; Frenn, Kristin; Fuglestad, Anita J.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Children adopted from institutions have been studied as models of the impact of stimulus deprivation on cognitive development (Nelson, Bos, Gunnar, & Sonuga-Barke, 2011), but these children may also suffer from micronutrient deficiencies (Fuglestad et al., 2008). The contributions of iron deficiency (ID) and duration of deprivation on…

  10. Cognitive Set Shifting Deficits and Their Relationship to Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Haylie L.; Ragozzino, Michael E.; Cook, Edwin H.; Sweeney, John A.; Mosconi, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    The neurocognitive impairments associated with restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are not yet clear. Prior studies indicate that individuals with ASD show reduced cognitive flexibility, which could reflect difficulty shifting from a previously learned response pattern or a failure to maintain a new…

  11. Cognitive Deficits Associated with Acquired Amusia after Stroke: A Neuropsychological Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkamo, Teppo; Tervaniemi, Mari; Soinila, Seppo; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M.; Laine, Matti; Hietanen, Marja

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence on amusia suggests that our ability to perceive music might be based on the same neural resources that underlie other higher cognitive functions, such as speech perception and spatial processing. We studied the neural correlates of acquired amusia by performing extensive neuropsychological assessments on 53 stroke patients with a…

  12. Cognitive mediational deficits and the role of coping styles in pedophile and ephebophile Roman Catholic clergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gregory P; Baerwald, Jeffrey P; McGlone, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to examine hypothesized differences between sex offending and nonoffending Roman Catholic clergy on cognitive mediation abilities as measured by the Rorschach Inkblot Test (H. Rorschach, 1921/1942). This study compared 78 priest pedophiles and 77 priest ephebophiles with 80 nonoffending priest controls on the Inkblot test using J. E. Exner's (2003) Comprehensive System. The three groups were compared on seven variables that constitute Exner's Cognitive Mediation cluster. Additionally, the groups' coping styles were compared to examine the interaction of coping style and cognitive mediational abilities. We found interactions between coping style and offending status across most of the cognitive variables indicating impairment in the mild to pathological ranges. Moreover, significantly higher unusual thinking styles (Xu%) and significantly lower conventional thinking styles (X+%) in offenders compared to nonoffenders. Those with an Extratensive style (n=31) showed significantly higher distorted thinking when compared to the Introversive (n=81), Ambitent (n=73), and Avoidant (n=50) coping styles. This study suggests that offenders display significantly higher distorted thinking styles than do nonoffenders. Possible reasons for these discrepancies and the role of coping styles in abusive behaviors were discussed.

  13. Dimensions and Correlates of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Sluggish Cognitive Tempo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Annie A.; Marceaux, Janice; Mrug, Sylvie; Patterson, Cryshelle; Hodgens, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) in relation to ADHD symptoms, clinical diagnosis, and multiple aspects of adjustment in a clinical sample. Parent and teacher reports were gathered for 322 children and adolescents evaluated for behavioral, emotional, and/or learning problems at a university clinic. Confirmatory factor…

  14. Prenatal exposure to vapors of gasoline-ethanol blends causes few cognitive deficits in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental exposure to inhaled ethanol-gasoline fuel blends is a potential public health concern. Here we assessed cognitive functions in adult offspring of pregnant rats that were exposed to vapors of gasoline blended with a range of ethanol concentrations, including gasoli...

  15. Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Achievement Deficits in Children with Mathematical Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, David C.; Hoard, Mary K.; Byrd-Craven, Jennifer; Nugent, Lara; Numtee, Chattavee

    2007-01-01

    Using strict and lenient mathematics achievement cutoff scores to define a learning disability, respective groups of children who are math disabled (MLD, n = 15) and low achieving (LA, n = 44) were identified. These groups and a group of typically achieving (TA, n = 46) children were administered a battery of mathematical cognition, working…

  16. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kaltsatou

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.

  17. Investigating Metacognition, Cognition, and Behavioral Deficits of College Students with Acute Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants: Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121…

  18. Beyond Stimulus Deprivation: Iron Deficiency and Cognitive Deficits in Postinstitutionalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doom, Jenalee R.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kroupina, Maria G.; Frenn, Kristin; Fuglestad, Anita J.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Children adopted from institutions have been studied as models of the impact of stimulus deprivation on cognitive development (Nelson, Bos, Gunnar, & Sonuga-Barke, 2011), but these children may also suffer from micronutrient deficiencies (Fuglestad et al., 2008). The contributions of iron deficiency (ID) and duration of deprivation on…

  19. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsdottir, S; Bouma, A; Sergeant, JA; Scherder, EJA; Bouma, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined type (ADHD-CT). Methods. Twenty-two children diagnosed with ADHD-

  20. Randomized Controlled Trial of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Paula D.; Winhusen, Theresa; Davies, Robert D.; Leimberger, Jeffrey D.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan; Klein, Constance; Macdonald, Marilyn; Lohman, Michelle; Bailey, Genie L.; Haynes, Louise; Jaffee, William B.; Haminton, Nancy; Hodgkins, Candace; Whitmore, Elizabeth; Trello-Rishel, Kathlene; Tamm, Leanne; Acosta, Michelle C.; Royer-Malvestuto, Charlotte; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc; Holmes, Beverly W.; Kaye, Mary Elyse; Vargo, Mark A.; Woody, George E.; Nunes, Edward V.; Liu, David

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of osmotic-release methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) compared with placebo for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the impact on substance treatment outcomes in adolescents concurrently receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders (SUD). Method: This was a…

  1. The NeuroIMAGE study : a prospective phenotypic, cognitive, genetic and MRI study in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Design and descriptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Rhein, Daniel; Mennes, Maarten; van Ewijk, Hanneke; Groenman, Annabeth P.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Heslenfeld, Dirk; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Hartman, Catharina; Buitelaar, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a persistent neuropsychiatric disorder which is associated with impairments on a variety of cognitive measures and abnormalities in structural and functional brain measures. Genetic factors are thought to play an important role in the etiology of AD

  2. Deficits of social-cognitive and social-perceptual aspects of theory of mind in remitted patients with schizophrenia: effect of residual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Emre; Gökçen, Sezen; Kayahan, Bülent; Veznedaroglu, Baybars

    2008-02-01

    Although ToM deficit in schizophrenia is widely accepted, findings regarding remitted schizophrenia patients are contradictory. Because residual symptoms are present out of psychotic exacerbation periods, the differences between definition of remission may be important to interpret these findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between performance of 2 different aspects of theory of mind (ToM) and residual clinical symptoms and other cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Ninety-one stable outpatients with schizophrenia and 55 healthy controls were assessed with a neuropsychological battery. Both social-cognitive and social-perceptual aspects of ToM were impaired in schizophrenia, even in patients who were totally free of residual symptoms. Still, the results showed that ToM deficit is related to residual symptoms of schizophrenia. Social-cognitive ToM abilities seem to be related to both positive and negative symptoms. The ToM deficits of fully remitted patients without persistent negative symptoms may be secondary to a more general cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  3. "SLC2A3" Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism and Duplication Influence Cognitive Processing and Population-Specific Risk for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Sören; Reif, Andreas; Ziegler, Georg C.; Weber, Heike; Mayer, Ute; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Conzelmann, Annette; Johansson, Stefan; Müller-Reible, Clemens; Nanda, Indrajit; Haaf, Thomas; Ullmann, Reinhard; Romanos, Marcel; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Pauli, Paul; Strekalova, Tatyana; Jansch, Charline; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Haavik, Jan; Ribasés, Marta; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with profound cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial impairments with persistence across the life cycle. Our initial genome-wide screening approach for copy number variants (CNVs) in ADHD implicated a duplication of…

  4. Effects on the visual system might contribute to some of the cognitive deficits of cancer chemotherapy-induced 'chemo-fog'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, R B; Tallarida, R J

    2010-06-01

    The diminution in certain aspects of cognitive function that is reported to occur in some patients during or after adjuvant cancer chemotherapy is variously known as 'chemo-fog', 'chemo-brain' or other such term. In addition to reported deficits in attention, concentration and other functions, most, if not all, of the studies report deficits involving visual-spatial function or visual memory. Since the visual system is part of the nervous system, it seems reasonable to ask if it is susceptible to some of the deleterious effects produced by adjuvant chemotherapeutic drugs. We propose here the possibility that some portion of the vision-related aspects of the 'chemo-fog' spectrum of cognitive deficits results from a direct action of the adjuvant drugs on the visual system or from drug/drug or site/site interaction between effects on the visual system and other critical brain regions.

  5. Effects on the visual system might contribute to some of the cognitive deficits of cancer chemotherapy-induced ‘chemo-fog’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, R. B.; Tallarida, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The diminution in certain aspects of cognitive function that is reported to occur in some patients during or after adjuvant cancer chemotherapy is variously known as ‘chemo-fog’, ‘chemo-brain’ or other such term. In addition to reported deficits in attention, concentration and other functions, most, if not all, of the studies report deficits involving visual-spatial function or visual memory. Since the visual system is part of the nervous system, it seems reasonable to ask if it is susceptible to some of the deleterious effects produced by adjuvant chemotherapeutic drugs. We propose here the possibility that some portion of the vision-related aspects of the ‘chemo-fog’ spectrum of cognitive deficits results from a direct action of the adjuvant drugs on the visual system or from drug / drug or site / site interaction between effects on the visual system and other critical brain regions. PMID:20831527

  6. A comparison of social cognitive profiles in children with autism spectrum disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a matter of quantitative but not qualitative difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Carly; Hopkins, Joyce; Davis, Amy

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare social cognitive profiles of children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and ADHD. Participants diagnosed with an ASD (n = 137) were compared to participants with ADHD (n = 436) on tests of facial and vocal affect recognition, social judgment and problem-solving, and parent- and teacher-report of social functioning. Both groups performed significantly worse than the normative sample on all measures. Although the ASD group had more severe deficits, the pattern of deficits was surprisingly similar between groups, suggesting that social cognitive deficit patterns may be more similar in ASD and ADHD than previously thought. Thus, like those with ASDs, individuals with ADHD may also need to be routinely considered for treatments targeting social skills.

  7. Cognitive deficits characterization using the CogState Research Battery in first-episode psychosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The computer-based CogState Research Battery (CSRB proposes a test structure which follows MATRICS recommended cognitive domains but lacks direct comparison to pen and paper batteries in first-episode psychosis (FEP. The aim of this study was to compare performances obtained with the CSRB and a pen and paper battery in a historical cohort of FEP patients. Among patients entering an early intervention program between 2003 and 2014, separate cohorts completed the traditional pen and paper cognitive battery (n = 182 and the CSRB (n = 97. Composite z-scores were derived using normative data of matched controls (n = 64 pen and paper, n = 69 CSRB and were compared between the two batteries for the 7 cognitive domains. The cohort tested using the CSRB performed better on the domains of processing speed, attention, visual memory, and verbal memory than the cohort tested using the pen and paper battery (all p < 0.001. Performance did not differ between the two types of batteries for the working memory, executive functions, and social cognition domains. Cognitive profiles identified in the two patient cohorts were similar, with verbal memory being the most impaired domain. Better performances on the CSRB may be primarily due to the minimal demand of the computerized tests on graphomotor abilities and reading speed compared to the pen and paper tests. Our investigation offers a better understanding on how the results obtained with computerized batteries may compare to earlier work done with traditional tests.

  8. Piperine, the main alkaloid of Thai black pepper, protects against neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in animal model of cognitive deficit like condition of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn

    2010-03-01

    Recently, numerous medicinal plants possessing profound central nervous system effects and antioxidant activity have received much attention as food supplement to improve cognitive function against cognitive deficit condition including in Alzheimer's disease condition. Based on this information, the effect of piperine, a main active alkaloid in fruit of Piper nigrum, on memory performance and neurodegeneration in animal model of Alzheimer's disease have been investigated. Adult male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were orally given piperine at various doses ranging from 5, 10 and 20mg/kg BW at a period of 2 weeks before and 1 week after the intracerebroventricular administration of ethylcholine aziridinium ion (AF64A) bilaterally. The results showed that piperine at all dosage range used in this study significantly improved memory impairment and neurodegeneration in hippocampus. The possible underlying mechanisms might be partly associated with the decrease lipid peroxidation and acetylcholinesterase enzyme. Moreover, piperine also demonstrated the neurotrophic effect in hippocampus. However, further researches about the precise underlying mechanism are still required.

  9. Centrophenoxine improves chronic cerebral ischemia induced cognitive deficit and neuronal degeneration in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun LIAO; Rui WANG; Xi-can TANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of centrophenoxine (CPH, meclofenoxate) on chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induced deficits in rats. METHODS: Chronic hypoperfusion in rats was performed by permanent bilateral ligation of the common carotid arteries. Morris water maze was used to measure spatial memory performance. Spectrophotometrical techniques were used to assay SOD, GPx activities, MDA content, TXB2, and 6-keto-PGF1α levels. Morphological change was examined by HE staining. The expression of Bax and p53 protein were assayed by immunohistochemistry analysis. RESULTS: Chronic hypoperfusion in rats resulted in spatial memory impairments shown by longer escape latency and shorter time spent in the target quadrant. These behavioral dysfunction were accompanied by increase in SOD and GPx activities, the content of MDA, the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (TXB2, 6-keto-PGF1α), overexpression of Bax and P53 protein, and delayed degeneration of neurons in cortex and hippocampus. Oral administration of CPH (100 mg/kg, once per day for 37 d) markedly improved the memory impairment, reduced the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities, MDA content and the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators to their normal levels, and attenuated neuronal damage. CONCLUSION: The abilities of CPH to attenuate memory deficits and neuronal damage after ischemia may be beneficial in cerebrovascular type dementia.

  10. Pretreatment with Resveratrol Prevents Neuronal Injury and Cognitive Deficits Induced by Perinatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Olatz; Revuelta, Miren; Urigüen, Leyre; Álvarez, Antonia; Montalvo, Haizea; Hilario, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in neonatal care, hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is still a serious clinical problem, which is responsible for many cases of perinatal mortality, cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol with important anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is present in grapevines, peanuts and pomegranates. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the possible neuroprotective effect of resveratrol when administered before or immediately after a hypoxic-ischemic brain event in neonatal rats by analyzing brain damage, the mitochondrial status and long-term cognitive impairment. Our results indicate that pretreatment with resveratrol protects against brain damage, reducing infarct volume, preserving myelination and minimizing the astroglial reactive response. Moreover its neuroprotective effect was found to be long lasting, as behavioral outcomes were significantly improved at adulthood. We speculate that one of the mechanisms for this neuroprotection may be related to the maintenance of the mitochondrial inner membrane integrity and potential, and to the reduction of reactive oxygen species. Curiously, none of these protective features was observed when resveratrol was administered immediately after hypoxia-ischemia.

  11. Lignans from Schisandra chinensis ameliorate cognition deficits and attenuate brain oxidative damage induced by D-galactose in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingxu; Shang, Lei; Wang, Mengshi; Zhang, Chenning; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the neuroprotective effects of active compounds from Schisandra chinensis (Trucz.) Baill. (Magnoliaceae) against the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced neurotoxicity in rat. The Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with D-gal (150 mg/(kg day)) for six weeks and orally administered with water extract or 95 % ethanol extract (partitioned with petroleum ether (PE), chloroform (CF), ethyl acetate (EA) and n-Butanol (NB), respectively) of the fruits of Schisandra chinensis simultaneously. The alteration of cognitive functions was assessed by using Morris water maze and Step-down type passive avoidance test. The results demonstrated that PE fraction was the most effective fraction to ameliorate cognitive deficits. Further biochemical examination indicated that PE could attenuate the activities decreasing of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), the total antioxidant (T-AOC) induced by D-gal, and maintain the normal levels of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum, prefrontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of the brain of related rat, selectively. Meanwhile, the compounds of PE fraction were also identified as mainly lignans, thus, these results suggest that lignans from the PE fraction of Schisandra chinensis represented a potential source of medicine for the treatment of the aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Effectiveness of a cognitive-functional group intervention among preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Lori; Maeir, Adina; Yochman, Aviva; Dahan, Idit; Hirsch, Idit

    2015-01-01

    To test functional improvement after a group cognitive-functional occupational therapy intervention for preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Seventeen preschooler-parent dyads attended 11 weekly group sessions focused on acquiring executive strategies through occupational performance. Functional improvement was measured using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS); executive function, using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Pediatric; ADHD symptomatology, using Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised; and social functioning, using the Social Participation scale of the Sensory Processing Measure. Significant improvement was found on the COPM and GAS measures, whereas mixed results were found on the other measures, with improvements found in children whose scores indicated impairment at baseline. Cognitive-functional group intervention appears to significantly improve daily functioning, executive function, and social functioning for children who demonstrate clinical impairment. Further research with a larger sample, a control group, and follow-up is required. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  13. Depression symptoms and cognitive-deficit in a population aged 60 years and older in a medium-sized city in São Paulo state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Evandro Marques Gomes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the world population is ageing, and Brazil follows this tendency, which requires the reorganization of society for care provision to older people. In such tendency, an increasing number of cases of depression and dementia is observed in addition to their association with other chronic-degenerative diseases. Objective: to estimate the prevalence of depression and cognitive-deficit symptoms in a population aged 60 years and older, residing in a middle-sized city in São Paulo state and to associate the population with other more prevalent chronic degenerative diseases. Methods: cross-sectional study on 364 older people using the following instruments: socio-demographic and morbidity, Mini Mental State Examination, Yesavage Scale, the Activities of Daily Living Scale, and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL Scale. The following were performed: statistical analyses of the instruments’ score frequencies; presentation and summarization of the variables; and the possible associations between depression/dementia by applying the X2 test followed by fitting of a logistic regression model for ordinal data. Results: the suspected depression was found in 44% (160, and cognitive deficit was observed in 38.7% (141 aged. About 75% of the individuals with suspicion of depression or cognitive deficit had at least another chronic pathology. It was possible to establish statistically significant associations between suspected depression and IADL (p<0.0001; OR=7.59; CI=3.361-7.139 and cognitive deficit and IADL (p=0.0007; OR=3.967; CI=1.788-8.799. No associations were found between age, marital status, schooling, placement in the work market, retirement or income. Conclusion: male and female older individuals are vulnerable to diseases, such as depression and dementia. On the other hand, depression symptoms and cognitive deficit were associated with the score of compromised older individuals, according to IADL.

  14. Cost of malingering mild traumatic brain injury-related cognitive deficits during compensation and pension evaluations in the veterans benefits administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, John H; Shura, Robert D

    2017-08-17

    Given the high rates of exaggeration in those claiming long-term cognitive deficits as a result of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), the aim of this study was to evaluate the rates of malingering in those seeking disability through the Veterans Benefits Administration and estimate the financial burden of disability payments for those receiving compensation despite exaggerated mTBI-related cognitive deficits. Retrospective review included 74 veterans seen for Compensation and Pension evaluations for mTBI. Rates of malingering were based on failure of the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) and/or the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) trial 1 ≤ 40. Total estimated compensation was based on the level of disability awarded and the number of individuals found to be malingering cognitive deficits. Overall, 33-52% of the sample was found to be malingering mTBI-related cognitive deficits. The malingering groups were receiving approximately $71,000-$121,000/year ($6,390-$7,063 per year, per veteran on average). Estimated nationwide disability payments for those possibly malingering mTBI-related cognitive deficits would be $136-$235 million/year (projected costs from 2015-2020 = $700 million-$1.2 billion). It is critical that providers and administrative officials identify those exaggerating disability claims attributed to mTBI. The cost of malingering impacts society in general as well as veterans themselves, as it diverts needed funds/resources away from those legitimately impaired by their military service.

  15. Anti-PrPC monoclonal antibody infusion as a novel treatment for cognitive deficits in an alzheimer's disease model mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strittmatter Stephen M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common of the conformational neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the conversion of a normal biological protein into a β-sheet-rich pathological isoform. In AD the normal soluble Aβ (sAβ forms oligomers and fibrils which assemble into neuritic plaques. The most toxic form of Aβ is thought to be oligomeric. A recent study reveals the cellular prion protein, PrPC, to be a receptor for Aβ oligomers. Aβ oligomers suppress LTP signal in murine hippocampal slices but activity remains when pretreated with the PrP monoclonal anti-PrP antibody, 6D11. We hypothesized that targeting of PrPC to prevent Aβ oligomer-related cognitive deficits is a potentially novel therapeutic approach. APP/PS1 transgenic mice aged 8 months were intraperitoneally (i.p. injected with 1 mg 6D11 for 5 days/week for 2 weeks. Two wild-type control groups were given either the same 6D11 injections or vehicle solution. Additional groups of APP/PS1 transgenic mice were given either i.p. injections of vehicle solution or the same dose of mouse IgG over the same period. The mice were then subjected to cognitive behavioral testing using a radial arm maze, over a period of 10 days. At the conclusion of behavioral testing, animals were sacrificed and brain tissue was analyzed biochemically or immunohistochemically for the levels of amyloid plaques, PrPC, synaptophysin, Aβ40/42 and Aβ oligomers. Results Behavioral testing showed a marked decrease in errors in 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice compared with the non-6D11 treated Tg groups (p C or Aβ oligomer levels. 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice had significantly greater synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus molecular layer of the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated APP/PS1 Tg mice (p Conclusions Even short term treatment with monoclonal antibodies such as 6D11 or other compounds which block the binding of Aβ oligomers to PrPC can be used to treat

  16. Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Catherine C.; Jared Tanner; Nguyen, Peter T.; Nadine A Schwab; Sandra Mitchell; Elizabeth Slonena; Babette Brumback; Okun, Michael S; Mareci, Thomas H.; Dawn Bowers

    2016-01-01

    Objective This prospective investigation examined: 1) processing speed and working memory relative to other cognitive domains in non-demented medically managed idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, and 2) the predictive role of cortical/subcortical gray thickness/volume and white matter fractional anisotropy on processing speed and working memory. Methods Participants completed a neuropsychological protocol, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, brain MRI, and fasting blood draw to rule out vas...

  17. [Duration of untreated psychosis and cognitive deficits in a cohort of chronic psychotic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavera, D; Carta, R; Lepori, T; Sanna, L; Carpiniello, B

    2013-01-01

    Outcome of psychotic disorders, particularly schizophrenia and related disorders, seems to be associated, among a number of other factors, to the latency of treatment of irst episode (duration of untreated psychosis, DUP); indeed, outcome seems to be worse in subjects with a longer DUP. However, few studies addressed the topic of long term outcome and DUP as regard to cognitive functioning, though the latter plays a crucial role in explaining a significant proportion of disability both in non-affective and affective psychoses. The study aims to analyze relationships between DUP and cognitive functioning in a sample of chronic psychotic patients. We considered a unselected sample constituted by 82 chronic outpatients, 49 males (59,8%) e 33 females (40,2%), age range 20-74 yrs (mean age 46,59; s.d. 10,68 yrs); these patients were affected by schizofrenia (n=41, 50%), Bipolar Disorder type I, with psychotic mood congruent or uncongruent features (n=18, 22%,) and Schizoaffettive Disorder (n=23, 28%) according to DSMIVTR, with diagnosis confirmed by means of SCID-I. Patients underwent WAIS-R in order to evaluate cognitive functioning. A longer DUP (more than 3 months between onset of first clinically evident psychotic symptoms and first antipsychotic treatment) was associated with significantly lower scores in 9 out of 11 subtests of WAIS, weighted total score, IQ-verbal score, IQ-performance score and IQ-total score. A significant relationship between a longer DUP and lower cognitive performances was confirmed among schizophrenic and schizoaffective patients, although limited to some subtests. The study provides new evidence for a positive association between longer DUP and worse neurocognitive functioning, even in the long term.

  18. Do Multiple Concussions Lead to Cumulative Cognitive Deficits? A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumul, Joy Noelle; McKinlay, Audrey

    2016-11-01

    A concussion is an important health concern for children and adolescents, particularly in the context of sporting injuries. Some research suggests a cumulative effect from multiple concussions (also referred to as mild traumatic brain injury), which creates a dilemma when considering how to manage children and young persons who may experience multiple concussive events within a sporting season. However, there is very little research regarding the outcomes of multiple concussions and their optimal management. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence regarding the cognitive outcomes of multiple concussions. After assessing the eligibility of the articles from the literature search, 7 studies were identified and included in the review. In most of the available literature, the cognitive outcomes related to multiple concussions are measured during the same developmental age as when the injuries happened. Moreover, most studies that investigated multiple concussions are focused on sports-related injuries, and only some are conducted in children and adolescents in the general population. The current evidence is inconclusive; whereas some studies reported adverse outcomes, others reported null findings. The studies that reported adverse or cumulative effects based their findings on worse cognitive outcomes, more subjective symptoms, and prolonged recovery postinjury. II. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intranasal Insulin Improves Age-Related Cognitive Deficits and Reverses Electrophysiological Correlates of Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaiti, Shaniya; Anderson, Katie L; DeMoll, Chris; Brewer, Lawrence D; Rauh, Benjamin A; Gant, John C; Blalock, Eric M; Porter, Nada M; Thibault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral insulin resistance is a key component of metabolic syndrome associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. While the impact of insulin resistance is well recognized in the periphery, it is also becoming apparent in the brain. Recent studies suggest that insulin resistance may be a factor in brain aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) whereby intranasal insulin therapy, which delivers insulin to the brain, improves cognition and memory in AD patients. Here, we tested a clinically relevant delivery method to determine the impact of two forms of insulin, short-acting insulin lispro (Humalog) or long-acting insulin detemir (Levemir), on cognitive functions in aged F344 rats. We also explored insulin effects on the Ca(2+)-dependent hippocampal afterhyperpolarization (AHP), a well-characterized neurophysiological marker of aging which is increased in the aged, memory impaired animal. Low-dose intranasal insulin improved memory recall in aged animals such that their performance was similar to that seen in younger animals. Further, because ex vivo insulin also reduced the AHP, our results suggest that the AHP may be a novel cellular target of insulin in the brain, and improved cognitive performance following intranasal insulin therapy may be the result of insulin actions on the AHP.

  20. Measuring specific, rather than generalized, cognitive deficits and maximizing between-group effect size in studies of cognition and cognitive change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Steven M

    2008-07-01

    While cognitive impairment in schizophrenia is easy to demonstrate, it has been much more difficult to measure a specific cognitive process unconfounded by the influence of other cognitive processes and noncognitive factors (eg, sedation, low motivation) that affect test scores. With the recent interest in the identification of neurophysiology-linked cognitive probes for clinical trials, the issue of isolating specific cognitive processes has taken on increased importance. Recent advances in research design and psychometric theory regarding cognition research in schizophrenia demonstrate the importance of (1) maximizing between-group differences via reduction of measurement error during both test development and subsequent research and (2) the development and use of process-specific tasks in which theory-driven performance indices are derived across multiple conditions. Use of these 2 strategies can significantly advance both our understanding of schizophrenia and measurement sensitivity for clinical trials. Novel data-analytic strategies for analyzing change across multiple conditions and/or multiple time points also allow for increased reliability and greater measurement sensitivity than traditional strategies. Following discussion of these issues, trade-offs inherent to attempts to address psychometric issues in schizophrenia research are reviewed. Finally, additional considerations for maximizing sensitivity and real-world significance in clinical trials are discussed.

  1. TNF-α protein synthesis inhibitor restores neuronal function and reverses cognitive deficits induced by chronic neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belarbi Karim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neuroinflammation is a hallmark of several neurological disorders associated with cognitive loss. Activated microglia and secreted factors such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α are key mediators of neuroinflammation and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction. Our study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a novel analog of thalidomide, 3,6'-dithiothalidomide (DT, an agent with anti-TNF-α activity, in a model of chronic neuroinflammation. Methods Lipopolysaccharide or artificial cerebrospinal fluid was infused into the fourth ventricle of three-month-old rats for 28 days. Starting on day 29, animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of DT (56 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 14 days. Thereafter, cognitive function was assessed by novel object recognition, novel place recognition and Morris water maze, and animals were euthanized 25 min following water maze probe test evaluation. Results Chronic LPS-infusion was characterized by increased gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus. Treatment with DT normalized TNF-α levels back to control levels but not IL-1β. Treatment with DT attenuated the expression of TLR2, TLR4, IRAK1 and Hmgb1, all genes involved in the TLR-mediated signaling pathway associated with classical microglia activation. However DT did not impact the numbers of MHC Class II immunoreactive cells. Chronic neuroinflammation impaired novel place recognition, spatial learning and memory function; but it did not impact novel object recognition. Importantly, treatment with DT restored cognitive function in LPS-infused animals and normalized the fraction of hippocampal neurons expressing the plasticity-related immediate-early gene Arc. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that the TNF-α synthesis inhibitor DT can significantly reverse hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits induced by chronic neuroinflammation. These results suggest that TNF-α is a

  2. [Associations between cognitive performance in a dementia screening test (SKT) and an intelligence test (WAIS IV) : Which deficits in cognitive performance in old age indicate a possible pathological deterioration process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Laura; Daseking, Monika; Petermann, Franz; Stemmler, Mark

    2017-06-09

    Which deficits in cognitive performance indicate the onset of a pathological deterioration process in older persons? Based on an established dementia screening test in elderly adults, a differentiation can be made between healthy cognitive performance and the onset of pathological deficits in performance (in the sense of mild cognitive impairment). The aim of the study was to investigate whether cognitive decline assessed with a dementia screening instrument is reflected in an intelligence test for adults. The dementia screening measured disorders in memory and attention, the intelligence testing battery measured information processing, working memory, perceptual reasoning, logical thinking and verbal comprehension. A total of 253 cognitively healthy, self-dependent and non-dementia persons (129 women and 124 men), aged between 60 and 91 years (M = 71.98 years; SD = ±7.13) were tested with the complete Wechsler adult intelligence scale (WAIS-IV) and the short performance test (SKT), based on the new normalization from 2015. The SKT enables an assessment of the degree of cognitive deterioration based on coloring codes of traffic lights. Green indicates normal aging, yellow mild cognitive impairment and red stands for abnormal cognitive aging. There were significant correlations between the total SKT score as a measure of total cognitive impairment and the indices of the WAIS-IV, such as information processing, working memory and perceptual reasoning. No significant covariation was found for verbal comprehension. The results suggest that in old age cognitive deterioration starts with reduced speed of information processing and impairment in the working memory log before deficits in memory are present. This finding was reflected in significant mean differences between the subjects in the category green versus yellow in the indices information processing and working memory. Under these aspects there were medium effect strengths (d = 0.60) and the second largest

  3. Regional cerebral blood flow and cognitive deficits in chronic lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Brian A; Keilp, John; Prohovnik, Isak; Heertum, Ronald Van; Mann, J John

    2003-01-01

    This study examined brain functioning in patients with Lyme encephalopathy. Eleven patients underwent neuropsychological tests and Xenon(133)-regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies, using an external detector system. Each rCBF scan was age- and sex-matched to two archival, normal controls. While few differences were noted on gray-matter flow indices (ISI, fg), Lyme patients demonstrated significant flow reductions in white matter index (k(2)) (p=.004), particularly in the posterior temporal and parietal lobes bilaterally (p=.003). Flow reductions in white matter areas were significantly associated with deficits in memory (r=.66, p=.027) and visuospatial organization (r=.62, p=.041). Results suggest that Lyme encephalopathy may be a disease primarily affecting the cerebral white matter.

  4. The effects of methylphenidate on cognitive function in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, Hanna A; Backenson, Erica M; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Piercy, Jamie C; Hale, James B

    2012-09-01

    Focusing on behavioral criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis leads to considerable neuropsychological profile heterogeneity among diagnosed children, as well as variable response to methylphenidate (MPH) treatment. Documenting "cold" executive working memory (EWM) or "hot" self-regulation (SR) neuropsychological impairments could aid in the differential diagnosis of ADHD subtypes and may help to determine the optimal MPH treatment dose. In this study, children with ADHD inattentive type (n = 19), combined type (n = 33), and hyperactive-impulse type (n = 4) underwent randomized controlled MPH trials; neuropsychological, behavioral, and observational data were collected to evaluate the children's responses. Those with moderate or significant baseline EWM/SR impairment showed robust MPH response, whereas response for those with lower baseline impairment was equivocal. Implications for medication use and titration, academic achievement, and long-term treatment efficacy are examined.

  5. Deficits in episodic memory retrieval reveal impaired default mode network connectivity in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron J. Dunn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI is believed to represent a transitional stage between normal healthy ageing and the development of dementia. In particular, aMCI patients have been shown to have higher annual transition rates to Alzheimer's Disease (AD than individuals without cognitive impairment. Despite intensifying interest investigating the neuroanatomical basis of this transition, there remain a number of questions regarding the pathophysiological process underlying aMCI itself. A number of recent studies in aMCI have shown specific impairments in connectivity within the default mode network (DMN, which is a group of regions strongly related to episodic memory capacities. However to date, no study has investigated the integrity of the DMN between patients with aMCI and those with a non-amnestic pattern of MCI (naMCI, who have cognitive impairment, but intact memory storage systems. In this study, we contrasted the DMN connectivity in 24 aMCI and 33 naMCI patients using seed-based resting state fMRI. The two groups showed no statistical difference in their DMN intra-connectivity. However when connectivity was analysed according to performance on measures of episodic memory retrieval, the two groups were separable, with aMCI patients demonstrating impaired functional connectivity between the hippocampal formation and the posterior cingulate cortex. We provide evidence that this lack of connectivity is driven by impaired communication from the posterior cingulate hub and does not simply represent hippocampal atrophy, suggesting that posterior cingulate degeneration is the driving force behind impaired DMN connectivity in aMCI.

  6. Deficits in episodic memory retrieval reveal impaired default mode network connectivity in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Cameron J.; Duffy, Shantel L; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim; Lewis, Simon J.G.; Naismith, Sharon L.; Shine, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is believed to represent a transitional stage between normal healthy ageing and the development of dementia. In particular, aMCI patients have been shown to have higher annual transition rates to Alzheimer's Disease (AD) than individuals without cognitive impairment. Despite intensifying interest investigating the neuroanatomical basis of this transition, there remain a number of questions regarding the pathophysiological process underlying aMCI itself. A number of recent studies in aMCI have shown specific impairments in connectivity within the default mode network (DMN), which is a group of regions strongly related to episodic memory capacities. However to date, no study has investigated the integrity of the DMN between patients with aMCI and those with a non-amnestic pattern of MCI (naMCI), who have cognitive impairment, but intact memory storage systems. In this study, we contrasted the DMN connectivity in 24 aMCI and 33 naMCI patients using seed-based resting state fMRI. The two groups showed no statistical difference in their DMN intra-connectivity. However when connectivity was analysed according to performance on measures of episodic memory retrieval, the two groups were separable, with aMCI patients demonstrating impaired functional connectivity between the hippocampal formation and the posterior cingulate cortex. We provide evidence that this lack of connectivity is driven by impaired communication from the posterior cingulate hub and does not simply represent hippocampal atrophy, suggesting that posterior cingulate degeneration is the driving force behind impaired DMN connectivity in aMCI. PMID:24634833

  7. Transgenerational effects of adolescent nicotine exposure in rats: Evidence for cognitive deficits in adult female offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Samantha M; Fountain, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent nicotine exposure in one generation of rats would impair the cognitive capacity of a subsequent generation. Male and female rats in the parental F0 generation were given twice-daily i.p. injections of either 1.0mg/kg nicotine or an equivalent volume of saline for 35days during adolescence on postnatal days 25-59 (P25-59). After reaching adulthood, male and female nicotine-exposed rats were paired for breeding as were male and female saline control rats. Only female offspring were used in this experiment. Half of the offspring of F0 nicotine-exposed breeders and half of the offspring of F0 saline control rats received twice-daily i.p. injections of 1.0mg/kg nicotine during adolescence on P25-59. The remainder of the rats received twice-daily saline injections for the same period. To evaluate transgenerational effects of nicotine exposure on complex cognitive learning abilities, F1 generation rats were trained to perform a highly structured serial pattern in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task. Beginning on P95, rats in the F1 generation were given either 4days of massed training (20patterns/day) followed by spaced training (10 patterns/day) or only spaced training. Transgenerational effects of adolescent nicotine exposure were observed as greater difficulty in learning a "violation element" of the pattern, which indicated that rats were impaired in the ability to encode and remember multiple sequential elements as compound or configural cues. The results indicated that for rats that received massed training, F1 generation rats with adolescent nicotine exposure whose F0 generation parents also experienced adolescent nicotine exposure showed poorer learning of the violation element than rats that experienced adolescent nicotine exposure only in the F1 generation. Thus, adolescent nicotine exposure in one generation of rats produced a cognitive impairment in the next generation.

  8. Candida albicans exposures, sex specificity and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severance, Emily G; Gressitt, Kristin L; Stallings, Catherine R; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy A; Savage, Christina L; Adamos, Maria B; Sweeney, Kevin M; Origoni, Andrea E; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F Markus; Dickerson, Faith B; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Immune aberrations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have led to the hypotheses that infectious agents or corresponding immune responses might contribute to psychiatric etiopathogeneses. We investigated case–control differences in exposure to the opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, and examined associations with cognition, medication, lifestyle, and somatic conditions. We quantified C. albicans IgG antibodies in two cohorts totaling 947 individuals and evaluated odds ratios (OR) of exposure with psychiatric disorder using multivariate regressions. The case–control cohort included 261 with schizophrenia, 270 with bipolar disorder, and 277 non-psychiatric controls; the second included 139 with first-episode schizophrenia, 78 of whom were antipsychotic naive. No differences in C. albicans exposures were found until diagnostic groups were stratified by sex. In males, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for a schizophrenia diagnosis (OR 2.04–9.53, P⩽0.0001). In females, C. albicans seropositivity conferred increased odds for lower cognitive scores on Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) in schizophrenia (OR 1.12, P⩽0.004), with significant decreases on memory modules for both disorders (P⩽0.0007–0.03). C. albicans IgG levels were not impacted by antipsychotic medications. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances were associated with elevated C. albicans in males with schizophrenia and females with bipolar disorder (P⩽0.009–0.02). C. albicans exposure was associated with homelessness in bipolar males (P⩽0.0015). In conclusion, sex-specific C. albicans immune responses were evident in psychiatric disorder subsets. Inquiry regarding C. albicans infection or symptoms may expedite amelioration of this treatable comorbid condition. Yeast exposure as a risk factor for schizophrenia and its associated cognitive and GI effects require further investigation including the possible contribution of

  9. THE EXPERIENCE OF HOPANTENIC ACID APPLICATION IN THE SYRUP FOR THE CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM EPILEPSY WITH COGNITIVE DISORDERS AND ATTENTION DEFICIT AND HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Guzeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for nootropic medications, which don't aggravate the implications of the hyperactivity disorder and sleep disturbances, is an urgent issue in the children's neurology. For the purpose of pantohamium sirupus appraisal, the researchers examined 20 patient aged between 3 years old and 4 years 11 months old, suffering from epilepsy with cognitive disorders and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder. All the patients underwent interviewing with the composite questionnaire, oddball tasks, mechanical memory tests (memorizing 3–4 words, dynamic memory tests (repeating 2 groups of words, colour test (for the children of 4 years old, as well as electroencephalography and by indications clinical and biochemical examination. After the course of panto hamium sirupus treatment the researchers discovered the general improvement of attention, mechanical and dynamic memory, anxiety reduction and compensation boost based on the colour test conducted among the children, suffering from epilepsy with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder. Most patients showed the improvement indices of the EEG background rhythm structure and normalization of background zone differences. The analysis of the obtained results allowed the researchers to conclude that pantohamium sirupus was safe and efficient in the complex therapy among the children, suffering from epilepsy with cognitive disorders and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder.Key words: hopantenic acid, pantohamium, epilepsy, attention deficit, hyperactivity, cognitive disorders.

  10. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Nehra, Ritu; Bhateja, Gaurav; Kulhara, Parmanand; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  11. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. Results: In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Conclusion: Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  12. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Fotiou, Dimitris; Tsiptsios, Dimitris; Orologas, Anastasios

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate with neurophysiological and neuropsychological methods such as pupillometry, cognitive test and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) the hypothesis of Central Nervous System (CNS) cholinergic involvement in patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Thirty-two patients (32) with MG and a mean age of 51.1 ± 17.2 volunteered to participate in this investigation, while thirty-three (33) healthy subjects with a mean age of 50.2 ± 14.8 served as controls. All subjects underwent pupillometric measurements and performed the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) and HAM-D. The pupillometric indices studied were: 1) latency for the onset of constriction (T1), 2) maximum constriction velocity (VCmax) and 3) maximum constriction acceleration (ACmax). T1 was found significantly increased by 21.7% (p WMS by 41.6% (p System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.

  13. Cognitive Deficits in Healthy Elderly Population With "Normal" Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether healthy older adults with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores above 23 exhibit cognitive impairment on neuropsychological tests. Participants completed the MMSE and a neuropsychological battery including tests of 10 domains. Results were compared to published normative data. On neuropsychological testing, participants performed well on measures of naming and recall but showed mild to moderate impairment in working memory and processing speed and marked impairment in inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Almost everyone (91%) scored at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean in at least 1 domain. The median number of domains in which individuals scored below 1 SD was 3.0 of 10.0, whereas over 21% scored below 1 SD in 5 domains or more. With the strictest of definitions for impairment, 20% of this population scored below 2.0 SDs below the norm in at least 2 domains, a necessary condition for a diagnosis of dementia. The finding that cognitive impairment, particularly in attention and executive functioning, is found in healthy older persons who perform well on the MMSE has clinical and research implications in terms of emphasizing normal variability in performance and early identification of possible impairment.

  14. Parent cognitions as predictors of child treatment response in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoza, B; Owens, J S; Pelham, W E; Swanson, J M; Conners, C K; Hinshaw, S P; Arnold, L E; Kraemer, H C

    2000-12-01

    Using a subsample of 105 children and their parents (100 mothers, 57 fathers) from the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (the MTA), the value of parents' baseline cognitions as predictors of children's treatment outcome at 14 months was examined. Measures of parents' cognitions about themselves, their ADHD children, and their parenting, as well as a self-report measure of dysfunctional discipline were included. Both mothers' and fathers' self-reported use of dysfunctional discipline predicted worse child treatment outcome. Low self-esteem in mothers, low parenting efficacy in fathers, and fathers' attributions of noncompliance to their ADHD child's insufficient effort and bad mood also were associated with worse child treatment outcome. All of these predictive relations were obtained even after MTA treatment effects had been taken into account. Secondary analyses indicated that mothers had a more external locus of control, lower self-esteem, lower parenting efficacy, and a greater tendency to attribute noncompliance to their ADHD child's bad mood than did fathers.

  15. The cognitive structure of time estimation impairments in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Isabel; Lopera, Francisco; Pineda, David; Casini, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    We compared the performance of 15 adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a group of 16 control adults on a temporal bisection task in auditory and visual modalities. The point of subjective equality (PSE) and the difference limen (DL) were computed to analyse performance. The main findings were that (a) individuals with ADHD overestimated the duration of both the auditory and visual stimuli in comparison to the control group, as evidenced by a shift in their mean PSE; (b) individuals with ADHD also showed less precision in their estimates than did the control group as evidenced by flatter psychometric functions; and (c) the degrees of overestimation and imprecision in subjects with ADHD were comparable across modalities. These results, discussed in the framework of the pacemaker-counter clock model of time estimation, suggest that temporal difficulties encountered by ADHD patients might be explained both by an alertness effect at the level of the switch that directs pulses into the accumulator and also by distortions of durations stored in reference memory.

  16. [Cognitive-behavioural guidance interventions in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Llagostera, Cristina; Vidal, Raquel; Abad, Alfonso; Corrales, Montse; Richarte, Vanesa; Casas, Miguel; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep A

    2015-02-25

    Introduccion. El trastorno por deficit de atencion/hiperactividad (TDAH) es un trastorno del neurodesarrollo que se puede manifestar a lo largo de la vida. Un 50-70% de los niños diagnosticados presenta el trastorno en la adolescencia. Los jovenes con TDAH tienen elevadas tasas de comorbilidad con otros trastornos psiquiatricos y una elevada afectacion funcional. Objetivo. Revisar la bibliografia de las intervenciones cognitivo-conductuales que se han aplicado al tratamiento del TDAH en la adolescencia. Desarrollo. Se revisan los estudios sobre tratamiento psicologico, clasificando las intervenciones en: tratamientos psicosociales, tratamiento en mindfulness y tratamiento cognitivo-conductual (individual y en formato de grupo). Se revisa el unico estudio publicado sobre terapia cognitivo-conductual para adolescentes con TDAH, asi como un nuevo protocolo de intervencion en formato de grupo diseñado en el Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron. Conclusiones. Aunque recientemente se ha incrementado el numero de publicaciones sobre el tratamiento psicologico del TDAH en el adolescente, se requiere un desarrollo mayor de protocolos de intervencion y estudios sobre la eficacia/efectividad de estos.

  17. Dietary Intake of Sulforaphane-Rich Broccoli Sprout Extracts during Juvenile and Adolescence Can Prevent Phencyclidine-Induced Cognitive Deficits at Adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Shirai

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play a role in cognitive impairment, which is a core symptom of schizophrenia. Furthermore, a hallmark of the pathophysiology of this disease is the dysfunction of cortical inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV, which is also involved in cognitive impairment. Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate derived from broccoli, is a potent activator of the transcription factor Nrf2, which plays a central role in the inducible expressions of many cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. Keap1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is essential for the regulation of Nrf2 activity. Here, we found that pretreatment with SFN attenuated cognitive deficits, the increase in 8-oxo-dG-positive cells, and the decrease in PV-positive cells in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus after repeated administration of phencyclidine (PCP. Furthermore, PCP-induced cognitive deficits were improved by the subsequent subchronic administration of SFN. Interestingly, the dietary intake of glucoraphanin (a glucosinolate precursor of SFN during the juvenile and adolescence prevented the onset of PCP-induced cognitive deficits as well as the increase in 8-oxo-dG-positive cells and the decrease in PV-positive cells in the brain at adulthood. Moreover, the NRF2 gene and the KEAP1 gene had an epistatic effect on cognitive impairment (e.g., working memory and processing speed in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that SFN may have prophylactic and therapeutic effects on cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Therefore, the dietary intake of SFN-rich broccoli sprouts during the juvenile and adolescence may prevent the onset of psychosis at adulthood.

  18. Cognitive Control Deficits in Shifting and Inhibition in Preschool Age Children are Associated with Increased Depression and Anxiety Over 7.5 Years of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz, Sarah J; Belden, Andy C; Tillman, Rebecca; Luby, Joan

    2016-08-01

    Although depression and anxiety are common in youth (Costello et al. 2003), factors that put children at risk for such symptoms are not well understood. The current study examined associations between early childhood cognitive control deficits and depression and anxiety over the course of development through school age. Participants were 188 children (at baseline M = 5.42 years, SD = 0.79 years) and their primary caregiver. Caregivers completed ratings of children's executive functioning at preschool age and measures of depression and anxiety severity over seven assessment waves (a period of approximately 7.5 years). Longitudinal multilevel linear models were used to examine the effect of attention shifting and inhibition deficits on depression and anxiety. Inhibition deficits at preschool were associated with significantly greater depression severity scores at each subsequent assessment wave (up until 7.5 years later). Inhibition deficits were associated with greater anxiety severity from 3.5 to 7.5 years later. Greater shifting deficits at preschool age were associated with greater depression severity up to 5.5 years later. Shifting deficits were also associated with significantly greater anxiety severity up to 3.5 years later. Importantly, these effects were significant even after accounting for the influence of other key predictors including assessment wave/time, gender, parental education, IQ, and symptom severity at preschool age, suggesting that effects are robust. Overall, findings indicate that cognitive control deficits are an early vulnerability factor for developing affective symptoms. Timely assessment and intervention may be beneficial as an early prevention strategy.

  19. Double-blind, randomized sham controlled study of deep-TMS add-on treatment for negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabany, Liron; Deutsch, Lisa; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2014-07-01

    Negative symptoms and cognitive deficits are considered core symptoms of schizophrenia, yet treatment for them remains inadequate. Deep-transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a novel technology that enables non-invasive stimulation of deep layers of the prefrontal cortex. Preliminary evidence suggests that deep-TMS could be effective in the treatment of negative symptoms and cognitive deficits. The current study is the first double-blind, randomized sham-controlled study to examine the feasibility of deep-TMS add-on treatment for negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Twenty daily H1 deep-TMS treatments (20Hz, 120% MT) were delivered, in a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled design (n=30). Extensive clinical and cognitive assessments were carried out throughout the study and for an additional one month follow-up period. The results indicate that at the end of the treatment period, negative symptoms (as indicated by the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS)) significantly reduced in the TMS group (-7.7), but not in the sham group (-1.9). Differences between the groups were not statistically significant.

  20. Investigating metacognition, cognition, and behavioral deficits of college students with acute traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-07-01

    Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121 college students with no history of a TBI were matched on sex and ethnicity to examine potential differences between groups. Participants completed the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX). A Rasch analysis indicated that the TBI group had significantly higher total scores on the DEX than the control group. Moreover, when compared with the control group, the students with a TBI had higher scores on all 3 subcomponents of the DEX. These findings suggest that students who endorse brain injuries may experience more difficulty with specific facets of college. Thus, the importance of academic and personal resources available for students with a TBI is discussed.

  1. Prevention of Hippocampal Neuronal Damage and Cognitive Function Deficits in Vascular Dementia by Dextromethorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Kaili; Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Zhao, Bing-Qiao; Zhao, Yuwu

    2016-07-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and a widely used component of cough medicine. Recently, its indication has been extended experimentally to a wide range of disorders including inflammation-mediated central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we investigate whether DM treatment has protective effects on the hippocampal neuron damage induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion [2VO]), an animal model of vascular dementia (VaD). Sprague-Dawley (SD) (10 weeks of age) rats were subjected to the 2VO, and DM was injected intraperitoneally once per day for 37 days. Neuron death, glial activation, and cognitive function were assessed at 37 days after 2VO (0.2 mg/kg, i.p., "DM-0.2" and 2 mg/kg, i.p., "DM-2"). DM-2 treatment provided protection against neuronal death and glial activation in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and reduced cognitive impairment induced by 2VO in rats. The study also demonstrates that activation of the Nrf2-HO-1 pathway and upregulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) play important roles in these effects. These results suggest that DM is effective in treating VaD and protecting against oxidative stress, which is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of VaD. Therefore, the present study suggests that DM treatment may represent a new and promising protective strategy for treating VaD.

  2. Pre- and postnatal exposure to kynurenine causes cognitive deficits in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocivavsek, Ana; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Elmer, Greg I; Bruno, John P; Schwarcz, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous product of tryptophan degradation, are elevated in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of individuals with schizophrenia (SZ). This increase has been implicated in the cognitive dysfunctions seen in the disease, as KYNA is an antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, both of which are critically involved in cognitive processes and in a defining neurodevelopmental period in the pathophysiology of SZ. We tested the hypothesis that early developmental increases in brain KYNA synthesis might cause biochemical and functional impairments in adulthood. To this end, we stimulated KYNA formation by adding the KYNA precursor kynurenine (100 mg/day) to the chow fed to rat dams from gestational day 15 to postnatal day 21 (PD 21). This treatment raised brain KYNA levels in the offspring by 341% on PD 2 and 210% on PD 21. Rats were then fed normal chow until adulthood (PD 56-80). In the adult animals, basal levels of extracellular KYNA, measured in the hippocampus by in vivo microdialysis, were elevated (+12%), whereas extracellular glutamate levels were significantly reduced (-13%). In separate adult animals, early kynurenine treatment was shown to impair performance in two behavioral tasks linked to hippocampal function, the passive avoidance test and the Morris water maze test. Collectively, these studies introduce a novel, naturalistic rat model of SZ, and also suggest that increases in brain KYNA during a vulnerable period in brain development may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  3. Peripheral Immune Cell Populations Associated with Cognitive Deficits and Negative Symptoms of Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Fernandez-Egea

    Full Text Available Hypothetically, psychotic disorders could be caused or conditioned by immunological mechanisms. If so, one might expect there to be peripheral immune system phenotypes that are measurable in blood cells as biomarkers of psychotic states.We used multi-parameter flow cytometry of venous blood to quantify and determine the activation state of 73 immune cell subsets for 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia (17 treated with clozapine, and 18 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, BMI and smoking. We used multivariate methods (partial least squares to reduce dimensionality and define populations of differentially co-expressed cell counts in the cases compared to controls.Schizophrenia cases had increased relative numbers of NK cells, naïve B cells, CXCR5+ memory T cells and classical monocytes; and decreased numbers of dendritic cells (DC, HLA-DR+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Likewise, within the patient group, more severe negative and cognitive symptoms were associated with decreased relative numbers of dendritic cells, HLA-DR+ Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Motivated by the importance of central nervous system dopamine signalling for psychosis, we measured dopamine receptor gene expression in separated CD4+ cells. Expression of the dopamine D3 (DRD3 receptor was significantly increased in clozapine-treated schizophrenia and covaried significantly with differentiated T cell classes in the CD4+ lineage.Peripheral immune cell populations and dopaminergic signalling are disrupted in clozapine-treated schizophrenia. Immuno-phenotypes may provide peripherally accessible and mechanistically specific biomarkers of residual cognitive and negative symptoms in this treatment-resistant subgroup of patients.

  4. Cognitive deficits and disruption of neurogenesis in a mouse model of apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeosun, Samuel O; Hou, Xu; Zheng, Baoying; Stockmeier, Craig; Ou, Xiaoming; Paul, Ian; Mosley, Thomas; Weisgraber, Karl; Wang, Jun Ming

    2014-01-31

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) allele is the major genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) due to the higher prevalence and earlier onset of AD in apoE4 carriers. Accumulating data suggest that the interaction between the N- and the C-terminal domains in the protein may be the main pathologic feature of apoE4. To test this hypothesis, we used Arg-61 mice, a model of apoE4 domain interaction, by introducing the domain interaction feature of human apoE4 into native mouse apoE. We carried out hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tests and related cellular and molecular assays on 12- and 3-month-old Arg-61 and age-matched background C57BL/6J mice. Learning and memory task performance were impaired in Arg-61 mice at both old and young ages compared with C57BL/6J mice. Surprisingly, young Arg-61 mice had more mitotic doublecortin-positive cells in the subgranular zone; mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB were also higher in 3-month-old Arg-61 hippocampus compared with C57BL/6J mice. These early-age neurotrophic and neurogenic (proliferative) effects in the Arg-61 mouse may be an inadequate compensatory but eventually detrimental attempt by the system to "repair" itself. This is supported by the higher cleaved caspase-3 levels in the young animals that not only persisted, but increased in old age, and the lower levels of doublecortin at old age in the hippocampus of Arg-61 mice. These results are consistent with human apoE4-dependent cognitive and neuro-pathologic changes, supporting the principal role of domain interaction in the pathologic effect of apoE4. Domain interaction is, therefore, a viable therapeutic/prophylactic target for cognitive impairment and AD in apoE4 subjects.

  5. Transitions in cognitive test scores over 5 and 10 years in elderly people: Evidence for a model of age-related deficit accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockwood Kenneth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On average, health worsens with age, but many people have periods of improvement. A stochastic model provides an excellent description of how such changes occur. Given that cognition also changes with age, we wondered whether the same model might also describe the accumulation of errors in cognitive test scores in community-dwelling older adults. Methods In this prospective cohort study, 8954 older people (aged 65+ at baseline from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging were followed for 10 years. Cognitive status was defined by the number of errors on the 100-point Modified Min-Mental State Examination. The error count was chosen to parallel the deficit count in the general model of aging, which is based on deficit accumulation. As with the deficit count, a Markov chain transition model was employed, with 4 parameters. Results On average, the chance of making errors increased linearly with the number of errors present at each time interval. Changes in cognitive states were described with high accuracy (R2 = 0.96 by a modified Poisson distribution, using four parameters: the background chance of accumulating additional errors, the chance of incurring more or fewer errors, given the existing number, and the corresponding background and incremental chances of dying. Conclusion The change in the number of errors in a cognitive test corresponded to a general model that also summarizes age-related changes in deficits. The model accounts for both improvement and deterioration and appears to represent a clinically relevant means of quantifying how various aspects of health status change with age.

  6. Early Cognitive/Social Deficits and Late Motor Phenotype in Conditional Wild-Type TDP-43 Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Julio A.; Silva, Pablo R.; Igaz, Lionel M.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are two neurodegenerative diseases associated to mislocalization and aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). To investigate in depth the behavioral phenotype associated with this proteinopathy, we used as a model transgenic (Tg) mice conditionally overexpressing human wild-type TDP 43 protein (hTDP-43-WT) in forebrain neurons. We previously characterized these mice at the neuropathological level and found progressive neurodegeneration and other features that evoke human TDP-43 proteinopathies of the FTD/ALS spectrum. In the present study we analyzed the behavior of mice at multiple domains, including motor, social and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that young hTDP-43-WT Tg mice (1 month after post-weaning transgene induction) present a normal motor phenotype compared to control littermates, as assessed by accelerated rotarod performance, spontaneous locomotor activity in the open field test and a mild degree of spasticity shown by a clasping phenotype. Analysis of social and cognitive behavior showed a rapid installment of deficits in social interaction, working memory (Y-maze test) and recognition memory (novel object recognition test) in the absence of overt motor abnormalities. To investigate if the motor phenotype worsen with age, we analyzed the behavior of mice after long-term (up to 12 months) transgene induction. Our results reveal a decreased performance on the rotarod test and in the hanging wire test, indicating a motor phenotype that was absent in younger mice. In addition, long-term hTDP-43-WT expression led to hyperlocomotion in the open field test. In sum, these results demonstrate a time-dependent emergence of a motor phenotype in older hTDP-43-WT Tg mice, recapitulating aspects of clinical FTD presentations with motor involvement in human patients, and providing a complementary animal model for studying TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:28066234

  7. Promoter polymorphisms in two overlapping 6p25 genes implicate mitochondrial proteins in cognitive deficit in schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jablensky, A

    2011-10-04

    In a previous study, we detected a 6p25-p24 region linked to schizophrenia in families with high composite cognitive deficit (CD) scores, a quantitative trait integrating multiple cognitive measures. Association mapping of a 10 Mb interval identified a 260 kb region with a cluster of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with CD scores and memory performance. The region contains two colocalising genes, LYRM4 and FARS2, both encoding mitochondrial proteins. The two tagging SNPs with strongest evidence of association were located around the overlapping putative promoters, with rs2224391 predicted to alter a transcription factor binding site (TFBS). Sequencing the promoter region identified 22 SNPs, many predicted to affect TFBSs, in a tight linkage disequilibrium block. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed promoter activity in the predicted promoter region, and demonstrated marked downregulation of expression in the LYRM4 direction under the haplotype comprising the minor alleles of promoter SNPs, which however is not driven by rs2224391. Experimental evidence from LYRM4 expression in lymphoblasts, gel-shift assays and modelling of DNA breathing dynamics pointed to two adjacent promoter SNPs, rs7752203-rs4141761, as the functional variants affecting expression. Their C-G alleles were associated with higher transcriptional activity and preferential binding of nuclear proteins, whereas the G-A combination had opposite effects and was associated with poor memory and high CD scores. LYRM4 is a eukaryote-specific component of the mitochondrial biogenesis of Fe-S clusters, essential cofactors in multiple processes, including oxidative phosphorylation. LYRM4 downregulation may be one of the mechanisms involved in inefficient oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress, increasingly recognised as contributors to schizophrenia pathogenesis.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 4 October 2011; doi:10.1038\\/mp.2011.129.

  8. Modulation of Rho GTPases rescues brain mitochondrial dysfunction, cognitive deficits and aberrant synaptic plasticity in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; de Bari, Lidia; Fiorentini, Carla; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Fabbri, Alessia; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Rho GTPases are molecules critically involved in neuronal plasticity and cognition. We have previously reported that modulation of brain Rho GTPases by the bacterial toxin CNF1 rescues the neurobehavioral phenotype in MeCP2-308 male mice, a model of Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a rare X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and a genetic cause of intellectual disability, for which no effective therapy is available. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of the disease pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that modulation of Rho GTPases by CNF1 rescues the reduced mitochondrial ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the condition which more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. In RTT mouse brain, CNF1 also restores the alterations in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes and of ATP synthase, the molecular machinery responsible for the majority of cell energy production. Such effects were achieved through the upregulation of the protein content of those MRC complexes subunits, which were defective in RTT mouse brain. Restored mitochondrial functionality was accompanied by the rescue of deficits in cognitive function (spatial reference memory in the Barnes maze), synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation) and Tyr1472 phosphorylation of GluN2B, which was abnormally enhanced in the hippocampus of RTT mice. Present findings bring into light previously unknown functional mitochondrial alterations in the brain of female mice modeling RTT and provide the first evidence that RTT brain mitochondrial dysfunction can be rescued by modulation of Rho GTPases.

  9. Cognitive control deficit in patients with first-episode schizophrenia is associated with complex deviations of early brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Olivier; Plaze, Marion; Oppenheim, Catherine; Gaillard, Raphael; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cachia, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    Background Several clinical and radiological markers of early neurodevelopmental deviations have been independently associated with cognitive impairment in patients with schizophrenia. The aim of our study was to test the cumulative and/or interactive effects of these early neurodevelopmental factors on cognitive control (CC) deficit, a core feature of schizophrenia. Methods We recruited patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, who underwent structural MRI. We evaluated CC efficiency using the Trail Making Test (TMT). Several markers of early brain development were measured: neurological soft signs (NSS), handedness, sulcal pattern of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and ventricle enlargement. Results We included 41 patients with schizophrenia in our analysis, which revealed a main effect of ACC morphology (p = 0.041) as well as interactions between NSS and ACC morphology (p = 0.005), between NSS and handedness (p = 0.044) and between ACC morphology and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume (p = 0.005) on CC measured using the TMT-B score – the TMT-A score. Limitations No 3- or 4-way interactions were detected between the 4 neurodevelopmental factors. The sample size was clearly adapted to detect main effects and 2-way interactions, but may have limited the statistical power to investigate higher-order interactions. The effects of treatment and illness duration were limited as the study design involved only patients with first-episode psychosis. Conclusion To our knowledge, our study provides the first evidence of cumulative and interactive effects of different neurodevelopmental markers on CC efficiency in patients with schizophrenia. Such findings, in line with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia, support the notion that CC impairments in patients with schizophrenia may be the final common pathway of several early neurodevelopmental mechanisms. PMID:28245174

  10. Vitamins C and E reverse melamine-induced deficits in spatial cognition and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Lei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-09-01

    Albeit the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment after exposure to melamine has not been fully elucidated, factors such as oxidative stress is thought to play potential roles. In the present study, we investigated the effect of treatment with vitamin C (150mg/kg) and vitamin E (200mg/kg) on the impairment induced by melamine. Three-week-old male Wistar rats were submitted to oral gavage with 300mg/kg melamine in 1% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) for 28 days (MEL-SAL group). After treatment with melamine, animals received administration of a combination of vitamin C and vitamin E once a day for 7 days (MEL-VIT group). Both control (CT-SAL) group and pair-fed (CT-VIT) group received the same dosage of CMC and vitamin complex, respectively. Melamine-treated rats presented a marked decrease in learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) as well as a reduced efficiency to find the platform in the reversal learning task. The rats treated with vitamins E and C had part of the above effects rescued in MWM tests, with mitigating the melamine-induced deficit in the learning and memory but slightly improving the reversal learning ability. The vitamins C plus E regimen mitigated melamine-induced impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. It showed that the modulation of oxidative stress with vitamins E and C reduced melamine-induced damage. The data suggested that there was a novel therapeutic strategy to the cognitive dysfunction observed in melamine-induced neuropathy.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor 1 gene polymorphisms and marijuana misuse interactions on white matter and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Beng-Choon; Wassink, Thomas H; Ziebell, Steven; Andreasen, Nancy C

    2011-05-01

    Marijuana exposure during the critical period of adolescent brain maturation may disrupt neuro-modulatory influences of endocannabinoids and increase schizophrenia susceptibility. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1/CNR1) is the principal brain receptor mediating marijuana effects. No study to-date has systematically investigated the impact of CNR1 on quantitative phenotypic features in schizophrenia and inter-relationships with marijuana misuse. We genotyped 235 schizophrenia patients using 12 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) that account for most of CB1 coding region genetic variability. Patients underwent a high-resolution anatomic brain magnetic resonance scan and cognitive assessment. Almost a quarter of the sample met DSM marijuana abuse (14%) or dependence (8%) criteria. Effects of CNR1 tSNPs and marijuana abuse/dependence on brain volumes and neurocognition were assessed using ANCOVA, including co-morbid alcohol/non-marijuana illicit drug misuse as covariates. Significant main effects of CNR1 tSNPs (rs7766029, rs12720071, and rs9450898) were found in white matter (WM) volumes. Patients with marijuana abuse/dependence had smaller fronto-temporal WM volumes than patients without heavy marijuana use. More interestingly, there were significant rs12720071 genotype-by-marijuana use interaction effects on WM volumes and neurocognitive impairment; suggestive of gene-environment interactions for conferring phenotypic abnormalities in schizophrenia. In this comprehensive evaluation of genetic variants distributed across the CB1 locus, CNR1 genetic polymorphisms were associated with WM brain volume variation among schizophrenia patients. Our findings suggest that heavy cannabis use in the context of specific CNR1 genotypes may contribute to greater WM volume deficits and cognitive impairment, which could in turn increase schizophrenia risk.

  12. Early cognitive/social deficits and late motor phenotype in conditional wild-type TDP-43 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Armando Alfieri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are two neurodegenerative diseases associated to mislocalization and aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43. To investigate in depth the behavioral phenotype associated with this proteinopathy, we used as a model transgenic mice conditionally overexpressing human wild-type TDP 43 protein (hTDP-43-WT in forebrain neurons. We previously characterized these mice at the neuropathological level and found progressive neurodegeneration and other features that evoke human TDP-43 proteinopathies of the FTD/ALS spectrum. In the present study we analyzed the behavior of mice at multiple domains, including motor, social and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that young hTDP-43-WT transgenic mice (1 month after post-weaning transgene induction present a normal motor phenotype compared to control littermates, as assessed by accelerated rotarod performance, spontaneous locomotor activity in the open field test and a mild degree of spasticity shown by a clasping phenotype. Analysis of social and cognitive behavior showed a rapid installment of deficits in social interaction, working memory (Y-maze test and recognition memory (novel object recognition test in the absence of overt motor abnormalities. To investigate if the motor phenotype worsen with age, we analyzed the behavior of mice after long-term (up to 12 months transgene induction. Our results reveal a decreased performance on the rotarod test and in the hanging wire test, indicating a motor phenotype that was absent in younger mice. In addition, long-term hTDP-43-WT expression led to hyperlocomotion in the open field test. In sum, these results demonstrate a time-dependent emergence of a motor phenotype in older hTDP-43-WT transgenic mice, recapitulating aspects of clinical FTD presentations with motor involvement in human patients, and providing a complementary animal model for studying TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  13. Academic, Behavioral, and Cognitive Effects of OROS® Methylphenidate on Older Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, Sharon B.; Wigal, Tim; Schuck, Sabrina; Brams, Matthew; Williamson, David; Armstrong, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effect of Osmotic-Release Oral System (OROS) methylphenidate (MPH) on a variety of measures evaluating academic performance, cognition, and social behavior in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory school study enrolled 78 children aged 9–12 years with ADHD who responded to OROS MPH. After determining individualized OROS MPH dosing (18–54 mg/day), 71 subjects received blinded treatment (OROS MPH or placebo then vice versa) on each of 2 laboratory school days, separated by 1 week. Primary efficacy was measured by Permanent Product Measure of Performance at 4 hours after study drug administration. Results Treatment with OROS MPH resulted in statistically significant improvement in Permanent Product Measure of Performance and Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn, and Pelham scores, measures of response time, and of working memory compared to placebo. Other measures did not meet all pre-established criteria for significance (maintenance of the overall type I error rate at 5%). Adverse events were consistent with previous reports of stimulant medications used in the management of ADHD. There were no discontinuations due to adverse events, and no serious adverse events or deaths. Conclusions OROS MPH dosed to reduce core symptoms of ADHD to within the normal range also improved performance on a variety of academic tasks in school-aged children compared to placebo. Adverse effects reported were consistent with prior studies. Clinical Trial Registry Information Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study Evaluating the Academic, Behavioral and Cognitive Effects of Concerta on Older Children with ADHD, URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00799409, unique identifier: NCT00799409. PMID:21488750

  14. Living in the Fast Lane: Evidence for a Global Perceptual Timing Deficit in Childhood ADHD Caused by Distinct but Partially Overlapping Task-Dependent Cognitive Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Ivo; Weirich, Steffen; Berger, Christoph; Herpertz, Sabine C.; Cohrs, Stefan; Wandschneider, Roland; Höppner, Jacqueline; Häßler, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctions in perceptual timing have been reported in children with ADHD, but so far only from studies that have not used the whole set of timing paradigms available from the literature, with the diversity of findings complicating the development of a unified model of timing dysfunctions and its determinants in ADHD. Therefore, we employed a comprehensive set of paradigms (time discrimination, time estimation, time production, and time reproduction) in order to explore the perceptual timing deficit profile in our ADHD sample. Moreover, we aimed to detect predictors responsible for timing task performance deficits in children with ADHD and how the timing deficits might be positively affected by methylphenidate. Male children with ADHD and healthy control children, all aged between 8 and 13 years, participated in this longitudinal study with three experimental sessions, where children with ADHD were medicated with methylphenidate at the second session but discontinued their medication at the remaining sessions. The results of our study reveal that children with ADHD were impaired in all timing tasks, arguing for a general perceptual timing deficit in ADHD. In doing so, our predictor analyses support the notion that distinct but partially overlapping cognitive mechanisms might exist for discriminating, estimating/producing, and reproducing time intervals. In this sense, working memory deficits in terms of an abnormally fast internal counting process might be common to dysfunctions in the time estimation/time production tasks and in the time reproduction task, with attention deficits (e.g., in terms of disruptions of the counting process) additionally contributing to time estimation/time production deficits and motivational alterations additionally contributing to time reproduction deficits. Methylphenidate did not significantly alter performance of the ADHD sample, presumably due to limited statistical power of our study. The findings of our study demonstrate a

  15. Huperzine A Ameliorates Cognitive Deficits in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yuan Mao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to probe the effects of Huperzine A (HupA on diabetes-associated cognitive decline (DACD using a streptozotocin (STZ-injected rat model. Diabetic rats were treated with HupA (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg for seven weeks. Memory functions were evaluated by the water maze test. Nissl staining was selected for detecting neuronal loss. Protein and mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were analyzed by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. The activities of choline acetylase (ChAT, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, catalase (CAT, NF-κB p65 unit, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and caspase-3 were measured using corresponding kits. After seven weeks, diabetic rats exhibited remarkable reductions in: body weight, percentage of time spent in target quadrant, number of times crossing the platform, ChAT and BDNF levels, SOD, GSH-Px and CAT accompanied with increases in neuronal damage, plasma glucose levels, escape latency, mean path length, AChE, MDA level as well as CAT, NF-κB p65 unit, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and caspase-3 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Supplementation with HupA significantly and dose-dependently reversed the corresponding values in diabetes. It is concluded that HupA ameliorates DACD via modulating BDNF, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis.

  16. Mismatch negativity (MMN amplitude as a biomarker of sensory memory deficit in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica eLindín

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that changes in some event-related potential (ERP parameters associated with controlled processing of stimuli could be used as biomarkers of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. However, data regarding the suitability of ERP components associated with automatic and involuntary processing of stimuli for this purpose are not conclusive. In the present study, we studied the Mismatch Negativity (MMN component, a correlate of the automatic detection of changes in the acoustic environment, in healthy adults and adults with aMCI (age range: 50-87 years. An auditory-visual attention-distraction task, in two evaluations separated by an interval of between 18 and 24 months, was used. In both evaluations, the MMN amplitude was significantly smaller in the aMCI adults than in the control adults. In the first evaluation, such differences were observed for the subgroup of adults between 50 and 64 years of age, but not for the subgroup of 65 years and over. In the aMCI adults, the MMN amplitude was significantly smaller in the second evaluation than in the first evaluation, but no significant changes were observed in the control adult group. The MMN amplitude was found to be a sensitive and specific biomarker of aMCI, in both the first and second evaluation.

  17. The moderating role of cognitive control deficits in the link from emotional dissonance to burnout symptoms and absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestel, Stefan; Schmidt, Klaus-Helmut

    2011-07-01

    The present study examines whether cognitive control deficits (CCDs) as a personal vulnerability factor amplify the relationship between emotional dissonance (ED; perceived discrepancy between felt and expressed emotions) and burnout symptoms (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) as well as absenteeism. CCDs refer to daily failures and impairments of attention regulation, impulse control, and memory. The prediction of the moderator effect of CCDs draws on the argument that portraying emotions which are not genuinely felt is a form of self-regulation taxing and depleting a limited resource capacity. Interindividual differences in the resource capacity are reflected by the measure of CCDs. Drawing on two German samples (one cross-sectional and one longitudinal sample; NTOTAL = 645) of service employees, the present study analyzed interactive effects of ED and CCDs on exhaustion, depersonalization, and two indicators of absenteeism. As was hypothesized, latent moderated structural equation modeling revealed that the adverse impacts of ED on both burnout symptoms and absence behavior were amplified as a function of CCDs. Theoretical and practical implications of the present results will be discussed.

  18. Spelling difficulties in school-aged girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: behavioral, psycholinguistic, cognitive, and graphomotor correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg Johnels, Jakob; Kopp, Svenny; Gillberg, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Writing difficulties are common among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the nature of these difficulties has not been well studied. Here we relate behavioral, psycholinguistic, cognitive (memory/executive), and graphomotor measures to spelling skills in school-age girls with ADHD (n = 30) and an age-matched group of typically developed spellers (TYPSP, n = 35). When subdividing the ADHD group into those with poor (ADHDPSP, n = 19) and typical spelling (ADHDTYPSP, n = 11), the two subgroups did not differ with regard to inattentive or hyperactive-impulsive symptom severity according to parent or teacher ratings. Both ADHD subgroups also had equally severe difficulties in graphomotor control-handwriting and (parent ratings of) written expression as compared to the TYPSP group. In contrast, ADHDPSP had problems relative to ADHDTYPSP and TYPSP on phonological and orthographic recoding (choice tasks) and verbal memory (digit span) and were more likely to make commissions on a continuous performance task (CPT). Further analyses using the collapsed ADHD group showed that both digit span and the presence of CPT commissions predicted spelling performance independently of each other. Finally, results showed that phonological recoding skills mediated the association between digit span and spelling performance in ADHD. Theoretical and educational implications are discussed.

  19. The association between sluggish cognitive tempo and academic functioning in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Becker, Stephen P; Dvorsky, Melissa R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relation between Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) and academic functioning in a sample of 52 adolescents (40 males, 12 females) with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; M age = 13.75). This study builds on prior work by utilizing an empirically-based and psychometrically validated measure of SCT, collecting ratings of SCT from both parents and teachers, and examining associations with multiple domains of academic functioning from both the parent and teacher perspective as well as grade point average (GPA). Both SCT and DSM-IV symptoms of inattention were significantly correlated with domains of academic functioning. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that the parent-rated SCT Slow subscale predicted overall academic functioning, organizational skills impairment, and homework problems above and beyond ADHD symptoms and child and demographic characteristics known to be associated with academics, including intelligence, academic achievement, and family income. The teacher-rated SCT Low Initiation/Persistence subscale also predicted homework problems and was the only SCT variable to predict school grades above and beyond ADHD symptoms and relevant covariates. Both the SCT Slow and Low Initiation/Persistence subscales include items related to youth seeming apathetic, unmotivated, and lacking initiative, behaviors that are strongly related to ADHD symptoms of inattention but not currently captured by the DSM-IV. Implications of these findings towards supporting the external validity of the SCT construct are discussed along with potential implications for intervention.

  20. Methylphenidate enhances cognitive performance in adults with poor baseline capacities regardless of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agay, Nirit; Yechiam, Eldad; Carmel, Ziv; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2014-04-01

    We compare the view that the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) is selective to individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with an alternative approach suggesting that its effect is more prominent for individuals with weak baseline capacities in relevant cognitive tasks. To evaluate theses 2 approaches, we administered sustained attention, working memory, and decision-making tasks to 20 ADHD adults and 19 control subjects, using a within-subject placebo-controlled design. The results demonstrated no main effects of MPH in the decision-making tasks. In the sustained attention and working-memory tasks, MPH enhanced performance of both ADHD and non-ADHD adults to a similar extent compared with placebo. Hence, the effect of MPH was not selective to ADHD adults. In addition, those benefitting most from MPH in all 3 task domains tended to be individuals with poor task performance. However, in most tasks, individuals whose performance was impaired by MPH were not necessarily better (or worse) performers. The findings suggest that the administration of MPH to adults with ADHD should consider not only clinical diagnosis but also their functional (performance-based) profile.

  1. The effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on intrinsic functional brain networks in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Qingjiu; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Zhaomin; Wang, Peng; Sun, Li; Cai, Taisheng; Wang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious psychological treatment for adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the neural processes underlying the benefits of CBT are not well understood. This study aims to unravel psychosocial mechanisms for treatment ADHD by exploring the effects of CBT on functional brain networks. Ten adults with ADHD were enrolled and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired before and after a 12-session CBT. Twelve age- and gender-matched healthy controls were also scanned. We constructed whole-brain functional connectivity networks using graph-theory approaches and further computed the changes of regional functional connectivity strength (rFCS) between pre- and post-CBT in ADHD for measuring the effects of CBT. The results showed that rFCS was increased in the fronto-parietal network and cerebellum, the brain regions that were most often affected by medication, in adults with ADHD following CBT. Furthermore, the enhanced functional coupling between bilateral superior parietal gyrus was positively correlated with the improvement of ADHD symptoms following CBT. Together, these findings provide evidence that CBT can selectively modulate the intrinsic network connectivity in the fronto-parietal network and cerebellum and suggest that the CBT may share common brain mechanism with the pharmacology in adults with ADHD.

  2. PMC-12, a Prescription of Traditional Korean Medicine, Improves Amyloid β-Induced Cognitive Deficits through Modulation of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Young Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PMC-12 is a prescription used in traditional Korean medicine that consists of a mixture of four herbal medicines, Polygonum multiflorum, Rehmannia glutinosa, Polygala tenuifolia, and Acorus gramineus, which have been reported to have various pharmacological effects on age-related neurological diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether PMC-12 improves cognitive deficits associated with decreased neuroinflammation in an amyloid-β-(Aβ- induced mouse model and exerts the antineuroinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-(LPS- stimulated murine BV2 microglia. Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25-35 in mice resulted in impairment in learning and spatial memory, whereas this was reversed by oral administration of PMC-12 (100 and 500 mg/kg/day in dose-dependent manners. Moreover, PMC-12 reduced the increase of Aβ expression and activation of microglia and astrocytes in the Aβ25-35-injected brain. Furthermore, quantitative PCR data showed that inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased by administration of PMC-12 in Aβ-injected brains. Consistent with the in vivo data, PMC-12 significantly reduced the inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells without cell toxicity. Moreover, PMC-12 exhibited anti-inflammatory properties via downregulation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings suggest that the protective effects of PMC-12 may be mediated by its antineuroinflammatory activities, resulting in the attenuation of memory impairment; accordingly, PMC-12 may be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  3. Cognitive endophenotypes of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intra-subject variability in patients with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscaldi, M; Bednorz, N; Weissbrodt, K; Saville, C W N; Feige, B; Bender, S; Klein, C

    2016-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have previously been studied mainly in isolation from each other. However the two conditions may be aetiologically related and thus show overlap in aetiologically relevant functions. In order to address this question of potential aetiological overlap between ADHD and ASD, the present study set out to investigate putative endophenotypes of ADHD in N=33 typically developing (TD) children and N=28 patients with ASD that were (ASD+) or were not (ASD-) co-morbid for ADHD. With regard to both the cognitive endophenotype candidates (working memory, inhibition, temporal processing) and intra-subject variability (ISV) the pattern of abnormalities was inconsistent. Furthermore, the overall profile of ASD-TD differences was extremely similar to the pattern of differences between the ASD+ and ASD- sub-groups, suggesting that any abnormalities found were due to the comorbid ASD subgroup. This held in particular for ISV, which did not show in patients with ASD the task-general increase that is common in ADHD samples. Altogether, the present results do not support the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between ASD and ADHD.

  4. CNF1 increases brain energy level, counteracts neuroinflammatory markers and rescues cognitive deficits in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Loizzo

    Full Text Available Overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cellular energy failure are associated with neuroinflammatory disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mice homozygous for human ApoE4 gene, a well known AD and atherosclerosis animal model, show decreased levels of ATP, increased inflammatory cytokines level and accumulation of beta amyloid in the brain. All these findings are considered responsible for triggering cognitive decline. We have demonstrated that a single administration of the bacterial E. coli protein toxin CNF1 to aged apoE4 mice, beside inducing a strong amelioration of both spatial and emotional memory deficits, favored the cell energy restore through an increment of ATP content. This was accompanied by a modulation of cerebral Rho and Rac1 activity. Furthermore, CNF1 decreased the levels of beta amyloid accumulation and interleukin-1β expression in the hippocampus. Altogether, these data suggest that the pharmacological modulation of Rho GTPases by CNF1 can improve memory performances in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease via a control of neuroinflammation and a rescue of systemic energy homeostasis.

  5. Cognitive and Adaptive Skill Profile Differences in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder With and Without Comorbid Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseck, Justin J; Davis, Andrew S; Cassady, Jerrell C; Finch, W Holmes; Gelder, Barbara C

    2015-01-01

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) often present with comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. This study investigated the cognitive and adaptive profiles of 81 children with ADHD/FASD and 147 children with ADHD. Multivariate analysis of variance and follow-up discriminant analysis indicated that the two groups had similar profiles on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, although the children with comorbid ADHD/FASD demonstrated significantly more impairment in verbal ability, perceptual reasoning, working memory, processing speed, and overall adaptive skills. The results suggested that when compared with children with ADHD alone, children with ADHD/FASD exhibit significantly more impaired cognitive processing and adaptive skill deficits that are essential for school success and healthy social, behavioral, and emotional functioning. Research evaluating the profiles of these groups is likely to facilitate earlier and more accurate diagnosis and intervention.

  6. The hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure: Different cognitive deficits in different first-responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat eLevy-Gigi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on first responders who are repeatedly exposed to traumatic events report low levels of PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. However, neuroimaging and behavioral studies show that traumatic exposure is associated with brain and cognitive dysfunctions. Taking together it may suggest that traumatic exposure have a price, which is not sufficiently defined by the standard PTSD measures. In a recent study we revealed that similar to individuals with PTSD, non-PTSD highly exposed firefighters display a selective impairment in hippocampal related functions. In the current study we aimed to test whether different first responders display a similar impairment. We concentrated on unique populations of active duty firefighters and criminal scene-investigators (CSI police, who are frequently exposed to similar levels and types of traumatic events, and compared them to civilian matched-controls with no history of trauma-exposure. We used a hippocampal dependent cue-context reversal paradigm, which separately evaluates reversal of negative and positive outcomes of cue and context related information. We predicted and found that all participants were equally able to acquire and retain stimulus-outcome associations. However, there were significant differences in reversal learning between the groups. Performance among firefighters replicated our prior findings; they struggled to learn that a previously negative context is later associated with a positive outcome. CSI police on the other hand showed a selective impairment in reversing the outcome of a negative cue. Hence after learning that a specific cue is associated with a negative outcome, they could not learn that later it is associated with a positive outcome. Performance in both groups did not correlate with levels of PTSD, anxiety, depression or behavioral inhibition symptoms. The results provide further evidence of the hidden price of traumatic exposure, suggesting that this price may differ as a

  7. Tocilizumab's effect on cognitive deficits induced by intracerebroventricular administration of streptozotocin in Alzheimer's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcioğlu, H Kübra; Aslan, Ersin; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Alan, Saadet; Salva, Emine; Elcioglu, Ö Haluk; Kabasakal, Levent

    2016-09-01

    Neuroinflammation plays pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). IL-6 is pleiotropic cytokine which plays significant pathological role in inflammatory diseases and causes prolonged inflammation. Additionally, IL-6 activates microglia cells and enhances the accumulation of amyloid-β peptides. Moreover, IL-6 signal transduction is mediated by membrane-bound and soluble IL-6 receptors. Tocilizumab which is a humanized anti-human IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody binds to both of these receptors and inhibits IL-6 signaling by this route. The objective was to investigate tocilizumab's potential effects in the treatment of AD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham (control), streptozotocin (STZ), and tocilizumab-STZ. We used a single dose of intracerebroventricular (ICV) tocilizumab, beginning 1 h prior to injection of STZ for 3 weeks. The rats in STZ and tocilizumab-STZ groups were given ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg). Behavioral parameters were evaluated on days 17-20 and the rats were sacrificed on day-21 to examine histopathological changes. STZ injection caused significant decrease in the mean escape latency in passive avoidance and also declined the performance improvement in Morris water maze tests. Tocilizumab-STZ group significantly improved learning and spatial memory functions by increasing RLT in the passive avoidance and by shortening escape latency in reaching the platform in the Morris water maze. Histopathological changes were examined using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical (IHC) stainings. IHC analysis revealed that while protein expressions of amyloid-ß (3.5 ± 0.2) and IL-6 (2.9 ± 0.4) showed intense immune-positivity in STZ group, amyloid-ß (1.3 ± 0.1) and IL-6 (1.5 ± 0.2) immunoreactivities were substantially decreased in tocilizumab treatment group. We conclude that tocilizumab treatment attenuated significantly STZ-induced cognitive impairment and histopathological changes

  8. Long-term post-stroke changes include myelin loss, specific deficits in sensory and motor behaviors and complex cognitive impairment detected using active place avoidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhou

    Full Text Available Persistent neurobehavioral deficits and brain changes need validation for brain restoration. Two hours middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO or sham surgery was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Neurobehavioral and cognitive deficits were measured over 10 weeks included: (1 sensory, motor, beam balance, reflex/abnormal responses, hindlimb placement, forepaw foot fault and cylinder placement tests, and (2 complex active place avoidance learning (APA and simple passive avoidance retention (PA. Electroretinogram (ERG, hemispheric loss (infarction, hippocampus CA1 neuronal loss and myelin (Luxol Fast Blue staining in several fiber tracts were also measured. In comparison to Sham surgery, tMCAO surgery produced significant deficits in all behavioral tests except reflex/abnormal responses. Acute, short lived deficits following tMCAO were observed for forelimb foot fault and forelimb cylinder placement. Persistent, sustained deficits for the whole 10 weeks were exhibited for motor (p<0.001, sensory (p<0.001, beam balance performance (p<0.01 and hindlimb placement behavior (p<0.01. tMCAO produced much greater and prolonged cognitive deficits in APA learning (maximum on last trial of 604±83% change, p<0.05 but only a small, comparative effect on PA retention. Hemispheric loss/atrophy was measured 10 weeks after tMCAO and cross-validated by two methods (e.g., almost identical % ischemic hemispheric loss of 33.4±3.5% for H&E and of 34.2±3.5% for TTC staining. No visual dysfunction by ERG and no hippocampus neuronal loss were detected after tMCAO. Fiber tract damage measured by Luxol Fast Blue myelin staining intensity was significant (p<0.01 in the external capsule and striatum but not in corpus callosum and anterior commissure. In summary, persistent neurobehavioral deficits were validated as important endpoints for stroke restorative research in the future. Fiber myelin loss appears to contribute to these long term behavioral dysfunctions and

  9. VEGF regulates hippocampal neurogenesis and reverses cognitive deficits in immature rats after status epilepticus through the VEGF R2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Song, Xiaojie; He, Rong; Li, Tianyi; Cheng, Li; Xie, Lingling; Chen, Hengsheng; Jiang, Li

    2017-02-10

    Epilepsy is the most common chronic disease in children, who exhibit a higher risk for status epilepticus (SE) than adults. Hippocampal neurogenesis is altered by epilepsy, particularly in the immature brain, which may influence cognitive development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) represents an attractive target to modulate brain function at the neurovascular interface and is a double-edged sword in seizures. We used the lithium-pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model in immature Sprague-Dawley rats to study the effects of VEGF on hippocampal neurogenesis in the acute phase and on long-term cognitive behaviors in immature rats following status epilepticus (SE). VEGF correlates with cell proliferation in the immature brain after SE. By preprocessing VEGF in the lateral ventricles prior to the induction of the SE model, we found that VEGF increased the proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) and promoted the migration of newly generated cells via the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling pathway. VEGF also inhibited cell loss and reversed the cognitive deficits that accompany SE. Based on our results, VEGF positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis and alleviates cognitive deficits following seizures; moreover, the VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling pathway may provide a novel treatment strategy for epilepsy.

  10. Gastrin-releasing peptide facilitates glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus and effectively prevents vascular dementia induced cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiajia; Yao, Yang; Wang, Ling; Yang, Chunxiao; Wang, Faqi; Guo, Jie; Wang, Zhiyun; Yang, Zhuo; Ming, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) has been proved to be an important neuromodulator in the brain and involved in a variety of neurological diseases. Whether GRP could attenuate cognition impairment induced by vascular dementia (VD) in rats, and the mechanism of synaptic plasticity and GRP's action on synaptic efficiency are still poorly understood. In this study, we first investigated the effects of GRP on glutamatergic transmission with patch-clamp recording. We found that acute application of GRP enhanced the excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 neurons via GRPR in a presynaptic mechanism. Secondly, we examined whether exogenous GRP or its analogue neuromedin B (NMB) could prevent VD-induced cognitive deficits and the mechanism of synaptic plasticity. By using Morris water maze, long-term potentiation (LTP) recording, western blot assay and immunofluorescent staining, we verified for the first time that GRP or NMB substantially improved the spatial learning and memory abilities in VD rats, restored the impaired synaptic plasticity and was able to elevate the expression of synaptic proteins, synaptophysin (SYP) and CaMKII, which play pivotal roles in synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that the facilitatory effects of GRP on glutamate release may contribute to its long-term action on synaptic efficacy which is essential in cognitive function. Our findings present a new entry point for a better understanding of physiological function of GRP and raise the possibility that GRPR agonists might ameliorate cognitive deficits associated with neurological diseases.

  11. Social cognitive deficits and biases in maltreated adolescents in U.K. out-of-home care: Relation to disinhibited attachment disorder and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Catherine L; Green, Jonathan M

    2016-02-01

    Children entering out-of-home (OoH) care have often experienced multiple forms of maltreatment and are at risk of psychiatric disorder and poor long-term outcome. Recent evidence shows high rates of disinhibited attachment disorder (DAD) among maltreated adolescents in U.K. OoH care (Kay & Green, 2013). This study aimed to further understand the mechanisms of outcome in this group through investigation of social cognitive functioning. Patterns of theory of mind (ToM) and social information processing were assessed alongside DAD behavior and psychopathology in 63 adolescents in U.K. OoH care (mean age = 176 months, SD = 22; 48% male; 89% White British) and 69 low-risk comparison adolescents (mean age = 171 months, SD = 17; 46% male; 87% White British). Compared to low risk, OoH adolescents showed a hostile attribution bias and ToM deficit, but this was confounded by language ability. ToM was associated with reduced hostile attribution and responding biases and increased social competence, which was further associated with lower levels of externalizing psychopathology. There was no association between social cognition and core features of DAD. Social cognitive deficits and biases may play a role in the high rates of externalizing psychopathology and relationship functioning difficulties in maltreated samples. Future research should assess alternative cognitive mechanisms for DAD.

  12. Are cognitive deficits similar in remitted early bipolar I disorder patients treated with lithium or valproate? Data from the STOP-EM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Kesavan; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Bücker, Joana; Silveira, Leonardo E; Torres, Ivan J; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2015-02-01

    In bipolar disorder (BD), lithium and valproate are both reportedly associated with mild cognitive deficits with impaired psychomotor speed and verbal memory ascribed to both while impairments in learning and attention are mainly attributed to valproate. However, there are few direct comparisons of the impact of lithium and valproate on cognitive function in early BD. Using data from the STOP-EM study, we compared neurocognitive functioning in BD patients, who had recently recovered from a first episode of mania, and were on treatment with lithium (n = 34) or valproate (n = 38), to a comparable sample of healthy controls (HC; n = 40), on the domains of processing speed, attention, verbal memory, nonverbal memory, working memory and executive functions. The three groups were comparable on socio-demographic (all p > 0.12) and clinical variables (all p > 0.08). MANOVA revealed a significant difference between the three groups on overall cognitive functioning (Wilk's lambda = 0.644; F = 3.775; p lithium (p = 0.001) and HC groups (p lithium and valproate groups on other cognitive domains (all p > 0.13). Treatment with valproate and not lithium may be associated with working memory deficits early in the course of BD. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of cognitive behavioral therapy and token economy to alleviate dysfunctional behavior in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Flavia Coelho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Medication has proved highly efficacious as a means of alleviating general symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However many patients remain functionally impaired by inappropriate behavior. The present study analyzed the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT with the Token Economy (TE technique to alleviate problem behavior for 25 participants with ADHD, all children (19 boys, mean age 10.11 on long-term methylphenidate medication, who were given 20 CBT sessions with 10 weeks of TE introduced as of session 5. Their ten most acute problem behaviors were selected and written records kept. On weekdays, parents recorded each inappropriate behavior and provided a suitable model for their actions. At weekly sessions, problem behaviors were counted and incident-free participants rewarded with a token. To analyze improvement (less frequent problem behavior, a list of 11 behavioral categories was rated: inattention, impulsivity, hyperactivity, disorganization, disobeying rules and routines, poor self-care, verbal/physical aggression, low frustration tolerance, compulsive behavior, antisocial behavior, lacking in initiative and distraction. Two CBT specialists categorized behaviors and an ADHD specialist ruled on discrepancies. Statistical analyses used were Generalized Estimating Equations with Poisson distribution and autoregressive order correlation structure. In the course of the sessions, problematic behaviors decreased significantly in 7 categories: impulsiveness, hyperactivity, disorganization, disobeying rules and routine, poor self-care, low frustration tolerance, compulsive behaviors, and antisocial behaviors. Caregiver attitudes to children's inappropriate behavior were discussed and reshaped. As functional improvement was observed on applying TE for 10 weeks, this type of intervention may be useful as an auxiliary strategy combined with medication.

  14. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder dimensions and sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms in relation to college students' sleep functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Langberg, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined separate inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive dimensions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms, in relation to college students' sleep functioning. Participants were 288 college students (ages 17-24; 65 % female; 90 % non-Hispanic White; 12 % self-reported having an ADHD diagnoses) who completed measures of ADHD/SCT symptoms and sleep functioning. Participants reported obtaining an average of 6.8 h of sleep per night (only 26 % reported obtaining ≥8 h of sleep) and having a sleep onset latency of 25 min. 63 % were classified as "poor sleepers," and poor sleepers had higher rates of ADHD and SCT symptoms than "good sleepers". Path analysis controlling for ADHD status and psychiatric medication use was used to determine associations between psychopathology and sleep functioning domains. Above and beyond covariates and other psychopathologies, hyperactivity (but not impulsivity) was significantly associated with poorer sleep quality, longer sleep latency, shorter sleep duration, and more use of sleep medications. SCT symptoms (but not inattention) were significantly associated with poorer sleep quality and increased nighttime sleep disturbance (e.g., having bad dreams, waking up in the middle of the night, feeling too cold or too hot). Both inattention and SCT were associated with greater daytime dysfunction. Regression analyses demonstrated that hyperactivity predicted sleep quality above and beyond the influence of daytime dysfunction, and inattention and SCT predicted daytime dysfunction above and beyond sleep quality. Further studies are needed to examine the interrelations of nighttime sleep functioning, ADHD/SCT, and daytime dysfunction, as well to elucidate mechanisms contributing to related functional impairments.

  15. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan prevents and rescues cerebrovascular, neuropathological and cognitive deficits in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongali, Brice; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Tong, Xin-Kang; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Lecrux, Clotilde; Imboden, Hans; Hamel, Edith

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) receptor blockers that bind selectively AngII type 1 (AT1) receptors may protect from Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the ability of the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan to cure or prevent AD hallmarks in aged (~18months at endpoint, 3months treatment) or adult (~12months at endpoint, 10months treatment) human amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We tested learning and memory with the Morris water maze, and evaluated neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-PET and laser Doppler flowmetry responses to whisker stimulation. Cerebrovascular reactivity was assessed with on-line videomicroscopy. We measured protein levels of oxidative stress enzymes (superoxide dismutases SOD1, SOD2 and NADPH oxidase subunit p67phox), and quantified soluble and deposited amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), AngII receptors AT1 and AT2, angiotensin IV receptor AT4, and cortical cholinergic innervation. In aged APP mice, losartan did not improve learning but it consolidated memory acquisition and recall, and rescued neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling and cerebrovascular dilatory capacity. Losartan normalized cerebrovascular p67phox and SOD2 protein levels and up-regulated those of SOD1. Losartan attenuated astrogliosis, normalized AT1 and AT4 receptor levels, but failed to rescue the cholinergic deficit and the Aβ pathology. Given preventively, losartan protected cognitive function, cerebrovascular reactivity, and AT4 receptor levels. Like in aged APP mice, these benefits occurred without a decrease in soluble Aβ species or plaque load. We conclude that losartan exerts potent preventive and restorative effects on AD hallmarks, possibly by mitigating AT1-initiated oxidative stress and normalizing memory-related AT4 receptors.

  16. Cognitive profiles of adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder based on the WAIS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Chieko; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Itahashi, Takashi; Tani, Masayuki; Yamada, Takashi; Ota, Haruhisa; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa

    2017-02-01

    The cognitive profile differences between adult patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are not well characterized. We examined the cognitive profiles of adults having either ASD (n=120) or ADHD (n=76) with no intellectual disabilities (IQ≥70) using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) - Performance Intelligence (PIQ) difference discrepancies were detected between the two groups. Information subtest scores of the Verbal Comprehension index and Arithmetic and Digit Span subtests of the Freedom from Distractibility index were significantly higher in ASD than in ADHD, while the Picture Completion subtest was significantly lower in ASD. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the difference in the cognitive profiles of adults with ASD and those with ADHD based on the WAIS III with a large number of participants.

  17. A double-blind randomized pilot trial comparing computerized cognitive exercises to Tetris in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida; Christensen, Torben Østergaard; Leckman, James F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this trial was to examine the feasibility and efficacy of computerized cognitive exercises from Scientific Brain Training (SBT), compared to the computer game Tetris as an active placebo, in a pilot study of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD...... perceived both interventions as not very interesting or helpful. There were no significant group differences on cognitive and ADHD-symptom measures after intervention. Pre-post intra-group measurement showed that the SBT had a significant beneficial effect on sustained attention, while the active placebo......). METHOD: Eighteen adolescents with ADHD were randomized to treatment or control intervention for 7 weeks. Outcome measures were cognitive test, symptom, and motivation questionnaires. RESULTS: SBT and Tetris were feasible as home-based interventions, and participants' compliance was high, but participants...

  18. A Neglected Drama for Elders: Discrepancy Between Self-Perception and Objective Performance Regarding Financial Capacity in Patients With Cognitive Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaitsa Giannouli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at investigating whether patients from Greece with different kinds of cognitive deficits (resulting from Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease Dementia, and Mild Cognitive Impairment can be characterized as financially capable (based on neuropsychological assessment, and if this claimed (incapacity is in accordance with their personal belief of (incapacity. Results revealed that the vast majority of the mild, moderate and severe Alzheimer’s disease patients as well as patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Parkinson’s disease, who scored significantly lower than normal on a relevant financial decision-making capacity test, believed that they were capable to handle their finances. This finding is in contrast with their actual financial capacity scores and the beliefs of their family members-caregivers on this issue. Some critical questions concerning incapacity and intellectual insight are raised, and future cross-cultural investigative attempts on this issue are suggested.

  19. Effects of glutamate positive modulators on cognitive deficits in schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of double-blind randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y; Nakajima, S; Suzuki, T; Keefe, R S E; Plitman, E; Chung, J K; Caravaggio, F; Mimura, M; Graff-Guerrero, A; Uchida, H

    2015-10-01

    Hypofunction of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors has been proposed to have an important role in the cognitive impairments observed in schizophrenia. Although glutamate modulators may be effective in reversing such difficult-to-treat conditions, the results of individual studies thus far have been inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine whether glutamate positive modulators have beneficial effects on cognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia. A literature search was conducted to identify double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials in schizophrenia or related disorders, using Embase, Medline, and PsycINFO (last search: February 2015). The effects of glutamate positive modulators on cognitive deficits were evaluated for overall cognitive function and eight cognitive domains by calculating standardized mean differences (SMDs) between active drugs and placebo added to antipsychotics. Seventeen studies (N=1391) were included. Glutamate positive modulators were not superior to placebo in terms of overall cognitive function (SMD=0.08, 95% confidence interval=-0.06 to 0.23) (11 studies, n=858) nor each of eight cognitive domains (SMDs=-0.03 to 0.11) (n=367-940) in this population. Subgroup analyses by diagnosis (schizophrenia only studies), concomitant antipsychotics, or pathway of drugs to enhance the glutamatergic neurotransmission (glycine allosteric site of NMDA receptors or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors) suggested no procognitive effect of glutamate positive modulators. Further, no effect was found in individual compounds on cognition. In conclusion, glutamate positive modulators may not be effective in reversing overall cognitive impairments in patients with schizophrenia as adjunctive therapies.

  20. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder symptoms and cognitive abilities in the late-life cohort of the PATH through life study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjani Das

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a common neuropsychiatric disorder that has not been well studied in older adults. In this study we examined relationships between ADHD symptoms and cognitive ability and compared them between middle-age (MA; 48-52 years and older-age (OA; 68-74 years adults sampled from the same population. ADHD, mood disorder symptoms and cognitive abilities were assessed in a large population-based sample (n = 3443; 50% male. We measured current ADHD symptoms using the adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS, which we found to have the same underlying structure in both cohorts. Older adults reported significantly lower levels of ADHD symptoms and 2.2% of the OA cohort scored equal or above the ASRS cut-off score of 14 (which has been previously associated with ADHD diagnosis compared with 6.2% of MA adults. Symptom levels were not significantly different between males and females. Using multi-group structural equation modelling we compared ADHD symptom-cognitive performance relationships between the two age groups. Generally higher ADHD symptoms were associated with poorer cognitive performance in the MA cohort. However, higher levels of inattention symptoms were associated with better verbal ability in both cohorts. Surprisingly, greater hyperactivity was associated with better task-switching abilities in older adults. In the OA cohort ADHD symptom-cognition relationships are indirect, mediated largely through the strong association between depression symptoms and cognition. Our results suggest that ADHD symptoms decrease with age and that their relationships with co-occurring mood disorders and cognitive performance also change. Although symptoms of depression are lower in older adults, they are much stronger predictors of cognitive performance and likely mediate the effect of ADHD symptoms on cognition in this age group. These results highlight the need for age-appropriate diagnosis and treatment of comorbid

  1. The switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of cognitive deficits. A pilot study in individuals with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Moreno José

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics provide better control of the negative and affective symptoms of schizophrenia when compared with conventional neuroleptics; nevertheless, their heightened ability to improve cognitive dysfunction remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to examine the changes in cognition associated with long-term antipsychotic treatment and to evaluate the effect of the type of antipsychotic (conventional versus novel antipsychotic drugs on cognitive performance over time. Methods In this naturalistic study, we used a comprehensive neuropsychological battery of tests to assess a sample of schizophrenia patients taking either conventional (n = 13 or novel antipsychotics (n = 26 at baseline and at two years after. Results Continuous antipsychotic treatment regardless of class was associated with improvement on verbal fluency, executive functions, and visual and verbal memory. Patients taking atypical antipsychotics did not show greater cognitive enhancement over two years than patients taking conventional antipsychotics. Conclusions Although long-term antipsychotic treatment slightly improved cognitive function, the switch from conventional to atypical antipsychotic treatment should not be based exclusively on the presence of these cognitive deficits.

  2. Adolescent maturational transitions in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine signalling as a risk factor for the development of obesity and high fat / high sugar diet induced cognitive deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Claire Reichelt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence poses as both a transitional period in neurodevelopment and lifestyle practices. In particular, the developmental trajectory of the prefrontal cortex, a critical region for behavioural control and self-regulation, is enduring, not reaching functional maturity until the early 20s in humans. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter dopamine is particularly abundant during adolescence, tuning the brain to rapidly learn about rewards and regulating aspects of neuroplasticity. Thus, adolescence is proposed to represent a period of vulnerability towards reward-driven behaviours such as the consumption of palatable high fat and high sugar diets. This is reflected in the increasing prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents as they are the greatest consumers of junk foods. Excessive consumption of diets laden in saturated fat and refined sugars not only leads to weight gain and the development of obesity, but experimental studies with rodents indicate they evoke cognitive deficits in learning and memory process by disrupting neuroplasticity and altering reward processing neurocircuitry. Consumption of these high fat and high sugar diets have been reported to have a particularly pronounced impact on cognition when consumed during adolescence, demonstrating a susceptibility of the adolescent brain to enduring cognitive deficits. The adolescent brain, with heightened reward sensitivity and diminished behavioural control compared to the mature adult brain, appears to be a risk for aberrant eating behaviours that may underpin the development of obesity. This review explores the neurodevelopmental changes in the prefrontal cortex and mesocortical dopamine signalling that occur during adolescence, and how these potentially underpin the overconsumption of palatable food and development of obesogenic diet induced cognitive deficits.

  3. Are psychiatric comorbidities and associated cognitive functions related to treatment response to methylphenidate in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan MH

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mandy H Chan,1 Patrick WL Leung,2 Ting-pong Ho,3 Se-fong Hung,4 Chi-chiu Lee,5 Chun-pan Tang,5 Ka-chai Cheung,2 Fung-yee Ching,2 Fefe HK Chan,6 Lu-hua Chen,2 Merce Garcia-Barcelo,7 Pak-chung Sham3 1Department of Clinical Psychology, Kowloon Hospital, Hospital Authority, 2Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, 4Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5Department of Psychiatry, Kwai Chung Hospital, Hospital Authority, 6Department of Clinical Psychology, Alice Ho Mui Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hospital Authority, 7Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China Background: Methylphenidate (MPH has been found to be an effective medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, there are neither consistent nor sufficient findings on whether psychiatric comorbidities and associated cognitive functions of ADHD are related to treatment response to MPH in ADHD children.Objectives: This study investigated whether psychiatric comorbidities, IQ, and neurocognitive deficits are related to treatment response to MPH in ADHD children. In some ways, it is preferable to have a drug that the effectiveness of which to a disorder is not affected by its associated cognitive functions and psychiatric comorbidities. On the other hand, it is likely that the baseline symptom severity of ADHD is associated with the effectiveness of MPH treatment on the symptoms post treatment.Methods: A total of 149 Chinese boys (aged 6–12 years with ADHD, combined type, and normal IQ participated in this study. Assessment of ADHD symptom severity was conducted pre and post MPH treatment, while assessment of psychiatric comorbidities, IQ, and neurocognitive deficits was performed in a non-medicated condition. Treatment response was defined as the ADHD symptom severity post MPH treatment.Results: Results indicated that MPH

  4. β-Caryophyllene/Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex Improves Cognitive Deficits in Rats with Vascular Dementia through the Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 -Mediated Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie; Teng, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liangke; Yang, Jiadan; Ma, Lianju; Wang, Fang; Tian, Xiaocui; An, Ruidi; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Lu; Dong, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    This work was conducted to prepare β-caryophyllene-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex (HPβCD/BCP) and investigate its effects and mechanisms on cognitive deficits in vascular dementia (VD) rats. First, HPβCD/BCP was prepared, optimized, characterized, and evaluated. HPβCD/BCP and AM630 were then administered to VD rats to upregulate and downregulate the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Results showed that HPβCD/BCP can significantly increase the bioavailability of BCP. Through the Morris water maze test, HPβCD/BCP can attenuate learning and memory deficits in rats. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) monitoring results indicated that HPβCD/BCP can promote the recovery of CBF. Moreover, molecular biology experiments showed that HPβCD/BCP can increase the expression levels of CB2 in brain tissues, particularly the hippocampus and white matter tissues, as well as the expression levels of PI3K and Akt. Overall, the findings demonstrated the protective effects of HPβCD/BCP against cognitive deficits induced by chronic cerebral ischemia and suggested the potential of HPβCD/BCP in the therapy of vascular dementia in the future. PMID:28154534

  5. Differential contribution of APP metabolites to early cognitive deficits in a TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Valentine; Héraud, Céline; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Herbeaux, Karine; Strittmatter, Carole; Mathis, Chantal; Goutagny, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology commonly characterized by a progressive and irreversible deterioration of cognitive functions, especially memory. Although the etiology of AD remains unknown, a consensus has emerged on the amyloid hypothesis, which posits that increased production of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) peptide induces neuronal network dysfunctions and cognitive deficits. However, the relative failures of Aβ-centric therapeutics suggest that the amyloid hypothesis is incomplete and/or that the treatments were given too late in the course of AD, when neuronal damages were already too extensive. Hence, it is striking to see that very few studies have extensively characterized, from anatomy to behavior, the alterations associated with pre-amyloid stages in mouse models of AD amyloid pathology. To fulfill this gap, we examined memory capacities as well as hippocampal network anatomy and dynamics in young adult pre-plaque TgCRND8 mice when hippocampal Aβ levels are still low. We showed that TgCRND8 mice present alterations in hippocampal inhibitory networks and γ oscillations at this stage. Further, these mice exhibited deficits only in a subset of hippocampal-dependent memory tasks, which are all affected at later stages. Last, using a pharmacological approach, we showed that some of these early memory deficits were Aβ-independent. Our results could partly explain the limited efficacy of Aβ-directed treatments and favor multitherapy approaches for early symptomatic treatment for AD.

  6. Adult Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder in Finland--Project DyAdd: WAIS-III Cognitive Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laasonen, Marja; Leppamaki, Sami; Tani, Pekka; Hokkanen, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The project Adult Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder in Finland (Project DyAdd) compares adults (n = 119, 18-55 years) with dyslexia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia together with ADHD (comorbid), and healthy controls with neuropsychological, psychophysical, and biological methods. The focus of this article is on the…

  7. Cognitive deficits develop 1month after diffuse brain injury and are exaggerated by microglia-associated reactivity to peripheral immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccigrosso, Megan M; Ford, Joni; Benner, Brooke; Moussa, Daniel; Burnsides, Christopher; Fenn, Ashley M; Popovich, Phillip G; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Walker, Fredrick Rohan; Eiferman, Daniel S; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits immediate neuroinflammatory events that contribute to acute cognitive, motor, and affective disturbance. Despite resolution of these acute complications, significant neuropsychiatric and cognitive issues can develop and progress after TBI. We and others have provided novel evidence that these complications are potentiated by repeated injuries, immune challenges and stressors. A key component to this may be increased sensitization or priming of glia after TBI. Therefore, our objectives were to determine the degree to which cognitive deterioration occurred after diffuse TBI (moderate midline fluid percussion injury) and ascertain if glial reactivity induced by an acute immune challenge potentiated cognitive decline 30 days post injury (dpi). In post-recovery assessments, hippocampal-dependent learning and memory recall were normal 7 dpi, but anterograde learning was impaired by 30 dpi. Examination of mRNA and morphological profiles of glia 30 dpi indicated a low but persistent level of inflammation with elevated expression of GFAP and IL-1β in astrocytes and MHCII and IL-1β in microglia. Moreover, an acute immune challenge 30 dpi robustly interrupted memory consolidation specifically in TBI mice. These deficits were associated with exaggerated microglia-mediated inflammation with amplified (IL-1β, CCL2, TNFα) and prolonged (TNFα) cytokine/chemokine expression, and a marked reactive morphological profile of microglia in the CA3 of the hippocampus. Collectively, these data indicate that microglia remain sensitized 30 dpi after moderate TBI and a secondary inflammatory challenge elicits robust microglial reactivity that augments cognitive decline. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor in development of neuropsychiatric problems long after injury, negatively affecting quality of life. Mounting evidence indicates that inflammatory processes worsen with time after a brain injury and are likely mediated by glia. Here

  8. One size does not fit all: face emotion processing impairments in semantic dementia, behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease are mediated by distinct cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A; Hsieh, Sharpley; Lah, Suncica; Savage, Sharon; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia (both behavioural variant [bvFTD] and semantic dementia [SD]) as well as those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show deficits on tests of face emotion processing, yet the mechanisms underlying these deficits have rarely been explored. We compared groups of patients with bvFTD (n = 17), SD (n = 12) or AD (n = 20) to an age- and education-matched group of healthy control subjects (n = 36) on three face emotion processing tasks (Ekman 60, Emotion Matching and Emotion Selection) and found that all three patient groups were similarly impaired. Analyses of covariance employed to partial out the influences of language and perceptual impairments, which frequently co-occur in these patients, provided evidence of different underlying cognitive mechanisms. These analyses revealed that language impairments explained the original poor scores obtained by the SD patients on the Ekman 60 and Emotion Selection tasks, which involve verbal labels. Perceptual deficits contributed to Emotion Matching performance in the bvFTD and AD patients. Importantly, all groups remained impaired on one task or more following these analyses, denoting a primary emotion processing disturbance in these dementia syndromes. These findings highlight the multifactorial nature of emotion processing deficits in patients with dementia.

  9. Dysfunctional cognitions and their emotional, behavioral, and functional correlates in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): is the cognitive-behavioral model valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Fernando; López, Pablo; Alvarez Prado, Dolores; Kichic, Rafael; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Lischinsky, Alicia; Manes, Facundo

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the presence of dysfunctional cognitions in adults with ADHD and to determine whether these cognitions are associated with emotional symptoms, maladaptive coping, and functional impairment, as predicted by the cognitive-behavioral model. A total of 35 adult participants with ADHD, 20 nonclinical controls, and 20 non-ADHD clinical controls were assessed with measures of ADHD symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, depression and anxiety symptoms, coping strategies, and quality of life. ADHD group showed elevated scores of dysfunctional cognitions relative to nonclinical control group and comparable with clinical control group. Dysfunctional cognitions were strongly associated with emotional symptoms. ADHD group also showed elevated scores in maladaptive coping strategies of the escape-avoidance type. Life impairment was satisfactorily predicted in data analysis when ADHD symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, and emotional symptoms were fitted into a regression model. Cognitive-behavioral therapy model appears to be a valid complementary model for understanding emotional and life impairment in adults with ADHD. © 2012 SAGE Publications.

  10. Developmental trajectories of aggression, prosocial behavior, and social-cognitive problem solving in emerging adolescents with clinically elevated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Michael J; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E; Tolan, Patrick H

    2015-11-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) given their childhood social difficulties. Relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior and social-cognitive problem solving beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (6th grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD-combined symptoms were compared longitudinally across 6th through 8th grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d = -0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d = 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group after accounting for co-occurring ODD symptoms and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in 6th grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was highly similar for the ADHD and non-ADHD groups.

  11. Amyloid β Protein Aggravates Neuronal Senescence and Cognitive Deficits in 5XFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wei

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: oAβ-accelerated neuronal senescence may be associated with the cognitive impairment in 5XFAD mice. Senescence-associated marker p16 can serve as an indicator to estimate the cognitive prognosis for AD population.

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang; Qian, Qiujin; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-04-14

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder beginning in childhood, and about half of patients have symptoms lasting into adulthood. Adult ADHD causes various impairments of emotional, self-esteem, and executive function and life quality aspects. Furthermore, adverse outcomes include academic and occupational failures, traffic accidents and substance abuse, which would be a family and social burden. A combination of medication and psychotherapy is recommended as the treatment for adult ADHD, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been validated mostly with evidence-based researches. However, there has been a lack of randomized controlled trials of CBT for patients in China. Moreover, booster sessions of CBT for other disorders have proven effective in reducing recurrence and improving long-term outcomes, which has not been investigated for adult ADHD. This study will testify to the effect of CBT and explore the efficacy of subsequent booster sessions on adult ADHD. It is a three-armed randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of 12 weeks of CBT based on the published and validated manual and its booster sessions. The 12 weeks of CBT will be conducted weekly and will end at the 12th week, and then the booster sessions will be conducted monthly and end at the 24th week. There are three randomized groups, including a CBT with booster sessions group, a CBT group and a waiting group. Participants are outpatients of the Peking University Sixth Hospital who are diagnosed as having adult ADHD. The Primary efficacy endpoints are the scores of ADHD core symptoms at 12 and 24 weeks. Secondary endpoints include emotion, executive function, self-esteem, life quality and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data at different time points, and the change within every group will also be analyzed. This is the first study to explore the efficacy of booster sessions of CBT in adult ADHD as far as we know. The results might increase proof

  13. Amelioration of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury induced cognitive deficits after neuronal differentiation of transplanted human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurlock, Markus S; Ahmed, Aminul Islam; Rivera, Karla N; Yokobori, Shoji; Lee, Stephanie W; Sam, Pingdewinde N; Shear, Deborah A; Hefferan, Michael P; Hazel, Thomas G; Johe, Karl K; Gajavelli, Shyam; Tortella, Frank C; Bullock, Ross

    2017-03-01

    Penetrating traumatic brain injury (PTBI) is one of the major cause of death and disability worldwide. Previous studies in penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI), a PTBI rat model revealed widespread peri-lesional neurodegeneration, similar to that seen in humans following gunshot wound to head, which is unmitigated by any available therapies to date. Therefore, we evaluated human neural stem cell (hNSC) engraftment to putatively exploit the potential of cell therapy that has been seen in other central nervous system injury models. Towards this, green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled hNSCs (400,000 per animal) were transplanted in immunosuppressed Sprague Dawley (SD), Fisher, and athymic (ATN) PBBI rats one week after injury. Tacrolimus (3mg/kg two days prior to transplantation, then 1mg/kg/day), Methylprednisolone (10mg/kg on day of transplant, 1mg/kg/week thereafter), and Mycophenolate mofetil (30mg/kg/day) for seven days following transplantation were used to confer immunosuppression. Engraftment in SD and ATN was comparable at 8-weeks post transplantation. Evaluation of hNSC differentiation and distribution revealed increased neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells with time. At 16-weeks post-transplantation neither cell proliferation nor glial lineage markers expression was detected. Transplanted cell morphology was similar to neighboring host neurons and there was relatively little migration of cells from the peri-transplant site. By 16 weeks, GFP positive processes extended both rostro-caudally and bilaterally into parenchyma, spreading along host white matter tracts, traversing internal capsule, extending ~13 mm caudally from transplantation site reaching into the brain stem. In a Morris water maze test at 8-weeks post-transplantation, animals with transplants had shorter latency to platform compared to vehicle treated animals. However, weak injury-induced cognitive deficits in the control group at the delayed time point confounded benefits

  14. On the relationships between DSM-5 dysfunctional personality traits and social cognition deficits: A study in a sample of consecutively admitted Italian psychotherapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Andrea; Somma, Antonella; Krueger, Robert F; Markon, Kristian E; Borroni, Serena

    2017-05-11

    This study aims at testing the hypothesis that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition (DSM-5) alternative model of personality disorder (AMPD) traits may be significantly associated with deficits on 2 different social cognition tasks, namely, the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test and the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition, in a sample of consecutively admitted inpatients and outpatients. The sample was composed of 181 consecutively admitted participants (57.5% women; mean age = 38.58 years). Correlation coefficients and partial correlation coefficients were computed in order to assess the associations among social cognition tasks, DSM-5 AMPD traits, and dimensionally assessed DSM-5 Section II personality disorders. Specific maladaptive traits listed in the DSM-5 AMPD were significantly associated with Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test scores and Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition scores, even when the effect of selected DSM-5 Section II personality disorders was controlled for. Our results support the relevance of studying social cognitive functioning in subjects suffering from personality disorders. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. An evaluation of istradefylline treatment on Parkinsonian motor and cognitive deficits in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated macaque models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wai Kin D; Camus, Sandrine M; Li, Qin; Yang, Jianzhong; McGuire, Steve; Pioli, Elsa Y; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-11-01

    Istradefylline (KW-6002), an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, is used adjunct with optimal doses of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) to extend on-time in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients experiencing motor fluctuations. Clinical application of istradefylline for the management of other l-DOPA-induced complications, both motor and non-motor related (i.e. dyskinesia and cognitive impairments), remains to be determined. In this study, acute effects of istradefylline (60-100 mg/kg) alone, or with optimal and sub-optimal doses of l-DOPA, were evaluated in two monkey models of PD (i) the gold-standard 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated macaque model of parkinsonian and dyskinetic motor symptoms and (ii) the chronic low dose (CLD) MPTP-treated macaque model of cognitive (working memory and attentional) deficits. Behavioural analyses in l-DOPA-primed MPTP-treated macaques showed that istradefylline alone specifically alleviated postural deficits. When combined with an optimal l-DOPA treatment dose, istradefylline increased on-time, enhanced therapeutic effects on bradykinesia and locomotion, but exacerbated dyskinesia. Istradefylline treatment at specific doses with sub-optimal l-DOPA specifically alleviated bradykinesia. Cognitive assessments in CLD MPTP-treated macaques showed that the attentional and working memory deficits caused by l-DOPA were lowered after istradefylline administration. Taken together, these data support a broader clinical use of istradefylline as an adjunct treatment in PD, where specific treatment combinations can be utilised to manage various l-DOPA-induced complications, which importantly, maintain a desired anti-parkinsonian response.

  16. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  17. Evidence that cognitive deficit in children is associated not only with iron deficiency, but also with blood lead concentration: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Park, Hyewon; Ha, Eunhee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Ha, Mina; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Lee, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Kyung Yeon; Kim, Ja Hyeong; Kim, Yangho

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether blood lead concentrations are elevated in iron-deficient children, and to examine the association between iron deficiency and/or elevated blood lead concentration and cognitive deficits in children. The present study is a component of the Mothers' and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) study, a multi-center birth cohort project in Korea that began in 2006. The study cohort consisted of 194 children who underwent testing of blood lead and serum C-reactive proteins (CRPs) and ferritin concentrations, and the Korean version of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, revised edition (WPPSI-R), at 60 months of age. In addition, the mothers' blood lead concentrations during pregnancy were included in the analyses. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between high blood lead and low serum ferritin concentrations, after adjustment for covariates, in children, as well as to analyze the association of verbal IQ with serum ferritin and blood lead concentrations. Lead and ferritin concentrations were inversely and significantly associated in children after adjustment for covariates. Moreover, both concentrations were associated with verbal IQ, after adjustment for covariates, and each was associated with cognitive deficits after adjustment for the other. Sobel test statistics showed that blood lead concentration was a significant partial mediator for the relationship between iron deficiency and verbal IQ. Due to the results discussed in the present study, cognitive deficit in children seems to be associated not only with iron deficiency, but also with blood lead concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  19. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  20. Memory deficits in long-term survivors of childhood brain tumors may primarily reflect general cognitive dysfunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Tonny Solveig; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the impact of potential predictors on memory performance in survivors of childhood brain tumors and to examine whether deficits in memory after radiotherapy (RT) should be considered part of a more global mental dysfunction.......To analyze the impact of potential predictors on memory performance in survivors of childhood brain tumors and to examine whether deficits in memory after radiotherapy (RT) should be considered part of a more global mental dysfunction....

  1. Facial expression in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in response to emotional stimuli: a partially shared cognitive and social deficit of the two disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersani G

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Bersani,1 Elisa Polli,1 Giuseppe Valeriani,1 Daiana Zullo,1 Claudia Melcore,1 Enrico Capra,2 Adele Quartini,1 Pietropaolo Marino,1 Amedeo Minichino,2 Laura Bernabei,2 Maddalena Robiony,1 Francesco Saverio Bersani,1,2 Damien Liberati1 1Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Introduction: It has recently been highlighted that patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ and those affected by bipolar disorder (BD undergo gradual chronic worsening of cognitive and social functioning. The objective of the current study was to evaluate and compare (using the Facial Action Coding System [FACS] the way by which patients with the two disorders experience and display emotions in relation to specific emotional stimuli. Materials and methods: Forty-five individuals participated in the study: 15 SCZ patients, 15 BD patients, and 15 healthy controls. All participants watched emotion-eliciting video clips while their facial activity was videotaped. The congruent/incongruent feeling of emotions and the facial expression in reaction to emotions were evaluated. Results: SCZ and BD patients presented similar incongruent emotive feelings and facial expressions (significantly worse than healthy participants; SCZ patients expressed the emotion of disgust significantly less appropriately than BD patients. Discussion: BD and SCZ patients seem to present a similar relevant impairment in both experiencing and displaying emotions; this impairment may be seen as a behavioral indicator of the deficit of social cognition present in both the disorders. As the disgust emotion is mainly elaborated in the insular cortex, the incongruent expression of disgust of SCZ patients can be interpreted as a further evidence of a functional deficit of the insular cortex in this disease. Specific remediation training could be used to improve

  2. Effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on spontaneous withdrawal signs, cognitive deficits and alterations in apoptosis-associated proteins in morphine-dependent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Ghodrati-Jaldbakhan, Shahrbanoo; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Akhavan, Maziar M; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Chronic exposure to morphine results in cognitive deficits and alterations of apoptotic proteins in favor of cell death in the hippocampus, a brain region critically involved in learning and memory. Physical activity has been shown to have beneficial effects on brain health. In the current work, we examined the effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on spontaneous withdrawal signs, the associated cognitive defects, and changes of apoptotic proteins in morphine-dependent rats. Morphine dependence was induced through bi-daily administrations of morphine (10mg/kg) for 10 days. Then, the rats were trained under two different exercise protocols: mild treadmill exercise or voluntary wheel exercise for 10 days. After exercise training, their spatial learning and memory and aversive memory were examined by a water maze and by an inhibitory avoidance task, respectively. The expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in the hippocampus were determined by immunoblotting. We found that chronic exposure to morphine impaired spatial and aversive memory and remarkably suppressed the expression of Bcl-2, but Bax expression remained constant. Both voluntary and treadmill exercise alleviated memory impairment, increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein, and only the later suppressed the expression of Bax protein in morphine-dependent animals. Moreover, both exercise protocols diminished the occurrence of spontaneous morphine withdrawal signs. Our findings showed that exercise reduces the spontaneous morphine-withdrawal signs, blocks the associated impairment of cognitive performance, and overcomes morphine-induced alterations in apoptotic proteins in favor of cell death. Thus, exercise may be a useful therapeutic strategy for cognitive and behavioral deficits in addict individuals.

  3. Effect of exercise-induced neurogenesis on cognitive function deficit in a rat model of vascular dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is strongly correlated with progressive cognitive decline in neurological diseases, such as vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease. Exercise can enhance learning and memory, and delay age-related cognitive decline. However, exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis in experimental animals submitted to CCH has not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate whether hippocampal neurogenesis induced by exercise can improve cognitive def...

  4. The trait 'pessimism' does not interact with cognitive flexibility but makes rats more vulnerable to stress-induced motivational deficits: Results from the attentional set-shifting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Robert; Rojek-Sito, Karolina; Rygula, Rafal

    2017-09-29

    In the present study, we have investigated the effects of the traits 'optimism' and 'pessimism' on cognitive flexibility in an animal model of depression based on chronic restraint stress. For this, first, we trained and tested the rats in a series of ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) tests, which allowed us to classify them as 'optimistic' or 'pessimistic'. Subsequently, we re-trained and re-tested the animals in the Attentional Set Shifting Task (ASST), which allowed evaluation of the differences between 'optimists' and 'pessimists' in terms of cognitive flexibility. Finally, we subjected half of the 'optimistic' and half of the 'pessimistic' rats to chronic (2 weeks) restraint stress and assessed the interaction between cognitive judgement bias and stress in the ASST. Although we did not observe statistically significant effects of the investigated traits and stress on cognitive flexibility, the 'pessimistic' animals subjected to chronic restraint stress showed significantly longer latencies to approach experimental rewards than their 'optimistic' conspecifics. This effect may indicate a stress-induced motivational deficit that is specific to 'pessimistic' animals. The results of the present study, along with our previous reports, indicate that the trait 'pessimism' determines animals' vulnerability to stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mathematical learning disabilities and attention deficit and/or hyperactivity disorder: A study of the cognitive processes involved in arithmetic problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Sarmiento, Valentín; Deaño, Manuel; Alfonso, Sonia; Conde, Ángeles

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of cognitive functioning to arithmetic problem solving and to explore the cognitive profiles of children with attention deficit and/or hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and with mathematical learning disabilities (MLD). The sample was made up of a total of 90 students of 4th, 5th, and 6th grade organized in three: ADHD (n=30), MLD (n=30) and typically achieving control (TA; n=30) group. Assessment was conducted in two sessions in which the PASS processes and arithmetic problem solving were evaluated. The ADHD group's performance in planning and attention was worse than that of the control group. Children with MLD obtained poorer results than the control group in planning and simultaneous and successive processing. Executive processes predicted arithmetic problem solving in the ADHD group whereas simultaneous processing was the unique predictor in the MLD sample. Children with ADHD and with MLD showed characteristic cognitive profiles. Groups' problem-solving performance can be predicted from their cognitive functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive deficits are associated with frontal and temporal lobe white matter lesions in middle-aged adults living in the community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bunce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between brain white matter lesions and cognitive impairment in old age is well established. However, little is known about this association in midlife. As this information will inform policy for early preventative healthcare initiatives, we investigated non-periventricular frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobe white matter hyperintensities (WMH in relation to cognitive function in 428 (232 women community-dwelling adults aged 44 to 48 years. RESULTS: Frontal white matter lesions were significantly associated with greater intraindividual RT variability in women, while temporal WMH were associated with face recognition deficits in men. Parietal and occipital lobe lesions were unrelated to cognitive performance. These findings did not differ when education and a range of health variables, including vascular risk factors, were taken into account. CONCLUSION: Gender differences in WMH-cognition associations are discussed, and we conclude that small vessel disease is present in midlife and has functional consequences which are generally not recognized. Preventative strategies should, therefore, begin early in life.

  7. Negative modulation of GABAA α5 receptors by RO4938581 attenuates discrete sub-chronic and early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP)-induced cognitive deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrobe, John P; Elster, Lisbeth; Frederiksen, Kristen; Bundgaard, Christoffer; de Jong, Inge E M; Smith, Garrick P; Bruun, Anne Techau; Larsen, Peter H; Didriksen, Michael

    2012-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that negative modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) GABA(A) α5 receptors may be a promising strategy for the treatment of certain facets of cognitive impairment; however, selective modulators of GABA(A) α5 receptors have not yet been tested in "schizophrenia-relevant" cognitive assay/model systems in animals. The objectives of this study were to investigate the potential of RO4938581, a negative modulator of GABA(A) α5 receptors, and to attenuate cognitive impairments induced following sub-chronic (sub-PCP) and early postnatal PCP (neo-PCP) administration in the novel object recognition (NOR) and intra-extradimensional shift (ID/ED) paradigms in rats. Complementary in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies were performed to confirm negative modulatory activity of RO4938581 and to investigate animal model validity, concept validity and potential side effect issues, respectively. In vitro studies confirmed the reported negative modulatory activity of RO4938581, whilst immunohistochemical analyses revealed significantly reduced parvalbumin-positive cells in the prefrontal cortex of sub-PCP- and neo-PCP-treated rats. RO4938581 (1 mg/kg) ameliorated both sub-PCP- and neo-PCP-induced cognitive deficits in NOR and ID/ED performance, respectively. In contrast, QH-II-066 (1 and 3 mg/kg), a GABA(A) α5 receptor positive modulator, impaired cognitive performance in the NOR task when administered to vehicle-treated animals. Additional studies revealed that both RO4938581 (1 mg/kg) and QH-II-066 (1 and 3 mg/kg) attenuated amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats. Taken together, these novel findings suggest that negative modulation of GABA(A) α5 receptors may represent an attractive treatment option for the cognitive impairments, and potentially positive symptoms, associated with schizophrenia.

  8. Reward modulation of cognitive function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study on the role of striatal dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Esther; van Holstein, Mieke; Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Kan, Cornelis; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2015-02-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by impairments in cognitive control, such as task-switching deficits. We investigated whether such problems, and their remediation by medication, reflect abnormal reward motivation and associated striatal dopamine transmission in ADHD. We used functional genetic neuroimaging to assess the effects of dopaminergic medication and reward motivation on task-switching and striatal BOLD signal in 23 adults with ADHD, ON and OFF methylphenidate, and 26 healthy controls. Critically, we took into account interindividual variability in striatal dopamine by exploiting a common genetic polymorphism (3'-UTR VNTR) in the DAT1 gene coding for the dopamine transporter. The results showed a highly significant group by genotype interaction in the striatum. This was because a subgroup of patients with ADHD showed markedly exaggerated effects of reward on the striatal BOLD signal during task-switching when they were OFF their dopaminergic medication. Specifically, patients carrying the 9R allele showed a greater striatal signal than healthy controls carrying this allele, whereas no effect of diagnosis was observed in 10R homozygotes. Aberrant striatal responses were normalized when 9R-carrying patients with ADHD were ON medication. These pilot data indicate an important role for aberrant reward motivation, striatal dopamine and interindividual genetic differences in cognitive processes in adult ADHD.

  9. Advantages of the Multiple Case Series Approach to the Study of Cognitive Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towgood, Karren J.; Meuwese, Julia D. I.; Gilbert, Sam J.; Turner, Martha S.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    In the neuropsychological case series approach, tasks are administered that tap different cognitive domains, and differences within rather than across individuals are the basis for theorising; each individual is effectively their own control. This approach is a mainstay of cognitive neuropsychology, and is particularly suited to the study of…

  10. Obesity elicits interleukin 1-mediated deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erion, Joanna R; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Dey, Aditi; Hao, Shuai; Davis, Catherine L; Pollock, Norman K; Stranahan, Alexis M

    2014-02-12

    Adipose tissue is a known source of proinflammatory cytokines in obese humans and animal models, including the db/db mouse, in which obesity arises as a result of leptin receptor insensitivity. Inflammatory cytokines induce cognitive deficits across numerous conditions, but no studies have determined whether obesity-induced inflammation mediates synaptic dysfunction. To address this question, we used a treadmill training paradigm in which mice were exposed to daily training sessions or an immobile belt, with motivation achieved by delivery of compressed air on noncompliance. Treadmill training prevented hippocampal microgliosis, abolished expression of microglial activation markers, and also blocked the functional sensitization observed in isolated cells after ex vivo exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Reduced microglial reactivity with exercise was associated with reinstatement of hippocampus-dependent memory, reversal of deficits in long-term potentiation, and normalization of hippocampal dendritic spine density. Because treadmill training evokes broad responses not limited to the immune system, we next assessed whether directly manipulating adiposity through lipectomy and fat transplantation influences inflammation, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. Lipectomy prevents and fat transplantation promotes systemic and central inflammation, with associated alterations in cognitive and synaptic function. Levels of interleukin 1β (IL1β) emerged as a correlate of adiposity and cognitive impairment across both the treadmill and lipectomy studies, so we manipulated hippocampal IL1 signaling using intrahippocampal delivery of IL1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra). Intrahippocampal IL1ra prevented synaptic dysfunction, proinflammatory priming, and cognitive impairment. This pattern supports a central role for IL1-mediated neuroinflammation as a mechanism for cognitive deficits in obesity and diabetes.

  11. Parenting Behavior and Cognitions in a Community Sample of Mothers with and without Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Tracy; Ninowski, Jerilyn E.; Mash, Eric J.; Semple, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    Although attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults has recently emerged as an important area of research, little attention has been given to the family functioning of women with ADHD, particularly in their role as mothers. We examined parenting self-esteem, locus of control, and disciplinary styles in a community sample of mothers…

  12. Deficits in Emotion-Regulation Skills Predict Alcohol Use during and after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Alcohol Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Matthias; Margraf, Matthias; Ebert, David; Wupperman, Peggilee; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Junghanns, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As emotion regulation is widely considered to be a primary motive in the misuse of alcohol, our aim in the study was to investigate whether deficits in adaptive emotion-regulation skills maintain alcohol dependence (AD). Method: A prospective study investigated whether emotion-regulation skills were associated with AD and whether these…

  13. Caramiphen edisylate as Adjunct to Standard Therapy attenuates soman-induced Seizures and Cognitive Deficits in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-16

    SUBJECT TERMS soman, caramiphen, anticonvulsant , behavior, rats, chemical warfare nerve agents, medical chemical defense , medical countermeasures 16...Keywords: Soman Caramiphen Anticonvulsant Behavior Chemical warfare nerve agents Rats The progression of epileptiform activity following soman (GD...whichmay lead to neuropathological damage and behavioral deficits. Caramiphen edisylate is an anticholinergic drug with antiglutamatergic properties

  14. Parenting Behavior and Cognitions in a Community Sample of Mothers with and without Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Tracy; Ninowski, Jerilyn E.; Mash, Eric J.; Semple, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    Although attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults has recently emerged as an important area of research, little attention has been given to the family functioning of women with ADHD, particularly in their role as mothers. We examined parenting self-esteem, locus of control, and disciplinary styles in a community sample of mothers…

  15. Ketogenic diet change cPLA2/clusterin and autophagy related gene expression and correlate with cognitive deficits and hippocampal MFs sprouting following neonatal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Hong; Zhao, Dong-Jing; Tian, Tian

    2016-02-01

    Because the ketogenic diet (KD) was affecting expression of energy metabolism- related genes in hippocampus and because lipid membrane peroxidation and its associated autophagy stress were also found to be involved in energy depletion, we hypothesized that KD might exert its neuroprotective action via lipid membrane peroxidation and autophagic signaling. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining the long-term expression of lipid membrane peroxidation-related cPLA2 and clusterin, its downstream autophagy marker Beclin-1, LC3 and p62, as well as its execution molecule Cathepsin-E following neonatal seizures and chronic KD treatment. On postnatal day 9 (P9), 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: flurothyl-induced recurrent seizures group and control group. On P28, they were further randomly divided into the seizure group without ketogenic diet (RS+ND), seizure plus ketogenic diet (RS+KD), the control group without ketogenic diet (NS+ND), and the control plus ketogenic diet (NS+KD). Morris water maze test was performed during P37-P43. Then mossy fiber sprouting and the protein levels were detected by Timm staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Flurothyl-induced RS+ND rats show a long-term lower amount of cPLA2 and LC3II/I, and higher amount of clusterin, Beclin-1, p62 and Cathepsin-E which are in parallel with hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and cognitive deficits. Furthermore, chronic KD treatment (RS+KD) is effective in restoring these molecular, neuropathological and cognitive changes. The results imply that a lipid membrane peroxidation and autophagy-associated pathway is involved in the aberrant hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and cognitive deficits following neonatal seizures, which might be a potential target of KD for the treatment of neonatal seizure-induced brain damage.

  16. Distinct phenotypes of new transmembrane-domain neuregulin 1 mutant mice and the rescue effects of valproate on the observed schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Chun ePei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that neuregulin 1 (NRG1 might be involved in the neurodevelopment, neural plasticity, GABAergic neurotransmission and pathogenesis of schizophrenia. NRG1 is abundantly expressed in the hippocampus, and emerging studies have begun to reveal the link between NRG1 signaling and cognitive deficits in schizophrenic patients. Because the transmembrane domain of NRG1 is vital for both forward and reverse signaling cascades, new Nrg1-deficient mice that carry a truncation of the transmembrane domain of the Nrg1 gene were characterized and used in this study to test a NRG1 loss-of-function hypothesis for schizophrenia. Both male and female Nrg1 heterozygous mutant mice and their wild-type littermates were used in a series of 4 experiments to characterize the impact of Nrg1 on behavioral phenotypes and to determine the importance of Nrg1 in the regulation of hippocampal neuromorphology and local GABAergic interneurons. First, a comprehensive battery of behavioral tasks indicated that male Nrg1-deficient mice exhibited significant impairments in cognitive functions. Second, pharmacological challenges were conducted and revealed that Nrg1 haploinsufficiency altered GABAergic activity in males. Third, although no genotype-specific neuromorphological alterations were found in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, significant reductions in the hippocampal expressions of GAD67 and parvalbumin were revealed in the Nrg1-deficient males. Fourth, chronic treatment with valproate rescued the observed behavioral deficits and hippocampal GAD67 reduction in Nrg1-deficient males. Collectively, these results indicate the potential therapeutic effect of valproate and the importance of Nrg1 in the regulation of cognitive functions and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons, especially in males.

  17. The emergence of age-dependent social cognitive deficits after generalized insult to the developing brain: a longitudinal prospective analysis using susceptibility-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Catroppa, Cathy; Cooper, Janine M; Beare, Richard; Ditchfield, Michael; Coleman, Lee; Silk, Timothy; Crossley, Louise; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Anderson, Vicki A

    2015-05-01

    Childhood and adolescence are critical periods for maturation of neurobiological processes that underlie complex social and emotional behavior including Theory of Mind (ToM). While structural correlates of ToM are well described in adults, less is known about the anatomical regions subsuming these skills in the developing brain or the impact of cerebral insult on the acquisition and establishment of high-level social cognitive skills. This study aimed to examine the differential influence of age-at-insult and brain pathology on ToM in a sample of children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Children and adolescents with TBI (n = 112) were categorized according to timing of brain insult: (i) middle childhood (5-9 years; n = 41); (ii) late childhood (10-11 years; n = 39); and (iii) adolescence (12-15 years; n = 32) and group-matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status to a typically developing (TD) control group (n = 43). Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging including a susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence 2-8 weeks postinjury and were assessed on a battery of ToM tasks at 6- and 24-months after injury. Results showed that for adolescents with TBI, social cognitive dysfunction at 6- and 24-months postinjury was associated with diffuse neuropathology and a greater number of lesions detected using SWI. In the late childhood TBI group, we found a time-dependent emergence of social cognitive impairment, linked to diffuse neuropathology. The middle childhood TBI group demonstrated performance unrelated to SWI pathology and comparable to TD controls. Findings indicate that the full extent of social cognitive deficits may not be realized until the associated skills reach maturity. Evidence for brain structure-function relationships suggests that the integrity of an anatomically distributed network of brain regions and their connections is necessary for the acquisition and establishment of high-level social

  18. Selective cognitive deficits and reduced hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J P R; Redrobe, J P; Hansen, H H; Petersen, S; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Mikkelsen, J D; Mirza, N R

    2009-09-29

    Small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels 1-3 (SK1-3) are important for neuronal firing regulation and are considered putative CNS drug targets. For instance non-selective SK blockers improve performance in animal models of cognition. The SK subtype(s) involved herein awaits identification and the question is difficult to address pharmacologically due to the lack of subtype-selective SK-channel modulators. In this study, we used doxycycline-induced conditional SK3-deficient (T/T) mice to address the cognitive consequences of selective SK3 deficiency. In T/T mice SK3 protein is near-eliminated from the brain following doxycycline treatment. We tested T/T and wild type (WT) littermate mice in five distinct learning and memory paradigms. In Y-maze spontaneous alternations and five-trial inhibitory avoidance the performance of T/T mice was markedly inferior to WT mice. In contrast, T/T and WT mice performed equally well in passive avoidance, object recognition and the Morris water maze. Thus, some aspects of working/short-term memory are disrupted in T/T mice. Using in situ hybridization, we further found the cognitive deficits in T/T mice to be paralleled by reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus and CA3 of the hippocampus. BDNF mRNA levels in the frontal cortex were not affected. BDNF has been crucially implicated in many cognitive processes. Hence, the biological substrate for the cognitive impairments in T/T mice could conceivably entail reduced trophic support of the hippocampus.

  19. Research of cognitive function in deficit schizophrenia%缺陷型精神分裂症患者认知功能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐小伟; 耿德勤; 沙维伟; 张晓斌; 周朝昀

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨缺陷型精神分裂症患者认知功能的变化.方法 采用Stroop测验、连线测试(TMT)、范畴流利测验对35例缺陷型精神分裂症、61例非缺陷型精神分裂症、59例健康志愿者进行测评.结果 缺陷型、非缺陷型精神分裂症组的所有神经心理测验均差于正常对照组(P<0.05).缺陷型精神分裂症除Stroop色词测验外,其他的神经心理测验成绩与非缺陷型精神分裂症相比差异均有统计学意义[分别为(122.53±69.05),(318.30±203.74),(45.49±21.74),(28.86±12.95),(14.37±5.06),(P<0.05)].除Stroop色词测验外,SDS阴性症状分、SANS量表分与其他神经心理测验均呈显著相关(P<0.05或0.01).结论 精神分裂症存在广泛的认知功能损害,而缺陷型精神分裂症作为一种独立亚型,可能存在更严重的额叶损伤.%Objective To explore the change of cognitive function in deficit schizophrenia.Methods Stroop Test,Trail Making Test (TMT),Category Fluency Test were administered in 35 patients with deficit schizophrenia,61 patients with non-deficit schizophrenia,and 59 healthy controls.Results Deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia showed dysfunction in neuropsychological tests compared with controls (P < 0.05).Deficit schizophrenia showed significant differences in other neuropsychological tests compared with nondeficit schizophrenia except Stroop color-word Test [(122.53±69.05),(318.30±203.74),(45.49±21.74),(28.86±12.95),(14.37±5.06),P < 0.05].The scores of SDS negative symptoms and SANS measuring scale were significantly correlated with other neuropsychological tests except Stroop color-word Test(P < 0.05 or 0.01).Conclusion There are wide cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.And deficit schizophrenia may have more severe damage in frontal lobe as an independent hypotype.

  20. Activation of the canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway is involved in isoflurane-induced hippocampal interleukin-1β elevation and the resultant cognitive deficits in aged rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng-Qian; Rong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ya-Jie; Ni, Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Tian, Xiao-Sheng [Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Mo, Na [Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100021 (China); Chui, De-Hua, E-mail: dchui@bjmu.edu.cn [Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Guo, Xiang-Yang, E-mail: puthmzk@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Isoflurane induces hippocampal IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits in aged rats. •Isoflurane transiently activates the canonical NF-κB pathway in aged rat hippocampus. •NF-κB inhibitor mitigates isoflurane-induced IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits. •We report a linkage between NF-κB signaling, IL-1β expression, and cognitive changes. -- Abstract: Although much recent evidence has demonstrated that neuroinflammation contributes to volatile anesthetic-induced cognitive deficits, there are few existing mechanistic explanations for this inflammatory process. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane on canonical nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling, and to explore its association with hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β levels and anesthetic-related cognitive changes in aged rats. After a 4-h exposure to 1.5% isoflurane in 20-month-old rats, increases in IκB kinase and IκB phosphorylation, as well as a reduction in the NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα), were observed in the hippocampi of isoflurane-exposed rats compared with control rats. These events were accompanied by an increase in NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation at 6 h after isoflurane exposure and hippocampal IL-1β elevation from 1 to 6 h after isoflurane exposure. Nevertheless, no significant neuroglia activation was observed. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate markedly suppressed the IL-1β increase and NF-κB signaling, and also mitigated the severity of cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze task. Overall, our results demonstrate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may stem from upregulation of hippocampal IL-1β, partially via activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, in aged rats.

  1. Emotional Processing, Recognition, Empathy and Evoked Facial Expression in Eating Disorders: An Experimental Study to Map Deficits in Social Cognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cardi, Valentina; Corfield, Freya; Leppanen, Jenni; Rhind, Charlotte; Deriziotis, Stephanie; Hadjimichalis, Alexandra; Hibbs, Rebecca; Micali, Nadia; Treasure, Janet

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study is to examine distinct processes of social-cognition in this patient group, including attentional processing and recognition, empathic reaction and evoked facial expression...

  2. Large-scale resting state network correlates of cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease and related dopaminergic deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Lebedev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment is a common non-motor feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD. The current study aimed to investigate resting state fMRI correlates of cognitive impairment in PD from a large-scale network perspective, and to assess the impact of dopamine deficiency on these networks. Thirty PD patients with resting state fMRI were included from the Parkinson’s Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI database. Eighteen patients from this sample were also scanned with 123I-FP-CIT SPECT. A standardized neuropsychological battery was administered, evaluating verbal memory, visuospatial, and executive cognitive domains. Image preprocessing was performed using an SPM8-based workflow, obtaining time-series from 90 regions-of-interest (ROIs defined from the AAL brain atlas. The Brain Connectivity Toolbox was used to extract nodal strength from all ROIs and modularity of the cognitive circuitry determined using the meta-analytical software Neurosynth. Brain-behavior covariance patterns between cognitive functions and nodal strength were estimated using Partial Least Squares. Extracted latent variable scores were correlated with performances in the three cognitive domains and striatal dopamine transporter binding ratios (SBR using linear modeling. Finally, influence of nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficiency on modularity of the cognitive network was analyzed. Less severe executive impairment was associated with increased dorsal fronto-parietal cortical processing and inhibited subcortical and primary sensory involvement. This pattern was positively influenced by the relative preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function. The pattern associated with better memory performance favored prefronto-limbic processing, and did not reveal associations with presynaptic striatal dopamine uptake. SBR ratios were negatively associated with modularity of the cognitive network, suggesting integrative effects of the preserved nigrostriatal dopamine system on this

  3. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals more intense physical activity is associated with better cognitive control performance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartanto, T A; Krafft, C E; Iosif, A M; Schweitzer, J B

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactivity is a key symptom and the most observable manifestation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The over-activity associated with ADHD can cause specific challenges in academic settings, extracurricular activities and social relationships. Cognitive control challenges are also well established in ADHD. The current study included 44 children between the ages of 10 and 17 diagnosed with ADHD or who were typically developing (TD), all of whom had no psychiatric co-morbidity or significant learning disorders. Participants wore an actometer on their ankle while performing a flanker paradigm in order to objectively measure their rates of activity in association with cognitive control. Analyses assessed the relationship between frequency and intensity of activity to task accuracy on a trial-by-trial basis. A significant interaction effect between group and performance revealed that more intense movement was associated with better performance in the ADHD group but not in the TD group. The ADHD group demonstrated more intense activity than the TD group during correct (but not error) trials. Within-group, children with ADHD generated higher intensity movements in their correct trials compared to their error trials, whereas the TD group did not demonstrate any within-group differences. These findings suggest that excessive motoric activity associated with clinically significant ADHD symptoms may reflect compensatory efforts to modulate attention and alertness. Future research should systematically explore the relationship between motion in ADHD and how it might be used to improve cognitive performance.

  4. A Patient with Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome Presenting with Executive Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku Kasuga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects males who are carriers of a premutation of a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene. In Asian populations, FXTAS has rarely been reported. Here, we report the case of a Japanese FXTAS patient who showed predominant executive cognitive deficits as the main feature of his disease. In contrast, the patient exhibited only very mild symptoms of intention tremor and ataxia, which did not interfere with daily activities. A gene analysis revealed that the patient carried a premutation of a CGG expansion (111 CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. The mRNA expression level of FMR1 in the patient was 1.5-fold higher than in controls. On brain MRI scans, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed high-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles and the cerebral white matter, with a frontal predominance. The present case extends previous notions regarding the cognitive impairment in FXTAS patients. Recognizing FXTAS patients with predominant cognitive impairment from various ethnic backgrounds would contribute to our understanding of the phenotypic variation of this disease.

  5. Antidepressant-like effects and possible mechanisms of amantadine on cognitive and synaptic deficits in a rat model of chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether amantadine (AMA), as a low-affinity noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is able to improve cognitive deficits caused by chronic stress in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control, control + AMA, stress and stress + AMA groups. The chronic stress model combined chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with isolated feeding. Animals were exposed to CUS continued for 21 days. AMA (25 mg/kg) was administrated p.o. for 20 days from the 4th day of CUS to the 23rd. Weight and sucrose consumption were measured during model establishing period. Spatial memory was evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM) test. Following MWM testing, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation were recorded in the hippocampal CA1 region. NR2B and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) proteins were measured by Western-blot analysis. AMA increased weight and sucrose consumption of stressed rats. Spatial memory and reversal learning in stressed rats were impaired relative to controls, whereas AMA significantly attenuated cognitive impairment. AMA also mitigated the chronic stress-induced impai