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Sample records for abnormal screening mammograms

  1. An abnormal screening mammogram causes more anxiety than a palpable lump in benign breast disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyzer-Dekker, C. M. G.; van Esch, L.; de Vries, J.; Ernst, Marloes; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.; Roukema, J. A.; van der Steeg, A. F. W.

    Being recalled for further diagnostic procedures after an abnormal screening mammogram (ASM) can evoke a high state anxiety with lowered quality of life (QoL). We examined whether these adverse psychological consequences are found in all women with benign breast disease (BBD) or are particular to

  2. Improving work-up of the abnormal mammogram through organized assessment: results from the ontario breast screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, May Lynn; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Holloway, Claire M D; O'Malley, Frances P; Chiarelli, Anna M

    2012-03-01

    Women with an abnormal screening mammogram should ideally undergo an organized assessment to attain a timely diagnosis. This study evaluated outcomes of women undergoing work-up after abnormal mammogram through a formal breast assessment affiliate (BAA) program with explicit care pathways compared with usual care (UC) using developed quality indicators for screening mammography programs. Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, a total of 320,635 women underwent a screening mammogram through the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP), of whom 25,543 had an abnormal result requiring further assessment. Established indicators assessing timeliness, appropriateness of follow-up, and biopsy rates were compared between women who were assessed through either a BAA or UC using χ(2) analysis. Work-up of the abnormal mammogram for patients screened through a BAA resulted in a greater proportion of women attaining a definitive diagnosis within the recommended time interval when a histologic diagnosis was required. In addition, use of other quality measures including specimen radiography for both core biopsies and surgical specimens and preoperative core needle biopsy was greater in BAA facilities. These findings support future efforts to increase the number of BAAs within the OBSP, because the pathways and reporting methods associated with them result in improvements in our ability to provide timely and appropriate care for women requiring work-up of an abnormal mammogram.

  3. Automatic detection of anomalies in screening mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnostic performance in breast screening programs may be influenced by the prior probability of disease. Since breast cancer incidence is roughly half a percent in the general population there is a large probability that the screening exam will be normal. That factor may contribute to false negatives. Screening programs typically exhibit about 83% sensitivity and 91% specificity. This investigation was undertaken to determine if a system could be developed to pre-sort screening-images into normal and suspicious bins based on their likelihood to contain disease. Wavelets were investigated as a method to parse the image data, potentially removing confounding information. The development of a classification system based on features extracted from wavelet transformed mammograms is reported. Methods In the multi-step procedure images were processed using 2D discrete wavelet transforms to create a set of maps at different size scales. Next, statistical features were computed from each map, and a subset of these features was the input for a concerted-effort set of naïve Bayesian classifiers. The classifier network was constructed to calculate the probability that the parent mammography image contained an abnormality. The abnormalities were not identified, nor were they regionalized. The algorithm was tested on two publicly available databases: the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM) and the Mammographic Images Analysis Society’s database (MIAS). These databases contain radiologist-verified images and feature common abnormalities including: spiculations, masses, geometric deformations and fibroid tissues. Results The classifier-network designs tested achieved sensitivities and specificities sufficient to be potentially useful in a clinical setting. This first series of tests identified networks with 100% sensitivity and up to 79% specificity for abnormalities. This performance significantly exceeds the mean sensitivity reported in literature

  4. Rapid point-of-care breath test for biomarkers of breast cancer and abnormal mammograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Phillips

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported volatile organic compounds (VOCs in breath as biomarkers of breast cancer and abnormal mammograms, apparently resulting from increased oxidative stress and cytochrome p450 induction. We evaluated a six-minute point-of-care breath test for VOC biomarkers in women screened for breast cancer at centers in the USA and the Netherlands. METHODS: 244 women had a screening mammogram (93/37 normal/abnormal or a breast biopsy (cancer/no cancer 35/79. A mobile point-of-care system collected and concentrated breath and air VOCs for analysis with gas chromatography and surface acoustic wave detection. Chromatograms were segmented into a time series of alveolar gradients (breath minus room air. Segmental alveolar gradients were ranked as candidate biomarkers by C-statistic value (area under curve [AUC] of receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve. Multivariate predictive algorithms were constructed employing significant biomarkers identified with multiple Monte Carlo simulations and cross validated with a leave-one-out (LOO procedure. RESULTS: Performance of breath biomarker algorithms was determined in three groups: breast cancer on biopsy versus normal screening mammograms (81.8% sensitivity, 70.0% specificity, accuracy 79% (73% on LOO [C-statistic value], negative predictive value 99.9%; normal versus abnormal screening mammograms (86.5% sensitivity, 66.7% specificity, accuracy 83%, 62% on LOO; and cancer versus no cancer on breast biopsy (75.8% sensitivity, 74.0% specificity, accuracy 78%, 67% on LOO. CONCLUSIONS: A pilot study of a six-minute point-of-care breath test for volatile biomarkers accurately identified women with breast cancer and with abnormal mammograms. Breath testing could potentially reduce the number of needless mammograms without loss of diagnostic sensitivity.

  5. The classification of normal screening mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Zoey Z. Y.; Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick C.; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2016-03-01

    Rationale and objectives: To understand how breast screen readers classify the difficulty of normal screening mammograms using common lexicon describing normal appearances. Cases were also assessed on their suitability for a single reader strategy. Materials and Methods: 15 breast readers were asked to interpret a test set of 29 normal screening mammogram cases and classify them by rating the difficulty of the case on a five-point Likert scale, identifying the salient features and assessing their suitability for single reading. Using the False Positive Fractions from a previous study, the 29 cases were classified into 10 "low", 10 "medium" and nine "high" difficulties. Data was analyzed with descriptive statistics. Spearman's correlation was used to test the strength of association between the difficulty of the cases and the readers' recommendation for single reading strategy. Results: The ratings from readers in this study corresponded to the known difficulty level of cases for the 'low' and 'high' difficulty cases. Uniform ductal pattern and density, symmetrical mammographic features and the absence of micro-calcifications were the main reasons associated with 'low' difficulty cases. The 'high' difficulty cases were described as having `dense breasts'. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between the difficulty of the cases and readers' recommendation for single reading (r = -0.475, P = 0.009). Conclusion: The findings demonstrated potential relationships between certain mammographic features and the difficulty for readers to classify mammograms as 'normal'. The standard Australian practice of double reading was deemed more suitable for most cases. There was an inverse moderate association between the difficulty of the cases and the recommendations for single reading.

  6. Association between Radiologists' Experience and Accuracy in Interpreting Screening Mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristany Maria-Teresa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiologists have been observed to differ, sometimes substantially, both in their interpretations of mammograms and in their recommendations for follow-up. The aim of this study was to determine how factors related to radiologists' experience affect the accuracy of mammogram readings. Methods We selected a random sample of screening mammograms from a population-based breast cancer screening program. The sample was composed of 30 women with histopathologically-confirmed breast cancer and 170 women without breast cancer after a 2-year follow-up (the proportion of cancers was oversampled. These 200 mammograms were read by 21 radiologists routinely interpreting mammograms, with different amount of experience, and by seven readers who did not routinely interpret mammograms. All readers were blinded to the results of the screening. A positive assessment was considered when a BI-RADS III, 0, IV, V was reported (additional evaluation required. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated through sensitivity and specificity. Results Average specificity was higher in radiologists routinely interpreting mammograms with regard to radiologists who did not (66% vs 56%; p Conclusion Among radiologists who read routinely, volume is not associated with better performance when interpreting screening mammograms, although specificity decreased in radiologists not routinely reading mammograms. Follow-up of cases for which further workup is recommended might reduce variability in mammogram readings and improve the quality of breast cancer screening programs.

  7. Performance of computer-aided detection in false-negative screening mammograms of breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Boo Kyung; Kim, Ji Young; Shin, Jung Hee; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2004-01-01

    To analyze retrospectively the abnormalities visible on the false-negative screening mammograms of patients with breast cancer and to determine the performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) in the detection of cancers. Of 108 consecutive cases of breast cancer diagnosed over a period of 6 years, of which previous screening mammograms were available, 32 retrospectively visible abnormalities (at which locations cancer later developed) were found in the previous mammograms, and which were originally reported as negative. These 32 patients ranged in age from 38 to 72 years (mean 52 years). We analyzed their previous mammographic findings, and assessed the ability of CAD to mark cancers in previous mammograms, according to the clinical presentation, the type of abnormalities and the mammographic parenchymal density. In these 32 previous mammograms of breast cancers (20 asymptomatic, 12 symptomatic), the retrospectively visible abnormalities were identified as densities in 22, calcifications in 8, and densities with calcifications in 2. CAD marked abnormalities in 20 (63%) of the 32 cancers with false-negative screening mammograms; 14 (70%) of the 20 subsequent screening-detected cancers, 5 (50%) of the 10 interval cancers, and 1 (50%) of the 2 cancers palpable after the screening interval. CAD marked 12 (50%) of the 24 densities and 9 (90%) of the 10 calcifications. CAD marked abnormalities in 7 (50%) of the 14 predominantly fatty breasts, and 13 (72%) of the 18 dense breasts. CAD-assisted diagnosis could potentially decrease the number of false-negative mammograms caused by the failure to recognize the cancer in the screening program, although its usefulness in the prevention of interval cancers appears to be limited

  8. Hospitalized women's willingness to pay for an inpatient screening mammogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Waseem; Harris, Ché Matthew; Landis, Regina; Bridges, John F P; Wright, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    Lower rates for breast cancer screening persist among low income and uninsured women. Although Medicare and many other insurance plans would pay for screening mammograms done during hospital stays, breast cancer screening has not been part of usual hospital care. This study explores the mean amount of money that hospitalized women were willing to contribute towards the cost of a screening mammogram. Of the 193 enrolled patients, 72% were willing to pay a mean of $83.41 (95% CI, $71.51-$95.31) in advance towards inpatient screening mammogram costs. The study's findings suggest that hospitalized women value the prospect of screening mammography during the hospitalization. It may be wise policy to offer mammograms to nonadherent hospitalized women, especially those who are at high risk for developing breast cancer. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  9. Computerized Analysis and Detection of Missed Cancer in Screening Mammogram

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Lihua

    2005-01-01

    This project is to explore an innovative CAD strategy for improving early detection of breast cancer in screening mammograms by focusing on computerized analysis and detection of cancers missed by radiologists...

  10. Computerized Analysis and Detection of Missed Cancer in Screening Mammogram

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Lihua

    2004-01-01

    This project is to explore an innovative CAD strategy for improving early detection of breast cancer in screening mammograms by focusing on computerized analysis and detection of cancers missed by radiologists...

  11. Effect on sensitivity and specificity of mammography screening with or without comparison of old mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurfjell, M.G.; Vitak, B.; Azavedo, E.; Svane, G.; Thurfjell, E.

    2000-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of old mammograms on the specificity and sensitivity of radiologists in mammography screening, one hundred and fifty sets of screening mammograms were examined by 3 experienced screeners twice: once without and once in comparison with older mammograms. The films came from a population-based screening done during the first half of 1994 and comprised all 35 cancers detected during screening in 1994, 12/24 interval cancers, 14/34 cancers detected in the following screening and 89 normal mammograms. Without old mammograms, the screeners detected an average of 40.3 cancers (range 37-42), with a specificity of 87% (85-88%). With old mammograms, the screeners detected 37.7 cancers (range 34-42) with a specificity of 96% (94-99%). The change in detection rate was not significant. However, the increase in specificity was significant for each screener. Mammography screening with old mammograms available for comparison decreased the false-positive recall rate. The effect on sensitivity, however, was unclear

  12. Ethnic differences in social support after initial receipt of an abnormal mammogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Yamile; Hohl, Sarah D; Nguyen, Michelle; Hempstead, Bridgette H; Weatherby, Shauna Rae; Dunbar, Claire; Beresford, Shirley A A; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2016-10-01

    We examine access to and type of social support after initial receipt of an abnormal mammogram across non-Latina White (NLW), African American, and Latina women. This cross-sectional study used a mixed method design, with quantitative and qualitative measures. Women were recruited through 2 community advocates and 3 breast-health-related care organizations. With regard to access, African American women were less likely to access social support relative to NLW counterparts. Similar nonsignificant differences were found for Latinas. Women did not discuss results with family and friends to avoid burdening social networks and negative reactions. Networks' geographic constraints and medical mistrust influenced Latina and African American women's decisions to discuss results. With regard to type of social support, women reported emotional support across ethnicity. Latina and African American women reported more instrumental support, whereas NLW women reported more informational support in the context of their well-being. There are shared and culturally unique aspects of women's experiences with social support after initially receiving an abnormal mammogram. Latina and African American women may particularly benefit from informational support from health care professionals. Communitywide efforts to mitigate mistrust and encourage active communication about cancer may improve ethnic disparities in emotional well-being and diagnostic resolution during initial receipt of an abnormal mammogram. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Modeling sequential context effects in diagnostic interpretation of screening mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamudun, Folami; Paulus, Paige; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2018-07-01

    Prior research has shown that physicians' medical decisions can be influenced by sequential context, particularly in cases where successive stimuli exhibit similar characteristics when analyzing medical images. This type of systematic error is known to psychophysicists as sequential context effect as it indicates that judgments are influenced by features of and decisions about the preceding case in the sequence of examined cases, rather than being based solely on the peculiarities unique to the present case. We determine if radiologists experience some form of context bias, using screening mammography as the use case. To this end, we explore correlations between previous perceptual behavior and diagnostic decisions and current decisions. We hypothesize that a radiologist's visual search pattern and diagnostic decisions in previous cases are predictive of the radiologist's current diagnostic decisions. To test our hypothesis, we tasked 10 radiologists of varied experience to conduct blind reviews of 100 four-view screening mammograms. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions were collected from each radiologist under conditions mimicking clinical practice. Perceptual behavior was quantified using the fractal dimension of gaze scanpath, which was computed using the Minkowski-Bouligand box-counting method. To test the effect of previous behavior and decisions, we conducted a multifactor fixed-effects ANOVA. Further, to examine the predictive value of previous perceptual behavior and decisions, we trained and evaluated a predictive model for radiologists' current diagnostic decisions. ANOVA tests showed that previous visual behavior, characterized by fractal analysis, previous diagnostic decisions, and image characteristics of previous cases are significant predictors of current diagnostic decisions. Additionally, predictive modeling of diagnostic decisions showed an overall improvement in prediction error when the model is trained on additional information about

  14. A retrospective study of the performance of radiographers in interpreting screening mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, S.; Warren-Forward, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper provides data on the continued success of radiographers in reviewing mammograms with similar accuracy to screen readers. Method: The participants consisted of 7 radiographers and 2 current official screen readers. Two hundred and fifty sets of mammograms from 2003 were used in this study. Each participant reviewed each set of mammograms as a Rescreen or Recall. Patient outcomes were assessed by following up the results of any histology or pathology tests in 2003 or the 2005/2006 screening results. Results: The screen reader's sensitivities ranged from 79% to 93% and the specificities ranged from 82% to 84%. The radiographer values ranged from 57% to 97% and 63% to 80% respectively. Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity values attained by some radiographers were equivalent to those of both the screen readers. Accuracy rates of the radiographers suggest that screen reading by selected and appropriately trained radiographers should be achievable in Australia.

  15. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  16. Improved Screening Mammogram Workflow by Maximizing PACS Streamlining Capabilities in an Academic Breast Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ramya; Forsberg, Daniel; Plecha, Donna

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an operational improvement project targeted at the breast imaging reading workflow of mammography examinations at an academic medical center with its associated breast centers and satellite sites. Through careful analysis of the current workflow, two major issues were identified: stockpiling of paperwork and multiple worklists. Both issues were considered to cause significant delays to the start of interpreting screening mammograms. Four workflow changes were suggested (scanning of paperwork, worklist consolidation, use of chat functionality, and tracking of case distribution among trainees) and implemented in July 2015. Timestamp data was collected 2 months before (May-Jun) and after (Aug-Sep) the implemented changes. Generalized linear models were used to analyze the data. The results showed significant improvements for the interpretation of screening mammograms. The average time elapsed for time to open a case reduced from 70 to 28 min (60 % decrease, p workflow for diagnostic mammograms at large unaltered even with increased volume of mammography examinations (31 % increase of 4344 examinations for May-Jun to 5678 examinations for Aug-Sep). In conclusion, targeted efforts to improve the breast imaging reading workflow for screening mammograms in a teaching environment provided significant performance improvements without affecting the workflow of diagnostic mammograms.

  17. Can Australian radiographers assess screening mammograms accurately? Biennial follow-up from a four year prospective study and lesion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, S.; Warren-Forward, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Globally, the role of the radiographer is changing; some countries have developed advanced roles with specific scopes of practice. Other countries, like Australia, are in the process of this change. This paper demonstrates the abilities of Australian radiographers in mammogram screen reading, highlighting some of their specific difficulties with different lesion types. Method: Six experienced radiographers participated in a prospective study, screen reading 2000 mammograms each between 2010 and 2011. This paper looks at the results of those same women at biennial re-screen. Analysis of the results included validation of normal results by negative follow-up screens and new cancers at biennial review; there is also analysis on the types of lesions detected and missed. Results: After biennial review, three cancers in 2013/2014 had been marked as abnormal by one radiographer two years prior, which increased her sensitivity from 64% to 85%. Sensitivity for the radiologists decreased from the assumed 100% to 95%. Radiographers appeared to be skilled in detection of calcifications and architectural distortions but had difficulty with non-specific densities. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential for Australian radiographers to enhance the accuracy of screen reading programs. - Highlights: • Radiographers have the potential to increase breast cancer detection rates. • Radiographers appear to be skilled at detecting calcifications. • Lesions commonly overlooked by radiographers could be targeted for training.

  18. Patient understanding of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines: need for development of patient decision aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Summer V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to examine patients’ understanding of the revised screening mammogram guidelines released by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF in 2009 addressing age at initiation and frequency of screening mammography. Methods Patients from the Departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Obstetrics and Gynecology (n = 150 at a tertiary care medical center in the United States completed a survey regarding their understanding of the revised USPSTF guidelines following their release, within four to six months of their scheduled mammogram (March 2010 to May 2010. Results Of the patients surveyed, 97/147 (67% indicated increased confusion regarding the age and frequency of screening mammography, 61/148 (41% reported increased anxiety about mammograms, and 58/146 (40% reported anxiety about their own health status following the release of the revised screening guidelines. Most of the patients surveyed, 111/148 (75%, did not expect to change their timing or frequency of screening mammograms in the future. Conclusion Results from this survey suggested increased confusion and possibly an increase in patients’ anxiety related to screening mammography and their own health status following the release of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines to the public and subsequent media portrayal of the revised guidelines. Although the study did not specifically address causality for these findings, the results highlight the need for improvements in the communication of guidelines to patients and the public. Development of shared decision-making tools and outcomes should be considered to address the communication challenge.

  19. Disparities in abnormal mammogram follow-up time for Asian women compared to non-Hispanic Whites and between Asian ethnic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, KH; Pasick, RJ; Stewart, SL; Kerlikowske, K; Karliner, LS

    2017-01-01

    Background Delays in abnormal mammogram follow-up contribute to poor outcomes. We examined abnormal screening mammogram follow-up differences for non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) and Asian women. Methods Prospective cohort of NHW and Asian women with a Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System abnormal result of 0 or 3+ in the San Francisco Mammography Registry between 2000–2010. We performed Kaplan-Meier estimation for median-days to follow-up with a diagnostic radiologic test, and compared proportion with follow-up at 30, 60 and 90 days, and no follow-up at one-year for Asians overall (and Asian ethnic groups) and NHWs. We additionally assessed the relationship between race/ethnicity and time-to-follow-up with adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among Asian women, Vietnamese and Filipinas had the longest, and Japanese the shortest, median follow-up time (32, 28, 19 days, respectively) compared to NHWs (15 days). The proportion of women receiving follow-up at 30 days was lower for Asians vs NHWs (57% vs 77%, pAsian ethnic groups except Japanese. Asians had a reduced hazard of follow-up compared with NHWs (aHR 0.70, 95% CI 0.69–0.72). Asians also had a higher rate than NHWs of no follow-up (15% vs 10%; pAsian ethnic groups, Filipinas had the highest percentage of women with no follow-up (18.1%). Conclusion Asian, particularly Filipina and Vietnamese, women were less likely than NHWs to receive timely follow-up after an abnormal screening mammogram. Research should disaggregate Asian ethnicity to better understand and address barriers to effective cancer prevention. PMID:28603859

  20. Reading screening mammograms – Attitudes among radiologists and radiographers about skill mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Lena Westphal; Brodersen, John

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Because of shortage of personnel for the Danish mammography screening programme, the aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of radiologists and radiographers towards a future implementation of radiographers reading screening mammograms. Materials and methods: Seven combined phenomenological and hermeneutical interviews with radiographers and radiologists were performed. Stratified selection was used for sampling of informants. The interviews were analysed against theory about quality, organization and profession. Results: Quality related possibilities: radiographers do routinely measure the performance quality, radiographers obtain sufficient reading qualifications, and skill mix improves quality. Quality related obstacles: radiologists do not routinely measure performance quality. Organization related possibilities: shortage of radiologists, positive attitudes of managers, and improved working relations. Organization related obstacles: shortage of radiographers and negative attitudes of managers. Professional related possibilities: positive experience with skill mix. Professional related obstacles: worries about negative consequences for the training of radiologists, and resistance against handing over tasks to another profession. Conclusion: Attitudes towards radiographers reading screening mammograms are attached to either quality-, organisational or professional perspectives. Radiographers are capable of learning to read mammograms at sufficient performance level but routine measurement of performance quality is essential. Resistance against skill mix may be caused by an emotionally conditioned fear of losing demarcations. The main motive for skill mix is improvement of the utilization of resources. No evidence was found regarding the organisational and financial consequences of skill mix. Despite of this all radiologists and radiographers experienced with skill mix were strong advocates for reading radiographers.

  1. Psychological distress, social withdrawal, and coping following receipt of an abnormal mammogram among different ethnicities: a mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Yamile; Beresford, Shirley A A; Espinoza, Noah; Thompson, Beti

    2014-09-01

    To explore ethnic differences in psychological distress and social withdrawal after receiving an abnormal mammogram result and to assess if coping strategies mediate ethnic differences. Descriptive correlational. Two urban mobile mammography units and a rural community hospital in the state of Washington. 41 Latina and 41 non-Latina Caucasian (NLC) women who had received an abnormal mammogram result. Women completed standard sociodemographic questions, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, the social dimension of the Psychological Consequences Questionnaire, and the Brief COPE. Ethnicity, psychological distress, social withdrawal, and coping. Latinas experienced greater psychological distress and social withdrawal compared to NLC counterparts. Denial as a coping strategy mediated ethnic differences in psychological distress. Religious coping mediated ethnic differences in social withdrawal. Larger population-based studies are necessary to understand how ethnic differences in coping strategies can influence psychological outcomes. This is an important finding that warrants additional study among women who are and are not diagnosed with breast cancer following an abnormal mammogram. Nurses may be able to work with Latina patients to diminish denial coping and consequent distress. Nurses may be particularly effective, given cultural values concerning strong interpersonal relationships and respect for authority figures.

  2. Detection of microcalcifications in television-enhanced nonmagnified screen-film mammograms compared with matching magnification unenhanced mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Gormley, L.S.; Gold, R.H.; Bassett, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    The object of this investigation was to determine which imaging method was associated with greater accuracy in the interpretation of breast microcalcifications: 1.5X to 2.0X magnification with a microfocal spot or Damon DETECT-enhanced mammograms. The authors' test series consisted of matched pairs of images of 31 breasts, each containing a cluster of microcalcifications within a biopsy-proved benign (N = 21) or malignant (N =10) lesion. Three experienced mammographers and three senior radiology residents with 2 weeks of training in mammography interpreted the calcifications. On the basis of receiver operating characteristic analysis, the authors conclude that (1) inexperienced mammographers should not use television image enhancement alone to evaluate microcalcifications and (2) television-enhanced mammograms are not a substitute for microfocal spot magnification mammograms

  3. Computer aided monitoring of breast abnormalities in X-ray mammograms

    OpenAIRE

    Selvan, Arul; Saatchi, Reza; Ferris, Christine

    2011-01-01

    X­ray mammography is regarded as the most effective tool for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, but the interpretation of mammograms is a difficult and \\ud error­prone task. Computer­aided detection (CADe) systems address the problem that radiologists often miss signs of cancers that are retrospectively visible in mammograms. Furthermore, computer­aided diagnosis (CADx) systems assist the radiologist in the classification of mammographic lesions as benign or malignant[1].\\ud This p...

  4. Annual Screening Mammogram and its Relation to Breast Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabek EAS

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current national screening programs totally depend on mammographic evaluation. After increased incidence of breast cancer in women under the age of 35, mammography sensitivity in now a question. Several factors added to decrease sensitivity of mammography, such as increased density in older age groups and increased aggressiveness of tumour biology. All these factors will change the reliability of the screening program. The study is a retrospective study conducted at Ain Shams University. Method: 138 patients diagnosed with cancer breast underwent both mammography and sonography to determine percentage of patient with more than one focus, age and density distribution breast cancer in the affected patient and accuracy of both mammography and US. Results: By studying this population, we found that around 61,44% have areas of density ranging from dense breast, heterogenous density or scattered density. These areas of density render the mammography a less sensitive tool as its sensitivity fall to 34.09%, while that of US was 77.27%. Conclusion: As breast cancer is prevalent in younger population, also with increased density in older population who are relatively insensitive to mammography, we recommended the use of Automated Breast Ultrasound (ABUS in the national screening program.

  5. Reading screening mammograms - Attitudes among radiologists and radiographers about skill mix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Lena Westphal; Brodersen, John

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because of shortage of personnel for the Danish mammography screening programme, the aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of radiologists and radiographers towards a future implementation of radiographers reading screening mammograms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven...... of managers, and improved working relations. Organization related obstacles: shortage of radiographers and negative attitudes of managers. Professional related possibilities: positive experience with skill mix. Professional related obstacles: worries about negative consequences for the training...... and financial consequences of skill mix. Despite of this all radiologists and radiographers experienced with skill mix were strong advocates for reading radiographers....

  6. Preoperative diagnosis of carcinoma within fibroadenoma on screening mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borecky, N.; Rickard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Three cases of fibroadenoma associated with carcinoma are reported. These cases were diagnosed within a screening programme as a result of suspicious mammographic findings, and the diagnosis of malignancy was confirmed preoperatively by core biopsy in all cases. The mammographic findings suggestive of carcinoma within fibroadenoma were irregularity of margins in one case and associated new suspicious pleomorphic and linear calcifications in the two other cases. The preoperative diagnosis of carcinoma within fibroadenoma was provided by ultrasound-guided core biopsy in two cases and core biopsy under stereotactic guidance in one case. Whereas asymptomatic fibroadenoma with benign imaging appearances usually does not require further investigation, fibroadenoma with atypical imaging features requires a triple test investigation.

  7. Can Australian radiographers assess screening mammograms accurately? First stage results from a four year prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, S.; Warren-Forward, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Globally, the role of the radiographer is changing; some countries have developed advanced roles with specific scopes of practice. Other countries, like Australia, are in the process of this change. The aim of this research is to assess the diagnostic outcomes reported by the radiographers and compare them to those reported by current screen readers. Method: Six experienced radiographers were invited to participate in a prospective study conducted between 2010 and 2011. They were required to read 2000 mammograms each. Their results were compared with those of the radiologists. Statistical analysis of the results included overall cancer detection rates, recall rates, levels of agreement, kappa, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Results: A total of 9348 women were included in the study. The percentage of cancers detected by the radiographers ranged from 53% to 100% of the cancers detected by the radiologists. Radiologist recall rate ranged between 3.4% and 5.5% and the radiographers' range was 2.9%–9.8%. Level of agreement of the radiographers with the radiologists ranged from 90 to 96%. Conclusion: The potential for accuracy in screen reading by Australian radiographers is supported by the results of this study. Implementation of formal training is likely to result in an increase in the diagnostic accuracy of radiographers. - Highlights: • Radiographers prospectively read 2000 screening mammograms each. • These results support potential for accuracy in screen reading by radiographers. • Will advanced practice be introduced within BreastScreen Australia?.

  8. Disparities in abnormal mammogram follow-up time for Asian women compared with non-Hispanic white women and between Asian ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim H; Pasick, Rena J; Stewart, Susan L; Kerlikowske, Karla; Karliner, Leah S

    2017-09-15

    Delays in abnormal mammogram follow-up contribute to poor outcomes. In the current study, the authors examined differences in abnormal screening mammogram follow-up between non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Asian women. The authors used a prospective cohort of NHW and Asian women with a Breast Imaging, Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) abnormal result of category 0 or 3-plus in the San Francisco Mammography Registry between 2000 and 2010. Kaplan-Meier estimation for the median number of days to follow-up with a diagnostic radiologic test was performed, and the authors compared the percentage of women with follow-up at 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days and no follow-up at 1 year for Asian women overall (and Asian ethnic groups) and NHW women. In addition, the authors assessed the relationship between race/ethnicity and time to follow-up with adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Among Asian women, Vietnamese and Filipina women had the longest, and Japanese women the shortest, median follow-up (32 days, 28 days, and 19 days, respectively) compared with NHW women (15 days). The percentage of women receiving follow-up at 30 days was lower for Asians versus NHWs (57% vs 77%; PAsian ethnic groups except Japanese. Asian women had a reduced hazard of follow-up compared with NHW women (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.72). Asian women also had a higher rate of receiving no follow-up compared with NHW women (15% vs 10%; PAsian ethnic groups, Filipinas were found to have the highest percentage of women with no follow-up (18.1%). Asian women, particularly Filipina and Vietnamese women, were less likely than NHW women to receive timely follow-up after an abnormal screening mammogram. Research should disaggregate Asian ethnicity to better understand and address barriers to effective cancer prevention. Cancer 2017;123:3468-75. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Can the NHS breast screening programme afford not to double read screening mammograms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liston, J.C.; Dall, B.J.G.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Rapid expansion of the National Health Service (UK) Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) to routinely invite women aged 50-70 years will result in many new readers undertaking screen reading. A timely method for assessing performance and preferably one that facilitates a steep learning curve will be required. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This unit screens a population of 88000 women aged 50-64 years and double reads >90% films. A record is kept of proven screen-detected cancers not recalled for assessment by either the first or second reader but correctly recalled following third-reader arbitration. Individual readers' workload and recall rates are obtained by running an annual co-writer report. The results of this 7 year prospective audit are presented. RESULTS: In total 177167 women were screened between 1/4/95 and 31/3/02 resulting in the detection of 1072 cancers. Eighty-seven cancers (8.1%) were detected after arbitration. Individual readers recall to assessment rates and percentage of cases incorrectly returned to routine recall varied. Prompt feedback of missed/misinterpreted cases allowed both experienced and inexperienced readers to modify their recall thresholds for particular mammographic abnormalities. CONCLUSION: It is recommended this audit method is adopted by all units in the NHSBSP and that the Advisory Committee for Breast Cancer Screening review the policy of single versus double reading

  10. Availability and accessibility of subsidized mammogram screening program in peninsular Malaysia: A preliminary study using travel impedance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Aidalina; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Access to healthcare is essential in the pursuit of universal health coverage. Components of access are availability, accessibility (spatial and non-spatial), affordability and acceptability. Measuring spatial accessibility is common approach to evaluating access to health care. This study aimed to determine the availability and spatial accessibility of subsidised mammogram screening in Peninsular Malaysia. Availability was determined from the number and distribution of facilities. Spatial accessibility was determined using the travel impedance approach to represent the revealed access as opposed to potential access measured by other spatial measurement methods. The driving distance of return trips from the respondent's residence to the facilities was determined using a mapping application. The travel expenditure was estimated by multiplying the total travel distance by a standardised travel allowance rate, plus parking fees. Respondents in this study were 344 breast cancer patients who received treatment at 4 referral hospitals between 2015 and 2016. In terms of availability, there were at least 6 major entities which provided subsidised mammogram programs. Facilities with mammogram involved with these programs were located more densely in the central and west coast region of the Peninsula. The ratio of mammogram facility to the target population of women aged 40-74 years ranged between 1: 10,000 and 1:80,000. In terms of accessibility, of the 3.6% of the respondents had undergone mammogram screening, their mean travel distance was 53.4 km (SD = 34.5, range 8-112 km) and the mean travel expenditure was RM 38.97 (SD = 24.00, range RM7.60-78.40). Among those who did not go for mammogram screening, the estimated travel distance and expenditure had a skewed distribution with median travel distance of 22.0 km (IQR 12.0, 42.0, range 2.0-340.0) and the median travel cost of RM 17.40 (IQR 10.40, 30.00, range 3.40-240.00). Higher travel impedance was noted among those who

  11. Primary breast osteosarcoma mimicking calcified fibroadenoma on screening digital breast tomosynthesis mammogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Lee Bennett, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary breast osteosarcoma is a rare malignancy, with mostly case reports in the literature. The appearance of breast osteosarcoma on digital breast tomosynthesis imaging has not yet been described. A 69-year-old woman presents for routine screening mammography and is found to have a calcified mass in her right breast. Pattern of calcification appeared “sunburst” on digital breast tomosynthesis images. This mass was larger than on the previous year's mammogram, at which time it had been interpreted as a benign calcified fibroadenoma. The subsequent workup demonstrated the mass to reflect primary breast osteosarcoma. The patient's workup and treatment are detailed in this case. Primary breast osteosarcoma, although rare, should be included as a diagnostic consideration for breast masses with a sunburst pattern of calcifications, particularly when the mammographic appearance has changed.

  12. Evaluating radiographers' diagnostic accuracy in screen-reading mammograms: what constitutes a quality study?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debono, Josephine C; Poulos, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to first evaluate the quality of studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of radiographers as mammogram screen-readers and then to develop an adapted tool for determining the quality of screen-reading studies. A literature search was used to identify relevant studies and a quality evaluation tool constructed by combining the criteria for quality of Whiting, Rutjes, Dinnes et al. and Brealey and Westwood. This constructed tool was then applied to the studies and subsequently adapted specifically for use in evaluating quality in studies investigating diagnostic accuracy of screen-readers. Eleven studies were identified and the constructed tool applied to evaluate quality. This evaluation resulted in the identification of quality issues with the studies such as potential for bias, applicability of results, study conduct, reporting of the study and observer characteristics. An assessment of the applicability and relevance of the tool for this area of research resulted in adaptations to the criteria and the development of a tool specifically for evaluating diagnostic accuracy in screen-reading. This tool, with further refinement and rigorous validation can make a significant contribution to promoting well-designed studies in this important area of research and practice

  13. Double versus single reading of mammograms in a breast cancer screening programme: a cost-consequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso, Margarita C; Puig, Teresa; Quintana, Ma Jesus; Solà-Roca, Judit; Bonfill, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    To assess the costs and health-related outcomes of double versus single reading of digital mammograms in a breast cancer screening programme. Based on data from 57,157 digital screening mammograms from women aged 50-69 years, we compared costs, false-positive results, positive predictive value and cancer detection rate using four reading strategies: double reading with and without consensus and arbitration, and single reading with first reader only and second reader only. Four highly trained radiologists read the mammograms. Double reading with consensus and arbitration was 15 % (Euro 334,341) more expensive than single reading with first reader only. False-positive results were more frequent at double reading with consensus and arbitration than at single reading with first reader only (4.5 % and 4.2 %, respectively; p cancer detection rate were similar for both reading strategies (4.6 and 4.2 per 1000 screens; p = 0.283). Our results suggest that changing to single reading of mammograms could produce savings in breast cancer screening. Single reading could reduce the frequency of false-positive results without changing the cancer detection rate. These results are not conclusive and cannot be generalized to other contexts with less trained radiologists. • Double reading of digital mammograms is more expensive than single reading. • Compared to single reading, double reading yields a higher proportion of false-positive results. • The cancer detection rate was similar for double and single readings. • Single reading may be a cost-effective strategy in breast cancer screening programmes.

  14. Abnormality detection of mammograms by discriminative dictionary learning on DSIFT descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Nasrin; Karimi, Maryam; Nejati, Mansour; Karimi, Nader; Reza Soroushmehr, S M; Samavi, Shadrokh; Najarian, Kayvan

    2017-07-01

    Detection and classification of breast lesions using mammographic images are one of the most difficult studies in medical image processing. A number of learning and non-learning methods have been proposed for detecting and classifying these lesions. However, the accuracy of the detection/classification still needs improvement. In this paper we propose a powerful classification method based on sparse learning to diagnose breast cancer in mammograms. For this purpose, a supervised discriminative dictionary learning approach is applied on dense scale invariant feature transform (DSIFT) features. A linear classifier is also simultaneously learned with the dictionary which can effectively classify the sparse representations. Our experimental results show the superior performance of our method compared to existing approaches.

  15. Detection of architectural distortion in prior screening mammograms using Gabor filters, phase portraits, fractal dimension, and texture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Prajna, Shormistha; Ayres, Fabio J.; Desautels, J.E.L.

    2008-01-01

    Mammography is a widely used screening tool for the early detection of breast cancer. One of the commonly missed signs of breast cancer is architectural distortion. The purpose of this study is to explore the application of fractal analysis and texture measures for the detection of architectural distortion in screening mammograms taken prior to the detection of breast cancer. A method based on Gabor filters and phase portrait analysis was used to detect initial candidates for sites of architectural distortion. A total of 386 regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically obtained from 14 ''prior mammograms'', including 21 ROIs related to architectural distortion. From the corresponding set of 14 ''detection mammograms'', 398 ROIs were obtained, including 18 related to breast cancer. For each ROI, the fractal dimension and Haralick's texture features were computed. The fractal dimension of the ROIs was calculated using the circular average power spectrum technique. The average fractal dimension of the normal (false-positive) ROIs was significantly higher than that of the ROIs with architectural distortion (p = 0.006). For the ''prior mammograms'', the best receiver operating characteristics (ROC) performance achieved, in terms of the area under the ROC curve, was 0.80 with a Bayesian classifier using four features including fractal dimension, entropy, sum entropy, and inverse difference moment. Analysis of the performance of the methods with free-response receiver operating characteristics indicated a sensitivity of 0.79 at 8.4 false positives per image in the detection of sites of architectural distortion in the ''prior mammograms''. Fractal dimension offers a promising way to detect the presence of architectural distortion in prior mammograms. (orig.)

  16. The clinical significance of normal mammograms and normal sonograms in patients with palpable abnormalities of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Choi, Sun Seob; Nam, Kyung Jin; Cho, Se Heon; Kim, Dae Cheol; Kim, Jung Il; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the clinical significance of normal mammograms and normal sonograms in patients with palpable abnormalities of the breast. From Apr 2003 to Feb 2005, 107 patients with 113 palpable abnormalities who had combined normal sonographic and normal mammographic findings were retrospectively studied. The evaluated parameters included age of the patients, the clinical referrals, the distribution of the locations of the palpable abnormalities, whether there was a past surgical history, the mammographic densities and the sonographic echo patterns (purely hyperechoic fibrous tissue, mixed fibroglandular breast tissue, predominantly isoechoic glandular tissue and isoechoic subcutaneous fat tissue) at the sites of clinical concern, whether there was a change in imaging and/or the physical examination results at follow-up, and whether there were biopsy results. This study period was chosen to allow a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The patients' ages ranged from 22 to 66 years (mean age: 48.8 years) and 62 (58%) of the 107 patients were between 41 and 50 years old (58%). The most common location of the palpable abnormalities was the upper outer portion of the breast (45%) and most of the mammographic densities were dense patterns (BI-RADS Type 3 or 4: 91%). Our cases showed similar distribution for all the types of sonographic echo patterns. 23 patients underwent biopsy; all the biopsy specimens were benign. For the 84 patients with 90 palpable abnormalities who were followed, there was no interval development of breast cancer in the areas of clinical concern. Our results suggest that we can follow up and prevent unnecessary biopsies in women with palpable abnormalities when both the mammography and ultrasonography show normal tissue, but this study was limited by its small sample size. Therefore, a larger study will be needed to better define the negative predictive value of combined normal sonographic and mammographic findings

  17. Value of FNAC in abnormal axillary lymph nodes with non specific mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania S.M. Ibrahim

    2018-06-01

    Conclusions: FNAC was a good cytological predictor in the majority of patients with abnormal lymph nodes and nonspecific mammography. FNAC is cost effective in assessing axillary lymph node status especially in limited resource setting like in our developing country. FNAC is preferred diagnostic tool in all cases of abnormal axillary lymph adenopathy.

  18. Relationship between arterial vascular calcifications seen on screening mammograms and biochemical markers of endothelial injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidal, Diego [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain)], E-mail: dpidal@hotmail.com; Sanchez Vidal, M Teresa [Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Jove (Spain)], E-mail: medicinainterna@hospitaldejove.com; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain); Servicio de Cirugia General, Hospital de Jove (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: investigacion@hospitaldejove.com; Corte, M Daniela [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: mdanielac@hotmail.com; Pravia, Paz [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital de Jove (Spain)], E-mail: radiologia@hospitaldejove.com; Guinea, Oscar [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital de Jove (Spain)], E-mail: oscarfguinea@seram.org; Pidal, Ivan [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain)], E-mail: ivanpida@hotmail.com; Bongera, Miguel [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain)], E-mail: mbchoppy@hotmail.com; Escribano, Damaso [Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Jove (Spain)], E-mail: medicinainterna@hospitaldejove.com; Gonzalez, Luis O. [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain)], E-mail: lovidiog@telefonica.net; Diez, M Cruz [Servicio de Cirugia General, Hospital de Jove (Spain)], E-mail: cirugiageneral@hospitaldejove.com; Venta, Rafael [Servicio de Analisis Clinicos, Hospital de San Agustin, Aviles (Spain); Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Universidad de Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: rafael.venta@sespa.princast.es; Vizoso, Francisco J. [Unidad de Investigacion del, Hospital de Jove, Gijon (Spain); Servicio de Cirugia General, Hospital de Jove (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: fjvizoso@telefonica.net

    2009-01-15

    To assess whether breast arterial calcifications (BAC) are associated with altered serum markers of cardiovascular risk, mammograms and records from 1759 women (age range: 45-65 years) screened for breast cancer were revised. One hundred and forty seven (8.36%) women showed BAC. A total of 136 women with BAC and controls (mean age: 57 and 55 years, respectively) accepted entering the study. There were no significant differences in serum levels of urea, glucose, uric acid, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C, folic acid, vitamin B{sub 12}, TSH or cysteine, between both groups of patients. However, women with BAC showed higher serum levels of triglycerides (p = 0.006), homocysteine (p = 0.002) and hs-CRP (p = 0.003) than women without BAC. Likewise, we found a significantly higher percentage of cases with an elevated LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (coronary risk index >2) amongst women with BAC than in women without BAC (56.7 and 38.2%, respectively; p = 0.04). Our results indicate that the finding of BAC identify women showing altered serum markers of cardiovascular risk.

  19. Relationship between arterial vascular calcifications seen on screening mammograms and biochemical markers of endothelial injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pidal, Diego; Sanchez Vidal, M Teresa; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Corte, M Daniela; Pravia, Paz; Guinea, Oscar; Pidal, Ivan; Bongera, Miguel; Escribano, Damaso; Gonzalez, Luis O.; Diez, M Cruz; Venta, Rafael; Vizoso, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess whether breast arterial calcifications (BAC) are associated with altered serum markers of cardiovascular risk, mammograms and records from 1759 women (age range: 45-65 years) screened for breast cancer were revised. One hundred and forty seven (8.36%) women showed BAC. A total of 136 women with BAC and controls (mean age: 57 and 55 years, respectively) accepted entering the study. There were no significant differences in serum levels of urea, glucose, uric acid, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C, folic acid, vitamin B 12 , TSH or cysteine, between both groups of patients. However, women with BAC showed higher serum levels of triglycerides (p = 0.006), homocysteine (p = 0.002) and hs-CRP (p = 0.003) than women without BAC. Likewise, we found a significantly higher percentage of cases with an elevated LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (coronary risk index >2) amongst women with BAC than in women without BAC (56.7 and 38.2%, respectively; p = 0.04). Our results indicate that the finding of BAC identify women showing altered serum markers of cardiovascular risk

  20. Digitisation of analogue screening mammograms. Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program Troms and Finnmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Kristin; Johansen, Stian; Roenning, Frank; Stormo, Sonja; Bjurstam, Nils

    2004-08-01

    In the coming years a transition from analogue to digital imaging technology will take place in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP). This will make softcopy reading of images possible. However, one will also wish to compare new (digital) images with prior images on on film. This can be solved in different ways. This report contains a brief description of different alternatives. The solution chosen in Troms and Finnmark, digitisation of prior images, is then described in detail. Both technical and economical aspects are covered. (Author)

  1. Avoidable surgical consultations in women with a positive screening mammogram: Experience from a southern region of the Dutch breast screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreutelkamp, J.L.; Kwee, R.M.; Booij, M. de; Adriaensen, M.E.A.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: According to current Dutch guidelines, all women with a positive screening mammogram are referred for a full hospital assessment, which includes surgical consultation and radiological assessment. Surgical consultation may be unnecessary for many patients. Our objective was to determine how often surgical consultations can be avoided by radiological pre-assessment. Materials and methods: All women with a positive screening mammogram, referred to our radiology department between 2002 and 2007, were included (n = 1014). Percentage of women that was downstaged to BI-RADS category 1 or 2 by radiological pre-assessment was calculated. Negative predictive value (NPV) for malignancy was estimated from the in-hospital follow-up, which was available up to September 2012. Results: 423 of 1014 women (42%) were downstaged to BI-RADS category 1 or 2 by radiological pre-assessment. During follow-up, 8 of these 423 women (2%) developed a malignancy in the same breast. At least 6 of these malignancies were located at a different location as the original screening findings which led to the initial referral. The estimated NPV for malignancy was 99.5% (95%CI, 98.3–99.9). Conclusion: By referring women with a positive screening mammogram to the radiology department for pre-assessment, a surgical consultation was avoided in 42%, with an estimated NPV of 99.5% for malignancy

  2. Application of support vector machines to breast cancer screening using mammogram and history data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; Akanda, Anab; Lo, Joseph Y.; Anderson, Francis; Bryden, Margaret

    2002-05-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a new and radically different type of classifiers and learning machines that use a hypothesis space of linear functions in a high dimensional feature space. This relatively new paradigm, based on Statistical Learning Theory (SLT) and Structural Risk Minimization (SRM), has many advantages when compared to traditional neural networks, which are based on Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM). Unlike neural networks, SVM training always finds a global minimum. Furthermore, SVMs have inherent ability to solve pattern classification without incorporating any problem-domain knowledge. In this study, the SVM was employed as a pattern classifier, operating on mammography data used for breast cancer detection. The main focus was to formulate the best learning machine configurations for optimum specificity and positive predictive value at very high sensitivities. Using a mammogram database of 500 biopsy-proven samples, the best performing SVM, on average, was able to achieve (under statistical 5-fold cross-validation) a specificity of 45.0% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 50.1% at 100% sensitivity. At 97% sensitivity, a specificity of 55.8% and a PPV of 55.2% were obtained.

  3. Risks of mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, H.M.; Reichling, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    In summary, the following practical guidelines for mammography are offered: 1. Any woman, regardless of age, with signs or symptoms that indicate breast cancer should have a mammogram. 2. A woman who has a high risk for breast cancer (e.g., strong family history, no pregnancy before 30 years of age, or a previous breast cancer) should receive periodic screening examinations, including mammography. 3. Periodic screening for asymptomatic women over the age of 50 is indicated. 4. The value of periodic screening for asymptomatic women who are not considered to be at high risk and are under the age of 50 years is not established. Such screening should be carried out only when useful data can be collected on the benefits and risks of this procedure. 5. For any individual woman, the risk of inducing breast cancer by mammography is very low. 6. Mammograms should be made only with modern equipment and techniques designed to provide optimum information with minimal dose

  4. Ten years of breast screening in the Nova Scotia breast screening program, 1991-2001. Experience: Use of an adaptable stereotactic device in the diagnosis of screening-detected abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caines, J.S.; Schaller, G.H.; Iles, S.E.; Woods, E.R.; Barnes, P.J.; Johnson, A.J.; Jones, G.R.M.; Borgaonkar, J.N.; Rowe, J.A.; Topp, T.J.; Porter, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate and present 10-year outcomes of The Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program (NSBSP), a population-based screening program in Its province of Nova Scotia, Canada, total population 900 000. Organized Breast Screening Program in Nova Scotia, Canada. Rates of participation, abnormal referrals, cancer detection rates, and benign: malignant (B:M) rates for core biopsy and surgical biopsy were calculated for asymptomatic women receiving a mammogram through The NSBSP 1991-2001. Of 192,454 mammograms performed on 71,317 women, 33% were aged 40 to 49 years, 39% aged 50 to 59 years, 23% aged 60 to 69 years, and 5% aged 70 years and over. Cancer detection rate increased in each age group respectively: 3.7, 5.8, 9.7, and 13.5 per 1000 population on first-time screens. The positive predictive value of an abnormal screen increased with increasing age groups. Benign breast surgery decreased with increased use of needle core breast biopsy (NCBB). Open surge decreased from 25 to 6 surgeries per 1000 screens. Of 1519 open surgical procedures (1328 women), 878 cancers were removed, with 37% 10mm or less, and 61% 15mm or less. In 613 women in whom the node status was assessed, 79% were negative. A quality screening program incorporating NCBB in the diagnostic work-up is effective in the early detection of breast cancer and results in less open surgery, particularly in younger women. (author)

  5. Characteristics of breast cancers detected by ultrasound screening in women with negative mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Min-Sun; Han, Wonshik; Koo, Hye-Ryoung

    2011-01-01

    Screening ultrasound (US) can increase the detection of breast cancer. However, little is known about the clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancers detected by screening US. A search of the database for patients with breast cancer yielded a dataset in 6837 women who underwent breast surgery at Seoul National University Hospital (Korea). Of 6837 women, 1047 were asymptomatic and had a non-palpable cancer. Two hundred fifty-four women with 256 cancers detected by US (US-detected cancer) and 793 women with 807 cancers detected by mammography (MG-detected cancer) were identified. The imaging, clinicopathologic, and molecular data were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Women with US-detected cancer were younger and were more likely to undergo breast-conserving surgery and to have node-negative invasive cancer (P 2 cm in size, tumors that were ≤1 cm in size were 2.2-fold more likely to be US-detected cancers (P=0.02). Compared to the luminal A subtype tumors (estrogen receptor [ER]+, PR+, HER2-), luminal B subtype tumors (ER+, PR+, HER2+) were less likely to be in the US-detected cancer group (P<0.01). Women with dense breasts were more likely to have US-detected cancer (P<0.01) versus those with non-dense breasts. Screening US-detected cancers were less likely to be diagnosed as category 5 instead of category 4 (P<0.01). In conclusion, women with US-detected breast cancer are more likely to have small-sized invasive cancer and more likely associated with the luminal A subtype. (author)

  6. Computer-Aided Evaluation of Screening Mammograms Based on Local Texture Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grim, Jiří; Somol, Petr; Haindl, Michal; Daneš, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2009), s. 765-773 ISSN 1057-7149 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/07/1594; GA ČR GA102/08/0593; GA MŠk 1M0572 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Screening mammography * texture information * local statistical model * Gaussian mixture Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.848, year: 2009

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis for screening of breast cancer on mammograms. Current status and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kunio

    2007-01-01

    Described are the history, current status and future potential of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) with particular emphasis on screening mammography for breast cancer. The systematic basic and clinical studies on CAD started around 20 years before and the significance of CAD has been well recognized to be evident because of human errors occurring in the visual check by doctors of so numerous screening images. Improvement of diagnostic accuracy by CAD has been demonstrated by statistical analysis of ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curves. In mammography, reviewed is detection of the early stage breast cancer like microcalcifications by computer alone, by CAD plus one or more doctors' reading, and by practical clinical CAD diagnosis. For differential diagnosis for malignancy, microcalcifications and masses are given their characteristic image properties and the results are that the Az-value (area under ROC curve) is higher in CAD than in doctor's (0.80 vs 0.61) in the former and, doctor's (0.93) is improved by CAD to 0.96 in the latter masses. In this diagnosis, similar images in the digital database are useful and the database can learn by repeated input of individual data by neural network. Detection of the lesion and especially, its differential diagnosis will be more important in parallel to database development and CAD will be also useful for doctor' carrier as an educational mean. (R.T.)

  8. Screening of diseases associated with abnormal metabolites for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dina A. Ghoraba

    2013-12-09

    Dec 9, 2013 ... IEMs to evaluate the efficiency of HPLC in detecting abnormal metabolites in urine samples. ... the initial screening of organic acid disorders and many other disease ..... Although a chromatogram from a patient with gross.

  9. Application of support vector machines to breast cancer screening using mammogram and clinical history data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; McKee, Dan; Velazquez, Roberto; Wong, Lut; Lo, Joseph Y.; Anderson, Francis R.

    2003-05-01

    The objectives of this paper are to discuss: (1) the development and testing of a new Evolutionary Programming (EP) method to optimally configure Support Vector Machine (SVM) parameters for facilitating the diagnosis of breast cancer; (2) evaluation of EP derived learning machines when the number of BI-RADS and clinical history discriminators are reduced from 16 to 7; (3) establishing system performance for several SVM kernels in addition to the EP/Adaptive Boosting (EP/AB) hybrid using the Digital Database for Screening Mammography, University of South Florida (DDSM USF) and Duke data sets; and (4) obtaining a preliminary evaluation of the measurement of SVM learning machine inter-institutional generalization capability using BI-RADS data. Measuring performance of the SVM designs and EP/AB hybrid against these objectives will provide quantative evidence that the software packages described can generalize to larger patient data sets from different institutions. Most iterative methods currently in use to optimize learning machine parameters are time consuming processes, which sometimes yield sub-optimal values resulting in performance degradation. SVMs are new machine intelligence paradigms, which use the Structural Risk Minimization (SRM) concept to develop learning machines. These learning machines can always be trained to provide global minima, given that the machine parameters are optimally computed. In addition, several system performance studies are described which include EP derived SVM performance as a function of: (a) population and generation size as well as a method for generating initial populations and (b) iteratively derived versus EP derived learning machine parameters. Finally, the authors describe a set of experiments providing preliminary evidence that both the EP/AB hybrid and SVM Computer Aided Diagnostic C++ software packages will work across a large population of patients, based on a data set of approximately 2,500 samples from five different

  10. "Thanks for Letting Us All Share Your Mammogram Experience Virtually": Developing a Web-Based Hub for Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Adam; Meredith, Joanne; Ure, Cathy; Robinson, Leslie

    2017-10-27

    The decision around whether to attend breast cancer screening can often involve making sense of confusing and contradictory information on its risks and benefits. The Word of Mouth Mammogram e-Network (WoMMeN) project was established to create a Web-based resource to support decision making regarding breast cancer screening. This paper presents data from our user-centered approach in engaging stakeholders (both health professionals and service users) in the design of this Web-based resource. Our novel approach involved creating a user design group within Facebook to allow them access to ongoing discussion between researchers, radiographers, and existing and potential service users. This study had two objectives. The first was to examine the utility of an online user design group for generating insight for the creation of Web-based health resources. We sought to explore the advantages and limitations of this approach. The second objective was to analyze what women want from a Web-based resource for breast cancer screening. We recruited a user design group on Facebook and conducted a survey within the group, asking questions about design considerations for a Web-based breast cancer screening hub. Although the membership of the Facebook group varied over time, there were 71 members in the Facebook group at the end point of analysis. We next conducted a framework analysis on 70 threads from Facebook and a thematic analysis on the 23 survey responses. We focused additionally on how the themes were discussed by the different stakeholders within the context of the design group. Two major themes were found across both the Facebook discussion and the survey data: (1) the power of information and (2) the hub as a place for communication and support. Information was considered as empowering but also recognized as threatening. Communication and the sharing of experiences were deemed important, but there was also recognition of potential miscommunication within online

  11. Screening human populations for abnormal radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Morrison, D.P.

    1990-07-01

    A relatively rapid and inexpensive in vitro growback assay was developed that uses the irradiated versus the unirradiated re-growth responses of lymphoblastoid cell lines developed from individual donors as an estimator of donor radioresponse. The purpose of this project was to furnish an estimate of the proportion of strains derived from various study populations that may be regarded as exhibiting abnormal radioresponse. The emphasis in this study was on hypersensitivity, because of the known radiation-hypersensitivity and cancer proneness associated with the genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Using methods developed especially for survival analyses, the percentage of significantly hypersensitive responses was 5.5% in a donor population composed of ostensibly normal individuals. We also examined lines derived from an unselected cancer patient population. These were not enriched, compared to the reference normal population, for hypersensitive responses. We thus conclude that hypersensitivity in vitro is not associated with increased risk for spontaneous development of cancer. However, the failure to observe an association between hypersensitivity and spontaneous cancer does not preclude a correlation between such sensitivity and radiogenic cancer. At the present stage, we would caution against the application of this assay or related in vitro tests to the situation of an individual, as opposed to a population. While we have clear indications that hypersensitivity in vitro is associated with abnormal radioresponse in vivo, this study has identified sources of variation that must be understood before attempts are made to unambiguously attribute a particular type of radioresponse to an individual

  12. Variations in screening outcome among pairs of screening radiologists at non-blinded double reading of screening mammograms: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompenhouwer, E. G.; Duijm, L. E. M.; Voogd, A. C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Nederend, J.; Jansen, F. H.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial inter-observer variability in screening mammography interpretation has been reported at single reading. However, screening results of pairs of screening radiologists have not yet been published. We determined variations in screening performances among pairs of screening radiologists at

  13. Timeliness of abnormal screening and diagnostic mammography follow-up at facilities serving vulnerable women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L Elizabeth; Walker, Rod; Hubbard, Rebecca; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2013-04-01

    Whether timeliness of follow-up after abnormal mammography differs at facilities serving vulnerable populations, such as women with limited education or income, in rural areas, and racial/ethnic minorities is unknown. We examined receipt of diagnostic evaluation after abnormal mammography using 1998-2006 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium-linked Medicare claims. We compared whether time to recommended breast imaging or biopsy depended on whether women attended facilities serving vulnerable populations. We characterized a facility by the proportion of mammograms performed on women with limited education or income, in rural areas, or racial/ethnic minorities. We analyzed 30,874 abnormal screening examinations recommended for follow-up imaging across 142 facilities and 10,049 abnormal diagnostic examinations recommended for biopsy across 114 facilities. Women at facilities serving populations with less education or more racial/ethnic minorities had lower rates of follow-up imaging (4%-5% difference, Pfacilities serving more rural and low-income populations had lower rates of biopsy (4%-5% difference, Pfacilities serving vulnerable populations had longer times until biopsy than those at facilities serving nonvulnerable populations (21.6 vs. 15.6 d; 95% confidence interval for mean difference 4.1-7.7). The proportion of women receiving recommended imaging within 11 months and biopsy within 3 months varied across facilities (interquartile range, 85.5%-96.5% for imaging and 79.4%-87.3% for biopsy). Among Medicare recipients, follow-up rates were slightly lower at facilities serving vulnerable populations, and among those women who returned for diagnostic evaluation, time to follow-up was slightly longer at facilities that served vulnerable population. Interventions should target variability in follow-up rates across facilities, and evaluate effectiveness particularly at facilities serving vulnerable populations.

  14. Toward the breast screening balance sheet: cumulative risk of false positives for annual versus biennial mammograms commencing at age 40 or 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Caleb J; Sherman, Kerry A; Boyages, John

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to: (1) Estimate cumulative risk of recall from breast screening where no cancer is detected (a harm) in Australia; (2) Compare women screened annually versus biennially, commencing age 40 versus 50; and (3) Compare with international findings. At the no-cost metropolitan program studied, women attended biennial screening, but were offered annual screening if regarded at elevated risk for breast cancer. The cumulative risk of at least one recall was estimated using discrete-time survival analysis. Cancer detection statistics were computed. In total, 801,636 mammograms were undertaken in 231,824 women. Over 10 years, cumulative risk of recall was 13.3 % (95 % CI 12.7-13.8) for those screened biennially, and 19.9 % (CI 16.6-23.2) for those screened annually from age 50-51. Cumulative risk of complex false positive involving a biopsy was 3.1 % (CI 2.9-3.4) and 5.0 % (CI 3.4-6.6), respectively. From age 40-41, the risk of recall was 15.1 % (CI 14.3-16.0) and 22.5 % (CI 17.9-27.1) for biennial and annual screening, respectively. Corresponding rates of complex false positive were 3.3 % (CI 2.9-3.8) and 6.3 % (CI 3.4-9.1). Over 10 mammograms, invasive cancer was detected in 3.4 % (CI 3.3-3.5) and ductal carcinoma in situ in 0.7 % (CI 0.6-0.7) of women, with a non-significant trend toward a larger proportion of Tis and T1N0 cancers in women screened annually (74.5 %) versus biennially (70.1 %), χ (2) = 2.77, p = 0.10. Cancer detection was comparable to international findings. Recall risk was equal to European estimates for women screening from 50 and lower for screening from 40. Recall risk was half of United States' rates across start age and rescreening interval categories. Future benefit/harm balance sheets may be useful for communicating these findings to women.

  15. Non‐invasive prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non‐invasive prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities using circulating cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma: Current applications, limitations and ... fetal DNAtesting is a matter of concern, because of the low positive predictive value for these changes, and the associated significant cumulative false-positive rate.

  16. Computer-aided detection of masses in full-field digital mammography using screen-film mammograms for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallenberg, Michiel; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2008-01-01

    It would be of great value when available databases of screen-film mammography (SFM) images can be used to train full-field digital mammography (FFDM) computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, as compilation of new databases is costly. In this paper, we investigate this possibility. Firstly, we develop a method that converts an FFDM image into an SFM-like representation. In this conversion method, we establish a relation between exposure and optical density by simulation of an automatic exposure control unit. Secondly, we investigate the effects of using the SFM images as training samples compared to training with FFDM images. Our FFDM database consisted of 266 cases, of which 102 were biopsy-proven malignant masses and 164 normals. The images were acquired with systems of two different manufacturers. We found that, when we trained our FFDM CAD system with a small number of images, training with FFDM images, using a five-fold crossvalidation procedure, outperformed training with SFM images. However, when the full SFM database, consisting of 348 abnormal cases (including 204 priors) and 810 normal cases, was used for training, SFM training outperformed FFDMA training. These results show that an existing CAD system for detection of masses in SFM can be used for FFDM images without retraining.

  17. Screening for fetal chromosome abnormalities during the second trimester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hui; Li Ming; Li Ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a pre -natal screening program for fetal chromosome abnormalities based on risk values calculated from maternal serum markers levels during the second trimester. Methods: Serum levels of AFP, β-HCG, uE 3 were determined with CLIA in 1048 pregnant women during 14-21w gestation period and the results were analyzed with a specific software (screening program for Down' s syndrome developed by Beckman) for the risk rate. In those women defined as being of high risk rate, cells from amniotic fluid or umbilical cord blood were studied for karyotype analysis. Results: Of these 1048 women, 77 were designated as being of high risk rate for several chromosome abnormalities i.e. Down's syndrome, open spina bifida and trisomy -18 syndrome (overall positive rate 7.3%). Further fetal chromosome study in 31 of them revealed three proven cases of abnormality. Another cord blood study was performed in a calculated low risk rate case but with abnormal sonographic finding at 31 w gestation and proved to be abnormal (software study false negative). The remaining 46 high risk rate cases either refused future study (n=35) or were lost for follow-up (n=11). Fortunately, all the 35 women refused further study gave birth to normal babies without any chromosome abnormalities discovered on peripheral blood study. Besides, in a trial study, five high risk rate women were again evaluated a few weeks later but with tremendous difference between the results. Conclusion: The present program proves to be clinically useful but needs further study and revision. Many factors may influence the result of the analysis and the duration of gestation period in weeks should be as accurate as possible. At present, in order to avoid getting false negatives, we don't advise a second check in 'high risk' cases. (authors)

  18. How reassuring is a normal breast ultrasound in assessment of a screen-detected mammographic abnormality? A review of interval cancers after assessment that included ultrasound evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M.L. [Breastscreen WA, Perth (Australia); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Welman, C.J. [Breastscreen WA, Perth (Australia); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Department of Radiology, Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Fremantle (Australia); Celliers, L.M., E-mail: liesl.celliers@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Department of Radiology, Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Fremantle (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Aim: To review factors resulting in a false-negative outcome or delayed cancer diagnosis in women recalled for further evaluation, including ultrasound, after an abnormal screening mammogram. Materials and methods: Of 646,692 screening mammograms performed between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004, 34,533 women were recalled for further assessment. Nine hundred and sixty-four interval cancers were reported in this period. Forty-six of these women had been recalled for further assessment, which specifically included ultrasound evaluation in the preceding 24 months, and therefore, met the inclusion criteria for this study. Screening mammograms, further mammographic views, ultrasound scans, clinical findings, and histopathology results were retrospectively reviewed by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The interval cancer developed in the contralateral breast (n = 9), ipsilateral breast, but different site (n = 6), and ipsilateral breast at the same site (n = 31) as the abnormality for which they had recently been recalled. In the latter group, 10 were retrospectively classified as a false-negative outcome, nine had a delay in obtaining a biopsy, and 12 had a delay due to a non-diagnostic initial biopsy. Various factors relating to these outcomes are discussed. Conclusion: Out of 34,533 women who attended for an assessment visit and the 46 women who subsequently developed an interval breast cancer, 15 were true interval cancers, 10 had a false-negative assessment outcome, and 21 had a delay to cancer diagnosis on the basis of a number of factors. When there is discrepancy between the imaging and histopathology results, a repeat biopsy rather than early follow-up would have avoided a delay in some cases. A normal ultrasound examination should not deter the radiologist from proceeding to stereotactic biopsy, if the index mammographic lesion is suspicious of malignancy.

  19. Radiation scars on mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.; Breining, H.; Knappschafts-Krankenhaus Essen

    1985-01-01

    Six patients with radiation scars are described. In each case the diagnosis was confirmed histologically in five cases corresponding mammograms were available. The histological appearances of radiation scars are described and the radiological features are presented. These lesions can be diagnosed mammographically in vivo. Macroscopically differentiation from a scirrhous carcinoma is not possible and therefore a radiation scar must always be excised; this also leads to definitive cure. On mammographic screening the incidence is 0.5 to 0.9 per thousand. The significance of radiation scars depends on the fact that they are pre-cancerous and therefore are equivalent to the early diagnosis of a carcinoma with the possibility of a complete cure. (orig.) [de

  20. Trends in screening mammograms for women 50 years of age and older - behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To assess whether the media attention to breast cancer screening and the promotional efforts in 1987 were paralleled by increases in screening of women greater than or equal to 50 years of age, CDC analyzed data from 33 states that participated in the 1987 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

  1. MAMMOGRAMS ANALYSIS USING SVM CLASSIFIER IN COMBINED TRANSFORMS DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N. Prathibha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a primary cause of mortality and morbidity in women. Reports reveal that earlier the detection of abnormalities, better the improvement in survival. Digital mammograms are one of the most effective means for detecting possible breast anomalies at early stages. Digital mammograms supported with Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD systems help the radiologists in taking reliable decisions. The proposed CAD system extracts wavelet features and spectral features for the better classification of mammograms. The Support Vector Machines classifier is used to analyze 206 mammogram images from Mias database pertaining to the severity of abnormality, i.e., benign and malign. The proposed system gives 93.14% accuracy for discrimination between normal-malign and 87.25% accuracy for normal-benign samples and 89.22% accuracy for benign-malign samples. The study reveals that features extracted in hybrid transform domain with SVM classifier proves to be a promising tool for analysis of mammograms.

  2. Abnormal ovarian cancer screening test result: women's informational, psychological and practical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patricia Y; Graves, Kristi D; Pavlik, Edward J; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the identification of cost-effective approaches to screening for ovarian cancer (OC). Transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) is one such screening approach. Approximately 5-7% of routine TVS screening tests yield abnormal results. Some women experience significant distress after receipt of an abnormal TVS screening test. Four focus groups provided in-depth, qualitative data regarding the informational, psychological, and practical needs of women after the receipt of an abnormal TVS result. Through question and content analytic procedures, we identified four themes: anticipation, emotional response, role of the screening technician, and impact of prior cancer experiences. Results provide initial guidance toward development of interventions to promote adaptive responses after receipt of an abnormal cancer screening test result.

  3. Comparing the use and interpretation of PGMI scoring to assess the technical quality of screening mammograms in the UK and Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, M.; Gullien, R.; Parashar, D.; Taylor, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare PGMI systems used in the UK and Norway, determine levels of agreement in its interpretation for radiographers within and between centres, informing further research towards developing a more quantitative, uniform system. Methods: Mammograms from 112 women consecutively screened in the UK and Norway were anonymised, numbered and enriched to include all four PGMI categories. Cases were scored by five mammographers from each centre using local PGMI. Sets were exchanged and the process repeated. Distribution of categories was recorded and faults documented for images scored less than perfect. These were compared within and between centres and agreement analysed using non-weighted kappa statistic. Results: Norway uses 38 assessment criteria, the UK uses 15. Best agreement was between Norway raters scoring MLO views from both UK(RMLO k = 0.57, LMLO k = 0.490) and Norway (RMLO k = 0.48, LMLO k = 0.470). Least agreement was between UK raters scoring CC views from both UK(RCC k = 0.007, LCC k = 0.01) and Norway(RCC k = −0.04, LCC k = −0.003). There were no other apparent trends in inter-rater assessment. Most frequent faults in both test sets were on MLO views. Two out of three most common faults were the same for UK and Norway raters. Conclusions: Use of PGMI varied between centres in both number and interpretation of criteria employed. We identified the most common mammographic faults highlighting possible training needs. We suggest further work to provide a consensus list of visual criteria with accurate descriptors for each classification category. A validated way of applying them could help to standardise the process. - Highlights: • No previous published work comparing PGMI use between different countries. • Variation in number of assessment criteria used and their interpretation. • Best agreement was Norway scoring MLO views from both centres-moderate. • Least agreement was UK raters scoring CC views from both

  4. The agreement between self-reported cervical smear abnormalities and screening programme records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfell, Karen; Beral, Valerie; Green, Jane; Cameron, Rebecca; Baker, Krys; Brown, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Million Women Study is a cohort study of women aged 50-64 years in England and Scotland. As a component of the follow-up questionnaire, participants were asked to indicate if they had an abnormal cervical smear in the previous five years. This study compared self-reported cervical abnormalities with screening records obtained from the National Health Service Cervical Screening Programme. For 1944 randomly selected Million Women Study participants in Oxfordshire, screening records were assessed over a six-year period prior to the date of self-reporting. The six-year period was chosen to allow for errors in the recall of timing of abnormal smears. A total of 68 women (3.5%) had a record of at least one equivocal or abnormal smear within the last six years, whereas 49 women (2.5%) self-reported an abnormality. There was a strong trend for an increased probability of self-reporting a history of an abnormal smear as the severity of the recorded abnormality increased (P screening programme records show an abnormal smear, the proportion self-reporting an abnormality increases with the severity of the recorded lesion. Almost all women with a record of negative or inadequate smear(s) correctly interpret the result and do not self-report an abnormality.

  5. Digitisation of analogue screening mammograms. Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program Troms and Finnmark; Digitalisering av analoge screeningbilder. Mammografiprogrammet Troms og Finnmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Kristin; Johansen, Stian; Roenning, Frank; Stormo, Sonja; Bjurstam, Nils

    2004-08-01

    In the coming years a transition from analogue to digital imaging technology will take place in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP). This will make softcopy reading of images possible. However, one will also wish to compare new (digital) images with prior images on on film. This can be solved in different ways. This report contains a brief description of different alternatives. The solution chosen in Troms and Finnmark, digitisation of prior images, is then described in detail. Both technical and economical aspects are covered. (Author)

  6. Use of prior mammograms in the transition to digital mammography: A performance and cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Phillips, S.; Wallis, M.G.; Duncan, A.; Gale, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast screening in Europe is gradually changing from film to digital imaging and reporting of cases. In the transition period prior mammograms (from the preceding screening round) are films thereby potentially causing difficulties in comparison to current digital mammograms. To examine this breast screening performance was measured at a digital mammography workstation with prior mammograms displayed in different formats, and the associated costs calculated. 160 selected difficult cases (41% malignant) were read by eight UK qualified mammography readers in three conditions: with film prior mammograms; with digitised prior mammograms; or without prior mammograms. Lesion location and probability of malignancy were recorded, alongside a decision of whether to recall each case for further tests. JAFROC analysis showed a difference between conditions (p = .006); performance with prior mammograms in either film or digitised formats was superior to that without prior mammograms (p < .05). There was no difference in the performance when the prior mammograms were presented in film or digitised form. The number of benign or normal cases recalled was 26% higher without prior mammograms than with digitised or film prior mammograms (p < .05). This would correspond to an increase in recall rate at the study hospital from 4.3% to 5.5% with no associated increase in cancer detection rate. The cost of this increase was estimated to be £11,581 (€13,666) per 10,000 women screened, which is higher than the cost of digitised (£11,114/€13,115), or film display (£6451/€7612) of the prior mammograms. It is recommended that, where available, prior mammograms are used in the transition to digital breast screening.

  7. Prevalence of Abnormal Cervical Smears from Sporadic Screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to find the prevalence of abnormal smears in an unscreened population of sexually active women attending a gynaecological clinic. “Pap” smears were taken sporadically for cytological examination from sexually active women attending gynaecological clinics at the Federal Medical Centre Gombe.

  8. Abnormal screening in the quantum disordered phases of nonlinear σ-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, X.G.; Zee, A.

    1989-01-01

    We study some properties of the quantum disordered phase of nonlinear σ-models, focussing on the quantum numbers of the quasi-particles and possible experimental implications. We find that the quasi-particles in the quantum disordered phase may, in many cases, carry new quantum numbers which do not appear in any finite combination of the fundamental fields. We call this phenomenon abnormal screening. Abnormal screening is shown to appear in (1+1)-dimensional systems. Using a large N mean field approach to the quantum disordered state, we show that abnormal screening may also appear in (1+2)-dimensional nonlinear σ-models. In 1+2 dimensions abnormal screening is closely related to spin-charge separation, which was proposed to occur in the spin liquid state relevant in some theories of high T c superconductivity. We compare the mean field approach with bosonization and other exact results for (1+1)-dimensional systems and find exact agreement for the quantum numbers of the quasi-particles. This suggests that mean field analysis of high T c superconductivity may yield a qualitatively reliable picture. Our result also gives an alternative way of understanding some novel properties of the antiferromagnetic spin chain. We estimate the density and temperature at which deconfinement and abnormal screening occur. Finally, we suggest some experimental signatures for this phenomenon. (orig.)

  9. PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS AND SCREENING OF GENETIC ABNORMALITIES IN EARLY PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Kiran Kohli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Genetic diseases are one of the major causes of hospital admissions due to disability and mortality particularly among children (1:5 children of hospital admission either partially/completely as distribution of genetic diseases is not related to socioeconomic background, which implies that developing world has a large number of genetic diseases largely left uncared for, i.e. overall incidence of foetal/neonatal loss due to genetic/genetic environmental causes are as follows: 1:50 newborns have major congenital abnormality, 1:100 have a unifactorial disorder, 1:200 have a major chromosomal abnormality before birth. Diagnosis of chromosomal anomalies in foetus is one of the most important challenges in modern perinatology as invasive or noninvasive methods. The aim of the study is to review on cytogenetic evaluation of CVS obtained (transcervically during first trimester of pregnancy by direct karyotyping of tissue. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted in 2001 in Department of Anatomy along with Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department, LNJP Hospital. 37 healthy cases with 6-12 weeks of gestational age coming for medical termination of pregnancy were included in the study. After written informed consent for procedure, ultrasound-guided transcervical chorionic villus sampling was done (Brambati’s method. Tissue procured was then processed for direct karyotyping and studied. Metaphase spreads were photographed and karyotypes prepared and studied. RESULTS Out of 37 pregnant females, 30 samples were successfully prepared and processed by Direct method out of which 23 were normal female (46, XX and 7 were normal male (46, XY. No normal anomaly was detected. Best biopsies were obtained with 8-12 weeks gestation. G Banding could not be performed as chromosome obtained were found to be resistant to banding. CONCLUSIONS To summarise chromosome preparations obtained from CVS by Direct method has advantage of providing sufficient number

  10. Clustering microcalcifications techniques in digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Claudia. C.; Bosco, Paolo; Cerello, Piergiorgio

    2008-11-01

    Breast cancer has become a serious public health problem around the world. However, this pathology can be treated if it is detected in early stages. This task is achieved by a radiologist, who should read a large amount of mammograms per day, either for a screening or diagnostic purpose in mammography. However human factors could affect the diagnosis. Computer Aided Detection is an automatic system, which can help to specialists in the detection of possible signs of malignancy in mammograms. Microcalcifications play an important role in early detection, so we focused on their study. The two mammographic features that indicate the microcalcifications could be probably malignant are small size and clustered distribution. We worked with density techniques for automatic clustering, and we applied them on a mammography CAD prototype developed at INFN-Turin, Italy. An improvement of performance is achieved analyzing images from a Perugia-Assisi Hospital, in Italy.

  11. Should previous mammograms be digitised in the transition to digital mammography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Phillips, S.; Gale, A.G.; Wallis, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Breast screening specificity is improved if previous mammograms are available, which presents a challenge when converting to digital mammography. Two display options were investigated: mounting previous film mammograms on a multiviewer adjacent to the workstation, or digitising them for soft copy display. Eight qualified screen readers were videotaped undertaking routine screen reading for two 45-min sessions in each scenario. Analysis of gross eye and head movements showed that when digitised, previous mammograms were examined a greater number of times per case (p=0.03), due to a combination of being used in 19% more cases (p=0.04) and where used, looked at a greater number of times (28% increase, p=0.04). Digitising previous mammograms reduced both the average time taken per case by 18% (p=0.04) and the participants' perceptions of workload (p < 0.05). Digitising previous analogue mammograms may be advantageous, in particular in increasing their level of use. (orig.)

  12. 1ST-TRIMESTER SCREENING FOR FETAL CHROMOSOMAL-ABNORMALITIES - PRELIMINARY-RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLITH, JMM

    We have started a multicentre trial to study the possibilities of first-trimester maternal serum screening for fetal chromosomal abnormalities. Maternal blood samples were obtained before 13 weeks of gestation. We present the preliminary results of the first 950 patients on alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).

  13. [Genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities in the clinical laboratory--pitfalls and screening approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideki; Ogawa, Tomomi; Note, Rhougou; Hayashi, Shirou; Ueno, Tomohiro; Harada, Kenu; Uji, Yoshinori; Kitajima, Isao

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities are increasingly recognized as critically important in the clinical genetic diagnostics. It is reported that approximately 10% of pathogenic mutations causing human inherited diseases are splicing mutations. Nonetheless, it is still difficult to identify splicing abnormalities in routine genetic diagnostic settings. Here, we studied two different kinds of cases with splicing abnormalities. The first case is a protein S deficiency. Nucleotide analyses revealed that the proband had a previously reported G to C substitution in the invariant AG dinucleotide at the splicing acceptor site of intronl/exon2, which produces multiple splicing abnormalities resulting in protein S deficiency. The second case is an antithrombin (AT) deficiency. This proband had a previously reported G to A substitution, at nucleotide position 9788 in intron 4, 14 bp in front of exon 5, which created a de novo exon 5 splice site and resulted in AT deficiency. From a practical standpoint, we discussed the pitfalls, attentions, and screening approaches in genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities. Due to the difficulty with full-length sequence analysis of introns, and the lack of RNA samples, splicing mutations may escape identification. Although current genetic testing remains to be improved, to screen for splicing abnormalities more efficiently, it is significant to use an appropriate combination of various approaches such as DNA and/or RNA samples, splicing mutation databases, bioinformatic tools to detect splice sites and cis-regulatory elements, and in vitro and/or in vivo experimentally methods as needed.

  14. Age Specific Cytological Abnormalities in Women Screened for Cervical Cancer in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Zaabi, Muna; Al Muqbali, Shaikha; Al Sayadi, Thekra; Al Ameeri, Suhaila; Coetsee, Karin; Balayah, Zuhur; Ortashi, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide, with about 500,000 new cases and 270,000 deaths each year. Globally, it is estimated that over one million women currently have cervical cancer, most of whom have not been diagnosed, or have no access to treatment that could cure them or prolong their lives. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE) cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women. A population-based cross-sectional retrospective survey of cervical smear abnormalities was conducted in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE, from January 2013 to December 2013 by collecting consecutive liquid-based cytology samples from the Department of Pathology at the SKMC Hospital in Abu Dhabi city. The total number of women screened for cervical cancer for the year 2013 at SKMC was 4,593, with 225 (4.89%) abnormal smears. The majority of the abnormal smear results were atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) 114 (2.48%). This study showed 60% increase in the rate of abnormal cervical smears in the UAE over the last 10 years. In this study the highest incidence of high grade abnormalities were seen in women above the age of 61 years (1.73%), this might be due to the fact that this group of women missed the chance of screening of cervical cancer earlier in their lives or could be explained by the well-known second peak of HPV infection seen in many prevalence studies. We conclude that the rate of abnormal cervical smear in the screened Abu Dhabi women is not different from the rate in developed countries. A notable increase in both low and high grade abnormalities has occurred within the last decade.

  15. Computerized detection of mass lesions in digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, F.F.; Giger, M.L.; Doi, K.; Metz, C.E.; Vyborny, C.J.; Schmidt, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer from the periodic screening of asymptomatic women could reduce breast cancer mortality by at least 40%. The authors are developing a computerized scheme for the detection of mass lesions in digital mammograms as an aid to radiologists in such high volume screening programs. Based on left-right architectural symmetry and gray-level histogram analysis, bilateral subtraction of left and right breast images is performed. False-positive detections included in bilateral-difference images are reduced with various images feature-extraction techniques. The database involves clinical film mammograms digitized by a TV camera and analyzed on a Micro-VAX workstation. Among five different bilateral subtraction techniques investigated, a nonlinear approach provided superior lesion enhancement. Feature-extraction techniques reduced substantially the remaining false-positives. Preliminary results, for 32 pairs of clinical mammograms, yielded a true-positive rate of approximately 95% with a false-positive rate of about 2 per image

  16. Probability of an Abnormal Screening PSA Result Based on Age, Race, and PSA Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espaldon, Roxanne; Kirby, Katharine A.; Fung, Kathy Z.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Powell, Adam A.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Walter, Louise C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of screening PSA values in older men and how different PSA thresholds affect the proportion of white, black, and Latino men who would have an abnormal screening result across advancing age groups. Methods We used linked national VA and Medicare data to determine the value of the first screening PSA test (ng/mL) of 327,284 men age 65+ who underwent PSA screening in the VA healthcare system in 2003. We calculated the proportion of men with an abnormal PSA result based on age, race, and common PSA thresholds. Results Among men age 65+, 8.4% had a PSA >4.0ng/mL. The percentage of men with a PSA >4.0ng/mL increased with age and was highest in black men (13.8%) versus white (8.0%) or Latino men (10.0%) (PPSA >4.0ng/mL ranged from 5.1% of Latino men age 65–69 to 27.4% of black men age 85+. Raising the PSA threshold from >4.0ng/mL to >10.0ng/mL, reclassified the greatest percentage of black men age 85+ (18.3% absolute change) and the lowest percentage of Latino men age 65–69 (4.8% absolute change) as being under the biopsy threshold (PPSA threshold together affect the pre-test probability of an abnormal screening PSA result. Based on screening PSA distributions, stopping screening among men whose PSA 10ng/ml has the greatest effect on reducing the number of older black men who will face biopsy decisions after screening. PMID:24439009

  17. First-trimester screening for chromosomal abnormalities: advantages of an instant results approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Mary E

    2010-09-01

    Protocols that include first trimester screening for fetal chromosome abnormalities have become standard of care throughout the United States. Earlier screening allows for first trimester diagnostic testing in cases found to be at increased risk. However, first trimester screening requires coordination of the nuchal translucency ultrasound screening (NT) and biochemical screening, during early, specific, narrow, but slightly different gestational age ranges. Instant results can often be provided at the time of the NT ultrasound if preceded by the programs that perform the biochemical analyses; this optimizes the benefits of the first trimester approach while improving efficiency and communication with the patient. This article discusses the benefits and logistics of such an approach. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interobserver variability in interpretation of mammogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Won Chul; Hwang, In Young; Park, Young Gyu; Jung, Sang Seol; Kim, Hoon Kyo; Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Hak Hee

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of radiologists for mammographic screening, and to analyze interobserver agreement in the interpretation of mammograms. 50 women were selected as subjects from the patients who were screened with mammograms at two university hospitals. The images were analyzed by five radiologists working independently and without their having any knowledge of the final diagnosis. The interobserver variation was analyzed by using the kappa statistic. There were moderate agreements for the findings of the parenchymal pattern (k=0.44; 95% CI 0.39-0.49). calcification type (k=0.66; 95% CI 0.60-0.72) and calcification distribution (K=0.43; 95% CI 0.38-0.48). The mean kappa values ranged from 0.66 to 0.42 for the mass findings. The mean kappa value for the final conclusion was 0.44 (95% CI 0.38-0.51). In general, moderate agreement was evident for all the categories that were evaluated. The general agreement was moderate, but there was wide variability in some findings. To improve the accuracy and reduce variability among physicians in interpretation, proper training of radiologists and standardization of criteria are essential for breast screening

  19. The frequent shift to intermediate flora in preterm delivery cases after abnormal vaginal flora screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Takanori; Akimoto, Yumiko; Tanimoto, Hirotoshi; Teramoto, Mitsue; Teramoto, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The effect of screening and treatment for abnormal vaginal flora on the reduction of preterm deliveries remains controversial. We evaluated whether this screening and treatment reduces the preterm delivery rate for general-population pregnant women. Pregnant women of the Intervention group (n = 574) underwent the screening test and the treatment of vaginal metronidazole during the early second trimester, and those of the Control group (n = 1,161) did not. We compared the preterm delivery rate between these two groups. We also compared the profiles of vaginal flora of the preterm delivery cases with those of the pregnant women with a normal course. There was no significant difference in the preterm delivery rate between these two groups. However, in the preterm delivery cases, a frequent shift to intermediate flora was observed not before but after the screening in the Intervention group. This shift may explain why most of the previous studies failed in regard to the prevention of preterm deliveries. PMID:24762852

  20. Screening for urine abnormalities among preschool children in western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharthi, Abdulla A.; Taha, Azza A.; Edrees, Awatif E.; Elnawawy, Ali N.; Abdelrahman, Azza H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the frequency of urinary problems among preschool children. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1000 preschool asymptomatic children attending the outpatient clinics of the Children’s Hospital, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between August 2013 and December 2013 were subjected to dipstick urine analysis. Microscopic examination was performed for the abnormal dipstick samples, and children with hematuria were investigated for kidney function. Results: Dipstick urine analysis revealed abnormal findings in 25.1% of the screened children. The most common dipstick abnormalities were positive nitrite test in 18.1%, hematuria in 16.9%, and positive leukocyte esterase test in 14.3% of the cases. The most common abnormality in microscopic urine examination was crystals in 13% of the cases. Pyuria were evident in 5% of cases and hematuria in 2.5%. The most common bacteria in positive urine culture samples was Escherichia coli in 62.6%. Conclusion: In view of these important findings, dipstick screening should be implemented in preschool children. PMID:25491212

  1. Decision support system for breast cancer detection using mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Karthikeyan; Acharya, Rajendra U; Chua, Chua K; Min, Lim C; Mathew, Betty; Thomas, Abraham K

    2013-07-01

    Mammograms are by far one of the most preferred methods of screening for breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer can improve survival rates to a greater extent. Although the analysis and diagnosis of breast cancer are done by experienced radiologists, there is always the possibility of human error. Interobserver and intraobserver errors occur frequently in the analysis of medical images, given the high variability between every patient. Also, the sensitivity of mammographic screening varies with image quality and expertise of the radiologist. So, there is no golden standard for the screening process. To offset this variability and to standardize the diagnostic procedures, efforts are being made to develop automated techniques for diagnosis and grading of breast cancer images. This article presents a classification pipeline to improve the accuracy of differentiation between normal, benign, and malignant mammograms. Several features based on higher-order spectra, local binary pattern, Laws' texture energy, and discrete wavelet transform were extracted from mammograms. Feature selection techniques based on sequential forward, backward, plus-l-takeaway-r, individual, and branch-and-bound selections using the Mahalanobis distance criterion were used to rank the features and find classification accuracies for combination of several features based on the ranking. Six classifiers were used, namely, decision tree classifier, fisher classifier, linear discriminant classifier, nearest mean classifier, Parzen classifier, and support vector machine classifier. We evaluated our proposed methodology with 300 mammograms obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography and 300 mammograms from the Singapore Anti-Tuberculosis Association CommHealth database. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values were used to compare the performances of the classifiers. Our results show that the decision tree classifier demonstrated an excellent performance compared to

  2. What women want. Women's preferences for the management of low-grade abnormal cervical screening tests: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm; Lynge, E; Rebolj, M

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Frederiksen M, Lynge E, Rebolj M. What women want. Women's preferences for the management of low-grade abnormal cervical screening tests: a systematic review. BJOG 2011; DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03130.x. Background If human papillomavirus (HPV) testing will replace...... cytology in primary cervical screening, the frequency of low-grade abnormal screening tests will double. Several available alternatives for the follow-up of low-grade abnormal screening tests have similar outcomes. In this situation, women's preferences have been proposed as a guide for management....... Selection criteria Studies asking women to state a preference between active follow-up and observation for the management of low-grade abnormalities on screening cytology or HPV tests. Data collection and analysis Information on study design, participants and outcomes was retrieved using a prespecified form...

  3. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    Lossy image coding significantly improves performance over lossless methods, but a reliable control of diagnostic accuracy regarding compressed images is necessary. The acceptable range of compression ratios must be safe with respect to as many objective criteria as possible. This study evaluates the compression efficiency of digital mammograms in both numerically lossless (reversible) and lossy (irreversible) manner. Effective compression methods and concepts were examined to increase archiving and telediagnosis performance. Lossless compression as a primary applicable tool for medical applications was verified on a set 131 mammograms. Moreover, nine radiologists participated in the evaluation of lossy compression of mammograms. Subjective rating of diagnostically important features brought a set of mean rates given for each test image. The lesion detection test resulted in binary decision data analyzed statistically. The radiologists rated and interpreted malignant and benign lesions, representative pathology symptoms, and other structures susceptible to compression distortions contained in 22 original and 62 reconstructed mammograms. Test mammograms were collected in two radiology centers for three years and then selected according to diagnostic content suitable for an evaluation of compression effects. Lossless compression efficiency of the tested coders varied, but CALIC, JPEG-LS, and SPIHT performed the best. The evaluation of lossy compression effects affecting detection ability was based on ROC-like analysis. Assuming a two-sided significance level of p=0.05, the null hypothesis that lower bit rate reconstructions are as useful for diagnosis as the originals was false in sensitivity tests with 0.04 bpp mammograms. However, verification of the same hypothesis with 0.1 bpp reconstructions suggested their acceptance. Moreover, the 1 bpp reconstructions were rated very similarly to the original mammograms in the diagnostic quality evaluation test, but the

  4. Use of prior mammograms in the classification of benign and malignant masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, Celia; Karssemeijer, Nico; Hendriks, Jan H.C.L.; Holland, Roland

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of using prior mammograms for classification of benign and malignant masses. Five radiologists and one resident classified mass lesions in 198 mammograms obtained from a population-based screening program. Cases were interpreted twice, once without and once with comparison of previous mammograms, in a sequential reading order using soft copy image display. The radiologists' performances in classifying benign and malignant masses without and with previous mammograms were evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The statistical significance of the difference in performances was calculated using analysis of variance. The use of prior mammograms improved the classification performance of all participants in the study. The mean area under the ROC curve of the readers increased from 0.763 to 0.796. This difference in performance was statistically significant (P = 0.008)

  5. Current controversies in prenatal diagnosis 2: Cell-free DNA prenatal screening should be used to identify all chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitty, Lyn S; Hudgins, Louanne; Norton, Mary E

    2018-02-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from maternal serum has been clinically available since 2011. This technology has revolutionized our ability to screen for the common aneuploidies trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), trisomy 18, and trisomy 13. More recently, clinical laboratories have offered screening for other chromosome abnormalities including sex chromosome abnormalities and copy number variants (CNV) without little published data on the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value. In this debate, the pros and cons of performing prenatal screening via cfDNA for all chromosome abnormalities is discussed. At the time of the debate in 2017, the general consensus was that the literature does not yet support using this technology to screen for all chromosome abnormalities and that education is key for both providers and the patients so that the decision-making process is as informed as possible. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Application of ultrasound in fetal cardiac abnormalitis screening and analyzing of influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; Chen Hui; Guo Hua; Fu Lijuan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify the application value of ultrasound in the screening of fetal cardiac abnormalities and to reduce its affecting factors, in order to maximally decrease the birth of oaf. Methods: Adopting the method of four chamber hearts cross-section and sound beam plane head laterodeviation, 3821 fetal hearts were screened by ultrasonocardiography in middle and late fetal period. The influencing factors were also analyzed. Screening results were compared with the autopsy following induced labor and the ultrasonocardiogram after borne. Results: Total 23 cases of the cardiac anomalies were confirmed by odinopoeia or after borned, 21 cases were diagnosed by antepartum ultrasonocardiography, the detectable rate were 91.3%(21/23). And the complex cardiac anomalies were 19 cases, accounted for 82.61%(19/23), the general malformation were 4 cases, accounted for 17.39%(4/23). In 19 cases of the complex anomalies, 17 cases were diagnosed by antepartum examination in the first time, 2 cases were diagnosed by reexamination, the total detectable rate were 100%(19/19). Conclusion: Ultrasonography is not only non-invasive but also unique method in detecting fetal heart defects. It will help to diagnose definitely the vast majority of congenital malformation in the fetal heart, especially complex malformation in the middle and later fetal period. There are some limitations and chronergy in ultrasonography for the screening of fetal heart defects, which should be followed-up when the fetal appeared 'normal' in the early screening. (authors)

  7. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  8. Cellphone based mobile colposcope for the evaluation of women with abnormal cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Bruce S.; Kass, Alex J.; Waalen, Jill; Levitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Objective: Compare an inexpensive cell-phone based Mobile Colposcope, with a standard colposcope in the evaluation of women with abnormal Pap smear screening. Methodology: The study was a prospective, parallel noninferiority trial. Thirty women underwent colposcopy for the evaluation of an abnormal Pap smear. After application of acetic acid, images of the cervix were obtained with both a standard colposcope and the Mobile Colposcope. An additional set of images using both devices were obtained using the red-free (green filter) mode. Eight experienced gynecologists then evaluated 100 paired images (plain and green filter) from two different sites in random order using a web based assessment program. After reviewing each set of paired images, the expert would make an assessment of: 1) normal (no biopsy/ random biopsy), or 2) abnormal. For abnormal images, the expert then electronically marked the site(s) on the image where a biopsy was recommended. In image analysis, the cervical image was divided into 12 radial sectors and the marked sites for biopsy on the matched pairs were compared. Matched pairs that were considered normal, or those where biopsy site recommendations were within +/- 30° were considered equivalent; unmatched biopsy sites were considered non-equivalent. Results were compared using Wilcoxon Matched Pairs Signed Ranks Test. Expert assessment of Mobile Colposcope images compared with assessment by standard colposcope is currently onging. Conclusions: if the Mobile Colposcope demonstrates non-inferiority to imaging obtained with a standard colposcope and due to its low cost, it has the potential help improve cervical cancer screening in low resource settings.

  9. ELM BASED CAD SYSTEM TO CLASSIFY MAMMOGRAMS BY THE COMBINATION OF CLBP AND CONTOURLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Venkatalakshmi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a serious life threat to the womanhood, worldwide. Mammography is the promising screening tool, which can show the abnormality being detected. However, the physicians find it difficult to detect the affected regions, as the size of microcalcifications is very small. Hence it would be better, if a CAD system can accompany the physician in detecting the malicious regions. Taking this as a challenge, this paper presents a CAD system for mammogram classification which is proven to be accurate and reliable. The entire work is decomposed into four different stages and the outcome of a phase is passed as the input of the following phase. Initially, the mammogram is pre-processed by adaptive median filter and the segmentation is done by GHFCM. The features are extracted by combining the texture feature descriptors Completed Local Binary Pattern (CLBP and contourlet to frame the feature sets. In the training phase, Extreme Learning Machine (ELM is trained with the feature sets. During the testing phase, the ELM can classify between normal, malignant and benign type of cancer. The performance of the proposed approach is analysed by varying the classifier, feature extractors and parameters of the feature extractor. From the experimental analysis, it is evident that the proposed work outperforms the analogous techniques in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  10. The importance of sensitive screening for abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Xiaoxia; Xie, Jingyuan; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Ya; Wang, Weiming; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism, insulin resistance (IR) and the related risk factors in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients. We analyzed oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and clinical data of 107 IgAN patients and 106 healthy controls. Glucose metabolism, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the insulin sensitivity index (ISI) of both groups were evaluated. The prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism was significantly higher in the IgAN group than in the control group (41.12% vs. 9.43%, p glucose, fasting insulin, OGTT 2-hour blood glucose, OGTT 2-hour insulin, HOMA-IR, and lower ISI than healthy controls. Triglyceride (OR = 2.55), 24-hour urine protein excretion (OR = 1.39), and age (OR = 1.06) were independent risk factors for abnormal glucose metabolism in IgAN patients. BMI, eGFR, 24-hour urine protein excretion, triglyceride, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, OGTT 2-hour blood glucose, and OGTT 2-hour insulin were significantly higher in IgAN patients with IR than in IgAN patients without IR, while HDL and ISI were significantly lower. BMI, serum albumin, and 24-hour urine protein excretion were correlated factors of IR in IgAN patients. Our study highlighted that abnormal glucose metabolism was common in IgAN patients. Triglyceride and 24-hour urine protein excretion were significant risk factors for abnormal glucose metabolism. Therefore, sensitive screening for glucose metabolism status and timely intervention should be carried out in clinical work.

  11. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has a higher incidence of cervical cancer than other Nordic countries, although all Danish women (aged 23–65) are screened regularly to identify possible cervical dysplasia or asymptomatic invasive cancer. Annually 40 000 women receives an abnormal or inadequate test result and a follow......-up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... up will be sent to the women (RCT). The intention is to ensure that all women will be notified about the test result, quickly, homogenously and in layman’s written language, still with the opportunity to contact or be contacted by the GP, if there is special needs. Furthermore, it is assumed that GP...

  12. Fibrocystic change of breast : relation with parenchymal pattern on mammogram and fibroadenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Yeol; Cha, In Ho; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Jung Hyuk [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To determine the relationship between fibrocystic change and parenchymal pattern and fibroadenoma on mammogram. Mammograms of 135 patients with histologically- diagnosed fibrocystic disease after excisional biopsy were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic specimens. Classification of the parenchymal pattern was based on Wolfe's method. On mammogram, we observed abnormality in 88 out of the 135 cases;these latter consisted of 70 cases of DY, 30 of P2, 20 of P1, and 15 of Nl, following Wolfe's parenchymal patterns. Among the 88 abnormal cases we obseved 37 cases of mass with clear boundaries, five cases of mass with unclear boundaries, 22 with clustered microcalcifications, six with macrocalcifications and 18 with asymmetric dense breast. Histologic examination revealed a varying composition of stromal fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia,cyst formation, apocrine metaplasia, etc. Histologically fibroadenomatoid change in 18 cases was appeared as a radiopaque mass on mammogram, especially in those cases where the change was well-defined, which were all except three. Fibrocystic disease was prevalent in Wolfe's P2 and DY patterns(about 80%). About 40% of fibrocystic change appearing as a well defined mass on mammogram showed fibroadenomatoid chage histologically and was difficult to differentiate from fibroadenoma. Fibrocystic disease should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass which on mammogram is well-defined.

  13. Fibrocystic change of breast : relation with parenchymal pattern on mammogram and fibroadenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Yeol; Cha, In Ho; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    1996-01-01

    To determine the relationship between fibrocystic change and parenchymal pattern and fibroadenoma on mammogram. Mammograms of 135 patients with histologically- diagnosed fibrocystic disease after excisional biopsy were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic specimens. Classification of the parenchymal pattern was based on Wolfe's method. On mammogram, we observed abnormality in 88 out of the 135 cases;these latter consisted of 70 cases of DY, 30 of P2, 20 of P1, and 15 of Nl, following Wolfe's parenchymal patterns. Among the 88 abnormal cases we obseved 37 cases of mass with clear boundaries, five cases of mass with unclear boundaries, 22 with clustered microcalcifications, six with macrocalcifications and 18 with asymmetric dense breast. Histologic examination revealed a varying composition of stromal fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia,cyst formation, apocrine metaplasia, etc. Histologically fibroadenomatoid change in 18 cases was appeared as a radiopaque mass on mammogram, especially in those cases where the change was well-defined, which were all except three. Fibrocystic disease was prevalent in Wolfe's P2 and DY patterns(about 80%). About 40% of fibrocystic change appearing as a well defined mass on mammogram showed fibroadenomatoid chage histologically and was difficult to differentiate from fibroadenoma. Fibrocystic disease should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass which on mammogram is well-defined

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of commercial system for computer-assisted detection (CADx) as an adjunct to interpretation of mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menna, Sabatino; Di Virgilio, Maria Rosaria; Burke, Paolo; Frigerio, Alfonso; Boglione, Elisa; Ciccarelli, Grazia; Di Filippo, Sabato; Garretti, Licia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the commercial computer-aided detection CADx system for the reading of mammograms. Materials and methods. The study assessed the Second Look system developed and marketed by CADx Medical Systems, Montreal, Canada. The diagnostic sensitivity was evaluated by means of a retrospective study on 98 consecutive cancers detected at screening by double independent reading. The specificity and the positive predictive value (PPV) for cancer of the CADx system were prospectively evaluated on a second group of 560 consecutive mammograms of asymptomatic women not included in screening program. The radiologist who was present during the test assessed the abnormal mammographic findings by one or more of the following diagnostic procedures: physical examination, additional mammographic detail views with or without magnification,ultrasonography, ultrasound- or mammography guided fine needle aspiration cytology, and core-biopsy. The exams first underwent conventional reading and then a second reading carried out with the aid of the CADx system. Results.The overall diagnostic sensitivity of the CADx system on the 98 screening cancers was 81.6%; in particular it was 89.3% for calcifications, 83.9% for masses and only 37.5% for architectural distortion. The CADx markings for each mammography were 4.7 on average. Identification of invasive carcinoma was independent from tumour size. In the second group of 560 mammograms, the CADx system marked all cases identified as positive by conventional reading and confirmed by biopsy (7/7), but did not permit the detection of any additional cancer. The CADx markings per exam were 4.2 on average, the specificity was 13.7% and the PPV was 0.55% versus 13.7% recall rate of conventional reading. CADx reading led to a 1.96% (11/560) increase of the women necessitating further diagnostic investigation. Conclusions. The results of our study show that the diagnostic sensitivity of the CADx system is lower

  15. Abnormal TREC-Based Newborn Screening Test in a Premature Neonate with Massive Perivillous Fibrin Deposition of the Placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kostadinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID, a primary immunodeficiency arising from variable defects in lymphocyte development and survival, is characterized by significant deficiency of thymus derived (T- lymphocytes and variable defects in the B-lymphocyte population. Newborn screening for SCID is based on detection of low numbers of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs by real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. This screening allows for early identification of individuals with SCID and other disorders characterized by T-lymphopenia. Higher rates of abnormal screens are commonly seen in premature and critically ill neonates, often representing false positives. It is possible that many abnormal screens seen in these populations are result of conditions that are characterized by systemic inflammation or stress, possibly in the context of stress-induced thymic involution. We present a case of a male infant delivered at 27 weeks, 6 days of gestation, with severe intrauterine growth restriction who had an abnormal TREC screen and a massive perivillous fibrin deposition (MPFD of the placenta. This association has not been reported previously. We are raising the awareness to the fact that conditions, such as MPFD, that can create adverse intrauterine environment are capable of causing severe stress-induced thymic involution of the fetus which can present with abnormal TREC results on newborn screening.

  16. Effect of JPEG2000 mammogram compression on microcalcifications segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, V.; Arikidis, N.; Karahaliou, A.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Costaridou, L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of mammographic image compression on the automated segmentation of individual microcalcifications. The dataset consisted of individual microcalcifications of 105 clusters originating from mammograms of the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. A JPEG2000 wavelet-based compression algorithm was used for compressing mammograms at 7 compression ratios (CRs): 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, 40:1, 50:1, 70:1 and 100:1. A gradient-based active contours segmentation algorithm was employed for segmentation of microcalcifications as depicted on original and compressed mammograms. The performance of the microcalcification segmentation algorithm on original and compressed mammograms was evaluated by means of the area overlap measure (AOM) and distance differentiation metrics (d mean and d max ) by comparing automatically derived microcalcification borders to manually defined ones by an expert radiologist. The AOM monotonically decreased as CR increased, while d mean and d max metrics monotonically increased with CR increase. The performance of the segmentation algorithm on original mammograms was (mean±standard deviation): AOM=0.91±0.08, d mean =0.06±0.05 and d max =0.45±0.20, while on 40:1 compressed images the algorithm's performance was: AOM=0.69±0.15, d mean =0.23±0.13 and d max =0.92±0.39. Mammographic image compression deteriorates the performance of the segmentation algorithm, influencing the quantification of individual microcalcification morphological properties and subsequently affecting computer aided diagnosis of microcalcification clusters. (authors)

  17. Comparison of transvagianl ultrasonography with hysterosonography as a screening method in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Bo Hyun; Lee, Jong Mee; Kim, Soo Ah; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2004-01-01

    To assess the utility of hysterosonography (HS) as a screening method in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding. We retrospectively reviewed transvaginal ultrasonography (TVS) and HS for 105 patients whose diagnosis was confirmed pathologically. All 105 patients were initially evaluated on the same day with both TVS and HS. On TVS and HS examination. endometrial cavitary lesions were classified as diffuse hyperplasis, endometrial polyp, endometrial cancer, uterine synechia and submucosal leiomyoma. Hysteroscopy with biopsy (n=35), curettage (n=60) or hysterectomy (n=10) was performed, and the results of TVS and HS examination were correlated with the pathological findings. The sensitivity and specificity were 79.0% and 45.8% for TVS, and 95.1% and 83.3% for HS, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 83.0% and 39.3% for TVS, and 95.1% and 83.3% for HS, respectively. Twenty-seven showed a discrepancy between the TVS and HS, and eight cases showed a discrepancy between HS and the pathologic diagnosis. TVS is a sensitive method to evaluate the endometrial cavitary lesions, but it often does not provide the physician with sufficient diagnostic information. With its higher sensitivities, specificities and positive and negative predictive values, HS can be better used than TVS in evaluating those patients with abnormal uterine bleeding

  18. Comparison of transvagianl ultrasonography with hysterosonography as a screening method in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Bo Hyun; Lee, Jong Mee; Kim, Soo Ah [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To assess the utility of hysterosonography (HS) as a screening method in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding. We retrospectively reviewed transvaginal ultrasonography (TVS) and HS for 105 patients whose diagnosis was confirmed pathologically. All 105 patients were initially evaluated on the same day with both TVS and HS. On TVS and HS examination. endometrial cavitary lesions were classified as diffuse hyperplasis, endometrial polyp, endometrial cancer, uterine synechia and submucosal leiomyoma. Hysteroscopy with biopsy (n=35), curettage (n=60) or hysterectomy (n=10) was performed, and the results of TVS and HS examination were correlated with the pathological findings. The sensitivity and specificity were 79.0% and 45.8% for TVS, and 95.1% and 83.3% for HS, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 83.0% and 39.3% for TVS, and 95.1% and 83.3% for HS, respectively. Twenty-seven showed a discrepancy between the TVS and HS, and eight cases showed a discrepancy between HS and the pathologic diagnosis. TVS is a sensitive method to evaluate the endometrial cavitary lesions, but it often does not provide the physician with sufficient diagnostic information. With its higher sensitivities, specificities and positive and negative predictive values, HS can be better used than TVS in evaluating those patients with abnormal uterine bleeding.

  19. Is screening for abnormal ECG patterns justified in long-term follow-up of childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracyclines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourier, M.S.; Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A.M.C.; Loonen, J.J.; Bokkerink, J.P.M.; Roeleveld, N.; Beer, G.; Bellersen, L.; Kapusta, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ECG and echocardiography are noninvasive screening tools to detect subclinical cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs). Our aims were as follows: (1) assess the prevalence of abnormal ECG patterns, (2) determine the agreement between abnormal ECG patterns and

  20. Intelligent detection of microcalcification from digitized mammograms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/sadh/036/01/0125-0139. Keywords. Breast cancer; digital mammogram; artificial neural networks; microcalcification detection. Abstract. This paper reports the design and implementation of an intelligent system for detection of microcalcification from digital mammograms.

  1. Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Resources for ... several new technologies to detect breast tumors. This research ranges from methods being developed in research labs to those that ...

  2. Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  3. Abnormal screening for gestational diabetes, maternal mood disorder, and preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Dorothy; Luther, James; Dills, John Louis Jesse; Eng, Heather; Wisniewski, Stephen; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-05-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 7% of pregnant mothers, and those with GDM have increased rates of perinatal complications. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and its pharmacologic treatments are associated with obesity and adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this prospective study, we investigated the relationship between abnormal GDM screens, maternal mood disorders, and adverse outcomes. We examined mothers with MDD, those with bipolar disorder (BD), and healthy controls (HC) at 20, 30, and 36 weeks of gestation and delivery. We obtained demographic data and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), and confirmed diagnoses with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We evaluated smoking, alcohol use, substance use, and medication treatments with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation interview. Mothers received the one-hour 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) at 26-28 weeks of gestation. Outcome variables were preterm birth, birth weight (BW) and peripartum events. We enrolled 62 HC, 50 BD, 41 past MDD, and 39 current MDD mother-infant pairs. Mean GCT levels and the frequency of abnormal GCT (>140 mg/dL) did not differ across groups. Rates of smoking (χ(2)  = 20.68, df = 3, p disorders, having increased GCT levels contributes to a higher likelihood for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Mothers with BD or current MDD can have additional risks for adverse outcomes and may benefit from early referral for high-risk services and supportive management in pregnancy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Using autoencoders for mammogram compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chun Chet; Eswaran, Chikkannan

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results obtained for medical image compression using autoencoder neural networks. Since mammograms (medical images) are usually of big sizes, training of autoencoders becomes extremely tedious and difficult if the whole image is used for training. We show in this paper that the autoencoders can be trained successfully by using image patches instead of the whole image. The compression performances of different types of autoencoders are compared based on two parameters, namely mean square error and structural similarity index. It is found from the experimental results that the autoencoder which does not use Restricted Boltzmann Machine pre-training yields better results than those which use this pre-training method.

  5. Normal mammogram detection based on local probability difference transforms and support vector machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiracharit, W.; Kumhom, P.; Chamnongthai, K.; Sun, Y.; Delp, E.J.; Babbs, C.F

    2007-01-01

    Automatic detection of normal mammograms, as a ''first look'' for breast cancer, is a new approach to computer-aided diagnosis. This approach may be limited, however, by two main causes. The first problem is the presence of poorly separable ''crossed-distributions'' in which the correct classification depends upon the value of each feature. The second problem is overlap of the feature distributions that are extracted from digitized mammograms of normal and abnormal patients. Here we introduce a new Support Vector Machine (SVM) based method utilizing with the proposed uncrossing mapping and Local Probability Difference (LPD). Crossed-distribution feature pairs are identified and mapped into a new features that can be separated by a zero-hyperplane of the new axis. The probability density functions of the features of normal and abnormal mammograms are then sampled and the local probability difference functions are estimated to enhance the features. From 1,000 ground-truth-known mammograms, 250 normal and 250 abnormal cases, including spiculated lesions, circumscribed masses or microcalcifications, are used for training a support vector machine. The classification results tested with another 250 normal and 250 abnormal sets show improved testing performances with 90% sensitivity and 89% specificity. (author)

  6. Efficacy of computer-aided detection system for screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Mioko; Ohnuki, Koji; Yamada, Takayuki; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Takahashi, Shoki

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for screening mammography (MMG). Screening mammograms of 2,231 women aged over 50 yr were examined. Medio-lateral oblique (MLO) images were obtained, and two expert observers interpreted the mammograms by consensus. First, each mammogram was interpreted without the assistance of CAD, followed immediately by a re-evaluation of areas marked by the CAD system. Data were recorded to measure the effect of CAD on the recall rate, cancer detection rate and detection rate of masses, microcalcifications and other findings. The CAD system increased the recall rate from 2.3% to 2.6%. Six recalled cases were diagnosed as breast cancer pathologically, and CAD detected all of these lesions. Seven additional cases in which CAD detected abnormal findings had no malignancy. The detection rate of CAD for microcalcifications was high (95.0%). However, the detection rate for mass lesions and other findings was low (29.2% and 25.0% respectively). The false positivity rate was 0.13/film for microcalcifications, and 0.25/film for mass lesions. The efficacy of the CAD system for detecting microcalcifications on screening mammograms was confirmed. However, the low detection rate of mass lesions and relatively high rate of false positivity need to be further improved. (author)

  7. Positive predictive values by mammographic density and screening mode in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Ursin, Giske; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Hofvind, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the probability of breast cancer among women recalled due to abnormal findings on the screening mammograms (PPV-1) and among women who underwent an invasive procedure (PPV-2) by mammographic density (MD), screening mode and age. We used information about 28,826 recall examinations from 26,951 subsequently screened women in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program, 1996-2010. The radiologists who performed the recall examinations subjectively classified MD on the mammograms into three categories: fatty (70%). Screening mode was defined as screen-film mammography (SFM) and full-field digital mammography (FFDM). We examined trends of PPVs by MD, screening mode and age. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratio (OR) of screen-detected breast cancer associated with MD among women recalled, adjusting for screening mode and age. PPV-1 and PPV-2 decreased by increasing MD, regardless of screening mode (p for trend breasts. Among women recalled, the adjusted OR of breast cancer decreased with increasing MD. Compared with women with fatty breasts, the OR was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.96) for those with medium dense breasts and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76-0.95) for those with dense breasts. PPVs decreased by increasing MD. Fewer women needed to be recalled or undergo an invasive procedure to detect one breast cancer among those with fatty versus dense breasts in the screening program in Norway, 1996-2010. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of newborns with abnormal results in a newborn screening program for four lysosomal storage diseases in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydy Bravo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are genetic disorders, clinically heterogeneous, mainly caused by defects in genes encoding lysosomal enzymes that degrade macromolecules. Several LSDs already have specific therapies that may improve clinical outcomes, especially if introduced early in life. With this aim, screening methods have been established and newborn screening (NBS for some LSDs has been developed. Such programs should include additional procedures for the confirmation (or not of the cases that had an abnormal result in the initial screening. We present here the methods and results of the additional investigation performed in four babies with positive initial screening results in a program of NBS for LSDs performed by a private laboratory in over 10,000 newborns in Brazil. The suspicion in these cases was of Mucopolysaccharidosis I - MPS I (in two babies, Pompe disease and Gaucher disease (one baby each. One case of pseudodeficiency for MPS I, 1 carrier for MPS I, 1 case of pseudodeficiency for Pompe disease and 1 carrier for Gaucher disease were identified. This report illustrates the challenges that may be encountered by NBS programs for LSDs, and the need of a comprehensive protocol for the rapid and precise investigation of the babies who have an abnormal screening result.

  9. Early detection of breast cancer mass lesions by mammogram segmentation images based on texture features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is at present one of the available method for early detection of masses or abnormalities which is related to breast cancer.The calcifications. The challenge lies in early and accurate detection to overcome the development of breast cancer that affects more and more women throughout the world. Breast cancer is diagnosed at advanced stages with the help of the digital mammogram images. Masses appear in a mammogram as fine, granular clusters, which are often difficult to identify in a raw mammogram. The incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in recent years. This paper proposes a computer aided diagnostic system for the extraction of features like mass lesions in mammograms for early detection of breast cancer. The proposed technique is based on a four-step procedure: (a) the preprocessing of the image is done, (b) regions of interest (ROI) specification, (c) supervised segmentation method includes two to stages performed using the minimum distance (M D) criterion, and (d) feature extraction based on Gray level Co-occurrence matrices GLC M for the identification of mass lesions. The method suggested for the detection of mass lesions from mammogram image segmentation and analysis was tested over several images taken from A L-llwiya Hospital in Baghdad, Iraq.The proposed technique shows better results.

  10. Prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities in IVF patients that opted for preimplantation genetic screening/diagnosis (PGS/D): a need for revised algorithms in the era of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takyi, Afua; Santolaya-Forgas, Joaquin

    2017-06-01

    Obstetricians offer prenatal screening for most common chromosomal abnormalities to all pregnant women including those that had in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic screening/diagnosis (PGS/D). We propose that free fetal DNA in maternal circulation together with the second trimester maternal serum alfa feto protein (MSAFP) and ultrasound imaging is the best prenatal screening test for chromosomal abnormalities and congenital anomalies in IVF-PGD/S patients because risk estimations from all other prenatal screening algorithms for chromosomal abnormalities depend heavily on maternal age which is irrelevant in PGS/D patients.

  11. Noise equalization for detection of microcalcification clusters in direct digital mammogram images.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLoughlin, K.J.; Bones, P.J.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2004-01-01

    Equalizing image noise is shown to be an important step in the automatic detection of microcalcifications in digital mammography. This study extends a well established film-screen noise equalization scheme developed by Veldkamp et al. for application to full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) images. A

  12. Rate of Opportunistic Pap Smear Screening and Patterns of Epithelial Cell Abnormalities in Pap Smears in Ajman, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Eyd, Ghaith J.; Shaik, Rizwana B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of women undergoing Papanicolaou (Pap) smear examinations, and the frequency of epithelial cell abnormalities in a teaching hospital in one emirate of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) during a three-year period. Methods: A retrospective study of 602 patient records from July 2007 to July 2010 was done in a teaching hospital in Ajman, UAE. The variables studied were age, ethnicity, menopausal status, and abnormalities in the Pap smear. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and presented mainly as percentages; to assess associations, the chi-square test was used. Results: The total number of outpatients who attended the Obstetrics & Gynaecology Department from July 2007 to July 2010 was 150,111 patients, of which 602 (0.4% of the total) had a Pap smear test. The sample was 50.1% Arabs and 49.9% other nationalities. While 73% of the outpatients had specific complaints, 27% came for a routine screening. Epithelial cell abnormalities were seen in 3.3% of the sample, with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) found in 1.8%, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs) found in 1.2%, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) found in 0.3%. There were no cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: Voluntary routine Pap smear screening was remarkably low in the study group. ASCUS was the most common epithelial cell abnormality. Community health education and opportunistic screening for cervical cancer are recommended for both national and expatriate women in the region. PMID:23275844

  13. Rate of Opportunistic Pap Smear Screening and Patterns of Epithelial Cell Abnormalities in Pap Smears in Ajman, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana B. Shaik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of women undergoing Papanicolaou (Pap smear examinations, and the frequency of epithelial cell abnormalities in a teaching hospital in one emirate of the United Arab Emirates (UAE during a three-year period. Methods: A retrospective study of 602 patient records from July 2007 to July 2010 was done in a teaching hospital in Ajman, UAE. The variables studied were age, ethnicity, menopausal status, and abnormalities in the Pap smear. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and presented mainly as percentages; to assess associations, the chi-square test was used. Results: The total number of outpatients who attended the Obstetrics & Gynaecology Department from July 2007 to July 2010 was 150,111 patients, of which 602 (0.4% of the total had a Pap smear test. The sample was 50.1% Arabs and 49.9% other nationalities. While 73% of the outpatients had specific complaints, 27% came for a routine screening. Epithelial cell abnormalities were seen in 3.3% of the sample, with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS found in 1.8%, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs found in 1.2%, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs found in 0.3%. There were no cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: Voluntary routine Pap smear screening was remarkably low in the study group. ASCUS was the most common epithelial cell abnormality. Community health education and opportunistic screening for cervical cancer are recommended for both national and expatriate women in the region.

  14. Factors associated with screening for glucose abnormalities after gestational diabetes mellitus: baseline cohort of the interventional IMPACT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihan, H; Cosson, E; Khiter, C; Vittaz, L; Faghfouri, F; Leboeuf, D; Carbillon, L; Dauphin, H; Reach, G; Valensi, P

    2014-04-01

    Although it is important to screen women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) for abnormal post-partum glucose levels, such testing is rarely performed. The aim of this study was to use data from the first observational phase of the IMPACT study to determine rates of screening within 6 months of delivery in a multiethnic cohort, focusing in particular on the effects of social deprivation and the risk of future diabetes. To investigate the frequency of post-partum screening, charts were analyzed, and all women attending four centres located in a deprived area who had had GDM between January 2009 and December 2010 were contacted by phone. The Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres (EPICES) deprivation index and Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISK) questionnaire were also evaluated. Data were evaluable for 589 of the 719 women contacted (mean age: 33.4 ± 5.2 years; mean body mass index: 27.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2)), and 196 (33.3%) reported having been screened. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with a lack of screening were smoking [odds ratio (OR): 0.42 (0.20-0.90), P<0.05], low consumption of fruit and vegetables [OR: 0.58 (0.39-0.82), P<0.01] and heavier offspring birth weight (P<0.05), although there were no differences in FINDRISK and EPICES scores between screened and unscreened women. One-third of women who had had GDM reported having been screened for dysglycaemia at 6 months post-partum. However, it is expected that the interventional phase of the IMPACT study will increase screening rates, especially in women with the risk factors associated with lower screening rates during this observational phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenatal screening tests for foetal abnormalities: A qualitative focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiser Bettina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments have made screening tests for foetal abnormalities available earlier in pregnancy and women have a range of testing options accessible to them. It is now recommended that all women, regardless of their age, are provided with information on prenatal screening tests. General Practitioners (GPs are often the first health professionals a woman consults in pregnancy. As such, GPs are well positioned to inform women of the increasing range of prenatal screening tests available. The aim of this study was to explore GPs experience of informing women of prenatal genetic screening tests for foetal abnormality. Methods A qualitative study consisting of four focus groups was conducted in metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. A discussion guide was used and the audio-taped transcripts were independently coded by two researchers using thematic analysis. Multiple coders and analysts and informant feedback were employed to reduce the potential for researcher bias and increase the validity of the findings. Results Six themes were identified and classified as 'intrinsic' if they occurred within the context of the consultation or 'extrinsic' if they consisted of elements that impacted on the GP beyond the scope of the consultation. The three intrinsic themes were the way GPs explained the limitations of screening, the extent to which GPs provided information selectively and the time pressures at play. The three extrinsic factors were GPs' attitudes and values towards screening, the conflict they experienced in offering screening information and the sense of powerlessness within the screening test process and the health care system generally. Extrinsic themes reveal GPs' attitudes and values to screening and to disability, as well as raising questions about the fundamental premise of testing. Conclusion The increasing availability and utilisation of screening tests, in particular first trimester tests, has expanded GPs

  16. Presenting and discussing nuchal translucency screening for fetal abnormality in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilnick, Alison M; Fraser, Diane M; James, David K

    2004-03-01

    to investigate the relationship between information giving by midwives and decision-making by women offered nuchal translucency (NT) screening. To establish how risk figures are discussed in practice, with the intention of relating this to the existing, and often critical, literature on women's accounts of antenatal screening. a qualitative study following women through the process of being offered and deciding to undergo NT screening. Tape recording of consultations, analysed in their entirety, was combined with post-screening interviews. a large teaching hospital in the UK. fourteen pregnant women eligible for NT screening at the time of recruitment. (i) tape recordings of consultations between community midwives and pregnant women where nuchal translucency screening was offered; (ii) tape recordings of consultations between hospital midwives and pregnant women immediately post-screening; (iii) individual face-to-face interviews with pregnant women between two and six weeks after the screening, carried out by the first author. NT screening was in general well received, particularly by those women who had undergone serum screening with previous pregnancies. However, communicating the nature of a risk figure is an interactionally complex process. A large amount of interactional work is required by midwives both before and after screening to ensure that women comprehend this information. Despite the emphasis placed in these consultations on understanding the purpose of NT screening and the status of the results, women often framed their decision to undergo NT screening in terms of it being a formality, or of presuming that all was well. This sometimes created practical and personal difficulties in terms of decision-making. previous sociological and psychological research has tended to be critical of midwives in terms of ensuring informed choice in screening, but this research is often based on post hoc accounts. Examining actual consultations with these accounts

  17. The relationship of cancer characteristics and patient outcome with time to lung cancer diagnosis after an abnormal screening CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonavane, Sushilkumar K.; Watts, Jubal; Singh, Satinder P.; Nath, Hrudaya [University of Alabama in Birmingham School of Medicine, Department of Radiology- Cardiopulmonary section, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pinsky, Paul [National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gierada, David S. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Munden, Reginald [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Winston Salem, NC (United States)

    2017-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a reduction in lung cancer and all-cause mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening. The aim of our study was to examine the time to diagnosis (TTD) of lung cancer in the LDCT arm of the NLST and assess its relationship with cancer characteristics and survival. The subjects (N = 462) with a positive baseline screen and subsequent lung cancer diagnosis within 3 years were evaluated by data and image review to confirm the baseline abnormality. The cases were analysed for the relationship between TTD and imaging features, cancer type, stage and survival for 7 years from baseline screen. Cancer was judged to be present at baseline in 397/462 cases. The factors that showed significant association (p value trend less than 0.05) with longer TTD included smaller nodule size, pure ground glass nodules (GGNs), smooth/lobulated margins, stages I/II, adenocarcinoma, and decreasing lung cancer mortality. The logistic regression model for lung cancer death showed significant inverse relationships with size less than 20 mm (OR = 0.32), pure GGNs (OR = 0.24), adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.57) and direct relationship with age (OR = 1.4). TTD after a positive LDCT screen in the NLST showed a strong association with imaging features, stage and mortality. (orig.)

  18. The relationship of cancer characteristics and patient outcome with time to lung cancer diagnosis after an abnormal screening CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonavane, Sushilkumar K.; Watts, Jubal; Singh, Satinder P.; Nath, Hrudaya; Pinsky, Paul; Gierada, David S.; Munden, Reginald

    2017-01-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a reduction in lung cancer and all-cause mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening. The aim of our study was to examine the time to diagnosis (TTD) of lung cancer in the LDCT arm of the NLST and assess its relationship with cancer characteristics and survival. The subjects (N = 462) with a positive baseline screen and subsequent lung cancer diagnosis within 3 years were evaluated by data and image review to confirm the baseline abnormality. The cases were analysed for the relationship between TTD and imaging features, cancer type, stage and survival for 7 years from baseline screen. Cancer was judged to be present at baseline in 397/462 cases. The factors that showed significant association (p value trend less than 0.05) with longer TTD included smaller nodule size, pure ground glass nodules (GGNs), smooth/lobulated margins, stages I/II, adenocarcinoma, and decreasing lung cancer mortality. The logistic regression model for lung cancer death showed significant inverse relationships with size less than 20 mm (OR = 0.32), pure GGNs (OR = 0.24), adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.57) and direct relationship with age (OR = 1.4). TTD after a positive LDCT screen in the NLST showed a strong association with imaging features, stage and mortality. (orig.)

  19. Scheduling mammograms for asymptomatic women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohagan, J.K.; Darby, W.P.; Spitznagel, E.L.; Tome, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    A decision theoretic model was used to investigate the relative importance of risk level, radiation hazard, mammographic accuracy, and cost in mammographic screening decision. The model uses woman-specific medical and family history facts and clinic-specific information regarding mammographic accuracy and practice to profile both woman and clinic, and to formulate periodic screening recommendations. Model parameters were varied extensively to investigate the sensitivity of screening schedules to input values. Multivariate risk was estimated within the program using published data from the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project 5-year follow-up study. Radiation hazard estimates were developed from published radiation physics and radioepidemiologic risk data. Benchmark values for mammographic sensitivity and specificity under screening conditions were calculated from Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project data. Procedural costs used in the analysis were varied around values reflecting conditions at the Washington University Medical Center. Mortality advantages of early versus late breast cancer detection were accounted for using Health Insurance Plan of New York case survival rates. Results are compared with published screening policies to provide insight into implicit assumptions behind those policies. This analysis emphasizes the importance of accounting for variations in clinical accuracy under screening circumstances, in costs, in radiation exposure, and in woman-specific risk when recommending mammographic screening

  20. Automated detection of microcalcification clusters in mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karale, Vikrant A.; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Singh, Tulika; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Sadhu, Anup

    2017-03-01

    Mammography is the most efficient modality for detection of breast cancer at early stage. Microcalcifications are tiny bright spots in mammograms and can often get missed by the radiologist during diagnosis. The presence of microcalcification clusters in mammograms can act as an early sign of breast cancer. This paper presents a completely automated computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detection of microcalcification clusters in mammograms. Unsharp masking is used as a preprocessing step which enhances the contrast between microcalcifications and the background. The preprocessed image is thresholded and various shape and intensity based features are extracted. Support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used to reduce the false positives while preserving the true microcalcification clusters. The proposed technique is applied on two different databases i.e DDSM and private database. The proposed technique shows good sensitivity with moderate false positives (FPs) per image on both databases.

  1. Breast ultrasonographic and histopathological characteristics without any mammographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Kentaro; Kamada, Yoshihiko; Uehara, Kano; Tamaki, Nobumitsu; Ishida, Takanori; Miyashita, Minoru; Amari, Masakazu; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated ultrasonographic findings and the corresponding histopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 1 mammogram. We retrospectively reviewed the ultrasonographic findings and the corresponding histopathological features of 45 breast cancer patients with BI-RADS category 1 mammogram and 537 controls with mammographic abnormalities. We evaluated the ultrasonographic findings including mass shape, periphery, internal and posterior echo pattern, interruption of mammary borders and the distribution of low-echoic lesions, and the corresponding histopathological characteristics including histological classification, hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status of invasive ductal carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ, histological grade, mitotic counts and lymphovascular invasion in individual cases of BI-RADS category 1 mammograms and compared with those of the control group. The ultrasonographic characteristics of the BI-RADS category 1 group were characterized by a higher ratio of round shape (P<0.001), non-spiculated periphery (P=0.021), non-interruption of mammary borders (P<0.001) and non-attenuation (P=0.011) compared with the control group. A total of 52.6% of low-echoic lesions were associated with spotted distribution in the BI-RADS 1 group, whereas 25.8% of low-echoic lesions were associated with spotted distribution in the control group (P=0.012). As for histopathological characteristics, there was a statistically higher ratio of triple-negative subtype (P=0.021), and this particular tendency was detected in histological grade 3 in the BI-RADS category 1 group (P=0.094). We evaluated ultrasonographic findings and the corresponding histopathological characteristics for BI-RADS category 1 mammograms and noted significant differences among these findings in this study. Evaluation of these ultrasonographic and histopathological characteristics may provide

  2. The Effect of Breast Implants on Mammogram Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Kelli; Lee, Esther; Pairawan, Seyed; Anderson, Kendra; Cora, Cherie; Bae, Won; Senthil, Maheswari; Solomon, Naveenraj; Lum, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer detection in women with implants has been questioned. We sought to evaluate the impact of breast implants on mammographic outcomes. A retrospective review of women undergoing mammography between March 1 and October 30, 2013 was performed. Demographic characteristics and mammogram results were compared between women with and without breast implants. Overall, 4.8 per cent of 1863 women identified during the study period had breast implants. Median age was 59 years (26-93). Women with implants were younger (53.9 vs 59.2 years, P breast tissue (72.1% vs 56.4%, P = 0.004) than those without. There were no statistically significant differences with regards to Breast Imaging Recording and Data System 0 score (13.3% with implants vs 21.4% without), call back exam (18.9% with vs 24.1% without), time to resolution of abnormal imaging (58.6 days with vs 43.3 without), or cancer detection rate (0% with implants vs 1.0% without). Because implants did not significantly affect mammogram results, women with implants should be reassured that mammography remains useful in detecting cancer. However, future research is required to determine whether lower call back rates and longer time to resolution of imaging findings contribute to delays in diagnosis in patients with implants.

  3. Evaluation of radiographers’ mammography screen-reading accuracy in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debono, Josephine C; Poulos, Ann E; Houssami, Nehmat; Turner, Robin M; Boyages, John

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of radiographers’ screen-reading mammograms. Currently, radiologist workforce shortages may be compromising the BreastScreen Australia screening program goal to detect early breast cancer. The solution to a similar problem in the United Kingdom has successfully encouraged radiographers to take on the role as one of two screen-readers. Prior to consideration of this strategy in Australia, educational and experiential differences between radiographers in the United Kingdom and Australia emphasise the need for an investigation of Australian radiographers’ screen-reading accuracy. Ten radiographers employed by the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute with a range of radiographic (median = 28 years), mammographic (median = 13 years) and BreastScreen (median = 8 years) experience were recruited to blindly and independently screen-read an image test set of 500 mammograms, without formal training. The radiographers indicated the presence of an abnormality using BI-RADS®. Accuracy was determined by comparison with the gold standard of known outcomes of pathology results, interval matching and client 6-year follow-up. Individual sensitivity and specificity levels ranged between 76.0% and 92.0%, and 74.8% and 96.2% respectively. Pooled screen-reader accuracy across the radiographers estimated sensitivity as 82.2% and specificity as 89.5%. Areas under the reading operating characteristic curve ranged between 0.842 and 0.923. This sample of radiographers in an Australian setting have adequate accuracy levels when screen-reading mammograms. It is expected that with formal screen-reading training, accuracy levels will improve, and with support, radiographers have the potential to be one of the two screen-readers in the BreastScreen Australia program, contributing to timeliness and improved program outcomes

  4. Evaluation of radiographers’ mammography screen-reading accuracy in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debono, Josephine C, E-mail: josephine.debono@bci.org.au [Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia); Poulos, Ann E [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Houssami, Nehmat [Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health (A27), Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Turner, Robin M [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Boyages, John [Macquarie University Cancer Institute, Macquarie University Hospital, Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of radiographers’ screen-reading mammograms. Currently, radiologist workforce shortages may be compromising the BreastScreen Australia screening program goal to detect early breast cancer. The solution to a similar problem in the United Kingdom has successfully encouraged radiographers to take on the role as one of two screen-readers. Prior to consideration of this strategy in Australia, educational and experiential differences between radiographers in the United Kingdom and Australia emphasise the need for an investigation of Australian radiographers’ screen-reading accuracy. Ten radiographers employed by the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute with a range of radiographic (median = 28 years), mammographic (median = 13 years) and BreastScreen (median = 8 years) experience were recruited to blindly and independently screen-read an image test set of 500 mammograms, without formal training. The radiographers indicated the presence of an abnormality using BI-RADS®. Accuracy was determined by comparison with the gold standard of known outcomes of pathology results, interval matching and client 6-year follow-up. Individual sensitivity and specificity levels ranged between 76.0% and 92.0%, and 74.8% and 96.2% respectively. Pooled screen-reader accuracy across the radiographers estimated sensitivity as 82.2% and specificity as 89.5%. Areas under the reading operating characteristic curve ranged between 0.842 and 0.923. This sample of radiographers in an Australian setting have adequate accuracy levels when screen-reading mammograms. It is expected that with formal screen-reading training, accuracy levels will improve, and with support, radiographers have the potential to be one of the two screen-readers in the BreastScreen Australia program, contributing to timeliness and improved program outcomes.

  5. Breast composition measurements using retrospective standard mammogram form (SMF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highnam, R; Pan, X; Warren, R; Jeffreys, M; Smith, G Davey; Brady, M

    2006-01-01

    The standard mammogram form (SMF) representation of an x-ray mammogram is a standardized, quantitative representation of the breast from which the volume of non-fat tissue and breast density can be easily estimated, both of which are of significant interest in determining breast cancer risk. Previous theoretical analysis of SMF had suggested that a complete and substantial set of calibration data (such as mAs and kVp) would be needed to generate realistic breast composition measures and yet there are many interesting trials that have retrospectively collected images with no calibration data. The main contribution of this paper is to revisit our previous theoretical analysis of SMF with respect to errors in the calibration data and to show how and why that theoretical analysis did not match the results from the practical implementations of SMF. In particular, we show how by estimating breast thickness for every image we are, effectively, compensating for any errors in the calibration data. To illustrate our findings, the current implementation of SMF (version 2.2β) was run over 4028 digitized film-screen mammograms taken from six sites over the years 1988-2002 with and without using the known calibration data. Results show that the SMF implementation running without any calibration data at all generates results which display a strong relationship with when running with a complete set of calibration data, and, most importantly, to an expert's visual assessment of breast composition using established techniques. SMF shows considerable promise in being of major use in large epidemiological studies related to breast cancer which require the automated analysis of large numbers of films from many years previously where little or no calibration data is available

  6. Assessing the patient's mammogram experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodendorf, Diane M; Deogun, Gurvinder K; Rodie, Amy Risch; Pol, Louis G

    2004-01-01

    This study overviews an operational blueprint that diagrams the activities and interactions of all participants in a typical screening mammography appointment in a large medical center. The blueprint is constructed from multiple sources of data collected from mammography patients, service providers in the radiology department, and medical records. The benefits from using patient perspectives, the insights gained from the blueprint development process, and the value of the resulting screening mammography appointment blueprint are included.

  7. Quantitative assessment of breast density from mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, N.; Ng, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: It is known that breast density is increasingly used as a risk factor for breast cancer. This study was undertaken to develop and validate a semi-automated computer technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitised mammograms. A computer technique had been developed using MATLAB (Version 6.1) based GUI applications. This semi-automated image analysis tool consists of gradient correction, segmentation of breast region from background, segmentation of fibroglandular and adipose region within the breast area and calculation of breast density. The density is defined as the percentage of fibroglandular tissue area divided by the total breast area in the mammogram. This technique was clinically validated with 122 normal mammograms; these were subjectively evaluated and classified according to the five parenchyma patterns of the Tabar's scheme (Class I- V) by a consultant radiologist. There was a statistical significant correlation between the computer technique and subjective classification (r 2 = 0.84, p<0.05). 71.3% of subjective classification was correctly classified using the computer technique. We had developed a computer technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density and validated its accuracy for computerized classification based on Tabar's scheme. This quantitative tool is useful for the evaluation of a large dataset of mammograms to predict breast cancer risk based on density. Furthermore it has the potential to provide an early marker for success or failure in chemoprevention studies such as hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. Global detection approach for clustered microcalcifications in mammograms using a deep learning network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Nishikawa, Robert M; Yang, Yongyi

    2017-04-01

    In computerized detection of clustered microcalcifications (MCs) from mammograms, the traditional approach is to apply a pattern detector to locate the presence of individual MCs, which are subsequently grouped into clusters. Such an approach is often susceptible to the occurrence of false positives (FPs) caused by local image patterns that resemble MCs. We investigate the feasibility of a direct detection approach to determining whether an image region contains clustered MCs or not. Toward this goal, we develop a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) as the classifier model to which the input consists of a large image window ([Formula: see text] in size). The multiple layers in the CNN classifier are trained to automatically extract image features relevant to MCs at different spatial scales. In the experiments, we demonstrated this approach on a dataset consisting of both screen-film mammograms and full-field digital mammograms. We evaluated the detection performance both on classifying image regions of clustered MCs using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and on detecting clustered MCs from full mammograms by a free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. For comparison, we also considered a recently developed MC detector with FP suppression. In classifying image regions of clustered MCs, the CNN classifier achieved 0.971 in the area under the ROC curve, compared to 0.944 for the MC detector. In detecting clustered MCs from full mammograms, at 90% sensitivity, the CNN classifier obtained an FP rate of 0.69 clusters/image, compared to 1.17 clusters/image by the MC detector. These results indicate that using global image features can be more effective in discriminating clustered MCs from FPs caused by various sources, such as linear structures, thereby providing a more accurate detection of clustered MCs on mammograms.

  9. Screening for Electrophysiological Abnormalities in Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: Peripheral Neuropathy and Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köşkderelioğlu, Aslı; Ortan, Pınar; Ari, Alpay; Gedizlioğlu, Muhteşem

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the existence of peripheral and optic neuropathies in asymptomatic individuals with hepatitis C infection. Thirty consecutive patients who were followed in a hepatitis C outpatient clinic were recruited for electrophysiological evaluation together with 30 age- and gender-compatible healthy controls. All patients had a detailed neurological examination. The information regarding the disease duration and management with interferons were collected. Nerve conduction studies and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded in all subjects. The results of the patient and control groups were statistically compared. Of the patients with hepatitis C infection, 16 were females and 14 males. The mean age was 57.5 years, and the average disease duration was 6.43 years. The P100 latencies in the patient group were within normal limits, while the amplitudes were meaningfully small by comparison with the controls. There were some abnormalities in the nerve conduction studies of 15 patients. Sensorial neuropathy was detected in two patients, sensorimotor polyneuropathy in four, carpal tunnel syndrome in seven, and carpal tunnel syndrome and sensorimotor polyneuropathy as comorbid states in another two patients. The nerve conduction studies and VEP parameters were entirely normal in the control group. Hepatitis C-related neurological abnormalities may occur both in the central and peripheral nervous system. Mononeuritis multiplex, sensorial axonal neuropathy, and multiple mononeuropathies are some of the presentations of the peripheral nervous system involvement. The mode of infection is considered to be via vasculitic mechanisms. In addition, optic neuropathy is a known complication of interferon treatment. Autoantibodies, cytokines, chemokines, and cryoglobulins are accused to play roles in the pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the peripheral nervous system and optic nerves in a group of patients with hepatitis C. The results were in

  10. Anatomic breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    was represented by geodesic distance (s) from nipple and parametric angle (¿) as shown in figure 1. The scoring technique called MTR (mammographic texture resemblance marker) used this breast coordinate system to extract Gaussian derivative features. The features extracted using the (x,y) and the curve......Purpose Many researchers have investigated measures also other than density in the mammogram such as measures based on texture to improve breast cancer risk assessment. However, parenchymal texture characteristics are highly dependent on the orientation of vasculature structure and fibrous tissue...... methodologies as seen from table 2 in given temporal study. Conclusion The curve-linear anatomical breast coordinate system facilitated computerized analysis of mammograms. The proposed coordinate system slightly improved the risk segregation by Mammographic Texture Resemblance and minimized the geometrical...

  11. Systematic screening for skin, hair, and nail abnormalities in a large-scale knockout mouse program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Sundberg

    Full Text Available The International Knockout Mouse Consortium was formed in 2007 to inactivate ("knockout" all protein-coding genes in the mouse genome in embryonic stem cells. Production and characterization of these mice, now underway, has generated and phenotyped 3,100 strains with knockout alleles. Skin and adnexa diseases are best defined at the gross clinical level and by histopathology. Representative retired breeders had skin collected from the back, abdomen, eyelids, muzzle, ears, tail, and lower limbs including the nails. To date, 169 novel mutant lines were reviewed and of these, only one was found to have a relatively minor sebaceous gland abnormality associated with follicular dystrophy. The B6N(Cg-Far2tm2b(KOMPWtsi/2J strain, had lesions affecting sebaceous glands with what appeared to be a secondary follicular dystrophy. A second line, B6N(Cg-Ppp1r9btm1.1(KOMPVlcg/J, had follicular dystrophy limited to many but not all mystacial vibrissae in heterozygous but not homozygous mutant mice, suggesting that this was a nonspecific background lesion. We discuss potential reasons for the low frequency of skin and adnexal phenotypes in mice from this project in comparison to those seen in human Mendelian diseases, and suggest alternative approaches to identification of human disease-relevant models.

  12. Breast screening: What can the interval cancer review teach us? Are we perhaps being a bit too hard on ourselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekanidi, Katerina; Dilks, Phil; Suaris, Tamara; Kennett, Steffan; Purushothaman, Hema

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the features that make interval cancers apparent on the preceding screening mammogram and determine whether changes in the ways of performing the interval cancer review will affect the true interval cancer rate. This study was approved by the clinical governance committee. Mammograms of women diagnosed with an interval cancer were included in the study if they had been allocated to either the "suspicious signs" group or "subtle signs" group, during the historic interval cancer review. Three radiologists, individually and blinded to the site of interval cancer, reviewed the mammograms and documented the presence, site, characteristics and classification of any abnormality. Findings were compared with the appearances of the abnormality at the site of subsequent cancer development by a different breast radiologist. The chi-squared test was used in the analysis of the results, seeking associations between recall concordance and cancer mammographic or histological characteristics. 111/590 interval cancers fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. In 17% of the cases none of the readers identified the relevant abnormality on the screening mammogram. 1/3 readers identified the relevant lesion in 22% of the cases, 2/3 readers in 28% of cases and all 3 readers in 33% of cases. The commonest unanimously recalled abnormality was microcalcification and the most challenging mammographic abnormality to detect was asymmetric density. We did not find any statistically significant association between recall concordance and time to interval cancer, position of lesion in the breast, breast density or cancer grade. Even the simple step of performing an independent blinded review of interval cancers reduces the rate of interval cancers classified as missed by up to 39%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interpolated sagittal and coronal reconstruction of CT images in the screening of neck abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Issei

    1983-01-01

    Recontructed sagittal and coronal images were analyzed for their usefulness during clinical applications and to determine the correct use of recontruction techniques. Recontructed stereoscopic images can be formed by continuous or interrupted image reconstruction using interpolation. This study showed that lesions less than 10 mm in diameter should be made continuously and recontructed with uninterrupted technique. However, 5 mm interrupted distances are acceptable for interpolated reconstruction except in cases of lesions less than 10 mm in diameter. Clinically, interpolated reconstruction is not adequated for semicircular lesions less than 10 mm. Blood vessels and linear lesions are good condiated for the application of interpolated recontruction. Reconstruction of images using interrupted interpolation is therefore recommended for screening and for demonstrating correct stereoscopic information, except cases of small lesions less than 10 mm in diameter. Results of this study underscore the fact that obscure information in transverse CT images should be routinely utilized by interporating recontruction techniques, if transverse images are not made continuously. Interpolated recontruction may be helpful in obtaining stereoscopic information. (author)

  14. Can HbA1c be Used to Screen for Glucose Abnormalities Among Adults with Severe Mental Illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, A J; Letendre, E; Akrass, Z; Avignon, A; Karelis, A D; Sultan, A; Abdel-Baki, A

    2017-04-01

    Aim: Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are highly prevalent among individuals with serious mental illness and increased by antipsychotic medication. Although widely recommended, many obstacles prevent these patients from obtaining a proper screening for dysglycemia. Currently, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels from the oral glucose tolerance test are used for screening prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to investigate if HbA1c could be used as the only screening test among individuals with serious mental illness. Methods: Cross sectional study comparing the sensitivity of HbA1c, fasting glucose, and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to detect dysglycemias in serious mental illness participants referred for metabolic complications. Results: A total of 84 participants (43 female; aged: 38.5±12.8 years; BMI: 35.0±6.8 kg/m²) was included. Regarding prediabetes, 44, 44 and 76% were identified by HbA1c, fasting glucose, and 2 h- oral glucose tolerance test respectively and for type 2 diabetes, 60, 53 and 66% were identified by HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2 h-oral glucose tolerance test. The overlap between the 3 markers was low (8% of participants for prediabetes and 26% for Type 2 diabetes). Sensitivity of HbA1c were moderate (range 40-62.5%), while its specificity was excellent (92-93%). Conclusion: The present study indicates a low agreement between HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. It appears that these markers do not identify the same participants. Thus, HbA1c may not be used alone to detect all glucose abnormalities among individuals with serious mental illness. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Significance of screening mammography in the detection of breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Hong In; Chung, Kyoo Byung

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the screening mammography in the detection of the breast diseases, especially breast carcinoma. We analyzed 1,800 cases of mammography retrospectively. The mammography was done as a part of routine check in Health Counselling Center, Korea University Medical Center, during 9 months from November 1993 to July 1994. The age range was from 23 years to 76 years, mean 49.8 years, and the largest age group was 6th decade (31.4%). According to the mammographic findings, we divided the subjects into three groups; normal group, abnormal group in need of follow-up study, abnormal group requiring biopsy. On mammography, the normal group consisted of 1,534 cases (85%), and the abnormal group consisted of 266 cases (15%). The abnormal findings were benign-looking calcification (n = 140), fibroadeno ma (n = 29), fibrocystic changes (n = 27), cyst (n = 23), malignant lesion (n = 15) lipoma (n = 7), and others. In four of 15 cases, which were suspected to be malignant on mammograms, breast carcinoma was confirmed pathologically. In four cases of breast carcinoma, one was under 40 and the other 3 were over 50 years of age. All of the breast cancers were under 3 cm in size, and the mammographic findings of breast cancer included spiculated margin (n = 3), parenchymal distortion (n = 3), malignant calcification (n = 2) and enlarged axillary node (n = 1). Screening mammogram is helpful for early detection of non-palpable breast cancer, especially for women over 50 years of age

  16. Significance of screening mammography in the detection of breast diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Hong In; Chung, Kyoo Byung [College of Medicine Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the screening mammography in the detection of the breast diseases, especially breast carcinoma. We analyzed 1,800 cases of mammography retrospectively. The mammography was done as a part of routine check in Health Counselling Center, Korea University Medical Center, during 9 months from November 1993 to July 1994. The age range was from 23 years to 76 years, mean 49.8 years, and the largest age group was 6th decade (31.4%). According to the mammographic findings, we divided the subjects into three groups; normal group, abnormal group in need of follow-up study, abnormal group requiring biopsy. On mammography, the normal group consisted of 1,534 cases (85%), and the abnormal group consisted of 266 cases (15%). The abnormal findings were benign-looking calcification (n = 140), fibroadeno ma (n = 29), fibrocystic changes (n = 27), cyst (n = 23), malignant lesion (n = 15) lipoma (n = 7), and others. In four of 15 cases, which were suspected to be malignant on mammograms, breast carcinoma was confirmed pathologically. In four cases of breast carcinoma, one was under 40 and the other 3 were over 50 years of age. All of the breast cancers were under 3 cm in size, and the mammographic findings of breast cancer included spiculated margin (n = 3), parenchymal distortion (n = 3), malignant calcification (n = 2) and enlarged axillary node (n = 1). Screening mammogram is helpful for early detection of non-palpable breast cancer, especially for women over 50 years of age.

  17. Resolution effects on the morphology of calcifications in digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallergi, Maria; He, Li; Gavrielides, Marios; Heine, John; Clarke, Laurence P [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, and H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Box 17, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    1999-12-31

    The development of computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) techniques and direct digital mammography systems have generated significant interest in the issue of the effect of image resolution on the detection and classification (benign vs malignant) of mammographic abnormalities. CAD in particular seems to heavily depend on image resolution, either due to the inherent algorithm design and optimization, which is almost always dependent, or due to the differences in image content at the various resolutions. This twofold dependence makes it even more difficult to answer the question of what is the minimum resolution required for successful detection and/or classification of a specific mammographic abnormality, such as calcifications. One may begin by evaluating the losses in the mammograms as the films are digitized with different pixel sizes and depths. In this paper we attempted to measure these losses for the case of calcifications at four different spatial resolutions through a simulation model and a classification scheme that is based only on morphological features. The results showed that a 60 {mu}m pixel size and 12 bits per pixel should at least be used if the morphology and distribution of the calcifications are essential components in the CAD algorithm design. These conclusions were tested with the use of a wavelet-based algorithm for the segmentation of simulated mammographic calcifications at various resolutions. The evaluation of the segmentation through shape analysis and classification supported the initial conclusion. (authors) 14 refs., 1 tabs.

  18. Dynamic multiple thresholding breast boundary detection algorithm for mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Zhou Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Daly, Caroline Plowden; Douglas, Julie A.; Zhang Yiheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Shi Jiazheng; Wei Jun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Automated detection of breast boundary is one of the fundamental steps for computer-aided analysis of mammograms. In this study, the authors developed a new dynamic multiple thresholding based breast boundary (MTBB) detection method for digitized mammograms. Methods: A large data set of 716 screen-film mammograms (442 CC view and 274 MLO view) obtained from consecutive cases of an Institutional Review Board approved project were used. An experienced breast radiologist manually traced the breast boundary on each digitized image using a graphical interface to provide a reference standard. The initial breast boundary (MTBB-Initial) was obtained by dynamically adapting the threshold to the gray level range in local regions of the breast periphery. The initial breast boundary was then refined by using gradient information from horizontal and vertical Sobel filtering to obtain the final breast boundary (MTBB-Final). The accuracy of the breast boundary detection algorithm was evaluated by comparison with the reference standard using three performance metrics: The Hausdorff distance (HDist), the average minimum Euclidean distance (AMinDist), and the area overlap measure (AOM). Results: In comparison with the authors' previously developed gradient-based breast boundary (GBB) algorithm, it was found that 68%, 85%, and 94% of images had HDist errors less than 6 pixels (4.8 mm) for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. 89%, 90%, and 96% of images had AMinDist errors less than 1.5 pixels (1.2 mm) for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. 96%, 98%, and 99% of images had AOM values larger than 0.9 for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. The improvement by the MTBB-Final method was statistically significant for all the evaluation measures by the Wilcoxon signed rank test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: The MTBB approach that combined dynamic multiple thresholding and gradient information provided better performance than the breast boundary

  19. Analysis and comparison of breast density according to age on mammogram between Korean and Western women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyung; Kim, Mi Hye; Oh, Ki Keun

    2000-01-01

    To compare changes in breast parenchymal density among diverse age groups in asymptomatic Korean women with those of Western women, and to evaluate the effect of different patterns of breast parenchymal density on the sensitivity of screening mammography in Korean women. We analyzed the distribution of breast parenchymal density among diverse age groups in 823 asymptomatic Korean women aged 30-64 who underwent screening mammography between January and December 1998. On the basis of ACR BI-RADS breast composition, four density patterns were designated: patterns 1 and 2 related to fatty mammograms, and patterns 3 and 4 to dense mammograms. We compared the results with those for western women. In Korean women, the frequency of dense mammogram was 88.1% (30-34 years old), 91.1% (35-39), 78.3% (40-44), 61.1% (45-49), 30.1% (50-54), 21.1% (55-59), and 7.0% (60-64). Korean women in their 40s thus showed a higher frequency of dense mammograms, but this frequency decreased abruptly between the ages of 40 and 54. In Western women, however, there was little difference between 40 and 54-year-olds: the figures were 47.2% (40-44 years), 44.8% (45-49), and 44.4% (50-54). Because the frequency of their dense mammograms shows little change between Western women in their forties and in their fifties, it is clear that between these two age groups, mammographic sensitivity is only slightly different. Because the frequency of dense mammograms is much greater among Korean women in their forties than among Western women of the same age, and among korean women this frequency decreases abruptly, it appears, however, that the mammographic sensitivity of korean women is less among those in their forties than among those in their fifties. It is therefore thought that mammography combined with ultrasonography may increase screening sensitivity among Korean women under 50, who have a relatively higher incidence of breast cancer in the younger age groups than do Western women. (author)

  20. Diagnostic image quality of mammograms in German outpatient medical care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfandzelter, R.; Wuelfing, U.; Boedeker, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A total of 79 115 mammograms from statutory health insurance (SHI) physicians within German outpatient care were evaluated with respect to the diagnostic image quality. Materials and Methods: Mammograms were randomly selected between 2006 and 2008 by the regional Associations of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians and submitted to regional boards of experts for external evaluation. The mammogram quality was evaluated using a 3-point scale (adequate, borderline, failure) and documented using a nationally standardized protocol. Results: 87.6 % of the mammograms were classified as adequate, 11.0 % as borderline and 1.4 % as failure. Mediolateral oblique mammograms (mlo) had worse ratings than craniocaudal mammograms (cc). Main reasons for classifying the mammograms as borderline or failure were 'inframammary fold not adequately visualized' (mlo), 'pectoral muscle not in the correct angle or not to the level with the nipple' (mlo), 'the nipple not in profile' (mlo, cc) and 'breast not completely or not adequately visualized' (cc). Conclusion: The results show a good overall quality of mammograms in German outpatient medical care. Failures can be associated predominantly with incorrect positioning of the breast. More precisely defined quality criteria using objective measures are recommended, especially for craniocaudal mammograms (cc). (orig.)

  1. Review and analysis of mammograms of the Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Calderon Guardia from January 2013 to May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Villalobos, Andrea; Solis Vargas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of 400 mammograms of the Radiology Service of the Calderon Guardia Hospital is carried out, linking the statistical findings between BIRADS Categorization, family hereditary factors, age groups and pathological personalities, of the patients treated in the period from January 2013 to May 2013 Calcifications are identified as the most frequent pathological findings in mammograms analyzed. Ultrasound is identified as the complementary method to mammography the most frequently used. Mammography is still the screening study for the early detection of breast cancer. The support of specialists in radiology of medical images is recommended to implement early reports in the second level of attention [es

  2. Detecting microcalcifications in digital mammogram using wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jucheng; Park Dongsun

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is still one of main mortality causes in women, but the early detection can increase the chance of cure. Microcalcifications are small size structures, which can indicate the presence of cancer since they are often associated to the most different types of breast tumors. However, they very small size and the X-ray systems limitations lead to constraints to the adequate visualization of such structures, which means that the microcalcifications can be missed many times in mammogram visual examination. In addition, the human eyes are not able to distinguish minimal tonality differences, which can be another constraint when mammogram image presents poor contrast between microcalcifications and the tissues around them. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes are being developed in order to increase the probabilities of early detection. To enhance and detect the microcalcifications in the mammograms we use the wavelets transform. From a signal processing point of view, microcalcifications are high frequency components in mammograms. Due to the multi-resolution decomposition capacity of the wavelet transform, we can decompose the image into different resolution levels which sensitive to different frequency bands. By choosing an appropriate wavelet and a right resolution level, we can effectively enhance and detect the microcalcifications in digital mammogram. In this work, we describe a new four-step method for the detection of microcalcifications: segmentation, wavelets transform processing, labeling and post-processing. The segmentation step is to split the breast area into 256x256 segments. For each segmented sub-image, wavelet transform is operated on it. For comparing study wavelet transform method, 4 typical family wavelets and 4 decomposing levels is discussed. We choose four family wavelets for detecting microcalcifications, that is, Daubechies, Biothgonai, Coieflets and Symlets wavelets, for simply, bd4, bior3.7, coif3, sym2 are chosen as the

  3. Cervical screening program and the psychological impact of an abnormal Pap smear: a self-assessment questionnaire study of 590 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, Fabinshy; Einzmann, Thomas; Bergauer, Florian; Patzke, Jan; Schmidt-Petruschkat, Silke; Theune, Monika; Engel, Katja; Puppe, Julian; Richters, Lisa; Mallmann, Peter; Kirn, Verena

    2016-02-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is today the fourth most common cancer of women in western civilization. Screening programs have led to a continuously decrease. Nevertheless, both screening and a positive test result are known to be associated with a negative psychological impact. Screening programs in European countries differ and thus psychological impact might as well. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychological impact of women with an abnormal Pap smear in a German cohort. Between July 2013 and May 2014, a self-assessment questionnaire was distributed to 595 patients that were referred to a special clinic for cervical dysplasia for further evaluation of an abnormal Pap smear. Patients were recruited in five different centers. Most patients (45.9 %) were informed about the test result via phone call by their doctor. 68.8 % of the patients felt anxious and 26.3 % even felt panic. After having talked to their physician, 51.4 % of our cohort still felt worried and only 24.4 % felt reassured. Concerning disease management, 48.4 % underwent a control Pap smear in 6 months. The preferred information source was the physician (63.9 %). Compared to the results in other European countries, our study cohort showed differences concerning age distribution, patients living in a partnership, number of children and especially disease management. Cancer screening itself and abnormal test results have an impact on patient's feelings. To reduce the psychological impact, patients need to be better informed about the risks and benefits of cancer screening programs and in case of cervical cancer screening about the meaning of an abnormal test result. Our results underline the importance of a trustful physician-patient relationship in that matter.

  4. Mammogram CAD, hybrid registration and iconic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, A.; Cloppet, F.; Vincent, N.

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to develop a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) based on a two-step methodology to register and analyze pairs of temporal mammograms. The concept of "medical file", including all the previous medical information on a patient, enables joint analysis of different acquisitions taken at different times, and the detection of significant modifications. The developed registration method aims to superimpose at best the different anatomical structures of the breast. The registration is designed in order to get rid of deformation undergone by the acquisition process while preserving those due to breast changes indicative of malignancy. In order to reach this goal, a referent image is computed from control points based on anatomical features that are extracted automatically. Then the second image of the couple is realigned on the referent image, using a coarse-to-fine approach according to expert knowledge that allows both rigid and non-rigid transforms. The joint analysis detects the evolution between two images representing the same scene. In order to achieve this, it is important to know the registration error limits in order to adapt the observation scale. The approach used in this paper is based on an image sparse representation. Decomposed in regular patterns, the images are analyzed under a new angle. The evolution detection problem has many practical applications, especially in medical images. The CAD is evaluated using recall and precision of differences in mammograms.

  5. Evaluation of hybrids algorithms for mass detection in digitalized mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Jose; Garzon Reyes, Johnson

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer remains being a significant public health problem, the early detection of the lesions can increase the success possibilities of the medical treatments. The mammography is an image modality effective to early diagnosis of abnormalities, where the medical image is obtained of the mammary gland with X-rays of low radiation, this allows detect a tumor or circumscribed mass between two to three years before that it was clinically palpable, and is the only method that until now achieved reducing the mortality by breast cancer. In this paper three hybrids algorithms for circumscribed mass detection on digitalized mammograms are evaluated. In the first stage correspond to a review of the enhancement and segmentation techniques used in the processing of the mammographic images. After a shape filtering was applied to the resulting regions. By mean of a Bayesian filter the survivors regions were processed, where the characteristics vector for the classifier was constructed with few measurements. Later, the implemented algorithms were evaluated by ROC curves, where 40 images were taken for the test, 20 normal images and 20 images with circumscribed lesions. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages in the correct detection of a lesion of every algorithm are discussed.

  6. Genome-Wide Screening of Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients Using Array-CGH Technique: A Czech Multicenter Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Smetana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic recurrent copy number aberrations (CNAs play a key role in multiple myeloma (MM pathogenesis and have important prognostic significance for MM patients. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH provides a powerful tool for genome-wide classification of CNAs and thus should be implemented into MM routine diagnostics. We demonstrate the possibility of effective utilization of oligonucleotide-based aCGH in 91 MM patients. Chromosomal aberrations associated with effect on the prognosis of MM were initially evaluated by I-FISH and were found in 93.4% (85/91. Incidence of hyperdiploidy was 49.5% (45/91; del(13(q14 was detected in 57.1% (52/91; gain(1(q21 occurred in 58.2% (53/91; del(17(p13 was observed in 15.4% (14/91; and t(4;14(p16;q32 was found in 18.6% (16/86. Genome-wide screening using Agilent 44K aCGH microarrays revealed copy number alterations in 100% (91/91. Most common deletions were found at 13q (58.9%, 1p (39.6%, and 8p (31.1%, whereas gain of whole 1q was the most often duplicated region (50.6%. Furthermore, frequent homozygous deletions of genes playing important role in myeloma biology such as TRAF3, BIRC1/BIRC2, RB1, or CDKN2C were observed. Taken together, we demonstrated the utilization of aCGH technique in clinical diagnostics as powerful tool for identification of unbalanced genomic abnormalities with prognostic significance for MM patients.

  7. Fusion of local and global features for classification of abnormality in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuradha C Phadke

    cancer death all over the world. In India, breast .... and efficient. Oliver et al [16] proposed a knowledge-based ... microcalcifications morphology is obtained by using bank of filters. ..... fication for management of abnormal mammograms. J. Am.

  8. Vitamin D intake, month the mammogram was taken and mammographic density in Norwegian women aged 50-69.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Ellingjord-Dale

    Full Text Available The role of vitamin D in breast cancer etiology is unclear. There is some, but inconsistent, evidence that vitamin D is associated with both breast cancer risk and mammographic density (MD. We evaluated the associations of MD with month the mammogram was taken, and with vitamin D intake, in a population of women from Norway--a country with limited sunlight exposure for a large part of the year.3114 women aged 50-69, who participated in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP in 2004 or 2006/07, completed risk factor and food frequency (FFQ questionnaires. Dietary and total (dietary plus supplements vitamin D, calcium and energy intakes were estimated by the FFQ. Month when the mammogram was taken was recorded on the mammogram. Percent MD was assessed using a computer assisted method (Madena, University of Southern California after digitization of the films. Linear regression models were used to investigate percent MD associations with month the mammogram was taken, and vitamin D and calcium intakes, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI, study year, estrogen and progestin therapy (EPT, education, parity, calcium intakes and energy intakes.There was no statistical significant association between the month the mammogram was taken and percent MD. Overall, there was no association between percent MD and quartiles of total or dietary vitamin D intakes, or of calcium intake. However, analysis restricted to women aged <55 years revealed a suggestive inverse association between total vitamin D intake and percent MD (p for trend = 0.03.Overall, we found no strong evidence that month the mammogram was taken was associated with percent MD. We found no inverse association between vitamin D intake and percent MD overall, but observed a suggestive inverse association between dietary vitamin D and MD for women less than 55 years old.

  9. Improved Classification of Mammograms Following Idealized Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Adam N.; Love, Bradley C.

    2014-01-01

    People often make decisions by stochastically retrieving a small set of relevant memories. This limited retrieval implies that human performance can be improved by training on idealized category distributions (Giguère & Love, 2013). Here, we evaluate whether the benefits of idealized training extend to categorization of real-world stimuli, namely classifying mammograms as normal or tumorous. Participants in the idealized condition were trained exclusively on items that, according to a norming study, were relatively unambiguous. Participants in the actual condition were trained on a representative range of items. Despite being exclusively trained on easy items, idealized-condition participants were more accurate than those in the actual condition when tested on a range of item types. However, idealized participants experienced difficulties when test items were very dissimilar from training cases. The benefits of idealization, attributable to reducing noise arising from cognitive limitations in memory retrieval, suggest ways to improve real-world decision making. PMID:24955325

  10. Improved Classification of Mammograms Following Idealized Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Adam N; Love, Bradley C

    2014-06-01

    People often make decisions by stochastically retrieving a small set of relevant memories. This limited retrieval implies that human performance can be improved by training on idealized category distributions (Giguère & Love, 2013). Here, we evaluate whether the benefits of idealized training extend to categorization of real-world stimuli, namely classifying mammograms as normal or tumorous. Participants in the idealized condition were trained exclusively on items that, according to a norming study, were relatively unambiguous. Participants in the actual condition were trained on a representative range of items. Despite being exclusively trained on easy items, idealized-condition participants were more accurate than those in the actual condition when tested on a range of item types. However, idealized participants experienced difficulties when test items were very dissimilar from training cases. The benefits of idealization, attributable to reducing noise arising from cognitive limitations in memory retrieval, suggest ways to improve real-world decision making.

  11. Development of a Computer-aided Diagnosis System for Early Detection of Masses Using Retrospectively Detected Cancers on Prior Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    des ign a c lassifier f or t he differentiation of the abnormal from the normal structures . In this project, we have also investigated the...were trained: one with the current m ammograms and the other with the prior mammograms. A feed- forward backpropagation artificial neural network...Sahin er, B., Helvie, M. A., Petri ck, N., Roubidou x, M. A., Wi lson, T. E., Adler, D. D., Pa ramagul, C., Ne wman, J . S . a nd G opal , S. S

  12. Can delayed time to referral to a tertiary level urologist with an abnormal PSA level affect subsequent Gleason grade in the opportunistically screened population?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, Fardod

    2013-09-01

    There is growing conflict in the literature describing the effect of delayed treatment on outcomes following radical prostatectomy. There is also evidence to suggest progression of low-risk prostate cancer to develop higher grades and volumes of prostate cancer during active surveillance. It is unknown as to what affect a delay in referral of those men with abnormal screened-PSA levels have on subsequent Gleason grade.

  13. The relationship of psychosocial factors to mammograms, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption among sisters of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartman SJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheri J Hartman1, Shira I Dunsiger1, Paul B Jacobsen21Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and W Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; 2Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: This study examined the relationship of psychosocial factors to health-promoting behaviors in sisters of breast cancer patients. One hundred and twenty sisters of breast cancer patients completed questionnaires assessing response efficacy of mammography screenings, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption on decreasing breast cancer risk, breast cancer worry, involvement in their sister’s cancer care, mammography screenings, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption. Results indicate that greater perceived effectiveness for mammograms was associated with a 67% increase in odds of yearly mammograms. Greater involvement in the patient’s care was associated with a 7% decrease in odds of yearly mammograms. Greater perceived effectiveness for physical activity was significantly related to greater physical activity. There was a trend for greater perceived effectiveness for fruits and vegetables to be associated with consuming more fruits and vegetables. Breast cancer worry was not significantly associated with the outcomes. While perceived effectiveness for a specific health behavior in reducing breast cancer risk was consistently related to engaging in that health behavior, women reported significantly lower perceived effectiveness for physical activity and fruits and vegetables than for mammograms. Making women aware of the health benefits of these behaviors may be important in promoting changes.Keywords: breast cancer risk, mammograms, physical activity, diet, perceived effectiveness

  14. What Is a Mammogram and When Should I Get One?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print Materials Buttons and Badges Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is a Mammogram? Language: English (US) Español ( ...

  15. Simultaneous detection and classification of breast masses in digital mammograms via a deep learning YOLO-based CAD system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masni, Mohammed A; Al-Antari, Mugahed A; Park, Jeong-Min; Gi, Geon; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Rivera, Patricio; Valarezo, Edwin; Choi, Mun-Taek; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2018-04-01

    Automatic detection and classification of the masses in mammograms are still a big challenge and play a crucial role to assist radiologists for accurate diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system based on one of the regional deep learning techniques, a ROI-based Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) which is called You Only Look Once (YOLO). Although most previous studies only deal with classification of masses, our proposed YOLO-based CAD system can handle detection and classification simultaneously in one framework. The proposed CAD system contains four main stages: preprocessing of mammograms, feature extraction utilizing deep convolutional networks, mass detection with confidence, and finally mass classification using Fully Connected Neural Networks (FC-NNs). In this study, we utilized original 600 mammograms from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM) and their augmented mammograms of 2,400 with the information of the masses and their types in training and testing our CAD. The trained YOLO-based CAD system detects the masses and then classifies their types into benign or malignant. Our results with five-fold cross validation tests show that the proposed CAD system detects the mass location with an overall accuracy of 99.7%. The system also distinguishes between benign and malignant lesions with an overall accuracy of 97%. Our proposed system even works on some challenging breast cancer cases where the masses exist over the pectoral muscles or dense regions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer-Aided Detection in Digital Mammography: False-Positive Marks and Their Reproducibility in Negative Mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ja; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Seong, Min Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are relatively few studies reporting the frequency of false-positive computer-aided detection (CAD) marks and their reproducibility in normal cases. Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the false-positive mark rate of a CAD system and the reproducibility of false-positive marks in two sets of negative digital mammograms. Material and Methods: Two sets of negative digital mammograms were obtained in 360 women (mean age 57 years, range 30-76 years) with an approximate interval of 1 year (mean time 343.7 days), and a CAD system was applied. False-positive CAD marks and the reproducibility were determined. Results: Of the 360 patients, 252 (70.0%) and 240 (66.7%) patients had 1-7 CAD marks on the initial and second mammograms, respectively. The false-positive CAD mark rate was 1.5 (1.1 for masses and 0.4 for calcifications) and 1.4 (1.0 for masses and 0.4 for calcifications) per examination in the initial and second mammograms, respectively. The reproducibility of the false-positive CAD marks was 12.0% for both mass (81/680) and microcalcification (33/278) marks. Conclusion: False-positive CAD marks were seen in approximately 70% of normal cases. However, the reproducibility was very low. Radiologists must be familiar with the findings of false-positive CAD marks, since they are very common and can increase the recall rate in screening

  17. Consensus double reading of mammograms in private practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacher, B.; Tscherney, R.; Litmann-Rowenta, B.; Liskutin, J.; Mazewski, I.; Leitner, H.; Tscholakoff, D.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the results of consensus double reading of mammograms in a private practice for a period of 1.5 years (November 2001 to March 2003). Materials and Method: Two independent experts with dedicated training read all mammograms on a weekly basis. All mammograms including sonographic examinations were evaluated independently and categorized using the Bl-RADS classification. The achieved consensus included a possible recommendation for recall or therapy. A total of 3936 mammograms and 1912 sonography studies were evaluated. All cases with BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories were compared with the histologic results. For a period of three months, the acceptance of double reading including a delay of the final report by one week was tested with a questionnaire and informed consent sheet. Results: BI-RADS categories 4 and 5 were found in 57 cases, with 41 consensus results by two independent readers and 26 carcinomas verified by histology. No consensus could be reached in 16 patients, of which 10 had a final histologic result, with 5 benign lesions and 5 carcinomas of less than 1 cm in diameter. Clinical symptoms or alterations were absent in all patients. The 5 carcinomas were discovered by the double reading procedure. The result of the questionnaire (695 questionnaires) showed a refusal rate of 0.7%, with only 5 women refusing the opportunity of double reading their mammograms. Conclusion: Double reading of mammograms by independent experts is feasible, shows a measurable increase in quality and is accepted by almost all women. (orig.)

  18. Study of the Effects of Total Modulation Transfer Function Changes on Observer Performance Using Clinical Mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencomo, Jose Antonio Fagundez

    The main goal of this study was to relate physical changes in image quality measured by Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) to diagnostic accuracy. One Hundred and Fifty Kodak Min-R screen/film combination conventional craniocaudal mammograms obtained with the Pfizer Microfocus Mammographic system were selected from the files of the Department of Radiology, at M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. The mammograms included 88 cases with a variety of benign diagnosis and 62 cases with a variety of malignant biopsy diagnosis. The average age of the patient population was 55 years old. 70 cases presented calcifications with 30 cases having calcifications smaller than 0.5mm. 46 cases presented irregular bordered masses larger than 1 cm. 30 cases presented smooth bordered masses with 20 larger than 1 cm. Four separated copies of the original images were made each having a different change in the MTF using a defocusing technique whereby copies of the original were obtained by light exposure through different thicknesses (spacing) of transparent film base. The mammograms were randomized, and evaluated by three experienced mammographers for the degree of visibility of various anatomical breast structures and pathological lesions (masses and calicifications), subjective image quality, and mammographic interpretation. 3,000 separate evaluations were anayzed by several statistical techniques including Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis, McNemar test for differences between proportions and the Landis et al. method of agreement weighted kappa for ordinal categorical data. Results from the statistical analysis show: (1) There were no statistical significant differences in the diagnostic accuracy of the observers when diagnosing from mammograms with the same MTF. (2) There were no statistically significant differences in diagnostic accuracy for each observer when diagnosing from mammograms with the different MTF's used in the study. (3) There statistical

  19. Controlled single-blind clinical evaluation of low-dose mammographic screen: film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sickles, E.A.; Genant, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The ability of five low-dose mammographic screen-film systems to portray normal and abnormal breast structures was evaluated in parallel with a study of physical image properties. Single-blind evaluations of the visibility of normal breast architecture, mass lesions, and calcifications were made on the mammograms of 100 patients radiographed with each of the systems. There was increased noise and slightly poorer resolution of the faster recording systems, but there was no difference in final diagnostic impressions among the five systems. These results suggest that the faster systems will result in substantial dose reduction without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy

  20. Mobile Versus Fixed Facility: Latinas' Attitudes and Preferences for Obtaining a Mammogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, John R; Tillack, Allison A; Mercer, Lauren; Coronado, Gloria D; Beresford, Shirley A A; Molina, Yamile; Thompson, Beti

    2018-01-01

    Mobile mammographic services have been proposed as a way to reduce Latinas' disproportionate late-stage presentation compared with white women by increasing their access to mammography. The aims of this study were to assess why Latinas may not use mobile mammographic services and to explore their preferences after using these services. Using a mixed-methods approach, a secondary analysis was conducted of baseline survey data (n = 538) from a randomized controlled trial to improve screening mammography rates among Latinas in Washington. Descriptive statistics and bivariate regression were used to characterize mammography location preferences and to test for associations with sociodemographic indices, health care access, and perceived breast cancer risk and beliefs. On the basis of these findings, a qualitative study (n = 18) was used to explore changes in perceptions after using mobile mammographic services. More Latinas preferred obtaining a mammogram at a fixed facility (52.3% [n = 276]) compared with having no preference (46.3% [n = 249]) and preferring mobile mammographic services (1.7% [n = 9]). Concerns about privacy and comfort (15.6% [n = 84]) and about general quality (10.6% [n = 57]) were common reasons for preferring a fixed facility. Those with no history of mammography preferred a fixed facility (P mobile mammographic services after obtaining a mammogram. Although most Latinas preferred obtaining a mammogram at a fixed facility, positive experiences with mobile mammography services changed their attitudes toward them. These findings highlight the need to include community education when using mobile mammographic service to increase screening mammography rates in underserved communities. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The visibility of cancer on previous mammograms in retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarenmaa, I.; Salminen, T.; Geiger, U.; Heikkinen, P.; Hyvarinen, S.; Isola, J.; Kataja, V.; Kokko, M.-L.; Kokko, R.; Kumpulainen, E.; Karkkainen, A.; Pakkanen, J.; Peltonen, P.; Piironen, A.; Salo, A.; Talviala, M.-L.; Hakama, M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study how many tumours were visible in restrospect on mammograms originally reported as normal or benign in patients coming to surgery with proven breast cancer. The effect of making the pre--operative mammogram available was also assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred and twenty initial mammograms of consecutive new breast cancer cases were analysed by a group of radiologists in the knowledge that all patients were later diagnosed with breast cancer. The films were read twice, first without and then with the later (pre-operative) mammograms available. The parenchymal density in the location of the tumour was classified as fatty, mixed or dense, and the tumours were classified as visible or not visible. The reasons for the invisibility of the tumour in the earlier examination were analysed. RESULTS: Fourteen per cent (45) of cancers were retrospectively visible in earlier mammograms without the pre-operative mammograms having been shown, and 29% (95) when pre-operative mammograms were shown. Breast parenchymal density decreased with age and the visibility of tumours increased with age. When considered simultaneously, the effect of age (over 55 vs under 55) was greater (OR = 2.9) than the effect of density (fatty vs others) (OR = 1.5). The most common reasons for non-detection were that the lesion was overlooked (55%), diagnosed as benign (33%) or was visible only in one projection (26%). Growing density was the most common (37%) feature of those lesions originally overlooked or regarded as benign. CONCLUSIONS: Tumours are commonly visible in retrospect, but few of them exhibit specific signs of cancer, and are recognized only if they grow or otherwise change. It is not possible to differentiate most of them from normal parenchymal densities. Saaremaa, I. (2001)

  2. A comparison of face to face and group education on informed choice and decisional conflict of pregnant women about screening tests of fetal abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Masoumeh; Riyazi, Sahar; Lotfalizade, Marziyeh; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Suny, Hoseyn Jafari

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND GOAL: Screening of fetal anomalies is assumed as a necessary measurement in antenatal cares. The screening plans aim at empowerment of individuals to make the informed choice. This study was conducted in order to compare the effect of group and face-to-face education and decisional conflicts among the pregnant females regarding screening of fetal abnormalities. METHODS: This study of the clinical trial was carried out on 240 pregnant women at education course were held in two weekly sessions for intervention groups during two consecutive weeks, and the usual care was conducted for the control group. The rate of informed choice and decisional conflict was measured in pregnant women before education and also at weeks 20–22 of pregnancy in three groups. The data analysis was executed using SPSS statistical software (version 16), and statistical tests were implemented including Chi-square test, Kruskal–Wallis test, Wilcoxon test, Mann–Whitney U-test, one-way analysis of variance test, and Tukey's range test. The P education group, 64 members (80%) in group education class, and 20 persons (25%) in control group had the informed choice regarding screening tests, but there was no statistically significant difference between two individual and group education classes. Similarly, during the postintervention phase, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of decisional conflict scale among pregnant women regarding screening tests in three groups (P = 0.001). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: With respect to effectiveness of group and face-to-face education methods in increasing the informed choice and reduced decisional conflict in pregnant women regarding screening tests, each of these education methods may be employed according to the clinical environment conditions and requirement to encourage the women for conducting the screening tests. PMID:29417066

  3. Towards an in-plane methodology to track breast lesions using mammograms and patient-specific finite-element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuebla-Ferri, Andrés; Cegoñino-Banzo, José; Jiménez-Mocholí, Antonio-José; Pérez del Palomar, Amaya

    2017-11-01

    In breast cancer screening or diagnosis, it is usual to combine different images in order to locate a lesion as accurately as possible. These images are generated using a single or several imaging techniques. As x-ray-based mammography is widely used, a breast lesion is located in the same plane of the image (mammogram), but tracking it across mammograms corresponding to different views is a challenging task for medical physicians. Accordingly, simulation tools and methodologies that use patient-specific numerical models can facilitate the task of fusing information from different images. Additionally, these tools need to be as straightforward as possible to facilitate their translation to the clinical area. This paper presents a patient-specific, finite-element-based and semi-automated simulation methodology to track breast lesions across mammograms. A realistic three-dimensional computer model of a patient’s breast was generated from magnetic resonance imaging to simulate mammographic compressions in cranio-caudal (CC, head-to-toe) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO, shoulder-to-opposite hip) directions. For each compression being simulated, a virtual mammogram was obtained and posteriorly superimposed to the corresponding real mammogram, by sharing the nipple as a common feature. Two-dimensional rigid-body transformations were applied, and the error distance measured between the centroids of the tumors previously located on each image was 3.84 mm and 2.41 mm for CC and MLO compression, respectively. Considering that the scope of this work is to conceive a methodology translatable to clinical practice, the results indicate that it could be helpful in supporting the tracking of breast lesions.

  4. Guidelines for breast cancer screening in Lebanon Public Health Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Salim M; El Saghir, Nagi S; Ammar, Walid

    2009-01-01

    The accumulation of national epidemiological data since the late 1990s has led to the adoption of evidence-based guidelines for breast cancer screening in Lebanon (2006). Almost 50% of breast cancer patients in Lebanon are below the age of 50 years and the age-adjusted incidence rate is estimated at 69 new cases per 100,000 per year (2004). This official notification calls for breast self-examination (BSE) every month starting age 20, and a clinical breast examination (CBE) performed by a physician every three years between the ages of 20 and 40 years. Starting age 40, and for as long as a woman is in good health, an annual CBE and mammography are recommended. Women with known genetic family history of breast cancer should start screening 10 years earlier than the first young patient in the family, or earlier depending on medical advice. The Breast Cancer National Task Force (BCNTF) recommends certification of mammography centers and continued training of personnel to assure high quality mammograms, and to minimize unnecessary investigations and surgeries.It recommends that a national program should record call-backs of women for annual screening and follow-up data on abnormal mammograms. BCNTF encourages the adoption of these guidelines and monitoring of their results, as well as follow-up of breast cancer epidemiology and registry in Lebanon, and scientific progress in early breast cancer detection to determine needs for modifications in the future.

  5. Three-Class Mammogram Classification Based on Descriptive CNN Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohsin Jadoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel classification technique for large data set of mammograms using a deep learning method is proposed. The proposed model targets a three-class classification study (normal, malignant, and benign cases. In our model we have presented two methods, namely, convolutional neural network-discrete wavelet (CNN-DW and convolutional neural network-curvelet transform (CNN-CT. An augmented data set is generated by using mammogram patches. To enhance the contrast of mammogram images, the data set is filtered by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE. In the CNN-DW method, enhanced mammogram images are decomposed as its four subbands by means of two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (2D-DWT, while in the second method discrete curvelet transform (DCT is used. In both methods, dense scale invariant feature (DSIFT for all subbands is extracted. Input data matrix containing these subband features of all the mammogram patches is created that is processed as input to convolutional neural network (CNN. Softmax layer and support vector machine (SVM layer are used to train CNN for classification. Proposed methods have been compared with existing methods in terms of accuracy rate, error rate, and various validation assessment measures. CNN-DW and CNN-CT have achieved accuracy rate of 81.83% and 83.74%, respectively. Simulation results clearly validate the significance and impact of our proposed model as compared to other well-known existing techniques.

  6. Mammogram segmentation using maximal cell strength updation in cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, J; Peter, J Dinesh

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer among women. Mammogram is one of the most effective tools for early detection of the breast cancer. Various computer-aided systems have been introduced to detect the breast cancer from mammogram images. In a computer-aided diagnosis system, detection and segmentation of breast masses from the background tissues is an important issue. In this paper, an automatic segmentation method is proposed to identify and segment the suspicious mass regions of mammogram using a modified transition rule named maximal cell strength updation in cellular automata (CA). In coarse-level segmentation, the proposed method performs an adaptive global thresholding based on the histogram peak analysis to obtain the rough region of interest. An automatic seed point selection is proposed using gray-level co-occurrence matrix-based sum average feature in the coarse segmented image. Finally, the method utilizes CA with the identified initial seed point and the modified transition rule to segment the mass region. The proposed approach is evaluated over the dataset of 70 mammograms with mass from mini-MIAS database. Experimental results show that the proposed approach yields promising results to segment the mass region in the mammograms with the sensitivity of 92.25% and accuracy of 93.48%.

  7. Mammogram retrieval through machine learning within BI-RADS standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chia-Hung; Li, Yue; Huang, Pai Jung

    2011-08-01

    A content-based mammogram retrieval system can support usual comparisons made on images by physicians, answering similarity queries over images stored in the database. The importance of searching for similar mammograms lies in the fact that physicians usually try to recall similar cases by seeking images that are pathologically similar to a given image. This paper presents a content-based mammogram retrieval system, which employs a query example to search for similar mammograms in the database. In this system the mammographic lesions are interpreted based on their medical characteristics specified in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) standards. A hierarchical similarity measurement scheme based on a distance weighting function is proposed to model user's perception and maximizes the effectiveness of each feature in a mammographic descriptor. A machine learning approach based on support vector machines and user's relevance feedback is also proposed to analyze the user's information need in order to retrieve target images more accurately. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed machine learning approach with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel function achieves the best performance among all tested ones. Furthermore, the results also show that the proposed learning approach can improve retrieval performance when applied to retrieve mammograms with similar mass and calcification lesions, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Similarity estimation for reference image retrieval in mammograms using convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Higuchi, Shunichi; Morita, Takako; Oiwa, Mikinao; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    Periodic breast cancer screening with mammography is considered effective in decreasing breast cancer mortality. For screening programs to be successful, an intelligent image analytic system may support radiologists' efficient image interpretation. In our previous studies, we have investigated image retrieval schemes for diagnostic references of breast lesions on mammograms and ultrasound images. Using a machine learning method, reliable similarity measures that agree with radiologists' similarity were determined and relevant images could be retrieved. However, our previous method includes a feature extraction step, in which hand crafted features were determined based on manual outlines of the masses. Obtaining the manual outlines of masses is not practical in clinical practice and such data would be operator-dependent. In this study, we investigated a similarity estimation scheme using a convolutional neural network (CNN) to skip such procedure and to determine data-driven similarity scores. By using CNN as feature extractor, in which extracted features were employed in determination of similarity measures with a conventional 3-layered neural network, the determined similarity measures were correlated well with the subjective ratings and the precision of retrieving diagnostically relevant images was comparable with that of the conventional method using handcrafted features. By using CNN for determination of similarity measure directly, the result was also comparable. By optimizing the network parameters, results may be further improved. The proposed method has a potential usefulness in determination of similarity measure without precise lesion outlines for retrieval of similar mass images on mammograms.

  9. Computerized classification of mass lesions in digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giger, M.L.; Doi, K.; Yin, F.F.; Schmidt, R.A.; Vyborny, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Subjective classification of masses on mammograms is a difficult task. On average, about 25% of masses referred for surgical biopsy are actually malignant. The authors are developing, as an aid to radiologists, a computerized scheme for the classification of lesions in mammograms to reduce the false-negative and false-positive diagnoses of malignancies. The classification scheme involves the extraction of border information from the mammographic lesion in order to quantify the degree of spiculation, which is related to the possibility of malignancy. Clinical film mammograms are digitized with an optical drum scanner (0.1-mm pixel size) for analysis on a Micro VAX 3500 computer. Border information (fluctuations) is obtained from the difference between the lesion border and its smoothed border. Using the rms variation of the frequency content of these fluctuations, approximately 85% of the cancerous lesions were correctly classified as malignant, while 15% of benign lesions were misclassified, in a preliminary study

  10. An anatomically oriented breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Sami; Karemore, Gopal; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-01-01

    and the shape of the breast boundary because these are the most robust features independent of the breast size and shape. On the basis of these landmarks, we have constructed a nonlinear mapping between the parameter frame and the breast region in the mammogram. This mapping makes it possible to identify...... the corresponding positions and orientations among all of the ML or MLO mammograms, which facilitates an implicit use of the registration, i.e., no explicit image warping is needed. We additionally show how the coordinate transform can be used to extract Gaussian derivative features so that the feature positions...... and orientations are registered and extracted without non-linearly deforming the images. We use the proposed breast coordinate transform in a cross-sectional breast cancer risk assessment study of 490 women, in which we attempt to learn breast cancer risk factors from mammograms that were taken prior to when...

  11. Attitudes of women in their forties toward the 2009 USPSTF mammogram guidelines: a randomized trial on the effects of media exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, AuTumn S; Liao, Xun; Magee, B Dale

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the study was to assess women's attitudes toward 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force mammography screening guideline changes and evaluate the role of media in shaping opinions. Two hundred forty-nine women, aged 39-49 years, presenting for annual examinations randomized to read 1 of 2 articles, and survey completion comprised the design of the study. Eighty-eight percent overestimated the lifetime breast cancer (BrCa) risk. Eighty-nine percent want yearly mammograms in their 40s. Eighty-six percent felt the changes were unsafe, and even if the changes were doctor recommended, 84% would not delay screening until age 50 years. Those with a friend/relative with BrCa were more likely to want annual mammography in their forties (92% vs 77%, P = .001), and feel changes unsafe (91% vs 69%, P ≤ .0001). Participants with previous false-positive mammograms were less likely to accept doctor-recommended screening delay until age 50 years (8% vs 21%, P = .01). Women overestimate BrCa risk. Skepticism of new mammogram guidelines exists, and is increased by exposure to negative media. Those with prior false-positive mammograms are less likely to accept changes. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automatic correspondence detection in mammogram and breast tomosynthesis images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Krüger, Julia; Bischof, Arpad; Barkhausen, Jörg; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Two-dimensional mammography is the major imaging modality in breast cancer detection. A disadvantage of mammography is the projective nature of this imaging technique. Tomosynthesis is an attractive modality with the potential to combine the high contrast and high resolution of digital mammography with the advantages of 3D imaging. In order to facilitate diagnostics and treatment in the current clinical work-flow, correspondences between tomosynthesis images and previous mammographic exams of the same women have to be determined. In this paper, we propose a method to detect correspondences in 2D mammograms and 3D tomosynthesis images automatically. In general, this 2D/3D correspondence problem is ill-posed, because a point in the 2D mammogram corresponds to a line in the 3D tomosynthesis image. The goal of our method is to detect the "most probable" 3D position in the tomosynthesis images corresponding to a selected point in the 2D mammogram. We present two alternative approaches to solve this 2D/3D correspondence problem: a 2D/3D registration method and a 2D/2D mapping between mammogram and tomosynthesis projection images with a following back projection. The advantages and limitations of both approaches are discussed and the performance of the methods is evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using a software phantom and clinical breast image data. Although the proposed 2D/3D registration method can compensate for moderate breast deformations caused by different breast compressions, this approach is not suitable for clinical tomosynthesis data due to the limited resolution and blurring effects perpendicular to the direction of projection. The quantitative results show that the proposed 2D/2D mapping method is capable of detecting corresponding positions in mammograms and tomosynthesis images automatically for 61 out of 65 landmarks. The proposed method can facilitate diagnosis, visual inspection and comparison of 2D mammograms and 3D tomosynthesis images for

  13. Regions of micro-calcifications clusters detection based on new features from imbalance data in mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Keju; Dong, Min; Yang, Zhen; Guo, Yanan; Ma, Yide

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Micro-calcification cluster on X-ray mammogram is one of the most important abnormalities, and it is effective for early cancer detection. Surrounding Region Dependence Method (SRDM), a statistical texture analysis method is applied for detecting Regions of Interest (ROIs) containing microcalcifications. Inspired by the SRDM, we present a method that extract gray and other features which are effective to predict the positive and negative regions of micro-calcifications clusters in mammogram. By constructing a set of artificial images only containing micro-calcifications, we locate the suspicious pixels of calcifications of a SRDM matrix in original image map. Features are extracted based on these pixels for imbalance date and then the repeated random subsampling method and Random Forest (RF) classifier are used for classification. True Positive (TP) rate and False Positive (FP) can reflect how the result will be. The TP rate is 90% and FP rate is 88.8% when the threshold q is 10. We draw the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve and the Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) value reaches 0.9224. The experiment indicates that our method is effective. A novel regions of micro-calcifications clusters detection method is developed, which is based on new features for imbalance data in mammography, and it can be considered to help improving the accuracy of computer aided diagnosis breast cancer.

  14. Effects of Different Compression Techniques on Diagnostic Accuracies of Breast Masses on Digitized Mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhigang Liang; Xiangying Du; Jiabin Liu; Yanhui Yang; Dongdong Rong; Xinyu Y ao; Kuncheng Li

    2008-01-01

    Background: The JPEG 2000 compression technique has recently been introduced into the medical imaging field. It is critical to understand the effects of this technique on the detection of breast masses on digitized images by human observers. Purpose: To evaluate whether lossless and lossy techniques affect the diagnostic results of malignant and benign breast masses on digitized mammograms. Material and Methods: A total of 90 screen-film mammograms including craniocaudal and lateral views obtained from 45 patients were selected by two non-observing radiologists. Of these, 22 cases were benign lesions and 23 cases were malignant. The mammographic films were digitized by a laser film digitizer, and compressed to three levels (lossless and lossy 20:1 and 40:1) using the JPEG 2000 wavelet-based image compression algorithm. Four radiologists with 10-12 years' experience in mammography interpreted the original and compressed images. The time interval was 3 weeks for each reading session. A five-point malignancy scale was used, with a score of 1 corresponding to definitely not a malignant mass, a score of 2 referring to not a malignant mass, a score of 3 meaning possibly a malignant mass, a score of 4 being probably a malignant mass, and a score of 5 interpreted as definitely a malignant mass. The radiologists' performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: The average Az values for all radiologists decreased from 0.8933 for the original uncompressed images to 0.8299 for the images compressed at 40:1. This difference was not statistically significant. The detection accuracy of the original images was better than that of the compressed images, and the Az values decreased with increasing compression ratio. Conclusion: Digitized mammograms compressed at 40:1 could be used to substitute original images in the diagnosis of breast cancer

  15. Screens

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This Sixth volume in the series The Key Debates. Mutations and Appropriations in European Film Studies investigates the question of screens in the context both of the dematerialization due to digitalization and the multiplication of media screens. Scholars offer various infomations and theories of topics such as the archeology of screen, film and media theories, contemporary art, pragmatics of new ways of screening (from home video to street screening).

  16. A new approach to develop computer-aided detection schemes of digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Qian, Wei; Pu, Jiantao; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new global mammographic image feature analysis based computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme and evaluate its performance in detecting positive screening mammography examinations. A dataset that includes images acquired from 1896 full-field digital mammography (FFDM) screening examinations was used in this study. Among them, 812 cases were positive for cancer and 1084 were negative or benign. After segmenting the breast area, a computerized scheme was applied to compute 92 global mammographic tissue density based features on each of four mammograms of the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. After adding three existing popular risk factors (woman’s age, subjectively rated mammographic density, and family breast cancer history) into the initial feature pool, we applied a sequential forward floating selection feature selection algorithm to select relevant features from the bilateral CC and MLO view images separately. The selected CC and MLO view image features were used to train two artificial neural networks (ANNs). The results were then fused by a third ANN to build a two-stage classifier to predict the likelihood of the FFDM screening examination being positive. CAD performance was tested using a ten-fold cross-validation method. The computed area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was AUC = 0.779   ±   0.025 and the odds ratio monotonically increased from 1 to 31.55 as CAD-generated detection scores increased. The study demonstrated that this new global image feature based CAD scheme had a relatively higher discriminatory power to cue the FFDM examinations with high risk of being positive, which may provide a new CAD-cueing method to assist radiologists in reading and interpreting screening mammograms.

  17. A novel approach for classification of abnormalities in digitized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Feature extraction is an important process for the overall system performance in classification. The objective of this article is to reveal the effectiveness of texture feature analysis for detecting the abnormalities in digitized mammograms using Self Adaptive Resource Allocation Network (SRAN) classifier. Thus, we proposed a ...

  18. Radiological and pathological findings of interval cancers in a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial of mammographic screening in women from age 40-41 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.J.; Kutt, E.; Record, C.; Waller, M.; Bobrow, L.; Moss, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse the radiographic findings of the screening mammograms of women with interval cancer who participated in a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial of mammographic screening in women from age 40-48 years. Materials and methods: The screening and diagnostic mammograms of 208 women with interval cancers were reviewed. Abnormalities were classified as malignant, subtle and non-specific. Results: Eighty-seven (42%) of women had true, 66 (32%) occult and 55 (26%) false-negative interval cancers. The features most frequently missed or misinterpreted were granular microcalcification (38%), asymmetric density (27%) and distortion (22%). Thirty-seven percent of abnormal previous screens were classified as malignant, 39% subtle change and 21% as non-specific. Granular calcifications were significantly more common on the diagnostic mammograms of false-negative interval cancers than those of true interval cancers (28 versus 14%, p = 0.04). Occult interval cancers were more likely to be <10 mm and <15 mm in invasive pathological size than other interval cancers (p = 0.03 and 0.005, respectively). True interval cancers were more likely to be histologically grade 3 than other interval cancers (p = 0.04). Women who developed true and false-negative interval cancers had similar background patterns, but women with occult cancers had a higher proportion of dense patterns (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Interval cancers in a young screening population have a high proportion of occult lesions that are small and occur in dense background patterns. The proportion of interval cancers that are false negative is similar that seen in older populations and granular microcalcification is the commonest missed mammographic feature

  19. Parameter estimation in stochastic mammogram model by heuristic optimization techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selvan, S.E.; Xavier, C.C.; Karssemeijer, N.; Sequeira, J.; Cherian, R.A.; Dhala, B.Y.

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of disproportionately large amounts of high-density breast parenchyma in mammograms has been found to be a strong indicator of the risk of developing breast cancer. Hence, the breast density model is popular for risk estimation or for monitoring breast density change in prevention or

  20. Flu Shots, Mammogram, and the Perception of Probabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carman, K.G.; Kooreman, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study individuals’ decisions to decline or accept preventive health care interventions such as flu shots and mammograms. In particular, we analyze the role of perceptions of the effectiveness of the intervention, by eliciting individuals' subjective probabilities of sickness and survival, with

  1. Volumetric breast density estimation from full-field digital mammograms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeland, S. van; Snoeren, P.R.; Huisman, H.J.; Boetes, C.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for estimation of dense breast tissue volume from mammograms obtained with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The thickness of dense tissue mapping to a pixel is determined by using a physical model of image acquisition. This model is based on the assumption that the breast

  2. Automatic breast cancer risk assessment from digital mammograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Brandt, Sami; Karssemeijer, N

    Purpose: Textural characteristics of the breast tissue structure on mammogram have been shown to improve breast cancer risk assessment in several large studies. Currently, however, the texture is not used to assess risk in standard clinical procedures or involved in general breast cancer risk ass...

  3. Application of texture analysis method for mammogram density classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, R.; Santhi, B.

    2017-07-01

    Mammographic density is considered a major risk factor for developing breast cancer. This paper proposes an automated approach to classify breast tissue types in digital mammogram. The main objective of the proposed Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system is to investigate various feature extraction methods and classifiers to improve the diagnostic accuracy in mammogram density classification. Texture analysis methods are used to extract the features from the mammogram. Texture features are extracted by using histogram, Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM), Gray Level Run Length Matrix (GLRLM), Gray Level Difference Matrix (GLDM), Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Entropy, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Wavelet Packet Transform (WPT), Gabor transform and trace transform. These extracted features are selected using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The features selected by ANOVA are fed into the classifiers to characterize the mammogram into two-class (fatty/dense) and three-class (fatty/glandular/dense) breast density classification. This work has been carried out by using the mini-Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) database. Five classifiers are employed namely, Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Naive Bayes (NB), K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), and Support Vector Machine (SVM). Experimental results show that ANN provides better performance than LDA, NB, KNN and SVM classifiers. The proposed methodology has achieved 97.5% accuracy for three-class and 99.37% for two-class density classification.

  4. Women with physical disability and the mammogram: An observational study to identify barriers and facilitators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulos, Ann; Balandin, Susan; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McCarthy, Louella; Dark, Leigha

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To identify barriers and facilitators experienced by women with physical disability having a mammogram. Method: Direct observation of the mammography procedure for women with a range of physical disability at screening facilities of BreastScreen NSW Australia. Results: A volunteer sample of 13 women with varying degrees of physical disability participated in the study. The outcomes suggested that many barriers for women with physical disability can be ameliorated by environmental adaptations and guidelines for both radiographers and women. Some women however cannot be screened successfully, or can be screened only with a level of trauma and/or pain which militates against their continuation within the screening program. This study has identified physical limitations which preclude a successful outcome, those which increase the discomfort/pain of the procedure and aspects of the procedure which can be improved to minimise the experience of discomfort/pain. Conclusion: From the outcomes of the study the development of a decision tool is indicated as a method of providing information for women with physical disability and their doctors as to the likelihood of a successful outcome to participation in mammography screening.

  5. Women with physical disability and the mammogram: An observational study to identify barriers and facilitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulos, Ann, E-mail: ann.poulos@sydney.edu.a [University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Balandin, Susan [University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Discipline of Speech Pathology, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Avdeling for helse- og sosialfag, Hogskolen i Molde, Postboks 2110, 6402 Molde (Norway); Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McCarthy, Louella [University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Discipline of Occupational Therapy, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Dark, Leigha [University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Discipline of Speech Pathology, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To identify barriers and facilitators experienced by women with physical disability having a mammogram. Method: Direct observation of the mammography procedure for women with a range of physical disability at screening facilities of BreastScreen NSW Australia. Results: A volunteer sample of 13 women with varying degrees of physical disability participated in the study. The outcomes suggested that many barriers for women with physical disability can be ameliorated by environmental adaptations and guidelines for both radiographers and women. Some women however cannot be screened successfully, or can be screened only with a level of trauma and/or pain which militates against their continuation within the screening program. This study has identified physical limitations which preclude a successful outcome, those which increase the discomfort/pain of the procedure and aspects of the procedure which can be improved to minimise the experience of discomfort/pain. Conclusion: From the outcomes of the study the development of a decision tool is indicated as a method of providing information for women with physical disability and their doctors as to the likelihood of a successful outcome to participation in mammography screening.

  6. Computer-aided detection system performance on current and previous digital mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ja; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min

    2012-01-01

    Background: The computer-aided detection (CAD) system is widely used for screening mammography. The performance of the CAD system for contralateral breast cancer has not been reported for women with a history of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the performance of a CAD system on current and previous mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer. Material and Methods: During a 3-year period, 4945 postoperative patients had follow-up examinations, from whom we selected 55 women with contralateral breast cancers. Among them, 38 had visible malignant signs on the current mammograms. We analyzed the sensitivity and false-positive marks of the system on the current and previous mammograms according to lesion type and breast density. Results: The total visible lesion components on the current mammograms included 27 masses and 14 calcifications in 38 patients. The case-based sensitivity for all lesion types was 63.2% (24/38) with false-positive marks of 0.71 per patient. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 59.3% (16/27) and 71.4% (10/14), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses in fatty and dense breasts was 68.8% (11/16) and 45.5% (5/11), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for calcifications in fatty and dense breasts was 100.0% (3/3) and 63.6% (7/11), respectively. The total visible lesion components on the previous mammograms included 13 masses and three calcifications in 16 patients, and the sensitivity for all lesion types was 31.3% (5/16) with false-positive marks of 0.81 per patient. On these mammograms, the sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 30.8% (4/13) and 33.3% (1/3), respectively. The sensitivity in fatty and dense breasts was 28.6% (2/7) and 33.3% (3/9), respectively. Conclusion: In the women with a history of breast cancer, the sensitivity of the CAD system in visible contralateral breast cancer was lower than in most previous reports using the same CAD

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of fundal height and handheld ultrasound-measured abdominal circumference to screen for fetal growth abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haragan, Adriane F.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Hawk, Angela F.; Newman, Roger B.; Chang, Eugene Y.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to compare fundal height and handheld ultrasound–measured fetal abdominal circumference (HHAC) for the prediction of fetal growth restriction (FGR) or large for gestational age. STUDY DESIGN This was a diagnostic accuracy study in nonanomalous singleton pregnancies between 24 and 40 weeks’ gestation. Patients underwent HHAC and fundal height measurement prior to formal growth ultrasound. FGR was defined as estimated fetal weight less than 10%, whereas large for gestational age was defined as estimated fetal weight greater than 90%. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared using methods described elsewhere. RESULTS There were 251 patients included in this study. HHAC had superior sensitivity and specificity for the detection of FGR (sensitivity, 100% vs 42.86%) and (specificity, 92.62% vs 85.24%). HHAC had higher specificity but lower sensitivity when screening for LGA (specificity, 85.66% vs 66.39%) and (sensitivity, 57.14% vs 71.43%). CONCLUSION HHAC could prove to be a valuable screening tool in the detection of FGR. Further studies are needed in a larger population. PMID:25818672

  8. Screening for abnormal vaginal microflora by self-assessed vaginal pH does not enable detection of sexually transmitted infections in Ugandan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Donders, Francesca; Bellen, Gert; Depuydt, Christophe; Eggermont, Natalie; Michiels, Thirsa; Lule, John; Byamughisa, Jacobat

    2016-06-01

    Is self-assessed vaginal pH measurement to detect abnormal vaginal bacterial microflora (AVF) an adequate prescreening method for detection of genital sexually transmitted infections (STIs)? A total of 360 Ugandan women tested themselves with a gloved finger and a pH color strip. PCR for bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria was tested by PCR for Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and/or Atopobium vaginae, while the STIs were diagnosed by positive PCR for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, and/or Trichomonas vaginalis. A strong correlation was found between self-assessed pH values and BV-associated bacteria (Pvaginal pH correlated well with markers of high-risk microflora types such as BV or aerobic vaginitis, but not with STIs. Hence, in a screening program addressing AVF in low-resource countries, extra specific tests are required to exclude STIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic classification for mammogram backgrounds based on bi-rads complexity definition and on a multi content analysis framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Besnehard, Quentin; Marchessoux, Cédric

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies for the validation of new medical imaging devices require hundreds of images. An important step in creating and tuning the study protocol is the classification of images into "difficult" and "easy" cases. This consists of classifying the image based on features like the complexity of the background, the visibility of the disease (lesions). Therefore, an automatic medical background classification tool for mammograms would help for such clinical studies. This classification tool is based on a multi-content analysis framework (MCA) which was firstly developed to recognize image content of computer screen shots. With the implementation of new texture features and a defined breast density scale, the MCA framework is able to automatically classify digital mammograms with a satisfying accuracy. BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting Data System) density scale is used for grouping the mammograms, which standardizes the mammography reporting terminology and assessment and recommendation categories. Selected features are input into a decision tree classification scheme in MCA framework, which is the so called "weak classifier" (any classifier with a global error rate below 50%). With the AdaBoost iteration algorithm, these "weak classifiers" are combined into a "strong classifier" (a classifier with a low global error rate) for classifying one category. The results of classification for one "strong classifier" show the good accuracy with the high true positive rates. For the four categories the results are: TP=90.38%, TN=67.88%, FP=32.12% and FN =9.62%.

  10. Improving follow-up of abnormal cancer screens using electronic health records: trust but verify test result communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Brian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of colorectal cancer through timely follow-up of positive Fecal Occult Blood Tests (FOBTs remains a challenge. In our previous work, we found 40% of positive FOBT results eligible for colonoscopy had no documented response by a treating clinician at two weeks despite procedures for electronic result notification. We determined if technical and/or workflow-related aspects of automated communication in the electronic health record could lead to the lack of response. Methods Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, we evaluated positive FOBT communication in the electronic health record of a large, urban facility between May 2008 and March 2009. We identified the source of test result communication breakdown, and developed an intervention to fix the problem. Explicit medical record reviews measured timely follow-up (defined as response within 30 days of positive FOBT pre- and post-intervention. Results Data from 11 interviews and tracking information from 490 FOBT alerts revealed that the software intended to alert primary care practitioners (PCPs of positive FOBT results was not configured correctly and over a third of positive FOBTs were not transmitted to PCPs. Upon correction of the technical problem, lack of timely follow-up decreased immediately from 29.9% to 5.4% (p Conclusion Electronic communication of positive FOBT results should be monitored to avoid limiting colorectal cancer screening benefits. Robust quality assurance and oversight systems are needed to achieve this. Our methods may be useful for others seeking to improve follow-up of FOBTs in their systems.

  11. Evaluating wait times from screening to breast cancer diagnosis among women undergoing organised assessment vs usual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Muradali, Derek; Blackmore, Kristina M; Smith, Courtney R; Mirea, Lucia; Majpruz, Vicky; O'Malley, Frances P; Quan, May Lynn; Holloway, Claire Mb

    2017-05-09

    Timely coordinated diagnostic assessment following an abnormal screening mammogram reduces patient anxiety and may optimise breast cancer prognosis. Since 1998, the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) has offered organised assessment through Breast Assessment Centres (BACs). For OBSP women seen at a BAC, an abnormal mammogram is followed by coordinated referrals through the use of navigators for further imaging, biopsy, and surgical consultation as indicated. For OBSP women seen through usual care (UC), further diagnostic imaging is arranged directly from the screening centre and/or through their physician; results must be communicated to the physician who is then responsible for arranging any necessary biopsy and/or surgical consultation. This study aims to evaluate factors associated with diagnostic wait times for women undergoing assessment through BAC and UC. Of the 2 147 257 women aged 50-69 years screened in the OBSP between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2009, 155 866 (7.3%) had an abnormal mammogram. A retrospective design identified two concurrent cohorts of women diagnosed with screen-detected breast cancer at a BAC (n=4217; 47%) and UC (n=4827; 53%). Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between wait times and assessment and prognostic characteristics by pathway. A two-sided 5% significance level was used. Screened women with breast cancer were two times more likely to be diagnosed within 7 weeks when assessed through a BAC vs UC (OR=1.91, 95% CI=1.73-2.10). In addition, compared with UC, women assessed through a BAC were significantly more likely to have their first assessment procedure within 3 weeks of their abnormal mammogram (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.12-1.39), ⩽3 assessment procedures (OR=1.54, 95% CI=1.41-1.69), ⩽2 assessment visits (OR=1.86, 95% CI=1.70-2.05), and ⩾2 procedures per visit (OR=1.41, 95% CI=1.28-1.55). Women diagnosed through a BAC were also more likely than those in UC to have imaging (OR=1.99, 95

  12. Alignment of breast cancer screening guidelines, accountability metrics, and practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Haas, Jennifer S; Bitton, Asaf; Brackett, Charles; Weiss, Julie; Goodrich, Martha; Harris, Kimberly; Pyle, Steve; Tosteson, Anna N A

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer screening guidelines and metrics are inconsistent with each other and may differ from breast screening practice patterns in primary care. This study measured breast cancer screening practice patterns in relation to common evidence-based guidelines and accountability metrics. Cohort study using primary data collected from a regional breast cancer screening research network between 2011 and 2014. Using information on women aged 30 to 89 years within 21 primary care practices of 2 large integrated health systems in New England, we measured the proportion of women screened overall and by age using 2 screening definition categories: any mammogram and screening mammogram. Of the 81,352 women in our cohort, 54,903 (67.5%) had at least 1 mammogram during the time period, 48,314 (59.4%) had a screening mammogram. Women aged 50 to 69 years were the highest proportion screened (82.4% any mammogram, 75% screening indication); 72.6% of women at age 40 had a screening mammogram with a median of 70% (range = 54.3%-84.8%) among the practices. Of women aged at least 75 years, 63.3% had a screening mammogram, with the median of 63.9% (range = 37.2%-78.3%) among the practices. Of women who had 2 or more mammograms, 79.5% were screened annually. Primary care practice patterns for breast cancer screening are not well aligned with some evidence-based guidelines and accountability metrics. Metrics and incentives should be designed with more uniformity and should also include shared decision making when the evidence does not clearly support one single conclusion.

  13. Monte Carlo Modelling of Mammograms : Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spyrou, G; Panayiotakis, G [Univercity of Patras, School of Medicine, Medical Physics Department, 265 00 Patras (Greece); Bakas, A [Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Department of Radiography, 122 10 Athens (Greece); Tzanakos, G [University of Athens, Department of Physics, Divission of Nuclear and Particle Physics, 157 71 Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    A software package using Monte Carlo methods has been developed for the simulation of x-ray mammography. A simplified geometry of the mammographic apparatus has been considered along with the software phantom of compressed breast. This phantom may contain inhomogeneities of various compositions and sizes at any point. Using this model one can produce simulated mammograms. Results that demonstrate the validity of this simulation are presented. (authors) 16 refs, 4 figs

  14. Monte Carlo Modelling of Mammograms : Development and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, G.; Panayiotakis, G.; Bakas, A.; Tzanakos, G.

    1998-01-01

    A software package using Monte Carlo methods has been developed for the simulation of x-ray mammography. A simplified geometry of the mammographic apparatus has been considered along with the software phantom of compressed breast. This phantom may contain inhomogeneities of various compositions and sizes at any point. Using this model one can produce simulated mammograms. Results that demonstrate the validity of this simulation are presented. (authors)

  15. Field nonuniformity correction for quantitative analysis of digitized mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2001-01-01

    Several factors, including the heel effect, variation in distance from the x-ray source to points in the image and path obliquity contribute to the signal nonuniformity of mammograms. To best use digitized mammograms for quantitative image analysis, these field non-uniformities must be corrected. An empirically based correction method, which uses a bowl-shaped calibration phantom, has been developed. Due to the annular spherical shape of the phantom, its attenuation is constant over the entire image. Remaining nonuniformities are due only to the heel and inverse square effects as well as the variable path through the beam filter, compression plate and image receptor. In logarithmic space, a normalized image of the phantom can be added to mammograms to correct for these effects. Then, an analytical correction for path obliquity in the breast can be applied to the images. It was found that the correction causes the errors associated with field nonuniformity to be reduced from 14% to 2% for a 4 cm block of material corresponding to a combination of 50% fibroglandular and 50% fatty breast tissue. A repeatability study has been conducted to show that in regions as far as 20 cm away from the chest wall, variations due to imaging conditions and phantom alignment contribute to <2% of overall corrected signal

  16. Estimating average glandular dose by measuring glandular rate in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Sachiko; Azuma, Yoshiharu; Sumimoto, Tetsuhiro; Eiho, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    The glandular rate of the breast was objectively measured in order to calculate individual patient exposure dose (average glandular dose) in mammography. By employing image processing techniques and breast-equivalent phantoms with various glandular rate values, a conversion curve for pixel value to glandular rate can be determined by a neural network. Accordingly, the pixel values in clinical mammograms can be converted to the glandular rate value for each pixel. The individual average glandular dose can therefore be calculated using the individual glandular rates on the basis of the dosimetry method employed for quality control in mammography. In the present study, a data set of 100 craniocaudal mammograms from 50 patients was used to evaluate our method. The average glandular rate and average glandular dose of the data set were 41.2% and 1.79 mGy, respectively. The error in calculating the individual glandular rate can be estimated to be less than ±3%. When the calculation error of the glandular rate is taken into consideration, the error in the individual average glandular dose can be estimated to be 13% or less. We feel that our method for determining the glandular rate from mammograms is useful for minimizing subjectivity in the evaluation of patient breast composition. (author)

  17. Quantification and normalization of x-ray mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromans, Christopher E; Cocker, Mary R; Brady, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of (x-ray) mammograms remains qualitative, relying on the judgement of clinicians. We present a novel method to compute a quantitative, normalized measure of tissue radiodensity traversed by the primary beam incident on each pixel of a mammogram, a measure we term the standard attenuation rate (SAR). SAR enables: the estimation of breast density which is linked to cancer risk; direct comparison between images; the full potential of computer aided diagnosis to be utilized; and a basis for digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction. It does this by removing the effects of the imaging conditions under which the mammogram is acquired. First, the x-ray spectrum incident upon the breast is calculated, and from this, the energy exiting the breast is calculated. The contribution of scattered radiation is calculated and subtracted. The SAR measure is the scaling factor that must be applied to the reference material in order to match the primary attenuation of the breast. Specifically, this is the scaled reference material attenuation which when traversed by an identical beam to that traversing the breast, and when subsequently detected, results in the primary component of the pixel intensity observed in the breast image. We present results using two tissue equivalent phantoms, as well as a sensitivity analysis to detector response changes over time and possible errors in compressed thickness measurement. (paper)

  18. Individualized correction for maternal weight in calculating the risk of chromosomal abnormalities with first-trimester screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, E; Thode, C; Eiben, B; Faber, R; Hackelöer, B J; Huesgen, G; Pruggmaier, M; Wellek, S

    2011-02-01

    In the algorithm developed by the Fetal Medicine Foundation (FMF) Germany designed to evaluate the findings of routine first-trimester screening, the false-positive rate (FPR) was determined for the entire study group without stratification by maternal weight. Based on the data received from the continuous audit we were able to identify an increase in the FPR for the weight-related subgroups of patients, particularly for patients with extremely high body weights. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the variability of the FPR can be reduced through adjusting the concentrations of free β-HCG and PAPP-A measured in the maternal serum by means of a nonlinear regression function modeling the dependence of these values on maternal weight. The database used to establish a version of the algorithm enabling control of the FPR over the whole range of maternal weight consisted of n = 123 546 pregnancies resulting in the birth of a child without chromosomal anomalies. The group with positive outcomes covered n = 500 cases of trisomy 21 and n = 159 trisomies 13 or 18. The dependency of the serum parameters free β-HCG and PAPP-A on maternal weight was analyzed in the sample of negative outcomes by means of nonlinear regression. The fitted regression curve was of exponential form with negative slope. Using this model, all individual measurements were corrected through multiplication with a factor obtained as the ratio of the concentration level predicted by the model to belong to the average maternal body weight of 68.2 kg, over the ordinate of that point on the regression curve which belongs to the weight actually measured. Subsequently, the totality of all values of free β-HCG and PAPP-A corrected for deviation from average weight were used as input data for carrying out the construction of diagnostic discrimination rules described in our recent paper for a database to which no corrections for over- or under-weight had been applied. This entailed in particular the

  19. Second-screening mammography: One versus two views per breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, D.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    To compare the advantages of single-versus two-view follow-up screening mammograms, oblique and craniocaudal examinations from 1,000 asymptomatic women who had prior normal baseline studies were reviewed retrospectively, first using only the oblique projection, then using the oblique and craniocaudal views. Single-view readings of dense breasts resulted in considerably more abnormal interpretations then were made with two-view readings. The induced costs from these false-positive readings more than offset the small savings in operating expense of single-view reading. In contradistinction, so few false-positive readings were made in women with fatty breasts (in whom superimposition of dense tissue is not a problem) that savings in operating expense exceeded induced costs

  20. The accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis compared with coned compression magnification mammography in the assessment of abnormalities found on mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.C.; Iqbal, A.; Wasan, R.K.; Peacock, C.; Evans, D.R.; Rahim, R.; Goligher, J.; Michell, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of the digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) with coned compression magnification mammography (CCMM). Materials and methods: The study design included two reading sessions completed by seven experienced radiologists. In the first session, all readers read bilateral standard two-view mammograms and a CCMM view of the lesion before giving a combined score for assessment. In the second session, readers read bilateral standard two-view mammograms plus one-view DBT. The two reading sessions of the experiment were separated by at least 2 weeks to reduce the chance of reader memory of the images read in the previous session from influencing the performance in the subsequent session. Results: Three hundred and fifty-four lesions were assessed and receiver-operative characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the difference between the two modes. For standard two-view mammography plus CCMM, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83–0.91] and for standard two-view mammography plus DBT the AUC was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.95). The difference between the AUCs was 0.06 with p-value of 0.0014. Conclusion: Two-view mammography with one-view DBT showed significantly improved accuracy compared to two-view mammography and CCMM in the assessment of mammographic abnormalities. These results show that DBT can be used effectively in the further evaluation of mammographic abnormalities found at screening and in symptomatic diagnostic practice. - Highlights: • Diagnostic accuracy of magnification mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis. • There is statistical difference between CCMM and DBT. • DBT has a role in evaluating mammographic abnormalities

  1. Automated registration of diagnostic to prediagnostic x-ray mammograms: Evaluation and comparison to radiologists' accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Pereira, Snehal M.; Hipwell, John H.; McCormack, Valerie A.; Tanner, Christine; Moss, Sue M.; Wilkinson, Louise S.; Khoo, Lisanne A. L.; Pagliari, Catriona; Skippage, Pippa L.; Kliger, Carole J.; Hawkes, David J.; Santos Silva, Isabel M. dos

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate intensity-based registration methods for computation of serial x-ray mammogram correspondence. Methods: X-ray mammograms were simulated from MRIs of 20 women using finite element methods for modeling breast compressions and employing a MRI/x-ray appearance change model. The parameter configurations of three registration methods, affine, fluid, and free-form deformation (FFD), were optimized for registering x-ray mammograms on these simulated images. Five mammography film readers independently identified landmarks (tumor, nipple, and usually two other normal features) on pairs of diagnostic and corresponding prediagnostic digitized images from 52 breast cancer cases. Landmarks were independently reidentified by each reader. Target registration errors were calculated to compare the three registration methods using the reader landmarks as a gold standard. Data were analyzed using multilevel methods. Results: Between-reader variability varied with landmark (p<0.01) and screen (p=0.03), with between-reader mean distance (mm) in point location on the diagnostic/prediagnostic images of 2.50 (95% CI 1.95, 3.15)/2.84 (2.24, 3.55) for nipples and 4.26 (3.43, 5.24)/4.76 (3.85, 5.84) for tumors. Registration accuracy was sensitive to the type of landmark and the amount of breast density. For dense breasts (≥40%), the affine and fluid methods outperformed FFD. For breasts with lower density, the affine registration surpassed both fluid and FFD. Mean accuracy (mm) of the affine registration varied between 3.16 (95% CI 2.56, 3.90) for nipple points in breasts with density 20%-39% and 5.73 (4.80, 6.84) for tumor points in breasts with density <20%. Conclusions: Affine registration accuracy was comparable to that between independent film readers. More advanced two-dimensional nonrigid registration algorithms were incapable of increasing the accuracy of image alignment when compared to affine registration.

  2. Hough transform for clustered microcalcifications detection in full-field digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizzi, A.; Basile, T. M. A.; Losurdo, L.; Amoroso, N.; Bellotti, R.; Bottigli, U.; Dentamaro, R.; Didonna, V.; Fausto, A.; Massafra, R.; Moschetta, M.; Tamborra, P.; Tangaro, S.; La Forgia, D.

    2017-09-01

    Many screening programs use mammography as principal diagnostic tool for detecting breast cancer at a very early stage. Despite the efficacy of the mammograms in highlighting breast diseases, the detection of some lesions is still doubtless for radiologists. In particular, the extremely minute and elongated salt-like particles of microcalcifications are sometimes no larger than 0.1 mm and represent approximately half of all cancer detected by means of mammograms. Hence the need for automatic tools able to support radiologists in their work. Here, we propose a computer assisted diagnostic tool to support radiologists in identifying microcalcifications in full (native) digital mammographic images. The proposed CAD system consists of a pre-processing step, that improves contrast and reduces noise by applying Sobel edge detection algorithm and Gaussian filter, followed by a microcalcification detection step performed by exploiting the circular Hough transform. The procedure performance was tested on 200 images coming from the Breast Cancer Digital Repository (BCDR), a publicly available database. The automatically detected clusters of microcalcifications were evaluated by skilled radiologists which asses the validity of the correctly identified regions of interest as well as the system error in case of missed clustered microcalcifications. The system performance was evaluated in terms of Sensitivity and False Positives per images (FPi) rate resulting comparable to the state-of-art approaches. The proposed model was able to accurately predict the microcalcification clusters obtaining performances (sensibility = 91.78% and FPi rate = 3.99) which favorably compare to other state-of-the-art approaches.

  3. Multi-task transfer learning deep convolutional neural network: application to computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer on mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Cha, Kenny H.; Richter, Caleb D.

    2017-12-01

    Transfer learning in deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) is an important step in its application to medical imaging tasks. We propose a multi-task transfer learning DCNN with the aim of translating the ‘knowledge’ learned from non-medical images to medical diagnostic tasks through supervised training and increasing the generalization capabilities of DCNNs by simultaneously learning auxiliary tasks. We studied this approach in an important application: classification of malignant and benign breast masses. With Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, digitized screen-film mammograms (SFMs) and digital mammograms (DMs) were collected from our patient files and additional SFMs were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. The data set consisted of 2242 views with 2454 masses (1057 malignant, 1397 benign). In single-task transfer learning, the DCNN was trained and tested on SFMs. In multi-task transfer learning, SFMs and DMs were used to train the DCNN, which was then tested on SFMs. N-fold cross-validation with the training set was used for training and parameter optimization. On the independent test set, the multi-task transfer learning DCNN was found to have significantly (p  =  0.007) higher performance compared to the single-task transfer learning DCNN. This study demonstrates that multi-task transfer learning may be an effective approach for training DCNN in medical imaging applications when training samples from a single modality are limited.

  4. Breast Cancer Detection with Gabor Features from Digital Mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new breast cancer detection algorithm, named the “Gabor Cancer Detection” (GCD algorithm, utilizing Gabor features is proposed. Three major steps are involved in the GCD algorithm, preprocessing, segmentation (generating alarm segments, and classification (reducing false alarms. In preprocessing, a digital mammogram is down-sampled, quantized, denoised and enhanced. Nonlinear diffusion is used for noise suppression. In segmentation, a band-pass filter is formed by rotating a 1-D Gaussian filter (off center in frequency space, termed as “Circular Gaussian Filter” (CGF. A CGF can be uniquely characterized by specifying a central frequency and a frequency band. A mass or calcification is a space-occupying lesion and usually appears as a bright region on a mammogram. The alarm segments (suspicious to be masses/calcifications can be extracted out using a threshold that is adaptively decided upon the histogram analysis of the CGF-filtered mammogram. In classification, a Gabor filter bank is formed with five bands by four orientations (horizontal, vertical, 45 and 135 degree in Fourier frequency domain. For each mammographic image, twenty Gabor-filtered images are produced. A set of edge histogram descriptors (EHD are then extracted from 20 Gabor images for classification. An EHD signature is computed with four orientations of Gabor images along each band and five EHD signatures are then joined together to form an EHD feature vector of 20 dimensions. With the EHD features, the fuzzy C-means clustering technique and k-nearest neighbor (KNN classifier are used to reduce the number of false alarms. The experimental results tested on the DDSM database (University of South Florida show the promises of GCD algorithm in breast cancer detection, which achieved TP (true positive rate = 90% at FPI (false positives per image = 1.21 in mass detection; and TP = 93% at FPI = 1.19 in calcification detection.

  5. Reproducibility of computer-aided detection system in digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ja; Cho, Nariya; Cha, Joo Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Lee, Sin Ho; Cho, Kyung Soo; Kim, Sun Mi; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of the computer-aided detection (CAD) system for digital mammograms. We applied the CAD system (ImageChecker M1000-DM, version 3.1; R2 Technology) to full field digital mammograms. These mammograms were taken twice at an interval of 10-45 days (mean:25 days) for 34 preoperative patients (breast cancer n=27, benign disease n=7, age range:20-66 years, mean age:47.9 years). On the mammograms, lesions were visible in 19 patients and these were depicted as 15 masses and 12 calcification clusters. We analyzed the sensitivity, the false positive rate (FPR) and the reproducibility of the CAD marks. The broader sensitivities of the CAD system were 80% (12 of 15), 67%(10 of 15) for masses and those for calcification clusters were 100% (12 of 12). The strict sensitivities were 50% (15 of 30) and 50% (15 of 30) for masses and 92% (22 of 24) and 79% (19 of 24) for the clusters. The FPR for the masses was 0.21-0.22/image, the FPR for the clusters was 0.03-0.04/image and the total FPR was 0.24-0.26/image. Among 132 mammography images, the identical images regardless of the existence of CAD marks were 59% (78 of 132), and the identical images with CAD marks were 22% (15 of 69). The reproducibility of the CAD marks for the true positive mass was 67% (12 of 18) and 71% (17 of 24) for the true positive cluster. The reproducibility of CAD marks for the false positive mass was 8% (4 of 53), and the reproducibility of CAD marks for the false positive clusters was 14% (1 of 7). The reproducibility of the total mass marks was 23% (16 of 71), and the reproducibility of the total cluster marks was 58% (18 of 31). CAD system showed higher sensitivity and reproducibility of CAD marks for the calcification clusters which are related to breast cancer. Yet the overall reproducibility of CAD marks was low; therefore, the CAD system must be applied considering this limitation

  6. A similarity measure method combining location feature for mammogram retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiong; Xin, Junchang; Huang, Yukun; Li, Chen; Xu, Ling; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Huizi; Qian, Wei

    2018-05-28

    Breast cancer, the most common malignancy among women, has a high mortality rate in clinical practice. Early detection, diagnosis and treatment can reduce the mortalities of breast cancer greatly. The method of mammogram retrieval can help doctors to find the early breast lesions effectively and determine a reasonable feature set for image similarity measure. This will improve the accuracy effectively for mammogram retrieval. This paper proposes a similarity measure method combining location feature for mammogram retrieval. Firstly, the images are pre-processed, the regions of interest are detected and the lesions are segmented in order to get the center point and radius of the lesions. Then, the method, namely Coherent Point Drift, is used for image registration with the pre-defined standard image. The center point and radius of the lesions after registration are obtained and the standard location feature of the image is constructed. This standard location feature can help figure out the location similarity between the image pair from the query image to each dataset image in the database. Next, the content feature of the image is extracted, including the Histogram of Oriented Gradients, the Edge Direction Histogram, the Local Binary Pattern and the Gray Level Histogram, and the image pair content similarity can be calculated using the Earth Mover's Distance. Finally, the location similarity and content similarity are fused to form the image fusion similarity, and the specified number of the most similar images can be returned according to it. In the experiment, 440 mammograms, which are from Chinese women in Northeast China, are used as the database. When fusing 40% lesion location feature similarity and 60% content feature similarity, the results have obvious advantages. At this time, precision is 0.83, recall is 0.76, comprehensive indicator is 0.79, satisfaction is 96.0%, mean is 4.2 and variance is 17.7. The results show that the precision and recall of this

  7. Role of technetium-99m sestamibi scintimammography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of indeterminate mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiling, R.; Moser, R.; Meyer, G.; Tatsch, K.; Hahn, K.; Khalkhali, I.; Sommer, H.; Willemsen, F.; Pfluger, T.

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared technetium-99m sestamibi scintimammography (SMM) and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results in patients with indeterminate mammograms to determine whether either technique can improve the sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of breast carcinoma. From 123 consecutive patients who underwent physical examination, mammography, SMM, and histopathologic confirmation, a subgroup of 82 patients presenting with indeterminate mammograms was studied. Sixty-eight patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI. SMM results were scored on the basis of the intensity and pattern of sestamibi uptake. MRI images were scored on the basis of signal intensity increase after administration of contrast material as well as the enhancement pattern and speed of gadolinium uptake. The results obtained with the two techniques were compared and related to the final histopathologic diagnoses. Considering indeterminate findings as positive, the sensitivity of SMM was 79% and the specificity, 70%. MRI displayed a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 49%. When indeterminate results were considered negative, the sensitivity and specificity of SMM were 62% and 83%, respectively. MRI revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 56% and 79%, respectively. The calculated sensitivities and specificities demonstrate the diagnostic limitations of both SMM and MRI in the evaluation of patients with indeterminate mammographic findings. Due to the higher specificity, SMM may be the preferred modality in the evaluation of selected patients with breast abnormalities. (orig.)

  8. Mammogram classification scheme using 2D-discrete wavelet and local binary pattern for detection of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi Putra, Januar

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new mammogram classification scheme to classify the breast tissues as normal or abnormal. Feature matrix is generated using Local Binary Pattern to all the detailed coefficients from 2D-DWT of the region of interest (ROI) of a mammogram. Feature selection is done by selecting the relevant features that affect the classification. Feature selection is used to reduce the dimensionality of data and features that are not relevant, in this paper the F-test and Ttest will be performed to the results of the feature extraction dataset to reduce and select the relevant feature. The best features are used in a Neural Network classifier for classification. In this research we use MIAS and DDSM database. In addition to the suggested scheme, the competent schemes are also simulated for comparative analysis. It is observed that the proposed scheme has a better say with respect to accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Based on experiments, the performance of the proposed scheme can produce high accuracy that is 92.71%, while the lowest accuracy obtained is 77.08%.

  9. Ameliorating mammograms by using novel image processing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, A.; Kwartowitz, D.

    2014-03-01

    Mammography is one of the most important tools for the early detection of breast cancer typically through detection of characteristic masses and/or micro calcifications. Digital mammography has become commonplace in recent years. High quality mammogram images are large in size, providing high-resolution data. Estimates of the false negative rate for cancers in mammography are approximately 10%-30%. This may be due to observation error, but more frequently it is because the cancer is hidden by other dense tissue in the breast and even after retrospective review of the mammogram, cannot be seen. In this study, we report on the results of novel image processing algorithms that will enhance the images providing decision support to reading physicians. Techniques such as Butterworth high pass filtering and Gabor filters will be applied to enhance images; followed by segmentation of the region of interest (ROI). Subsequently, the textural features will be extracted from the ROI, which will be used to classify the ROIs as either masses or non-masses. Among the statistical methods most used for the characterization of textures, the co-occurrence matrix makes it possible to determine the frequency of appearance of two pixels separated by a distance, at an angle from the horizontal. This matrix contains a very large amount of information that is complex. Therefore, it is not used directly but through measurements known as indices of texture such as average, variance, energy, contrast, correlation, normalized correlation and entropy.

  10. Computerized detection of masses on mammograms by entropy maximization thresholding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kom, Guillaume; Tiedeu, Alain; Feudjio, Cyrille; Ngundam, J.

    2010-03-01

    In many cases, masses in X-ray mammograms are subtle and their detection can benefit from an automated system serving as a diagnostic aid. It is to this end that the authors propose in this paper, a new computer aided mass detection for breast cancer diagnosis. The first step focuses on wavelet filters enhancement which removes bright background due to dense breast tissues and some film artifacts while preserving features and patterns related to the masses. In the second step, enhanced image is computed by Entropy Maximization Thresholding (EMT) to obtain segmented masses. The efficiency of 98,181% is achieved by analyzing a database of 84 mammograms previously marked by radiologists and digitized at a pixel size of 343μmm x 343μ mm. The segmentation results, in terms of size of detected masses, give a relative error on mass area that is less than 8%. The performance of the proposed method has also been evaluated by means of the receiver operating-characteristics (ROC) analysis. This yielded respectively, an area (Az) of 0.9224 and 0.9295 under the ROC curve whether enhancement step is applied or not. Furthermore, we observe that the EMT yields excellent segmentation results compared to those found in literature. (author)

  11. Mammographer personality traits – elements of the optimal mammogram experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Louw

    2014-11-01

    Doelstellings: Die doel van hierdie studie was om van die faktore wat pasiënte se persepsies beïnvloed, te ondersoek. Pasiënte se persepsies en voorkeure ten opsigte van mammograwe se persoonlikheidseienskappe word in hierdie artikel bespreek. Metode: In dié beskrywende, verkennende studie is ’n nie-waarskynlikheid-gerieflikheidsteekproef-metode gebruik om data van 274 mammogram-pasiënte in vier kliniese opleidingsentrums in Gauteng met behulp van ’n vraelys in te win. Die respondente moes die belangrikheid van 24 persoonlikheidseienskappe van mammograwe beoordeel. Geldigheid, betroubaarheid, geloofwaardigheid en etiese oorwegings is in ag geneem. Resultate: Van al die vraelyste is 91% ingehandig. Die data is met behulp van beskrywende statistiek en faktoranalise geïnterpreteer, en vier faktore is uit die persoonlikheidskaal geïdentifiseer. Gevolgtrekking: Dit blyk dat pasiënte mammograwe beoordeel volgens die vertroue wat hulle inboesem, die sorg wat hulle verleen, hoe veilig hulle pasiënte laat voel, asook hoe goed hulle kommunikeer. Aangesien die mammograaf-pasiënt-verhouding pasiënte se indrukke van mammogramme sterk beïnvloed, kan hierdie vier faktore as fundamentele elemente van ’n optimale mammogram-ondersoek beskou word.

  12. ANALISA PERBANDINGAN METODE SEGMENTASI CITRA PADA CITRA MAMMOGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Arifin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is a desaeas with a high prevalence in the world. As many 8,2 million people died of cancer. The prevalence of cancer was happened in woman that is breast cancer. Breast cancer is a malignancy derived from grandular cells, gland duct and supporting the breast tissues. There are many ways of detecting the presence of breast cancer which one is mammography test that aims to examine the human breast using low-dose X-rays. Observation mammography results in the form of mammogram images can be done with image processing, in this way the process of observation is not take a long time and error in the observation can be reduced. One of the process image processing is image segmentation, the step of image segmentation is an important in image analysis there force is needed method in process of image sementation. This observation is aims to analyze comparison of two image segmentation methods of mammogram images that is using Watershed method and Otsu method after that it will see the quality of image by calculating the signal to noise ratio and timing run of each method. The result of this observation is showed that the signal to noise ratio on the Watershed method 7,475 dB and Otsu method 6.197 dB and the conclution is Watershed method is better than Otsu method, whereas if viewed the timing run Watershed method 0,016 seconds is more faster than Otsu method.

  13. Automated registration of diagnostic to prediagnostic x-ray mammograms: Evaluation and comparison to radiologists' accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Pereira, Snehal M.; Hipwell, John H.; McCormack, Valerie A.; Tanner, Christine; Moss, Sue M.; Wilkinson, Louise S.; Khoo, Lisanne A. L.; Pagliari, Catriona; Skippage, Pippa L.; Kliger, Carole J.; Hawkes, David J.; Santos Silva, Isabel M. dos [Cancer Research UK Epidemiology and Genetics Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lifestyle and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, Lyon 69008 (France); Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Cancer Screening Evaluation Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); St. George' s Healthcare NHS Trust and South West London Breast Screening Service, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Epidemiology and Genetics Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate intensity-based registration methods for computation of serial x-ray mammogram correspondence. Methods: X-ray mammograms were simulated from MRIs of 20 women using finite element methods for modeling breast compressions and employing a MRI/x-ray appearance change model. The parameter configurations of three registration methods, affine, fluid, and free-form deformation (FFD), were optimized for registering x-ray mammograms on these simulated images. Five mammography film readers independently identified landmarks (tumor, nipple, and usually two other normal features) on pairs of diagnostic and corresponding prediagnostic digitized images from 52 breast cancer cases. Landmarks were independently reidentified by each reader. Target registration errors were calculated to compare the three registration methods using the reader landmarks as a gold standard. Data were analyzed using multilevel methods. Results: Between-reader variability varied with landmark (p<0.01) and screen (p=0.03), with between-reader mean distance (mm) in point location on the diagnostic/prediagnostic images of 2.50 (95% CI 1.95, 3.15)/2.84 (2.24, 3.55) for nipples and 4.26 (3.43, 5.24)/4.76 (3.85, 5.84) for tumors. Registration accuracy was sensitive to the type of landmark and the amount of breast density. For dense breasts ({>=}40%), the affine and fluid methods outperformed FFD. For breasts with lower density, the affine registration surpassed both fluid and FFD. Mean accuracy (mm) of the affine registration varied between 3.16 (95% CI 2.56, 3.90) for nipple points in breasts with density 20%-39% and 5.73 (4.80, 6.84) for tumor points in breasts with density <20%. Conclusions: Affine registration accuracy was comparable to that between independent film readers. More advanced two-dimensional nonrigid registration algorithms were incapable of increasing the accuracy of image alignment when compared to affine registration.

  14. Factors Influencing Compliance with Mammography Screening Recommendations in an Air Force Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Link, Tamara

    1998-01-01

    .... Data was analyzed using SPSS for Windows version 6.1. This study found that over 80% of respondents indicated their last mammogram was for routine screening purposes as opposed to diagnostic purposes. Most respondents (82...

  15. Psychological distress and streamlined BreastScreen follow-up assessment versus standard assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Kerry A; Winch, Caleb J; Borecky, Natacha; Boyages, John

    2013-11-04

    To establish whether altered protocol characteristics of streamlined StepDown breast assessment clinics heightened or reduced the psychological distress of women in attendance compared with standard assessment. Willingness to attend future screening was also compared between the assessment groups. Observational, prospective study of women attending either a mammogram-only StepDown or a standard breast assessment clinic. Women completed questionnaires on the day of assessment and 1 month later. Women attending StepDown (136 women) or standard assessment clinics (148 women) at a BreastScreen centre between 10 November 2009 and 7 August 2010. Breast cancer worries; positive and negative psychological consequences of assessment (Psychological Consequences Questionnaire); breast cancer-related intrusion and avoidance (Impact of Event Scale); and willingness to attend, and uneasiness about, future screening. At 1-month follow-up, no group differences were evident between those attending standard and StepDown clinics on breast cancer worries (P= 0.44), positive (P= 0.88) and negative (P = 0.65) consequences, intrusion (P = 0.64), and avoidance (P = 0.87). Willingness to return for future mammograms was high, and did not differ between groups (P = 0.16), although higher levels of unease were associated with lessened willingness to rescreen (P = 0.04). There was no evidence that attending streamlined StepDown assessments had different outcomes in terms of distress than attending standard assessment clinics for women with a BreastScreen-detected abnormality. However, unease about attending future screening was generally associated with less willingness to do so in both groups; thus, there is a role for psycho-educational intervention to address these concerns.

  16. Assessment of a novel mass detection algorithm in mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Kozegar

    2013-01-01

    Settings and Design: The proposed mass detector consists of two major steps. In the first step, several suspicious regions are extracted from the mammograms using an adaptive thresholding technique. In the second step, false positives originating by the previous stage are reduced by a machine learning approach. Materials and Methods: All modules of the mass detector were assessed on mini-MIAS database. In addition, the algorithm was tested on INBreast database for more validation. Results: According to FROC analysis, our mass detection algorithm outperforms other competing methods. Conclusions: We should not just insist on sensitivity in the segmentation phase because if we forgot FP rate, and our goal was just higher sensitivity, then the learning algorithm would be biased more toward false positives and the sensitivity would decrease dramatically in the false positive reduction phase. Therefore, we should consider the mass detection problem as a cost sensitive problem because misclassification costs are not the same in this type of problems.

  17. Locally adaptive decision in detection of clustered microcalcifications in mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz de Cea, María V.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Yang, Yongyi

    2018-02-01

    In computer-aided detection or diagnosis of clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in mammograms, the performance often suffers from not only the presence of false positives (FPs) among the detected individual MCs but also large variability in detection accuracy among different cases. To address this issue, we investigate a locally adaptive decision scheme in MC detection by exploiting the noise characteristics in a lesion area. Instead of developing a new MC detector, we propose a decision scheme on how to best decide whether a detected object is an MC or not in the detector output. We formulate the individual MCs as statistical outliers compared to the many noisy detections in a lesion area so as to account for the local image characteristics. To identify the MCs, we first consider a parametric method for outlier detection, the Mahalanobis distance detector, which is based on a multi-dimensional Gaussian distribution on the noisy detections. We also consider a non-parametric method which is based on a stochastic neighbor graph model of the detected objects. We demonstrated the proposed decision approach with two existing MC detectors on a set of 188 full-field digital mammograms (95 cases). The results, evaluated using free response operating characteristic (FROC) analysis, showed a significant improvement in detection accuracy by the proposed outlier decision approach over traditional thresholding (the partial area under the FROC curve increased from 3.95 to 4.25, p-value  FPs at a given sensitivity level. The proposed adaptive decision approach could not only reduce the number of FPs in detected MCs but also improve case-to-case consistency in detection.

  18. Exposure parameters of mammograms with and without mass lesions from a South African breast care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acho, Sussan N.; Boonzaier, Willem P. E.; Nel, Ina F.

    2017-01-01

    In South African breast care centres, full-field digital mammography units provide breast imaging services to symptomatic and asymptomatic women simultaneously. This study evaluated the technical exposure parameters of 800 mammograms of which 100 mammograms had obvious mass lesions in the fibro-glandular tissue. The average breast compression force of mammograms with mass lesions in the fibro-glandular tissue was 18.4% less than the average breast compression force of mammograms without mass lesions. The average mean glandular dose (MGD), tube potential (kV p ) and compressed breast thickness (CBT) values were 2.14 mGy, 30.5 kV p and 63.9 mm, respectively, for mammograms with mass lesions, and 1.45 mGy, 29.6 kV p and 56.9 mm, respectively, for mammograms without mass lesions. Overall, the average MGD and mean CBT of mammograms with mass lesion were significantly higher compared to those without mass lesions (p < 0.05), although there was no significant difference in their tube potentials (p > 0.05). (authors)

  19. A Single Sided Edge Marking Method for Detecting Pectoral Muscle in Digital Mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Toz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the computer-assisted diagnosis of breast cancer, the removal of pectoral muscle from mammograms is very important. In this study, a new method, called Single-Sided Edge Marking (SSEM technique, is proposed for the identification of the pectoral muscle border from mammograms. 60 mammograms from the INbreast database were used to test the proposed method. The results obtained were compared for False Positive Rate, False Negative Rate, and Sensitivity using the ground truth values pre-determined by radiologists for the same images. Accordingly, it has been shown that the proposed method can detect the pectoral muscle border with an average of 95.6% sensitivity.

  20. Hidden costs of low-cost screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyrlak, D.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-two hundred women in Orange County, California, took part in a low-cost mammography screening project sponsored by the American Cancer Society and the KCBS-TV. Patients were followed up by telephone and questioned about actual costs incurred as a result of screening mammography, including costs of repeated and follow-up mammograms, US examinations and surgical consultations. The total number of biopsies, cancers found, and the costs involved were investigated. The authors' results suggest that particularly in centers with a high positive call rate, the cost of screening mammograms accounts for only a small proportion of the medical costs

  1. Barriers and facillitators to compliance with routine mammographic screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, H.B.; Rimer, B.; Keintz, M.K.; Myers, R.E.; Engstrom, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Six hundred one randomly selected women were interviewed to determine their reasons for compliance or noncompliance with free HMO-sponsored mammographic examinations. Noncompliers were significantly more likely to believe mammograms are unnecessary without symptoms, too much trouble, or inconvenient and to perceive their physicians as not recommending mammograms. Compliers were more likely to believe that early breast cancer can be cured and to recognize that breast screening is for asymptomatic individuals. When cost is eliminated as a barrier to screening, a variety of socioeconomic, psychological, and access barriers are exposed. Radiologists must be cognizant of these factors in planning and participating in breast cancer screening programs

  2. Factors Affecting African American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening Programs: A Qualitative Study of Uninsured Low Income Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Frances

    2002-01-01

    .... During Year 02, we conducted technical analyses of completed Phase 1 interviews that were obtained from African American women who were eligible to receive, but who chose to decline, free screening mammograms...

  3. Factors Affecting African American Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening Programs: A Qualitative Study of Uninsured Low Income Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Frances

    2004-01-01

    .... Both Phase I and 2 work and analyses have been completed. Phase I involved case intensive elicitation interviews of a population data base of over 600 women who were offered but declined participation in free screening mammogram through the Breast...

  4. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Breast Masses Using Digitized Images Versus Screen-Film Mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhigang Liang; Xiangying Du; Jiabin Liu; Xinyu Yao; Yanhui Yang; Kuncheng Li

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical film digitizers play an important transitory role as digital-analogue bridges in radiology. Digitized mammograms require evaluation of performance to assure medical image quality. Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy in the interpretation of breast masses using original screen-film mammograms versus digitized images. Material and Methods: A total of 72 female patients between 55 and 81 years of age suspected of having breast cancer were selected by two non-observing radiologists. Of these, 31 cases were benign lesions and 41 cases were cancer. The mammography films were digitized using a laser film digitizer. Three radiologists, each with more than 10 years of experience in mammography, interpreted the screen-film mammograms and digitized images respectively. The time interval was 4 weeks. A four-point malignancy scale was used, with 1 defined as definitely not malignant, 2 as probably not malignant, 3 as probably malignant, and 4 as definitely malignant. Receiver operating characteristic (Roc) curves, sensitivity, and specificity were compared. Results: The average area-under-the-curve (Az) value of the original screen-film mammograms was 0.921, and the average Az value of the digitized images was 0.859. This difference was not statistically significant (P=0.131). The detection specificity of extremely dense breasts was lower than that for other breast compositions for both digitized images and screen-film mammograms. No statistical significance in sensitivity and specificity was observed between digitized images and mammograms for each breast composition. Original screen-film mammograms were observed to perform better than digitized images. Conclusion: Digitized images with a spatial resolution of 175 μm can be used instead of screen-film mammograms in the diagnosis of breast cancer

  5. Abnormality Detection in Mammography using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Pengcheng; Shu, Chang; Goubran, Rafik

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The most common screening technology is mammography. To reduce the cost and workload of radiologists, we propose a computer aided detection approach for classifying and localizing calcifications and masses in mammogram images. To improve on conventional approaches, we apply deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) for automatic feature learning and classifier building. In computer-aided mammography, deep CNN classifiers cannot be tra...

  6. Automated detection of microcalcification clusters in digital mammograms based on wavelet domain hidden Markov tree modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regentova, E.; Zhang, L.; Veni, G.; Zheng, J.

    2007-01-01

    A system is designed for detecting microcalcification clusters (MCC) in digital mammograms. The system is intended for computer-aided diagnostic prompting. Further discrimination of MCC as benign or malignant is assumed to be performed by radiologists. Processing of mammograms is based on the statistical modeling by means of wavelet domain hidden markov trees (WHMT). Segmentation is performed by the weighted likelihood evaluation followed by the classification based on spatial filters for a single microcalcification (MC) and a cluster of MC detection. The analysis is carried out on FROC curves for 40 mammograms from the mini-MIAS database and for 100 mammograms with 50 cancerous and 50 benign cases from DDSM database. The designed system is capable to detect 100% of true positive cases in these sets. The rate of false positives is 2.9 per case for mini-MIAS dataset; and 0.01 for the DDSM images. (orig.)

  7. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer screening is performed using mammogram, clinical breast exam (CBE), and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) tests. Learn about these and other tests that have been studied to detect or screen for breast cancer in this expert-reviewed and evidence-based summary.

  8. Computer-aided detection system applied to full-field digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bolivar, Alfonso; Sanchez Gomez, Sonia; Merino, Paula; Alonso-Bartolome, Pilar; Ortega Garcia, Estrella; Munoz Cacho, Pedro; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although mammography remains the mainstay for breast cancer screening, it is an imperfect examination with a sensitivity of 75-92% for breast cancer. Computer-aided detection (CAD) has been developed to improve mammographic detection of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively estimate CAD sensitivity and false-positive rate with full-field digital mammograms (FFDMs). Material and Methods: CAD was used to evaluate 151 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (n=48) and invasive breast cancer (n=103) detected with FFDM. Retrospectively, CAD sensitivity was estimated based on breast density, mammographic presentation, histopathology type, and lesion size. CAD false-positive rate was estimated with screening FFDMs from 200 women. Results: CAD detected 93% (141/151) of cancer cases: 97% (28/29) in fatty breasts, 94% (81/86) in breasts containing scattered fibroglandular densities, 90% (28/31) in heterogeneously dense breasts, and 80% (4/5) in extremely dense breasts. CAD detected 98% (54/55) of cancers manifesting as calcifications, 89% (74/83) as masses, and 100% (13/13) as mixed masses and calcifications. CAD detected 92% (73/79) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 89% (8/9) of invasive lobular carcinomas, 93% (14/15) of other invasive carcinomas, and 96% (46/48) of DCIS. CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm was 87% (47/54); 11-20 mm, 99% (70/71); 21-30 mm, 86% (12/14); and larger than 30 mm, 100% (12/12). The CAD false-positive rate was 2.5 marks per case. Conclusion: CAD with FFDM showed a high sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as calcifications or masses. CAD sensitivity was maintained in small lesions (1-20 mm) and invasive lobular carcinomas, which have lower mammographic sensitivity

  9. Comparison Between Digital and Synthetic 2D Mammograms in Breast Density Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshafeiy, Taghreed I; Wadih, Antoine; Nicholson, Brandi T; Rochman, Carrie M; Peppard, Heather R; Patrie, James T; Harvey, Jennifer A

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare assessments of breast density on synthetic 2D images as compared with digital 2D mammograms. This retrospective study included consecutive women undergoing screening with digital 2D mammography and tomosynthesis during May 2015 with a negative or benign outcome. In separate reading sessions, three radiologists with 5-25 years of clinical experience and 1 year of experience with synthetic 2D mammography read digital 2D and synthetic 2D images and assigned breast density categories according to the 5th edition of BI-RADS. Inter- and intrareader agreement was assessed for each BI-RADS density assessment and combined dense and nondense categories using percent agreement and Cohen kappa coefficient for consensus and all reads. A total of 309 patients met study inclusion criteria. Agreement between consensus BI-RADS density categories assigned for digital and synthetic 2D mammography was 80.3% (95% CI, 75.4-84.5%) with κ = 0.73 (95% CI, 0.66-0.79). For combined dense and nondense categories, agreement reached 91.9% (95% CI, 88.2-94.7%). For consensus readings, similar numbers of patients were shifted between nondense and dense categories (11 and 14, respectively) with the synthetic 2D compared with digital 2D mammography. Interreader differences were apparent; assignment to dense categories was greater with digital 2D mammography for reader 1 (odds ratio [OR], 1.26; p = 0.002), the same for reader 2 (OR, 0.91; p = 0.262), and greater with synthetic 2D mammography for reader 3 (OR, 0.86; p = 0.033). Overall, synthetic 2D mammography is comparable with digital 2D mammography in assessment of breast density, though there is some variability by reader. Practices can readily adopt synthetic 2D mammography without concern that it will affect density assessment and subsequent recommendations for supplemental screening.

  10. Computer-aided detection system applied to full-field digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Bolivar, Alfonso; Sanchez Gomez, Sonia; Merino, Paula; Alonso-Bartolome, Pilar; Ortega Garcia, Estrella (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Marques of Valdecilla Hospital, Santander (Spain)), e-mail: avegab@telefonica.net; Munoz Cacho, Pedro (Dept. of Statistics, Univ. Marques of Valdecilla Hospital, Santander (Spain)); Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W. (iCAD, Inc., Nashua, NH (United States))

    2010-12-15

    Background: Although mammography remains the mainstay for breast cancer screening, it is an imperfect examination with a sensitivity of 75-92% for breast cancer. Computer-aided detection (CAD) has been developed to improve mammographic detection of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively estimate CAD sensitivity and false-positive rate with full-field digital mammograms (FFDMs). Material and Methods: CAD was used to evaluate 151 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (n=48) and invasive breast cancer (n=103) detected with FFDM. Retrospectively, CAD sensitivity was estimated based on breast density, mammographic presentation, histopathology type, and lesion size. CAD false-positive rate was estimated with screening FFDMs from 200 women. Results: CAD detected 93% (141/151) of cancer cases: 97% (28/29) in fatty breasts, 94% (81/86) in breasts containing scattered fibroglandular densities, 90% (28/31) in heterogeneously dense breasts, and 80% (4/5) in extremely dense breasts. CAD detected 98% (54/55) of cancers manifesting as calcifications, 89% (74/83) as masses, and 100% (13/13) as mixed masses and calcifications. CAD detected 92% (73/79) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 89% (8/9) of invasive lobular carcinomas, 93% (14/15) of other invasive carcinomas, and 96% (46/48) of DCIS. CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm was 87% (47/54); 11-20 mm, 99% (70/71); 21-30 mm, 86% (12/14); and larger than 30 mm, 100% (12/12). The CAD false-positive rate was 2.5 marks per case. Conclusion: CAD with FFDM showed a high sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as calcifications or masses. CAD sensitivity was maintained in small lesions (1-20 mm) and invasive lobular carcinomas, which have lower mammographic sensitivity

  11. Staging of breast cancer and the advanced applications of digital mammogram: what the physician needs to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Maha H; Mansour, Sahar M; Zaglol, Mai; Salaleldin, Lamia A; Nada, Omniya M; Haggag, Marwa A

    2017-03-01

    -enhanced spectral mammogram shows the extent of abnormal contrast uptake and detects multiplicity. Integrated analysis provides optimal findings for proper "T" staging of breast cancer.

  12. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  13. Volumetric breast density estimation from full-field digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engeland, Saskia; Snoeren, Peter R; Huisman, Henkjan; Boetes, Carla; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2006-03-01

    A method is presented for estimation of dense breast tissue volume from mammograms obtained with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The thickness of dense tissue mapping to a pixel is determined by using a physical model of image acquisition. This model is based on the assumption that the breast is composed of two types of tissue, fat and parenchyma. Effective linear attenuation coefficients of these tissues are derived from empirical data as a function of tube voltage (kVp), anode material, filtration, and compressed breast thickness. By employing these, tissue composition at a given pixel is computed after performing breast thickness compensation, using a reference value for fatty tissue determined by the maximum pixel value in the breast tissue projection. Validation has been performed using 22 FFDM cases acquired with a GE Senographe 2000D by comparing the volume estimates with volumes obtained by semi-automatic segmentation of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The correlation between MRI and mammography volumes was 0.94 on a per image basis and 0.97 on a per patient basis. Using the dense tissue volumes from MRI data as the gold standard, the average relative error of the volume estimates was 13.6%.

  14. A Probabilistic Approach for Breast Boundary Extraction in Mammograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Habibi Aghdam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of the breast boundary is crucial to perform further analysis of mammogram. Methods to extract the breast boundary can be classified into two categories: methods based on image processing techniques and those based on models. The former use image transformation techniques such as thresholding, morphological operations, and region growing. In the second category, the boundary is extracted using more advanced techniques, such as the active contour model. The problem with thresholding methods is that it is a hard to automatically find the optimal threshold value by using histogram information. On the other hand, active contour models require defining a starting point close to the actual boundary to be able to successfully extract the boundary. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic approach to address the aforementioned problems. In our approach we use local binary patterns to describe the texture around each pixel. In addition, the smoothness of the boundary is handled by using a new probability model. Experimental results show that the proposed method reaches 38% and 50% improvement with respect to the results obtained by the active contour model and threshold-based methods respectively, and it increases the stability of the boundary extraction process up to 86%.

  15. Quantifying the effect of colorization enhancement on mammogram images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnicki, Paul J.; Uyeda, Elizabeth; Micheli-Tzanakou, Evangelia

    2002-04-01

    Current methods of radiological displays provide only grayscale images of mammograms. The limitation of the image space to grayscale provides only luminance differences and textures as cues for object recognition within the image. However, color can be an important and significant cue in the detection of shapes and objects. Increasing detection ability allows the radiologist to interpret the images in more detail, improving object recognition and diagnostic accuracy. Color detection experiments using our stimulus system, have demonstrated that an observer can only detect an average of 140 levels of grayscale. An optimally colorized image can allow a user to distinguish 250 - 1000 different levels, hence increasing potential image feature detection by 2-7 times. By implementing a colorization map, which follows the luminance map of the original grayscale images, the luminance profile is preserved and color is isolated as the enhancement mechanism. The effect of this enhancement mechanism on the shape, frequency composition and statistical characteristics of the Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) are analyzed and presented. Thus, the effectiveness of the image colorization is measured quantitatively using the Visual Evoked Potential (VEP).

  16. Search for lesions in mammograms: Statistical characterization of observer responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochud, Francois O.; Abbey, Craig K.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate human performance for visually detecting simulated microcalcifications and tumors embedded in x-ray mammograms as a function of signal contrast and the number of possible signal locations. Our results show that performance degradation with an increasing number of locations is well approximated by signal detection theory (SDT) with the usual Gaussian assumption. However, more stringent statistical analysis finds a departure from Gaussian assumptions for the detection of microcalcifications. We investigated whether these departures from the SDT Gaussian model could be accounted for by an increase in human internal response correlations arising from the image-pixel correlations present in 1/f spectrum backgrounds and/or observer internal response distributions that departed from the Gaussian assumption. Results were consistent with a departure from the Gaussian response distributions and suggested that the human observer internal responses were more compact than the Gaussian distribution. Finally, we conducted a free search experiment where the signal could appear anywhere within the image. Results show that human performance in a multiple-alternative forced-choice experiment can be used to predict performance in the clinically realistic free search experiment when the investigator takes into account the search area and the observers' inherent spatial imprecision to localize the targets

  17. A combined approach for the enhancement and segmentation of mammograms using modified fuzzy C-means method in wavelet domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, Neeraj; Singh, S K; Srivastava, R

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a combined approach for enhancement and segmentation of mammograms is proposed. In preprocessing stage, a contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) method is applied to obtain the better contrast mammograms. After this, the proposed combined methods are applied. In the first step of the proposed approach, a two dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is applied to all the input images. In the second step, a proposed nonlinear complex diffusion based unsharp masking and crispening method is applied on the approximation coefficients of the wavelet transformed images to further highlight the abnormalities such as micro-calcifications, tumours, etc., to reduce the false positives (FPs). Thirdly, a modified fuzzy c-means (FCM) segmentation method is applied on the output of the second step. In the modified FCM method, the mutual information is proposed as a similarity measure in place of conventional Euclidian distance based dissimilarity measure for FCM segmentation. Finally, the inverse 2D-DWT is applied. The efficacy of the proposed unsharp masking and crispening method for image enhancement is evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and that of the proposed segmentation method is evaluated in terms of random index (RI), global consistency error (GCE), and variation of information (VoI). The performance of the proposed segmentation approach is compared with the other commonly used segmentation approaches such as Otsu's thresholding, texture based, k-means, and FCM clustering as well as thresholding. From the obtained results, it is observed that the proposed segmentation approach performs better and takes lesser processing time in comparison to the standard FCM and other segmentation methods in consideration.

  18. Screen-film mammography versus full-field digital mammography in a population-based screening program: The Sogn and Fjordane study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juel, Inger-Marie; Johannessen, Gunnar; Skaane, Per; Roth Hoff, Solveig; Hofvind, Solveig

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies comparing analog and digital mammography in breast cancer screening have shown conflicting results. Little is known about the use of digital photon-counting detectors. Purpose: To retrospectively compare performance indicators in screen-film (SFM) and full-field digital mammography (FFDM) using a photon-counting detector in a population-based screening program. Material and Methods: The Norwegian Social Science Data Services approved the study, which was part of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. The program invites women aged 50-69 years to two-view mammography biannually. The study period was January 2005 to June 2006 for SFM and August 2006 to December 2007 for FFDM. Independent double reading was performed using a five-point rating scale for probability of cancer. Recalls due to abnormal mammography were retrospectively reviewed by an expert panel. Performance indicators for the two techniques were compared. Attendance rate was 83.6% (7442/8901) for SFM and 82.0% (6932/8451) for FFDM. Results: The recall rate due to abnormal mammography, cancer detection rate and positive predictive value did not differ significantly between SFM and FFDM: recall 2.3% (174/7442) versus 2.4% (168/6932), cancer detection 0.39% (29/7442) versus 0.48% (33/6932), positive predictive value 16.7% (29/174) versus 19.6% (33/168), respectively (P>0.05 for all). The recall rate due to technically inadequate mammograms was 0.3% (19/7442) for SFM and 0.01% (1/6932) for FFDM. In the retrospective review, a significantly higher proportion of calcifications and asymmetric density were categorized as normal or definitively benign in FFDM compared with SFM. The average glandular dose was 2.17 mGy for SFM and 1.25 mGy for FFDM. Conclusion: Performance indicators show that FFDM using photon-counting detector is suitable for breast cancer screening. The lower radiation dose and lower recalls due to technically inadequate mammograms are of importance in mammography

  19. With the Advent of Tomosynthesis in the Workup of Mammographic Abnormality, is Spot Compression Mammography Now Obsolete? An Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhuircheartaigh, Neasa; Coffey, Louise; Fleming, Hannah; O' Doherty, Ann; McNally, Sorcha

    2017-09-01

    To determine if the routine use of spot compression mammography is now obsolete in the assessment of screen detected masses, asymmetries and architectural distortion since the availability of digital breast tomosynthesis. We introduced breast tomosynthesis in the workup of screen detected abnormalities in our screening center in January 2015. During an initial learning period with tomosynthesis standard spot compression views were also performed. Three consultant breast radiologists retrospectively reviewed all screening mammograms recalled for assessment over the first 6-month period. We assessed retrospectively whether there was any additional diagnostic information obtained from spot compression views not already apparent on tomography. All cases were also reviewed for any additional lesions detected by tomosynthesis, not detected on routine 2-view screening mammography. 548 women screened with standard 2-view digital screening mammography were recalled for assessment in the selected period and a total of 565 lesions were assessed. 341 lesions were assessed by both tomosynthesis and routine spot compression mammography. The spot compression view was considered more helpful than tomosynthesis in only one patient. This was because the breast was inadequately positioned for tomosynthesis and the area in question was not adequately imaged. Apart from this technical error there was no asymmetry, distortion or mass where spot compression provided more diagnostic information than tomosynthesis alone. We detected three additional cancers on tomosynthesis, not detected by routine screening mammography. From our initial experience with tomosynthesis we conclude that spot compression mammography is now obsolete in the assessment of screen detected masses, asymmetries and distortions where tomosynthesis is available. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The mammography screening employee inreach program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joanne; Seltzer, Vicki; Lawrence, Loretta; Autz, George; Kostroff, Karen; Weiselberg, Lora; Colagiacomo, Maria

    2007-02-01

    To determine whether our health care employees were undergoing mammography screening according to American Cancer Society guidelines and to determine whether aggressive outreach, education and streamlining of mammography scheduling could improve compliance. All female employees at North Shore University Hospital (NSUH) and several other health system facilities (SF) were sent mailings to their homes that included breast health education and mammography screening guidelines, a questionnaire regarding their own mammography screening history and the opportunity to have their mammography screening scheduled by the Mammography Screening Employee Inreach Program (MSEIP) coordinator. Of the approximately 2,700 female employees aged 40 and over at NSUH and SF, 2,235 (82.7%) responded to the questionnaire, and 1,455 had a mammogram done via the MSEIP. Of the 1,455, 43% either were overdue for a mammogram or had never had one. During a second year of the MSEIP at NSUH and SF, an additional 1,706 mammograms were done. People employed in health care jobs do not necessarily avail themselves of appropriate health care screening. An aggressive program that utilized education, outreach and assistance with scheduling was effective in increasing compliance with mammography screening.

  1. Abnormal Newborn Screening in a Healthy Infant of a Mother with Undiagnosed Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Christensen, Mette; Olesen, Jes

    2015-01-01

    A neonate with low blood free carnitine level on newborn tandem mass spectrometry screening was evaluated for possible carnitine transporter defect (CTD). The plasma concentration of free carnitine was marginally reduced, and the concentrations of acylcarnitines (including C6, C8, and C10:1) were...

  2. Clinical outcomes and a high prevalence of abnormalities on comprehensive arterial and venous thrombophilia screening in TIA or ischaemic stroke patients with a patent foramen ovale, an inter-atrial septal aneurysm or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soon Tjin; Murphy, Stephen J X; Smith, Deirdre R; Williams, Jennifer; Navarro, Silvia Gil; McCabe, John; Moore, David P; McHugh, Johnny; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2017-06-15

    Data are limited on the optimal management of cryptogenic TIA/stroke patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO)±inter-atrial septal aneurysm (IASA), especially with an inherited thrombophilia. Prospectively-collected data on TIA/ischaemic stroke patients with PFO, IASA or both who received 'goal-directed secondary-prevention medical treatment' were analysed. All patients had trans-oesophageal echocardiography, anti-nuclear, anti-cardiolipin, anti-beta 2 glycoprotein I antibodies, rheumatoid factor, lupus anticoagulant, protein C&S, anti-thrombin, factor VIII activity, activated protein C resistance, Factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene and MTHFR-c.677C>T mutation screening. ENA and homocysteine were assessed in the latter study period. Eighty-three patients were recruited. Mean follow-up: 48.1months. Forty-seven patients (56.6%) had an isolated PFO, 32 (38.6%) a PFO and an IASA, and 4 (4.8%) an IASA alone. Eighteen (21.7%) had ≥1 abnormality on thrombophilia screening. The most important abnormalities which lead to treatment changes in 11 patients (13.3%) were primary anti-phospholipid syndrome (N=3; 3.6%), protein S deficiency (N=2; 2.4%) hyper-homocysteinaemia (N=6/72 screened, 8.3%). Four patients (4.8%) opted for PFO closure: two with protein S deficiency, and two with no identified thrombophilia. Seven (8.4%) had recurrent TIA/ischaemic stroke during follow-up (overall annualised incidence: 2.1%), of whom five had a PFO alone and two a PFO and IASA. Comprehensive arterial and venous thrombophilia screening is warranted in TIA/ischaemic stroke patients with a PFO±IASA, is conclusively abnormal in over a fifth, and informed important decision-making regarding individualised therapy in 13.3% of patients. The incidence of recurrent vascular events in this population is low on optimal, personalised secondary-prevention treatment, even with an underlying thrombophilia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The clinical importance of axillary lymphadenopathy detected on screening mammography: revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, T.; Given-Wilson, R.M.; Thomas, V.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to re-evaluate our protocol for the management of isolated axillary lymphadenopathy (ALP) on mammographic screening. METHODS: In a retrospective review of 200,716 women screened at the South West London Breast Screening Service (SWLBSS) over 7 years, 72 women with ALP with an otherwise normal mammogram were identified. Thirteen patients were not recalled, nine of who had a known underlying diagnosis and the remainder had longstanding unchanged mammograms. Fifty-nine patients were recalled for further clinical assessment and investigations, including ultrasound, further mammographic views, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), blood tests and a chest radiograph. Those with a definite diagnosis were referred for appropriate management and those with benign reactive cytology on FNAC reviewed at 6 weeks with subsequent referral for excision of persisting abnormal nodes. RESULTS: The ultimate diagnosis was benign in 45 cases: 26 benign reactive changes, 11 arthritides, five with dermatological and viral conditions and three with tuberculosis. Malignancy was diagnosed in 13 cases: four with metastatic breast carcinoma and nine with lymphoma/leukaemia. The total number of newly diagnosed malignancies was 20% of women recalled. Another 5% of patients had active tuberculosis. Of the 22 patients with benign reactive cytology, one had significant pathology on excision biopsy: tuberculosis. Over 95% of the results from excision biopsy in these patients did not alter management. CONCLUSION: In the majority of patients, the FNAC results were representative of the final excision pathology. The present study suggests that excision biopsy could be omitted for those patients whose FNAC and culture are negative

  4. Screening for human papillomavirus, cervical cytological abnormalities and associated risk factors in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukanyangezi, M F; Sengpiel, V; Manzi, O; Tobin, G; Rulisa, S; Bienvenu, E; Giglio, D

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the major cause of death from cancer in Africa. We wanted to assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and associated risk factors and to determine whether HPV testing could serve as a screening method for squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) in Rwanda. We also wanted to obtain a broader understanding of the underlying risk factors for the establishment of HPV infection in Rwanda. A total of 206 HIV-positive women, 172 HIV-negative women and 22 women with unknown HIV status were recruited at the University Teaching Hospitals of Kigali (UTHK) and of Butare (UTHB) in Rwanda. Participants underwent an interview, cervical sampling for a Thinprep Pap test and a screening test analysing 37 HPV strains. Only 27% of HIV-positive women and 7% of HIV-negative women had been screened for cervical cancer before. HPV16 and HPV52 were the most common HPV strains. HIV-positive women were more commonly infected with high-risk (HR) HPV and multitype HPV than HIV-negative women. The sensitivity was 78% and the specificity 87% to detect high-grade SIL (HSIL) with HPV screening. Among HIV-negative women, being divorced was positively associated with HR-HPV infection, while hepatitis B, Trichomonas vaginalis infection and HR-HPV infection were factors positively associated with SILs. Ever having had gonorrhoea was positively associated with HR-HPV infection among HIV-positive women. HR-HPV infection and the number of live births were positively associated with SILs. The currently used quadrivalent vaccine may be insufficient to give satisfactory HPV coverage in Rwanda. HPV Screening may be effective to identify women at risk of developing cervical cancer, particularly if provided to high-risk patients. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  5. Clinical images evaluation of mammograms: a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Tae Jung; Cha, Joo Hee

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to survey the overall quality of mammographic images in Korea. A total of 598 mammographic images collected from 257 hospitals nationwide were reviewed in terms of eight images quality categories, namely positioning, compression, contrast, exposure, sharpness, noise, artifacts, and examination identification, and rated on a five-point scale: (1=severe deficiency, 2=major deficiency, 3=minor deficiency, 4=good, 5=best). Failure was defined as the occurrence of more than four major deficiencies or one severe deficiency (score of 1 or 2). The results were compared among hospitals of varying kinds, and common problems in clinical images quality were identified. Two hundred and seventeen mammographic images (36.3%) failed the evaluation. Poor images were found in descending order of frequency, at The Society for Medical Examination (33/69, 47.8%), non-radiologyclinics (42/88, 47.7%), general hospitals (92/216, 42.6%), radiology clinics (39/102, 38.2%), and university hospitals (11/123, 8.9%) (p<0.01, Chi-square test). Among the 598 images, serious problems which occurred were related to positioning in 23.7% of instances (n=142) (p<0.01, Chi-square test), examination identification in 5.7% (n=34), exposure in 5.4% (n=32), contrast in 4.2% (n=25), sharpness in 2.7% (n=16), compression in 2.5% (n=15), artifacts in 2.5% (n=15), and noise in 0.3% (n=2). This study showed that in Korea, 36.3% of the mammograms examined in this sampling had important image-related defects that might have led to serious errors in patient management. The failure rate was significantly higher in non-radiology clinics and at The Society for Medical Examination than at university hospitals

  6. Computerized image analysis: estimation of breast density on mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Helvie, Mark A.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.

    2000-06-01

    An automated image analysis tool is being developed for estimation of mammographic breast density, which may be useful for risk estimation or for monitoring breast density change in a prevention or intervention program. A mammogram is digitized using a laser scanner and the resolution is reduced to a pixel size of 0.8 mm X 0.8 mm. Breast density analysis is performed in three stages. First, the breast region is segmented from the surrounding background by an automated breast boundary-tracking algorithm. Second, an adaptive dynamic range compression technique is applied to the breast image to reduce the range of the gray level distribution in the low frequency background and to enhance the differences in the characteristic features of the gray level histogram for breasts of different densities. Third, rule-based classification is used to classify the breast images into several classes according to the characteristic features of their gray level histogram. For each image, a gray level threshold is automatically determined to segment the dense tissue from the breast region. The area of segmented dense tissue as a percentage of the breast area is then estimated. In this preliminary study, we analyzed the interobserver variation of breast density estimation by two experienced radiologists using BI-RADS lexicon. The radiologists' visually estimated percent breast densities were compared with the computer's calculation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of estimating mammographic breast density using computer vision techniques and its potential to improve the accuracy and reproducibility in comparison with the subjective visual assessment by radiologists.

  7. Computer-aided classification of breast masses using contrast-enhanced digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danala, Gopichandh; Aghaei, Faranak; Heidari, Morteza; Wu, Teresa; Patel, Bhavika; Zheng, Bin

    2018-02-01

    By taking advantages of both mammography and breast MRI, contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has emerged as a new promising imaging modality to improve efficacy of breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The primary objective of study is to develop and evaluate a new computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) scheme of CEDM images to classify between malignant and benign breast masses. A CEDM dataset consisting of 111 patients (33 benign and 78 malignant) was retrospectively assembled. Each case includes two types of images namely, low-energy (LE) and dual-energy subtracted (DES) images. First, CAD scheme applied a hybrid segmentation method to automatically segment masses depicting on LE and DES images separately. Optimal segmentation results from DES images were also mapped to LE images and vice versa. Next, a set of 109 quantitative image features related to mass shape and density heterogeneity was initially computed. Last, four multilayer perceptron-based machine learning classifiers integrated with correlationbased feature subset evaluator and leave-one-case-out cross-validation method was built to classify mass regions depicting on LE and DES images, respectively. Initially, when CAD scheme was applied to original segmentation of DES and LE images, the areas under ROC curves were 0.7585+/-0.0526 and 0.7534+/-0.0470, respectively. After optimal segmentation mapping from DES to LE images, AUC value of CAD scheme significantly increased to 0.8477+/-0.0376 (pbreast tissue on lesions, segmentation accuracy was significantly improved as compared to regular mammograms, the study demonstrated that computer-aided classification of breast masses using CEDM images yielded higher performance.

  8. DETECTION OF MICROCALCIFICATION IN DIGITAL MAMMOGRAMS USING ONE DIMENSIONAL WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balakumaran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammography is the most efficient method for breast cancer early detection. Clusters of microcalcifications are the early sign of breast cancer and their detection is the key to improve prognosis of breast cancer. Microcalcifications appear in mammogram image as tiny localized granular points, which is often difficult to detect by naked eye because of their small size. Automatic and accurately detection of microcalcifications has received much more attention from radiologists and physician. An efficient method for automatic detection of clustered microcalcifications in digitized mammograms is the use of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD systems. This paper presents a one dimensional wavelet-based multiscale products scheme for microcalcification detection in mammogram images. The detection of microcalcifications were achieved by decomposing the each line of mammograms by 1D wavelet transform into different frequency sub-bands, suppressing the low-frequency subband, and finally reconstructing the mammogram from the subbands containing only significant high frequencies features. The significant features are obtained by multiscale products. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed scheme is better in suppressing the background and detecting the microcalcification clusters than any other wavelet decomposition methods.

  9. INDIAM--an e-learning system for the interpretation of mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliato, Denise; Bôaventura, Ricardo S; Maia, Marcelo A; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Simedo, Mariângela S; Macedo, Túlio A A

    2009-08-01

    We propose the design of a teaching system named Interpretation and Diagnosis of Mammograms (INDIAM) for training students in the interpretation of mammograms and diagnosis of breast cancer. The proposed system integrates an illustrated tutorial on radiology of the breast, that is, mammography, which uses education techniques to guide the user (doctors, students, or researchers) through various concepts related to the diagnosis of breast cancer. The user can obtain informative text about specific subjects, access a library of bibliographic references, and retrieve cases from a mammographic database that are similar to a query case on hand. The information of each case stored in the mammographic database includes the radiological findings, the clinical history, the lifestyle of the patient, and complementary exams. The breast cancer tutorial is linked to a module that simulates the analysis and diagnosis of a mammogram. The tutorial incorporates tools for helping the user to evaluate his or her knowledge about a specific subject by using the education system or by simulating a diagnosis with appropriate feedback in case of error. The system also makes available digital image processing tools that allow the user to draw the contour of a lesion, the contour of the breast, or identify a cluster of calcifications in a given mammogram. The contours provided by the user are submitted to the system for evaluation. The teaching system is integrated with AMDI-An Indexed Atlas of Digital Mammograms-that includes case studies, e-learning, and research systems. All the resources are accessible via the Web.

  10. Consensus review of discordant findings maximizes cancer detection rate in double-reader screening mammography: Irish National Breast Screening Program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Colette M; Flanagan, Fidema L; Fenlon, Helen M; McNicholas, Michelle M

    2009-02-01

    To assesses consensus review of discordant screening mammography findings in terms of its sensitivity, safety, and effect on overall performance in the first 6 years of operation of the Irish National Breast Screening Program (NBSP). Women who participated in the Irish NBSP gave written informed consent for use of their data for auditing purposes. Local ethics committee approval was obtained. The study population consisted of women who participated in the Irish NBSP and underwent initial screening mammography at one of the two screening centers serving the eastern part of Ireland between 2000 and 2005. Independent double reading of mammograms was performed. When the readers disagreed regarding referral, the case was reviewed by a consensus panel. Of the 128 569 screenings performed, 1335 (1%) were discussed by consensus. Of the 1335 cases discussed by consensus, 606 (45.39%) were recalled for further assessment. This resulted in an overall recall rate of 4.41%. In those recalled to assessment, 71 cases of malignant disease were diagnosed (ductal carcinoma in situ, n = 24; invasive cancer, n = 47). The remaining 729 patients were returned to biennial screening. Of these 729 patients, seven had false-negative findings that were identified in the subsequent screening round. Use of the highest reader recall method, in which a patient is recalled if her findings are deemed abnormal by either reader, could potentially increase the cancer detection rate by 0.6 per 1000 women screened but would increase the recall rate by 12.69% and the number of false-positive findings by 15.37%. The consensus panel identified 71 (7.33%) of 968 cancers diagnosed. Consensus review substantially reduced the number of cases recalled and was associated with a low false-negative rate.

  11. National Performance Benchmarks for Modern Screening Digital Mammography: Update from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Constance D; Arao, Robert F; Sprague, Brian L; Lee, Janie M; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Henderson, Louise M; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Rauscher, Garth H; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To establish performance benchmarks for modern screening digital mammography and assess performance trends over time in U.S. community practice. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study measured the performance of digital screening mammography interpreted by 359 radiologists across 95 facilities in six Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registries. The study included 1 682 504 digital screening mammograms performed between 2007 and 2013 in 792 808 women. Performance measures were calculated according to the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 5th edition, and were compared with published benchmarks by the BCSC, the National Mammography Database, and performance recommendations by expert opinion. Benchmarks were derived from the distribution of performance metrics across radiologists and were presented as 50th (median), 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentiles, with graphic presentations using smoothed curves. Results Mean screening performance measures were as follows: abnormal interpretation rate (AIR), 11.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.5, 11.6); cancers detected per 1000 screens, or cancer detection rate (CDR), 5.1 (95% CI: 5.0, 5.2); sensitivity, 86.9% (95% CI: 86.3%, 87.6%); specificity, 88.9% (95% CI: 88.8%, 88.9%); false-negative rate per 1000 screens, 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7, 0.8); positive predictive value (PPV) 1, 4.4% (95% CI: 4.3%, 4.5%); PPV2, 25.6% (95% CI: 25.1%, 26.1%); PPV3, 28.6% (95% CI: 28.0%, 29.3%); cancers stage 0 or 1, 76.9%; minimal cancers, 57.7%; and node-negative invasive cancers, 79.4%. Recommended CDRs were achieved by 92.1% of radiologists in community practice, and 97.1% achieved recommended ranges for sensitivity. Only 59.0% of radiologists achieved recommended AIRs, and only 63.0% achieved recommended levels of specificity. Conclusion The majority of radiologists in the BCSC surpass cancer detection recommendations for screening

  12. Motivators and barriers to mammography screening uptake by female health-care workers in primary health-care centres: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, Zaher; Sholi, Hisham; Sholi, Suha B; Sholi, Mohammad B; Lahaseh, Rawya

    2018-02-21

    Mammography screening is an effective tool for early detection and management of breast cancer. Female health-care workers' awareness of breast cancer screening is important because their beliefs and behaviours could influence other women. The aim of this study was to assess mammography screening uptake by female health-care workers at primary health-care centres and to identify the primary motivators and barriers that affect uptake. This cross-sectional study included all governmental primary health-care centres in the West Bank. Governorates were grouped into three regions as follows: north West Bank (Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarm, Tubas, Qalqiliya, and Salfit), middle West Bank (Jerusalem, Jericho, and Ramallah), and south West Bank (Hebron, and Bethlehem). The study population included all female health-care workers older than 40 years. Those who performed mammography for a suspected mass or other breast abnormalities were excluded. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, knowledge about mammography screening, the extent and regularity of mammography screening, and motivators and barriers influencing their mammography screening uptake. The rate of mammography screening uptake was calculated. χ 2 test and t tests were used to assess screening motivators and barriers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the An-Najah National University. Participation was voluntary, and written consent was obtained from each participant. 299 female health-care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire. The mean age of the participants was 46 years (SD 4·7). 284 (95%) women had adequate knowledge about breast cancer and mammography screening, and 149 (50%) women reported having had at least one mammogram. 62 (21%) women had had regular scheduled mammograms. The most frequent reported motivators were the perceived benefit that early detection of breast cancer is important for its management (269 [90

  13. Computer aided system for segmentation and visualization of microcalcifications in digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reljin, B.; Reljin, I.; Milosevic, Z.; Stojic, T.

    2009-01-01

    Two methods for segmentation and visualization of microcalcifications in digital or digitized mammograms are described. First method is based on modern mathematical morphology, while the second one uses the multifractal approach. In the first method, by using an appropriate combination of some morphological operations, high local contrast enhancement, followed by significant suppression of background tissue, irrespective of its radiology density, is obtained. By iterative procedure, this method highly emphasizes only small bright details, possible microcalcifications. In a multifractal approach, from initial mammogram image, a corresponding multifractal 'images' are created, from which a radiologist has a freedom to change the level of segmentation. An appropriate user friendly computer aided visualization (CAV) system with embedded two methods is realized. The interactive approach enables the physician to control the level and the quality of segmentation. Suggested methods were tested through mammograms from MIAS database as a gold standard, and from clinical praxis, using digitized films and digital images from full field digital mammograph. (authors)

  14. Mammogram synthesis using a 3D simulation. I. Breast tissue model and image acquisition simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakic, Predrag R.; Albert, Michael; Brzakovic, Dragana; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2002-01-01

    A method is proposed for generating synthetic mammograms based upon simulations of breast tissue and the mammographic imaging process. A computer breast model has been designed with a realistic distribution of large and medium scale tissue structures. Parameters controlling the size and placement of simulated structures (adipose compartments and ducts) provide a method for consistently modeling images of the same simulated breast with modified position or acquisition parameters. The mammographic imaging process is simulated using a compression model and a model of the x-ray image acquisition process. The compression model estimates breast deformation using tissue elasticity parameters found in the literature and clinical force values. The synthetic mammograms were generated by a mammogram acquisition model using a monoenergetic parallel beam approximation applied to the synthetically compressed breast phantom

  15. A Qualitative Secondary Evaluation of Statewide Follow-Up Interviews for Abnormal Newborn Screening Results for Cystic Fibrosis and Sickle Cell Hemoglobinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Pean, Alison; Collins, Jenelle L.; Christopher, Stephanie A.; Eskra, Kerry L.; Roedl, Sara; Tluczek, Audrey; Farrell, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative analysis was to assess parental acceptability of large-scale, telephone follow-up regarding their infants' newborn screening (NBS) results indicating carrier status for sickle cell hemoglobinopathy (SCH) and cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods Analysis of 195 interview transcripts focused on parents' responses to two open-ended questions “What was your reaction to being called by me?” and “What do you think of the state newborn screening program having follow-up people calling parents like you?” Responses were coded using conventional content analysis procedures and non-parametric tests were performed to analyze quantitative data. Results Most parents reported favorable opinions about the follow-up. Favorable opinions were associated with several emotional reactions to receiving follow-up (pinterview beneficial (pinterview. Conclusion Parents of CF and SCH carrier infants had favorable opinions and identified specific benefits to receiving follow-up contact. This analysis demonstrates an information deficit among carrier parents and illustrates the importance of NBS follow-up and need for comprehensive communication and counseling. PMID:22261754

  16. The personal costs and convenience of screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Lisa Gale; Nakano, Connie Y; Elmore, Joann G

    2002-09-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of women's personal costs on obtaining a screening mammogram in the United States. All women obtaining screening mammograms at nine Connecticut mammography facilities during a 2-week study period were asked to complete a questionnaire. Facilities included urban and rural fixed sites and mobile sites. The survey included questions about insurance coverage, mammogram payment, and personal costs in terms of transportation, family care, parking, and lost work time from the women's perspective. The response rate was 62% (731 of 1189). Thirty-two percent of respondents incurred some type of personal cost, including lost work time, family care, and parking. Women incurring personal costs were more likely than those without personal costs to attend an urban facility (46% vs. 23%, p convenience and 17% listed cost as a reason for choosing a mammography facility; 23% reported that cost might prevent them from obtaining a future mammogram. One third of women obtaining mammograms may be incurring personal costs. These personal costs should be considered in future cost-effectiveness analyses.

  17. Mass screening in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strax, P.

    1977-01-01

    Some questions about mass screening in breast cancer are answered it being concluded that: 1. mass screening for the detection of early breast cancer is the only means with proven potential for lowering the death rate of the disease; 2. mammography is an importante - if not the most important modality in mass screening; 3. new film - screen combinations generally available are capable of producing mammograms of excelent quality with radiation doses down to .1 rad into the body of breast. The risk of malignant changes from such dosage - even when given periodically is negligeable. New equipment, to be available, shortly, will use the new film - screen combinations in an automated manner with must reduce cost in time, filme, personnel and processing - of more than 50%. This would make mass screening more practical. (M.A.) [pt

  18. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and cancer screening among female Medicare beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Kohler, Racquel E; Jensen, Gail A; Sheridan, Stacey L; Carpenter, William R; Biddle, Andrea K

    2014-03-01

    Medicare covers several cancer screening tests not currently recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). In September 2002, the Task Force relaxed the upper age limit of 70 years for breast cancer screening recommendations, and in March 2003 an upper age limit of 65 years was introduced for cervical cancer screening recommendations. We assessed whether mammogram and Pap test utilization among women with Medicare coverage is influenced by changes in the Task Force's recommendations for screening. We identified female Medicare beneficiaries aged 66-80 years and used bivariate probit regression to examine the receipt of breast (mammogram) and cervical (Pap test) cancer screening reflecting changes in the Task Force recommendations. We analyzed 9,760 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey responses from 2001 to 2007. More than two-thirds reported receiving a mammogram and more than one-third a Pap test in the previous 2 years. Lack of recommendation was given as a reason for not getting screened among the majority (51% for mammogram and 75% for Pap). After controlling for beneficiary-level socioeconomic characteristics and access to care factors, we did not observe a significant change in breast and cervical cancer screening patterns following the changes in Task Force recommendations. Although there is evidence that many Medicare beneficiaries adhere to screening guidelines, some women may be receiving non-recommended screening services covered by Medicare.

  19. TU-F-18C-09: Mammogram Surveillance Using Texture Analysis for Breast Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, H; Tome, W; FOX, J; Hong, L; Yaparpalvi, R; Mehta, K; Bodner, W; Kalnicki, S [Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Huang, Y [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Great Neck, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of applying cancer risk model established from treated patients to predict the risk of recurrence on follow-up mammography after radiation therapy for both ipsilateral and contralateral breast. Methods: An extensive set of textural feature functions was applied to a set of 196 Mammograms from 50 patients. 56 Mammograms from 28 patients were used as training set, 44 mammograms from 22 patients were used as test set and the rest were used for prediction. Feature functions include Histogram, Gradient, Co-Occurrence Matrix, Run-Length Matrix and Wavelet Energy. An optimum subset of the feature functions was selected by Fisher Coefficient (FO) or Mutual Information (MI) (up to top 10 features) or a method combined FO, MI and Principal Component (FMP) (up to top 30 features). One-Nearest Neighbor (1-NN), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Nonlinear Discriminant Analysis (NDA) were utilized to build a risk model of breast cancer from the training set of mammograms at the time of diagnosis. The risk model was then used to predict the risk of recurrence from mammogram taken one year and three years after RT. Results: FPM with NDA has the best classification power in classifying the training set of the mammogram with lesions versus those without lesions. The model of FPM with NDA achieved a true positive (TP) rate of 82% compared to 45.5% of using FO with 1-NN. The best false positive (FP) rates were 0% and 3.6% in contra-lateral breast of 1-year and 3-years after RT, and 10.9% in ipsi-lateral breast of 3-years after RT. Conclusion: Texture analysis offers high dimension to differentiate breast tissue in mammogram. Using NDA to classify mammogram with lesion from mammogram without lesion, it can achieve rather high TP and low FP in the surveillance of mammogram for patient with conservative surgery combined RT.

  20. Screening mammography. A missed clinical opportunity? Results of the NCI [National Cancer Institute] Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and national health interview survey studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Data from seven studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were used to determine current rates of breast cancer screening and to identify the characteristics of and reasons for women not being screened. All seven studies were population-based surveys of women aged 50 to 74 years without breast cancer. While over 90% of non-Hispanic white respondents had regular sources of medical care, 46% to 76% had a clinical breast examination within the previous year, and only 25% to 41% had a mammogram. Less educated and poorer women had fewer mammograms. The two most common reasons women gave for never having had a mammogram were that they did not known they needed it and that their physician had not recommended it. Many physicians may have overlooked the opportunity to recommend mammography for older women when performing a clinical breast examination and to educate their patients about the benefit of screening mammography

  1. Abnormalities of the external genitalia and groins among primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    penoscrotal abnormalities are common in our community (36.20%). Screening of pre-school and school children to detect them should be introduced into the school health programs in Nigeria. Keywords: External genitalia, groin abnormalities, ...

  2. New Embedded Denotes Fuzzy C-Mean Application for Breast Cancer Density Segmentation in Digital Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Khairulnizam; Ahmad, Afandi

    2016-11-01

    In this research we explore the application of normalize denoted new techniques in advance fast c-mean in to the problem of finding the segment of different breast tissue regions in mammograms. The goal of the segmentation algorithm is to see if new denotes fuzzy c- mean algorithm could separate different densities for the different breast patterns. The new density segmentation is applied with multi-selection of seeds label to provide the hard constraint, whereas the seeds labels are selected based on user defined. New denotes fuzzy c- mean have been explored on images of various imaging modalities but not on huge format digital mammograms just yet. Therefore, this project is mainly focused on using normalize denoted new techniques employed in fuzzy c-mean to perform segmentation to increase visibility of different breast densities in mammography images. Segmentation of the mammogram into different mammographic densities is useful for risk assessment and quantitative evaluation of density changes. Our proposed methodology for the segmentation of mammograms on the basis of their region into different densities based categories has been tested on MIAS database and Trueta Database.

  3. Experiences with a self-test for Dutch breast screening radiologists: lessons learnt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J. M. H.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; Pijnappel, R. M.; Broeders, M. J. M.; den Heeten, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a self-test for Dutch breast screening radiologists introduced as part of the national quality assurance programme. A total of 144 radiologists were invited to complete a test-set of 60 screening mammograms (20 malignancies). Participants assigned findings such as location, lesion type

  4. The Association of Social Support and Education with Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Patricia; Bear, Todd M.; Flatt, Jason D.; Macia, Laura; Trauth, Jeanette; Ricci, Edmund M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening by socioeconomic status persist in the United States. It has been suggested that social support may facilitate screening, especially among women of low socioeconomic status. However, at present, it is unclear whether social support enables mammogram and Pap test compliance. Purpose:…

  5. Visual field abnormalities in multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, V H; Heron, J R

    1980-01-01

    Visual fields were examined with a tangent screen in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or optic neuritis (ON). Visual fields were abnormal in all patients with definite MS, 94% with probable MS and 81% with possible MS. Three-quarters of the MS patients with no history of visual symptoms had abnormal fields. The commonest defect found was an arcuate scotoma. As a diagnostic test of visual pathway involvement in MS, tangent screen examination compares favourably with more sophisticated ...

  6. Cancer on a mammogram is not memorable: readers remember their recalls and not cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitman, Alexander G.; Kok, Phebe; Zentner, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    To determine if presence of cancer on a mammogram makes that mammogram more memorable. A total of 100 mammograms (25 cancers) were grouped into 5 sets of 20 cases. Set pairs were presented in five reads to eight radiologist readers. Readers were asked to 'clear' or 'call back' cases, and at post-baseline reads to indicate whether each case was 'new' or 'old ' (remembered from prior read). Two sets were presented only at baseline, to calculate each reader's false recollection rate. For cases presented more than once ('old' cases, 100 presentations) readers could have 'correct memory' or 'memory loss'. Memory performance was defined as odds ratio of correct memory to memory loss. Multivariate logistic data regression analysis identified predictors of memory performance from: reader, set, time since last read, presence of cancer, and whether the case was called back at the last read. Memory performance differed markedly between readers and reader identity was a highly significant predictor of memory performance. Presence of cancer was not a significant predictor of memory performance (odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI: 0.49–1.21). Whether the case was called back at the last read was a highly significant predictor (odds ratio 4.22, 95% CI: 2.70–6.61) for the model incorporating reader variability, and also the model without reader variability (odds ratio 2.67, 95% CI: 1.74–4.08). The only statistically significant predictor of radiologist memory for a mammogram was whether the radiologist 'called it back' at a prior reading round. Presence of cancer on a mammogram did not make it memorable.

  7. Improving mass candidate detection in mammograms via feature maxima propagation and local feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Jaime; Sánchez, Clara I; van Ginneken, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-08-01

    Mass candidate detection is a crucial component of multistep computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. It is usually performed by combining several local features by means of a classifier. When these features are processed on a per-image-location basis (e.g., for each pixel), mismatching problems may arise while constructing feature vectors for classification, which is especially true when the behavior expected from the evaluated features is a peaked response due to the presence of a mass. In this study, two of these problems, consisting of maxima misalignment and differences of maxima spread, are identified and two solutions are proposed. The first proposed method, feature maxima propagation, reproduces feature maxima through their neighboring locations. The second method, local feature selection, combines different subsets of features for different feature vectors associated with image locations. Both methods are applied independently and together. The proposed methods are included in a mammogram-based CAD system intended for mass detection in screening. Experiments are carried out with a database of 382 digital cases. Sensitivity is assessed at two sets of operating points. The first one is the interval of 3.5-15 false positives per image (FPs/image), which is typical for mass candidate detection. The second one is 1 FP/image, which allows to estimate the quality of the mass candidate detector's output for use in subsequent steps of the CAD system. The best results are obtained when the proposed methods are applied together. In that case, the mean sensitivity in the interval of 3.5-15 FPs/image significantly increases from 0.926 to 0.958 (p < 0.0002). At the lower rate of 1 FP/image, the mean sensitivity improves from 0.628 to 0.734 (p < 0.0002). Given the improved detection performance, the authors believe that the strategies proposed in this paper can render mass candidate detection approaches based on image location classification more robust to feature

  8. Rastreamento anterior para câncer de colo uterino em mulheres com alterações citológicas ou histológicas Previous screening for cervical cancer among women with cytological and histological abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rama

    2008-06-01

    do último exame citológico anterior.OBJECTIVE: To examine previous Pap smear history in women screened for cervical cancer with cytological or histological abnormalities. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in a sample of 5,485 women (15-65 years old who self-referred to cervical cancer screening in Sao Paulo and Campinas, Southeastern Brazil, between February 2002 and March 2003. A behavioral questionnaire was applied and cervical specimens were obtained for testing by Pap smears or liquid-based cytology. Women who had abnormal cytology were referred for colposcopic examination and, if abnormal, for cervical punch biopsy. To explore factors associated to cervical abnormalities Pearson's chi-was conduted square test at a 5% significance level. RESULTS: Cytological abnormalities were found in 354 women (6.4% and included 41 high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions and 3 carcinomas; 92.7% were normal results. Colposcopy was performed in 289 women, and 145 (50.2% showed abnormal results. Punch biopsies showed 14 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias grade 3 and 4 carcinomas. Previous Pap smears were reported in all women who had cytology suspected of carcinoma, 97.6% of those with high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions, all women with histological diagnosis of carcinoma and 92.9% of those who had cervical intraepithelial neoplasias grade 3 histologically. Previous Pap smear in the last tree years was reported by 86.5% and 92.8% of women with abnormal cytology and biopsy, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference regarding the number of Pap tests and time since their last test between women with histologically diagnosed carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 compared with those with normal cytology.

  9. Screen film vs full-field digital mammography: image quality, detectability and characterization of lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenauer, S.; Luftner-Nagel, S.; Heyden, D. von; Baum, F.; Grabbe, E.; Munzel, U.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare screen-film mammography (SFM) to full-field digital mammography (FFDM) regarding image quality as well as detectability and characterization of lesions using equivalent images of the same patient acquired with both systems. Two mammography units were used, one with a screen-film system (Senographe DMR) and the other with a digital detector (Senographe 2000D, both GEMS). Screen-film and digital mammograms were performed on 55 patients with cytologically or histologically proven tumors on the same day. Together with these, 75 digital mammograms of patients without tumor and the corresponding previous screen-film mammograms not older than 1.5 years were reviewed by three observers in a random order. Contrast, exposure, and the presence of artifacts were evaluated. Different details, such as the skin, the retromamillary region, and the parenchymal structures, were judged according to a three-point ranking scale. Finally, the detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. Image contrast was judged to be good in 76%, satisfactory in 20%, and unsatisfactory in 4% of screen-film mammograms. Digital mammograms were judged to be good in 99% and unsatisfactory in 1% of cases. Improper exposure of screen-film system occurred in 18% (10% overexposed and 8% underexposed). Digital mammograms were improperly exposed in 4% of all cases but were of acceptable quality after post-processing. Artifacts, most of them of no significance, were found in 78% of screen-film and in none of the digital mammograms. Different anatomical regions, such as the skin, the retromamillary region, and dense parenchymal areas, were better visualized in digital than in screen-film mammography. All malignant tumors were seen by the three radiologists; however, digital mammograms allowed a better characterization of these lesions to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADSZZZ;) categories (FFDM better than

  10. Evaluation of information-theoretic similarity measures for content-based retrieval and detection of masses in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourassi, Georgia D.; Harrawood, Brian; Singh, Swatee; Lo, Joseph Y.; Floyd, Carey E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate image similarity measures employed in an information-theoretic computer-assisted detection (IT-CAD) scheme. The scheme was developed for content-based retrieval and detection of masses in screening mammograms. The study is aimed toward an interactive clinical paradigm where physicians query the proposed IT-CAD scheme on mammographic locations that are either visually suspicious or indicated as suspicious by other cuing CAD systems. The IT-CAD scheme provides an evidence-based, second opinion for query mammographic locations using a knowledge database of mass and normal cases. In this study, eight entropy-based similarity measures were compared with respect to retrieval precision and detection accuracy using a database of 1820 mammographic regions of interest. The IT-CAD scheme was then validated on a separate database for false positive reduction of progressively more challenging visual cues generated by an existing, in-house mass detection system. The study showed that the image similarity measures fall into one of two categories; one category is better suited to the retrieval of semantically similar cases while the second is more effective with knowledge-based decisions regarding the presence of a true mass in the query location. In addition, the IT-CAD scheme yielded a substantial reduction in false-positive detections while maintaining high detection rate for malignant masses

  11. Effects of Perceived Discrimination and Trust on Breast Cancer Screening among Korean American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hye Chong; Ferrans, Carol Estwing; Park, Chang; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Quinn, Lauretta; Collins, Eileen G

    Korean American (KA) women continue to have lower breast cancer screening rates than other racial groups. Perceived discrimination and trust have been associated with breast cancer screening adherence, but little is known about the associations in KA women. Surveys were completed by 196 KA women in the Chicago metropolitan area. Multiple and Firth logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors (perceived discrimination, trust, acculturation, cultural beliefs, health care access) influencing breast cancer screening adherence (mammogram). In addition, SPSS macro PROCESS was used to examine the mediating role of trust between perceived discrimination and breast cancer screening adherence. Ninety-three percent of the women surveyed had health insurance and 54% reported having a mammogram in the past 2 years. Predictors of having a mammogram were knowing where to go for a mammogram, having a regular doctor or usual place for health care, greater trust in health care providers, and lower distrust in the health care system. Perceived discrimination had an indirect effect on breast cancer screening through trust. The breast cancer screening rate among KA women is low. Perceived discrimination in health care, trust in health care providers, and distrust in the health care system directly or indirectly influenced breast cancer screening adherence in KA women. Trust is a factor that can be strengthened with educational interventions. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of psychophysical similarity measures for selection of similar images in the diagnosis of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert; Shiraishi, Junji; Doi, Kunio [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States) and Department of Intelligent Image Information, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu (Japan); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Labs, Duke University, 2424 Erwin Road, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    The presentation of images with lesions of known pathology that are similar to an unknown lesion may be helpful to radiologists in the diagnosis of challenging cases for improving the diagnostic accuracy and also for reducing variation among different radiologists. The authors have been developing a computerized scheme for automatically selecting similar images with clustered microcalcifications on mammograms from a large database. For similar images to be useful, they must be similar from the point of view of the diagnosing radiologists. In order to select such images, subjective similarity ratings were obtained for a number of pairs of clustered microcalcifications by breast radiologists for establishment of a ''gold standard'' of image similarity, and the gold standard was employed for determination and evaluation of the selection of similar images. The images used in this study were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography developed by the University of South Florida. The subjective similarity ratings for 300 pairs of images with clustered microcalcifications were determined by ten breast radiologists. The authors determined a number of image features which represent the characteristics of clustered microcalcifications that radiologists would use in their diagnosis. For determination of objective similarity measures, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed. The ANN was trained with the average subjective similarity ratings as teacher and selected image features as input data. The ANN was trained to learn the relationship between the image features and the radiologists' similarity ratings; therefore, once the training was completed, the ANN was able to determine the similarity, called a psychophysical similarity measure, which was expected to be close to radiologists' impressions, for an unknown pair of clustered microcalcifications. By use of a leave-one-out test method, the best combination of features

  13. Investigation of psychophysical similarity measures for selection of similar images in the diagnosis of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert; Shiraishi, Junji; Doi, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of images with lesions of known pathology that are similar to an unknown lesion may be helpful to radiologists in the diagnosis of challenging cases for improving the diagnostic accuracy and also for reducing variation among different radiologists. The authors have been developing a computerized scheme for automatically selecting similar images with clustered microcalcifications on mammograms from a large database. For similar images to be useful, they must be similar from the point of view of the diagnosing radiologists. In order to select such images, subjective similarity ratings were obtained for a number of pairs of clustered microcalcifications by breast radiologists for establishment of a ''gold standard'' of image similarity, and the gold standard was employed for determination and evaluation of the selection of similar images. The images used in this study were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography developed by the University of South Florida. The subjective similarity ratings for 300 pairs of images with clustered microcalcifications were determined by ten breast radiologists. The authors determined a number of image features which represent the characteristics of clustered microcalcifications that radiologists would use in their diagnosis. For determination of objective similarity measures, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed. The ANN was trained with the average subjective similarity ratings as teacher and selected image features as input data. The ANN was trained to learn the relationship between the image features and the radiologists' similarity ratings; therefore, once the training was completed, the ANN was able to determine the similarity, called a psychophysical similarity measure, which was expected to be close to radiologists' impressions, for an unknown pair of clustered microcalcifications. By use of a leave-one-out test method, the best combination of features was selected. The correlation

  14. Mammographic density and structural features can individually and jointly contribute to breast cancer risk assessment in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    and jointly with density can improve the ability to identify screening women at increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The study included 121 cases and 259 age- and time matched controls based on a cohort of 14,736 women with negative screening mammograms from a population-based screening programme...... in Denmark in 2007 (followed until 31 December 2010). Mammograms were assessed using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density classification, Tabár's classification on parenchymal patterns and a fully automated texture quantification technique. The individual and combined association...

  15. Evaluation of the population dose to the UK population from the National Health Service breast screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Wallis, M. G.; Neilson, F.; Whitaker, C. J.

    2008-01-01

    In the United Kingdom National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP), women aged between 50 and 70 y are invited for mammography every 3 y. Screening histories for each woman, over four screening rounds, were analysed. Data from five screening programmes were used to select 57 425 women into the study. Cases were selected on the basis of being between the ages of 50 and 53 at the start of the NHSBSP (i.e. between 1989 and 1992). Assessment of the outcome for each screening round for each woman involved assigning a simple outcome code. Each of the possible pathways through the four screening rounds was analysed. This comprises of 500 possible pathways. This data enabled the following information to be determined: (i) The number of times a woman attended the screening programme. (ii) The number of women referred for assessment at each screening round. This information may be used to deduce the population dose to this group of women averaged over four screening rounds. Patient doses have been monitored since the programme's inception and are typically 4.5 mGy for two-view screening. It is possible to determine the mean glandular dose received by this cohort of women over four screening rounds by multiplying the number of examinations by the mean glandular dose for a typical woman. Allowance has to be made for the number of projections taken at each screening round. Once a woman has been screened, she may be invited back for further assessment if an abnormality is found on her mammogram. A stereotactic attachment is used to determine where to place the biopsy device. Although the dose received during a normal screening mammogram is well known, the dose for a stereotactic procedure and other assessment procedures is less well known, partly because only a small part of the breast is directly irradiated during stereo-taxis. However, the woman may have multiple exposures during this stage. A prospective survey of doses was completed to deduce the mean

  16. Comparison of cumulative false-positive risk of screening mammography in the United States and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Kemp

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the United States (US), about one-half of women screened with annual mammography have at least one false-positive test after ten screens. The estimate for European women screened ten times biennially is much lower. We evaluate to what extent screening interval, mammogram type......=400,204), between 1991-2012 and 1993-2013, respectively. Model-based cumulative false-positive risks were computed for the entire sample, using two statistical methods (Hubbard Njor) previously used to estimate false-positive risks in the US and Europe. RESULTS: Empirical cumulative risk of at least...... one false-positive test after eight (annual or biennial) screens was 41.9% in BCSC, 16.1% in Copenhagen, and 7.4% in Funen. Variation in screening interval and mammogram type did not explain the differences by country. Using the Hubbard method, the model-based cumulative risks after eight screens...

  17. A combined approach for the enhancement and segmentation of mammograms using modified fuzzy C-means method in wavelet domain

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, Neeraj; Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a combined approach for enhancement and segmentation of mammograms is proposed. In preprocessing stage, a contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) method is applied to obtain the better contrast mammograms. After this, the proposed combined methods are applied. In the first step of the proposed approach, a two dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is applied to all the input images. In the second step, a proposed nonlinear complex diffusion based uns...

  18. Detection of masses in mammograms by analysis of gradient vector convergence using sector filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhari, Y.; Karimian, A.; Mohammadbeigi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Although mammography is the main diagnostic method for breast cancer, but the interpretation of mammograms is a difficult task and depends on the experience and skill of the radiologists. Computer Aided Detection (CADe) systems have been proposed to help radiologist in interpretation of mammograms. In this paper a novel filter called Sector filter is proposed to detect masses. This filter works based on the analysis of convergence of gradient vectors toward the center of filter. Using this filter, rounded convex regions, which are more likely to be pertained to a mass, could be detected in a gray scale image. After applying this filter on the images with two scales and their linear combination suspicious points were selected by a specific process. After implementation of the proposed method, promising results were achieved. The performance of the proposed method in this research was competitive or in some cases even better than that of other suggested methods in the literature. (authors)

  19. Detecting microcalcifications in mammograms by using SVM method for the diagnostics of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Baikun; Wang, Ruiping; Qi, Hongzhi; Cao, Xuchen

    2005-01-01

    Support vector machine (SVM) is a new statistical learning method. Compared with the classical machine learning methods, SVM learning discipline is to minimize the structural risk instead of the empirical risk of the classical methods, and it gives better generative performance. Because SVM algorithm is a convex quadratic optimization problem, the local optimal solution is certainly the global optimal one. In this paper a SVM algorithm is applied to detect the micro-calcifications (MCCs) in mammograms for the diagnostics of breast cancer that has not been reported yet. It had been tested with 10 mammograms and the results show that the algorithm can achieve a higher true positive in comparison with artificial neural network (ANN) based on the empirical risk minimization, and is valuable for further study and application in the clinical engineering.

  20. Bayesian Maximum Entropy Based Algorithm for Digital X-ray Mammogram Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Mutihac

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Basics of Bayesian statistics in inverse problems using the maximum entropy principle are summarized in connection with the restoration of positive, additive images from various types of data like X-ray digital mammograms. An efficient iterative algorithm for image restoration from large data sets based on the conjugate gradient method and Lagrange multipliers in nonlinear optimization of a specific potential function was developed. The point spread function of the imaging system was determined by numerical simulations of inhomogeneous breast-like tissue with microcalcification inclusions of various opacities. The processed digital and digitized mammograms resulted superior in comparison with their raw counterparts in terms of contrast, resolution, noise, and visibility of details.

  1. Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Screening in Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Halliday, PhD; Deborah A. Taira, ScD; James Davis, PhD; Henry Chan

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Despite evidence that breast cancer screening reduces morbidity and mortality, many women do not obtain mammograms. Our objective was to analyze the relationship between income and mammography screening for members enrolled in a large health plan in Hawaii. Methods We analyzed claims data for women (N = 46,328) aged 50 to 70 years during 2003 and 2004. We used parametric and nonparametric regression techniques. We used probit estimation to conduct multivariate analysis. Results A...

  2. Mammographic microcalcifications: Detection with xerography, screen-film, and digitized film display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smathers, R.L.; Bush, E.; Drace, J.; Stevens, M.; Sommer, F.G.; Brown, B.W.; Karras, B.

    1986-01-01

    Pulverized bone specks and aluminum oxide specks were measured by hand into sizes ranging from 0.2 mm to 1.0 mm and then arranged in clusters. These clusters were superimposed on a human breast tissue phantom, and xeromammograms and screen-film mammograms of the clusters were made. The screen-film mammograms were digitized using a high-resolution laser scanner and then displayed on cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors. Six radiologists independently counted the microcalcifications on the xeromammograms, the screen-film mammograms, and the digitized film mammograms. The xeromammograms were examined with a magnifying glass; the screen-film images were examined with a magnifying glass and by hot light; and the digitized-film images were examined by electronic magnification and image processing. The bone speck size that corresponded to a mean 50% detectability level for each technique was as follows: xeromammography, 0.550 mm; digitized film, 0.573 mm; and screen-film, 0.661 mm. We postulate that electronic magnification and image processing with edge enhancement can improve the capability of screen-film mammography to enhance the detection of microcalcifications

  3. Clinical Image Evaluation of Film Mammograms in Korea: Comparison with the ACR Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Yeon Joo; Kim, Hye Jung; Kwak, Jin Young; Son, Eun Ju; Ko, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lee, You Jin; Park, Ji Won; Shin, Kyung Min; Jang, Yun-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to compare the overall quality of film mammograms taken according to the Korean standards with the American College of Radiology (ACR) standard for clinical image evaluation and to identify means of improving mammography quality in Korea. Four hundred and sixty eight sets of film mammograms were evaluated with respect to the Korean and ACR standards for clinical image evaluation. The pass and failure rates of mammograms were compared by medical facility types. Average scores in each category of the two standards were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify an optimal Korean standard pass mark by taking the ACR standard as the reference standard. 93.6% (438/468) of mammograms passed the Korean standard, whereas only 80.1% (375/468) passed the ACR standard (p < 0.001). Non-radiologic private clinics had the lowest pass rate (88.1%: Korean standard, 71.8%: ACR standard) and the lowest total score (76.0) by the Korean standard. Average scores of positioning were lowest (19.3/29 by the Korean standard and 3.7/5 by the ACR standard). A cutoff score of 77.0 for the Korean standard was found to correspond to a pass level when the ACR standard was applied. We suggest that tighter regulations, such as, raising the Korean pass mark, subtracting more for severe deficiencies, or considering a very low scores in even a single category as failure, are needed to improve the quality of mammography in Korea

  4. Association between mammogram density and background parenchymal enhancement of breast MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Danala, Gopichandh; Wang, Yunzhi; Zarafshani, Ali; Qian, Wei; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2018-02-01

    Breast density has been widely considered as an important risk factor for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between mammogram density results and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) of breast MRI. A dataset involving breast MR images was acquired from 65 high-risk women. Based on mammography density (BIRADS) results, the dataset was divided into two groups of low and high breast density cases. The Low-Density group has 15 cases with mammographic density (BIRADS 1 and 2), while the High-density group includes 50 cases, which were rated by radiologists as mammographic density BIRADS 3 and 4. A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was applied to segment and register breast regions depicted on sequential images of breast MRI scans. CAD scheme computed 20 global BPE features from the entire two breast regions, separately from the left and right breast region, as well as from the bilateral difference between left and right breast regions. An image feature selection method namely, CFS method, was applied to remove the most redundant features and select optimal features from the initial feature pool. Then, a logistic regression classifier was built using the optimal features to predict the mammogram density from the BPE features. Using a leave-one-case-out validation method, the classifier yields the accuracy of 82% and area under ROC curve, AUC=0.81+/-0.09. Also, the box-plot based analysis shows a negative association between mammogram density results and BPE features in the MRI images. This study demonstrated a negative association between mammogram density and BPE of breast MRI images.

  5. Segmentation of the Breast Region in Digital Mammograms and Detection of Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Armen Sahakyan; Hakop Sarukhanyan

    2012-01-01

    The mammography is the most effective procedure for an early diagnosis of the breast cancer. Finding an accurate and efficient breast region segmentation technique still remains a challenging problem in digital mammography. In this paper we explore an automated technique for mammogram segmentation. The proposed algorithm uses morphological preprocessing algorithm in order to: remove digitization noises and separate background region from the breast profile region for further edge detection an...

  6. Computerized detection of masses on mammograms: A comparative study of two algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiedeu, A.; Kom, G.; Kom, M.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we implement and carry out the comparison of two methods of computer-aided-detection of masses on mammograms. The two algorithms basically consist of 3 steps each: segmentation, binarization and noise suppression but using different techniques for each step. A database of 60 images was used to compare the performance of the two algorithms in terms of general detection efficiency, conservation of size and shape of detected masses. (author)

  7. Quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms into Tabar's patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamal, N [Medical Technology Division, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Ng, K-H [Department of Radiology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Looi, L-M [Department of Pathology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); McLean, D [Medical Physics Department, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2145 (Australia); Zulfiqar, A [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 56000 Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Malaysia); Tan, S-P [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 56000 Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Malaysia); Liew, W-F [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 56000 Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Malaysia); Shantini, A [Department of Radiology, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, 50586 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ranganathan, S [Department of Radiology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2006-11-21

    We describe a semi-automated technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms in comparison with patterns suggested by Tabar. It was developed using the MATLAB-based graphical user interface applications. It is based on an interactive thresholding method, after a short automated method that shows the fibroglandular tissue area, breast area and breast density each time new thresholds are placed on the image. The breast density is taken as a percentage of the fibroglandular tissue to the breast tissue areas. It was tested in four different ways, namely by examining: (i) correlation of the quantitative assessment results with subjective classification, (ii) classification performance using the quantitative assessment technique, (iii) interobserver agreement and (iv) intraobserver agreement. The results of the quantitative assessment correlated well (r{sup 2} = 0.92) with the subjective Tabar patterns classified by the radiologist (correctly classified 83% of digitized mammograms). The average kappa coefficient for the agreement between the readers was 0.63. This indicated moderate agreement between the three observers in classifying breast density using the quantitative assessment technique. The kappa coefficient of 0.75 for intraobserver agreement reflected good agreement between two sets of readings. The technique may be useful as a supplement to the radiologist's assessment in classifying mammograms into Tabar's pattern associated with breast cancer risk.

  8. Quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms into Tabar's patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, N; Ng, K-H; Looi, L-M; McLean, D; Zulfiqar, A; Tan, S-P; Liew, W-F; Shantini, A; Ranganathan, S

    2006-01-01

    We describe a semi-automated technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms in comparison with patterns suggested by Tabar. It was developed using the MATLAB-based graphical user interface applications. It is based on an interactive thresholding method, after a short automated method that shows the fibroglandular tissue area, breast area and breast density each time new thresholds are placed on the image. The breast density is taken as a percentage of the fibroglandular tissue to the breast tissue areas. It was tested in four different ways, namely by examining: (i) correlation of the quantitative assessment results with subjective classification, (ii) classification performance using the quantitative assessment technique, (iii) interobserver agreement and (iv) intraobserver agreement. The results of the quantitative assessment correlated well (r 2 = 0.92) with the subjective Tabar patterns classified by the radiologist (correctly classified 83% of digitized mammograms). The average kappa coefficient for the agreement between the readers was 0.63. This indicated moderate agreement between the three observers in classifying breast density using the quantitative assessment technique. The kappa coefficient of 0.75 for intraobserver agreement reflected good agreement between two sets of readings. The technique may be useful as a supplement to the radiologist's assessment in classifying mammograms into Tabar's pattern associated with breast cancer risk

  9. Using x-ray mammograms to assist in microwave breast image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Charlotte; Frayne, Richard; Fear, Elise

    2012-01-01

    Current clinical breast imaging modalities include ultrasound, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and the ubiquitous X-ray mammography. Microwave imaging, which takes advantage of differing electromagnetic properties to obtain image contrast, shows potential as a complementary imaging technique. As an emerging modality, interpretation of 3D microwave images poses a significant challenge. MR images are often used to assist in this task, and X-ray mammograms are readily available. However, X-ray mammograms provide 2D images of a breast under compression, resulting in significant geometric distortion. This paper presents a method to estimate the 3D shape of the breast and locations of regions of interest from standard clinical mammograms. The technique was developed using MR images as the reference 3D shape with the future intention of using microwave images. Twelve breast shapes were estimated and compared to ground truth MR images, resulting in a skin surface estimation accurate to within an average Euclidean distance of 10 mm. The 3D locations of regions of interest were estimated to be within the same clinical area of the breast as corresponding regions seen on MR imaging. These results encourage investigation into the use of mammography as a source of information to assist with microwave image interpretation as well as validation of microwave imaging techniques.

  10. Using X-Ray Mammograms to Assist in Microwave Breast Image Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current clinical breast imaging modalities include ultrasound, magnetic resonance (MR imaging, and the ubiquitous X-ray mammography. Microwave imaging, which takes advantage of differing electromagnetic properties to obtain image contrast, shows potential as a complementary imaging technique. As an emerging modality, interpretation of 3D microwave images poses a significant challenge. MR images are often used to assist in this task, and X-ray mammograms are readily available. However, X-ray mammograms provide 2D images of a breast under compression, resulting in significant geometric distortion. This paper presents a method to estimate the 3D shape of the breast and locations of regions of interest from standard clinical mammograms. The technique was developed using MR images as the reference 3D shape with the future intention of using microwave images. Twelve breast shapes were estimated and compared to ground truth MR images, resulting in a skin surface estimation accurate to within an average Euclidean distance of 10 mm. The 3D locations of regions of interest were estimated to be within the same clinical area of the breast as corresponding regions seen on MR imaging. These results encourage investigation into the use of mammography as a source of information to assist with microwave image interpretation as well as validation of microwave imaging techniques.

  11. Computer-aided diagnosis scheme for histological classification of clustered microcalcifications on magnification mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Ryoji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Namba, Kiyoshi; Doi, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    The histological classification of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms can be difficult, and thus often require biopsy or follow-up. Our purpose in this study was to develop a computer-aided diagnosis schemefor identifying the histological classification of clustered microcalcifications on magnification mammograms in order to assist the radiologists' interpretation as a 'second opinion'. Our database consisted of 58 magnification mammograms, which included 35 malignant clustered microcalcifications (9 invasive carcinomas, 12 noninvasive carcinomas of the comedo type, and 14 noninvasive carcinomas of the noncomedo type) and 23 benign clustered microcalcifications (17 mastopathies and 6 fibroadenomas). The histological classifications of all clustered microcalcifications were proved by pathologic diagnosis. The clustered microcalcifications were first segmented by use of a novel filter bank and a thresholding technique. Five objective features on clustered microcalcifications were determined by taking into account subjective features that experienced the radiologists commonly use to identify possible histological classifications. The Bayes decision rule with five objective features was employed for distinguishing between five histological classifications. The classification accuracies for distinguishing between three malignant histological classifications were 77.8% (7/9) for invasive carcinoma, 75.0% (9/12) for noninvasive carcinoma of the comedo type, and 92.9% (13/14) for noninvasive carcinoma of the noncomedo type. The classification accuracies for distinguishing between two benign histological classifications were 94.1% (16/17) for mastopathy, and 100.0% (6/6) for fibroadenoma. This computerized method would be useful in assisting radiologists in their assessments of clustered microcalcifications

  12. Analysis of previous screening examinations for patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Cha, Joo Hee; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Young Ho; Hwang, Ki Tae; Ryu, Dae Sik; Kwak, Jin Ho; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to improve the quality of subsequent screening by reviewing the previous screening of breast cancer patients. Twenty-four breast cancer patients who underwent previous screening were enrolled. All 24 took mammograms and 15 patients also took sonograms. We reviewed the screening retrospectively according to the BI-RADS criteria and we categorized the results into false negative, true negative, true positive and occult cancers. We also categorized the causes of false negative cancers into misperception, misinterpretation and technical factors and then we analyzed the attributing factors. Review of the previous screening revealed 66.7% (16/24) false negative, 25.0% (6/24) true negative, and 8.3% (2/24) true positive cancers. False negative cancers were caused by the mammogram in 56.3% (9/16) and by the sonogram in 43.7% (7/16). For the false negative cases, all of misperception were related with mammograms and this was attributed to dense breast, a lesion located at the edge of glandular tissue or the image, and findings seen on one view only. Almost all misinterpretations were related with sonograms and attributed to loose application of the final assessment. To improve the quality of breast screening, it is essential to overcome the main causes of false negative examinations, including misperception and misinterpretation. We need systematic education and strict application of final assessment categories of BI-RADS. For effective communication among physicians, it is also necessary to properly educate them about BI-RADS

  13. Reader practice in mammography screen reporting in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.; Poulos, A.; Brennan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Reader variability is a problem in mammography image reporting and compromises the efficacy of screening programmes. The purpose of this exploratory study was to survey reader practice in reporting screening mammograms in Australia to identify aspects of practice that warrant further investigation. Mammography reporting practice and influences on concentration and attention were investigated by using an original questionnaire distributed to screen readers in Australia. A response rate of 71% (83 out of 117) was achieved. Demographic data indicated that the majority of readers were over 46 years of age (73%), have been reporting on screening mammograms for over 10 years (61%), take less than 1 min to report upon a screening mammogram examination (66%), report up to 200 examinations in a single session (83%) and take up to 2 h to report one session (61%). A majority report on more than 5000 examinations annually (66%); 93% of participants regard their search strategy as systematic, 87% agreed that their concentration can vary throughout a session, 64% agreed that the relatively low number of positives can lead to lapses in concentration and attention and almost all (94%) participants agreed that methods to maximise concentration should be explored. Participants identified a range of influences on concentration within their working environment including volume of images reported in one session, image types and aspects of the physical environment. This study has provided important evidence of the need to investigate adverse influences on concentration during mammography screen reporting

  14. Rastreamento Pré-natal de Anormalidades Cardíacas: Papel da Ultra–sonografia Obstétrica de Rotina renatal Screening of Cardiac Abnormalities: The Role of Routine Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvi Bacaltchuk

    2001-10-01

    was accessible by the four-chamber view alone. Arrhythmias during obstetrical scan were observed in 26.3 of the babies with prenatal suspicion of a heart abnormality, while only 3.4% of the patients without prenatal suspicion showed a rhythm alteration (p=0.009. Significant differences between the groups with and without prenatal suspicion of cardiac abnormalities were observed in relation to parity (p=0.029, delivery by cesarean section (p=0.006, need for intensive care (p=0.046 and school education level of the father (p=0.014. At multivariate analysis, only the presence of a rhythm alteration during ultrasound scan was shown to be an independent variable associated with prenatal suspicion of cardiac abnormalities. Conclusions: routine obstetrical ultrasound has been underused in prenatal screening of congenital heart diseases. Adequate training and making obstetricians and the population a ware of the problem may be instruments for increasing the efficacy of routine obstetrical ultrasound in rising the suspicion of fetal cardiac abnormalities.

  15. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health history and certain medicines can affect the risk of developing endometrial cancer. Anything that increases your ... have abnormal vaginal bleeding, check with your doctor. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  16. Joint two-view information for computerized detection of microcalcifications on mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, H.-P.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Paramagul, Chinatana; Ge Jun; Wei Jun; Zhou Chuan

    2006-01-01

    We are developing new techniques to improve the accuracy of computerized microcalcification detection by using the joint two-view information on craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views. After cluster candidates were detected using a single-view detection technique, candidates on CC and MLO views were paired using their radial distances from the nipple. Candidate pairs were classified with a similarity classifier that used the joint information from both views. Each cluster candidate was also characterized by its single-view features. The outputs of the similarity classifier and the single-view classifier were fused and the cluster candidate was classified as a true microcalcification cluster or a false-positive (FP) using the fused two-view information. A data set of 116 pairs of mammograms containing microcalcification clusters and 203 pairs of normal images from the University of South Florida (USF) public database was used for training the two-view detection algorithm. The trained method was tested on an independent test set of 167 pairs of mammograms, which contained 71 normal pairs and 96 pairs with microcalcification clusters collected at the University of Michigan (UM). The similarity classifier had a very low FP rate for the test set at low and medium levels of sensitivity. However, the highest mammogram-based sensitivity that could be reached by the similarity classifier was 69%. The single-view classifier had a higher FP rate compared to the similarity classifier, but it could reach a maximum mammogram-based sensitivity of 93%. The fusion method combined the scores of these two classifiers so that the number of FPs was substantially reduced at relatively low and medium sensitivities, and a relatively high maximum sensitivity was maintained. For the malignant microcalcification clusters, at a mammogram-based sensitivity of 80%, the FP rates were 0.18 and 0.35 with the two-view fusion and single-view detection methods, respectively. When the

  17. Mammographic screening practices among Chinese-Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Cannas; Fethney, Judith; White, Kate

    2012-03-01

    To report mammographic screening practice among Chinese-Australian women, and to examine the relationship between demographic characteristics, acculturation factors (English proficiency and length of stay in Australia), cultural beliefs, and having a mammogram as recommended. Cross-sectional and descriptive. The study was conducted in 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Of 988 Chinese-Australian women over 18 years of age invited to participate in the study, 785 (79%) completed and returned the questionnaire. Of these women, 320 (40.8%) were in the target age range of 50 to 69 years. The Chinese Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (CBCSB) was used as a data collection instrument. Analysis included descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis using chi-square and t tests, and logistic regression. Of the 320 women in the targeted age range of 50 to 69 years, 238 (74.4%) had a mammogram as recommended biannually. Being married-de facto, in the 60 to 69 age group, and speaking Cantonese at home were positively associated with women's mammographic screening practice. However, no statistically significant differences in acculturation factors and having a mammogram as recommended were found. In terms of CBCSB score, women who had mammograms as recommended had more positive attitudes toward health checkups and perceived fewer barriers to mammographic screening. Effort should be focused on specific subgroups of Chinese-Australian women in order to fully understand the barriers involved in participating in mammographic screening. Nurses can use the findings from the present study to design culturally sensitive breast cancer screening programs to encourage women's participation in mammography. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Mammographic Screening Provided by the National Health Insurance Corporation: A 1 year Audit in a Secondary Medical Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Na Mi; Lee, A Lum; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu

    2009-01-01

    We performed a medical audit of the mammograms performed as part of the existing public cancer screening program to propose a plan for improving the program. We analyzed the results of 3,317 mammograms performed between March 2006 and February 2007. The American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI R ADS) guidelines were used for follow-up and outcome monitoring. Cases in categories 0, 4, and 5 were followed up by a review of the patient's medical records and a phone call survey to determine the reasons for not continuing with follow-up examinations. The mean age of the women enrolled in this study was 51 years. The rate of recall was approximately 6.4% and the cancer detection rate was 2.1 out of every 1000 women examined. Positive predictive values (PPV) of 1, 2 and 3 were observed in 3.3%, 33.3% and 70.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 93.8%, respectively. As a result of the phone-call survey to determine the reasons for not following up with additional examinations, 53.8% of cases were 'belittled since there was no subjective symptom,' and 16.3%, 'didn't check the cancer examination notice thoroughly or did not fully understand it'. The result of medical audit indicates that reading and follow-up examinations were conducted in a relatively proper manner. Taking into consideration the characteristics of the objects for public examination, it is thought that active follow-up management as well as a written notice of the results, is necessary for patients who were found to be abnormal

  19. Mammographic Screening Provided by the National Health Insurance Corporation: A 1 year Audit in a Secondary Medical Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Na Mi; Lee, A Lum; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    We performed a medical audit of the mammograms performed as part of the existing public cancer screening program to propose a plan for improving the program. We analyzed the results of 3,317 mammograms performed between March 2006 and February 2007. The American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI{sub R}ADS) guidelines were used for follow-up and outcome monitoring. Cases in categories 0, 4, and 5 were followed up by a review of the patient's medical records and a phone call survey to determine the reasons for not continuing with follow-up examinations. The mean age of the women enrolled in this study was 51 years. The rate of recall was approximately 6.4% and the cancer detection rate was 2.1 out of every 1000 women examined. Positive predictive values (PPV) of 1, 2 and 3 were observed in 3.3%, 33.3% and 70.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 93.8%, respectively. As a result of the phone-call survey to determine the reasons for not following up with additional examinations, 53.8% of cases were 'belittled since there was no subjective symptom,' and 16.3%, 'didn't check the cancer examination notice thoroughly or did not fully understand it'. The result of medical audit indicates that reading and follow-up examinations were conducted in a relatively proper manner. Taking into consideration the characteristics of the objects for public examination, it is thought that active follow-up management as well as a written notice of the results, is necessary for patients who were found to be abnormal.

  20. Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonzo-Proulx, O; Shen, S Z; Yaffe, M J; Packard, N; Boone, J M; Al-Mayah, A; Brock, K K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of an algorithm used to measure the volumetric breast density (VBD) from digital mammograms. The algorithm is based on the calibration of the detector signal versus the thickness and composition of breast-equivalent phantoms. The baseline error in the density from the algorithm was found to be 1.25 ± 2.3% VBD units (PVBD) when tested against a set of calibration phantoms, of thicknesses 3-8 cm, with compositions equivalent to fibroglandular content (breast density) between 0% and 100% and under x-ray beams between 26 kVp and 32 kVp with a Rh/Rh anode/filter. The algorithm was also tested against images from a dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) scanner acquired on 26 volunteers. The CT images were segmented into regions representing adipose, fibroglandular and skin tissues, and then deformed using a finite-element algorithm to simulate the effects of compression in mammography. The mean volume, VBD and thickness of the compressed breast for these deformed images were respectively 558 cm 3 , 23.6% and 62 mm. The displaced CT images were then used to generate simulated digital mammograms, considering the effects of the polychromatic x-ray spectrum, the primary and scattered energy transmitted through the breast, the anti-scatter grid and the detector efficiency. The simulated mammograms were analyzed with the VBD algorithm and compared with the deformed CT volumes. With the Rh/Rh anode filter, the root mean square difference between the VBD from CT and from the algorithm was 2.6 PVBD, and a linear regression between the two gave a slope of 0.992 with an intercept of -1.4 PVBD and a correlation with R 2 = 0.963. The results with the Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh anode/filter were similar.

  1. Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo-Proulx, O; Shen, S Z; Yaffe, M J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Packard, N; Boone, J M [UC Davis Medical Center, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Al-Mayah, A; Brock, K K, E-mail: oliviera@sri.utoronto.c [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2010-06-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of an algorithm used to measure the volumetric breast density (VBD) from digital mammograms. The algorithm is based on the calibration of the detector signal versus the thickness and composition of breast-equivalent phantoms. The baseline error in the density from the algorithm was found to be 1.25 {+-} 2.3% VBD units (PVBD) when tested against a set of calibration phantoms, of thicknesses 3-8 cm, with compositions equivalent to fibroglandular content (breast density) between 0% and 100% and under x-ray beams between 26 kVp and 32 kVp with a Rh/Rh anode/filter. The algorithm was also tested against images from a dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) scanner acquired on 26 volunteers. The CT images were segmented into regions representing adipose, fibroglandular and skin tissues, and then deformed using a finite-element algorithm to simulate the effects of compression in mammography. The mean volume, VBD and thickness of the compressed breast for these deformed images were respectively 558 cm{sup 3}, 23.6% and 62 mm. The displaced CT images were then used to generate simulated digital mammograms, considering the effects of the polychromatic x-ray spectrum, the primary and scattered energy transmitted through the breast, the anti-scatter grid and the detector efficiency. The simulated mammograms were analyzed with the VBD algorithm and compared with the deformed CT volumes. With the Rh/Rh anode filter, the root mean square difference between the VBD from CT and from the algorithm was 2.6 PVBD, and a linear regression between the two gave a slope of 0.992 with an intercept of -1.4 PVBD and a correlation with R{sup 2} = 0.963. The results with the Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh anode/filter were similar.

  2. Studies on computer-aided diagnosis systems for chest radiographs and mammograms (in Japanese)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for chest radiographs and mammograms. Preprocessing and imaging processing methods for each CAD system include dynamic range compression and region segmentation technique. A new pattern recognition technique combines genetic algorithms with template matching methods to detect lung nodules. A genetic algorithm was employed to select the optimal shape of simulated nodular shadows to be compared with real lesions on digitized chest images. Detection performance was evaluated using 332 chest radiographs from the database of the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology. Our average true-positive rate was 72.8% with an average of 11 false-positive findings per image. A new detection method using high resolution digital images with 0.05 mm sampling is also proposed for the mammogram CAD system to detect very small microcalcifications. An automated classification method uses feature extraction based on fractal dimension analysis of masses. Using over 200 cases to evaluate the detection of mammographic masses and calcifications, the detection rate of masses and microcalcifications were 87% and 96% with 1.5 and 1.8 false-positive findings, respectively. The classification performance on benign vs malignant lesions, the Az values that were defined by the areas under the ROC curves derived from classification schemes of masses and microcalcifications were 0.84 and 0.89. To demonstrate the practicality of these CAD systems in a computer-network environment, we propose to use the mammogram CAD system via the Internet and WWW. A common gateway interface and server-client approach for the CAD system via the Internet will permit display of the CAD results on ordinary computers

  3. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  4. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  5. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. www. ...

  6. False-positive breast screening due to fat necrosis following mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawson, Jennifer N.; Malara, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Traumatic fat necrosis can result in a spectrum of imaging appearances that range from characteristically benign to those indistinguishable from malignancy. In such cases, biopsy might be required for diagnosis. The present case demonstrates a suspicious mammographic mass lesion appearing following a haematoma caused by a previous screening mammogram Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  7. American Indian Women and Screening Mammography: Findings from a Qualitative Study in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolma, Eleni; Batterton, Chasity; Hamm, Robert M.; Thompson, David; Engelman, Kimberly K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is an important public health issue within the American Indian (AI) community in Oklahoma; however, there is limited information to explain the low screening mammography rates among AI women. Purpose: To identify the motivational factors affecting an AI woman's decision to obtain a mammogram. Methods: Through the use of…

  8. Promoting Breast Cancer Screening through Storytelling by Chamorro Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manglona, Rosa Duenas; Robert, Suzanne; Isaacson, Lucy San Nicolas; Garrido, Marie; Henrich, Faye Babauta; Santos, Lola Sablan; Le, Daisy; Peters, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    The largest Chamorro population outside of Guam and the Mariana Islands reside in California. Cancer health disparities disproportionally affect Pacific Islander communities, including the Chamorro, and breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women. To address health concerns such as cancer, Pacific Islander women frequently utilize storytelling to initiate conversations about health and to address sensitive topics such as breast health and cancer. One form of storytelling used in San Diego is a play that conveys the message of breast cancer screening to the community in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way. This play, Nan Nena’s Mammogram, tells the story of an older woman in the community who learns about breast cancer screening from her young niece. The story builds upon the underpinnings of Chamorro culture - family, community, support, and humor - to portray discussing breast health, getting support for breast screening, and visiting the doctor. The story of Nan Nena’s Mammogram reflects the willingness of a few pioneering Chamorro women to use their personal experiences of cancer survivorship to promote screening for others. Through the support of a Chamorro community-based organization, these Chamorro breast cancer survivors have used the success of Nan Nena’s Mammogram to expand their education activities and to form a new cancer survivor organization for Chamorro women in San Diego.

  9. Mammography screening credit card and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, D V; Kumar, N B; Clark, R A; Yag, C

    1992-07-15

    Screening for breast cancer using mammography has been shown to be effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The authors attempted to determine if use of a wallet-size plastic screening "credit" card would increase participants' compliance for subsequent mammograms when compared with traditional methods of increasing compliance. Two hundred and twenty consecutive women, ages 40-70 years, undergoing their first screening mammography were recruited and assigned randomly to four groups receiving (1) a reminder plastic credit card (2) reminder credit card with written reminder; (3) appointment card; and (4) verbal recommendation. Return rates of the four groups were determined after 15 months. The return rate for subsequent mammograms was significantly higher for participants (72.4%) using the credit card than for participants (39.8%) exposed to traditional encouragement/reminders (P less than 0.0001). The credit card was designed to show the participant's screening anniversary, and the durability of the card may have been a factor in increasing the return rate. The use of reminder credit cards may increase compliance for periodic screening examinations for other cancers and other chronic diseases.

  10. Mammography screening services: market segments and messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammon, D L; Smith, J A; Beard, T

    1991-01-01

    Mammography has become a vital tool for the early detection of breast cancer. Although many organizations and health care facilities are working to educate and motivate women to take advantage of the life saving opportunity that is offered through screening mammography, only twenty percent of women who should be screened actually have the procedure performed. In order to reach women who have not been screened, it is important to learn which factors most strongly motivate those women who do choose to have a mammogram. Depth interviews with 18 women attending a mobile mammography unit were conducted to explore the decision making process of women obtaining mammography screening services and to develop a profile of prevalent emotions, attitudes, and feelings associated with receiving breast cancer screening services. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed several important themes to which health care professionals can direct marketing and health promotion strategies.

  11. [Granulomatous lobular mastitis: a benign abnormality that mimics malignancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingerhoedt, N M; Janssen, S; Mravunac, M; Wauters, C A P; Strobbe, L J A

    2008-05-03

    A palpable abnormality of the breast was found in three women, one aged 57 and two aged 41. The first two patients predominantly showed the characteristics of a purulent inflammation, and on mammogram the third patient appeared to have mastitis carcinomatosa. Histopathological investigation revealed a lobular, non-caseating granulomatous inflammation. They were treated with prednisone and the first and third patients also received azathioprine. After some time, the condition recurred in the contralateral breast in the second and third patients. Once again, medicinal treatment was given. When a palpable tumour of the breast is found the primary goal is to exclude malignancy. Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare and benign tumour of the breast that clinically mimics carcinoma. Often, conventional imaging does not lead to the diagnosis. A histological needle biopsy is the best way to reach a diagnosis. Immunosuppressive therapy is effective and is preferred over surgery.

  12. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  13. Multiplexed wavelet transform technique for detection of microcalcification in digitized mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mini, M G; Devassia, V P; Thomas, Tessamma

    2004-12-01

    Wavelet transform (WT) is a potential tool for the detection of microcalcifications, an early sign of breast cancer. This article describes the implementation and evaluates the performance of two novel WT-based schemes for the automatic detection of clustered microcalcifications in digitized mammograms. Employing a one-dimensional WT technique that utilizes the pseudo-periodicity property of image sequences, the proposed algorithms achieve high detection efficiency and low processing memory requirements. The detection is achieved from the parent-child relationship between the zero-crossings [Marr-Hildreth (M-H) detector] /local extrema (Canny detector) of the WT coefficients at different levels of decomposition. The detected pixels are weighted before the inverse transform is computed, and they are segmented by simple global gray level thresholding. Both detectors produce 95% detection sensitivity, even though there are more false positives for the M-H detector. The M-H detector preserves the shape information and provides better detection sensitivity for mammograms containing widely distributed calcifications.

  14. Digitized mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, J.N.; Balu-Maestro, C.; Rogopoulos, A.; Chauvel, C.; Geoffray, A.

    1988-01-01

    Two observers conducted a blind evaluation of 100 mammography files, including 47 malignant cases. Films were read both before and after image digitization at 50 μm and 100 μm with the FilmDRSII. Digitization permitted better analysis of the normal anatomic structures and moderately improved diagnostic sensitivity. Searches for microcalcifications before and after digitization at 100 μm and 50 μm showed better analysis of anatomic structures after digitization (especially for solitary microcalcifications). The diagnostic benefit, with discovery of clustered microcalcifications, was more limited (one case at 100 μm, nine cases at 50 μm). Recognition of microcalcifications was clearly improved in dense breasts, which can benefit from reinterpretation after digitization at 50 μm rather 100μm

  15. Characteristics and screening outcome of women referred twice at screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setz-Pels, Wikke; Duijm, Lucien E.M.; Jansen, Frits H.; Louwman, Marieke W.J.; Roumen, Rudi M.H.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the characteristics and screening outcome of women referred twice at screening mammography. We included 424,703 consecutive screening mammograms and collected imaging, biopsy and surgery reports of women with screen-detected breast cancer. Review of screening mammograms was performed to determine whether or not an initial and second referral comprised the same lesion. The overall positive predictive value of referral for cancer was 38.6% (95% CI 37.3-39.8%). Of 147 (2.6%) women referred twice, 86 had been referred for a different lesion at second referral and 32 of these proved malignant (37.2%, 95% CI 27.0-47.4%). Sixty-one women had been referred twice for the same lesion, of which 22 proved malignant (36.1%, 95% CI 24.1-48.0%). Characteristics of these women were comparable to women with cancer diagnosed after first referral. Compared with women without cancer at second referral for the same lesion, women with cancer more frequently showed suspicious densities at screening mammography (86.4% vs 53.8%, P = 0.02) and work-up at first referral had less frequently included biopsy (22.7% vs 61.5%, P = 0.004). Cancer risk in women referred twice for the same lesion is similar to that observed in women referred once, or referred for a second time but for a different lesion. (orig.)

  16. Engaging Patients in Decisions About Cancer Screening: Exploring the Decision Journey Through the Use of a Patient Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Steven H; Krist, Alex H; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Jones, Resa M; Lehman, Rebecca R; Hochheimer, Camille J; Sabo, Roy T; Frosch, Dominick L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Longo, Daniel R

    2018-02-01

    Engaging patients to make informed choices is paramount but difficult in busy practices. This study sought to engage patients outside the clinical setting to better understand how they approach cancer screening decisions, including their primary concerns and their preferences for finalizing their decision. Twelve primary care practices offering patients an online personal health record invited eligible patients to complete a 17-item online interactive module. Among 11,458 registered users, invitations to complete the module were sent to adults aged 50-74 years who were overdue for colorectal cancer screening and to women aged 40-49 years and men aged 55-69 who had not undergone a recent mammogram or prostate-specific antigen test, respectively. The module was started by 2,355 patients and completed by 903 patients. Most respondents (76.8%) knew they were eligible for screening. Preferred next steps were talking to the clinician (76.6%), reading/research (28.6%), and consulting trusted friends/family (16.4%). Priority topics included how much screening improves life expectancy, comparative test performance, and the prevalence/health risks of the cancer. Leading fears were getting cancer/delayed detection (79.2%), abnormal results (40.5%), and testing complications (39.1%), the last referring to false test results, medical complications, or unnecessary treatments. Men eligible for prostate-specific antigen screening were more likely than women eligible for mammography to express concerns about testing complications and to prioritize weighing pros and cons over gut feelings (pengagement strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Common echocardiographic abnormalities in Nigerians of different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-17

    Sep 17, 2012 ... artery disease, cardiac murmurs, atrial fibrillation, stroke, and transient ischaemic attack.[4,5] In some circumstances, the examination is an appropriate screening test even in the absence of cardiovascular symptoms, especially. Common echocardiographic abnormalities in. Nigerians of different age groups.

  18. Plant abnormality inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plant abnormality inspection device for conducting remote or automatic patrolling inspection in a plant and, more particularly, relates to such a device as capable of detecting abnormal odors. That is, the device comprises a moving device for moving to a predetermined position in the plant, a plurality of gas sensors for different kind of gases to be inspected mounted thereon, a comparator for comparing the concentration of a gas detected by the gas sensor with the normal gas concentration at the predetermined position and a judging means for judging the absence or presence of abnormality depending on the combination of the result of the comparison and deliverying a signal if the state is abnormal. As a result, a slight amount of gas responsible to odors released upon abnormality of the plant can be detected by a plurality of gas sensors for different kinds gases to rapidly and easily find abnormal portions in the plant. (I.S.)

  19. Computer aided detection of clusters of microcalcifications on full field digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, H.-P.; Wei Jun; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou Chuan

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to identify microcalcification clusters (MCCs) automatically on full field digital mammograms (FFDMs). The CAD system includes six stages: preprocessing; image enhancement; segmentation of microcalcification candidates; false positive (FP) reduction for individual microcalcifications; regional clustering; and FP reduction for clustered microcalcifications. At the stage of FP reduction for individual microcalcifications, a truncated sum-of-squares error function was used to improve the efficiency and robustness of the training of an artificial neural network in our CAD system for FFDMs. At the stage of FP reduction for clustered microcalcifications, morphological features and features derived from the artificial neural network outputs were extracted from each cluster. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to select the features. An LDA classifier was then used to differentiate clustered microcalcifications from FPs. A data set of 96 cases with 192 images was collected at the University of Michigan. This data set contained 96 MCCs, of which 28 clusters were proven by biopsy to be malignant and 68 were proven to be benign. The data set was separated into two independent data sets for training and testing of the CAD system in a cross-validation scheme. When one data set was used to train and validate the convolution neural network (CNN) in our CAD system, the other data set was used to evaluate the detection performance. With the use of a truncated error metric, the training of CNN could be accelerated and the classification performance was improved. The CNN in combination with an LDA classifier could substantially reduce FPs with a small tradeoff in sensitivity. By using the free-response receiver operating characteristic methodology, it was found that our CAD system can achieve a cluster-based sensitivity of 70, 80, and 90 % at 0.21, 0.61, and 1.49 FPs/image, respectively. For case

  20. Block-based wavelet transform coding of mammograms with region-adaptive quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Nam Su; Song, Jun S.; Kwon, Musik; Kim, JongHyo; Lee, ChoongWoong

    1998-06-01

    To achieve both high compression ratio and information preserving, it is an efficient way to combine segmentation and lossy compression scheme. Microcalcification in mammogram is one of the most significant sign of early stage of breast cancer. Therefore in coding, detection and segmentation of microcalcification enable us to preserve it well by allocating more bits to it than to other regions. Segmentation of microcalcification is performed both in spatial domain and in wavelet transform domain. Peak error controllable quantization step, which is off-line designed, is suitable for medical image compression. For region-adaptive quantization, block- based wavelet transform coding is adopted and different peak- error-constrained quantizers are applied to blocks according to the segmentation result. In view of preservation of microcalcification, the proposed coding scheme shows better performance than JPEG.

  1. Case base classification on digital mammograms: improving the performance of case base classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Valliappan; Then, H. H.; Sumari, Putra; Venkatesa Mohan, N.

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. The aim of the research presented here is in twofold. First stage of research involves machine learning techniques, which segments and extracts features from the mass of digital mammograms. Second level is on problem solving approach which includes classification of mass by performance based case base classifier. In this paper we build a case-based Classifier in order to diagnose mammographic images. We explain different methods and behaviors that have been added to the classifier to improve the performance of the classifier. Currently the initial Performance base Classifier with Bagging is proposed in the paper and it's been implemented and it shows an improvement in specificity and sensitivity.

  2. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  3. Incidence of fetal chromosome abnormalities in insulin dependent diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriques, C U; Damm, P; Tabor, A

    1991-01-01

    -diabetic women with little risk of contracting genetic disorders. The results suggest that maternal IDDM does not increase the risk of fetal chromosome abnormality and consequently screening by amniocentesis for chromosome abnormalities among diabetic women does not seem to be indicated....

  4. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    increase its efficiency, by targeting populations at a higher risk than the women currently included, and to reduce the number of mammograms done outside the program, as they are not subject to the same quality controls. Risks could be reduced by increasing the sensitivity of mammography and the specificity of the readings. Moreover, it is mandatory to inform women of both the benefits and risks of screening, in compliance with the principle of enabling patients to make a free and informed choice.

  5. Breast cancer screening in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, L S; Haynes, S G

    1996-01-01

    There is currently an epidemic of breast cancer in women 65 years of age and older. The purposes of this paper are to explore the breast cancer screening behaviors of older women and to identify some of the determinants of screening in these women. Data were analyzed from the 1987 National Health Interview Survey, a continuous nationwide household interview survey of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population. As in other studies, the utilization of breast cancer screening by older women was less in older women than in younger women. This was true for both mammography and clinical breast examination. A number of determinants of screening in older women were identified here. Women with a usual source of care and/or no activity limitation, as well as high school graduates, were the ones most likely to have received a screening mammogram and/or a screening clinical breast exam during the past year. The failure of older women to receive adequate breast cancer screening is an important concern which should be reevaluated, given the breast cancer epidemic in this population. This study identified a number of determinants of breast cancer screening in older women. For the most part, these determinants point to the primary care physician as the key to breast cancer screening in these women. Therefore, the primary care physician must be informed of, and encouraged to follow, the recommendations for periodic breast cancer screening in older women.

  6. Breast cancer screening with digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaane, Per

    2017-01-01

    To give an overview of studies comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in breast cancer screening. The implementation of tomosynthesis in breast imaging is rapidly increasing world-wide. Experimental clinical studies of relevance for DBT screening have shown that tomosynthesis might have a great potential in breast cancer screening, although most of these retrospective reading studies are based on small populations, so that final conclusions are difficult to draw from individual reports. Several retrospective studies and three prospective trials on tomosynthesis in breast cancer screening have been published so far, confirming the great potential of DBT in mammography screening. The main results of these screening studies are presented. The retrospective screening studies from USA have all shown a significant decrease in the recall rate using DBT as adjunct to mammography. Most of these studies have also shown an increase in the cancer detection rate, and the non-significant results in some studies might be explained by a lack of statistical power. All the three prospective European trials have shown a significant increase in the cancer detection rate. The retrospective and the prospective screening studies comparing FFDM and DBT have all demonstrated that tomosynthesis has a great potential for improving breast cancer screening. DBT should be regarded as a better mammogram that could improve or overcome limitations of the conventional mammography, and tomosynthesis might be considered as the new technique in the next future of breast cancer screening.

  7. A novel image toggle tool for comparison of serial mammograms: automatic density normalization and alignment-development of the tool and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Fukuda, Wataru; Saida, Yukihisa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose is to develop a new image toggle tool with automatic density normalization (ADN) and automatic alignment (AA) for comparing serial digital mammograms (DMGs). We developed an ADN and AA process to compare the images of serial DMGs. In image density normalization, a linear interpolation was applied by taking two points of high- and low-brightness areas. The alignment was calculated by determining the point of the greatest correlation while shifting the alignment between the current and prior images. These processes were performed on a PC with a 3.20-GHz Xeon processor and 8 GB of main memory. We selected 12 suspected breast cancer patients who had undergone screening DMGs in the past. Automatic processing was retrospectively performed on these images. Two radiologists subjectively evaluated them. The process of the developed algorithm took approximately 1 s per image. In our preliminary experience, two images could not be aligned approximately. When they were aligned, image toggling allowed detection of differences between examinations easily. We developed a new tool to facilitate comparative reading of DMGs on a mammography viewing system. Using this tool for toggling comparisons might improve the interpretation efficiency of serial DMGs.

  8. Benefits of the quality assured double and arbitration reading of mammograms in the early diagnosis of breast cancer in symptomatic women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldmann, Annika; Katalinic, Alexander; Kapsimalakou, Smaragda; Grande-Nagel, Isabell; Barkhausen, Joerg; Vogt, Florian M.; Stoeckelhuber, Beate M.; Fischer, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    To address the benefits of double and arbitration reading regarding tumour detection rates, percentage of in situ tumours, and number (of patients) needed to send for expert reading (number needed to treat; NNT) for one additional tumour finding. QuaMaDi is a quality assured breast cancer diagnosis programme; with two-view mammography (craniocaudal, mediolateral oblique) and, in case of breast density ACR 3 or 4, routine ultrasound imaging; and with independent double reading of all images. A consecutive sample of symptomatic women, i.e. women at risk for breast cancer, women aged 70 and above, and/or women with preceding BI-RADS III findings, was analysed. 28,558 mammograms were performed (mean age of women: 57.3 [standard deviation: 12.3] years). Discordant findings were present in 3,837 double readings and were sent for arbitration reading. After histopathological assessment, 52 carcinomas were found (thereof 32% in situ). These carcinomas accounted for 1.8 tumours per 1,000 examinations in the total cohort and increased the tumour detection rate up to 16.4/1,000. The NNT in discordant cases was 74. Double and arbitration reading appears to be a useful tool to ensure the quality of early detection of breast lesions in symptomatic women during indication-based, standardised mammography. circle Quality assured breast cancer diagnosis is feasible outside organised screening structures. (orig.)

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  11. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality ...

  13. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  14. Morphologic abnormalities in 2-year-old children born after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection with preimplantation genetic screening : follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, Fenny; van der Heide, Maaike; Middelburg, Karin J.; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Breur, Rinske; van der Lee, Johanna H.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Bos, Arend F.; Kok, Joke H.

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) on morphologic outcome in children. Design: Follow-up of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Setting: University hospital. Patient(s): Two-year-old children born to mothers who participated in an RCT on the efficacy of

  15. Morphologic abnormalities in 2-year-old children born after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection with preimplantation genetic screening: follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, Fenny; van der Heide, Maaike; Middelburg, Karin J.; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Breur, Rinske; van der Lee, Johanna H.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Bos, Arend F.; Kok, Joke H.; Houtzager, Bregje A.; Repping, Sjoerd; Twisk, Moniek; van der Veen, Fulco; Haadsma, Maaike; Heineman, Maas Jan; van Hoften, Jacorina; Jongbloed-Pereboom, Marjolein; Keating, Paul; Seggers, Jorien

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) on morphologic outcome in children. Follow-up of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). University hospital. Two-year-old children born to mothers who participated in an RCT on the efficacy of PGS: 50 children born after in vitro

  16. Characteristics of Quoit filter, a digital filter developed for the extraction of circumscribed shadows, and its applications to mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Yoshiaki; Ohkubo, Natsumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Kobatake, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a newly developed filter called Quoit filter, which detects circumscribed shadows (concentric circular isolated image), like typical cancer regions. This Quoit filter is based on the mathematical morphology and is found to have interesting facts as follows. (1) Output of this filter can be analytically expressible when an input image is assumed to be a concentric circular model (output is expectable for typical inputs). (2) This filter has an ability to reconstruct original isolated models mentioned in (1) selectively, when this filter is applied sequentially twice. This filter was tested on the detection of cancer regions in X-ray mammograms, and for 12 cancer mammograms, this filter achieved a true-positive cancer detection rate of 100 %. (author)

  17. Is there a correlation between the presence of a spiculated mass on mammogram and luminal a subtype breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Song; Wu, Xiao Dong; Xu, Wen Jian; Lin, Qing; Liu, Xue Jun; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the appearance of a spiculated mass on a mammogram is associated with luminal A subtype breast cancer and the factors that may influence the presence or absence of the spiculated mass. Three hundred seventeen (317) patients who underwent image-guided or surgical biopsy between December 2014 and April 2015 were included in the study. Radiologists conducted retrospective assessments of the presence of spiculated masses according to the criteria of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. We used combinations of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki67 as surrogate markers to identify molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Pearson chi-square test was employed to measure statistical significance of correlations. Furthermore, we built a bi-variate logistic regression model to quantify the relative contribution of the factors that may influence the presence or absence of the spiculated mass. Seventy-one percent (71%) of the spiculated masses were classified as luminal A. Masses classified as luminal A were 10.3 times more likely to be presented as spiculated mass on a mammogram than all other subtypes. Patients with low Ki67 index (< 14%) and HER2 negative were most likely to present with a spiculated mass on their mammograms (p <0.001) than others. The hormone receptor status (ER and PR), pathology grade, overall breast composition, were all associated with the presence of a spiculated mass, but with less weight in contribution than Ki67 and HER2. We observed an association between the luminal A subtype of invasive breast cancer and the presence of a spiculated mass on a mammogram. It is hypothesized that lower Ki67 index and HER2 negativity may be the most significant factors in the presence of a spiculated mass

  18. Volumetric quantification of the effect of aging and hormone replacement therapy on breast composition from digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammann-Kloss, J.S.; Bick, U.; Fallenberg, E.; Engelken, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the physiological changes in breast composition with aging using volumetric breast composition measurement from digital mammograms and to assess the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Methods: A total of 764 consecutive mammograms of 208 non-HRT using women and 508 mammograms of 134 HRT-using women were analyzed using a volumetric breast composition assessment software (Quantra™, Hologic Inc.). Fibroglandular tissue volume (FTV), breast volume (BV), and percent density (PD) were measured. For statistical analysis, women were divided into a premenopausal (<46 years), a perimenopausal (46–55 years), and a postmenopausal (>55 years) age group. More detailed graphical analysis was performed using smaller age brackets. Women using HRT were compared to age-matched controls not using HRT. Results: Women in the postmenopausal age group had a significantly lower FTV and PD and a significantly higher BV than women in the premenopausal age group (FTV: 77 vs. 120 cm 3 , respectively; PD: 16% vs. 28%, respectively; BV 478 vs. 406 cm 3 , respectively; p < 0.01 for all). Median FTV was nearly stable in consecutive mammograms in the premenopausal and postmenopausal age groups, but declined at a rate of 3.9% per year in the perimenopausal period. Median PD was constant in the premenopausal and postmenopausal age groups and declined at a rate of 0.57% per year in the perimenopausal age group. BV continuously increased with age. Women using HRT throughout the study had a 5% higher PD than women not using HRT (22% vs. 17%, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Accurate knowledge of normal changes in breast composition are of particular interest nowadays due to the importance of breast density for breast cancer risk evaluation. FTV and PD change significantly during the perimenopausal period but remain relatively constant before and thereafter. Median total breast volume consistently increases with age and further contributes to changes in breast

  19. Is there a correlation between the presence of a spiculated mass on mammogram and luminal a subtype breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Song; Wu, Xiao Dong; Xu, Wen Jian; Lin, Qing; Liu, Xue Jun; Li, Ying [The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao (China)

    2016-11-15

    To determine whether the appearance of a spiculated mass on a mammogram is associated with luminal A subtype breast cancer and the factors that may influence the presence or absence of the spiculated mass. Three hundred seventeen (317) patients who underwent image-guided or surgical biopsy between December 2014 and April 2015 were included in the study. Radiologists conducted retrospective assessments of the presence of spiculated masses according to the criteria of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. We used combinations of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki67 as surrogate markers to identify molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Pearson chi-square test was employed to measure statistical significance of correlations. Furthermore, we built a bi-variate logistic regression model to quantify the relative contribution of the factors that may influence the presence or absence of the spiculated mass. Seventy-one percent (71%) of the spiculated masses were classified as luminal A. Masses classified as luminal A were 10.3 times more likely to be presented as spiculated mass on a mammogram than all other subtypes. Patients with low Ki67 index (< 14%) and HER2 negative were most likely to present with a spiculated mass on their mammograms (p <0.001) than others. The hormone receptor status (ER and PR), pathology grade, overall breast composition, were all associated with the presence of a spiculated mass, but with less weight in contribution than Ki67 and HER2. We observed an association between the luminal A subtype of invasive breast cancer and the presence of a spiculated mass on a mammogram. It is hypothesized that lower Ki67 index and HER2 negativity may be the most significant factors in the presence of a spiculated mass.

  20. Breast cancer screening: Evidence of the effect of adjunct ultrasound screening in women with unilateral mammography-negative dense breasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with the previous history of breast cancer are in risk of contralateral breast cancer. On the other hand, increased breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer and the sensitivity of detecting nonpalpable cancers in screening mammography in radiographically dense breasts is low. The use of ultrasonography in dense breast remains a controversial topic. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of routine ultrasonography in follow-up of women with the previous history of breast cancer and negative mammography but dense breasts. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 267 individuals with unilateral postmastectomy mammogram screened and 153 subjects assigned to study. There were 28 subjects with American College of Radiology (ACR breast density 2 and 125 with ACR breast density 3-4, which there was no new finding in their mammogram in comparison to previous studies. We assumed subjects with ACR breast density 3-4 as mammographic Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS category 0 for malignancy. Standard two-view mammogram was performed for all participants, and breast ultrasound (US examinations were performed by an expert radiologist in radial and anti-radial planes. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: The results showed that in subjects with ACR breast density 3-4, when there was no new density in two consecutive mammograms in comparison to previous studies, US also showed no possibility for malignancy (BI-RADS 1-2. And also in subjects with ACR breast density 2, when the mammographic results were BI-RADS 1-2, the US results was the same. Conclusion: Our data indicate that for the detection of breast cancer, sensitivity of US was not greater than mammography in patients with postmastectomy unilateral dense breast if there is not any new density.

  1. False Negative Mammogram of Breast Cancer : Analysis of Mammographic and Sonographic Findings and Correlation with Clinical Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kil Jun; Lee, Ji Yeon; Han, Sung Nim; Jeong, Seong Ki; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyoung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun

    1995-01-01

    Recent mammographic equipment have been of good quality and yielded high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of breast cancer. However, negative mammogram does not necessarily rule out breast cancer. Therefore were viewed cause of false negative mammography in confirmed breast cancer to improve diagnostic accuracy and for adequate clinical approach. We reviewed 19 cases of confirmed breast cancer, which showed false negative mammography with positive sonographic findings. Retrospective analysis was done by correlating the patient's age, sonographic finding and mass size, mammographic breast pattern and cause of false negative mammogram, and clinical symptoms. Among the 5 patients below 35 years in age, mass was not visible due to dense breast in 4 and due to small size in 1 case. In 14 patients over 35 years in age, 11 had normal mammographic findings, 4 had dense breast, and 7 had small sized mass. Remaining 3 cases showed asymmetric density in 2 and architecture distortion in 1 case. All showed mass lesion in sonography : ill defined malignant appearance in 14,well defined malignant appearance in 2, and well defined benign in 3 cases. Negative mammogram should be correlated with sonography in case of dense breast, below 35 years in age with palpable mass and under risk for breast cancer

  2. Analysis of utilization patterns and associated costs of the breast imaging and diagnostic procedures after screening mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahiotis A

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Anna Vlahiotis,1 Brian Griffin,2 A Thomas Stavros,3 Jay Margolis1 1Value Based Care, Outcomes Research, Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, Bethesda, MD USA; 2Value Based Care, Outcomes Research, Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Seno Medical Instruments, Inc., San Antonio, TX, USA Background: Little data exist on real-world patterns and associated costs of downstream breast diagnostic procedures following an abnormal screening mammography or clinical exam.Objectives: To analyze the utilization patterns in real-world clinical settings for breast imaging and diagnostic procedures, including the frequency and volume of patients and procedures, procedure sequencing, and associated health care expenditures.Materials and methods: Using medical claims from 2011 to 2015 MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Databases, adult females with breast imaging/diagnostic procedures (diagnostic mammography, ultrasound, molecular breast imaging, tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, or biopsy other than screening mammography were selected. Continuous health plan coverage without breast diagnostic procedures was required for ≥13 months before the first found breast diagnostic procedure (index event, with a 13-month post-index follow-up period. Key outcomes included diagnostic procedure volumes, sequences, and payments. Results reported descriptively were projected to provide US national patient and procedure volumes.Results: The final sample of 875,526 patients was nationally projected to 12,394,432 patients annually receiving 8,732,909 diagnostic mammograms (53.3% of patients, 6,987,399 breast ultrasounds (42.4% of patients, and 1,585,856 biopsies (10.3% of patients. Following initial diagnostic procedures, 49.4% had second procedures, 20.1% followed with third procedures, and 10.0% had a fourth procedure. Mean (SD costs for diagnostic mammograms of US$349 ($493, ultrasounds US$132 ($134, and biopsies US$1,938 ($2,343 contributed

  3. A novel featureless approach to mass detection in digital mammograms based on support vector machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanini, Renato [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Dongiovanni, Danilo [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Iampieri, Emiro [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Lanconelli, Nico [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Masotti, Matteo [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Palermo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Riccardi, Alessandro [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Roffilli, Matteo [Department of Computer Science, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2004-03-21

    In this work, we present a novel approach to mass detection in digital mammograms. The great variability of the appearance of masses is the main obstacle to building a mass detection method. It is indeed demanding to characterize all the varieties of masses with a reduced set of features. Hence, in our approach we have chosen not to extract any feature, for the detection of the region of interest; in contrast, we exploit all the information available on the image. A multiresolution overcomplete wavelet representation is performed, in order to codify the image with redundancy of information. The vectors of the very-large space obtained are then provided to a first support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The detection task is considered here as a two-class pattern recognition problem: crops are classified as suspect or not, by using this SVM classifier. False candidates are eliminated with a second cascaded SVM. To further reduce the number of false positives, an ensemble of experts is applied: the final suspect regions are achieved by using a voting strategy. The sensitivity of the presented system is nearly 80% with a false-positive rate of 1.1 marks per image, estimated on images coming from the USF DDSM database.

  4. Iso-precision scaling of digitized mammograms to facilitate image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karssmeijer, N.; van Erning, L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a 12 bit CCD camera equipped with a linear sensor of 4096 photodiodes which is used to digitize conventional mammographic films. An iso-precision conversion of the pixel values is preformed to transform the image data to a scale on which the image noise is equal at each level. For this purpose film noise and digitization noise have been determined as a function of optical density and pixel size. It appears that only at high optical densities digitization noise is comparable to or larger than film noise. The quantization error caused by compression of images recorded with 12 bits per pixel to 8 bit images by an iso-precision conversion has been calculated as a function of the number of quantization levels. For mammograms digitized in a 4096 2 matrix the additional error caused by such a scale transform is only about 1.5 percent. An iso-precision scale transform can be advantageous when automated procedures for quantitative image analysis are developed. Especially when detection of signals in noise is aimed at, a constant noise level over the whole pixel value range is very convenient. This is demonstrated by applying local thresholding to detect small microcalcifications. Results are compared to those obtained by using logarithmic or linearized scales

  5. Study on Compression Induced Contrast in X-ray Mammograms Using Breast Mimicking Phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. M. Aowlad Hossain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray mammography is commonly used to scan cancer or tumors in breast using low dose x-rays. But mammograms suffer from low contrast problem. The breast is compressed in mammography to reduce x-ray scattering effects. As tumors are stiffer than normal tissues, they undergo smaller deformation under compression. Therefore, image intensity at tumor region may change less than the background tissues. In this study, we try to find out compression induced contrast from multiple mammographic images of tumorous breast phantoms taken with different compressions. This is an extended work of our previous simulation study with experiment and more analysis. We have used FEM models for synthetic phantom and constructed a phantom using agar and n-propanol for simulation and experiment. The x-ray images of deformed phantoms have been obtained under three compression steps and a non-rigid registration technique has been applied to register these images. It is noticeably observed that the image intensity changes at tumor are less than those at surrounding which induce a detectable contrast. Addition of this compression induced contrast to the simulated and experimental images has improved their original contrast by a factor of about 1.4

  6. Mass-Like Fibrocystic Disease of the Breast : Characteristic Findings on Mammogram and Sonogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIm, Hyeon Hee; Yun, Duk Hee; Hwang, Ho Kyumg; Kim, Jang Min; Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Jung Hee

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic features of mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast to differentiate from other breast mass. We retrospectively analyzed characteristics mammographic(16 cases) and sonographic findings(39 cases) of histopathologically proven mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast in 39 patients. Of 16 patients with mammogram, mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast was round shape in 12 cases, high density in 14 cases.The margin of the mass was well marginated in 8 cases, poorly marginated in 8 cases. The calcification within the mass was not detected in 13 cases. In 39 patients with sonogram, mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast was mostly ovoid shape in 24 cases, hypoechoic in 23 cases, with homogenous internal echo in 36 cases, well defined in 28 cases, and with equivocal posterior shadowing in 26 cases. The T/AP ratios of the mass was not less than 1.5 in 29 cases. The bilateral edge-shadowing of the mass was not noted in 24 cases. Characteristic findings of the mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast are round shape, high density, well defined mass on mammograrn and ovoid shape, homogeneous internal echo, well marginated mass on sonogram which were similar to those in other benign lesion. Mass-like fibrocystic disease, which in a frequent cause of breast lumps, should be included in the differential diagnosis of breast mass with benign mammographic and/or sonographic findings

  7. Mass-Like Fibrocystic Disease of the Breast : Characteristic Findings on Mammogram and Sonogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Hyeon Hee; Yun, Duk Hee; Hwang, Ho Kyumg; Kim, Jang Min; Kim, Young Sun; Lee, Jung Hee [Kwang Myung Sung Ae Hospital, Gwangmyeong (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic features of mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast to differentiate from other breast mass. We retrospectively analyzed characteristics mammographic(16 cases) and sonographic findings(39 cases) of histopathologically proven mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast in 39 patients. Of 16 patients with mammogram, mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast was round shape in 12 cases, high density in 14 cases.The margin of the mass was well marginated in 8 cases, poorly marginated in 8 cases. The calcification within the mass was not detected in 13 cases. In 39 patients with sonogram, mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast was mostly ovoid shape in 24 cases, hypoechoic in 23 cases, with homogenous internal echo in 36 cases, well defined in 28 cases, and with equivocal posterior shadowing in 26 cases. The T/AP ratios of the mass was not less than 1.5 in 29 cases. The bilateral edge-shadowing of the mass was not noted in 24 cases. Characteristic findings of the mass-like fibrocystic disease of the breast are round shape, high density, well defined mass on mammograrn and ovoid shape, homogeneous internal echo, well marginated mass on sonogram which were similar to those in other benign lesion. Mass-like fibrocystic disease, which in a frequent cause of breast lumps, should be included in the differential diagnosis of breast mass with benign mammographic and/or sonographic findings

  8. An automatic system to discriminate malignant from benign massive lesions on mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retico, A.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Kasae, P.

    2006-01-01

    Mammography is widely recognized as the most reliable technique for early detection of breast cancers. Automated or semi-automated computerized classification schemes can be very useful in assisting radiologists with a second opinion about the visual diagnosis of breast lesions, thus leading to a reduction in the number of unnecessary biopsies. We present a computer-aided diagnosis (CADi) system for the characterization of massive lesions in mammograms, whose aim is to distinguish malignant from benign masses. The CADi system we realized is based on a three-stage algorithm: (a) a segmentation technique extracts the contours of the massive lesion from the image; (b) 16 features based on size and shape of the lesion are computed; (c) a neural classifier merges the features into an estimated likelihood of malignancy. A data set of 226 massive lesions (109 malignant and 117 benign) has been used in this study. The system performances have been evaluated in terms of the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, obtaining A z =0.80+/-0.04 as the estimated area under the ROC curve

  9. An SVM classifier to separate false signals from microcalcifications in digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, Armando; Bollini, Dante; Brancaccio, Rosa; Campanini, Renato; Riccardi, Alessandro; Romani, Davide [Department of Physics, University of Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Lanconelli, Nico [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy). E-mail: nico.lanconelli@bo.infn.it; Bevilacqua, Alessandro [Department of Electronics, Computer Science and Systems, University of Bologna, and INFN, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the feasibility of using an SVM (support vector machine) classifier in our automatic system for the detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital mammograms. SVM is a technique for pattern recognition which relies on the statistical learning theory. It minimizes a function of two terms: the number of misclassified vectors of the training set and a term regarding the generalization classifier capability. We compare the SVM classifier with an MLP (multi-layer perceptron) in the false-positive reduction phase of our detection scheme: a detected signal is considered either microcalcification or false signal, according to the value of a set of its features. The SVM classifier gets slightly better results than the MLP one (Az value of 0.963 against 0.958) in the presence of a high number of training data; the improvement becomes much more evident (Az value of 0.952 against 0.918) in training sets of reduced size. Finally, the setting of the SVM classifier is much easier than the MLP one. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional reconstruction of clustered microcalcifications from two digitized mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotzka, Rainer; Mueller, Tim O.; Epper, Wolfgang; Gemmeke, Hartmut

    1998-06-01

    X-ray mammography is one of the most significant diagnosis methods in early detection of breast cancer. Usually two X- ray images from different angles are taken from each mamma to make even overlapping structures visible. X-ray mammography has a very high spatial resolution and can show microcalcifications of 50 - 200 micron in size. Clusters of microcalcifications are one of the most important and often the only indicator for malignant tumors. These calcifications are in some cases extremely difficult to detect. Computer assisted diagnosis of digitized mammograms may improve detection and interpretation of microcalcifications and cause more reliable diagnostic findings. We build a low-cost mammography workstation to detect and classify clusters of microcalcifications and tissue densities automatically. New in this approach is the estimation of the 3D formation of segmented microcalcifications and its visualization which will put additional diagnostic information at the radiologists disposal. The real problem using only two or three projections for reconstruction is the big loss of volume information. Therefore the arrangement of a cluster is estimated using only the positions of segmented microcalcifications. The arrangement of microcalcifications is visualized to the physician by rotating.

  11. A deep learning approach for the analysis of masses in mammograms with minimal user intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, Neeraj; Carneiro, Gustavo; Bradley, Andrew P

    2017-04-01

    We present an integrated methodology for detecting, segmenting and classifying breast masses from mammograms with minimal user intervention. This is a long standing problem due to low signal-to-noise ratio in the visualisation of breast masses, combined with their large variability in terms of shape, size, appearance and location. We break the problem down into three stages: mass detection, mass segmentation, and mass classification. For the detection, we propose a cascade of deep learning methods to select hypotheses that are refined based on Bayesian optimisation. For the segmentation, we propose the use of deep structured output learning that is subsequently refined by a level set method. Finally, for the classification, we propose the use of a deep learning classifier, which is pre-trained with a regression to hand-crafted feature values and fine-tuned based on the annotations of the breast mass classification dataset. We test our proposed system on the publicly available INbreast dataset and compare the results with the current state-of-the-art methodologies. This evaluation shows that our system detects 90% of masses at 1 false positive per image, has a segmentation accuracy of around 0.85 (Dice index) on the correctly detected masses, and overall classifies masses as malignant or benign with sensitivity (Se) of 0.98 and specificity (Sp) of 0.7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Classification of findings in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamilo, M; Lönnqvist, J; Halttunen, A

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to find out if it is possible, by classifying screening mammograms according to the likelihood of malignancy, to divide the recalled women to a group in which there is high suspicion of malignancy, most having breast cancers, and a group with more obscure findings. DE...... a few will be proven to have breast cancer. The invitation procedure for the further studies should be improved on this basis of minimising anxiety among recalled women.......STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to find out if it is possible, by classifying screening mammograms according to the likelihood of malignancy, to divide the recalled women to a group in which there is high suspicion of malignancy, most having breast cancers, and a group with more obscure findings...... breast cancer. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--All cases classified as 5, 60% of the cases classified as 4, 6.5% of the cases classified as 3, 0% of the cases classified as 2 or 1, and 1.2% of the cases classified as 0 proved to have breast cancers. However classification 5 represented 5.9% of all...

  13. Mammography screening among Arab American women in metropolitan Detroit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kendra; Fakhouri, Monty; Bartoces, Monina; Monsur, Joseph; Younis, Amani

    2008-12-01

    Mammography screening behavior has not been well studied among Middle Eastern immigrant women. We conducted a telephone survey of 365 Arab American women residing in metropolitan Detroit, home to one of the largest populations of Middle Eastern immigrants in the US, to determine prevalence of factors associated with mammography, and attitudes and beliefs regarding mammography screening. Of 365 participants, only five were born in the US. Mean age was 53.2 years (SD 10.8). Two hundred twelve (58.1%) reported having mammogram every 1-2 years; 70% ever had mammogram. Age 50-64 years, having health insurance, married status, being in the US over 10 years, and being Lebanese were associated with mammography every 1-2 years. After adjusting for demographic factors, perceived seriousness of disease, general health motivation, and having fewer barriers were associated with more frequent screening. Appropriate mammography screening is decreased in this group. Targeted outreach regarding screening is appropriate for this population; however, lack of insurance may prevent adequate follow-up.

  14. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression Screening Substance Abuse Screening Alcohol Use Screening Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  15. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  16. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.).

  17. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  18. Potential impact of legislation mandating breast density notification: benefits, harms, and cost effectiveness of supplemental ultrasound screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Brian L.; Stout, Natasha K.; Schechter, Clyde; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Cevik, Mucahit; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Lee, Christoph I.; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; de Koning, Harry J.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Lehman, Constance D.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background At least nineteen states have laws that require telling women with dense breasts and a negative screening mammogram to consider supplemental screening. The most readily available supplemental screening modality is ultrasound, yet little is known about its effectiveness. Objective To evaluate the benefits, harms, and cost-effectiveness of supplemental ultrasound screening for women with dense breasts. Design Comparative modeling with 3 validated simulation models. Data Sources Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium; the medical literature. Target Population A contemporary cohort of women eligible for routine screening. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Payer. Interventions Supplemental ultrasound screening for women with dense breasts following a negative screening mammogram. Outcome Measures Breast cancer deaths averted, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, false positive ultrasound biopsy recommendations, costs, costs per QALY gained. Results of Base-Case Analysis Supplemental ultrasound screening after a negative mammogram for women aged 50–74 with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts averted 0.36 additional breast cancer deaths (range across models: 0.14–0.75), gained 1.7 QALYs (0.9–4.7), and resulted in 354 false-positive ultrasound biopsy recommendations (345–421) per 1000 women with dense breasts compared with biennial screening by mammography alone. The cost-effectiveness ratio was $325,000 per QALY gained ($112,000-$766,000). Restricting supplemental ultrasound screening to women with extremely dense breasts cost $246,000 per QALY gained ($74,000-$535,000). Results of Sensitivity Analysis The conclusions were not sensitive to ultrasound performance characteristics, screening frequency, or starting age. Limitations Provider costs for coordinating supplemental ultrasound were not considered. Conclusions Supplemental ultrasound screening for women with dense breasts undergoing

  19. Human observer detection experiments with mammograms and power-law noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Judy, Philip F.

    2001-01-01

    We determined contrast thresholds for lesion detection as a function of lesion size in both mammograms and filtered noise backgrounds with the same average power spectrum, P(f )=B/f 3 . Experiments were done using hybrid images with digital images of tumors added to digitized normal backgrounds, displayed on a monochrome monitor. Four tumors were extracted from digitized specimen radiographs. The lesion sizes were varied by digital rescaling to cover the range from 0.5 to 16 mm. Amplitudes were varied to determine the value required for 92% correct detection in two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) and 90% for search experiments. Three observers participated, two physicists and a radiologist. The 2AFC mammographic results demonstrated a novel contrast-detail (CD) diagram with threshold amplitudes that increased steadily (with slope of 0.3) with increasing size for lesions larger than 1 mm. The slopes for prewhitening model observers were about 0.4. Human efficiency relative to these models was as high as 90%. The CD diagram slopes for the 2AFC experiments with filtered noise were 0.44 for humans and 0.5 for models. Human efficiency relative to the ideal observer was about 40%. The difference in efficiencies for the two types of backgrounds indicates that breast structure cannot be considered to be pure random noise for 2AFC experiments. Instead, 2AFC human detection with mammographic backgrounds is limited by a combination of noise and deterministic masking effects. The search experiments also gave thresholds that increased with lesion size. However, there was no difference in human results for mammographic and filtered noise backgrounds, suggesting that breast structure can be considered to be pure random noise for this task. Our conclusion is that, in spite of the fact that mammographic backgrounds have nonstationary statistics, models based on statistical decision theory can still be applied successfully to estimate human performance

  20. Volumetric Mammogram Assessment: A Helpful Tool in the Treatment of Breast Asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimman, Oscar A; Butto, Carlos D; Rostagno, Román; Rostagno, Camila

    2017-12-01

    The surgical approach to breast asymmetry depends on several factors, including the surgeon's experience, the anatomy of the patient, and several methods that may help to choose a technique and define the size of the implant or the amount of breast tissue to be excised. The aim of this study is to assist in evaluation of breast volumes with the Quantra™ software application, intended for use with Hologic™ digital mammography systems. Twenty-eight women were studied with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with the Quantra™ software application, for use with Hologic™ digital mammography systems preoperatively. The case diagnoses were as follows: breast hypertrophy, ptosis, hypoplasia, and reconstruction, and the surgeries included breast reduction, mastopexy, mastopexy and breast reduction, mastoplasty and breast augmentation, breast augmentation, and immediate or delayed breast reconstruction. Patients were evaluated from 6 to 18 months after surgery. Volumetric mammogram studies help to decide the amount of tissue to be excised, the size of the implants, and the combination of both. The results of this study were evaluated by surgeons and patients and found to be highly satisfactory. The use of full-field digital mammography with adequate software should be considered as another tool to assist in making decisions regarding the correction of breast asymmetries. Level of Evidence IV This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  1. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use......Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  2. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  3. Differences in Knowledge of Breast Cancer Screening Among African American, Arab American, and Latina Women

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Karen Patricia; Mabiso, Athur; Todem, David; Hammad, Adnan; Hamade, Hiam; Hill-Ashford, Yolanda; Robinson-Lockett, Murlisa; Palamisono, Gloria; Zambrana, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We examined differences in knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with 3 types of breast cancer screening (breast self-examination, clinical breast examination, and mammogram) among African American, Arab, and Latina women. Methods Community health workers used a community-based intervention to recruit 341 women (112 Arab, 113 Latina, and 116 African American) in southeastern Michigan to participate in a breast cancer prevention intervention from August through October 20...

  4. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  5. Impact of intermediate mammography assessment on the likelihood of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascunce, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Instituto de Salud Publica, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Ederra, Maria; Delfrade, Josu; Erdozain, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Baroja, Araceli [Fundacion Rioja Salud, Logrono (Spain); Zubizarreta, Raquel [Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Galicia (Spain); Salas, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Castells, Xavier [Mar Teaching Hospital, CIBERESP, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Breast cancer screening is offered to 100% of the target population in Spain and intermediate mammograms (IMs) are sometimes indicated. This study was aimed at analysing the frequency of IMs, the factors determining their recommendation, and their impact on the risk of false-positive results and the detection rate. Data from 3,471,307 mammograms from Spanish breast cancer screening programmes were included. 3.36% of the mammograms were IMs. The factors associated with the use of IMs were age, initial screening, previous invasive tests, a familial history of breast cancer and use of hormone replacement therapy. In screening episodes with an IM, the probability of a false-positive result was 13.74% (95% CI: 13.43-14.05), almost double that in episodes without IMs (6.02%, 95% CI 5.99-6.05). In young women with previous invasive procedures, a familial history of breast cancer or hormone replacement therapy use who were undergoing their initial screen, this probability was lower when IMs were performed. IMs always increased the detection rate. The factors prompting IMs should be characterised so that radiologists can systematise their recommendations according to the presence of the factors maximising the benefits and minimising the adverse effects of this procedure. (orig.)

  6. Impact of intermediate mammography assessment on the likelihood of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascunce, Nieves; Ederra, Maria; Delfrade, Josu; Erdozain, Nieves; Baroja, Araceli; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Salas, Dolores; Castells, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer screening is offered to 100% of the target population in Spain and intermediate mammograms (IMs) are sometimes indicated. This study was aimed at analysing the frequency of IMs, the factors determining their recommendation, and their impact on the risk of false-positive results and the detection rate. Data from 3,471,307 mammograms from Spanish breast cancer screening programmes were included. 3.36% of the mammograms were IMs. The factors associated with the use of IMs were age, initial screening, previous invasive tests, a familial history of breast cancer and use of hormone replacement therapy. In screening episodes with an IM, the probability of a false-positive result was 13.74% (95% CI: 13.43-14.05), almost double that in episodes without IMs (6.02%, 95% CI 5.99-6.05). In young women with previous invasive procedures, a familial history of breast cancer or hormone replacement therapy use who were undergoing their initial screen, this probability was lower when IMs were performed. IMs always increased the detection rate. The factors prompting IMs should be characterised so that radiologists can systematise their recommendations according to the presence of the factors maximising the benefits and minimising the adverse effects of this procedure. (orig.)

  7. Design and evaluation of a theory-based, culturally relevant outreach model for breast and cervical cancer screening for Latina immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kari; Garces, Isabel C; Bandura, Lisa; McGuire, Allison A; Scarinci, Isabel C

    2012-01-01

    Breast and cervical cancer are common among Latinas, but screening rates among foreign-born Latinas are relatively low. In this article we describe the design and implementation of a theory-based (PEN-3) outreach program to promote breast and cervical cancer screening to Latina immigrants, and evaluate the program's effectiveness. We used data from self-administered questionnaires completed at six annual outreach events to examine the sociodemographic characteristics of attendees and evaluate whether the program reached the priority population - foreign-born Latina immigrants with limited access to health care and screening services. To evaluate the program's effectiveness in connecting women to screening, we examined the proportion and characteristics of women who scheduled and attended Pap smear and mammography appointments. Among the 782 Latinas who attended the outreach program, 60% and 83% had not had a Pap smear or mammogram, respectively, in at least a year. Overall, 80% scheduled a Pap smear and 78% scheduled a mammogram. Women without insurance, who did not know where to get screening and had not been screened in the last year were more likely to schedule appointments (P < .05). Among women who scheduled appointments, 65% attended their Pap smear and 79% attended the mammogram. We did not identify significant differences in sociodemographic characteristics associated with appointment attendance. Using a theoretical approach to outreach design and implementation, it is possible to reach a substantial number of Latina immigrants and connect them to cancer screening services.

  8. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  9. Area and volumetric density estimation in processed full-field digital mammograms for risk assessment of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Cheddad

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mammographic density, the white radiolucent part of a mammogram, is a marker of breast cancer risk and mammographic sensitivity. There are several means of measuring mammographic density, among which are area-based and volumetric-based approaches. Current volumetric methods use only unprocessed, raw mammograms, which is a problematic restriction since such raw mammograms are normally not stored. We describe fully automated methods for measuring both area and volumetric mammographic density from processed images. METHODS: The data set used in this study comprises raw and processed images of the same view from 1462 women. We developed two algorithms for processed images, an automated area-based approach (CASAM-Area and a volumetric-based approach (CASAM-Vol. The latter method was based on training a random forest prediction model with image statistical features as predictors, against a volumetric measure, Volpara, for corresponding raw images. We contrast the three methods, CASAM-Area, CASAM-Vol and Volpara directly and in terms of association with breast cancer risk and a known genetic variant for mammographic density and breast cancer, rs10995190 in the gene ZNF365. Associations with breast cancer risk were evaluated using images from 47 breast cancer cases and 1011 control subjects. The genetic association analysis was based on 1011 control subjects. RESULTS: All three measures of mammographic density were associated with breast cancer risk and rs10995190 (p0.10 for risk, p>0.03 for rs10995190. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that it is possible to obtain reliable automated measures of volumetric and area mammographic density from processed digital images. Area and volumetric measures of density on processed digital images performed similar in terms of risk and genetic association.

  10. Travel Times for Screening Mammography: Impact of Geographic Expansion by a Large Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Liang, Yu; Duszak, Richard; Recht, Michael P

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of off-campus facility expansion by a large academic health system on patient travel times for screening mammography. Screening mammograms performed from 2013 to 2015 and associated patient demographics were identified using the NYU Langone Medical Center Enterprise Data Warehouse. During this time, the system's number of mammography facilities increased from 6 to 19, reflecting expansion beyond Manhattan throughout the New York metropolitan region. Geocoding software was used to estimate driving times from patients' homes to imaging facilities. For 147,566 screening mammograms, the mean estimated patient travel time was 19.9 ± 15.2 minutes. With facility expansion, travel times declined significantly (P travel times between such subgroups. However, travel times to pre-expansion facilities remained stable (initial: 26.8 ± 18.9 minutes, final: 26.7 ± 18.6 minutes). Among women undergoing mammography before and after expansion, travel times were shorter for the postexpansion mammogram in only 6.3%, but this rate varied significantly (all P travel burden and reduce travel time variation among sociodemographic populations. Nonetheless, existing patients strongly tend to return to established facilities despite potentially shorter travel time locations, suggesting strong site loyalty. Variation in travel times likely relates to various factors other than facility proximity. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of California's Breast Density Notification Legislation on Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Stephanie Lynn; Alabaster, Amy; Luikart, Karin; Brenman, Leslie Manace; Habel, Laurel A

    2017-04-01

    Half of US states mandate women be notified if they have dense breasts on their mammogram, yet guidelines and data on supplemental screening modalities are limited. Breast density (BD) refers to the extent that breast tissue appears radiographically dense on mammograms. High BD reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography and increases breast cancer risk. The aim of this study was to determine the potential impact of California's 2013 BD notification legislation on breast cancer screening patterns. We conducted a cohort study of women aged 40 to 74 years who were members of a large Northern California integrated health plan (approximately 3.9 million members) in 2011-2015. We calculated pre- and post-legislation rates of screening mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also examined whether women with dense breasts (defined as BI-RADS density c or d) had higher MRI rates than women with nondense breasts (defined as BI-RADS density a or b). After adjustment for race/ethnicity, age, body mass index, medical facility, neighborhood median income, and cancer history, there was a relative 6.6% decrease (relative risk [RR] 0.934, confidence interval [CI] 0.92-0.95) in the rate of screening mammography, largely driven by a decrease among women screening MRI, with the greatest increase among the youngest women. In the postlegislation period, women with extremely dense breasts (BI-RADS d) had 2.77 times (CI 1.93-3.95) the odds of a MRI within 9 months of a screening mammogram compared with women with nondense breasts (BI-RADS b). In this setting, MRI rates increased in the postlegislation period. In addition, women with higher BD were more likely to have supplementary MRI. The decrease in mammography rates seen primarily among younger women may have been due to changes in national screening guidelines.

  12. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  13. Computerized image analysis: Texture-field orientation method for pectoral muscle identification on MLO-view mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chuan; Wei Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Douglas, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new texture-field orientation (TFO) method that combines a priori knowledge, local and global information for the automated identification of pectoral muscle on mammograms. Methods: The authors designed a gradient-based directional kernel (GDK) filter to enhance the linear texture structures, and a gradient-based texture analysis to extract a texture orientation image that represented the dominant texture orientation at each pixel. The texture orientation image was enhanced by a second GDK filter for ridge point extraction. The extracted ridge points were validated and the ridges that were less likely to lie on the pectoral boundary were removed automatically. A shortest-path finding method was used to generate a probability image that represented the likelihood that each remaining ridge point lay on the true pectoral boundary. Finally, the pectoral boundary was tracked by searching for the ridge points with the highest probability lying on the pectoral boundary. A data set of 130 MLO-view digitized film mammograms (DFMs) from 65 patients was used to train the TFO algorithm. An independent data set of 637 MLO-view DFMs from 562 patients was used to evaluate its performance. Another independent data set of 92 MLO-view full field digital mammograms (FFDMs) from 92 patients was used to assess the adaptability of the TFO algorithm to FFDMs. The pectoral boundary detection accuracy of the TFO method was quantified by comparison with an experienced radiologist's manually drawn pectoral boundary using three performance metrics: The percent overlap area (POA), the Hausdorff distance (Hdist), and the average distance (AvgDist). Results: The mean and standard deviation of POA, Hdist, and AvgDist were 95.0±3.6%, 3.45±2.16 mm, and 1.12±0.82 mm, respectively. For the POA measure, 91.5%, 97.3%, and 98.9% of the computer detected pectoral muscles had POA larger than 90%, 85%, and 80%, respectively. For the distance measures, 85.4% and 98.0% of the

  14. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Umbilical cord abnormalities Umbilical cord abnormalities Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. ... blood supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where ...

  16. Utility of supplemental screening with breast ultrasound in asymptomatic women with dense breast tissue who are not at high risk for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Klevos, Geetika A; Collado-Mesa, Fernando; Net, Jose M; Yepes, Monica M

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results of an initial round of supplemental screening with hand-held bilateral breast ultrasound following a negative screening mammogram in asymptomatic women with dense breast tissue who are not at high risk for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, Institutional Research Board approved study was performed at a single academic tertiary breast center. Informed consent was waived. A system...

  17. Does computer-aided detection have a role in the arbitration of discordant double-reading opinions in a breast-screening programme?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, J.J.; Cornford, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether a computer-aided detection (CAD) system could act as an arbitrator of discordant double-reading opinions, replacing the need for an independent third film reader. Methods: The mammograms of the 240 women that underwent arbitration by an independent third reader were identified from the 16,629 women attending our screening centre between July 2003 and April 2004. Mammograms of the arbitration cases were digitized and analysed by a CAD system. To assess the ability of CAD to act as the arbitrator, the site of the CAD prompts was retrospectively compared to the site of any abnormality noted by the original film readers. If a CAD prompt was placed on a region marked by one of the film readers then the decision of CAD as the arbitrator was that the women should be recalled for further assessment. If no mark was placed then the region was considered low risk and the decision was not to recall. The decision of CAD as the arbitrator was retrospectively compared with the original recall decision of the independent third reader. Results: There were 21 cancer cases in the group of women undergoing arbitration, diagnosed both at the original screening episode and subsequently. The independent third reader recalled 15/18 (83%) of the cancers that corresponded with the arbitrated lesion. CAD as the arbitrator would have recalled 16/18 (89%) of the cancers that corresponded to the arbitrated lesion. CAD acting as the arbitrator would have resulted in a significant increase in normal women being recalled to assessment in the arbitration group (P < 0.001). The extra 50 recalls would have potentially increased the overall recall rate to assessment from 3.1 to 3.4%; a relative increase of 10%. Conclusions: The main effect of CAD acting as an arbitrator of discordant double-reading opinions is to increase the recall rate, significantly above what is found when arbitration is performed by an independent third reader. Using CAD as an arbitrator may be an

  18. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sickles, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Mammography is generally accepted as a useful problem-solving clinical tool in characterizing known breast lesions, so that appropriate and timely treatment can be given. However, it remains grossly underutilized at what it does best: screening. The major strengths of mammography are (a) its ability to detect breast cancer at a smaller, potentially more curable stage than any other examination, and (b) its proved efficacy in reducing breast cancer mortality in asymptomatic women aged 40-74. If, as has recently been estimated, screening with mammography and physical examination can be expected to lower breast cancer deaths by 40%-50% among those actually examined (13), then the lives of almost 20,000 U.S. women might be saved each year if screening were to become very widely used. The challenges of the next decade are clear, to mount much more effective campaigns to educate physicians and lay women about the life-saving benefits of breast cancer screening, to devise increasingly effective and lower cost screening strategies, to further improve the current high quality of mammographic imaging despite its increasing proliferation, and to train large numbers of breast imaging specialists to guarantee that the growing case load of screening and problem-solving mammograms is interpreted with a very high level of skill

  19. Abnormal cervical cytology and health care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm; Baillet, Miguel Vázquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the long-term use of health care services in women with abnormal cytology results compared to women with normal cytology results. METHODS: We did a nationwide population-based study, using women aged 23 to 59years participating in the national organized...... cervical cancer screening program. We included a study population of 40,153 women with abnormal cytology (exposed) and 752,627 women with normal cytology (non-exposed). We retrieved data from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Pathology Data Bank, the National Health Service, the National......" the cytology result and for the 5-year period "after" the result. RESULTS: During the "before" period exposed women had more contacts to GPs, more contacts to psychologists/psychiatrist, and more hospital admissions than non-exposed women. In both exposed and non-exposed women, health care use increased from...

  20. Normal and abnormal growth plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Madewell, J.E.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Skeletal growth is a dynamic process. A knowledge of the structure and function of the normal growth plate is essential in order to understand the pathophysiology of abnormal skeletal growth in various diseases. In this well-illustrated article, the authors provide a radiographic classification of abnormal growth plates and discuss mechanisms that lead to growth plate abnormalities

  1. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Cuckle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs, chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening.

  3. Mammography Screening Uptake among Female Health Care Workers in Primary Health Care Centers in Palestine - Motivators and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, Zaher; Sholi, Hisham; Sholi, Suha; Sholi, Mohammad; Lahaseh, Rawya

    2016-01-01

    Early detection remains the cornerstone of breast cancer control in terms of outcome and survival. Thus far the only breast cancer screening method proven effective is mammography. The awareness of female health care workers (HCW) about breast cancer prevention is of vital importance, as their beliefs and behavior may have a major impact on other women. This study was designed to assess mammography screening uptake among female healthcare workers at primary healthcare centers, and to identify the primary motivators and barriers that affect uptake results. A cross sectional study design was used to assess mammography screening by 299 female healthcare workers who completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed demographics, screening uptake, motivators and barriers. The mean age was 46 years (within age of risk). The majority (95.1%) demonstrated adequate knowledge about breast cancer and mammography screening and 50% of the participants reported having at least one mammogram; however only 21% of them had regularly scheduled mammograms. The most frequent reported motivator was the perceived benefit that early detection of breast cancer is important for its management (89.6%), followed by the belief that mammography can detect breast cancer before its symptoms appear (84.4%). On the other hand, the most frequent barrier reported was being busy (46.7%), followed by the lack of perceived susceptibility (41.5%). Mammography screening was found to be sub-optimal in a population of HCW's with 50 % stating that they received a mammogram at least once, and a minority reported regular screening. There is a pressing need for educational programs aimed at removing the barriers that limit compliance with recommendations for mammography screening, and to emphasize the importance of early detection in breast cancer treatment. Ensuring the availability and accessibility of screening services, particularly for healthcare workers within their work settings are other

  4. Psychosocial predictors of first attendance for organised mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; de Koning, H J; Absetz, P

    1999-01-01

    Scale, Illness Attitude Scale, Health Locus of Control Scale, Anxiety Inventory, and Depression Inventory. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to predict attendance. RESULTS: Those most likely to attend were working, middle income, and averagely educated women, who had...... not had a mass mammogram recently, but who regularly visited gynaecologists, attended for Pap smear screening, practised breast self examination, and who did not smoke. Low confidence in their own capabilities in breast cancer prevention, overoptimism about the sensitivity of mammography, and perception...

  5. iPixel: a visual content-based and semantic search engine for retrieving digitized mammograms by using collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alor-Hernández, Giner; Pérez-Gallardo, Yuliana; Posada-Gómez, Rubén; Cortes-Robles, Guillermo; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Aguilar-Laserre, Alberto A

    2012-09-01

    Nowadays, traditional search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing facilitate the retrieval of information in the format of images, but the results are not always useful for the users. This is mainly due to two problems: (1) the semantic keywords are not taken into consideration and (2) it is not always possible to establish a query using the image features. This issue has been covered in different domains in order to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. The expert community has focussed their attention on the healthcare domain, where a lot of visual information for medical analysis is available. This paper provides a solution called iPixel Visual Search Engine, which involves semantics and content issues in order to search for digitized mammograms. iPixel offers the possibility of retrieving mammogram features using collective intelligence and implementing a CBIR algorithm. Our proposal compares not only features with similar semantic meaning, but also visual features. In this sense, the comparisons are made in different ways: by the number of regions per image, by maximum and minimum size of regions per image and by average intensity level of each region. iPixel Visual Search Engine supports the medical community in differential diagnoses related to the diseases of the breast. The iPixel Visual Search Engine has been validated by experts in the healthcare domain, such as radiologists, in addition to experts in digital image analysis.

  6. Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS based wavelet co-occurrence feature selection in mammogram classification for breast cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi M. Pawar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is significant health problem diagnosed mostly in women worldwide. Therefore, early detection of breast cancer is performed with the help of digital mammography, which can reduce mortality rate. This paper presents wrapper based feature selection approach for wavelet co-occurrence feature (WCF using Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS in mammogram classification problem. The performance of GFS algorithm is explained using mini-MIAS database. WCF features are obtained from detail wavelet coefficients at each level of decomposition of mammogram image. At first level of decomposition, 18 features are applied to GFS algorithm, which selects 5 features with an average classification success rate of 39.64%. Subsequently, at second level it selects 9 features from 36 features and the classification success rate is improved to 56.75%. For third level, 16 features are selected from 54 features and average success rate is improved to 64.98%. Lastly, at fourth level 72 features are applied to GFS, which selects 16 features and thereby increasing average success rate to 89.47%. Hence, GFS algorithm is the effective way of obtaining optimal set of feature in breast cancer diagnosis.

  7. Reduction of false positives in the detection of architectural distortion in mammograms by using a geometrically constrained phase portrait model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, Fabio J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective One of the commonly missed signs of breast cancer is architectural distortion. We have developed techniques for the detection of architectural distortion in mammograms, based on the analysis of oriented texture through the application of Gabor filters and a linear phase portrait model. In this paper, we propose constraining the shape of the general phase portrait model as a means to reduce the false-positive rate in the detection of architectural distortion. Material and methods The methods were tested with one set of 19 cases of architectural distortion and 41 normal mammograms, and with another set of 37 cases of architectural distortion. Results Sensitivity rates of 84% with 4.5 false positives per image and 81% with 10 false positives per image were obtained for the two sets of images. Conclusion The adoption of a constrained phase portrait model with a symmetric matrix and the incorporation of its condition number in the analysis resulted in a reduction in the false-positive rate in the detection of architectural distortion. The proposed techniques, dedicated for the detection and localization of architectural distortion, should lead to efficient detection of early signs of breast cancer. (orig.)

  8. Roentgenologic abnormalities in Down's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takehiko; Russell, W J; Komatsuda, Michio; Neriishi, Shotaro

    1968-07-25

    Roentgenograms of 28 patients with Down's syndrome were reviewed with emphasis on all previously reported abnormalities and any possible additional ones. Most of the abnormalities occurred with the same frequency as previously reported, but some less frequently reported findings were also seen. One abnormal vertebral measurement found in this series may be an additional stigma of Down's syndrome. All of the 27 cases studied cytogenetically had chromosomal abnormalities consistent with this disease. This study emphasizes the need for roentgenologic norms for the Japanese, and the desirability of combining chromosome studies with roentgenological abnormalities and clinical observations in diagnosing Down's syndrome. 19 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  9. What next for preimplantation genetic screening? A polar body approach!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, Joep; Collins, John; Gianaroli, Luca; Goossens, Veerle; Handyside, Alan; Harper, Joyce; Montag, Markus; Repping, Sjoerd; Schmutzler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Screening of human preimplantation embryos for numerical chromosome abnormalities has been conducted mostly at the preimplantation stage using fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, it is clear that preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) as it is currently practiced does not improve live

  10. Screening for breast cancer post reduction mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, T.M.; Tresham, J.; Fritschi, L.; Wylie, E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether remodelling of the breast after breast reduction surgery has an effect on mammographic cancer detection. Methods and materials: For women who attended population-based screening between January 1998 to December 2007, data were extracted on their age, history of previous breast reduction, and the result of screening (recall for further assessment, cancer, or no cancer). The number of cancers detected, recalls per 1000 screens and the characteristics of the cancers detected in the two groups was compared. Results: In total 244,147 women with 736,219 screening episodes were reviewed. In the 4743 women who had a breast reduction, 51 breast cancers were detected [age standardized rate (ASR) of 4.28 per 1000 screening episodes; 95% CI 3.11-5.46], compared with 4342 breast cancers in 239 404 women screened in the non-reduction group (ASR of 5.99 per 1000 screening episodes; 95% CI 5.81-6.16). There were fewer cancers in the breast reduction group with a relative risk of 0.71. There was no significant difference in the rate of recall between the two groups, with a crude recall rate of 46.1 per 1000 screening episodes post-breast reduction compared with 50.7 per 1000 screening episodes for women without breast reduction. There was no significant difference in the pathological type or location of the cancer between the two groups of women. Conclusion: Postoperative breast changes following reduction mammoplasty do not significantly hinder analysis of the screening mammogram.

  11. Breast Cancer Screening in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lung and Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Study of Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C; Ward, Kevin C; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Jiang, Renjian; Applegate, Kimberly E; Duszak, Richard

    2017-07-01

    To assess breast cancer screening utilization in Medicare beneficiaries with colorectal and lung cancer versus cancer-free controls. Female fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who were ≥67 years old and diagnosed with lung or colorectal cancer between 2000 and 2011 and who reported to a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry (case group) were followed for 2 years after their diagnoses, unless death, a diagnosis of breast cancer, or the end of 2013 came first. A similar number of cancer-free controls were individually matched to cases by age, race, registry region, and follow-up time. Screening utilization was defined as the percentage of women with ≥1 screening mammogram during follow-up. Overall, 104,164 cases (48% colorectal, 52% lung; 30% advanced cancer) and 104,164 controls were included. Among women with lung or colorectal cancer, 22% underwent ≥1 screening mammogram versus 26% of controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-0.82). Stratified by cancer type, 28% of colorectal cancer cases versus 29% of controls (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.95-1.01) and 17% of lung cancer cases versus 23% of controls (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.60-0.65) received ≥1 mammogram. When stratified by stage, 8% with advanced cancer versus 18% of controls (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.31-0.35) and 30% with early-stage cancer versus 30% of controls (OR 1; 95% CI 0.97-1.02) underwent ≥1 mammogram. Screening mammography utilization rates are similar between Medicare beneficiaries with early-stage cancer versus controls. Although the majority of patients with advanced-stage cancer appropriately do not pursue screening mammography, a small number (8%) continue with screening. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  13. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  14. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does routine screening for breast cancer raise anxiety? Results from a three wave prospective study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S; Saidi, G; Bickler, G; Hunter, J

    1995-01-01

    feeling extremely anxious after they had received the referral letter but their retrospective anxiety was also higher than in the negative screenees at earlier stages in the breast screening process. They also reported having experienced more pain and discomfort during the x ray. CONCLUSIONS--Anxiety does not seem to be an important problem in routinely screened women who receive a negative result. This finding is very reassuring in relation to a major criticism of breast screening programmes. Thus, apart from maintaining current procedures such as keeping waiting times to a minimum, there seems to be no need to introduce special anxiety reducing interventions into the national programme. On the other hand, the findings for women who received false positive results suggest that there are aspects of the experience of being recalled for assessment after an abnormal mammogram that warrant further attention. The relationship between contemporaneous and retrospective anxiety should also be studied. PMID:7650466

  16. Breast Density Awareness and Knowledge, and Intentions for Breast Cancer Screening in a Diverse Sample of Women Age Eligible for Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rivas, Marimer; Benjamin, Shayna; Andrews, Janna Z; Jandorf, Lina

    2017-08-14

    The objectives of this study were to assess breast density knowledge and breast density awareness, and to identify information associated with intention to complete routine and supplemental screening for breast cancer in a diverse sample of women age eligible for mammography. We quantitatively (self-report) assessed breast density awareness and knowledge (N = 264) in black (47.7%), Latina (35.2%), and white (17%) women recruited online and in the community. Most participants reported having heard about breast density (69.2%); less than one third knew their own breast density status (30.4%). Knowing their own breast density, believing that women should be notified of their breast density in their mammogram report, and feeling informed if being provided this information are associated with likelihood of completing mammogram. Intending mammogram completion and knowledge regarding the impact of breast density on mammogram accuracy are associated with likelihood of completing supplemental ultrasound tests of the breast. These findings help inform practitioners and policy makers about information and communication factors that influence breast cancer screening concerns and decisions. Knowing this information should prepare practitioners to better identify women who may have not been exposed to breast density messages.

  17. Factors associated with abnormal spirometry among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, M Bradley; Huang, Laurence; Diaz, Philip T; Kirk, Gregory D; Kleerup, Eric C; Morris, Alison; Rom, William; Weiden, Michael D; Zhao, Enxu; Thompson, Bruce; Crothers, Kristina

    2015-08-24

    HIV-infected individuals are susceptible to development of chronic lung diseases, but little is known regarding the prevalence and risk factors associated with different spirometric abnormalities in this population. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors and performance characteristics of risk factors for spirometric abnormalities among HIV-infected individuals. Cross-sectional cohort study. We analyzed cross-sectional US data from the NHLBI-funded Lung-HIV consortium - a multicenter observational study of heterogeneous groups of HIV-infected participants in diverse geographic sites. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors statistically significantly associated with spirometry patterns. A total of 908 HIV-infected individuals were included. The median age of the cohort was 50 years, 78% were men and 68% current smokers. An abnormal spirometry pattern was present in 37% of the cohort: 27% had obstructed and 10% had restricted spirometry patterns. Overall, age, smoking status and intensity, history of Pneumocystis infection, asthma diagnosis and presence of respiratory symptoms were independently associated with an abnormal spirometry pattern. Regardless of the presence of respiratory symptoms, five HIV-infected participants would need to be screened with spirometry to diagnose two individuals with any abnormal spirometry pattern. Nearly 40% of a diverse US cohort of HIV-infected individuals had an abnormal spirometry pattern. Specific characteristics including age, smoking status, respiratory infection history and respiratory symptoms can identify those at risk for abnormal spirometry. The high prevalence of abnormal spirometry and the poor predictive capability of respiratory symptoms to identify abnormal spirometry should prompt clinicians to consider screening spirometry in HIV-infected populations.

  18. Screening mammography in Finland--1.5 million examinations with 97 percent specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, P.B.; Pamilo, M.

    1999-01-01

    A nationwide mammography screening program including women aged 50-59 years at the time of the first invitation and involving more than 100 radiologists was started in Finland in January, 1987. From 1987 through 1997, a total of 1,690,496 invitations to biennial two-view mammography screening was sent out. The compliance for screening was 88.5% with 1,495,744 screening examinations performed during this 11-year period. There were 49,020 recalls for further work-up studies and 9,689 women were referred for surgery. The total number of screening-detected breast cancers was 5,595, giving a detection rate of 3.7 cancers per 1000 screening studies. More than half of all surgical biopsies revealed breast cancer and 67.8% of the invasive cancers were at Stage I. The positive predictive value of referral to surgical biopsy increased from 33.2% in 1987 to 65.5% in 1997. and the ratio of malignant to benign biopsies more than tripled from the first to the fifth year of screening. The observed/expected ratio of invasive cancer detection was 2.44. Only 0.27% of all screening mammograms were followed by a benign biopsy, and 2.90% of all screening mammograms were followed by the women being recalled for further studies and not found to have breast cancer. This gave a specificity of recall after screening mammography greater than 97.0% and a specificity of referral to surgical biopsy greater than 99.7%. Measures of specificity improved considerably during the first three years of the screening program. The high specificity of screening mammography can be attributed to the nature of the screening process as well as to the opportunity for individual radiologists to attain a greater level of experience and competence. The decision to recall appears to have been crucial in determining the specificity

  19. Why mammography screening has not lived up to expectations from the randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Zahl, Per-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    adjuvant therapy and breast cancer awareness, not screening. We also believe it is more important to reduce the incidence of cancer than to detect it 'early.' Avoiding getting screening mammograms reduces the risk of becoming a breast cancer patient by one-third.......We analysed the relation between tumour sizes and stages and the reported effects on breast cancer mortality with and without screening in trials and observational studies. The average tumour sizes in all the trials suggest only a 12% reduction in breast cancer mortality, which agrees with the 10......% reported in the most reliable trials. Recent studies of tumour sizes and tumour stages show that screening has not lowered the rate of advanced cancers. In agreement with this, recent observational studies of breast cancer mortality have failed to find an effect of screening. In contrast, screening leads...

  20. Preimplantation genetic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Joyce C

    2018-03-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis was first successfully performed in 1989 as an alternative to prenatal diagnosis for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic or chromosomal abnormality, such as cystic fibrosis, to their child. From embryos generated in vitro, biopsied cells are genetically tested. From the mid-1990s, this technology has been employed as an embryo selection tool for patients undergoing in vitro fertilisation, screening as many chromosomes as possible, in the hope that selecting chromosomally normal embryos will lead to higher implantation and decreased miscarriage rates. This procedure, preimplantation genetic screening, was initially performed using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, but 11 randomised controlled trials of screening using this technique showed no improvement in in vitro fertilisation delivery rates. Progress in genetic testing has led to the introduction of array comparative genomic hybridisation, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and next generation sequencing for preimplantation genetic screening, and three small randomised controlled trials of preimplantation genetic screening using these new techniques indicate a modest benefit. Other trials are still in progress but, regardless of their results, preimplantation genetic screening is now being offered globally. In the near future, it is likely that sequencing will be used to screen the full genetic code of the embryo.

  1. Decision trees and integrated features for computer aided mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.; Groshong, B.; Allmen, M.; Woods, K.

    1997-02-01

    Breast cancer is a serious problem, which in the United States causes 43,000 deaths a year, eventually striking 1 in 9 women. Early detection is the only effective countermeasure, and mass mammography screening is the only reliable means for early detection. Mass screening has many shortcomings which could be addressed by a computer-aided mammographic screening system. Accordingly, we have applied the pattern recognition methods developed in earlier investigations of speculated lesions in mammograms to the detection of microcalcifications and circumscribed masses, generating new, more rigorous and uniform methods for the detection of both those signs. We have also improved the pattern recognition methods themselves, through the development of a new approach to combinations of multiple classifiers.

  2. Automatic and consistent registration framework for temporal pairs of mammograms in application to breast cancer risk assessment due to hormone replacement therapy (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Carreras, I. Arganda; Nielsen, Mads

    2009-01-01

     Purpose: Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. However, whether changes in mammographic density due to HRT are associated with risk remains unclear. The aim of this study is to provide a framework for accurate interval change analysis in temporal pairs of mammograms of ...

  3. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  4. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  5. Breast and cervical cancer screening among South Asian immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Usha; Szalacha, Laura A; Prabhughate, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    South Asian (SA) immigrants (from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) constitute the fastest growing of all Asian American immigrants to the United States, with a growth rate of 106% from 1990 to 2001. Data are lacking on health behaviors of this population subgroup, including cancer-related information. : The purpose of this study was to assess rates and correlates of breast and cervical cancer screening in a community sample of SAs. Participants were recruited from among attendees of 3 community-based agency programs. Data were collected in English, Hindi, and Gujarati from a convenience sample of 198 participants. Two-thirds of the sample (n = 127, 65.5%) had ever had a mammogram, whereas only a third (n = 65, 32.8%) had ever had a Papanicolaou smear or vaginal examination. Several predisposing factors (eg, country of birth, years in the United States, acculturation, age, and acknowledged barriers to screening) were significant predictors of breast and cervical screening, whereas the only enabling factor was past screening behavior. Additional study is warranted on cultural aspects of cancer screening behaviors. These data are formative on facilitators and barriers to mammogram and Papanicolaou test completion among these understudied minority women. Nurses who practice in primary care may begin to target health education based on sociodemographics of SA women and emphasize discussion of barriers to screening.

  6. Opt-Out Patient Navigation to Improve Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Homeless Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Wisnivesky, Juan

    2017-09-01

    A patient navigation model was implemented to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among women who were homeless in five shelters and shelter clinics in New York City in 2014. Navigation consisted of opt-out screening to eligible women; cancer health and screening education; scheduling and following up for screening completion, obtaining, and communicating results to patients and providers; and care coordination with social services organizations. Women (n = 162, aged 21-74, 58% black) completed mammogram (88%) and Pap testing (83%) from baselines of 59% and 50%, respectively. There was no association between mental health or substance abuse and screening completion. Adjusted analysis showed a significant association between refusing/missing Pap testing and older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.20); independent predictors of mammogram included more pregnancies (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.37-0.88) and older age (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79-0.90). Opt-out patient navigation is feasible and effective and may mitigate multilevel barriers to cancer screening among women with unstable housing.

  7. Comparison of breast and cervical cancer screening utilization among rural and urban Hispanic and American Indian women in the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño, Tomas; Gerald, Joe K; Harris, Robin; Martinez, Maria Elena; Estrada, Antonio; García, Francisco

    2012-08-01

    Rural Hispanic and American Indian (AI) women are at risk of non-participation in cancer screening programs. The objective of this study was to compare breast and cervical cancer screening utilization among Hispanic and AI women that reside in rural areas of the Southwestern United States to their urban counterparts and to assess characteristics that influence cancer screening. This study utilizes Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data from 2006 to 2008 for Arizona and New Mexico. The BRFSS is a federally funded telephone survey to collect data on risk factors contributing to the leading causes of death and chronic diseases. Rural Hispanic and AI populations reported some differences in screening rates compared with their urban counterparts. Among Hispanic women, 58 % of rural residents reported having had a mammogram within the past year, compared with 66 % of urban residents. Among AI women, 81 % of rural residents had ever had a mammogram, compared with 89 % of urban residents. Rural AI women were less likely to have ever had a mammogram (OR = 0.5; 95 % CI = 0.3-0.9) compared with urban AI women. Rural Hispanic women were less likely to have had a mammogram within 1 year (OR = 0.7; 95 % CI = 0.5-0.9) compared with urban Hispanic women. Results suggest that rural Hispanic women were less likely to have had a Pap smear within 3 years (OR = 0.7; 95 % CI = 0.4-1.3) compared with urban Hispanic women. Our results provide some evidence that Hispanic and AI women that reside in rural areas of the Southwestern United States have lower rates of breast and cervical cancer screening use compared with their urban counterparts. Special efforts are needed to identify ways to overcome barriers to breast and cervical cancer screening for rural Hispanic and AI women.

  8. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  9. Screening mammography. A risk versus risk decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritenour, E.R.; Hendee, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potential risk of a radiologic procedure often is compared with the potential benefit of the procedure. While risk vs. benefit analysis has been useful as a step toward increased communication and understanding among radiologists, referring physicians, and the general public, it has the disadvantage that risk and benefit are fundamentally different quantities. Hence, their juxtaposition for purposes of comparison presents contextual difficulties. In this article, the concept is presented of comparing the risk of doing a procedure with the risk of choosing not to do the procedure. An example of risk vs. risk analysis of screening mammography for women over the age of 50 is given, with the conclusion that the risk of having yearly mammograms is less than 1/10 the risk of early death caused by failure to diagnose breast cancer by x-ray mammography. This approach to risk analysis would yield interesting data for examinations that are part of more complicated diagnostic pathways.19 references

  10. Breast cancer screening practices of African migrant women in Australia: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsiji, Olayide Oluyemisi; Kwok, Cannas; Fan, Lee Chun

    2017-04-17

    Breast cancer is the most diagnosed cancer among women and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, globally. Breast cancer mortality can be improved through routine cancer screening, yet migrant populations have lower participation rates. While African migrants are among the fastest growing migrant population in Australia, their breast cancer screening behaviour is under-studied. The aims of this study were to report breast cancer screening status of African migrant women and factors associated with their breast cancer screening behaviour in Australia. A descriptive, cross-sectional approach was utilised for this study. Two hundred and sixty four African migrant women aged 18-69 years and recruited from a number of organisations responded to a self-reported African version of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ). Main research variables are breast cancer screening practices and demographic characteristics and total scores on each of the BCSBQ subscales. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of the demographic variables on the likelihood of women in the target age range 50-74 years having screening practices as recommended. While most of the participants heard of breast awareness (76.1%) and mammogram (85.2%), only 11.4% practised monthly breast awareness, whereas 65.9% had ever had a mammogram as frequently as recommended. Age and employment were determining factors for participating in mammogram. Significant different scores were found in the "Practical barriers" between women at the target age who had and had not performed breast awareness (80.4 versus 77.5, p-value = 0.002) and mammogram (77.1 versus 70.3, p-value = 0.009) regularly as recommended. Moreover, attitudes towards general health check-ups subscale scores were significantly higher in women who had performed clinical breast examination as frequently as recommended than those who had not. The research reveals that practical

  11. Mobile Phone Multilevel and Multimedia Messaging Intervention for Breast Cancer Screening: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee; Ghebre, Rahel; Le, Chap; Jang, Yoo Jeong; Sharratt, Monica; Yee, Douglas

    2017-11-07

    Despite the increasing breast cancer incidence and mortality rates, Korean American immigrant women have one of the lowest rates of breast cancer screening across racial groups in the United States. Mobile health (mHealth), defined as the delivery of health care information or services through mobile communication devices, has been utilized to successfully improve a variety of health outcomes. This study adapted the principles of mHealth to advance breast cancer prevention efforts among Korean American immigrant women, an underserved community. Using a randomized controlled trial design, 120 Korean American women aged 40 to 77 years were recruited and randomly assigned to either the mMammogram intervention group (n=60) to receive culturally and personally tailored multilevel and multimedia messages through a mobile phone app along with health navigator services or the usual care control group (n=60) to receive a printed brochure. Outcome measures included knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about breast cancer screening, readiness for mammography, and mammogram receipt. The feasibility and acceptability of the mMammogram intervention was also assessed. The intervention group showed significantly greater change on scores of knowledge of breast cancer and screening guidelines (P=.01). The intervention group also showed significantly greater readiness for mammography use after the intervention compared with the control group. A significantly higher proportion of women who received the mMammogram intervention (75%, 45/60) completed mammograms by the 6-month follow-up compared with the control group (30%, 18/60; Pservice was a feasible, acceptable, and effective intervention mechanism to promote breast cancer screening in Korean American immigrant women. A flexible, easily tailored approach that relies on recent technological advancements can reach underserved and hard-to-recruit populations that bear disproportionate cancer burdens. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01972048;

  12. Effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubizarreta Alberdi, Raquel; Llanes, Ana B.F.; Ortega, Raquel Almazan; Exposito, Ruben Roman; Collado, Jose M.V.; Oliveres, Xavier Castells; Queiro Verdes, Teresa; Natal Ramos, Carmen; Sanz, Maria Ederra; Salas Trejo, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in population-based breast cancer screening programmes. We evaluated 1,440,384 single-read screening mammograms, corresponding to 471,112 women aged 45-69 years participating in four Spanish programmes between 1990 and 2006. The mammograms were interpreted by 72 radiologists. The overall percentage of false-positive results was 5.85% and that for false-positives resulting in an invasive procedure was 0.38%. Both the risk of false-positives overall and of false-positives leading to an invasive procedure significantly decreased (p 14,999 mammograms with respect to the reference category (<500). The risk of both categories of false-positives was also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) as radiologists' years of experience increased: OR 0.96 and OR 0.84, respectively, for 1 year's experience and OR 0.72 and OR 0.73, respectively, for more than 4 years' experience with regard to the category of <1 year's experience. Radiologist experience is a determining factor in the risk of a false-positive result in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  13. Interval breast cancer characteristics before, during and after the transition from screen-film to full-field digital screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, Rob M G; Weber, Roy; Voogd, Adri C; Nederend, Joost; Louwman, Marieke W J; Venderink, Dick; Strobbe, Luc J A; Rutten, Matthieu J C; Plaisier, Menno L; Lohle, Paul N; Hooijen, Marianne J H; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Duijm, Lucien E M

    2017-05-05

    To determine the proportion of "true" interval cancers and tumor characteristics of interval breast cancers prior to, during and after the transition from screen-film mammography screening (SFM) to full-field digital mammography screening (FFDM). We included all women with interval cancers detected between January 2006 and January 2014. Breast imaging reports, biopsy results and breast surgery reports of all women recalled at screening mammography and of all women with interval breast cancers were collected. Two experienced screening radiologists reviewed the diagnostic mammograms, on which the interval cancers were diagnosed, as well as the prior screening mammograms and determined whether or not the interval cancer had been missed on the most recent screening mammogram. If not missed, the cancer was considered an occult ("true") interval cancer. A total of 442 interval cancers had been diagnosed, of which 144 at SFM with a prior SFM (SFM-SFM), 159 at FFDM with a prior SFM (FFDM-SFM) and 139 at FFDM with a prior FFDM (FFDM-FFDM). The transition from SFM to FFDM screening resulted in the diagnosis of more occult ("true") interval cancers at FFDM-SFM than at SFM-SFM (65.4% (104/159) versus 49.3% (71/144), P screened digitally for the second time (57.6% (80/139) at FFDM-FFDM versus 49.3% (71/144) at SFM-SFM). Tumor characteristics were comparable for the three interval cancer cohorts, except of a lower porportion (75.7 and 78.0% versus 67.2% af FFDM-FFDM, P cancers at FFDM with prior FFDM. An increase in the proportion of occult interval cancers is observed during the transition from SFM to FFDM screening mammography. However, this increase seems temporary and is no longer detectable after the second round of digital screening. Tumor characteristics and type of surgery are comparable for interval cancers detected prior to, during and after the transition from SFM to FFDM screening mammography, except of a lower proportion of invasive ductal cancers after the

  14. Abnormal vaginal microbiota may be associated with poor reproductive outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, T.

    2016-01-01

    primers were specific for four common Lactobacillus spp., G. vaginalis and A. vaginae. Results: The prevalence of BV defined by Nugent score was 21% (27/130), whereas the prevalence of an abnormal vaginal microbiota was 28% (36/130) defined by qPCR with high concentrations of G. vaginalis and/or A....... vaginae. The qPCR diagnostic approach had a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 93% for Nugent-defined BV. Eighty-four patients completed IVF treatment. The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 35% (29/84). Interestingly, only 9% (2/22) with qPCR defined abnormal vaginal microbiota obtained a clinical...... pregnancy (P = 0.004). Wider implications: If a negative correlation between abnormal vaginal microbiota and the clinical pregnancy rate is corroborated, patients could be screened and subsequently treated for abnormal vaginal microbiota prior to fertility treatment....

  15. SU-E-I-59: Investigation of the Usefulness of a Standard Deviation and Mammary Gland Density as Indexes for Mammogram Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarabe, S; Yabuuchi, H; Morishita, J

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the usefulness of the standard deviation of pixel values in a whole mammary glands region and the percentage of a high- density mammary glands region to a whole mammary glands region as features for classification of mammograms into four categories based on the ACR BI-RADS breast composition. We used 36 digital mediolateral oblique view mammograms (18 patients) approved by our IRB. These images were classified into the four categories of breast compositions by an experienced breast radiologist and the results of the classification were regarded as a gold standard. First, a whole mammary region in a breast was divided into two regions such as a high-density mammary glands region and a low/iso-density mammary glands region by using a threshold value that was obtained from the pixel values corresponding to a pectoral muscle region. Then the percentage of a high-density mammary glands region to a whole mammary glands region was calculated. In addition, as a new method, the standard deviation of pixel values in a whole mammary glands region was calculated as an index based on the intermingling of mammary glands and fats. Finally, all mammograms were classified by using the combination of the percentage of a high-density mammary glands region and the standard deviation of each image. The agreement rates of the classification between our proposed method and gold standard was 86% (31/36). This result signified that our method has the potential to classify mammograms. The combination of the standard deviation of pixel values in a whole mammary glands region and the percentage of a high-density mammary glands region to a whole mammary glands region was available as features to classify mammograms based on the ACR BI- RADS breast composition. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Diagnostic abilities of three CAD methods for assessing microcalcifications in mammograms and an aspect of equivocal cases decisions by radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, W.T.; Nguyen, H.T.; Thornton, B.S.; Rickard, M.T.; Blinowska, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiologists use an 'Overall impression' rating to assess a suspicious region on a mammogram. The value ranges from 1 to 5. They will definitely send a patient for biopsy if the rating is 4 or 5. They will send the patient for core biopsy when a rating of 3 (indeterminate) is given. We have developed three methods to aid diagnosis of cases with microcalcifications. The first two methods, namely, Bayesian and multiple logistic regression (with a special 'cutting score' technique), utilise six parameter ratings which minimise subjectivity in characterising the microcalcifications. The third method uses three parameters (age of patient, uniformity of size of microcalcification and their distribution) in a multiple stepwise regression. For both training set and test set, all three methods are as good as the two radiologists in terms of percentages of correct classification. Therefore, all three proposed methods potentially can be used as second readers. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. Mapping 3D breast lesions from full-field digital mammograms using subject-specific finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E.; Oliver, A.; Diaz, O.; Diez, Y.; Gubern-Mérida, A.; Martí, R.; Martí, J.

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific finite element (FE) models of the breast have received increasing attention due to the potential capability of fusing images from different modalities. During the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to X-ray mammography registration procedure, the FE model is compressed mimicking the mammographic acquisition. Subsequently, suspicious lesions in the MRI volume can be projected into the 2D mammographic space. However, most registration algorithms do not provide the reverse information, avoiding to obtain the 3D geometrical information from the lesions localized in the mammograms. In this work we introduce a fast method to localize the 3D position of the lesion within the MRI, using both cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic projections, indexing the tetrahedral elements of the biomechanical model by means of an uniform grid. For each marked lesion in the Full-Field Digital Mammogram (FFDM), the X-ray path from source to the marker is calculated. Barycentric coordinates are computed in the tetrahedrons traversed by the ray. The list of elements and coordinates allows to localize two curves within the MRI and the closest point between both curves is taken as the 3D position of the lesion. The registration errors obtained in the mammographic space are 9.89 +/- 3.72 mm in CC- and 8.04 +/- 4.68 mm in MLO-projection and the error in the 3D MRI space is equal to 10.29 +/- 3.99 mm. Regarding the uniform grid, it is computed spending between 0.1 and 0.7 seconds. The average time spent to compute the 3D location of a lesion is about 8 ms.

  18. Image quality of a wet laser printer versus a paper printer for full-field digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Gerd; Kaindl, Elisabeth; Matzek, Wolfgang K; Semturs, Friedrich; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Helbich, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the image quality of a wet laser printer with that of a paper printer for full-field digital mammography (FFDM). For both a wet laser printer and a paper printer connected to an FFDM system, image quality parameters were evaluated using a standardized printer test image (luminance density, dynamic range). The detectability of standardized objects on a phantom was also evaluated. Furthermore, 640 mammograms of 80 patients with different breast tissue composition patterns were imaged with both printers. Subjective image quality parameters (brightness, contrast, and detection of details of anatomic structures-that is, skin, subcutis, musculature, glandular tissue, and fat), the detectability of breast lesions (mass, calcifications), and the diagnostic performance according to the BI-RADS classification were evaluated. Both the luminance density and the dynamic range were superior for the wet laser printer. More standardized objects were visible on the phantom imaged with the wet laser printer than with the paper printer (13/16 vs 11/16). Each subjective image quality parameter of the mammograms from the wet laser printer was rated superior to those of the paper printer. Significantly more breast lesions were detected on the wet laser printer images than on the paper printer images (masses, 13 vs 10; calcifications, 65 vs 48; p printer images, BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories were underestimated for 10 (43.5%) of 23 patients. For FFDM, images obtained from a wet laser printer show superior objective and subjective image quality compared with a paper printer. As a consequence, the paper printer should not be used for FFDM.

  19. Antenatal care--antenatal screening for fetal abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Helen

    2003-02-01

    JOANNA IS NOW 24 WEEKS pregnant. She is feeling very well and finding that now her energy has returned, she is really enjoying being preganant. She still proudly shows her precious scan picture to interested friends and takes the occasional glance herself during quiet moments. Joanna, has a cousin, Susan, who has Down's syndrome. Susan is a happy and loving child who has brought a lot of joy, as well as heartache, to the extended family. Although Joanna has no delusions about the hard work and continuing care that her cousin requires, she would not herself contemplate terminating a pregnancy if her baby had the condition.

  20. Mechanistic modeling for mammography screening risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijwaard, Harmen

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Western populations show a very high incidence of breast cancer and in many countries mammography screening programs have been set up for the early detection of these cancers. Through these programs large numbers of women (in the Netherlands, 700.000 per year) are exposed to low but not insignificant X-ray doses. ICRP based risk estimates indicate that the number of breast cancer casualties due to mammography screening can be as high as 50 in the Netherlands per year. The number of lives saved is estimated to be much higher, but for an accurate calculation of the benefits of screening a better estimate of these risks is indispensable. Here it is attempted to better quantify the radiological risks of mammography screening through the application of a biologically based model for breast tumor induction by X-rays. The model is applied to data obtained from the National Institutes of Health in the U.S. These concern epidemiological data of female TB patients who received high X-ray breast doses in the period 1930-1950 through frequent fluoroscopy of their lungs. The mechanistic model that is used to describe the increased breast cancer incidence is based on an earlier study by Moolgavkar et al. (1980), in which the natural background incidence of breast cancer was modeled. The model allows for a more sophisticated extrapolation of risks to the low dose X-ray exposures that are common in mammography screening and to the higher ages that are usually involved. Furthermore, it allows for risk transfer to other (non-western) populations. The results have implications for decisions on the frequency of screening, the number of mammograms taken at each screening, minimum and maximum ages for screening and the transfer to digital equipment. (author)

  1. New information on high risk breast screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedl, C.C.; Ponhold, L.; Gruber, R.; Pinker, K.; Helbich, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    Women with an elevated risk for breast cancer require intensified screening beginning at an early age. Such high risk screening differs considerably from screening in the general population. After an expert has evaluated the exact risk a breast MRI examination should be offered at least once a year and beginning latest at the age of 30 depending on the patients risk category. Complementary mammograms should not be performed before the age of 35. An additional ultrasound examination is no longer recommended. To ensure a high sensitivity and specificity high risk screening should be performed only at a nationally or regionally approved and audited service. Adequate knowledge about the phenotypical characteristics of familial breast cancer is essential. Besides the common malignant phenotypes, benign morphologies (round or oval shape and smooth margins) as well as a low prevalence of calcifications have been described. Using MRI benign contrast media kinetics as well as non-solid lesions with focal, regional and segmental enhancement can often be visualized. (orig.) [de

  2. Breast cancer screening: the underuse of mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, S.; Baum, J.K.; Klos, D.S.; Tsou, C.V.

    1985-01-01

    The early detection of breast cancer is promoted by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) by encouraging the regular use of three types of screening: breast self-examination (BSE), the clinical breast examination, and mammography. In August 1983, the ACS publicized seven recommendations pertaining to screening, including a revised statement about the routine use of mammography for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. In response to the ACS statement, the present study assessed compliance with the updated recommendations for all three types of screening. The results show reasonable rates of compliance for the BSE (53%-69%) and clinical examination (70%-78%). In contrast, only 19% of the women between the ages of 35 and 49 and 25% of the women older than 50 reported complying with the recommendation to undergo one baseline screening mammogram. Some implications for health education by physicians and the professional education of physicians in the use of mammography are discussed

  3. Age distribution of abnormal pap smear in a secondary hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age distribution of abnormal pap smear in a secondary hospital in south-west Nigeria. ... Objective: To determine the age distribution pattern of abnormal Paps smear in women in our environment in order to have a basis for the points of entry and exit for cervical cancer screening protocol. Materials and Method: In this ...

  4. Effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubizarreta Alberdi, Raquel [Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Edificio Administrativo da Conselleria de Sanidade, Servicio de Programas Poboacionais de Cribado, Direccion Xeral de Saude Publica e Planificacion, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Llanes, Ana B.F.; Ortega, Raquel Almazan [Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Exposito, Ruben Roman; Collado, Jose M.V.; Oliveres, Xavier Castells [Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Parc de Salut Mar. CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Queiro Verdes, Teresa [Galician Agency for Health Technology Assessment, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Natal Ramos, Carmen [Principality of Asturias Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Principality of Asturias (Spain); Sanz, Maria Ederra [Public Health Institute, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Salas Trejo, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    To evaluate the effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in population-based breast cancer screening programmes. We evaluated 1,440,384 single-read screening mammograms, corresponding to 471,112 women aged 45-69 years participating in four Spanish programmes between 1990 and 2006. The mammograms were interpreted by 72 radiologists. The overall percentage of false-positive results was 5.85% and that for false-positives resulting in an invasive procedure was 0.38%. Both the risk of false-positives overall and of false-positives leading to an invasive procedure significantly decreased (p < 0.001) with greater reading volume in the previous year: OR 0.77 and OR 0.78, respectively, for a reading volume 500-1,999 mammograms and OR 0.59 and OR 0.60 for a reading volume of >14,999 mammograms with respect to the reference category (<500). The risk of both categories of false-positives was also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) as radiologists' years of experience increased: OR 0.96 and OR 0.84, respectively, for 1 year's experience and OR 0.72 and OR 0.73, respectively, for more than 4 years' experience with regard to the category of <1 year's experience. Radiologist experience is a determining factor in the risk of a false-positive result in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  5. Does gender discrimination impact regular mammography screening? Findings from the race differences in screening mammography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Amy B; Kasl, Stanislav V; Jones, Beth A

    2008-03-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine if gender discrimination, conceptualized as a negative life stressor, is a deterrent to adherence to mammography screening guidelines. African American and white women (1451) aged 40-79 years who obtained an index screening mammogram at one of five urban hospitals in Connecticut between October 1996 and January 1998 were enrolled in this study. This logistic regression analysis includes the 1229 women who completed telephone interviews at baseline and follow-up (average 29.4 months later) and for whom the study outcome, nonadherence to age-specific mammography screening guidelines, was determined. Gender discrimination was measured as lifetime experience in seven possible situations. Gender discrimination, reported by nearly 38% of the study population, was significantly associated with nonadherence to mammography guidelines in women with annual family incomes of > or =$50,000 (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.33, 2.98) and did not differ across racial/ethnic group. Our findings suggest that gender discrimination can adversely influence regular mammography screening in some women. With nearly half of women nonadherent to screening mammography guidelines in this study and with decreasing mammography rates nationwide, it is important to address the complexity of nonadherence across subgroups of women. Life stressors, such as experiences of gender discrimination, may have considerable consequences, potentially influencing health prevention prioritization in women.

  6. Newborn screening for MCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Davidson, A G F; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia G

    2008-01-01

    . Both C8 and C8/C10 ratios remained abnormal in all confirmed MCAD cases. Positive predictive value of screening was 58% with no false negative results. Seven patients were homozygous for the common c.985A > G MCAD mutation and three others were compound heterozygous for the c.985A > G and a second...

  7. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation with methadone and benzodiazepines.

  8. CANCER SCREENING AWARENESS AMONG NURSING STAFF IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Shanthilal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cervical and breast cancers are the common malignancies among female population in India. Though there are approved screening methods available to prevent and detect these cancers at an early stage, there is a lack of awareness about cancer screening among general public as well as the health care professionals. This study is aimed to identify the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP among the nursing staff regarding cancer screening in these two diseases. METHOD A cross-sectional interview based survey was conducted among 303 female nursing staff working in a government medical college hospital from November 2015 to December 2015. Ethical committee approval was taken. Verbal informed consent was sought from the study subjects. Nursing staff who gave consent to participate in the study were enrolled. There were no specific inclusion or exclusion criteria for the study subjects. A structured pretested questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP was used to collect the data. The questions were open-ended. Recall and recognition type of questions were used. The data was entered into MS Excel worksheet and analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS Total of 303 nurses included in the study. The age ranged from 21 to 64 years. Median age is 38 years. Only 24.4% (74/303 of Nurses were aware of cancer screening and many of them were aware of Pap smear (55.1%, 167/303 and mammogram (66.3%, 201/303 as investigational tools in diagnosing cancer. Only 17 out of 303 (5.6% nurses had Pap smear test done with an average of 1.23% Pap smear per individual. Mammogram screening was done in 13% (15/115 of the eligible nurses with an average of 1.2% mammogram per individual. The most common reason for not undergoing screening as expressed was they did not feel the need to be screened unless they were symptomatic (55%, they are too young for screening (14.8%, shyness (11.1%, fear (11.1% and lack of time (7.4%. However, 90% of them

  9. Triagem de hemoglobinopatias e avaliação da degeneração oxidativa da hemoglobina em trabalhadores portadores do traço falciforme (HbAS, expostos a riscos ocupacionais Screening of abnormal hemoglobin and the evaluation of oxidative degeneration of hemoglobin among workers with the sickle cell trait (HbAS, exposed to occupational hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac L. Silva Filho

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Desde os anos 40, quando foram realizados os primeiros trabalhos de triagem para hemoglobinas anormais na população brasileira, tem sido descrita uma elevada prevalência destas em nosso meio, especialmente a hemoglobina S que, a despeito da heterogeneidade de sua distribuição geográfica, quase sempre é a mais freqüente nas diversas regiões estudadas. Aliado a este fato, estudos recentes têm demonstrado uma maior susceptibilidade desta a oxidação, tornando-a mais sensível ao estresse oxidativo que a hemoglobina normal (HbAA, mesmo em se tratando de portadores heterozigotos (HbAS. Tendo em vista que algumas substâncias químicas são comprovadamente meta-hemoglobinizantes, que alguns fatores ambientais podem influenciar na morbidade da anemia falciforme e também o pouco e controverso conhecimento de que se dispõe a respeito de portadores do traço falciforme, este estudo, além da pesquisa de hemo-globinas anormais, avaliou também a degeneração oxidativa da hemoglobina, através da pesquisa de corpos de Heinz e dosagem de meta-hemoglobina em uma população de trabalhadores portadores do traço falciforme, expostos a riscos ocupacionais. Foram triadas 2.190 amostras sangüíneas entre Outubro de 1999 e Dezembro de 2001. A população estudada foi constituída de trabalhadores de ambos os sexos com idades variando entre 18 e 76 anos. Os resultados evidenciaram 4,7% portadores de hemoglobinas anormais na população analisada, sendo que a hemoglobina S foi a mais freqüente - 3,2% (71. Trabalhadores portadores do traço falciforme apresentaram uma chance 14 vezes maior de possuírem valores aumentados de meta-hemoglobina em relação aos trabalhadores com genótipo AA, porém, esta diferença não foi estatisticamente significativa.Hemoglobinopathies are frequent hereditary diseases in Brazilian population and have been a public health problem. This study reports the screening of abnormal hemoglobin among Fiocruz`s employees, as

  10. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franquet, T.; Gimenez, A.; Alegret, X.; Sanchis, E.; Rivas, A.

    1997-01-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  11. Associations Between Religion-Related Factors and Breast Cancer Screening Among American Muslims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I.; Murrar, Sohad; Adviento, Brigid; Liao, Chuanhong; Hosseinian, Zahra; Peek, Monica; Curlin, Farr

    2015-01-01

    American Muslims have low rates of mammography utilization, and research suggests that religious values influence their health-seeking behaviors. We assessed associations between religion-related factors and breast cancer screening in this population. A diverse group of Muslim women were recruited from mosques and Muslim organization sites in Greater Chicago to self-administer a survey incorporating measures of fatalism, religiosity, discrimination, and Islamic modesty. 254 surveys were collected of which 240 met age inclusion criteria (40 years of age or older). Of the 240, 72 respondents were Arab, 71 South Asian, 59 African American, and 38 identified with another ethnicity. 77 % of respondents had at least one mammogram in their lifetime, yet 37 % had not obtained mammography within the past 2 years. In multivariate models, positive religious coping, and perceived religious discrimination in healthcare were negatively associated with having a mammogram in the past 2 years, while having a PCP was positively associated. Ever having a mammogram was positively associated with increasing age and years of US residency, and knowing someone with breast cancer. Promoting biennial mammography among American Muslims may require addressing ideas about religious coping and combating perceived religious discrimination through tailored interventions. PMID:24700026

  12. Associations between religion-related factors and breast cancer screening among American Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Murrar, Sohad; Adviento, Brigid; Liao, Chuanhong; Hosseinian, Zahra; Peek, Monica; Curlin, Farr

    2015-06-01

    American Muslims have low rates of mammography utilization, and research suggests that religious values influence their health-seeking behaviors. We assessed associations between religion-related factors and breast cancer screening in this population. A diverse group of Muslim women were recruited from mosques and Muslim organization sites in Greater Chicago to self-administer a survey incorporating measures of fatalism, religiosity, discrimination, and Islamic modesty. 254 surveys were collected of which 240 met age inclusion criteria (40 years of age or older). Of the 240, 72 respondents were Arab, 71 South Asian, 59 African American, and 38 identified with another ethnicity. 77% of respondents had at least one mammogram in their lifetime, yet 37% had not obtained mammography within the past 2 years. In multivariate models, positive religious coping, and perceived religious discrimination in healthcare were negatively associated with having a mammogram in the past 2 years, while having a PCP was positively associated. Ever having a mammogram was positively associated with increasing age and years of US residency, and knowing someone with breast cancer. Promoting biennial mammography among American Muslims may require addressing ideas about religious coping and combating perceived religious discrimination through tailored interventions.

  13. Predictors of Participation in Mammography Screening among non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Melvin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many factors influence women’s decisions to participate in guideline recommended screening mammography. We evaluated the influence of women’s socioeconomic characteristics, healthcare access, and cultural and psychological healthcare preferences on timely mammography screening participation.Materials and methods: A random digit dial survey of United States non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic women ages 40-75, from January-August 2009 determined self- reported time of most recent mammogram. Screening rates were assessed based on receipt of a screening mammogram within the prior 12 months, the interval recommended at the time by the American Cancer Society.Results: Thirty-nine percent of women reported not having a mammogram within the last 12 months. The odds of not having had a screening mammography was higher for non-Hispanic White women than for non-Hispanic Black (OR=2.16, 95% CI=0.26, 0.82, p=0.009 or Hispanic (OR=4.17, 95% CI=0.12, 0.48, p=0.01 women. Lack of health insurance (OR=3.22, 95% CI=1.54, 6.73, p=0.002 and lack of usual source of medical care (OR=3.37, 95% CI=1.43, 7.94, p=0.01 were associated with not being screened as were lower self-efficacy to obtain screening (OR=2.43, 95% CI=1.26, 4.73, p=0.01 and greater levels of religiosity and spirituality (OR=1.42, 95% CI=1.00, 2.00, p=0.05. Neither perceived risk nor present temporal orientation was significant.Discussion: Odds of not having a mammogram increased if women were uninsured, without medical care, non-Hispanic white, older in age, not confident in their ability to obtain screening, or held passive or external religious/spiritual values. Results are encouraging given racial disparities in healthcare participation and suggest that efforts to increase screening among minority women may be working.

  14. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  15. ECG abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, S.; Saleem, M.; Anjum, R.; Abdullah, W.; Shafi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in CKD patients. However, there is variation in literature regarding frequency of ECG abnormalities in CKD patients and limited information in local population. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. All patients between ages of 20-80 years with CKD not previously on renal replacement therapy who were admitted to nephrology ward at a tertiary care facility over a 6-month period were included. All patients underwent 12 lead electrocardiograms (ECG). ECG abnormalities were defined based on accepted standard criteria. Results: Total number of patients included in the study was 124. Mean age of all patients was 49.9+-13.8 years, 106 (84.8%) had hypertension, 84 (70%) had diabetes mellitus, and 35 (29.9%) had known cardiovascular disease. Mean serum creatinine was 7.2+-3.4 mg/dl, mean eGFR was 10.6+-9.2 ml/min/1.73 m/sup 2/. Overall 78.4% of all CKD patients have one or more ECG abnormality. Left ventricular hypertrophy (40%), Q waves (27.2%), ST segment elevation or depression (23.4%), prolonged QRS duration (19.2%), tachycardia (17.6%) and left and right atrial enlargement (17.6%) were the most common abnormalities. Conclusion: ECG abnormalities are common in hospitalized CKD patients in local population. All hospitalized CKD patients should undergo ECG to screen for cardiovascular disease. (author)

  16. Toxicology screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003578.htm Toxicology screen To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A toxicology screen refers to various tests that determine the ...

  17. Physician-patient discussions of controversial cancer screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A S; Shridharani, K V; Lou, W; Bernstein, J; Horowitz, C R

    2001-02-01

    Screening mammography for younger women and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement have controversial benefits and known potential adverse consequences. While providing informed consent and eliciting patient preference have been advocated for these tests, little is known about how often these discussions take place or about barriers to these discussions. We administered a survey to medical house staff and attending physicians practicing primary care. The survey examined physicians' likelihood of discussing screening mammography and PSA testing, and factors influencing the frequency and quality of these discussions. For the three scenarios, 16% to 34% of physicians stated that they do not discuss the screening tests. The likelihood of having a discussion was significantly associated with house staff physicians' belief that PSA screening is advantageous; house staff and attending physicians' intention to order a PSA test, and attending physicians' intention to order a mammogram; and a controversial indication for screening. The most commonly identified barriers to discussions were lack of time, the complexity of the topic, and a language barrier. Physicians report they often do not discuss cancer screening tests with their patients. Our finding that physicians' beliefs and intention to order the tests, and extraneous factors such as time constraints and a language barrier, are associated with discussions indicates that some patients may be inappropriately denied the opportunity to choose whether to screen for breast and prostate cancer.

  18. Physician–Patient Discussions of Controversial Cancer Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Andrew S.; Shridharani, Kanan V.; Lou, Wendy; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening mammography for younger women and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement have controversial benefits and known potential adverse consequences. While providing informed consent and eliciting patient preference have been advocated for these tests, little is known about how often these discussions take place or about barriers to these discussions. Methods We administered a survey to medical house staff and attending physicians practicing primary care. The survey examined physicians’ likelihood of discussing screening mammography and PSA testing, and factors influencing the frequency and quality of these discussions. Results For the three scenarios, 16% to 34% of physicians stated that they do not discuss the screening tests. The likelihood of having a discussion was significantly associated with house staff physicians’ belief that PSA screening is advantageous; house staff and attending physicians’ intention to order a PSA test, and attending physicians’ intention to order a mammogram; and a controversial indication for screening. The most commonly identified barriers to discussions were lack of time, the complexity of the topic, and a language barrier. Conclusions Physicians report they often do not discuss cancer screening tests with their patients. Our finding that physicians’ beliefs and intention to order the tests, and extraneous factors such as time constraints and a language barrier, are associated with discussions indicates that some patients may be inappropriately denied the opportunity to choose whether to screen for breast and prostate cancer. PMID:11165455

  19. Applying a social network analysis (SNA) approach to understanding radiologists' performance in reading mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli Taba, Seyedamir; Hossain, Liaquat; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Rationale and objectives: Observer performance has been widely studied through examining the characteristics of individuals. Applying a systems perspective, while understanding of the system's output, requires a study of the interactions between observers. This research explains a mixed methods approach to applying a social network analysis (SNA), together with a more traditional approach of examining personal/ individual characteristics in understanding observer performance in mammography. Materials and Methods: Using social networks theories and measures in order to understand observer performance, we designed a social networks survey instrument for collecting personal and network data about observers involved in mammography performance studies. We present the results of a study by our group where 31 Australian breast radiologists originally reviewed 60 mammographic cases (comprising of 20 abnormal and 40 normal cases) and then completed an online questionnaire about their social networks and personal characteristics. A jackknife free response operating characteristic (JAFROC) method was used to measure performance of radiologists. JAFROC was tested against various personal and network measures to verify the theoretical model. Results: The results from this study suggest a strong association between social networks and observer performance for Australian radiologists. Network factors accounted for 48% of variance in observer performance, in comparison to 15.5% for the personal characteristics for this study group. Conclusion: This study suggest a strong new direction for research into improving observer performance. Future studies in observer performance should consider social networks' influence as part of their research paradigm, with equal or greater vigour than traditional constructs of personal characteristics.

  20. The quality of digital mammograms. Development and use of a phantom for optimal certainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoefer, H.; Kotsianos, D.; Wirth, S.; Britsch, S.; Reiser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Digital imaging in mammography is becoming more and more accepted using both computed (CR) and direct radiography (DR). These techniques will soon be used in screening programs. Therefore, quality assurance for this technique is indispensable. The relevance of the current regulations, such as EPOC and the German QS-RL was investigated. For the investigation, a breast phantom and appropriate software were developed. Both were tested using digital mammography systems from six manufactures. Quality assurance parameters (such as contrast to noise ratio and contrast resolution) were calculated from these data sets. The results should be considered in future standards for mammography (IEC respectively DIN). In addition, this type of test procedure is time saving and enables a reduction in test devices, i. e. in costs. (orig.) [de

  1. Health Screening - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pelvic Exam and Pap Test - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 National Cancer Institute How to Prepare for a ... a Mammogram and Pap Test - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Asian Health Coalition Arabic (العربية) Expand Section American ...

  2. A method to test the reproducibility and to improve performance of computer-aided detection schemes for digitized mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Bin; Gur, David; Good, Walter F.; Hardesty, Lara A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new method for assessment of the reproducibility of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for digitized mammograms and to evaluate the possibility of using the implemented approach for improving CAD performance. Two thousand digitized mammograms (representing 500 cases) with 300 depicted verified masses were selected in the study. Series of images were generated for each digitized image by resampling after a series of slight image rotations. A CAD scheme developed in our laboratory was applied to all images to detect suspicious mass regions. We evaluated the reproducibility of the scheme using the detection sensitivity and false-positive rates for the original and resampled images. We also explored the possibility of improving CAD performance using three methods of combining results from the original and resampled images, including simple grouping, averaging output scores, and averaging output scores after grouping. The CAD scheme generated a detection score (from 0 to 1) for each identified suspicious region. A region with a detection score >0.5 was considered as positive. The CAD scheme detected 238 masses (79.3% case-based sensitivity) and identified 1093 false-positive regions (average 0.55 per image) in the original image dataset. In eleven repeated tests using original and ten sets of rotated and resampled images, the scheme detected a maximum of 271 masses and identified as many as 2359 false-positive regions. Two hundred and eighteen masses (80.4%) and 618 false-positive regions (26.2%) were detected in all 11 sets of images. Combining detection results improved reproducibility and the overall CAD performance. In the range of an average false-positive detection rate between 0.5 and 1 per image, the sensitivity of the scheme could be increased approximately 5% after averaging the scores of the regions detected in at least four images. At low false-positive rate (e.g., ≤average 0.3 per image), the grouping method

  3. Quantitative comparison of clustered microcalcifications in for-presentation and for-processing mammograms in full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Nishikawa, Robert M; Yang, Yongyi

    2017-07-01

    Mammograms acquired with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems are provided in both "for-processing'' and "for-presentation'' image formats. For-presentation images are traditionally intended for visual assessment by the radiologists. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using for-presentation images in computerized analysis and diagnosis of microcalcification (MC) lesions. We make use of a set of 188 matched mammogram image pairs of MC lesions from 95 cases (biopsy proven), in which both for-presentation and for-processing images are provided for each lesion. We then analyze and characterize the MC lesions from for-presentation images and compare them with their counterparts in for-processing images. Specifically, we consider three important aspects in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of MC lesions. First, we quantify each MC lesion with a set of 10 image features of clustered MCs and 12 textural features of the lesion area. Second, we assess the detectability of individual MCs in each lesion from the for-presentation images by a commonly used difference-of-Gaussians (DoG) detector. Finally, we study the diagnostic accuracy in discriminating between benign and malignant MC lesions from the for-presentation images by a pretrained support vector machine (SVM) classifier. To accommodate the underlying background suppression and image enhancement in for-presentation images, a normalization procedure is applied. The quantitative image features of MC lesions from for-presentation images are highly consistent with that from for-processing images. The values of Pearson's correlation coefficient between features from the two formats range from 0.824 to 0.961 for the 10 MC image features, and from 0.871 to 0.963 for the 12 textural features. In detection of individual MCs, the FROC curve from for-presentation is similar to that from for-processing. In particular, at sensitivity level of 80%, the average number of false-positives (FPs) per image region is 9

  4. Bavarian mammography screening program; Bayerisches Mammographiescreening (BMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willgeroth, F. [Lenkungsausschuss BMS (Germany); Universitaetsfrauenklinik Innenstadt, Muenchen (Germany); Baumann, M.; Blaser, D.; Froschauer, S.; Kaeaeb, V.; Stich, V.; Thomaschewski, S.; Walter, D. [Kassenaerztliche Vereinigung Bayern (Germany); Crispin, A. [Klinikum Grosshadern der LMU Muenchen, Institut fuer Medizinische Informationsverarbeitung (Germany); Waal, J. de; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.; Rothe, R. [Lenkungsausschuss BMS (Germany); Hoelzel, D. [Lenkungsausschuss BMS (Germany); Klinikum Grosshadern der LMU Muenchen, Institut fuer Medizinische Informationsverarbeitung (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    In Bavaria since the 1st April 2003 we have been conducting a high quality mammography-screening carried out in individual practises (BMS). We have used the European and the S 3 guidelines. The best diagnosis is an early diagnosis of the breast carcinoma to save human life. Because of this and the high mortality rate due to this disease it is essential to have a mammogram screening program. There is no single one ideal way of constructing a screening program, it is always based on compromise within the particular health care-systems. Arising problems cannot be avoided, it is only possible when all parties work closely together that the BMS works properly. (orig.) [German] In Bayern laeuft seit dem 01.04.2003 ein qualitaetsgesichertes, flaechendeckendes Mammographiescreening mit dezentralem Charakter (BMS). Zugrunde liegen die Empfehlungen der European Guidelines sowie der S-3-Leitlinie. Die Vorverlegung der Diagnostik ist beim Mammakarzinom bis heute die effektivste Moeglichkeit, um das Leben von Frauen zu retten, die an diesem Krebs erkrankt sind. Daraus und aufgrund der hohen Mortalitaetsrate dieser Erkrankung leitet sich die Notwendigkeit eines Screeningprogramms ab. Dessen Aufbau kann unterschiedlich sein, denbesten Weg gibt es nicht; es wird sich immer eine Kompromissloesung ergeben, die sehr stark vom jeweiligen Gesundheitssystem beeinflusst wird. Auftretende Probleme sind vielschichtig. Nur durch gemeinsame Anstrengungen aller Beteiligten liess sich das Bayerische Mammographiescreening installieren. (orig.)

  5. Caregiving associated with selected cancer risk behaviors and screening utilization among women: cross-sectional results of the 2009 BRFSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeves Katherine W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informal caregiving is increasingly common as the U.S. population ages, and there is concern that caregivers are less likely than non-caregivers to practice health-promoting behaviors, including cancer screening. We examined caregiving effects on cancer risk behaviors and breast and cervical cancer screening in the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Methods Women age ≥41 with data on breast and cervical cancer screening were included (weighted frequency 3,478,000 women. Cancer screening was classified according to American Cancer Society guidelines. We evaluated the association of caregiving with cancer risk behaviors (obesity, physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking status, and fruit/vegetable consumption and cancer screening (mammography, clinical breast exam [CBE], and Pap test using logistic regression overall and with stratification on age ( Results Caregivers had greater odds of being obese, physically active, and current smokers. Subgroup analyses revealed that caregiving was associated with obesity in younger women and whites, and with less obesity in older women. Also, caregiving was associated with smoking only among younger women and non-whites. Caregivers had greater odds of ever having had a mammogram or CBE, yet there was no association with mammogram, CBE, or Pap test within guidelines. Conclusions Caregiving was associated with some health behaviors that increase cancer risk, yet not with cancer screening within guidelines. Effects of caregiving by age and race require confirmation by additional studies.

  6. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  7. Evaluation of the "Angelina Jolie Effect" on Screening Mammography Utilization in an Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesch, Marco D; Schetter, Susann; Segel, Joel; Chetlen, Alison

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the impact on screening mammography at our institution, comparing weekly utilization in the 2 years before and the 2 years after Ms Angelina Jolie disclosed in the New York Times on May 13, 2013, that she had had a prophylactic double mastectomy. All 48,110 consecutive screening mammograms conducted at our institution between May 16, 2011, and May 16, 2015, were selected from our electronic medical record system. We used interrupted time series statistical models and graphical methods on utilization data to understand utilization changes before and after Ms Jolie's news. The graphed trend of weekly screening mammogram utilization failed to show changes around the time of interest. Analytical models and statistical tests also failed to show a step change increase or acceleration of utilization around May 2013. However, graphical and time series analyses showed a flattening of utilization in the middle of 2014. In our well-powered analysis in a large regional breast imaging center, we found no support for the hypothesis that this celebrity news drove increased screening. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Promoting mammography screening among Chinese American women using a message-framing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiyuan; Sarma, Elizabeth A; Moyer, Anne; Messina, Catherine R

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the role of women's perceptions about the relative pros versus cons (decisional balance) of mammography in moderating Chinese American women's responses to gain- and loss-framed messages that promote mammography. One hundred and forty-three Chinese American women who were currently nonadherent to guidelines for receiving annual screening mammograms were randomly assigned to read either a gain- or loss-framed culturally appropriate print brochure about mammography screening. Mammography screening was self-reported at a 2-month follow-up. Although there was not a main effect for message frame, the hypothesized interaction between message frame and decisional balance was significant, indicating that women who received a framed message that matched their decisional balance were significantly more likely to have obtained a mammogram by the follow-up than women who received a mismatched message. Results suggest that decisional balance, and more generally, perceptions about mammography, may be an important moderator of framing effects for mammography among Chinese American women. The match between message frame and decisional balance should be considered when attempting to encourage Chinese American women to receive mammography screening, as a match between the two may be most persuasive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors Associated with Breast Cancer Screening in a Country with National Health Insurance: Did We Succeed in Reducing Healthcare Disparities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Samah; Enav, Teena; Shohat, Tamy; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2017-02-01

    The effectiveness of breast cancer screening programs in reducing mortality is well established in the scientific literature. The National Breast Cancer Screening Program in Israel provides biennial mammograms for women of average risk aged 50-74 and annual mammograms for women aged 40-49 at higher risk. Compliance is high, but differential. This study explores different factors associated with breast cancer screening attendance among women aged 40-74 years. Two main outcomes were studied: ever been screened and been screened in the 2 years preceding the study, using the cross-sectional Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) Survey conducted in 2010-2012 among 2575 Israeli women aged 21+ years. The independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, perceived health status, lifestyle habits, and healthcare fund membership. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were conducted. Of the 943 participants aged 50-74, 87% had ever been screened and 74.8% had attended screening for breast cancer in the last 2 years. In multivariable models, Jewish compared to Arab women (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR] = 2.09, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-4.32), and unmarried compared to married women (APR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.2-7.2), were more likely to have ever been screened. The only factor associated with breast cancer screening in the 2 years preceding the study was healthcare fund membership. In women aged 40-49 years, ethnicity was the only contributing factor associated with breast cancer screening, with higher screening rates in the 2 years preceding the study in Jewish versus Arab women (APR = 3.7, 95% CI: 1.52-9.3). Breast cancer screening attendance in Israel is high. However, significant differences are observed by membership of healthcare fund and by ethnicity, calling for better targeted outreach programs at this level.

  10. Inequity of healthcare utilization on mammography examination and Pap smear screening in Thailand: Analysis of a population-based household survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Chongthawonsatid

    Full Text Available Healthcare in Thailand is not equally distributed, and not all people can equally access healthcare resources even if they are covered by health insurance. To examine factors associated with the utilization of mammography examination for breast cancer and Pap smear screening for cervical cancer, data from the national reproductive health survey conducted by the National Statistical Office of Thailand in 2009 was examined. The survey was carried out on 15,074,126 women aged 30-59 years. The results showed that the wealthier respondents had more mammograms than did the lower-income groups. The concentration index was 0.144. The data on Pap smears for cervical cancer also showed that the wealthier respondents were more likely to have had a Pap smear than their lower-income counterparts. The concentration index was 0.054. Determinants of mammography examination were education, followed by health welfare and wealth index, whereas the determinants of Pap smear screening were wealth index, followed by health welfare and education. The government should support greater education for women because education was associated with socioeconomic status and wealth. There should be an increase in the number of screening campaigns, mobile clinics, and low-cost mammograms and continued support for accessibility to mammograms, especially in rural areas and low-income communities.

  11. Racial and Ethnic Disparity in Symptomatic Breast Cancer Awareness despite a Recent Screen: The Role of Tumor Biology and Mammography Facility Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortel, Mylove; Rauscher, Garth H; Murphy, Anne Marie; Hoskins, Kent; Warnecke, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    In a racially and ethnically diverse sample of recently diagnosed urban patients with breast cancer, we examined associations of patient, tumor biology, and mammography facility characteristics on the probability of symptomatic discovery of their breast cancer despite a recent prior screening mammogram. In the Breast Cancer Care in Chicago study, self-reports at interview were used to define patients as having a screen-detected breast cancer or having symptomatic awareness despite a recent screening mammogram (SADRS), in the past 1 or 2 years. Patients with symptomatic breast cancer who did not report a recent prior screen were excluded from these analyses. Characteristics associated with more aggressive disease [estrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative status and higher tumor grade] were abstracted from medical records. Mammogram facility characteristics that might indicate aspects of screening quality were defined and controlled for in some analyses. SADRS was more common among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic than among non-Hispanic white patients (36% and 42% vs. 25%, respectively, P = 0.0004). SADRS was associated with ER/PR-negative and higher-grade disease. Patients screened at sites that relied on dedicated radiologists and sites that were breast imaging centers of excellence were less likely to report SADRS. Tumor and facility factors together accounted for two thirds of the disparity in SADRS (proportion mediated = 70%, P = 0.02). Facility resources and tumor aggressiveness explain much of the racial/ethnic disparity in symptomatic breast cancer among recently screened patients. A more equitable distribution of high-quality screening would ameliorate but not eliminate this disparity. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. A new parameter enhancing breast cancer detection in computer-aided diagnosis of X-ray mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanki, Nobuyoshi; Murase, Kenya; Nagao, Michinobu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a new parameter which enhances breast cancer detection using X-ray mammography. We used the database of X-ray mammograms generated by the Japan Society of Radiological Technology. The new parameter called 'quasi-fractal dimension (Q-FD)' was calculated from the relationship between the cutoff values for the maximum image intensity in the lesion set at 21 levels from 20% to 100% at equal intervals and the number of pixels with an intensity exceeding the cutoff value. In addition to Q-FD, the image features such as curvature (C) and eccentricity (E) were extracted. The conventional fractal dimension (C-FD) was also calculated using the box-counting method. We used artificial neural networks (ANNs) as a classification method. When using C, E, C-FD and age as inputs in ANNs and taking the number of neurons in the hidden layer as 50, we found the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A Z ) was 0.87±0.07 in the task differentiating between benign and malignant masses. When Q-FD was added to inputs in addition to the above parameters, the A Z value was significantly improved to become 0.93±0.09. These results suggested that Q-FD is effective for discriminating between benign and malignant masses. (author)

  13. Analysis of the effect of spatial resolution on texture features in the classification of breast masses in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangayyan, R.M.; Nguyen, T.M.; Ayres, F.J.; Nandi, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of spatial resolution on co-occurrence matrix-based texture features in discriminating breast lesions as benign masses or malignant tumors. The highest classification result, in terms of the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve, of A z 0.74, was obtained at the spatial resolution of 800 μm using all 14 of Haralick's texture features computed using the margins, or ribbons, of the breast masses as seen on mammograms. Furthermore, our study indicates that texture features computed using the ribbons resulted in higher classification accuracy than the same texture features computed using the corresponding regions of interest within the mass boundaries drawn by an expert radiologist. Classification experiments using each single texture feature showed that the texture F 8 , sum entropy, gives consistently high classification results with an average A z of 0.64 across all levels of resolution. At certain levels of resolution, the textures F 5 , F 9 , and F 11 individually gave the highest classification result with A z = 0.70. (orig.)

  14. An automatic method to discriminate malignant masses from normal tissue in digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brake, Guido M. te; Karssemeijer, Nico; Hendriks, Jan H.C.L.

    2000-01-01

    Specificity levels of automatic mass detection methods in mammography are generally rather low, because suspicious looking normal tissue is often hard to discriminate from real malignant masses. In this work a number of features were defined that are related to image characteristics that radiologists use to discriminate real lesions from normal tissue. An artificial neural network was used to map the computed features to a measure of suspiciousness for each region that was found suspicious by a mass detection method. Two data sets were used to test the method. The first set of 72 malignant cases (132 films) was a consecutive series taken from the Nijmegen screening programme, 208 normal films were added to improve the estimation of the specificity of the method. The second set was part of the new DDSM data set from the University of South Florida. A total of 193 cases (772 films) with 372 annotated malignancies was used. The measure of suspiciousness that was computed using the image characteristics was successful in discriminating tumours from false positive detections. Approximately 75% of all cancers were detected in at least one view at a specificity level of 0.1 false positive per image. (author)

  15. Inclusive integral evaluation for mammograms using the hierarchical fuzzy integral (HFI) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Takashi; Yamashita, Kazuya; Arao, Shinichi; Kitayama, Akira; Hayashi, Akiko; Suemori, Shinji; Ohkura, Yasuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Physical factors (physically evaluated values) and psychological factors (fuzzy measurements) of breast x-ray images were comprehensively evaluated by applying breast x-ray images to an extended stratum-type fuzzy integrating model. In addition, x-ray images were evaluated collectively by integrating the quality (sharpness, graininess, and contrast) of x-ray images and three representative shadows (fibrosis, calcification, tumor) in the breast x-ray images. We selected the most appropriate system for radiography of the breast from three kinds of intensifying screens and film systems for evaluation by this method and investigated the relationship between the breast x-ray images and noise equivalent quantum number, which is called the overall physical evaluation method, and between the breast x-ray images and psychological evaluation by a visual system with a stratum-type fuzzy integrating model. We obtained a linear relationship between the breast x-ray image and noise-equivalent quantum number, and linearity between the breast x-ray image and psychological evaluation by the visual system. Therefore, the determination of fuzzy measurement, which is a scale for fuzzy evaluation of psychological factors of the observer, and physically evaluated values with a stratum-type fuzzy integrating model enabled us to make a comprehensive evaluation of x-ray images that included both psychological and physical aspects. (author)

  16. Neighborhood Structural Similarity Mapping for the Classification of Masses in Mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabidas, Rinku; Midya, Abhishek; Chakraborty, Jayasree

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, two novel feature extraction methods, using neighborhood structural similarity (NSS), are proposed for the characterization of mammographic masses as benign or malignant. Since gray-level distribution of pixels is different in benign and malignant masses, more regular and homogeneous patterns are visible in benign masses compared to malignant masses; the proposed method exploits the similarity between neighboring regions of masses by designing two new features, namely, NSS-I and NSS-II, which capture global similarity at different scales. Complementary to these global features, uniform local binary patterns are computed to enhance the classification efficiency by combining with the proposed features. The performance of the features are evaluated using the images from the mini-mammographic image analysis society (mini-MIAS) and digital database for screening mammography (DDSM) databases, where a tenfold cross-validation technique is incorporated with Fisher linear discriminant analysis, after selecting the optimal set of features using stepwise logistic regression method. The best area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.98 with an accuracy of is achieved with the mini-MIAS database, while the same for the DDSM database is 0.93 with accuracy .

  17. Do pre-trained deep learning models improve computer-aided classification of digital mammograms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutalib, Sarah S.; Mohamed, Aly A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Berg, Wendie A.; Luo, Yahong; Wu, Shandong

    2018-02-01

    Digital mammography screening is an important exam for the early detection of breast cancer and reduction in mortality. False positives leading to high recall rates, however, results in unnecessary negative consequences to patients and health care systems. In order to better aid radiologists, computer-aided tools can be utilized to improve distinction between image classifications and thus potentially reduce false recalls. The emergence of deep learning has shown promising results in the area of biomedical imaging data analysis. This study aimed to investigate deep learning and transfer learning methods that can improve digital mammography classification performance. In particular, we evaluated the effect of pre-training deep learning models with other imaging datasets in order to boost classification performance on a digital mammography dataset. Two types of datasets were used for pre-training: (1) a digitized film mammography dataset, and (2) a very large non-medical imaging dataset. By using either of these datasets to pre-train the network initially, and then fine-tuning with the digital mammography dataset, we found an increase in overall classification performance in comparison to a model without pre-training, with the very large non-medical dataset performing the best in improving the classification accuracy.

  18. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  19. Prevalence and distribution of congenital abnormalities in Turkey: differences between the prenatal and postnatal periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Gedikbasi, Ali; Yildirim, Dogukan; Arslan, Oguz; Adal, Erdal; Kavuncuoglu, Sultan; Ozbek, Sibel; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of cases associated with congenital abnormalities during the following three periods: pregnancy, birth, and the neonatal period. This was a retrospective study of cases between 2002 and 2006. All abnormal pregnancies, elective terminations of pregnancies, stillbirths, and births with congenital abnormalities managed in the Neonatology Unit were classified based on the above distribution scheme. During the 5-year study period, 1906 cases with congenital abnormalities were recruited, as follows: 640 prenatally detected and terminated cases, with most abnormalities related to the central nervous system, chromosomes, and urogenital system (56.7%, 12.7%, and 8.9%, respectively); 712 neonates with congenital abnormalities (congenital heart disease [49.2%], central nervous system abnormalities [14.7%], and urogenital system abnormalities [12.9%]); and hospital stillbirths, of which 34.2% had malformations (220 prenatal cases [34.4%] had multiple abnormalities, whereas 188 liveborn cases [26.4%] had multiple abnormalities). The congenital abnormalities rate between 2002 and 2006 was 2.07%. Systematic screening for fetal anomalies is the primary means for identification of affected pregnancies. © 2010 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2010 Japanese Teratology Society.

  20. Exploring the potential of context-sensitive CADe in screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourassi, Georgia D.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Conventional computer-assisted detection (CADe) systems in screening mammography provide the same decision support to all users. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of a context-sensitive CADe system which provides decision support guided by each user's focus of attention during visual search and reporting patterns for a specific case. Methods: An observer study for the detection of malignant masses in screening mammograms was conducted in which six radiologists evaluated 20 mammograms while wearing an eye-tracking device. Eye-position data and diagnostic decisions were collected for each radiologist and case they reviewed. These cases were subsequently analyzed with an in-house knowledge-based CADe system using two different modes: Conventional mode with a globally fixed decision threshold and context-sensitive mode with a location-variable decision threshold based on the radiologists' eye dwelling data and reporting information. Results: The CADe system operating in conventional mode had 85.7% per-image malignant mass sensitivity at 3.15 false positives per image (FPsI). The same system operating in context-sensitive mode provided personalized decision support at 85.7%-100% sensitivity and 0.35-0.40 FPsI to all six radiologists. Furthermore, context-sensitive CADe system could improve the radiologists' sensitivity and reduce their performance gap more effectively than conventional CADe. Conclusions: Context-sensitive CADe support shows promise in delineating and reducing the radiologists' perceptual and cognitive errors in the diagnostic interpretation of screening mammograms more effectively than conventional CADe.

  1. Determining the spatial heterogeneity underlying racial and ethnic differences in timely mammography screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Gibbons

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leading cause of cancer death for women worldwide continues to be breast cancer. Early detection through timely mammography has been recognized to increase the probability of survival. While mammography rates have risen for many women in recent years, disparities in screening along racial/ethnic lines persist across nations. In this paper, we argue that the role of local context, as identified through spatial heterogeneity, is an unexplored dynamic which explains some of the gaps in mammography utilization by race/ethnicity. Methods We apply geographically weighted regression methods to responses from the 2008 Public Health Corporations’ Southeastern Household Health Survey, to examine the spatial heterogeneity in mammograms in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Results We find first aspatially that minority identity, in fact, increases the odds of a timely mammogram: 74% for non-Hispanic Blacks and 80% for Hispanic/Latinas. However, the geographically weighted regression confirms the relation of race/ethnicity to mammograms varies by space. Notably, the coefficients for Hispanic/Latinas are only significant in portions of the region. In other words, the increased odds of a timely mammography we found are not constant spatially. Other key variables that are known to influence timely screening, such as the source of healthcare and social capital, measured as community connection, also vary by space. Conclusions These results have ramifications globally, demonstrating that the influence of individual characteristics which motivate, or inhibit, cancer screening may not be constant across space. This inconsistency calls for healthcare practitioners and outreach services to be mindful of the local context in their planning and resource allocation efforts.

  2. Receiver operating characteristic analysis for the detection of simulated microcalcifications on mammograms using hardcopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, C J; Shaw, Chris C; Whitman, Gary J; Yang, Wei T; Dempsey, Peter J; Nguyen, Victoria; Ice, Mary F

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mammography systems based on three different detectors-a conventional screen-film (SF) combination, an a-Si/CsI flat-panel (FP)-based detector, and a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based x-ray phosphor-based detector-for their performance in detecting simulated microcalcifications (MCs). 112-150 μm calcium carbonate grains were used to simulate MCs and were overlapped with a slab phantom of simulated 50% adipose/50% glandular breast tissue-equivalent material referred to as the uniform background. For the tissue structure background, 200-250 μm calcium carbonate grains were used and overlapped with an anthropomorphic breast phantom. All MC phantom images were acquired with and without magnification (1.8X). The hardcopy images were reviewed by five mammographers. A five-point confidence level rating was used to score each detection task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and the areas under the ROC curves (A z s) were used to compare the performances of the three mammography systems under various conditions. The results showed that, with a uniform background and contact images, the FP-based system performed significantly better than the SF and the CCD-based systems. For magnified images with a uniform background, the SF and the FP-based systems performed equally well and significantly better than the CCD-based system. With tissue structure background and contact images, the SF system performed significantly better than the FP and the CCD-based systems. With magnified images and a tissue structure background, the SF and the CCD-based systems performed equally well and significantly better than the FP-based system. In the detection of MCs in the fibroglandular and the heterogeneously dense regions, no significant differences were found except that the SF system performed significantly better than the CCD-based system in the fibroglandular regions for the contact images

  3. Comparison of breast percent density estimation from raw versus processed digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Diane; Gavenonis, Sara; Conant, Emily; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    We compared breast percent density (PD%) measures obtained from raw and post-processed digital mammographic (DM) images. Bilateral raw and post-processed medio-lateral oblique (MLO) images from 81 screening studies were retrospectively analyzed. Image acquisition was performed with a GE Healthcare DS full-field DM system. Image post-processing was performed using the PremiumViewTM algorithm (GE Healthcare). Area-based breast PD% was estimated by a radiologist using a semi-automated image thresholding technique (Cumulus, Univ. Toronto). Comparison of breast PD% between raw and post-processed DM images was performed using the Pearson correlation (r), linear regression, and Student's t-test. Intra-reader variability was assessed with a repeat read on the same data-set. Our results show that breast PD% measurements from raw and post-processed DM images have a high correlation (r=0.98, R2=0.95, p<0.001). Paired t-test comparison of breast PD% between the raw and the post-processed images showed a statistically significant difference equal to 1.2% (p = 0.006). Our results suggest that the relatively small magnitude of the absolute difference in PD% between raw and post-processed DM images is unlikely to be clinically significant in breast cancer risk stratification. Therefore, it may be feasible to use post-processed DM images for breast PD% estimation in clinical settings. Since most breast imaging clinics routinely use and store only the post-processed DM images, breast PD% estimation from post-processed data may accelerate the integration of breast density in breast cancer risk assessment models used in clinical practice.

  4. Breast cancer knowledge, attitudes and screening behaviors among Indian-Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, C; Tranberg, R; Lee, F C

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the study were to report breast cancer screening practices among Indian-Australian women and to examine the relationship between demographic characteristics, cultural beliefs and women's breast cancer screening (BCS) behaviors. A descriptive and cross-sectional method was used. Two hundred and forty two Indian-Australian women were recruited from several Indian organizations. English versions of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ) were administered. The main research variables are BCS practices, demographic characteristics and total scores on each of the BCSBQ subscales. The majority of participants (72.7%-81.4%) had heard of breast awareness, clinical breast examination (CBE) and mammograms. Only 28.9% performed a BSE monthly and although 60% had practiced CBE, only 27.3% of women within the targeted age group had annual CBE. Only 23.6% of women within the targeted age group reported they had a mammogram biennial. Marital status and length of stay in Australia were positively associated with women's screening behaviors. In terms of BCSBQ score, women who had the three screening practices regularly as recommended obtained significantly higher scores on the "attitude towards general health check-ups" and "barriers to mammographic screening" subscales. There was a significant difference in the mean score of the "knowledge and perceptions about breast cancer" between women who did and who did not engage in breast awareness. Our study reveals that attitudes toward health check-ups and perceived barriers to mammographic screening were influential in determining compliance with breast cancer screening practices among Indian-Australian women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interval breast cancers: Absolute and proportional incidence and blinded review in a community mammographic screening program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonaro, Luca A., E-mail: luca.carbonaro@gmail.com [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Azzarone, Antonio [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Paskeh, Bijan Babaei [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Brambilla, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Radiologia, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano (Mi) 20089 (Italy); Brunelli, Silvia [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, ULSS 20, Piazza Lambranzi, Verona 37034 (Italy); Calori, Anna [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Caumo, Francesca [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, ULSS 20, Piazza Lambranzi, Verona 37034 (Italy); Malerba, Paolo [Dipartimento di Radiologia, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano (Mi) 20089 (Italy); Menicagli, Laura [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca M. [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Vadalà, Giuseppe [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Brambilla, Gelma; Fantini, Luigi [Servizio di Medicina Preventiva delle Comunità, ASL Milano 2, Via Friuli 2, Lacchiarella (Mi) 20084 (Italy); Ciatto, Stefano [Screening Program, ULSS 16, Padova (Italy); and others

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the first years since the beginning of a mammographic population-based screening program. Materials and methods: Women aged 49–69 were invited biennially for two-view film-screen mammography and double reading without arbitration was performed. Interval cancers (ICs) from 2001 to 2006 were identified using screening archives, local pathology archives, and hospital discharge records. The proportional incidence of IC was determined considering breast cancers expected without screening. Three offsite radiologists experienced in breast cancer screening blindly evaluated mammograms prior to diagnosis, randomly mixed with negative mammograms (1:2 ratio). Cases unrecalled at review were considered as true ICs, those recalled by only one reviewer as minimal signs, and those recalled by two or three reviewers as missed cancers. T and N stage of the reviewed ICs were evaluated and compared. Results: A total of 86,276 first level mammograms were performed. Mean recall rate was 6.8% at first and 4.6% at repeat screening. We had 476 screen-detected cancers and 145 ICs (10 of them ductal carcinomas in situ). Absolute incidence was 17 per 10,000 screening examinations. Invasive proportional incidence was 19% (44/234) in the first year, 39% (91/234) in the second year, and 29% (135/468) in the two-year interval. Of 145 ICs, 130 (90%) were reviewed mixed with 287 negative controls: 55% (71/130) resulted to be true ICs, 24% (31/130) minimal signs, and 22% (28/130) missed cancers. The rate of ICs diagnosed in the first year interval was 21% (15/71) for true ICs, 46% (13/28) for missed cancers, and 39% (12/31) for minimal signs, with a significant difference of true ICs rate compared to missed cancers rate (p = 0.012). A higher rate of T3 and T4 stages was found for missed cancers (18%, 5/28) compared to minimal signs (6%, 2/31) or true ICs (8%, 6/71), while the rate of N2 and N3 stage for both minimal signs (19%, 6/31) or missed cancers (25

  6. Interval breast cancers: Absolute and proportional incidence and blinded review in a community mammographic screening program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonaro, Luca A.; Azzarone, Antonio; Paskeh, Bijan Babaei; Brambilla, Giorgio; Brunelli, Silvia; Calori, Anna; Caumo, Francesca; Malerba, Paolo; Menicagli, Laura; Sconfienza, Luca M.; Vadalà, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Gelma; Fantini, Luigi; Ciatto, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the first years since the beginning of a mammographic population-based screening program. Materials and methods: Women aged 49–69 were invited biennially for two-view film-screen mammography and double reading without arbitration was performed. Interval cancers (ICs) from 2001 to 2006 were identified using screening archives, local pathology archives, and hospital discharge records. The proportional incidence of IC was determined considering breast cancers expected without screening. Three offsite radiologists experienced in breast cancer screening blindly evaluated mammograms prior to diagnosis, randomly mixed with negative mammograms (1:2 ratio). Cases unrecalled at review were considered as true ICs, those recalled by only one reviewer as minimal signs, and those recalled by two or three reviewers as missed cancers. T and N stage of the reviewed ICs were evaluated and compared. Results: A total of 86,276 first level mammograms were performed. Mean recall rate was 6.8% at first and 4.6% at repeat screening. We had 476 screen-detected cancers and 145 ICs (10 of them ductal carcinomas in situ). Absolute incidence was 17 per 10,000 screening examinations. Invasive proportional incidence was 19% (44/234) in the first year, 39% (91/234) in the second year, and 29% (135/468) in the two-year interval. Of 145 ICs, 130 (90%) were reviewed mixed with 287 negative controls: 55% (71/130) resulted to be true ICs, 24% (31/130) minimal signs, and 22% (28/130) missed cancers. The rate of ICs diagnosed in the first year interval was 21% (15/71) for true ICs, 46% (13/28) for missed cancers, and 39% (12/31) for minimal signs, with a significant difference of true ICs rate compared to missed cancers rate (p = 0.012). A higher rate of T3 and T4 stages was found for missed cancers (18%, 5/28) compared to minimal signs (6%, 2/31) or true ICs (8%, 6/71), while the rate of N2 and N3 stage for both minimal signs (19%, 6/31) or missed cancers (25

  7. A retrospective audit of the first screening round of the Maltese breast screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizzi, D.; Zarb, F.; Dennis, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyse whether the screening performance parameters of the Maltese National Breast Screening Programme first screening round met requirements set by European standards. The association between screening age and results of screening performance parameters was also investigated. Method: Quantitative methodology was used to review examinations of women who were recalled for a technical recall or further assessment rates. All accessible members of the population recalled during the first round were retrospectively reviewed resulting in a sample of 2300 recalled examinations. Results: Malta's first screening round met the European Guidelines recommendations for technical repeat rate (0.26%), early recall rate (0.45%), breast cancer detection rate (13.77 per 1000 women) and Positive Predictive Value of screening test (7.58%). However, local recall rate (18.53%) and further assessment rate (18.27%) were higher than recommended. The Chi square test showed a statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in recall rates between the compared age groups, as younger women (51–55 years) were more likely to have a negative diagnosis after the initial mammogram whereas older women (56–60 years) were more likely to be recalled. There was no age discrepancy (p ≥ 0.05) in local breast cancer detection rate and positive predictive value of screening test. Conclusion: Although the Maltese first screening round performed well, this study found deficiencies in recall and further assessment rates, which according to literature may result in psychological morbidity and inefficient use of screening resources. This study also concluded that when a cohort is analysed, age is not as significant as the screening round itself (first/subsequent). - Highlights: • The Maltese technical and early recall rates complied with European guidelines. • Breast cancer detection rate and positive predictive value conformed to guidelines. • The recall and further

  8. [ASCUS in screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, L; Monari, F; De Bianchi, P S; Amadori, A; Bondi, A

    2001-12-01

    The significance and use of the cytological diagnosis "atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance" (ASCUS) remain a major problem in cervical cancer screening. The prevalence of ASCUS by patient age has seldom been investigated. The present paper reports the prevalence of ASCUS in a large series of screening Pap smears from the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna. The study was based on the data collected by the Department of Health of the Emilia-Romagna Region for the first 3-year round (1997-1999) of a population-based screening programme (target age, 25-64 years). The age-specific frequency of ASCUS has been calculated as a prevalence rate per 1000 screened patients. A total of 597,386 women participated in the programme. Women diagnosed with ASCUS (n = 8205 or 13.7 per 1000) accounted for 49% of the recalls for colposcopy (n = 16,871, or 28.2 per 1000). The prevalence of diagnoses of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL) decreased progressively with age while that of high-grade SIL was slightly higher between 30 and 39 years. The prevalence of ASCUS peaked at age 45-49 years (17.3 per 1000 subjects). The observed peak reflects the prevalence of (1) cytological changes closely associated with perimenopausal age and at least compatible with the ASCUS diagnosis, and (2) cytological abnormalities induced by hormone replacement therapy.

  9. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... His height. mass. intelligence and genitalia were normal. The aSSOCiatIOn between deafness and disturbance of cardiac conduction and between pigmented skin lesions and cardiac abnormalities, has been well described. Should. ~I patient present with multiple lentigines and/or familial sensineural ...

  10. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  11. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  12. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcome