WorldWideScience

Sample records for abnormal occurrences october december

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1993. Volume 16, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1993. This report discusses six abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities. Five involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved an overexposure to a nursing infant. Seven abnormal occurrences that were reported by the Agreement States are also discussed, based on information provided by the Agreement States as of February 28, 1994. Of these events, three involved brachytherapy misadministrations, one involved a teletherapy misadministration, one involved a theft of radioactive material during transport and improper disposal, and two involved lost sources.

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1994. Volume 17, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such occurrences to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those incidents and events that have been determined to be AOs during the period of October 1 through December 31, 1994. This report addresses four AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. These occurrences involved the following: a generic concern relating to core shroud cracking in boiling water reactors; recurring incidents of administering higher doses than procedurally allowed for diagnostic imaging at a single facility; one medical teletherapy misadministration; and one medical brachytherapy misadministration. Agreement States submitted four AO reports. These four occurrences involved the following: one major contamination at a commercial facility; two medical brachytherapy misadministrations; and one medical teletherapy misadministration. The report also contains updates of seven AOs previously reported by NRC licensees and four AOs previously reported by the Agreement States. Two ``Other Events of Interest`` are also being reported. These occurrences involved the operability of safety relief valves at a nuclear power plant, and an error in the installation process of a Leksell Gamma KnifeR teletherapy unit that resulted in an operational failure.

  3. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmayda, W. T. [editor

    2005-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  4. Tester status report: October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draut, C.F.

    1979-02-09

    This report details the status of the testers which provide the testing support of timers, actuators, detonators, firing sets, transducers, isolators, and pyrospacers during the time period of October through December 1978.

  5. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the third quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  6. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  7. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-23

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the third quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  8. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  9. LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-05-28

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, thereby optimizing these critical parameters.

  10. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge and Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of...

  11. Southwestern Power Administration Update, October- December 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-12-01

    On October 29, 2004, Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) reached agreement on interim arrangements to be implemented after the October 31, 2004, expiration of the membership agreement between the two parties. According to Jim McDonald, Director of Southwestern’s Division of Customer Service, the interim agreement forged between Southwestern and SPP seeks to minimize impacts to SPP as well as to Southwestern and its customers while Southwestern and SPP work on a seams/coordination agreement to succeed the expired membership agreement.

  12. Defense Standardization Program Journal. October/December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    varying supplies of solar , wind, and other renewable energy sources and better respond to changing demand. »§i DSP JOURNAL October/December 2009...Activity. This year’s work- shop will highlight five logistics life cycle tools— POWERLOG-J, SYSPARS, CASA , COMPASS, and PFSA—as well as the new

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1988). Volume 37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenty, P. W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1988-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1988, contains several articles devoted to our work in the understanding, identification, and correction of illumination non-uniformities on the OMEGA laser system. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  14. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report describes activities and reports on progress for the second quarter (October 93 - December 93) of the second year of the grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). It reports progress against grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant.

  15. RECENT REFERENCES: OCTOBER 1, 2005 TO DECEMBER 31, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WINCHELL, D.F.

    2005-12-31

    This document lists experimental references added to Nuclear Science References (NSR) during the period October 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. The first section lists keynumbers and keywords sorted by mass and nuclide. The second section lists all references, ordered by keynumber.

  16. Management & communication: Programme of Seminars October to December 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Situation : 11.10.2004 Bilingual seminar Dates Days Places available Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Project Management - Case Study 22 November 1 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 24, 25, 26 November 3 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 8, 9, 10 December 3 yes Séminaires en Français Appréciation des performances - MAPS 1, 2, 3 d&eacut...

  17. Bulk shielding facility quarterly report, October, November, and December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, III, S. S.; Lance, E. D.; Thomas, J. R.

    1977-08-01

    The BSR operated at an average power level of 1,836 kw for 78.01 percent of the time during October, November, and December. Water-quality control in both the reactor primary and secondary cooling systems was satisfactory. The PCA was used in training programs and was operated on two occasions when the University of Kentucky students actively participated in training laboratories.

  18. Fusion Power Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the October--December 1978 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Three separate abstracts were prepared for the included sections. (MOW)

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1985). Volume 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1985-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review comprises reports on the performance of the active-mirror-boosted glass development laser (GDL) single-beam system; the implementation of multichannel, soft x-ray diagnostic instrumentation; computer simulation of recent OMEGA laser implosion experiments; materials and ultrafast technology developments in the LLE advanced technology program; and the National Laser Users Facility activities for October-December 1985.

  20. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1990). Volume 45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperlein, E. M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1990-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1990, contains descriptions of a new phase-conversion technique designed to improve irradiation uniformity, a report on the interpretation of highdensity implosion experiments of argon-filled targets, and an article on the use of absorption spectroscopy to diagnose compressed target layers. The section on advanced technology has a report on the application of KTP crystals as electro-optic amplitude modulators, and describes the use of chirped-pulse technology to measure X(3) by nearly degenerate four-wave mixing. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  1. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1987). Volume 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1987-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1987, contains descriptions of the implementation of distributed phase plates for improved irradiation uniformity and the implementation of a cryogenic target capability on the OMEGA facility. The section on advanced technology has reports on the design and optimization of recombination x-ray lasers and a near-infrared dichroic dye for use in both active and passive liquid-crystal devices. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  2. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2000). Volume 85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sources, John M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2000, begins with an article by R. Betti, M. Umansky, V. Lobatchev, V. N. Goncharov, and R. L. McCrory, who report on the development of a model for the deceleration phase of an imploding inertial fusion capsule (p. 1). The model shows that the ablative flow off the inner shell surface plays a critical role in reducing the growth rate and suppressing short-wavelength modes in the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Other articles in this volume are: The Effect of Shock Heating on the Stability of Laser-Driven Targets; Spherical Cavity Expansion in Material with Densification; Design and Performance of a Selectable-Rate Streak-Camera Deflection Ramp Generator; Unique High-Bandwidth, UV Fiber Deliver System for OMEGA Diagnostics Applications; Fabrication and Properties of an Ultrafast NbN Hot-Electron Single-Photon detector; and, Preliminary Design of NIF 2-D SSD.

  3. LLE review. Volume 65. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehly, T.R. [ed.

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1995, contains a description of the generation and characterization of continuous, deep-surface-relief phase plates that are more efficient and versatile than previous designs. The LLE program plan has scheduled a number of enhancements to OMEGA`s performance and uniformity, the first of which is the implementation of these new distributed phase plates. Other articles in this volume include the discussion of an x-ray diagnostic method to measure shell-fuel mixing, the theoretical analysis of ablation-front stability, a description of a major subsystem in the OMEGA control system software, a study of the population inversions in intensely pumped Nd:YLF, and a description of a new ultrafast laser system and its uses.

  4. LLE review. Volume 61, Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This volume of the LLE review, covering the period of October--December 1994, contains articles on a diagnostic method employing krypton spectroscopy for measurement of temperature and shell-fuel mixing in high-temperature implosions; the first direct assessment of the ion-acoustic decay instability in a large-scale length, hot plasma; measurements of polarization mode dispersion and group-velocity walkaway in birefringent media using a frequency domain interferometer; an evaluation of the magnetic flux dynamics occurring in an optically triggered, thin-film superconducting switch; the effect of slurry fluid chemistry on particle size distribution during aqueous polishing of optical glass; and the influence of thermal and mechanical processing history in the preparation of well-ordered liquid crystal elastomer systems.

  5. Radioactive contamination in the Hanford environs. October-December 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, B.V.; Soldat, J.K.

    1956-02-06

    This document summarizes the results obtained from monitoring the Hanford environs for radioactive contamination during the period October, November, and December 1955. Samples were collected by Regional Monitoring forces. These samples were analyzed by Radio-Analysis Laboratory forces. Counting rates obtained from these analyses were corrected for geometry, backscatter, air-window absorption, source size, selfabsorption, chemical yield, and collection efficiency by Radio-Analysis Laboratory forces. Additional corrections for decay were applied to those samples in which significant amounts of short half-life beta particle emitters were found. The findings obtained from analyzing the direct samples were supplemented with readings obtained from portable and fixed instrumentation. The results obtained from the described efforts are presented in Sections I through VII. These sections discuss the amounts of active material discharged from plant facilities and their effect on the contamination of vegetation, air, soil, and water. 5 refs.

  6. Radioactive contamination in the Hanford environs, October-December 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, B.V.; McConiga, M.W.; Soldat, J.K.

    1957-02-25

    This document summarizes the results obtained from monitoring the Hanford environs for radioactive contamination during the period October, November, and December, 1956. Samples were collected by Regional Monitoring forces. These samples were analyzed by Radiological Chemical Analysis forces. Counting rates obtained from these analyses were corrected for geometry, backscatter, air-window absorption, source size, self-absorption, chemical yield, and collection efficiency by Radiological Chemical Analysis forces. Additional corrections for decay were applied to those samples in which significant amounts of short half-life beta particle emitters were found. The findings obtained from analyzing the direct samples were supplemented with readings obtained from portable and fixed instrumentation. The results obtained from the described efforts are presented in Sections I through VII. These sections discuss the amounts of active material discharged from plant facilities and their effect on the contamination of vegetation, air, soil, and water. 8 refs.

  7. Radioactive contamination in the Hanford environs, October-December 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConiga, M.W.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, J.K.

    1958-02-28

    This document summarizes the results obtained from monitoring the Hanford environs for radioactive contamination during the period October, November, December, 1957. Samples were collected by Regional Monitoring forces. These samples were analyzed by Radiological Chemical Analysis forces. Counting rates obtained from these analyses were corrected for geometry, backscatter, air-window absorption, source size, self-absorption, chemical yield, and collection efficiency by Radiological Chemical Analysis forces. Additional corrections for decay were applied to those samples in which significant amounts of sort half-life beta particle emitters were found. The findings obtained from analyzing the direct samples were supplemented with readings obtained from portable and fixed instrumentation. The results obtained from the described efforts are presented in Sections I through VI. These sections discuss the amounts of active material discharged from plant facilities and their effect on the contamination of vegetation, air, soil, and water. 8 refs.

  8. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Bischoff, W.S.; Bishop, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) was modified in April 1978 from a four stage flash/binary process to a two stage cycle for the extraction of energy from a high temperature, high salinity, liquid-dominated resource. The overhaul and cleaning during October and pigging problems which led to a limited shutdown in December are discussed. Reservoir assessment, including production and injection wells, are discussed. Results of tests that were accomplished are included. Laboratory data obtained for steam, brine, binary and cooling water, and scale are indicated. Any equipment that required repairs or modifications to equipment and the clarifier/media filter are discussed. The status of the feasibility and surge studies is covered. (MHR)

  9. LLE review. Quarterly report, October--December 1991: Volume 49

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, R.L. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  10. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2001). Volume 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, William R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2001-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2001, features “Time-Integrated Light Images of OMEGA Implosions” by P. Morley and W. Seka (p. 1). E. Kowaluk initiated this project for aesthetic rather than scientific reasons when he began taking visible light photographs of imploding OMEGA targets. These beautiful images are used to communicate LLE’s mission to the general public. A closer examination of the images revealed a one-to-one correspondence between the bright spots in the image and each of the 60 laser beams. The intensity of the bright spots has been related to refraction and absorption in the plasma surrounding the imploding target. These photographs are now proving to be the basis of a new laser-plasma interaction diagnostic. Other articles in this volume are titled the following: Analytical Model of Nonlinear, Single-Mode, Classical Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at Arbitrary Atwood Numbers; A High-Pass Phase Plate Design for OMEGA and the NIF; Advanced Tritium Recovery System; Establishing Links Between Single Gold Nanoparticles Buried Inside SiO2 Thin Film and 351-nm Pulsed-Laser-Damage Morphology; Resistive Switching Dynamics in Current-Biased Y-Ba-Cu-O Microbridges Excited by Nanosecond Electrical Pulses; and, Properties of Amorphous Carbon Films.

  11. Performance Analysis of Occurrences January 1, 2011-December 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, M

    2012-03-16

    This report documents the analysis of the occurrences during the period January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. The report compares LLNL occurrences by reporting criteria and significance category to see if LLNL is reporting occurrences along similar percentages as other DOE sites. The three-year trends are analyzed. It does not include the analysis of the causes or the lessons learned from the occurrences, as they are analyzed separately. The number and types of occurrences that LLNL reports to DOE varies over time. This variation can be attributed to normally occurring changes in frequency; DOE's or LLNL's heightened interest in a particular subject area; changes in LLNL processes; or emerging problems. Since all of the DOE sites use the same reporting criteria, it is helpful to understand if LLNL is consistent with or diverging from reporting at other sites. This section compares the normalized number of occurrences reported by LLNL and other DOE sites. In order to compare LLNL occurrence reports to occurrence reports from other DOE sites, we normalized (or standardized) the data from the sites. DOE sites vary widely in their budgets, populations, and scope of work and these variations may affect reporting frequency. In addition, reports are required for a wide range of occurrence types, some of which may not be applicable to all DOE sites. For example, one occurrence reporting group is Group 3, Nuclear Safety Basis, and not all sites have nuclear operations. Because limited information is available for all sites, the sites were normalized based on best available information. Site effort hours were extracted from the DOE Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) and used to normalize (or standardize) the number of occurrences by site. Effort hours are those hours that employees normally work and do not include vacation, holiday hours etc. Sites are responsible for calculating their effort hours and ensuring entry into CAIRS. Out of the

  12. LLE review, Volume 77. Quarterly report, October--December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, S.P. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October--December 1998, includes two articles addressing issues applicable to direct-drive ICF on the National Ignition Facility (NIF): laser-plasma interactions and laser-irradiation uniformity. Additional highlights of the research presented in this issue are: (1) P.B. Radha and S. Skupsky present a novel charged-particle diagnostic that performs simultaneous {rho}R measurements of the fuel, shell, and ablator regions of a compressed ICF target, consisting of an inner DT fuel region, a plastic (CH) shell, and an ablator (CD), by measuring the knock-on deuteron spectrum. (2) F. Dahmani, S. Burns, J. Lambropoulos, S. Papernov, and A. Schmid report results from stress-inhibited laser-driven crack propagation and stress-delayed damage-initiation experiments in fused silica at 351 nm. Research is underway presently to determine the ramifications of these findings for large-aperture systems, such as OMEGA. (3) V. Goncharov presents an analytic theory of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, which shows that the main stabilizing mechanism of the ablation-front perturbations is the dynamic overpressure of the blowoff plasma with respect to the target material. The perturbation evolution during the shock transit time is studied to determine the initial conditions for the Rayleigh-Taylor phase of the instability and to analyze the level of laser imprint on ICF direct-drive targets. (4) J.M. Larkin, W.R. Donaldson, T.H. Foster, and R.S. Knox examine the triplet state of rose bengal, a dye used in photodynamic therapy, that is produced by 1,064-nm excitation of T{sub 1}. (5) R. Adam, M. Currie, R. Sobolewski, O. Harnack, and M. Darula report measurements of the picosecond photoresponse of a current-biased YBCO microbridge coupled to a bicrystal YBCO Josephson junction.

  13. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Quarterly narrative report: October, Novermber, December 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narative report for Necedah NWR describes refuge accomplishments from 1 October- 31 December 1942. It begins with a monthly account of distribution of enrolled...

  14. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC`s Special Inspection Branch, Vendor Inspection Section, that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1996 through December 1996.

  15. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly report, October 1997--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The periodical covers the results of inspections performed between October 1997 and December 1997 by the NRC`s Quality Assurance, Vendor Inspection and Maintenance Branch that have been distributed to the inspected organizations.

  16. Seney Migratory Waterfowl Refuge [Narrative report: October 1 - December 31, 1937

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seneca Unit of the Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from October through December of 1937. The report...

  17. Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2016 October-December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Brian D.

    2017-04-01

    Lightcurves for 33 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) obtained at the Center for Solar System Studies-Palmer Divide Station (CS3-PDS) from 2016 October through December were analyzed for rotation period and signs of satellites or tumbling.

  18. Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Astronomical Observatory - University of Siena (Italy): 2016 October-December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaggio, F.; Marchini, Alessandro; Papini, Riccardo

    2017-04-01

    CCD photometric observations were made from 2016 October to December with the goal of finding the synodic rotation periods of four asteroids: 4945 Ikenozenni, 7333 Bec-Borsenberger, 7487 Toshitanaka, and (10704) 1981 RQ1.

  19. Camas National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1938: 3: October-December

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Camas Migratory Waterfowl Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from October through December of 1938. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. High Impact Papers from OctoberDecember, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IJCTO Editorial Office

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High impact papers from a particular Issue are selected based on the quality of the article and the number of citations. High impact papers are typically recognized once the Issue completes the publication time period of 12 months.Following articles are recognized as High Impact Papers from October - December, 2014: Ojala J. The accuracy of the Acuros XB algorithm in external beam radiotherapy – a comprehensive review. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:020417.  DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.17Read                      Download                           Citations Rout BK, Muralidhar KR, Ali M, Shekar MC, Kumar A. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:02046.DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.6Read                      Download                           CitationsRana S, Pokharel S. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:020421. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.21Read                      Download                           CitationsPetrou EI, Narayanasamy G, Lavdas E, Stathakis S, Papanikolaou N, Lind BK, Mavroidis P. Evaluation of the generalized gamma as a tool for treatment planning optimization. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:020418.DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.18Read                      Download                           Citations (High impact papers from January-March, 2015 will be recognized in the next Issue of the IJCTO

  1. NEAMS Update. Quarterly Report for October - December 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-02-16

    The Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office within the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has been charged with revolutionizing the design tools used to build nuclear power plants during the next 10 years. To accomplish this, the DOE has brought together the national laboratories, U.S. universities, and the nuclear energy industry to establish the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program. The mission of NEAMS is to modernize computer modeling of nuclear energy systems and improve the fidelity and validity of modeling results using contemporary software environments and high-performance computers. NEAMS will create a set of engineering-level codes aimed at designing and analyzing the performance and safety of nuclear power plants and reactor fuels. The truly predictive nature of these codes will be achieved by modeling the governing phenomena at the spatial and temporal scales that dominate the behavior. These codes will be executed within a simulation environment that orchestrates code integration with respect to spatial meshing, computational resources, and execution to give the user a common 'look and feel' for setting up problems and displaying results. NEAMS is building upon a suite of existing simulation tools, including those developed by the federal Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing and Advanced Simulation and Computing programs. NEAMS also draws upon existing simulation tools for materials and nuclear systems, although many of these are limited in terms of scale, applicability, and portability (their ability to be integrated into contemporary software and hardware architectures). NEAMS investments have directly and indirectly supported additional NE research and development programs, including those devoted to waste repositories, safeguarded separations systems, and long-term storage of used nuclear fuel. NEAMS is organized into two broad efforts, each comprising four elements. The quarterly highlights October-December

  2. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. Narrative report, Crescent Lake Refuge : September, October, November, & December, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by...

  6. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. Narrative report, Crescent Lake Refuge : September, October, November & December, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942. The report begins by...

  9. NEAMS Update. Quarterly Report for October - December 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-02-16

    The Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office within the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has been charged with revolutionizing the design tools used to build nuclear power plants during the next 10 years. To accomplish this, the DOE has brought together the national laboratories, U.S. universities, and the nuclear energy industry to establish the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program. The mission of NEAMS is to modernize computer modeling of nuclear energy systems and improve the fidelity and validity of modeling results using contemporary software environments and high-performance computers. NEAMS will create a set of engineering-level codes aimed at designing and analyzing the performance and safety of nuclear power plants and reactor fuels. The truly predictive nature of these codes will be achieved by modeling the governing phenomena at the spatial and temporal scales that dominate the behavior. These codes will be executed within a simulation environment that orchestrates code integration with respect to spatial meshing, computational resources, and execution to give the user a common 'look and feel' for setting up problems and displaying results. NEAMS is building upon a suite of existing simulation tools, including those developed by the federal Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing and Advanced Simulation and Computing programs. NEAMS also draws upon existing simulation tools for materials and nuclear systems, although many of these are limited in terms of scale, applicability, and portability (their ability to be integrated into contemporary software and hardware architectures). NEAMS investments have directly and indirectly supported additional NE research and development programs, including those devoted to waste repositories, safeguarded separations systems, and long-term storage of used nuclear fuel. NEAMS is organized into two broad efforts, each comprising four elements. The quarterly highlights October-December

  10. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1999). Volume 81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, P. B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1999-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October–December 1999, includes a report on the stability of direct-drive NIF capsules. V. N. Goncharov, R. Betti, J. A. Delettrez, P. W. McKenty, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town examine the conditions under which direct-drive NIF capsules ignite. Their numerical study uses two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with a model that includes the various mechanisms that can influence target performance. Inner-surface roughness of the DT ice of the direct-drive cryogenic capsules and laser nonuniformities have been identified as the principal seeds of the instabilities that can potentially quench ignition. The authors conclude that a target gain greater than 10 can be achieved for a realistic inner-surface ice roughness when beam smoothing with 2-D SSD and a bandwidth greater than 0.5 THz is used.

  11. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October - December 2007). Volume 113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuegel, Jonathan D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2007-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October–December 2007, features “High-Intensity Laser–Plasma Interactions in the Refluxing Limit,” by P. M. Nilson, W. Theobald, J. Myatt, C. Stoeckl, M. Storm, O. V. Gotchev, J. D. Zuegel, R. Betti, D. D. Meyerhofer, and T. C. Sangster. In this article (p. 1), the authors report on target experiments using the Multi-Terawatt (MTW) Laser Facility to study isochoric heating of solid-density targets by fast electrons produced from intense, short-pulse laser irradiation. Electron refluxing occurs due to target-sheath field effects and contains most of the fast electrons within the target volume. This efficiently heats the solid-density plasma through collisions. X-ray spectroscopic measurements of absolute Kα (x-radiation) photon yields and variations of the Kβ/Kα b emission ratio both indicate that laser energy couples to fast electrons with a conversion efficiency of approximately 20%. Bulk electron temperatures of at least 200 eV are inferred for the smallest mass targets.

  12. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments and reports issued by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during October 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995, reports on changes in the AGTSR membership, describes 1993, 1994 and 1995 subcontract progress, third combustion workshop, first combustion specialty meeting, materials workshop, industrial internship, research topics highlighted, and seminar sponsorship.

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report October - December 2011. Volume 129

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvydky, Alex [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2011-12-01

    This volume of LLE Review, covering October–December 2011, features “Crossed-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Implosions” by I. V. Igumenshchev, W. Seka, D. H. Edgell, D. T. Michel, D. H. Froula, R. S. Craxton, R. Follett, J. H. Kelly, T. Z. Kosc, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, A. Shvydky, S. Skupsky, and C. Stoeckl (LLE); V. N. Goncharov and A. V. Maximov (LLE and Department of Mechanical Engineering, U. of Rochester); L. Divol and P. Michel (LLNL); and R. L. McCrory and D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE and Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, U. of Rochester). In this article (p. 1), direct-drive–implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1995)] have shown discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicates the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10% to 20%. The authors attribute this degradation in laser coupling to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)— which is electromagnetically seeded—low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  14. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-31

    During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved; Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993: Volume 12, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  16. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    he Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20 October 2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2 November 2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans : 18.20 December 2006 (3 days) All the above sessions will be given in English, at the CERN Training Centre....

  17. CERN Technical Training 2006: Office Software Curriculum Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Office Software Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme currently offers comprehensive training in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Access, Outlook), MS Project, Frontpage, Dreamweaver, Indesign, LaTeX, and CERN EDMS. There are some places available on the following Microsoft Office 2003 course sessions, currently scheduled until December 2007: EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL - 16-17 October (2 days, session in French) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge - 2 November (morning, bilingual session) WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document - 2 November (afternoon, bilingual session) OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation - 3 November (morning, bilingual session) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Link cells, worksheets and workbooks - 3 November (afternoon, bilingual session) EXCEL 2003 - Level 1: ECDL - 13-14 November (2 days, session in English) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL - 5-6 December (2 days, session in English) The abo...

  18. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 titled {open_quotes}Decontamination Systems Information and Research programs{close_quotes} (DOE Instrument No. DE-FC21-92MC29467) This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 4th calendar quarter of 1995, and is the final quarterly report deliverable required for the period ending 31 December 1995. The projects reported for the WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into the following three areas: 1.0 In Situ Remediation Process Development, 2.0 Advanced Product Applications Testing, and 3.0 Information Systems, Public Policy, Community Outreach, and Economics. Summaries of the significant accomplishments for the projects reported during the period 1 October 95 through 31 December 95 are presented in the following discussions.

  19. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1993. Volume 16, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period April through June 1993, and discusses four abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities, three involving medical brachytherapy misadministrations and one involving a research reactor that operated without a safety system. One pool irradiation facility contamination event, two medical misadministrations (one ``sodium iodide`` and one brachytherapy), and one industrial radiographer overexposure event that were reported by NRC Agreement States are also discussed. The report also contains information updating one previously reported abnormal occurrence and information on three other events of interest.

  20. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  1. Heber geothermal binary demonstration project quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1981--December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, R.G.; Allen, R.F.; Alsup, R.A.; Liparidis, G.S.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this quarterly technical progress report is to document work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of October 1, 1981, through December 31, 1981. The work was performed by San Diego Gas and Electric Company under the support and cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Imperial Irrigation District, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Southern California Edison Company. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluid Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  2. Quarterly Report 11 for the Period October 1978 - December 1978 and Proceedings of the 11th Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-10-01

    This report describes progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period October through December 1978. It includes task reports on silicon material processing, large-area silicon sheet development, encapsulation mate3rials testing and development, Project engineering and operations, and manufacturing techniques, plus the steps taken to integrate these efforts. it also includes a report on and copies of viewgraphs presented at the Project Integration Meeting held December 13-14, 1978.

  3. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  4. Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.W. (comp.)

    1988-11-01

    This report summarizes some of the technical contributions by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project from October 1 through December 31, 1984. The report is not a detailed technical document but does indicate the status of the investigations being performed at Los Alamos.

  5. E-Learning in European Higher Education Institutions: Results of a Mapping Survey Conducted in October-December 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Michael; Kupriyanova, Veronika; Morais, Rita; Colucci, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The present study on e-learning intends to contribute to closing a data gap and to stimulate the discussion on the further development of national and European policies on the issue and to support its systematic institutional take-up. It draws upon a survey conducted by the European University Association between October and December 2013. 249…

  6. Valve development for coal gasification plants. Phase II (Draft). Quarterly technical program report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezza, D.

    1979-01-01

    This is the tenth in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports relating to the Valve Development for Coal Gasification Plants Program. This document discusses engineering progress during the period of October to December 1978. Work performed is discussed briefly. (LTN)

  7. Automated array assembly. Phase II. Final report, October 1977-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiello, R. V.

    1980-10-01

    The philosophy of this project was to establish an experimental process line starting with 3-in.-diameter silicon wafers and consisting of junction formation using POCl/sub 3/ gaseous diffusion, screen-printed thick-film metallization, reflow solder interconnect, and double-glass lamination panel assembly. This experimental production line produced a sufficient number of solar cells to demonstrate the technological readiness of each of those process steps. Variations (of each process) were made to set limits on the usable range of each process step and to determine the interaction with adjoining steps. Inspections, measurements, and tests were included to determine the output requirement characteristics of each step, obtain statistical variations, and evaluate the performance of the solar cells and panels. A description of this work, which was conducted from October 1977 through December 1978, is given. This was followed by an 18-month study in which three manufacturing sequences synthesized from the previous work and from studies conducted by other participants in the LSA program were exercised. The objectives were to assess the compatibility between process steps for each sequence, to generate sufficient data for comparative SAMICS cost analysis, and to make recommendations of the suitability of one or more of these sequences for the large-scale automated production of solar cells within the cost goal of $0.70/pW. The detailed experimental results of this study are described, followed by SAMICS cost analysis, recommendations, and conclusions.

  8. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is a summary of the work conducted for the period of October--December 1993 by the West Virginia University for the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Research under the program focuses on pertinent technology for hazardous waste clean-up. This report reflects the progress performed on sixteen technical projects encompassed by this program: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Site remediation technologies: (a) Drain-enhanced soil flushing and (b) In situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; Excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: Dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; Chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; Development of organic sensors: Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Microbial enrichment for enhancing biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes in soil; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Treatment of volatile organic compounds using biofilters; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organic, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; and Improved socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration techniques.

  9. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-98 (October--December 1997). It describes 216 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications of lineshaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, a comprehensive aquaculture developer package and revisions to the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 4) which was devoted entirely to geothermal activities in South Dakota, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  10. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  11. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-03-01

    Retort No. 27 was ignited on August 11, 1983 and by December 31 had completed 139 days of operation and produced 11,420 barrels of oil. Retort No. 28 was ignited on October 18, 1983 and on December 31 had completed 74 days of operation and produced 5,285 barrels of oil. The off-gas processing plants for the two retorts was completed and put through a shakedown run. Concentration levels of H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/ in the retort off gas did not warrant plant operation in the fourth quarter. Environmental studies are reported.

  12. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Employees of Iranian Petrochemical Industries: October 2009 to December 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Haghayegh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs are a common health problem throughout the world and a major cause of disability in the workplace.Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of MSDs, assessment of ergonomics working conditions and identification of major risk factors associated with MSDs symptoms among employees of Iranian petrochemical industries between October 2009 and December 2012.Methods: In this study, we studied 1184 randomly selected employees of 4 Iranian petrochemical companies with at least one year of work experience in office or operational units. For those with office jobs, data were collected using Nordic Musculoskeletal disorders Questionnaire (NMQ and ergonomics checklist for the assessment of working conditions. For those with operational jobs, NMQ and Quick Exposure Check (QEC method were used for data collection.Results: The most prevalent MSD symptoms were reported in lower back (41.5% and neck (36.5%. The prevalence of MSDs in all body regions but elbows and thighs of the office staff was significantly higher than that of operational workers. Assessment of working conditions in office staff revealed that the lowest index was attributed to workstation. QEC technique among operational workers showed that in 73.8% of the workers studied, the level of exposure to musculoskeletal risks was “high” or “very high.” MSDs were associated with type of job, age, body mass index, work experience, gender, marital status, educational level and type of employment.Conclusion: The prevalence of MSDs in the office staff was higher than that of operational workers. Level of exposure to MSDs risk was high in operational workers. Corrective measures are thus necessary for improving working conditions for both office and operational units.

  13. Estimated Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on Employment and Economic Output from October 2011 Through December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Employment and Economic Output from October 2011 Through December 2011 February 2012 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...PAGES 22 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8...the names used in the Joint Committee on Taxation’s (JCT’s) estimate (see www.house.gov/ jct /x-19-09.pdf). Some provisions include individual

  14. Spoc-experiment: Wide-angle Profiling and Seismological Network Off Central Chile (october - December 2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierer, P. O.; Flueh, E. R.; Kopp, H.; Tilmann, F.; Gaedicke, C.; Schreckenberger, B.

    The main goal of the RV SONNE cruise 161 SPOC (Subduction Processes Off Chile), Leg 1 and 4, was to investigate the effects of subducting aseismic ridges and frac- ture zones on the seismicity and structure of the Central Chilean Margin. Scientists from GEOMAR (Kiel), BGR (Hannover), FU Berlin (SFB 267), Universidad de Chile (Santiago) and Instituto Costaricense de Electricidad (Costa Rica) participated in data acquisition and analysis. The SPOC experiment consists of four consecutive legs off Valparaiso, Central Chile. During Leg 1 (October), an array of 23 ocean bottom hydrophons and seismome- ters (OBH/S) was deployed to register local earthquakes. In December (Leg 4), the network was recovered and a total of 125 OBH/S locations were occupied on five wide-angle profiles. They recorded more than 10.000 airgun shots, fired by an airgun array of 20 guns with a total volume of 50 liters. In addition, the wide-angle seis- mic lines were extended by land-based seismometers, operated by the Universidad de Chile, Santiago. Furthermore gravity, magnetics and high resolution bathymetry (SIMRADTM) and sediment echo-sound data (PARASOUNDTM) were recorded. On Legs 2 and 3, the BGR carried out a multi-channel reflection (MCS) seismic survey. Preliminary analysis of the data shows that a considerable number of local earthquakes has been recorded by the passive seismological network. Preliminary location of the hypocenters yield earthquake depths predominantly between 15 and 30 km. Many events registered by the local seismological network have been relocated~10 km west- wards of the previous land-based locations, which might indicate a bias in the existing catalogues. Wide-angle record sections of high quality were obtained, for all profiles shot. Mantle phases over offsets of more than 120 km were recorded by many stations. The pre- liminary velocity depth model derived for a profile striking E-W at 31a S across the subduction zone resolved the lateral transition on the

  15. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the AQUALAB from 14 October 1968 to 11 December 1968 (NODC Accession 7100270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the AQUALAB from 14 October 1968 to 11 December 1968. Data were submitted by the Southern...

  16. Department of Veterans Affairs Quarterly Notice to Congress on Data Breaches First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2014 October 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This is a quarterly notice to congress containing statistics on data breeches for fiscal year 2014 for the first quarter (2014 October 1, 2013 through December 31,...

  17. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From October 1, 1934 to December 31, 1934: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1934. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  18. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From October 1, 1933, to December 31, 1933: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1933. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  19. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from October 1, 1935 to December 31, 1935: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1935. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  20. Assessment of Health Behaviors, Health Education Interests, and Injuries among Employees at the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, October 2014 - December 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Technical Report No. S.0032417-16, May 2016 Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Portfolio Injury Prevention Program Assessment of Health...Behaviors, Health Education Interests, and Injuries among Employees at the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, October 2014 – December 2014... Education Interests, and Injuries among Employees at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, October- December 2014 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER n/a

  1. Pipeline investigation report : natural gas compressor station occurrence : Gazoduc TQM Inc., December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    On December 28, 2000, a release of natural gas resulted in an explosion that destroyed the electrical and services building at the Gazoduc TQM East Hereford compressor station, damaging the compressor building. Before the occurrence, the station had been shut down due to a manual initiation of the station's emergency shutdown system. A maintenance person was sent to the station to reinitiate the electric motor-driven compressor unit. The on-site maintenance person was seriously injured. This report presents factual information about the accident, the injuries and the damage to equipment. It also reviews particulars of the pipeline system, the compressor station design, construction and operations. An analysis of the natural gas stream found an unknown product in the compressor station. A history of previous explosions, ruptures, leaks and fires was presented along with quality control programs. Findings as to the causes and contributing factors of the accident were revealed along with findings as to risk and safety actions. tabs., figs.

  2. The December 2015 North Pole Warming Event and the Increasing Occurrence of Such Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G. W. K.

    2016-12-01

    In late December 2015, widespread media interest revolved around forecasts that the surface air temperature at the North Pole would rise above freezing. Although there has been significant interest in the enhanced warming that is occurring at high northern latitudes, a process known as arctic amplification, remarkably little is known about these midwinter warming events at the pole including their frequency, duration and magnitude as well as the environmental conditions responsible for their occurrence. Here we use buoy and radiosonde data along with operational weather forecasts and atmospheric reanalyses to show that such events are associated with surface cyclones near the pole as well as a highly perturbed polar vortex. They occur once or twice each decade with the earliest identified event taking place in 1959. In addition, the warmest midwinter temperatures at the North Pole have been increasing at a rate that is twice as large as that for mean midwinter temperatures at the pole. It is argued that this enhanced trend is consistent with the loss of winter sea ice from the Nordic Seas that moves the reservoir of warm air over this region northwards making it easier for weather systems to transport this heat polewards.

  3. Can we predict the frequency of cyclones over Bay of Bengal during October-December?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    ) with the frequency of cyclones during November. In this study an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between Sea surface Temperature (SST) and Total Number of Cyclones (TNC) (depressions + cyclones + severe cyclones) during postmonsoon (October...

  4. Oak Ridge reservation federal facility agreement for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered is October through December 1993 (first quarter of FY 1994). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1994 commitments.

  5. Water and streambed-material data, Eagle Creek watershed, Indiana, August 1980 and October and December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangsness, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Water quality studies within the Eagle Creek watershed, Indiana, were done by the US Geological Survey in august 1980, October 1982, and December 1982 in cooperation with the city of Indianapolis, Department of Public Works. Streambed-material and water samples were collected from Finley and Eagle Creeks at various flow rates and were analyzed for volatile organics. This report lists all the data collected and analyzed by the US Geological Survey during the 1980 and 1982 surveys but does not interpret the data. 4 refs., 2 figs. 19 tabs.

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees (non-medical). Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1994) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees (non-medical) with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  8. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-18

    This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described. This includes: screening creep results, weight gain and post-exposure mechanical properties for materials thermally exposed at 750/sup 0/ and 850/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/ and 1562/sup 0/F). In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  9. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for September, October, November, December [1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November, December, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by...

  15. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1961: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, and December, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1962 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Waterfowl Production Areas - District IVA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1950 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  2. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge & Batchtown National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  3. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area : September, October, November, and December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  5. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Narrative report: Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Brigantine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November and December 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  10. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  11. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December 1945: [Narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Moosehorn NWR outlines Refuge (including the Edmunds Unit) accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by...

  14. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1949. The report begins by...

  18. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  19. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for period: September, October, November and December, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Narrative report: Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November and December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by...

  1. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. Quarterly narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1950: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, and December, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, and December, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December 1949: [Narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Moosehorn NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1960: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November and December 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November - December 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Calhoun and Batchtown Units Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by...

  10. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Calhoun-Batchtown Unit: September, October, November, December - 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  11. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. Narrative report for September, October, November and December 1944 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  16. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  17. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by...

  18. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by...

  19. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  20. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by...

  1. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by...

  2. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chincoteague NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by...

  7. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November, and December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by...

  11. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by...

  19. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November, and December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September, October, November and December, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by...

  5. Talcot Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Talcot Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  7. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  8. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December [1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chincoteague NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chincoteague NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, and December, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November and December 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by...

  2. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, and December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chincoteague NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  5. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November & December, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. September, October, November, & December, 1958: Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: [September, October, November, December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, and December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. Lower Souris National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lower Souris NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by...

  2. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November & December 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Union Slough NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, December, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. [Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for period: September, October, November and December, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, December, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: Fiscal year 1996. Volume 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 (PL 93-438) identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety. The Federal Reports Elimination and Sunset Act of 1995 (PL 104-66) requires that AOs be reported to Congress on an annual basis. This report includes those events that NRC determined to be AOs during fiscal year 1996. This report addresses eighteen AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. Two involved events at nuclear power plants, eleven involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and five involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Eight AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved stolen radiography cameras, one involved a ruptured source, one involved release of radioactive material while being transported, one involved a lost source, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and two involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Four updates of previously reported AOs are included in this report. Three ``Other Events of Interest`` events are being reported, and one previously reported ``Other Events of Interest`` event is being updated.

  11. Relationship of shale dewatering and smectite dehydration to undercompaction occurrence. Final report, October 1995--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leftwich, J.T. Jr.

    1996-12-01

    The cause(s) of abnormal fluid pressures in sedimentary basins are not clearly understood. One step in determining the mechanism(s) of abnormal pressure generation in sedimentary basins is to develop and understanding of the relationship among undercompacted shale, abnormal pressure, and temperature. The research focused on understanding undercompaction and how it related to smectite-illite conversion. A series of carefully designed experiments were used to help clarify and evaluate the relationship of smectite-illite transformation to undercompaction. Work was performed at the East Flour Bluff oil field, Nueces County, TX and the Ann Mag oil field, south TX.

  12. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-04-01

    This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  13. United States Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal program. Special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, 1 December 1978-30 October 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Work for the period, December 1, 1978 through October 31, 1980, is documented. The following activities are covered: project technical coordination assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance for geopressured-geothermal test wells; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface utilization program; legal research; and special projects. (MHR)

  14. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

  15. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1, Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement Quarterly Report for the Environmental Restoration Program was prepared to satisfy requirements for progress reporting on Environmental Restoration Program (ER) activities as specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The reporting period covered in this document is October through December 1995. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.2.3.04 (Activity Data Sheet 8304). Publication of this document meets two FFA milestones. The FFA Quarterly Report meets an FFA milestone defined as 30 days following the end of the applicable reporting period. Appendix A of this report meets the FFA milestone for the Annual Removal Action Report for the period FYs 1991--95. This document provides information about ER Program activities conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation under the FFA. Specifically, it includes information on milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period, as well as scheduled for completion during the next reporting period (quarter); accomplishments of the ER Program; concerns related to program work; and scheduled activities for the next quarter. It also provides a listing of the identity and assigned tasks of contractors performing ER Program work under the FFA.

  17. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  18. Occurrence of maxillary sinus abnormalities detected by cone beam CT in asymptomatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rege Inara Carneiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images of the maxillofacial region allow the inspection of the entire volume of the maxillary sinus (MS, identifying anatomic variations and abnormalities in the image volume, this is frequently neglected by oral radiologists when interpreting images of areas at a distance from the dentoalveolar region, such as the full anatomical aspect of the MS. The aim of this study was to investigate maxillary sinus abnormalities in asymptomatic patients by using CBCT. Methods 1113 CBCT were evaluated by two examiners and identification of abnormalities, the presence of periapical lesions and proximity to the lower sinus wall were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and Kappa statistics. Results Abnormalities were diagnosed in 68.2% of cases (kappa = 0.83. There was a significant difference between genders (p Conclusions Abnormalities in maxillary sinus emphasizes how important it is for the dentomaxillofacial radiologist to undertake an interpretation of the whole volume of CBCT images.

  19. Occurrence of abnormal starfish Astropecten indicus (Doderlein, 1888 (Echinodermata: Astroidea along Southeast coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Prabhu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Starfish Astropecten indicus was collected from bycatch landings at Mudasalodai fishing harbour, Tamil Nadu (India in November 2011. Totally 134 specimens collected among three specimens (2,2% have abnormally developed four and six arms. Normally, A. indicus has five arms and the deviation from pentamerism is a rare phenomenon in starfishes. The present observations suggest that deviations from pentamerism are not a heritable character but are a consequence of environmental perturbations on the metamorphosis of larvae and/or abnormal regeneration of arms.

  20. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  1. Occurrence of cancer in a cohort of 183 persons with constitutional chromosome 7 abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, H; Olsen, J H; Hansen, J;

    1998-01-01

    with constitutional abnormalities involving chromosome 7, including 16 patients with Williams syndrome. By linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry, we found five persons with cancer, including one thyroid carcinoma, three carcinomas of the digestive tract, and one malignant melanoma. There were no cases of leukemia......Cytogenetic abnormalities in human malignancies frequently involve chromosome 7. The existence of several tumor suppressor genes on the long arm of chromosome 7 has been suggested in both epithelial and hematologic malignancies. From the Danish Cytogenetic Register, we identified 183 persons...

  2. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon (October-December) season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Maneesha, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between summer monsoon rainfall (June-September) and the total number of depressions, cyclones and severe cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during the post-monsoon (October-December) season. The seasonal rainfall of the subdivisions (located in south India) (referred as rainfall index - RI), is positively and significantly correlated (r=0.59; significant at >99% level) with the TNDC during the period, 1984-2013. By using the first differences (current season minus previous season), the correlations are enhanced and a remarkably high correlation of 0.87 is observed between TNDC and RI for the recent period, 1993-2013. The average seasonal genesis potential parameter (GPP) showed a very high correlation of 0.84 with the TNDC. A very high correlation of 0.83 is observed between GPP and RI for the period, 1993-2013. The relative vorticity and mid-tropospheric relative humidity are found to be the dominant terms in GPP. The GPP was 3.5 times higher in above (below) normal RI in which TNDC was 4 (2). It is inferred that RI is playing a key role in TNDC by modulating the environmental conditions (low level vorticity and relative humidity) over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season which could be seen from the very high correlation of 0.87 (which explains 76% variability in TNDC). For the first time, we show that RI is a precursor for the TNDC over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season. Strong westerlies after the SW monsoon season transport moisture over the subdivisions towards Bay of Bengal due to cyclonic circulation. This circulation favours upward motion and hence transport moisture vertically to mid-troposphere which causes convective instability and this in turn favour more number of TNDC, under above-normal RI year.

  3. Advanced fuel cell development. Progress report for October--December 1978. [LiAlO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, P A; Kinoshita, K; Kucera, G H; Sim, J W; Pierce, R D

    1979-06-01

    Advanced fuel cell research activities at Argonne National laboratory during the period of October--December 1978 are described. These efforts have been directed toward understanding and improving the components of molten--carbonate--electrolyte fuel cells operated at temperatures near 925/sup 0/K. The primary focus of this work has been the development of electrolyte structures that have good electrolyte retention and mechanical properties as well as long-term stability, and on developing methods of synthesis amendable to mass production. The characterization of these structures and their stability is an integral part of this effort. Current electrolyte structures are comprised of LiAlO/sub 2/ particles and an eutectic of Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The development of procedures for synthesizing LiAlO/sub 2/ from low cost materials is being pursued. The thermal stability of cold-pressed pellets of LiAlO/sub 2/ and carbonate eutectic has been tested at 925/sup 0/K for 22 to 2400 h in air, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/--CO/sub 2/--H/sub 2/O. In general, under these test conditions the allotropic form of the LiAlO/sub 2/ particles remained stable, but their surface area decreased with time of heat treatment. Thermomechanical tests indicated that the strength of LiAlO/sub 2/ pellets increases with increased particle surface area. Several small (94 cm/sup 2/) cells have been operated in which the electrolyte tiles contained alkali carbonates and LiAlO/sub 2/, primarily the ..gamma.. allotrope. The performance of these cells was improved by using a high carbonate content (69 vol %) in the tiles and the mechanical strength of the tiles was improved by the use of a metal screen.

  4. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon (October-December) season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Maneesha, K.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between summer monsoon rainfall (June-September) and the total number of depressions, cyclones and severe cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during the post-monsoon (October-December) season. The seasonal rainfall of the subdivisions (located in south India) (referred as rainfall index - RI), is positively and significantly correlated ( r=0.59; significant at >99% level) with the TNDC during the period, 1984-2013. By using the first differences (current season minus previous season), the correlations are enhanced and a remarkably high correlation of 0.87 is observed between TNDC and RI for the recent period, 1993-2013. The average seasonal genesis potential parameter (GPP) showed a very high correlation of 0.84 with the TNDC. A very high correlation of 0.83 is observed between GPP and RI for the period, 1993-2013. The relative vorticity and mid-tropospheric relative humidity are found to be the dominant terms in GPP. The GPP was 3.5 times higher in above (below) normal RI in which TNDC was 4 (2). It is inferred that RI is playing a key role in TNDC by modulating the environmental conditions (low level vorticity and relative humidity) over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season which could be seen from the very high correlation of 0.87 (which explains 76% variability in TNDC). For the first time, we show that RI is a precursor for the TNDC over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season. Strong westerlies after the SW monsoon season transport moisture over the subdivisions towards Bay of Bengal due to cyclonic circulation. This circulation favours upward motion and hence transport moisture vertically to mid-troposphere which causes convective instability and this in turn favour more number of TNDC, under above-normal RI year.

  5. Enumeration of Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Underwater Video, Performance Period: October 2005 (Project Inception) - 31 December 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Peter N.; Rayton, Michael D.; Nass, Bryan L.; Arterburn, John E.

    2007-06-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes) identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of adult salmonids in the Okanogan River Basin in order to determine basin and tributary-specific spawner distributions, evaluate the status and trends of natural salmonid production in the basin, document local fish populations, and augment existing fishery data. This report documents the design, installation, operation and evaluation of mainstem and tributary video systems in the Okanogan River Basin. The species-specific data collected by these fish enumeration systems are presented along with an evaluation of the operation of a facility that provides a count of fish using an automated method. Information collected by the Colville Tribes Fish & Wildlife Department, specifically the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP), is intended to provide a relative abundance indicator for anadromous fish runs migrating past Zosel Dam and is not intended as an absolute census count. Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected fish passage data between October 2005 and December 2006. Video counting stations were deployed and data were collected at two locations in the basin: on the mainstem Okanogan River at Zosel Dam near Oroville, Washington, and on Bonaparte Creek, a tributary to the Okanogan River, in the town of Tonasket, Washington. Counts at Zosel Dam between 10 October 2005 and 28 February 2006 are considered partial, pilot year data as they were obtained from the operation of a single video array on the west bank fishway, and covered only a portion of the steelhead migration. A complete description of the apparatus and methodology can be found in 'Fish Enumeration Using Underwater Video Imagery - Operational Protocol' (Nass 2007). At Zosel Dam, totals of 57 and 481 adult Chinook salmon were observed with the video monitoring system in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Run

  6. Enumeration of Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Underwater Video, Performance Period: October 2005 (Project Inception) - 31 December 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Peter N.; Rayton, Michael D.; Nass, Bryan L.; Arterburn, John E.

    2007-06-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes) identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of adult salmonids in the Okanogan River Basin in order to determine basin and tributary-specific spawner distributions, evaluate the status and trends of natural salmonid production in the basin, document local fish populations, and augment existing fishery data. This report documents the design, installation, operation and evaluation of mainstem and tributary video systems in the Okanogan River Basin. The species-specific data collected by these fish enumeration systems are presented along with an evaluation of the operation of a facility that provides a count of fish using an automated method. Information collected by the Colville Tribes Fish & Wildlife Department, specifically the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP), is intended to provide a relative abundance indicator for anadromous fish runs migrating past Zosel Dam and is not intended as an absolute census count. Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected fish passage data between October 2005 and December 2006. Video counting stations were deployed and data were collected at two locations in the basin: on the mainstem Okanogan River at Zosel Dam near Oroville, Washington, and on Bonaparte Creek, a tributary to the Okanogan River, in the town of Tonasket, Washington. Counts at Zosel Dam between 10 October 2005 and 28 February 2006 are considered partial, pilot year data as they were obtained from the operation of a single video array on the west bank fishway, and covered only a portion of the steelhead migration. A complete description of the apparatus and methodology can be found in 'Fish Enumeration Using Underwater Video Imagery - Operational Protocol' (Nass 2007). At Zosel Dam, totals of 57 and 481 adult Chinook salmon were observed with the video monitoring system in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Run

  7. Surface-Water Hydrology and Quality at the Pike Hill Superfund Site, Corinth, Vermont, October 2004 to December 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiah, Richard G.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Coles, James F.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrology and quality of surface water in and around the Pike Hill Brook watershed, in Corinth, Vermont, was studied from October 2004 to December 2005 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Pike Hill was mined intermittently for copper from 1847 to 1919 and the site is known to be contributing trace elements and acidity to Pike Hill Brook and an unnamed tributary to Cookville Brook. The site has been listed as a Superfund site since 2004. Streamflow, specific conductance, pH, and water temperature were measured continuously and monthly at three sites on Pike Hill Brook to determine the variation in these parameters over an annual cycle. Synoptic water-quality sampling was done at 10 stream sites in October 2004, April 2005, and June 2005 and at 13 stream sites in August 2005 to characterize the quality of surface water in the watershed on a seasonal and spatial basis, as well as to assess the effects of wetlands on water quality. Samples for analysis of benthic macroinvertebrate populations were collected at 11 stream sites in August 2005. Water samples were analyzed for 5 major ions and 32 trace elements. Concentrations of trace elements at sites in the Pike Hill Brook watershed exceeded USEPA National Recommended Water Quality Criteria acute and chronic toxicity standards for aluminum, iron, cadmium, copper, and zinc. Concentrations of copper exceeded the chronic criteria in an unnamed tributary to Cookville Brook in one sample. Concentrations of sulfate, calcium, aluminum, iron, cadmium, copper, and zinc decreased with distance from a site directly downstream from the mine (site 1), as a result of dilution and through sorption and precipitation of the trace elements. Maximum concentrations of aluminum, iron, cadmium, copper, and zinc were observed during spring snowmelt. Concentrations of sulfate, calcium, cadmium, copper, and zinc, and instantaneous loads of calcium and aluminum were

  8. Occurrence and transport of nitrogen in the Big Sunflower River, northwestern Mississippi, October 2009-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jeannie R.B.; Coupe, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    The Big Sunflower River Basin, located within the Yazoo River Basin, is subject to large annual inputs of nitrogen from agriculture, atmospheric deposition, and point sources. Understanding how nutrients are transported in, and downstream from, the Big Sunflower River is key to quantifying their eutrophying effects on the Gulf. Recent results from two Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes (SPARROW models), which include the Big Sunflower River, indicate minimal losses of nitrogen in stream reaches typical of the main channels of major river systems. If SPARROW assumptions of relatively conservative transport of nitrogen are correct and surface-water losses through the bed of the Big Sunflower River are negligible, then options for managing nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico may be limited. Simply put, if every pound of nitrogen entering the Delta is eventually delivered to the Gulf, then the only effective nutrient management option in the Delta is to reduce inputs. If, on the other hand, it can be shown that processes within river channels of the Mississippi Delta act to reduce the mass of nitrogen in transport, other hydrologic approaches may be designed to further limit nitrogen transport. Direct validation of existing SPARROW models for the Delta is a first step in assessing the assumptions underlying those models. In order to characterize spatial and temporal variability of nitrogen in the Big Sunflower River Basin, water samples were collected at four U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations located on the Big Sunflower River between October 1, 2009, and June 30, 2011. Nitrogen concentrations were generally highest at each site during the spring of the 2010 water year and the fall and winter of the 2011 water year. Additionally, the dominant form of nitrogen varied between sites. For example, in samples collected from the most upstream site (Clarksdale), the concentration of organic nitrogen was generally higher than the concentrations of

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMAGI MARU and other platforms from North Pacific Ocean by the Hokkaido Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory and other institutions from 04 October 1904 to 31 December 1985 (NODC Accession 9200262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMAGI MARU and other platforms from 04 October 1904 to 31 December 1985. Data were collected by the...

  10. Physical profile data from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the GLOBEC Project from 02 October 1998 to 07 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000238)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data were collected from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska from October 2, 1998 to December 7, 1999. Data were submitted by the University...

  11. Water physics and chemistry data from XBT casts from the OCEAN PRINCE and other platforms as part of the Ocean Dumping project from 04 December 1976 to 27 October 1977 (NODC Accession 7800049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from XBT casts from the OCEAN PRINCE and other platforms from 04 December 1976 to 27 October 1977. Data were...

  12. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 19 December 1977 - 29 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from December 19, 1977 to October 29, 1978. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  13. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, October--December 1992. Progress review No. 73, quarter ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Accomplishments for this quarter ending December 31, 1992 are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; reservoir classes; and novel technology.

  14. Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from 26 October 1982 to 06 December 1982 (NODC Accession 8600235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service (NOS) from 26 October 1982 to 06...

  15. Patients admitted in an Intensive Care Unit with severe clinical manifestations of Influenza, october-december 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenisey Quintero Mendez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive study of a series of cases was carried out, where 109 patients with the presumptive diagnosis of severe clinical pictures of Influenza were included, the total of them admitted in one of our Intensive Care Units (ICU, prepared for that purpose during the recent pandemic, during the period comprised between October 1 and December 31, 2009. There were 62 women (56,9%, of which 19 were pregnant or postpartum women (17,4%. The mean age of the sick persons of this serie was of 52,53 ± 22,54 years. The beginning of symptoms before the time of admission revealed an average of 4,90 ± 4,37 days. The predominant symptoms were: cough in 93 patients (85,3%, dyspnea in 86 (78,9%, fever in 76 (68,8% and general symptoms of asthenia and anorexia in 76 (68,8%. In the physical exam, the most frequent signs were: polypnea in 86 (78,9% and wet rales in 65 (59,6%. Personal antecedents were informed by patients suffering arterial hypertension in 31 (28,4%, bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease in 26 (23,9%, diabetes in 19 (17,4%, ischemic heart disease in 19 (17,4%, alcoholism in 5 (4,6% and valvulopathies in 4 (3,7%. Among the signs found in the thorax´s radiographies at the moment of admission, it prevailed the pattern of radiopacity diffuse hilar and bilateral parahilar in 31 patients (28,4%, followed by bilateral diffuse opacities toward medial and inferiors lobes in 16 (14,7%, unilateral diffuse radiopacity in 12 (11,0%, increment in the broncovascular network in 13 (11,9%, lobar consolidation in 7 (6,4% and pleural esfusion in 5 (4,6%. In 25 cases the initial X-ray films were normal. In electrocardiograms, alterations were verified of ST-T in 12 sick persons (11,0%, sinusal tachicardia in 12 (11,0%, supraventricular arrhythmias (that included acute auricular fibrillation and supraventricular paroxysmal tachicardia in 7 (6,4% and ventricular arrhythmias in 2 (1,8%. The complications verified with more frequency were the

  16. Design, construction, operation and evaluation of a prototype culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis and Limited Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction during the period October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered are presented. Progress on the components and system engineering studies is described. The Preliminary Design of Prototype Unit Topical Report was submitted. Final design activity is continuing and the progress on drawing preparation and advanced procurement activity is discussed. Based on authorization for a limited amount of Phase II activity, initial Purchase Orders were released authorizing preparation of certified drawings for fabricated equipment required to support the Phase I final design activity. The Purchase Order for site clearance and installation of boiler foundations was awarded and ground breaking ceremonies were held at the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler site in Paxinos, Pennsylvania, on December 7, 1979.

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  18. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1963 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IVA & Waterfowl Production Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November & December, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by...

  20. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  1. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  2. Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1945 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1946 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1945 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge and Easement Refuges in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria and gene markers of pathogenic bacteria in Great Lakes tributaries, March-October 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Angela K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Totten, Alexander R.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    From March through October 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), conducted a study to determine the frequency of occurrence of pathogen gene markers and densities of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in 22 tributaries to the Great Lakes. This project was funded as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) and included sampling at 22 locations throughout 6 states that border the Great Lakes.

  6. Estimated Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on Employment and Economic Output from October 2012 Through December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 ESTIMATED IMPACT OF ARRA ON EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC OUTPUT FROM OCTOBER...www.house.gov/ jct /x-19-09.pdf). The economic impact of three tax provisions with budgetary costs over $5 billion was analyzed using a different

  7. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A J; Azarm, A; Baum, J W; Boccio, J L; Carew, J; Diamond, D J; Fitzpatrick, R; Ginsberg, T; Greene, G A; Guppy, J G; Haber, S B

    1989-07-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988.

  8. The western South China Sea currents from measurements by Argo profiling floats during October to December 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周慧; 袁东亮; 李瑞祥; 何蕾

    2010-01-01

    The three dimensional structure of the western boundary current east of the Vietnam coast was determined from measurements by Argo profiling floats which deployed near the east of the Vietnam Coast in October 2007. The trajectories of the Argo floats provided robust evidence that there does exist southward flowing current along the Vietnam coast. The southward current begins at about 15°N, 111°E, flowing along the 1 000 m isobath and extending to 5°N south. The estimated surface and parking depth velocities...

  9. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a prototype culm-combustion boiler/heater unit. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis and Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction during the period October 1, 1980 through December 31, 1980. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered during the reporting period are presented. The final detail design effort was completed and the final design report submitted. Progress on procurement activity authorized by full Phase II release on March 20, 1980, is discussed. Following approval by DOE, a purchase order was placed with the Norflor Construction Corporation for the prototype plant construction which began in November. Construction of the access roadway installation of the electric power, sewer and water lines was completed during this reporting period. Boiler construction continued.

  10. Population Effects of Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic among Health Plan Members, San Diego, California, USA, October-December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    Lacking population-specific data, activity of seasonal and pandemic influenza is usually tracked by counting the number of diagnoses and visits to medical facilities above a baseline. This type of data does not address the delivery of services in a specific population. To provide population-specific data, this retrospective study of patients with influenza-like illness, influenza, and pneumonia among members of a Kaiser Permanente health plan in San Diego, California, USA, during October-December 2009 was initiated. Population data included the number of outpatients accessing healthcare; the number of patients diagnosed with pneumonia; antimicrobial therapy administered; number of patients hospitalized with influenza, influenza-like illness, or pneumonia; level of care provided; and number of patients requiring specialized treatments (e.g., oxygen, ventilation, vasopressors). The rate of admissions specific to weeks and predictions of 2 epidemiologic models shows the strengths and weaknesses of those tools. Data collected in this study may improve planning for influenza pandemics.

  11. Design, construction, operation and evaluation of a Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis and Limited Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction during the period October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered during the reporting period are presented. Progress on the components and system engineering studies is described. The Preliminary Design of Prototype Unit Topical Report was submitted during this reporting period. Final design activity is continuing and the progress on drawing preparation and advanced procurement activity is discussed. Based on authorization for a limited amount of Phase II activity, initial purchase orders were released authorizing preparation of certified drawings for fabricated equipment required to support the Phase I final design activity. The Purchase Order for site clearance and installation of boiler foundations was awarded during this reporting period and ground breaking ceremonies were held at the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler site in Paxinos, Pennsylvania on December 7, 1979.

  12. Distribution of marine birds on Georges Bank and adjacent waters. Progress report No. 4, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    From 27 September to 14 December 1978, MBO observers participated in 8 cruises from the U.S. mid-Atlantic area of the outer continental to western Nova Scotia. The U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, Federal Republic of Germany, Peoples Republic of Poland, and U.S. Coast Guard were the agencies that provided at-sea platforms. The greater portion of the survey coverage involved the Southern New England--Georges Bank--Gulf of Maine area, where 779.32 km/sup 2/ were sampled. Bird densities were greatest in the Georges Bank area where averages in excess of 30 birds/km/sup 2/ were recorded during the final quarter of 1978. All data collected during 1978 has been submitted to U.S.F.W.S. Migratory Bird and Habitat Research Laboratory in Luurel, MD for punching. Fifteen of 24 MBO cruises conducted in 1978 have been submitted to USFWS--MBHRL for punching and the remaining 9 have been transcribed. Seven of 16 MBO cruises conducted in 1976 have been transcribed.

  13. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  14. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-01-25

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

  15. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1988. There are 16 individual hazardous waste facilities covered by the 13 ground-water monitoring projects. The Grout Treatment Facility is included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. The 13 projects discussed in this report were designed according to applicable interim-status ground-water monitoring requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). During this quarter, field activities primarily consisted of sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes sediment analyses in addition to ground-water monitoring results. Twelve new wells were installed during the previous quarter: two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, six at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells include drillers' logs and other drilling and site characterization data, and are provided in Volume 2 or on microfiche in the back of Volume 1. 26 refs., 28 figs., 74 tabs.

  16. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a prototype culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 21, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis, Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction and Phase III - Start-Up and Operation during the period October 1, 1981 through December 31, 1981. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered during the reporting period are presented. Seven shakedown tests were run. Start-up and shakedown testing was completed. Four parametric tests were run. Performance data are presented with the exception of boiler efficiency which will be reported once chemical analyses are completed. Total boiler operation time through the end of this quarter - 1225 h, 50 min; operating time on culm and culm/limestone - 682 h, 43 min. Inspection revealed no problems with boiler tube wear. Sulfur capture greater than 94% was demonstrated (design is 88%). A turndown of better than 4 to 1 was shown (design is 2.5 to 1). Computer control of most of the loops has been successful and manual control was also demonstrated.

  17. Advanced fuel cell development. Progress report, October--December 1977. [LiAlO/sub 2/ matrix for molten carbonate electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Kinoshita, K.; Finn, P.A.; Sim, J.W.; Nelson, P.A.

    1978-03-01

    Advanced fuel cell research and development activities in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the period October to December 1977 are described. This work has been aimed at understanding and improving the performance of fuel cells having molten alkali-carbonate mixtures as electrolytes; the fuel cells operate at temperatures near 925/sup 0/K. The largest part of this effort has been directed toward development of methods for fabricating and evaluating electrolyte structures for these cells. Cell performance, life, and cost are the criteria of optimization. During this quarter, the desirable physical characteristics of LiAlO/sub 2/ particles, which act to retain the molten carbonates in the electrolyte structure of the cell, have been more clearly defined; a low temperature synthesis of the stable ..gamma..-allotrope of LiAlO/sub 2/ has been devised; an extensive study of LiAlO/sub 2/ stability has begun; and analytical methods have been refined for separating LiAlO/sub 2/, in unaltered form, from carbonates. Testing of various electrolyte structures and other components in 7-cm-dia round cells has provided a means for evaluating new electrolyte developments and verifying a previously developed method for protecting the wet-seal areas of a cell from corrosion.

  18. Characterization and analysis of Devonian shales as related to release of gaseous hydrocarbons. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Snyder, M.J.

    1979-01-15

    The characterization data obtained during the period October through December 1978 are described. One well in Allegany County, New York, was sampled in September 1978. A total of 412 samples were collected from the Allegany County, New York well (165 for Battelle and 247 for other DOE/MERC contractors). Two other wells, namely in Wetzel County, West Virginia and Johnson County, Kentucky, were cored during the last quarter of 1978. A total of 109 samples were obtained from the Wetzel County, West Virginia well (46 samples for Battelle and 63 samples for other DOE/MERC contractors). The samples were obtained from depths of 6100 to 6635 feet. Characterization data on I-2 (EGSP Ind. No. 2), Clark County, Indiana, and Y-1 (EGSP New York No. 1), Allegany County, New York wells are reported and discussed. Analysis of the hydrocarbon gases in Y-1 samples indicates that the longer chain hydrocarbon gases (ethane, propane, butane) in these shales are significantly higher than in the previous wells studied. The Indiana well (I-2) shows surprisingly high carbon contents compared with the hydrocarbon gas contents. The carbon contents of the Y-1 (Allegany County, New York) well, on the other hand, are somewhat lower than would be predicted from the hydrocarbon gas contents. Among the physical properties, the I-2 well generally exhibits lower density values than previously studied shales.

  19. AFRRI Reports October - December 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Chernobyl, USSR (12) and Goiania , exposed to 10 Gy "Co radiation. Aviat. Space Environ. Med. 1990; Brazil (18). 61:893-8. The effects of 10 Grey (Oy...ation. Percept. Mot. Skills. 1976:42.511-4. behavior was maintained until the irradiated mouse was 18. Roberts L. Radiation accident grips Goiania

  20. Fires. October-December 08

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    flexibility—and to enhance their careers in the process. We also are shaping our career-field designation contributions, allowing our captains to “re- Red ...Operational training and Advisory Group in Kent, england. He served as the 1st infantry Division Artillery s3, deploying in support of Kosovo Forces...constructed mud huts or tents. The company we relieved cautioned us that these camps were suspected of harboring illicit arms markets. Over time

  1. Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stewart F.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients

  2. Louisiana/Texas shelf physical oceanography program. Task C, Eddy circulation study : NODC hydrographic data submission, 28 October 1993 to 23 December 1993 (NODC Accession 9400064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT, AXBT, and XBT casts from AIRCRAFT in Gulf of Mexico. Data were collected from 28 October 1993 to 23...

  3. Water and streambed-material data, Eagle Creek watershed, Indiana, August 1980, October and December 1982, and April 1983; updating of U.S. Geological Survey Open-file report 83-215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsness, David J.

    1983-01-01

    Water-quality surveys within the Eagle Creek watershed were done by the U.S. Geological Survey in August 1980, October and December 1982 and April 1983 in cooperation with the city of Indianapolis, Department of Public Works. Streambed-material and water samples were collected from Finley and Eagle Creek and was analyzed for selected metals, insecticides, and acid-extractable and base-neutral-extractable compounds. Water samples also were analyzed for volatile organic compounds. The 1982-83 surveys represent different flow conditions. This report lists all the data collected and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey but does not interpret any of the results.

  4. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1957 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1956 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Lake Mason National Wildlife Refuge, Hailstone National Wildlife Refuge, Halfbreed National Wildlife Refuge, Lamesteer National Wildlife Refuge: Easement narrative report: September, October, November, December - 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Mason NWR, Hailstone NWR, Halfbreed NWR, and Lamesteer NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942....

  7. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1949 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1955 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  9. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1962 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Quality of volatile organic compound data from groundwater and surface water for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, October 1996–December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; Mueller, David K.; Rose, Donna L.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Brenner, Cassandra K.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the quality of volatile organic compound (VOC) data collected from October 1996 to December 2008 from groundwater and surface-water sites for the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The VOC data described were collected for three NAWQA site types: (1) domestic and public-supply wells, (2) monitoring wells, and (3) surface-water sites. Contamination bias, based on the 90-percent upper confidence limit (UCL) for the 90th percentile of concentrations in field blanks, was determined for VOC samples from the three site types. A way to express this bias is that there is 90-percent confidence that this amount of contamination would be exceeded in no more than 10 percent of all samples (including environmental samples) that were collected, processed, shipped, and analyzed in the same manner as the blank samples. This report also describes how important native water rinsing may be in decreasing carryover contamination, which could be affecting field blanks. The VOCs can be classified into four contamination categories on the basis of the 90-percent upper confidence limit (90-percent UCL) concentration distribution in field blanks. Contamination category 1 includes compounds that were not detected in any field blanks. Contamination category 2 includes VOCs that have a 90-percent UCL concentration distribution in field blanks that is about an order of magnitude lower than the concentration distribution of the environmental samples. Contamination category 3 includes VOCs that have a 90-percent UCL concentration distribution in field blanks that is within an order of magnitude of the distribution in environmental samples. Contamination category 4 includes VOCs that have a 90-percent UCL concentration distribution in field blanks that is at least an order of magnitude larger than the concentration distribution of the environmental samples. Fifty-four of the 87 VOCs analyzed in samples from domestic and public

  11. The new European and German law regarding abnormal occurrences - Seveso in the gas industry; Das neue europaeische und deutsche Stoerfallrecht - Seveso in der Gaswirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evers, C. [Thyssengas GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    On 3rd February 1999 the deadline for the realisation of directive 96/82/EC for the control of major accident hazards (Seveso II directive - Directive on the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH)) expired. At the same time a modification to the Federal Pollution Control Act became effective. A fundamental reenactment of the ordinance regarding abnormal occurrences is imminent. The article outlines the contents of the European and planned German rulings and their consequences for gas supply companies. In the light of the example of the pipeline network of the public gas supply in particular it deals from a legal viewpoint with the problems of the newly created term of the `operating area`, with which an abandonment of plant-related pollution control seems to be linked. In conclusion, two fundamental operator obligations are portrayed as examples - the compilation of a concept for the prevention of major accidents and the setting-up of a safety management system. (orig.) [Deutsch] Am 3. Februar 1999 lief die Frist zur Umsetzung der Richtlinie 96/82/EG zur Beherrschung der Gefahren bei schweren Unfaellen mit gefaehrlichen Stoffen (Seveso-II-Richtline [engl.: Directive on the Control Of Major Accident Hazards - COMAH]) ab. Zum gleichen Zeitpunkt trat eine Aenderung des Bundesimmissionsschutzgesetzes in Kraft. Eine grundlegende Novellierung der Stoerfallverordnung steht bevor. Der Beitrag skizziert die Inhalte der europaeischen und geplanten deutschen Regelungen und deren Auswirkungen auf Gasversorgungsunternehmen. Am Beispiel des Pipelinenetzes insbesondere der oeffentlichen Gasversorgung geht er aus juristischer Sicht auf den neugeschaffenen Begriff des `Betriebsbereichs` ein, mit dem eine Abkehr vom anlagenbezogenen Immissionsschutz verbunden zu sein scheint. Abschliessend werden zwei fundamentale Betreiberpflichten exemplarisch dargestellt: Die Erstellung eines Konzepts zur Verhuetung schwerer Unfaelle und der Aufbau eines Sicherheitsmanagementsystems. (orig.)

  12. Bench-scale testing of the Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with Microcel. Fifth quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    During the quarter ending December, 31, 1993, the independent, combined and long duration testing were completed for both the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and the Illinois No. 6 coal. Overall, the project is on schedule and the bulk of the critical work, from a timing perspective, is complete. Table 1 summarizes the status of major project tasks as of December 31, 1993. Preliminary results provide strong evidence that combining the Microcel flotation column with the Multi-Gravity Separator has a synergistic effect. Overall ash and pyritic sulfur rejections of 75 %, at a 90 % combustible recovery, were consistently achieved on the Pittsburgh No.8 seam coal. On the Illinois No. 6 coal, pyritic sulfur rejections over 75 % and combustible recoveries of over 85 % were achieved. These results are discussed in this report. Although further analysis is taking place, it is very evident from the results presented herein that a well-designed and -operated flotation column performs well for ash rejection but not as well for pyrite rejection. It is equally evident that a good fine gravity separator can reject pyrite from coal but perform more poorly for ash rejection. The concept of combining the best of both units into one circuit has therefore been successfully tested in this project.

  13. Combined shift and methanation in a fluidized-bed reactor. Quarterly progress report, 1 October-31 December 1979. BCR report L-1061

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streeter, R C

    1980-01-01

    Construction of a new bench-scale methanation reactor is in progress. This system will provide the capability of adding steam to the feed gas. A bench-scale activity test, employing four samples of a Ni/Mo catalyst, was conducted using the existing life test system. Results showed that a spent catalyst sample containing 18 percent carbon was still as active as the fresh, as-received catalyst, thus confirming an earlier observation based on the results of PEDU Test No. 37. The activity of one sample that was previously heated at 450 C to remove the carbon seemed abnormally low. However, the results were inconclusive, and this sample will be tested further. No PEDU tests were scheduled. Some planned modifications to the PEDU reactor system are being delayed due to late delivery of a water injection pump and malfunctioning of new ball valves intended for installation on the catalyst sampling system. Arrangements have been made with Dr. Calvin Bartholomew of Brigham Young University to undertake continued studies on carbon deposition and catalyst regeneration. A research proposal submitted by Dr. Bartholomew has been reviewed and approved, and the BYU work is expected to commence early in January 1980.

  14. Coal combustion science quarterly progress report, October--December 1992. Task 1, Coal char combustion [and] Task 2, Fate of mineral matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardesty, D.R. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-06-01

    In the Coal Combustion Laboratory (CCL) this quarter, controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to better understand the late stages of coal combustion and its relation to unburned carbon levels in fly ash. Optical in situ measurements were made during char combustion at high carbon conversions and the optical data were related to particle morphologies revealed by optical microscopy on samples extracted under the same conditions. Results of this work are reported in detail below. In the data presented below, we compare the fraction of alkali metal loss to that of the alkaline earth metals as a function of coal rank to draw conclusions about the mechanism of release for the latter. Figure 2.1 illustrates the fractional release of the major alkali and alkaline earth metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg) as a function of coal rank for a series of coals and for several coal blends. All data are derived from combustion experiments in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor (MFC) and represent the average of three to eight experiments under conditions where the mass loss on a dry, ash-free (daf) basis exceeds 95 %. There are no missing data in the figure. The several coals with no indicated result exhibited no mass loss of the alkali or alkaline earth metals in our experiments. There is a clear rank dependence indicated by the data in Fig. 2.1, reflecting the mode of occurrence of the material in the coal.

  15. [The occurrence of dioctophymosis in dogs from Municipality of Cachoeiro do Itapemirim in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil, from May to December of 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruna J; Girardelli, Giovani L; Trivilin, Leonardo O; Lima, Vanessa R; Nunes, Louisiane de C; Martins, Isabella V F

    2006-01-01

    Dioctophyma renale is frequently observed in dogs from rural areas. From a total of 67 necropsies carried out from May to December of 2004, 56 were dogs, which came from the minicipality of Cachoeiro do Itapemirim, two animals parasited for D. renale. In one of these animals in a mass of epiplon a nematode female of 15 cm of length was found in ectopic position. The right kidney was atrophic and with the presence of 2 females (58 and 50 cm) and 2 males (21 cm each). In the second animal, the kidneys were morphologically different. The left kidney was presented hypertrophic, while right kidney was observed a female with 45 cm. The recovered helminths were identified and fixed in AFA. During the ovariectomy of a dog of the same region a male nematode of approximately 20 cm was found in site the abdominal cavity. All of them were identified as D. renale.

  16. Task 23 - field studies of the occurrence, transport, and fate of mercury at natural gas industry sites. Topical report, May 1, 1992--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J.A.; Harju, J.A.; Kuehnel, V.; Charlton, D.S.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this research project is to define the occurrence, transport, and fate of mercury in air, water, and soil at natural gas production sites that had been instrumented with mercury-based gas flowmeters in the past. The primary focus of this research was initially on determining the potential for mercury contamination in groundwater at these sites. The scope was later broadened to include determinations of the spatial distribution of mercury in soil. Air concentrations were determined solely as a health and safety routine.

  17. Preseismic oscillating electric field "strange attractor like" precursor, of T = 6 months, triggered by Ssa tidal wave. Application on large (Ms > 6.0R) EQs in Greece (October 1st, 2006 - December 2nd, 2008)

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G; Zymaris, N

    2009-01-01

    In this work the preseismic "strange attractor like" precursor is studied, in the domain of the Earth's oscillating electric field for T = 6 months. It is assumed that the specific oscillating electric field is generated by the corresponding lithospheric oscillation, triggered by the Ssa tidal wave of the same wave length (6 months) under excess strain load conditions met in the focal area of a future large earthquake. The analysis of the recorded Earth's oscillating electric field by the two distant monitoring sites of PYR and HIO and for a period of time of 26 months (October 1st, 2006 - December 2nd, 2008) suggests that the specific precursor can successfully resolve the predictive time window in terms of months and for a "swarm" of large EQs (Ms > 6.0R), in contrast to the resolution obtained by the use of electric fields of shorter (T = 1, 14 days, single EQ identification) wave length. More over, the fractal character of the "strange attractor like" precursor in the frequency domain is pointed out. Fina...

  18. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 October-December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  19. Asteroids Lightcurves Analysis: 2015 October-December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbognani, Albino; Buzzi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Eight asteroids, main-belt (MBA) and near-Earth (NEA), were observed in 2015 Oct-Dec: 6853 Silvanomassaglia, (112985) 2002 RS28, (155110) 2005 TB, (163899) 2003 SD220, (253106) 2002 UR3, (337866) 2001 WL15, 2015 XC, and 2015 WG9.

  20. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the NIMT (Thailand) and the BIPM October to December 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Pimsut, S.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Institute of Metrology (Thailand), NIMT, was carried out from October to December 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPMA (ZA) and BIPM6 (Z6), were transported by freight to NIMT and back to BIPM. At NIMT, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NIMT, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned toDC voltage standards by NIMT, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at NIMT, UNIMT, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 23 November 2014. UNIMT - UBIPM = 0.16 mV; uc = 0.14 mV, at 1 V UNIMT - UBIPM = - 0.03 mV; uc = 0.11 mV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NIMT, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected during two research cruises in the Ross Sea, Antarctica from December 2004 to January 2005 and October to November 2005 for Ross Sea Sulfur Dynamics study (NODC Accession 0117322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains transect data from two research cruises to the Ross Sea, Antarctica, aboard the RV Nathaniel B. Palmer (NBP) in December 2004 to January 2005...

  2. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Hematological abnormalities in severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Allison L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Statland, Barbara; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of hematologic abnormalities in adults with severe anorexia nervosa. We report the first major analysis of hematologic dysfunction in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 53 men and women with severe anorexia nervosa, admitted between October 2008 and December 2010 for medical stabilization to our center, which has a national referral base. Patients were predominantly female (89 %), with a median age of 28 years (range 17-65), and were hospitalized for a median duration of 15 days (I.Q.R. 9-29). Nadir body mass index during hospitalization was markedly low at 12.4 kg/m(2) (range 8.4-15.7), and the mean discharge BMI was 13.8 kg/m(2) (range 10.2-16.8). 83 % of patients were anemic (hematocrit  400 k/μL) during their hospitalization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had resolved their neutropenia by discharge. Marked hematologic deficiencies are often present in patients with severe anorexia nervosa, generally attributed to starvation-mediated gelatinous marrow transformation which resolves with proper nutritional rehabilitation. Improved provider awareness of this association may reduce unnecessary testing and costly treatment interventions.

  4. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  5. Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil, fluvial: Dominated deltaic reservoir. First quarterly technical progress report, Fiscal year 1994, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-15

    Production from the Port Neches CO{sub 2} project was initiated on December 6, 1993 after having been shut-in since the start of CO{sub 2} injection on September 22, 1993 to allow reservoir pressure to build. Rates were established at 236 barrels of oil per day (BOPD) from two wells in the 235 acre waterflood project area, which before project initiation had produced only 80 BOPD from the entire area. These wells are flowing large amounts of fluid due to the high reservoir pressure and their oil percentages are increasing as a result of the CO{sub 2} contacting the residual oil. One well, the H. J. Kuhn No. 15-R is flowing 217 BOPD, 1139 BWPD, and 2500 MCFPD of CO{sub 2} at a flowing tubing pressure (FTP) of 890 psi. The other producing well, the H. J. Kuhn No. 33, is currently flowing 19 BOPD, 614 BWPD, and 15 MCFPD at a FTP of 400 psi. Unexpectedly high rates of CO{sub 2} production are being made from Well No. 15-R and from the W. R. Stark ``B`` No. 8. This No. 8 well produced 7 BOPD, 697 BWPD, and 15 MCFPD prior to being shut-in during September to allow for the reservoir pressure to build by injecting CO{sub 2}, but when opened on December 6, the well flowed dry CO{sub 2} at a rate of 400 MCFPD for a two day test period. More sustained production tests will be obtained after all wells are tied into the new production facility. Many difficulties occurred in the drilling of the horizontal CO{sub 2} injection well but a successful completion across 2501 of sand has finally been accomplished. A formation dip of 11--14 degrees in the area where the well was being drilled made the proposed 1500{prime} horizontal sand section too difficult to accomplish. The shale section directly above the sand caused sticking problems on two separate occasions resulting in two sidetracks of the well around stuck pipe. The well will be tied into the facility and CO{sub 2} injection into the well will begin before February 1, 1994.

  6. Environmental occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the onsite and offsite releases of radioactive and regulated materials. The specific agencies notified of the releases depended on the type, amount, and location of the individual occurrences. The more significant of these off-normal environmental occurrences are summarized in this section.

  7. Bilateral Comparison of 1 V and 10 V Standards between the SMD (Belgium) and the BIPM October to December 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Vlad, D.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the Service Métrologie—Metrologische Dienst (SMD), Brussel, Belgium, was carried out from October to November 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM4 (Z4) and BIPM5 (Z5), were transported by freight to SMD and also back to BIPM. At SMD, the reference standard for DC voltage is a Josephson Voltage Standard (JVS). The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the primary standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at SMD, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned toDC voltage standards by SMD, at the level of 1.018 V and 10 V, at SMD, USMD, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 5 November 2014. USMD - UBIPM = 0.14 mV; uc = 0.07 mV, at 1 V USMD - UBIPM = 0.09 mV; uc = 0.49 mV , at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at SMD, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. The Correlation of Upwelling Phenomena and Ocean Sunfish Occurrences in Nusa Penida, Bali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tito, C. K.; Susilo, E.

    2017-02-01

    Sea surface Temperature (SST) is an important oceanographic variable that can figure the upwelling phenomena. This study aims to determine the variability of SST in relation to upwelling phenomena in the Indian Ocean Southern of Bali Island and the Ocean Sunfish occurrences in the southern of Nusa Penida. Data loggers and remote sensing approach that record temperature was used. An Onset HOBO U20 Water Level Logger U20-001-02 was deployed in Crystal Bay (08°42‧S and 115°27‧E) at 8 meters depth. The daily field SST data were available from June 2011 to December 2014 with 30 minutes time interval. The monthly satellite images obtained from MODIS on board the Aqua satellite. While the ocean sunfish occurrences were based on rate of encounter (ROE) of previous works by Putra (2015) on July to October 2014. It was found that field data and MODIS have a high correlation (r=0.89) with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE=1.64°C). The upwelling phenomena characterized by the evidence of the colder water mass (SST phenomena coincidence with the high occurrences of Ocean Sunfish in Crystal Bay on August to October.

  9. Meteorological conditions at Kaarstoe. September-December 1996; Meteorologiske forhold paa Kaarstoe. September-desember 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugsbakk, I.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes meteorological data measured in Statoil`s area at Kaarstoe, Norway, September-December 1996. The dominant wind direction was from N and NNE. The strongest winds were measured from SSW. The mean wind force was 3.1 m/s, and the calm air frequency was 0.2%. At the meteorological station at Utsira the wind was usually from S and SSE, at mean wind force 8.2 m/s and calm air frequency 0%. Stability measurements indicate the occurrence of thermal stratification with weak dispersion conditions about 1/3 of the time. Stability was least in October (13.7%) and greatest in November (40.7%). 1 ref., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Army AL&T, October-December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    IEDs and investigate patterns and methods of prevention. PMs and Product Directors (PDs) PEO C3T’s project and product management offices play a key... facial image) to identify a subject. HIIDE proved to be exceptionally well-suited for decentralized use across both special operations and...this instruction, Soldiers learn how to treat the three most preventable combat deaths: a collapsed lung, a blocked airway , and blood loss. Students

  11. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The Department of Energy's demonstration plant program was started in 1974 by one of the Department of Energy's predecessor agencies: the Office of Coal Research, US Department of the Interior. The objective of the program is to establish the technical and financial feasibility of coal conversion technologies proven during pilot plant testing. Demonstration plants will minimize the technical and economic risks of commercialization by providing a near commercial size plant for testing and production. Thus, DOE is sponsoring the development of a series of demonstration plants, each of which will be a smaller version of commercial plants envisioned for the 1980's. These plants will be wholly integrated, self-sufficient in terms of heat generation, and dependent only on feedstock of coal, water, and air. Under the DOE program, contracts for designing, constructing, and operating the demonstration plants will be awarded through competitive procedures and will be jointly funded. The conceptual design phase will be funded by the government, with the detailed design, procurement, construction, and operating phases being co-funded, 50% from industry and 50% from the government. The cost involved in building and operating a demonstration plant will probably be between $200 million and $500 million, depending on the size of the plant. Individual demonstration plant contracts are described briefly.

  12. Coal Combustion Science. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardesty, D.R. [ed.; Baxter, L.L.; Davis, K.A.; Hurt, R.H.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency (IEA) Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks include: Task 1--Kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion; and Task 2--deposit growth and property development in coal-fired furnaces. The objective of task 1 is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: (a) kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; (b) char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; (c) the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; (d) unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. The objectives of Task 2 are to provide a self-consistent database of simultaneously measured, time-resolved, ash deposit properties in well-controlled and well-defined environments and to provide analytical expressions that relate deposit composition and structure to deposit properties of immediate relevance to PETC`s Combustion 2000 program. The task include the development and use of diagnostics to monitor, in situ and in real time, deposit properties, including information on both the structure and composition of the deposits.

  13. LLE Review, Volume 57. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, A. [ed.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the visible fruits of long design labors on the OMEGA Upgrade began to appear. The target mirror structure was put in place, along with the target chamber itself. The laser bay structures were also installed, and the bay is now being prepared to receive optomechanical, control, and laser assemblies. Further details are in the OMEGA Upgrade Status Report in this issue. Theory and analysis of previous experiments continued during this reporting period. Articles contained herein describe an improved theory of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a novel proposal for characterizing plasma-density profiles by using grid image refractometry; a much-improved treatment of the damping of ion sound waves in a mixture of light and heavy ions; and, finally, a new interpretation of measurements of 3/2-harmonic radiation emitted from the long-scale-length plasmas created in earlier OMEGA experiments.

  14. LLE review, volume 73. Quarterly report, October 1997--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This progress report contains discussion on the following topics: A high-bandwidth electrical-waveform generator based on aperture-coupled striplines for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications; sweep deflection circuit development using computer-aided circuit design for the OMEGA multichannel streak camera; D-{sup 3}He protons as a diagnostic for target {rho}R; growth rates of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion; three-dimensional analysis of the power transfer between crossed laser beams; characterization of freestanding polymer films for application in 351-nm, high-peak-power laser systems; subsurface damage in microgrinding optical glasses; bound-abrasive polishers for optical glass; and color gamut of cholesteric liquid crystal films and flakes by standard colorimetry.

  15. US Army Medical Department Journal, October-December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Burton Editorial Assistant EDITORIAL REVIEW BOARD COL Mustapha Debboun, MS, Chairman Chief, Medical Zoology Branch, Dept of Preventive Health...institutionalized by the AMEDD and DoD as the authorized "Medical Equipment Book Set-Detainee Healthcare Opera- tions." Along with the appropriate DoD...UNDOC/GEN/N03/563/91/ PDF /N0356391. pdf ? OpenElement. 3. Coyle A. A Human Rights Approach to Prison management: Handbook for Prison Staff. London

  16. Nuclear Waste Management quarterly progress report, October--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M. (comp.)

    1977-04-01

    Research topics on which progress is reported include decontamination and densification of chop-leach cladding residues, monitoring of effluents from waste solidification, TRU waste fixation, krypton solidification, /sup 14/C and /sup 129/I fixation, waste management system studies, organic complexes of fission products, characterization of 300 Area burial grounds, electropolishing as a decontamination technique, and decommissioning of Hanford facilities. 11 tables, 18 figures. (DLC)

  17. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    learning. Cognit Sci. 1988;12(2):257-285. 40. Prensky M. Digital natives, digital immigrants. Horizon. 2001;9(5):1-6. 41. Bandura A. Social Learning...Theory. New York, NY: General Learning Press; 1971. 42. Bandura A. Social Foundations of Thought and Action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall...we used when we created them. Albert Einstein 74 http://www.cs.amedd.army.mil/dasqaDocuments.aspx?type=1 USG who asked for the status of abortion

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1998 with data for October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. 82 tabs.

  19. Army AL&T, October-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Infantry Division, monitor vehicular and pedestrian traffic in and out of Riyadh, Iraq, last April. (U.S. Air Force photo by TSGT Maria J. Bare, 1st Combat...Riyadh, Iraq, last April. (U.S. Air Force photo by TSGT Maria J. Bare, 1st Combat Camera Squadron.) A_ALT_Oct-Dec 2007_V10_CC.qxp 9/26/2007 12:13 AM...25, 2007. (DOD photo by U.S. Army SGT Antonieta Rico.) A_ALT_Oct-Dec 2007_V10_CC.qxp 9/26/2007 12:25 AM Page 70 “The LMCC is a collection of minds

  20. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-01

    Progress on seventeen projects related to coal liquefaction or the upgrading of coal liquids and supported by US DOE is reported with emphasis on funding, brief process description history and current progress. (LTN)

  1. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-01

    A number of the processes for converting coal to gas supported by US DOE have reached the pilot plant stage. Laboratory research is also continuing in order to develop data for verifying the feasibility of the specific process and for supporting the operation of the plant. Responsibility for designing, constructing, and operating these pilot plants is given. The most successful test to date was completed in the pilot plant of the BI-GAS Process. The HYGAS Process pilot plant continued testing with Illinois bituminous coal to acquire data necessary to optimize the design of a commercial demonstration plant using the HYGAS process. The Synthane Process pilot plant continued studies of Illinois No. 6 coal. Other processes discussed are: Agglomerating Burner Process, Liquid Phase Methanation Process, Molten Salt Gasification Process, Advanced Coal Gasification System, and Lo-Btu Gasification of Coal for Electric Power Generation. Each project is described briefly with funding, history, and progress during the quarter. (LTN)

  2. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-01

    DOE's demonstration plant program's objective is to establish the technical and financial feasibility of coal conversion technologies proven during pilot plant testing. Demonstration plants will minimize the technical and economic risks of commercialization by providing a near commercial size plant for testing and production. Thus, DOE is sponsoring the development of a series of demonstration plants, each of which will be a smaller version of commercial plants envisioned for the 1980's. These plants will be wholly integrated, self-sufficient in terms of heat generation, and dependent only on feedstock of coal, water, and air. Under the DOE program, contracts for designing, constructing, and operating the demonstration plants will be awarded through competitive procedures and will be jointly funded. The conceptual design phase will be funded by the government, with the detailed design, procurement, construction, and operation phases being co-funded, 50 percent from industry and 50 percent from the government. The cost involved in building and operating a demonstration plant will probably be between $200 million and $500 million, depending on the size of the plant. Eighteen projects related to the program are described with emphasis on funding, planning, status, and progress. (LTN)

  3. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to gaseous fuels was started by two of its predecessor agencies: the Office of Coal Research (OCR) and ERDA. The US Bureau of Mines, Department of Interior, had previously done research in the 1930's. Both high- and low-Btu gasification processes are being developed. High-Btu gas can be distributed economically to consumers in the same pipeline systems now used to carry natural gas. Low-Btu gas, the cheapest of the gaseous fuels produced from coal, can be used economically only on site, either for electric power generation or by industrial and petrochemical plants. The conversion of coal to high-Btu gas requires a chemical and physical transformation of solid coal. Coals have widely differing chemical and physical properties depending on where they are mined, and are difficult to process. Therefore, to develop the most suitable techniques for gasifying coal, DOE, together with the American Gas Association (AGA), is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes. Although the basic coal-gasification chemical reactions are the same for each process, each of the processes under development have unique characteristics. There are, for example, important differences in reactor configurations and methods of supplying heat for gasification. Moreover, because these processes require high temperatures, because some require high pressures, and because all produce corrosive and chemically-active gases, resistant alloys and new pressure vessels must be developed to obtain reliable performance. A number of the processes for converting coal to high-Btu gas have reached the pilot plant stage. Laboratory research is also continuing in order to develop data for verifying the feasibility of each specific process and for supporting the operation of each plant. Responsibility for designing, constructing, and operating these pilot plants is contracted to individual companies. Each process is described briefly.

  4. Satellite Applications Information Notes, October 1975 - December 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    the practical applications of satellite data. Geographical coverage of topics range from Hawaii to tHe east coast of continental U. S. and the Atlantic...34 in extreme southeast Nebraska. The geographical location of this old boundary, with respect to the squall line(s) easing in from the west, was...REASON FOR SEGEMENT ENHANCEMENT *1 +58.8 To +28.2 Little or no useful Met Data (Black) *2 +28.8 To + 6.8 Low Level/Sea Surface Difference 3 + 6.8 To

  5. Technical Reports - FY16 Q1 - October-December 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubenstein, Brenda M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ray, Keith G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-20

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the frequency dependence of motional heating rates in ion traps can vary dramatically with temperature.1-6 More specifically, it has been shown that, at temperatures below roughly 70 K, heating rates are substantially lower than those observed at temperatures above 70 K.1,2 These observations, combined with experiments that show that ion bombardment may also reduce heating rates,4,5 suggest that one potential source of heating may be the presence of unwanted adatoms on trap surfaces. Based upon this evidence, this past quarter, we have used our previously detailed microscopic model of anomalous heating to study which adatoms may be responsible for the observed temperature-dependent scaling of motional heating rates with frequency. We have also examined the validity of one of the key assumptions in our model - that surface adatom dipoles can be accurately obtained from a variational ansatz - by using more direct DFT calculations of the dipole moments. Our current results suggest that the adatoms potentially responsible for the observed motional heating rates should bind weakly to the electrode surface and likely have a mass that exceeds that of Ne. Preliminary DFT calculations suggest that an analytical adatom dipole model,9 previously used in the ion trap noise literature7 to obtain the dipole as a function of adatom-surface distance, may be insufficiently accurate. Therefore, we are working toward obtaining a tabulation of the distance-dependent dipole for several adsorbates using first principles calculations for more accurate input to the heating model. The accurate calculation of the adatom dipole is important because its fluctuation is what couples to and heats the trapped ion qubit. Future work will focus on calculating the frequency spectra of a variety of hydrocarbons, which should have the binding characteristics identified below as necessary for reproducing experimental results. Upcoming efforts will moreover be directed toward deriving an improved microscopic model of heating which will enable direct comparisons of heating rates with measured ion-surface distances and will more accurately account for experimental parameters such as the trapping frequency, ion-electrode distance, and RF power applied to the electrodes.

  6. Plasma research. Final report, October 1, 1968--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekefi, G.; Coppi, B.; Parker, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The research in plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research at M.I.T. has evolved from a relatively long tradition of basic theoretical and experimental contributions, during the period covered by this contract. A major commitment to research in magnetically confined plasmas was undertaken with the Alcator program that began in 1969 and with the theoretical effort necessary to back this up. The Alcator A device was brought to successful operation and, after the identification of a sequence of plasma regimes that have been realized in it, let to attainment record values of plasma density, of the confinement parameter n tau, and of the degree of plasma purity. A second more advanced device, Alcator C, has been designed and is presently under construction. A line of toroidal experiments characterized by relatively low cost and extreme simplicity has been developed in order to study basic plasma physics problems related to magnetic confinement and relevant processes of plasma decontamination. The devices that have been operated are Versator I, now discontinued, Rector, with non-circular cross section, Erasmus, with small aspect ratio and Versator II. A number of theoretical contributions concerning the interpretation of the regimes found in Alcator, runaway phenomena, new trapped particle instabilities, internal resistive modes, etc. have been given and presented in publications or appropriate meetings. A special consideration, within the theoretical effort, has been devoted to the study of plasma regimes that are important in devising future experiments of thermonuclear interest.

  7. Energy Information Administration quarterly coal report, October--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-21

    The United States produced just over 1 billion short tons of coal in 1992, 0.4 percent more than in 1991. Most of the 4-million-short-ton increase in coal production occurred west of the Mississippi River, where a record level of 408 million short tons of coal was produced. The amount of coal received by domestic consumers in 1992 totaled 887 million short tons. This was 7 million short tons more than in 1991, primarily due to increased coal demand from electric utilities. The average price of delivered coal to each sector declined by about 2 percent. Coal consumption in 1992 was 893 million short tons, only 1 percent higher than in 1991, due primarily to a 1-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Consumer coal stocks at the end of 1992 were 163 million short tons, a decrease of 3 percent from the level at the end of 1991, and the lowest year-end level since 1989. US coal exports fell 6 percent from the 1991 level to 103 million short tons in 1992. Less coal was exported to markets in Europe, Asia, and South America, but coal exports to Canada increased 4 million short tons.

  8. Nulcear Safety: Technical progress review, October--December 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Safety is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  9. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    health benefits increase as you spend more time being active. Children and adolescents: get 60 minutes or more a day. Adults: get 2 hours and 30...aeromedical platform in Afghanistan High Open The immediate effects of yoga on wounded warriors in a deployed setting: a pilot study Medium Closed

  10. Ames Laboratory quarterly report, October 1, 1987--December 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: laser induced luminescence and multiphoton ionization in gaseous and low temperature matrices; fundamental studies of chemical carcinogenesis by fluorescence line narrowing spectroscopy; analytical applications of supersonic jet spectroscopy; measurement of toxic compounds and metabolites present in environmental and biological samples; and quantitation in electrophoresis based on lasers.

  11. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1997 with data from October 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describes the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregates, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. 16 figs., 66 tabs.

  12. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, October-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-07-01

    This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, in situ storage or disposal, waste from development and characterization, process and equipment development, and low-level waste management are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October-December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.

    1997-01-01

    The articles in this issue report progress on: Supernova Hydrodynamics Experiments on the Nova Laser; Characterization of Laser-Driven Shock Waves Using Interferometry; Absolute Equation of State Measurements of Compressed Liquid Deuterium Using Nova; Low-Density-Foam Shells; Tetrahedral Hohlraums; The Rosseland Mean Opacity of a Composite Material at High Temperatures.

  14. Defense Standardization Program Journal. October/December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    lb 0.86 lb Pack shape Rectangular Rectangular Rectangular Voltage 12 10.8 10.8 Cells/chemistry 6 lithium ion 18650 -type 6 lithium ion 18650 -type 6...lithium ion 18650 -type The three packs differ slightly in makeup, but they are similar in that all use six of the same type of lithium ion

  15. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    Several new initiatives were begun in coal preparation, including a project to develop a liquid CO/sub 2/ coalescence process that will produce a superclean coal containing less than 1% ash. Another new project in this area is focusing on chemical coal cleaning for the removal of harmful trace elements, such as arsenic, lead, and zinc. Milestones were reached in both of our major electron beam flue gas cleanup projects. In the area of coal-water mixtures, our major industrial contracts are now approaching critical milestones. The analysis of our in-house combustion testing of micronized coal-water mixtures in PETC's 700-horsepower oil-designed boiler has been completed. By reducing the coal particle size from 90% minus 200 mesh down to 87% minus 19 microns, the carbon conversion efficiency increased from a level of 96% to 98%. Combustion tests with a commercially available CWM showed that combustion air enriched to 23% oxygen reduced the needed air preheat temperature from 370/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/F. Work also got underway in the new projects selected last summer to investigate advanced direct liquefaction processes. At Kerr-McGee, three scoping runs on their 350 pound/day integrated bench-scale unit were successfully completed. The objective of these runs was to evaluate subbituminous coal process options in terms of catalyst performance, distillate yields, and generation of coke precursors. Cities Service began its project on the characterization of hydrogen donor solvents in two-stage liquefaction. 7 figures, 33 tables.

  16. Defense Standardization Program Journal. October/December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    working with Beynon Sports Surfaces, Inc. He reformulated the edible film composition for William Wrigley Jr. Company dur- ing his time at TIC Gums...alone additional , standardization work may present insuperable challenges. NSA Reform In keeping with decisions made at the June 2011 ministerial...planning questions and integrating standard operating procedures (SOPs) to achieve interoperability. The U.S. Army has incorporated the COH and other

  17. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, No. 18, October - December 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-25

    Svetlichnyy (0). Study of amplification of CO., laser radiation in reaction products of carbon dioxide with nitrous oxide. ZhPMTF, no. 5...Stud, si cere, fiz., v. 26, no. 4, 1974, 355- 359. (RZhRadiot, 10/74, 10Ye72) 136. Vasiliu, V. (NS). Carbon monoxide lasers... Photodissociative Basov. N. G. . L. Ye. Golubev. V. S. Zuyev, V. A. Katulin. V. N. Netenun. V. Yu. Nosach. O. Yu. Nosach

  18. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report October - December 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-03-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2008/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the fourth quarter of 2008.

  19. ARM Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, Jimmy W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. This quarterly report is written to comply with this requirement. This reports on the first quarter facility statistics.

  20. Seizure increases electroencephalographic abnormalities in children with tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastiya Indra Gunawan

    2016-04-01

    The EEG pattern in children with TBM varies, and EEG abnormalities were more frequently localized in the frontotemporal region. Seizures were associated with EEG abnormalities in children with TBM. EEG abnormalities occurring simultaneously with seizures may predict the occurrence of seizures.

  1. December Sigma-Virginids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Yasuo; Ueda, Masayoshi

    2013-02-01

    We studied the December sigma-Virginids from the TV meteor observation network database in Japan (the "SonotaCo Network"). The December sigma-Virginids are a minor annual meteor shower that has a broad peak around December 20 and about 40 days active duration. The visual maximum zenithal hourly rate (ZHR) is estimated at 1.5.

  2. Disease Occurrence - Worldwide, July - December 1983. Compilation of Unclasssified Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    in Puerto Barrios on the Caribbean coast reportedly is under control, according to Dr. Adolfo Castaneda Felice, Minister of Public Health and Social...Additional cases have been reported from Chiapas, Puebla , Morelos, and Jalisco. Several of the epidemics have occurred in cities which had not

  3. Basil Willey, Sixty Years after (October 22, 2007)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    On the occasion of the sixtieth anniversary of the foundation of the Danish Association of English Teachers' newsletter, Anglo Files, the essay reconsiders the contents of the first issue from December 1947, Cambridge professor Basil Willey's address to the Association on October 22, 1947, 'Poetr...

  4. THE BLIZZARD FROM 25-26 OCTOBER 2014 AND ITS IMPACT ON AIR FLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŞCHIOPU C.-L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available On a calendar basis, October is considered the middle month of the fall, and for this reason, some meteorological phenomena such as blizzards, specific of the cold season, may occur extremely rare. Throughout the latest years there haven’t been any blizzards on this specific month, the earliest snow occurring on 15 October 1970 and the first snow cover on 26 October 1988. Climatologically the first month in which blizzard occurs is November with 0-1 days, when the multi-annual average is 0.4 days, therefore, the occurrence of this phenomenon on this month may be considered as an abnormal event which exceeds by far the multi-annual climatologic normalized standards. In order to highlight the synoptic context which determined the blizzard, the authors have revised the synoptic maps of air-pressure topography at the 500 hPa and ground levels and the meteorological data which were extracted from www.wetter3.de, www.ogimet.com, www.sat24.com, www.zamg.ac.at, www.weather.uwyo.edu. On 25-26 October 2014, the air flight activity was disturbed by the unexpected blizzard conditions and the Air Operators were taken by surprise and the Emergency and Rescue Air Unit (SMURD could not intervene. Also, the military helicopters were not able to fly in transport missions to Carei (Satu Mare county where there is the commemoration of the Romanian Army Day and the high officials of the Romanian state which were taking part have arrived with military aircrafts (C-27J Spartan, C-130B Hercules, An-30. After this event, at the landing on Otopeni Military Aerodrome they encountered severe meteorological hazard, but the aircrafts landed in safety conditions.

  5. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  6. Civil Code, 11 December 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Article 162 of this Mexican Code provides, among other things, that "Every person has the right freely, responsibly, and in an informed fashion to determine the number and spacing of his or her children." When a marriage is involved, this right is to be observed by the spouses "in agreement with each other." The civil codes of the following states contain the same provisions: 1) Baja California (Art. 159 of the Civil Code of 28 April 1972 as revised in Decree No. 167 of 31 January 1974); 2) Morelos (Art. 255 of the Civil Code of 26 September 1949 as revised in Decree No. 135 of 29 December 1981); 3) Queretaro (Art. 162 of the Civil Code of 29 December 1950 as revised in the Act of 9 January 1981); 4) San Luis Potosi (Art. 147 of the Civil Code of 24 March 1946 as revised in 13 June 1978); Sinaloa (Art. 162 of the Civil Code of 18 June 1940 as revised in Decree No. 28 of 14 October 1975); 5) Tamaulipas (Art. 146 of the Civil Code of 21 November 1960 as revised in Decree No. 20 of 30 April 1975); 6) Veracruz-Llave (Art. 98 of the Civil Code of 1 September 1932 as revised in the Act of 30 December 1975); and 7) Zacatecas (Art. 253 of the Civil Code of 9 February 1965 as revised in Decree No. 104 of 13 August 1975). The Civil Codes of Puebla and Tlaxcala provide for this right only in the context of marriage with the spouses in agreement. See Art. 317 of the Civil Code of Puebla of 15 April 1985 and Article 52 of the Civil Code of Tlaxcala of 31 August 1976 as revised in Decree No. 23 of 2 April 1984. The Family Code of Hidalgo requires as a formality of marriage a certification that the spouses are aware of methods of controlling fertility, responsible parenthood, and family planning. In addition, Article 22 the Civil Code of the Federal District provides that the legal capacity of natural persons is acquired at birth and lost at death; however, from the moment of conception the individual comes under the protection of the law, which is valid with respect to the

  7. Eventos de Octubre (October Events).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Myrna; Toro, Leonor

    Written in Spanish, this booklet contains information on three events occurring in the month of October: the discovery of America (October 12), the organization of the United Nations (October 24), and Halloween (October 31). Christopher Columbus' journey to America is discussed through a short story; an epic poem ("Velas Epicas"); and…

  8. OCCURRENCE OF Cyclocephala forsteri ON Acronomia aculeata OCORRÊNCIA DE Cyclocephala forsteri EM Acronomia aculeata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crébio José Ávila

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of the Cyclocephala forsteri (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae beetle, in area with Acronomia aculeata (Arecaceae, was verified in Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, in November and December 2008, and from October to December 2009. Adult beetle was observed attacking the plant inflorescence, causing the fall of flower buds and, consequently, reduction of fruits on the bunch of A. aculeata.

    Verificou-se a ocorrência do besouro Cyclocephala forsteri (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae, em área com Acronomia aculeata (Arecaceae, no município de Dourados (MS, durante os meses de novembro e dezembro de 2008 e de outubro a dezembro de 2009. Foi observado coleóptero adulto atacando a inflorescência da planta, causando a queda dos botões florais e, consequentemente, redução de frutos no cacho de A. aculeata.

     

  9. Mail Delivery | 19 December

    CERN Multimedia

    Mail Office

    2014-01-01

    Due to the annual closure of CERN, no mail will be distributed on Friday, 19 December but mail will still be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, it will be possible for you to bring outgoing mail to building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.

  10. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  11. The gravitation of the moon plays pivotal roles in the occurrence of the acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Haze, Kazuo; Otani, Shinichiro; Yoshimura, Takayoshi; Toda, Iku; Nishimoto, Masaki; Kawarabayashi, Takahiko; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimada, Kenei; Iida, Hidetaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2008-10-31

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a social burden. However, being able to predict AMI could lead to prevention. A previous study showed only the relation between the lunar phase and the occurrence of AMI, but the period it takes for the moon to orbit around the earth and the period of the lunar phase differ. This study investigated the effect of the gravitation of the moon on AMI. Data was comprised of 1369 consecutive patients with first AMI at 5 hospitals from October, 1984 to December, 1997. The universal gravitation of the moon was calculated and compared to the earth onset time of AMI. Universal gravitation of the moon was derived by G*m/d(2) (G: universal gravitation constant, m: the mass of the moon, d: the distance between the center of the moon and the center of the earth). The relationship between m/d(2) and the cases of AMI was determined. There was an increase in cases, when there is a distance of more than 399864 km from the center of the earth to the center of the moon. The gravitation of more than 399864 km was determined to be weaker gravitation. It is confirmed that the number of AMI patients significantly increases at weaker gravitation periods in this multicenter trial. In conclusion, these results suggest that the gravitation of the moon may have an influence on the occurrence of AMI.

  12. The Gravitation of the Moon Plays Pivotal Roles in the Occurrence of the Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryotaro Wake

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is a social burden. However, being able to predict AMI could lead to prevention. A previous study showed only the relation between the lunar phase and the occurrence of AMI, but the period it takes for the moon to orbit around the earth and the period of the lunar phase differ. This study investigated the effect of the gravitation of the moon on AMI. Data was comprised of 1369 consecutive patients with first AMI at 5 hospitals from October, 1984 to December, 1997. The universal gravitation of the moon was calculated and compared to the earth onset time of AMI. Universal gravitation of the moon was derived by G*m/d2 (G: universal gravitation constant, m: the mass of the moon, d: the distance between the center of the moon and the center of the earth. The relationship between m/d2 and the cases of AMI was determined. There was an increase in cases, when there is a distance of more than 399864 km from the center of the earth to the center of the moon. The gravitation of more than 399864 km was determined to be weaker gravitation. It is confirmed that the number of AMI patients significantly increases at weaker gravitation periods in this multicenter trial. In conclusion, these results suggest that the gravitation of the moon may have an influence on the occurrence of AMI.

  13. A STUDY OF SEASONAL VARIATION OBSERVED IN OCCURRENCE OF IMMINENT ECLAMPSIA AND ECLAMPSIA AT TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Eclampsia is an occurrence of seizures in women with pre-eclampsia. It is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity in India. Their etiology is poorly understood even today. Seasonal variation is considered as one of the cause. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To see the frequency of occurrence of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia during rainy (June to August and winter (October to December season. MATERIALS AND METHOD This is a descriptive, retrospective, observational and analytical study on seasonal variations in admission of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia patients in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in KIMS, Karad, from 2012 to 2014. RESULT Among 9122 total number of admissions in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 7678 got delivered in our institute. In which 4150 deliveries occurred in rainy season in which imminent eclampsia were 55 (1.3%, eclampsia cases were 42 (1.01%. While 3528 cases delivered in winter in which imminent eclampsia were 28 (0.7% and eclampsia were 24 (0.68%. The study showed frequency of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia being more common in rainy season than that of winter season. CONCLUSION In our study, we observed the seasonal variation in occurrence of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia. Number of cases of both imminent eclampsia and eclampsia was more common in rainy season. Regular health checkup, availability of health facilities and prompt referral to tertiary hospital can decrease mortality and morbidity of patient.

  14. Physics Flash December 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). ADEPS Communications

    2016-12-01

    This is the December 2016 issue of Physics Flash, the newsletter of the Physics Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In this issue, the following topics are covered: Novel liquid helium technique to aid highly sensitive search for a neutron electrical dipole moment; Silverleaf: Prototype Red Sage experiments performed at Q-site; John L. Kline named 2016 APS Fellow; Physics students in the news; First Entropy Engine quantum random number generator hits the market; and celebrating service.

  15. 75 FR 51287 - Agreements in Force as of December 31, 2009, Between the American Institute in Taiwan and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ...-hydraulic code applications and maintenance research. Signed December 13, 2004 and December 13, 2004... priority filing rights for patent and trademark applications. Signed April 10, 1996. Entered into force... and communication technologies (ICT) forum terms of reference. Signed October 31, 2007. Entered...

  16. Loglines. September - October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    officer, said. To streamline the ordering process, the new toner contract will be available for online ordering and payment via Government Purchase...September - October 2012 Engineering Savings Story by Amanda Neumann T he federal government is one savvy shopper – minus the coupon clipping. Just like...been online that long. “That allows planners to use the data to do analytical studies that could not be done before, because GTN only retained

  17. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  18. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  19. Abnormal menstrual periods (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have a variety of causes, such as endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, and abnormal thyroid or ... the endometrium becomes unusually thick it is called endometrial ... Hyperplasia may cause profuse or extended menstrual bleeding.

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  1. Monitoring the Corniglio Landslide (Parma, Italy) before and after the M=5.4 earthquake of December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdis, S.; Guastaldi, E.; Rindinella, A.; Disperati, L.; Ciulli, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the results of monitoring the Corniglio landslide (CL), a large landslide located in the Northern Apennines, by integrating traditional geomorphologic and geological surveys, digital photogrammetry, GPS and geostatistics. The CL spreads over an area of about 3 km x 1 km, close to Corniglio village (Parma, Italy). We propose a new kinematic framework for the CL as Deep-Seated Slope Gravitational Deformation (DSGSD). Surveys were carried out in six periods, in July and September 2006, March and August 2007, July 2008 (after a M=4 earthquake of 28 December 2007, 10 km far from Corniglio), and finally January 2009 (after several earthquakes occurred in the last days of December 2008, with magnitude from 4 to 5.4 and epicentres located less than 30 km far from Corniglio). Geological survey, interpretation of orthophotographs related to 1976, 1988, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2005, and satellite imagery related to 2003 were integrated for analysing the state of activity of landslide from 1976 to 2009, quantifying the ground displacement vectors. A RTK GPS survey was periodically carried out in order to locate the crown of the main landslide scarp and to identify reactivation of the CL after the earthquakes of the end of December 2008. Then, kriged multitemporal maps representing azimuth and module of ground displacement vectors were built, by evaluating the displacement with time of homologous ground targets on the multitemporal remotely sensed images. Measuring of ground deformations was performed on imagery related to the periods between December 1994 to July 1996, between October and November 1996, as well as the recurrent activity from October 1998 to 2003. In some sector of the main body of the landslide we estimated 70 m of total of ground displacement. The fieldwork results and photogeologic interpretation performed along the the Bratica valley, to the east of the CL, suggest that the occurrence of rigid behaviour lithotypes (Mt. Caio calcareous

  2. Abnormal protein aggregationand neurodegenerativediseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal protein aggregation or amyloid is the major cause ofmany neurodegenerative disorders. The present review focuses on the correlation between sequence and structure features of proteins related to the diseases and abnormal protein aggregation. Recent progress has improved our knowledge on understand-ing the mechanism of amyloid formation. We suggest a nucleation model for ordered protein aggregation, which can also explain pathogenesis mechanisms of these neurodegenerative diseases in vivo.

  3. Dopaminergic system abnormalities Etiopathogenesis of dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhui Wu; Huifang Shang; Xiaoyi Zou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much research has focused on the close relationship between etiopathogenesis of dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Nevertheless, details of the mechanism are still not clear.OBJECTIVE: To review studies from the past few years about pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system.RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the key words "dystonia" and "dopamine", PubMed database and SCI databases were searched from January 1990 to December 2005 for relevant English publications. A total of 73 articles were searched and, initially, all articles were selected. Inclusive criteria: studies based on pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Exclusive criteria: duplicated studies. A total of 19 articles were extracted after preliminary screening.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The data sources were the PubMed and SCI databases. The types of articles chosen were reviews and original articles.DATA SYNTHESIS: Metabolism and function of dopamine in the central nervous system: the chemical constitution of dopamine is a single benzene ring. The encephalic regions of dopamine synthesis and their fiber projections comprise four nervous system pathways. One of these pathways is the substantia nigra-striatum dopamine pathway, which is a side-loop of the basal ganglia circuitry that participates in movement control and plays a main role in the adjustment of extracorticospinal tract movement. Dopamine can lead to the facilitation of movement. Dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system: different modes of dopamine abnormality exist in various forms of dystonia. Abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in several primary dystonias: at present, fifteen gene loci of primary dystonia have been reported (DYT1-DYT15). The relationship between abnormalities of the dopaminergic system and the

  4. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  5. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  6. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  7. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...

  8. Lacrimal system abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B D

    1994-03-01

    This report outlines several of the more important abnormalities of the lacrimal system in infants and young children. Although rare, alacrima can be a very difficult clinical problem to treat. The most common cause of alacrima is the Riley-Day syndrome. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a very common anomaly in children. The clinical appearance and treatment of this disorder are discussed.

  9. Intelligent Process Abnormal Patterns Recognition and Diagnosis Based on Fuzzy Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shi-Wang; Feng, Shunxiao; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Locating the assignable causes by use of the abnormal patterns of control chart is a widely used technology for manufacturing quality control. If there are uncertainties about the occurrence degree of abnormal patterns, the diagnosis process is impossible to be carried out. Considering four common abnormal control chart patterns, this paper proposed a characteristic numbers based recognition method point by point to quantify the occurrence degree of abnormal patterns under uncertain conditions and a fuzzy inference system based on fuzzy logic to calculate the contribution degree of assignable causes with fuzzy abnormal patterns. Application case results show that the proposed approach can give a ranked causes list under fuzzy control chart abnormal patterns and support the abnormity eliminating.

  10. Cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colombo; Sri Lanka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytogenetic analysis is a valuable investigation in the diagnostic work up of children with suspected chromosomal disorders. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of various types of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis. Methods: Cytogenetic reports of 1554 consecutive children with suspected chromosomal disorders who underwent karyotyping in two genetic centers in Sri Lanka from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1548 children were successfully karyotyped. Abnormal karyotypes were found in 783 (50.6%) children. Numerical and structural abnormalities accounted for 90.8% and 9.2%, respectively. Down syndrome was the commonest aneuploidy identifi ed. Other various autosomal and sex chromosomal aneuploidies as well as micro-deletion syndromes were also detected. Conclusions: The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis for suspected chromosomal disorders was relatively higher than that in Caucasian and other Asian populations.

  11. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  12. Ophthalmological abnormalities in children with congenital disorders of glycosylation type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Wosik, H.; Sykut-Cegielska, J.; Adamowicz, M.; Guillard, M.; Wevers, R.A.; Lefeber, D.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) type Ia frequently present with ocular involvement and visual loss. Little is known, however, about the occurrence of ophthalmological abnormalities in other subtypes of CDG syndrome. METHODS: We evaluated 45 children sequentially

  13. Analysis of co-occurrence networks with clique occurrence information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bin; Li, Yixiao

    2014-12-01

    Most of co-occurrence networks only record co-occurrence relationships between two entities, and ignore the weights of co-occurrence cliques whose size is bigger than two. However, this ignored information may help us to gain insight into the co-occurrence phenomena of systems. In this paper, we analyze co-occurrence networks with clique occurrence information (CNCI) thoroughly. First, we describe the components of CNCIs and discuss the generation of clique occurrence information. And then, to illustrate the importance and usefulness of clique occurrence information, several metrics, i.e. single occurrence rate, average size of maximal co-occurrence cliques and four types of co-occurrence coefficients etc., are given. Moreover, some applications, such as combining co-occurrence frequency with structure-oriented centrality measures, are also discussed.

  14. The role of seasonal factor in congenital abnormality forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Antonov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of prevalence, structure and timerisk study in children birth with malformations inOmskin the period of 1998—2008 are presented. Birth of children with congenital abnormality weight average index accounted for (47.72 ± 0.66%. Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular malformations prevailed in birth abnormality total number structure. Accor­ding to ICD-10 the congenital malformations were united in groups and seasonal variation indices nave been determined for them. Study results indicated the predominance of children conception cases with high risk malformations forming in August, November and December.

  15. Abnormal austenite-ferrite transformation behavior in pure iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongchang; F.Sommer; E.J. Mittemeijer

    2004-01-01

    The austenite → ferrite transformation is the most important reaction route in the manufacture of Fe-based materials. Here the austenite (γ) → ferrite (α)transformation of pure iron was systematically explored by high-resolution dilatometry. Abnormal transformation kinetics, multi-peak discontinuous reaction, was recognized in pure iron according to the variation of the ferrite-formation rate. The occurrence the one or the other type of γ→α trans formation strongly depends on the grain size: the transformation type changes from abnormal to normal (single-peak continuous reaction) with decreasing grain size. The inherent reason for the occurrence of abnormal transformation could be attributed to the repeated nucleation in front of the moving γ/α interface induced by the accumulation of elastic and plastic accommodation energy.

  16. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  17. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  18. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION: Programme of Seminars September to December 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION Nathalie Dumeaux tel. 78144 management.communication@cern.ch Situation : 13.10.2003 Dates Days Places Available Bilingual seminars Interpersonal Communication (Module 1-CM) 21, 22, 23 October 3 non* Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 2) 28, 29 October 2 non Quality Management 10, 11, 12 November 3 oui Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 3) 11, 12 November 2 non Risk Management 11, 12 December 2 oui Seminars In English Communicating Effectively (first part) 12, 13 November & 4...

  19. Management & Communication: Programme of Seminars September to December 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    Situation : 13.07.2004 Bilingual seminars Dates Days Places Available Project Management 13, 14, 15 September 3 oui Introduction to Management 20, 21, 22 September 3 oui Managing by project 28, 29 September 2 oui Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively 20 September, 1 october + 2, 3 November 4 yes Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Séminaires en Français Communiquer efficacement 21, 22 septembre + 12, 13 octobre 4 oui Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 27, 28 septembre + 18 octobre 3 oui Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail 15, 16, 17 novembre 3 oui * If you are interested in a seminar where there are no places available, please fill in an application form and we will contact you as soon as a new session is organised. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICA...

  20. Russia: An Abnormal Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Rosefielde

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman recently rendered a summary verdict on the post Soviet Russian transition experience finding that the Federation had become a normal country with the west's assistance, and predicting that it would liberalize and develop further like other successful nations of its type. This essay demonstrates that they are mistaken on the first count, and are likely to be wrong on the second too. It shows factually, and on the norms elaborated by Pareto, Arrow and Bergson that Russia is an abnormal political economy unlikely to democratize, westernize or embrace free enterprise any time soon

  1. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  2. 2012/13 abnormal cold winter in Japan associated with Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation and Local Sea Surface Temperature over the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Y.; Ogi, M.; Tachibana, Y.

    2013-12-01

    On Japan, wintertime cold wave has social, economic, psychological and political impacts because of the lack of atomic power stations in the era of post Fukushima world. The colder winter is the more electricity is needed. Wintertime weather of Japan and its prediction has come under the world spotlight. The winter of 2012/13 in Japan was abnormally cold, and such a cold winter has persisted for 3 years. Wintertime climate of Japan is governed by some dominant modes of the large-scale atmospheric circulations. Yasunaka and Hanawa (2008) demonstrated that the two dominant modes - Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) pattern - account for about 65% of the interannual variation of the wintertime mean surface air temperature of Japan. A negative AO brings about cold winter in Japan. In addition, a negative WP also brings about cold winter in Japan. Looking back to the winter of 2012/13, both the negative AO and negative WP continued from October through December. If the previous studies were correct, it would have been extremely very cold from October through December. In fact, in December, in accordance with previous studies, it was colder than normal. Contrary to the expectation, in October and November, it was, however, warmer than normal. This discrepancy signifies that an additional hidden circumstance that heats Japan overwhelms these large-scale atmospheric circulations that cool Japan. In this study, we therefore seek an additional cause of wintertime climate of Japan particularly focusing 2012 as well as the AO and WP. We found that anomalously warm oceanic temperature surrounding Japan overwhelmed influences of the AO or WP. Unlike the inland climate, the island climate can be strongly influenced by surrounding ocean temperature, suggesting that large-scale atmospheric patterns alone do not determine the climate of islands. (a) Time series of a 5-day running mean AO index (blue) as defined by Ogi et al., (2004), who called it the SVNAM index. For

  3. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  4. Precursor times of abnormal b-values prior to mainshocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeen-Hwa; Chen, Kou-Cheng; Leu, Peih-Lin; Chang, Chien-Hsin

    2016-07-01

    Seismic observations exhibit the presence of abnormal b-values prior to numerous earthquakes. The time interval from the appearance of abnormal b-values to the occurrence of mainshock is called the precursor time. There are two kinds of precursor times in use: the first one denoted by T is the time interval from the moment when the b-value starts to increase from the normal one to the abnormal one to the occurrence time of the forthcoming mainshock, and the second one denoted by T p is the time interval from the moment when the abnormal b-value reaches the peak one to the occurrence time of the forthcoming mainshock. Let T* be the waiting time from the moment when the abnormal b-value returned to the normal one to the occurrence time of the forthcoming mainshock. The precursor time, T (usually in days), has been found to be related to the magnitude, M, of the mainshock expected in a linear form as log( T) = q + rM where q and r are the coefficient and slope, respectively. In this study, the values of T, T p , and T* of 45 earthquakes with 3 ≤ M ≤ 9 occurred in various tectonic regions are compiled from or measured from the temporal variations in b-values given in numerous source materials. The relationships of T and T p , respectively, versus M are inferred from compiled data. The difference between the values of T and T p decreases with increasing M. In addition, the plots of T*/ T versus M, T* versus T, and T* versus T- T* will be made and related equations between two quantities will be inferred from given data.

  5. Analysis of abnormalities of snubbers in nuclear-reactor service (Report 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.H.; O' Hara, F.M. Jr.

    1976-10-14

    An investigation was conducted of malfunctions of snubbers (seismic-shock arrestors) in service in nuclear power plants. The construction and use of snubbers is summarized, and the history of snubber problems in nuclear service is reviewed. Reports of many hundreds of snubber malfunctions were found in the abnormal-occurrence reports of the docket literature. The great majority of these abnormal occurrences consisted of hydraulic snubbers whose hydraulic fluid had leaked out because of deteriorated seals; snubbers that were damaged in manufacture, shipping, installation, refitting, or use; and snubbers whose performance did not match service requirements. Additional information about the failures was obtained from the reactor operators, snubber manufacturers, reactor vendors, and independent laboratories. The abnormal occurrences were classified into 12 categories. Analyses of the causes of the individual abnormalities are presented, and preliminary comments on the current state of snubber manufacture and use are made.

  6. Atmospheric circulation leading to record breaking precipitation and floods in southern Iberia in December 1876

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, R. M.; Varino, F.; Vaquero, J.; Valente, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The first week of December 1876 was marked by extreme weather conditions that affected the south-western sector of the Iberian Peninsula (IP), leading to an all-time record flow in both large international rivers running from Spain to Portugal, Tagus and Guadiana. As a direct consequence, several towns in centre and south IP suffered serious flood damage. These catastrophic floods were amplified by the occurrence of anomalously wet October and November months, as shown by recently digitised time series for both IP countries. These events resulted from the continuous pouring of precipitation registered between 29 November and 7 December, due to the consecutive Atlantic low-pressure systems and their associated frontal systems that reached the Iberian Peninsula. Using several different data sources, such as historical newspapers of that time, meteorological data recently digitised from several stations in Portugal and Spain and the recently available 20th Century Reanalysis (Compo et al., 2011), we were able (135 years afterwards), to study in detail the damage and the atmospheric circulation conditions associated with this event. The synoptic conditions were represented by 6 hourly fields of complementary variables, namely; 1) precipitation rate and mean sea level pressure (SLP); 2) precipitation rate and CAPE; 3) wind speed intensity and divergence at 250 hPa, 4) wind speed intensity and divergence also at 850 hPa; 5) air temperature at 850 hPa and geopotential height at 500 hPa; 6) wind speed barbs and specific moisture content at 850 hPa. Movies with all these variables were obtained for the 10-day sequence that spans between 29 November and 7 December. For two recently digitised stations in Portugal (Lisbon and Évora), the values of precipitation registered during those weeks were so remarkable that when we computed daily accumulated precipitation successively from 1 to 10 days, the episode of 1876 always stood as the maximum precipitation event, with the

  7. Hans Henriksen Ussing. 30 December 1911 - 22 December 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2009-01-01

    Hans Ussing was born on 30 December 1911 at Sorø Academy in Denmark, where his father Dr Henrik Ussing was a lecturer and, as historian, a leading Danish folklorist. After his doctoral thesis in marine biology, Hans Ussing came to August Krogh's laboratory, where he studied protein turnover by us...

  8. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 22 December 1977 - 01 July 1978 (NODC Accession 7900123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 22, 1977 to October...

  9. The seasonal dependence of cycle slip occurrence of GPS data over China low latitude region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG DongHe; FENG Man; XIAO Zuo; HAO YongQiang; SHI LiQin; YANG GuangLin; SUO YuCheng

    2007-01-01

    The relationship of daily accumulated cycle slip occurrence with the season is analyzed using the GPS data observed in six GPS stations located in China low latitude region in 2001. It is found that the seasonal dependence of cycle slip occurrence is evident. The cycle slip mainly occurs during the periods of two equinox months (March to May and September to October), and some correlative changes of the cycle slip occurrences over all six stations are exhibited in some special days. Considering the diurnal dependence of cycle slip, it can be inferred that the cycle slip occurrence with certain elevation limitation is related with the ionospheric irregularities over this region.

  10. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  11. Statistics of GNSS amplitude scintillation occurrences over Dakar, Senegal, at varying elevation angles during the maximum phase of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akala, A. O.; Awoyele, A.; Doherty, P. H.

    2016-03-01

    This study characterizes Global Navigation Satellite System amplitude scintillation over Dakar (14.75°N, 17.45°W, magnitude latitude: 5.88°N), Senegal. The data, which we arranged on daily and monthly scales, cover 14 months: September-November 2012; February-December 2013; and January-February 2014. The data were further binned into three levels of scintillation using the S4 index: weak (0.3 ≤ S4 < 0.4), moderate (0.4 ≤ S4 < 0.7), and intense (S4 ≥ 0.7), over varying elevation angles (10°, 20°, and 30°). Daily occurrences of scintillation were most frequent around 22-02 LT. On a month-by-month basis, October recorded the highest occurrences of scintillations, while June recorded the least. Furthermore, contrary to Akala et al. (2014, 2015) who earlier reported January as off season for scintillation occurrences at some sites in Africa, namely, Lagos (Central West Africa), Nairobi, and Kampala (East Africa), the current study recorded some scintillation occurrences at Dakar (far west of West Africa) in January. It therefore implies that longitudinal variations do exist in the climatology of ionospheric scintillations over Africa. Consequently, detailed understanding of the climatology and daily distributions of ionospheric scintillations over equatorial Africa, which is our key objective in this study (from the perspective of Dakar), is the basic requirement for developing robust physics-based scintillation models for the African equatorial region. Finally, we noted that the conventional adoption of high-elevation masking angles during scintillation data processing, with a view to suppressing multipath effects usually hid important ionospheric-induced scintillation data.

  12. Planning a December to Remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Because the population of today's schools is so multicultural, teachers may find a variety of religious beliefs represented in their classrooms, from Islam, Judaism, and Christianity to Jehovah's Witnesses, Hinduism, atheism, and many others. All of which makes the season of December a little tricky to navigate, even when one is teaching "the…

  13. Eventos de Diciembre (December Events).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Myrna; Toro, Leonor

    Written in Spanish, this booklet contains information on three events occurring in the month of December: winter, Christmas, and New Year's Eve. Winter is briefly discussed. The section on Christmas includes a short story ("La Nochebuena"); a poem about Christmas in Puerto Rico; a legend about the poinsettia; brief discussion of Santa…

  14. Telephone switchboard closure | 19 December

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Exceptionally, the telephone switchboard will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 19 December, instead of the usual time of 6 p.m., to allow time for closing all systems properly before the annual closure. Therefore, switchboard operator assistance to transfer calls from/to external lines will stop. All other phone services will run as usual.

  15. Malawi Economic Monitor, October 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Record, Richard; Kandoole, Priscilla; Chilima, Efrem; Kalemba, Sunganani; von Carnap, Tillman

    2016-01-01

    The Malawi Economic Monitor (MEM) provides ananalysis of economic and structural developmentissues in Malawi. This edition of the MEM waspublished in October 2016. It follows on from thethree previous editions of the MEM, and is part of an ongoing series, with future editions to follow twiceper year. The aim of the publication is to foster better-informed policy analysis and debate regardi...

  16. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami Minemura; Kazuto Tajiri; Yukihiro Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  17. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  18. 老年高血压性左室舒张功能不全对房室性心律失常的影响%Effect of abnormal left ventricular diastolic function on occurrence of atrial or ventricular arrhythmia in elderly essential hypertensive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文辉; 邵健智; 王齐增; 彭万军; 李新祥; 朱玲军; 林斌; 马湘俊

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究老年高血压患者左室舒张功能不全对房、室性心律失常发生及其严重程度的影响.方法 入选老年原发性高血压患者210例,均经24 h动态心电图检查判定心律失常情况,和多普勒超声心动图检查评价心脏结构和功能.根据不同左室舒张充盈类型分为正常舒张充盈型(即左室舒张功能正常组)、松弛受损型、假正常充盈型、限制性充盈型(后3型为左室舒张功能不全组).结果 (1)共检出房性心律失常占70%,室性心律失常占49%,两组差异有统计学意义(χ2=19.975,P<0.05);(2)左室舒张功能不全组的房、室性心律失常发生率以及复杂房、室性心律失常发生率分别为89%、63%、49%、30%,均高于左室舒张功能正常组[40%、26%、13%、7%,χ2=56.723、28.359、28.076、15.9102,P<0.05];(3)不同左室舒张充盈类型间的房室性心律失常以及复杂房室性心律失常的发生率差异亦有统计学意义(P<0.05),其中以假正常充盈型和限制性充盈型的发生率最高,分别为93.6%和96.4%.结论 老年高血压患者左室舒张功能不全促进房、室性心律失常的发生,并影响其严重程度;左室舒张功能不全的假正常充盈型和限制性充盈型易发生复杂房、室性心律失常.%Objective To study the effect of abnormal left ventricular diastolic function(LVDF)on the onset and severity of atrial or ventricular arrhythmia in elderly essential hypertensive patients.Methods The 210 elderly essential hypertensive patients were enrolled in this study. Their arrhythmias were monitored by 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram. The essential hypertensive patients were referred for Doppler echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular function, while patients with abnormal systolic function were excluded, and then the patients were classified as normal LVDF and abnormal LVDF including, impaired relaxation, pseudonormal, and restrictivelike filling patterns. Results In 210

  19. Group photograph: Dark Energy Survey Autumn Collaboration meeting Cambridge 2016 12 December 2016 - 16 December 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Group photograph of participants in the Dark Energy Survey Autumn collaboration meeting Cambridge 2016 12 December 2016 - 16 December 2016 taken outside the Cambridge Observatory building on 14 December 2016, by Amanda Smith, Graphics Officer.

  20. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  1. The Correlation between Electroencephalography Amplitude and Interictal Abnormalities: Audit study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami F. Al-Rawas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between background amplitude and interictal abnormalities in routine electroencephalography (EEG. Methods: This retrospective audit was conducted between July 2006 and December 2009 at the Department of Clinical Physiology at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A total of 1,718 electroencephalograms (EEGs were reviewed. All EEGs were from patients who had been referred due to epilepsy, syncope or headaches. EEGs were divided into four groups based on their amplitude: group one ≤20 μV; group two 21–35 μV; group three 36–50 μV, and group four >50 μV. Interictal abnormalities were defined as epileptiform discharges with or without associated slow waves. Abnormalities were identified during periods of resting, hyperventilation and photic stimulation in each group. Results: The mean age ± standard deviation of the patients was 27 ± 12.5 years. Of the 1,718 EEGs, 542 (31.5% were abnormal. Interictal abnormalities increased with amplitude in all four categories and demonstrated a significant association (P <0.05. A total of 56 EEGs (3.3% had amplitudes that were ≤20 μV and none of these showed interictal epileptiform abnormalities. Conclusion: EEG amplitude is an important factor in determining the presence of interictal epileptiform abnormalities in routine EEGs. This should be taken into account when investigating patients for epilepsy. A strong argument is made for considering long-term EEG monitoring in order to identify unexplained seizures which may be secondary to epilepsy. It is recommended that all tertiary institutions provide EEG telemetry services.

  2. Occurrence of Ionophores in the Danish Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Alex Bak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics in the environment are a potential threat to environmental ecosystems as well as human health and safety. Antibiotics are designed to have a biological effect at low doses, and the low levels detected in the environment have turned focus on the need for more research on environmental occurrence and fate, to assess the risk and requirement for future regulation. This article describes the first occurrence study of the antibiotic polyether ionophores (lasalocid, monensin, narasin, and salinomycin in the Danish environment. Various environmental matrices (river water, sediment, and soil have been evaluated during two different sampling campaigns carried out in July 2011 and October 2012 in an agricultural area of Zealand, Denmark. Lasalocid was not detected in any of the samples. Monensin was measured at a concentration up to 20 ng·L−1 in river water and 13 µg·kg−1 dry weight in the sediment as well as being the most frequently detected ionophore in the soil samples with concentrations up to 8 µg·kg−1 dry weight. Narasin was measured in sediment samples at 2 µg·kg−1 dry weight and in soil between 1 and 18 µg·kg−1 dry weight. Salinomycin was detected in a single soil sample at a concentration of 30 µg·kg−1 dry weight.

  3. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Gimenez, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Alegret, X. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Rivas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  4. ICF quarterly report October-December 1998 volume 8, number 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feit, M

    1998-09-08

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly Report focuses on the final section of the 192-arm, 1.8-MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF). We describe both technological advances necessary for optimal utilization of the delivered energy and the hohlraum physics resulting from extremely high energy densities. Two articles belong to the first category. The conversion of infrared light to ultraviolet occurs at the tripler in the NIF's Final Optics Assembly. It is then necessary to separate any unconverted (first- and second-harmonic) light from the tripled-frequency light passed to the target. Large-Aperture Color-Separation Gratings for Diverting Unconverted Light Away from the NIF Target describes the design and fabrication of novel diffraction gratings that fulfill this function. In both direct- and indirect-drive ICF, the symmetry of the capsule as it compresses is crucial. The NIF will have 48 clusters of four beams incident on targets. Optimization of Beam Angles for the National Ignition Facility (p. 15) presents the rationale used to assign beam angles for cylindrical indirect drive while still allowing direct-drive and tetrahedral indirect-drive experiments to be performed.

  5. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-97. It describes 174 contracts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  6. Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) meeting compendium. October 1991--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    Under the direction of the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG), the Power Information Center (PIC) provides support services for each IAPG information exchange session. IAPG members meet a minimum of once each year to share programmatic and technical information on federally funded research and development (R&D) projects in the area of advanced power. This R&D is directed by one of the five IAPG member agencies-the US Army, US Navy, US Air Force, US Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Affiliated Federal groups and federally funded research and development centers can also participate. To enhance the exchange of information between Government researchers, this 1992 IAPG Meeting Compendium has been assembled. This publication is a re-printing of abstracts of each IAPG presentation offered during 1991-1992. The information is arranged chronologically by IAPG meeting. During the 1992 IAPG meeting year, there were presentations restricted to Government audiences only. These ``Restricted`` minutes have not been included in this compilation.

  7. Medical and Health Physics Quarterly Report October, November, andDecember, 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Health and Biology

    1951-02-27

    A considerable volume of work was accomplished during the past three months in the tracer program, experiments being conducted with At{sup 211}, carrier-free Bi{sup 206}, carrier-free Mn{sup 52}, carrier-free Mo{sup 93,99}, Np{sup 237}, Ta{sup 182} of a fair degree of specific activity, carrier-free Sc{sup 46}, and high specific activity Tm{sup 170}.

  8. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) Reports, October-December 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    homogeneity puripotent hematopoictic stem cells of bone marrow by large granu - anal~sis of proportions and life table data.Computer and Biomedical lar...8217on A-stimulated 3% lymphocytes, and 23±9c granulocytes, primarily eosinophils . PBMC targets. Cultures of PBMC to be used for targets in the CML...Arai R. Ventura U. Hitielman W. Broxmeyer HE. Gutterman JU K. Rennick D (1985) Isolation of cDNA for a human granu - (1988) Stimulation

  9. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) Reports, October, November and December 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    phagocytosis of the extruded mast cell granule by neutrophils, macrophages, or eosinophils could also lead to the production of various eicosanoids. The...1979) Identification of mega- T-cell subpopulation on the immune system in a rhesus mon- karyocyte, macrophages, and eosinophils in colonies of hu- key...units (CFU- tribution of recovered day 8 CFU-S was different S) was well separated from that of in vitro granu - from the distribution of day 12 CFU-S

  10. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, October-December 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    in water analysis for outlying border stations and in a were assembled on Dodd Field at Fort Sam Houston-the study of Malta Fever ( brucellosis ...involving testing of goat First (under COLs Mallory and Comell) scheduled for Italy, milk and blood. He also performed autopsies at the hospital, the Fourth

  11. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The APF was shut down on September 23, 1993 and no operation was performed during this quarter. This report summarizes inspection, candle reinstallation, retrofit and accelerometer testing conducted during this three month outage.

  12. Materials Science Division coal technology fifth quarterly report, October--December 1975. [Gasification plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-01-01

    Results on refractories tested in the slag-corrosion-cup test indicate that attack by acidic slag is less severe than by basic slag. The first (200 h) test in the slag-abrasion-corrosion test rig was completed. Nondestructive tests have been conducted at the CO/sub 2/ Acceptor plant and the HYGAS plant, and an instrumented piping section is being prepared for the Synthane plant. Carburization studies, which have been performed on several alloys, indicate that the extent of carburization increases with an increase in the chromium content of the alloy. Present erosion models predict greater erosion rates than found experimentally, but they assume all particles impact the surface. Failure analyses have been conducted for HYGAS materials, and support in materials identification was given to Synthane plant personnel. (auth)

  13. ONRASIA Scientific Information Bulletin, Volume 15, Number 4, October-December 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    zirconia (PSZ). Once again, in-situ tests parameters and basic mechanisms of tribolog- with the SEM have allowed identification of ical processes and to...includes both ceramics (silicon nitride, director, and Dr. Y. Mizutani, manager. The zirconia , silicon carbide, alumina) and metals Toyota Research...organisms 4-003 Contrarotating propellers 2-018 Hyperbaric oxygen therapy 4-127 Crown ether chemistry 3-104 Hysteresis loss 2-004 Crystal growth 3-090

  14. Development and evaluation of elastomeric materials for geothermal applications. Annual report, October 1977-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.A.; Kalfayan, S.H.; Reilly, W.W.; Yavrouian, A.H.; Mosesman, I.D.; Ingham, J.D.

    1979-05-15

    The research involved formulation of commercially available materials and synthesis of new elastomers. Formulation studies at JPL and elsewhere produced a material having about 250-350 psi tensile strength and 30 to 80% elongation at 260/sup 0/C for at least 24 hours in simulated brine. The relationship between these laboratory test results and sealing performance in actual or simulated test conditions is not entirely clear; however, it is believed that no conventional formation or casing packer design is likely to perform well using these materials. The synthetic effort focused on high temperature block copolymers and development of curable polystyrene. Procedures were worked out for synthesizing these new materials. Initial results with heat-cured unfilled polystyrene gum at 260/sup 0/C indicated a tensile strength of about 50 psi. Cast films of the first sample of polyphenyl quinoxaline-polystyrene block copolymer, which has a graft-block structure consisting of a polystyrene chain with pendant polyphenyl quinoxaline groups, showed elastomeric behavior in the required temperature range. Its tensile strength and elongation at 260/sup 0/C were 220 to 350 psi and 18 to 36%, respectively. All of these materials also showed satisfactory hydrolytic stability. A procedure for the synthesis of a linear block copolymer of this type has been devised, and the required new intermediates have been synthesized and characterized. A description of the previous year's work is included in an appendix.

  15. Development of an advanced gas-fired mineral wool melter. Final report, October 1987-December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vereecke, F.J.; Gardner, K.M.; Thekdi, A.C.; Swift, M.D.

    1990-12-01

    A gas-fired mineral wool melter was successfully designed and tested. The test results clearly show that the gas-fired melter offers significant advantages over the current state-of-the-art system, the coke-fired cupola. The primary benefits offered are: lower energy costs, fewer airborne pollutant emissions, virtual elimination of solid waste generation and superior control and quality of the resultant melt stream. Specifically, the unit eliminates the emission of carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and hydrocarbons. Emissions of SOx and particulate are substantially reduced as well. The generation of solid wastes is eliminated through the gas-fired melters ability to utilize untreated process wastes as a feedstock.

  16. High-energy gas-fracturing development. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and optimize the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique to produce multiple fractures around a wellbore in order to stimulate natural-gas production in Devonian shale. The HEGF technique uses a wellbore charge of a propellant tailored to produce pressure loading in the borehole that avoids crushing yet produces multiple fractures radiating from the wellbore. The multiple-fracture regime has been characterized and releated to parameters such as borehole size, pressure risetime, and surface-wave velocity. Pressure risetimes and peak pressures, measured for different propellants in boreholes to specify a propellant for a desired peak pressure and pressure risetime. Semiempirical models, using results from previous experiments, successfully relate stress, acceleration, and fracture radii in surrounding rock to peak pressure and pressure risetime. A finite-element model also has been developed which predicts fracture type and direction of fractures as a function of pressure loading, in situ stress, and material properties. A full-scale HEGF system has been developed for application in gas-well-stimulation experiments in Devonian shale. During this quarter, a proof test of the full-scale HEGF was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The designed pressure pulse of 0.5 ms risetime was achieved, and the tamp remained in place during the test. The borehole was successfully cleared posttest. Multiple fracturing was verified with a downhole TV camera. The test of the full-scale hardware and its operational capability was successful. As a result, the HEGF system is ready for application in gas-well-stimulation experiments in Devonian shale. Tests were conducted to determine worst-case accident scenarios to establish sensitivity to shock and fire. There appears to be no risk of initiation resulting from shock or breakage of the propellant-canister segments.

  17. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, A.J. (comp.)

    1978-01-01

    HTGR safety evaluation included studies on fission product release; materials, chemistry, and instrumentation; structural evaluation; and analytical safety evaluation. LMFBR safety evaluation included studies on accident sequences, technical coordination of structural integrity, and SSC code development and validation. LWR safety studies included thermal/hydraulic accident analysis, THOR code development, and stress corrosion cracking of PWR steam generator tubing.

  18. Instrumentation and process control for fossil demonstration plants. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeSage, L. G.; O' Fallon, N. M; Bump, T. R.; Cohn, C. E.; Doering, R. W.; Duffey, D.; Kirsch,; Lipinski, W. C.; Managan, W. W.; Porges, K. G.; Raptis, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    The final report of the state-of-the-art study of instrumentation for process control and safety in large-scale coal conversion and fluidized-bed combustion systems was distributed in November. A conceptual design for the Solids/Gas Flow Test Facility has been initiated, the major components identified, and vendors located. Work on acoustic flow measurement has included theoretical feasibility studies of acoustic/ultrasonic techniques for mass-flow measurements of slurries and solid/gas media. Initial planning was conducted to establish a laboratory facility necessary to verify theoretical findings. A survey of the literature relating to capacitive measurements was begun to provide a basis for conceptual designs and preliminary bench tests of the feasibility of these designs. Conceptual design of a capacitive on-line solids density measuring device and calculations to select the type of system for initial feasibility tests were carried out. Preliminary tests of neutron capture gamma analysis for on-line elemental composition of liquid and solid streams in coal plants indicate that most coal elements can be detected quantitatively through the pipe walls. A computer program for peak-fitting in the gamma spectrum was modified for requirements of this work. A literature search was started to determine the state-of-the-art in dynamic process modeling of fossil energy system components, physical property models, and process control models. A partial review of abstracts from a computerized literature search has identified over 50 references having possible application to process analysis activities in this program.

  19. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, D. G.

    1980-02-01

    Progress on each of the following topics is outlined: (1) rotating target neutron source, (2) fusion materials irradiation test facility, (3) environmental characterization, (4) damage production, and (5) damage microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior. (MOW)

  20. H-division quarterly report, October--December 1977. [Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-10

    The Theoretical EOS Group develops theoretical techniques for describing material properties under extreme conditions and constructs equation-of-state (EOS) tables for specific applications. Work this quarter concentrated on a Li equation of state, equation of state for equilibrium plasma, improved ion corrections to the Thomas--Fermi--Kirzhnitz theory, and theoretical estimates of high-pressure melting in metals. The Experimental Physics Group investigates properties of materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, and develops new experimental techniques. Effort this quarter concerned the following: parabolic projectile distortion in the two-state light-gas gun, construction of a ballistic range for long-rod penetrators, thermodynamics and sound velocities in liquid metals, isobaric expansion measurements in Pt, and calculation of the velocity--mass profile of a jet produced by a shaped charge. Code development was concentrated on the PELE code, a multimaterial, multiphase, explicit finite-difference Eulerian code for pool suppression dynamics of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident in a nuclear reactor. Activities of the Fluid Dynamics Group were directed toward development of a code to compute the equations of state and transport properties of liquid metals (e.g. Li) and partially ionized dense plasmas, jet stability in the Li reactor system, and the study and problem application of fluid dynamic turbulence theory. 19 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

  1. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Final report, October 1988--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbane, J.J. II; Bielaga, B.A.

    1991-12-01

    The overall objective of this project was to use molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal, and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. (VC)

  2. ONR Far East Scienticic Bulletin. Volume 11, Number 4, October-December 1986,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    March 19871 - Generic Materials Tecnology Mniisamla - 9 Member Companies + ETL - MM budget: V6 billion - $25 million (-1,3 of total) Nippon Sheet...Isn’t improved acceleration the driving force for this whole push toward ceramic turbochargers? ONRFE SCI BUL 11 (4) 86 49 Answer: Better acceleration...of the breech loader is also applicable. Once the explosive is fired by some means, this acts as a source of weakly ionized plasma that pushes the

  3. ONR Tokyo Scientific Bulletin. Volume 4, Number 4, October-December 1979,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    collaboration observed several unusual interactions that were called the " Centauro events." In these high-energy collisions, the customary electron...short-lived particles (half-life about 10- 13 sec) were observed by some Japanese groups. The " Centauro events" discussed in my paper on the Kyoto

  4. 78 FR 22332 - Notice of Quarterly Report (October 1, 2012-December 31, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Smart Homes Activity. Number of National Aid Fund households with improved water and wastewater network...-Koudougou- investments in the Perkoa-Didyr. road network. International Roughness Index: Dedougou-Nouna... to the electricity network. Household benefiting with the installation of isolated solar...

  5. Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments and heterogeneity. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, C.

    1998-01-01

    A case study approach using Terry Sandstone production from the Hambert-Aristocrat Field, Weld County, Colorado was used to document the process of integration. One specific project goal is to demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach can be used to detect reservoir compartmentalization and improve reserve estimates. The final project goal is to derive a general strategy for integration for independent operators. Teamwork is the norm for the petroleum industry where teams of geologists, geophysicists, and petroleum engineers work together to improve profits through a better understanding of reservoir size, compartmentalization, and orientation as well as reservoir flow characteristics. In this manner, integration of data narrows the uncertainty in reserve estimates and enhances reservoir management decisions. The process of integration has proven to be iterative. Integration has helped identify reservoir compartmentalization and reduce the uncertainty in the reserve estimates. This research report documents specific examples of integration and the economic benefits of integration.

  6. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 15, October--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1993-03-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; re-analyzed the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; updated the topical summary report; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

  7. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1994-04-04

    The objectives of this project are to test novel fullerene based catalysts for application in methane activation. During this period we investigated a novel method of activating carbon soot which was recently reported in literature. In this method, the soot is treated with carbon dioxide at temperatures of 850{degrees}C to give a microporous carbon with a high surface area. We repeated this activation step and found that the BET surface areas increased from approximately 125 m{sup 2}/g to over 600 m{sup 2}/g. We plan to test this activated soot for methane activation to compare with the results obtained before activation. We continued our investigation of the base-line conditions for both thermal reactions and soot-catalyzed reactions of methane, and in addition, we compared these results to those obtained with Norit-A carbon as a catalyst. Diluents such as hydrogen and helium were added into the reaction system to determine their respective effects on selectivity during the methane activation experiments. In terms of methane activation, under our conditions, the fullerene soot was found to be the most active, with the threshold for the methane activation below as 800{degrees}C, while the Norit-A catalyst exhibited a threshold slightly above 800{degrees}C, and the pure thermal reaction required temperatures in the range of 900 to 950{degrees}C. Under these conditions the selectivity to C{sub 2} was in the reverse order, with the highest selectivity exhibited for the thermal reactions, and the lowest selectivity with the fullerene soot, suggesting that the contact time is essential in order to maximize the selectivity to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and minimize coke formation. However, we observed interesting results when the diluents were used.

  8. Selection of reservoirs amenable to micellar flooding. First annual report, October 1978-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldburg, A.; Price, H.

    1980-12-01

    The overall project objective is to build a solid engineering base upon which the Department of Energy (DOE) can improve and accelerate the application of micellar-polymer recovery technology to Mid-Continent and California sandstone reservoirs. The purpose of the work carried out under these two contracts is to significantly aid, both DOE and the private sector, in gaining the following Project Objectives: to select the better micellar-polymer prospects in the Mid-Continent and California regions; to assess all of the available field and laboratory data which has a bearing on recovering oil by micellar-polymer projects in order to help identify and resolve both the technical and economic constraints relating thereto; and to design and analyze improved field pilots and tests and to develop a micellar-polymer applications matrix for use by the potential technology users; i.e., owner/operators. The report includes the following: executive summary and project objectives; development of a predictive model for economic evaluation of reservoirs; reservoir data bank for micellar-polymer recovery evaluation; PECON program for preliminary economic evaluation; ordering of candidate reservoirs for additional data acquisition; validation of predictive model by numerical simulation; and work forecast. Tables, figures and references are included.

  9. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. Second quarterly report, October 1--December 15, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, J.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). School of Medicine; Kitchell, J.P. [Holometrix, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1988-12-15

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ``model`` organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  10. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

  11. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (October-December 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    approach discusses both practical and theoretical considerations, covering benefits and disadvantages . This article provides an interesting perspective on...level and an expert level, with the latter, supplemented by a research project, forming the basis for the master’s program. Completion of requirements...Exchange Service established an exchange at the site that was open to Soldiers in the evenings. The McCoy gym staff created a workout area for the

  12. ONR Tokyo Scientific Bulletin. Volume 5, Number 4, October-December 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    technology, acoustic detection, etc. - Seaweed ;studies of culturing techniques for Ltaninaria and Porphyra; ecently introduced kelp culturing. - Animal...culturing; aquaculture techniques for sea cucumbers, prawns, oysters, niussels and fish are studied. - Fish processing; methods so protect freshness of fish...3-012 Electronics ......... .......... .. .. 2021 Aquaculture .... .................... 1-011 Electronics

  13. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, W.D.; Feldman, M.J.; Groenier, W.S.; Vondra, B.L.; Unger, W.E.

    1979-03-01

    The status of the following studies is reported: plutonium (IV) polymer reaction in aqueous solutions; plutonium reductive stripping studies; plutonium--uranium--thorium coprocessing studies; plutonium losses due to solution instability and solids formation; solvent cleanup; nitrogen compound chemistry; fission product chemistry; electrochemical methods evaluation; evaluation of alternate extractants; hot-cell development; solvent extraction; product conversion; analytical chemistry development; voloxidation; dissolution; feed preparation; off-gas processing; and engineering systems. (LK)

  14. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  15. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    It is estimated that over 3700 hazardous waste sites are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Energy (DOE). These sites were primarily generated from 45 years worth of environmental pollution from the design and manufacture of nuclear materials and weapons, and contain numerous types of wastes including: (1) volatile, low-volatile and nonvolatile organics, (2) radionuclides (e.g., uranium, plutonium and cesium), (3) nonradioactive heavy metals (e.g., chromium, nickel, and lead), and (4) toxic chemicals. These contaminants affect several media including soils (saturated and unsaturated), groundwater, vegetation, and air. Numerous and diverse DOE hazardous waste sites can be enumerated from soils contaminated by organics such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) at the Savannah River site to biota and vegetation contaminated by radionuclides such as radiocesium and radiostrontium at the Oak Ridge site. Over the next 30 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to bringing all its facilities into compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations. This clean-up task is quite complex involving numerous sites containing various radioactive, organic and inorganic contaminants. To perform this clean-up effort in the most efficient manner at each site will require that DOE managers have access to all available information on pertinent technologies; i.e., to aid in maximum technology transfer. The purpose of this effort is to systematically develop a databast of those currently available and emerging clean-up technologies.

  16. 78 FR 16664 - List of Correspondence From October 1, 2012, Through December 31, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... and other documents that the Department believes will assist the public in understanding the... Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free...

  17. Performance Monitoring System: Summary of Lock Statistics for October-December 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    NAME DriuISINAWE lNPS REPTiED E3 l YORK NORTH ATLANTI 10/83 11/83 12M9 ALL TIE rim coo IN fMMTE LOCK PROCESSIE TIME ELATED DELAY ELAT ELAT APPROACH...MRIOR LOCK I DAN 0600/0110/12,0 04-IIM BACON OLIVER LK a ON 0600/O0/12,0 05-HOLT LOCK & OAK 0600/0110/12,0 06-JOII IIOLLIS BAN" LK I O 0600/0110/12,0...LOCK A DAN 1 12 32 1 4 16 1 13 50 3 11 34? 282 9796 31.2 129 W ARRIOR LOCK I DAN 1 12 41 1 4 18 5 17 29 1 9 403 : 289 10956 37.9 160 WILLIAM BACON

  18. Performance Monitoring System: Summary of Lock Statistics for October-December 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    R EIE EIE DISTRICT NMVE DIVISO WE HEIRS WRlD E4 NOR MTLKNI ATLANTI 10/K4 11/K4 12/H4 ALL TMlES Ell RSED IM OMITE LOC IPROCEII 1TME : DELAYED DELAY...LOCK 0600/0110/12,0 2-DENOPOLIS LOCK A DAN 0600/0110/120 3-WARRIOR LOCK A DAN 0600/0110/12#0 4-IILLIAN BACON OLIVER LK A DN 0460/0095/12°0 5-HOLT

  19. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This report is a summation of three months drilling and testing activitie in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin.

  20. Basalt waste isolation project. Quarterly report, October 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deju, R.A.

    1981-02-01

    In September 1977, the National Waste Terminal Storage Program was restructured to support investigations of two US DOE sites - Hanford and Nevada. The Basalt Waste Isolation Project within Rockwell Hanford Operations has been chartered with the responsibility of conducting these investigations. The overall Basalt Waste Isolation Project is divided into the following principal work areas: systems integration, geosciences, hydrology, engineered barriers, near-surface test facility, engineering testing, and repository studies. Summaries of major accomplishments for each of these areas are reported in this document.

  1. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    D. Leadership that gets results. Harv Bus Rev. 2000;79(2):78-87. VIDEO: Miracle, Scenes 14 & 16; I am a hockey player / This is your time ( Disney ...organization. A leader develops subordinates by establishing and maintaining an ethical climate, which emphasizes that racism , sexism, and prejudice are

  2. Large area silicon sheet by EFG. Fourth quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, F.V.

    1979-03-01

    Crystal growth station no. 1 further explored displaced die concepts, along with some initial work on buckle characterization. Also, convective impurity redistribution was further studied. In particular, a side channel die was used to grow material doped with aluminum and compare the results at least semiquantitatively with computer calculations. The ribbons grown have not been characterized yet. In station no. 3A growth from single cartridges was continued to create a quality baseline to allow comparison of the results with those in the upcoming multiple run and to choose the most appropriate die design. Also fabrication and assembly work on the actual five ribbon furnace continued. On furnace 17 progress was made toward the development of the video optical system for edge position and meniscus height control. Also, in preparation for a detailed program, designed to explore the buckling problem, ribbon width ribon was then grown under stable conditions without a cold shoe, an achievement essential to finally arrive at quantitative correlations between growth conditions and buckle formation. The most significant result from the characterization program was a demonstration that the original runs with displaced dies were indeed reproducible, inasmuch as large area cells (7.5 x 7.5 cm/sup 2/) of approx. 9% efficiency could be fabricated again from run 18-103, a repeat of run no. 18-102 which had previously produced the best cells.

  3. Project 57 Air Monitoring Report: October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-02-01

    On April 24, 1957, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC, now the Department of Energy [DOE]) conducted the Project 57 safety experiment in western Emigrant Valley north east of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) on lands withdrawn by the Department of Defense (DoD) for the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). The test was undertaken to develop (1) a means of estimating plutonium distribution resulting from a nonnuclear detonation; (2) biomedical evaluation techniques for use in plutonium-laden environments; (3) methods of surface decontamination; and (4) instruments and field procedures for prompt estimation of alpha contamination (Shreve, 1958). Although the test did not result in the fission of nuclear materials, it did disseminate plutonium across the land surface. Following the experiment, the AEC fenced the contaminated area and returned control of the surrounding land to the DoD. Various radiological surveys have been performed in the area and in 2007, the DOE expanded the demarked contamination area by posting signs 200 to 400 feet (60 to 120 meters) outside of the original fence. Plutonium in soil is thought to attach preferentially to smaller particles. Therefore, redistribution of soil particulates by wind (dust) is the mechanism most likely to transport plutonium beyond the boundary of the Project 57 contamination area. In 2011, DRI installed two instrumentation towers to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination was detectable in samples of airborne dust and characterize meteorological and environmental parameters that influence dust transport. Collected data also permits comparison of radiological conditions at the Project 57 monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Biweekly samples of airborne particulates are submitted for laboratory assessment of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity and for determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides. Annual average gross alpha values at the Project 57 monitoring stations are in the same range as the highest two values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the NTTR. Annual average gross beta values at the Project 57 monitoring stations are slightly higher than the lowest value reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the NTTR. Gamma spectroscopy analyses on samples collected from the Project 57 stations identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. No manmade radionuclides were detected. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) indicated that the average annual radioactivity dose at the monitoring stations is higher than the dose determined at surrounding CEMP stations but approximately half of the estimated national average dose received by the general public as a result of exposure to natural sources. The TLDs at the Project 57 monitoring stations are exposed to both natural sources (terrestrial and cosmic) and radioactive releases from the Project 57 contamination area. These comparisons show that the gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma spectroscopy levels at the Project 57 monitoring stations are similar to levels observed at the CEMP stations but that the average annual dose rate is higher than at the CEMP stations. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to generate dust movement by saltation (migration of sand at the ground surface) or direct suspension in the air. Saltated sand, PM10 (inhalable) dust, and PM2.5 (fine particulate dust) exhibit an approximately exponential increase with increasing wind speed. The greatest concentrations of dust occur for winds exceeding 20 mph. During the reporting period, winds in excess of 20 mph occurred approximately 1.6 percent of the time. Preliminary assessment of individual wind events suggests that dust generation is highly variable likely because of the influence of other meteorological and environmental parameters. Although winds sufficient to generate significant amounts of dust occur at the Project 57 site, they are infrequent and of short duration. Additionally, the potential for wind transport of dust is dependent on other parameters whose influence have not yet been assessed.

  4. Nevada nuclear waste storage investigations. Quarterly report, October-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-03-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) are investigating and determining whether specific underground rock masses are suitable for permanently disposing of highly radioactive wastes, studying and determining whether the Nevada Test Site (NTS) would qualify as a suitable repository site, and developing and demonstrating the capability to safely handle and store commercial spent reactor fuel and high-level waste. This document is a compilation of the technical progress of the principal project participants of the NNWSI in meeting the objectives described in the draft FY 1982 NNWSI Project Plan and revised planning documentation during the first quarter of FY 1982. The NNWSI Project Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for FY 1982 is comprised of eight tasks which form the main sections of this document. They are: systems; waste package; site; repository; regulatory and institutional; test facilities; land acquisition; and program management. Scenarios for the release of radionuclide from a repository in alternate rock types occuring in the southwest NTS area were ranked by probabilities. Analysis of data from 60 wells in and around NTS are nearing completion. A computerized data recording and earthquake detection system that is more efficient was made operational. A series of 55 evaluations of repository locations in the screening area was performed. A review has been completed covering the likelihood of creep failure in a tuff repository. (DMC)

  5. Nuclear Safety. Technical Progress Journal, October--December 1991: Volume 32, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  6. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, October-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    even with a rare day off, adds up to 14,800 hours a year. Thus, today residency training time is 20% shorter. The current situation violates the “ Bermuda ... Triangle ” of business that states you can only get two of the following three in any given product: good, fast, or cheap. If we want good residency

  7. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  8. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Culture screening and performance studies were performed with a variety of cultures in removing nitrogen compounds from coal liquid. Two cultures were shown to be effective in removing 17 and 26 percent of the nitrogen in coal liquid as determined by elemental analysis. Experiments will continue in an effort to find additional cultures and isolates able to degrade nitrogen, as well as oxygen and sulfur as heteroatom compounds, from coal liquids. A biological process for upgrading of coal liquids would offer significant advantages, such as operation at ordinary temperature and pressure with better energy efficiency. Of greater importance is the fact that microorganisms do not require an external supply of hydrogen for heteroatom removal, obtaining required hydrogen from water. Furthermore, the biocatalysts are continuously regenerated by growth on the heteroatom compounds. Ring structures are degraded as the heteroatoms are removed. The heteroatoms are in an inocuous form, such as NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Therefore, there is significant potential for the development of an economical biological process for upgrading of coal liquids.

  9. Project 57 Air Monitoring Report: October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-02-01

    On April 24, 1957, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC, now the Department of Energy [DOE]) conducted the Project 57 safety experiment in western Emigrant Valley north east of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) on lands withdrawn by the Department of Defense (DoD) for the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). The test was undertaken to develop (1) a means of estimating plutonium distribution resulting from a nonnuclear detonation; (2) biomedical evaluation techniques for use in plutonium-laden environments; (3) methods of surface decontamination; and (4) instruments and field procedures for prompt estimation of alpha contamination (Shreve, 1958). Although the test did not result in the fission of nuclear materials, it did disseminate plutonium across the land surface. Following the experiment, the AEC fenced the contaminated area and returned control of the surrounding land to the DoD. Various radiological surveys have been performed in the area and in 2007, the DOE expanded the demarked contamination area by posting signs 200 to 400 feet (60 to 120 meters) outside of the original fence. Plutonium in soil is thought to attach preferentially to smaller particles. Therefore, redistribution of soil particulates by wind (dust) is the mechanism most likely to transport plutonium beyond the boundary of the Project 57 contamination area. In 2011, DRI installed two instrumentation towers to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination was detectable in samples of airborne dust and characterize meteorological and environmental parameters that influence dust transport. Collected data also permits comparison of radiological conditions at the Project 57 monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Biweekly samples of airborne particulates are submitted for laboratory assessment of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity and for determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides. Annual average gross alpha values at the Project 57 monitoring stations are in the same range as the highest two values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the NTTR. Annual average gross beta values at the Project 57 monitoring stations are slightly higher than the lowest value reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the NTTR. Gamma spectroscopy analyses on samples collected from the Project 57 stations identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. No manmade radionuclides were detected. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) indicated that the average annual radioactivity dose at the monitoring stations is higher than the dose determined at surrounding CEMP stations but approximately half of the estimated national average dose received by the general public as a result of exposure to natural sources. The TLDs at the Project 57 monitoring stations are exposed to both natural sources (terrestrial and cosmic) and radioactive releases from the Project 57 contamination area. These comparisons show that the gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma spectroscopy levels at the Project 57 monitoring stations are similar to levels observed at the CEMP stations but that the average annual dose rate is higher than at the CEMP stations. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to generate dust movement by saltation (migration of sand at the ground surface) or direct suspension in the air. Saltated sand, PM10 (inhalable) dust, and PM2.5 (fine particulate dust) exhibit an approximately exponential increase with increasing wind speed. The greatest concentrations of dust occur for winds exceeding 20 mph. During the reporting period, winds in excess of 20 mph occurred approximately 1.6 percent of the time. Preliminary assessment of individual wind events suggests that dust generation is highly variable likely because of the influence of other meteorological and environmental parameters. Although winds sufficient to generate significant amounts of dust occur at th

  10. ONR Far East Scientific Information Bulletin. Volume 14, Number 4, October-December 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    High Magnetic Kanazawa, ISEF -KANAZAWA Secretariat 9-11 Field Generation and Its Japan c/o Faculty of Technology Application to Materials and Kanazawa...University Biological Systems 2-40-20 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa 920 ( ISEF -KANAZAWA) l0-F20-J80 January International Conference on Wollongong, Metallurgical

  11. Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System. Topical report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the results of Phase 1 efforts to develop a Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System for the detection of semivolatile organic contaminants on concrete, transite, and metal surfaces. The characterization of equipment and building surfaces for the presence of contaminants as part of building decontamination and decommissioning activities is an immensely large tacks of concern to both government and industry. Contaminated and clean materials must be clearly identified and segregated so that the clean materials can be recycled or reused, if possible, or disposed of more cheaply as nonhazardous waste. Characterization of building and equipment surfaces will be needed during initial investigations, during cleanup operations, and during the final confirmatory process, increasing the total number of samples well beyond that needed for initial characterization. This multiplicity of information places a premium on the ability to handle and track data as efficiently as possible. Aware of the shortcomings of traditional surface characterization technology, GE, with DOE support has undertaken a 12-month effort to complete Phase 1 of a proposed four-phase program to develop the RSSAR system. The objectives of this work are to provide instrumentation to cost-effectively sample concrete and steel surfaces, provide a quick-look indication for the presence or absence of contaminants, and collect samples for later, more detailed analysis in a readily accessible and addressable form. The Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System will be a modular instrument made up of several components: (1) sampling heads for concrete surfaces, steel surfaces, and bulk samples; (2) quick-look detectors for photoionization and ultraviolet; (3) multisample trapping module to trap and store vaporized contaminants in a manner suitable for subsequent detailed lab-based analyses.

  12. Liquid fuels production from biomass. Progress report No. 6, 1 October-31 December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    The current program to convert biomass into liquid hydrocarbon fuels is an extension of the previous program to ferment marine algae to acetic acid. In that study, it was found that marine algae could be converted to higher aliphatic organic acids and that these acids could be readily removed from the fermentation both by membrane or liquid-liquid extraction. It was then proposed to convert these higher organic acids to aliphatic hydrocarbons via Kolbe Electrolysis, which may be used as a diesel fuel. The specific goals for the current program are: (1) establish conditions under which substrates other than marine algae may be converted in good yield to organic acids. The primary task in this regard is methane suppression; (2) modify the current 300 liter fixed packed bed batch fermenter to operate in a continuous mode; (3) change from membrane extraction of organic acids to liquid-liquid extraction; (4) optimize the energy balance of the electrolytic oxidation process. The primary task in this regard is to reduce the working potential required for the electrolysis while maintaining an adequate current density; and (5) scale the entire process up to match the output of the 300 liter fermenter. The accomplishments in this program are on schedule. Experimental results show that the electrolysis of organic acids produced by fermentation to liquid hydrocarbon fuels already have a favorable energy balance of 6/1 based on the applied potential and over 10/1 based on the working potential.

  13. Composite quarterly technical report long-term high-level-waste technology, October-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornman, W.R. (comp.)

    1982-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed at participating sites on the immobilization of high-level wastes from the chemical reprocessing of reactor fuels. The plan is to develop waste form alternatives for each of the three DOE sites (SRP, ICPP, and Hanford). Progress is reported in the following areas: waste preparation; fixation in glass, concrete, tailored ceramics, and coated particles; process and equipment development; and final handling. 12 figures, 19 tables. (DLC)

  14. United States Army Medical Department Journal. Leadership in the Army Medical Department, October - December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    resonant leadership is based on a principle of physics that describes the generation of sound of musical instruments. Instru- ments all have...ural frequency of a second sets the second into vibra- tional motion, you have resonance. And you get music . The sound of the sea you hear when you...instantly transformed by a shared laugh or smile. The best indicator of the morale or " timbre " of an organization—its resonance—is the presence of

  15. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 22, October-December 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-17

    Nikiforov , A. M. Prokhorov, A. N. Sidorov, L. L. Chelnokov, and M. D. Yarysheva (0). Plasma-ribbon CO-, laser. r>i: Sb 1, 29...1975, 2348-2350. (LC) 916, Kovalenko, V. S. , V. P. Kotlyarov, V. P. Dyatel, V. I. Yepifanov, ?;nd K. I. Proskuryakov (0...NESTRIZHENKO, YU. A. NEUSTRUYEV, V. B. NEVEROV, V.G. NGUYEN TKHO VYONG NGUYEN MIN’ KHIYEN NIKIFOROV , S. M. NIKITCHENKO, V. M. NIKITIN, N. V

  16. Optical properties of flyash. Quarterly report, 1 October--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    The general aims of this research are to provide a fundamental scientific basis for the physical understanding and reliable calculation of radiative heat transfer in coal combustion systems, particularly as its influenced by the presence of inorganic constitutents deriving from the mineral matter in coal.

  17. CPC air-blown integrated gasification combined cycle project. Quarterly report, October--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The overall project cost and schedule. The combustion turbine commercial operation date is scheduled for 7/1/95 with the combined cycle commercial operation date of 7/1/96. A two year demonstration period will commence after IGCC commercial operation. Details of costs on a total project and DOE Envelope basis along with detailed schedule components were covered. Major cost variances to date were discussed. The major variances this year relate to contracts which were anticipated to be finalized mid 1992 but which are not executed. These include GEESI, the ASU and key vessels. Some of these contracts are almost in place and others are scheduled for the first quarter 1993. Numerous project specifications, process flow diagrams, piping and instrument diagrams and other drawings have been reviewed and approved as part of the preliminary engineering process.

  18. Exxon catalytic coal-gasification process development program. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euker, Jr, C. A.

    1980-03-01

    Work continued on the catalyst recovery screening studies to evaluate the economic impacts of alternative processing approaches and solid-liquid separation techniques. Equipment specifications have been completed for two cases with countercurrent water washing using rotary-drum filters for the solid-liquid separations. Material and energy balances have been completed for an alternative methane recovery process configuration using low pressure stripping which requires 26% less horsepower than the Study Design system. A study has been initiated to identify trace components which might be present in the CCG gas loop and to assess their potential impacts on the CCG process. This information will be used to assist in planning an appropriate series of analyses for the PDU gasifier effluent. A study has been initiated to evaluate the use of a small conventional steam reformer operating in parallel with a preheat furnace for heat input to the catalytic gasifier which avoids the potential problem of carbon laydown. Preliminary replies from ten manufacturers are being evaluated as part of a study to determine the types and performance of coal crushing equipment appropriate for commercial CCG plants. A material and energy balance computer model for the CCG reactor system has been completed. The new model will provide accurate, consistent and cost-efficient material and energy balances for the extensive laboratory guidance and process definition studies planned under the current program. Other activities are described briefly.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    During the 1994 summer institute NTEP teachers worked in coordination with LANL and the Los Alamos Middle School and Mountain Elementary School to gain experience in communicating on-line, to gain further information from the Internet and in using electronic Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) to exchange ideas with other teachers. To build on their telecommunications skills, NTEP teachers participated in the International Telecommunications In Education Conference (Tel*ED `94) at the Albuquerque Convention Center on November 11 & 12, 1994. They attended the multimedia keynote address, various workshops highlighting many aspects of educational telecommunications skills, and the Telecomm Rodeo sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Rodeo featured many presentations by Laboratory personnel and educational institutions on ways in which telecommunications technologies can be use din the classroom. Many were of the `hands-on` type, so that teachers were able to try out methods and equipment and evaluate their usefulness in their own schools and classrooms. Some of the presentations featured were the Geonet educational BBS system, the Supercomputing Challenge, and the Sunrise Project, all sponsored by LANL; the `CU-seeMe` live video software, various simulation software packages, networking help, and many other interesting and useful exhibits.

  20. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) Reports, October-December 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Wadeson LJ, Collins P. McKenzie cell surface of rat thy mocytes. Nature 289:456 IFC. Penington DG (1984) An antigenic difference between 13. W\\Villiams AF...consistent in part with a eral blood neutrophilia and erythroid ane- number of publications that report hemato - mia, increased splenic erythrocytopoiesis...5 Balducci, L.; Hardy, C.: Concentration of hemato - duction, an increase in the destruction of poictic precursors in Lewis lung carcinoma-bear- RBC

  1. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, R.H.; Basim, B.; Luttrell, G.H.; Phillips, D.I. [and others

    1997-01-28

    Novel chemicals that can be used for increasing the efficiency of fine coal dewatering was developed at Virginia Tech. During the past quarter, Reagent A was tested on three different coal samples in laboratory vacuum filtration tests. These included flotation products from Middle Fork plant, Elkview Mining Company, and CONSOL, Inc. The tests conducted with the Middle Fork coal sample (100 mesh x 0) showed that cake moisture can be reduced by more than 10% beyond what can be achieved without using dewatering aid. This improvement was achieved at 1 lb/ton of Reagent A and 0.1 inch cake thickness. At 0.5 inches of cake thickness, the improvement was limited to 8% at the same reagent dosage. The results obtained with the Elkview coal (28 mesh x 0) showed similar advantages in using the novel dewatering aid. Depending on the reagent dosage, cake thickness, drying cycle time and temperature, it was possible to reduce the cake moisture to 12 to 14% rage. In addition to achieving lower cake moisture, the use of Reagent A substantially decreased the cake formation time, indicating that the reagent improves the kinetics of dewatering. The test results obtained with CONSOL coal were not as good as with the other coals tested in the present work, which may be attributed to possible oxidation and/or contamination.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation techniques for high-temperature ceramic components. Fifth quarterly report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The adequacy of several nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for the detection of flaws in SiC heat-exchanger tubing are discussed. Experimental results regarding adaptability to ceramic tubing and minimum detectable flaw size have been obtained for conventional ultrasonic testing, acoustic microscopy, conventional and dye-enhanced radiography, holographic interferometry, infrared scanning and internal-friction measurements. The advantages and disadvantages of overload proof testing are also discussed. No single NDE technique will be sufficient to detect all types of critically sized flaws. Preservice inspection should include traditional visual and dye-penetrant examinations for outer-wall surface defects, and possibly overload proof testing to screen weak ceramic tubing. Further examinations should employ dye-enhanced radiography for inner-wall surface defects and acoustic microscopy or conventional ultrasonic testing at 20 MHz (and possible holographic interferometry) for subsurface defects. Anomalous heat-transport characteristics may be detected by infrared techniques. For in-service examinations, where is is assumed that access to the tube is from the bore side only, inspection employing 20-MHz longitudinal and transverse waves appears to be the most practical technique. Infrared scanning through the bore could possibly provide data with regard to hot spots, wall thinning and anomalous heat-transport characteristics. Holographic interferometry, while requiring extensive development, may be capable of providing inner-wall crack-detection data not generated by other techniques.The attributes of the various techniques evaluated to date are tabulated.

  3. ONR Far East Scientific Bulletin. Volume 6, Number 4, October - December 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Spectroscopic Investigations of Chemical Compounds," (A. Meisel, Karl -Marx University, Leipzig); - "Chemical Analysis of Solid Surfaces by Means of Low...the one physiology department is headed by Yoshinobu Kanno, who has spent several years in the laboratory of W. Loewenstein at the University of Miami

  4. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October-December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    efense. Supports creativity for positive change and evaluates outcom es. Education B O LC , AO C/ ASI C ourse, JEC C, C 4 , ACCC G raduate Course W...which has been replaced by the Army Nursing Capabilities Map. Glossary AN - Army Nurse AOC - Area of concentration ASI - Additional skill identifier...Success: The Art and Science of Staffing Assessment and Employee Selection. San Francisco , CA: Pfeiffer; 2007. AUTHOR MAJ Nagra is Chief

  5. Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame. Quarterly report, October 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-20

    Short summaries of thirty-seven investigations in progress in radiation chemistry and photochemistry are presented. Abstracts of twenty-three reports published are also presented. Some of the research in progress are: hyperfine coupling constants in methyl radical; theoretical calculations on 4-membered heterocyclic ring systems; absorption spectra of solvated electrons in THF; electron thermalization in liquid argon; electron capture in rare gases in competition with thermalization; electron spin densities for LiOH/sub 2/ in argon matrices; CO desorption and adsorption on Pt(III); radical reactions in combustion chemistry; laser photolysis of aqueous systems; laser flash photolysis study of hydrogen bending equilibria involving phenols; charge transfer interaction in the lowest singlet excited state of all-trans twenty-two carbon homologue of retinal; photoinduced redox transformations in macrocyclic complexes; photochemical properties of molybdenum complexes of dithiocarbamato ligands; scavenging reactions in the radiolysis of cyclopentane; determination of the products of oxidation of aniline by Ag(II); hydroxyl radical reactions with Ni(II) macrocyclic complexes.

  6. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) Reports, October, November, December 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    Dubois, A., and Shea-Donohue, T. The role of endogenous prostaglandins in the regulation of gastric secretion in rhesus monkeys. SR86-40: Kafka , M. S...production. SR86-41: Kafka , M. S., Benedito, M. A., Steele, L. K., Gibson, M. J., Zerbe, R. L., Jacobowitz, D. M., Roth, R. H., and Zander, K...Helgeson, E. A., and Franz , D. R. Organophosphate-induced histamine release from mast cells. SR86-45: Patchen, M. L., and MacVittie, T. J

  7. Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins CBE: 15 December 1916 - 5 October 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Struther; Kibble, T W B; Shallice, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins was the 'Third man of the double helix; according to the publishers who were allowed to foist this title on his late-written autobiography. Certainly it is for his role in the discover of the duplex secondary structure of DNA that he will be remembered. It might be argued that he was the first man, rather than the third, for it was his successful revival of X-ray diffraction studies of DNA and his earliest result in 1950, a pattern of a well-oriented and polycrystalline DNA of unprecedented quality, that allowed him to conclude almost immediately that the basic framework of the genetical material was simple and symmetrical, and that the symmetrical structure took the form of a helix. This same pattern, displayed at a conference in Naples six months later, was the major inspiration for the involvement of J. D. Watson (ForMemRS 1981) in modelling DNA structure in collaboration with F. H. C. Crick (FRS 1959). Crick was a personal friend of Maurice's and was more involved with studies of proteins until the progress of Maurice's research programme and Watson's enthusiastic presence in Cambridge convinced him to put nucleic acids first. The carefully crafted citation for the 1960 Lasker Award, which these three men shared in 1960, put Maurice's name first and accurately referred to '...the painstaking x-ray diffraction studies of Wilkins that provided a most important clue that was pursued in a ingenious fashion and to a logical conclusion by Crick and Watson...'. Maurice's diffraction studies of DNA were not only the alpha but also the omega of the double helix because it left to him to remedy a major flaw in the original (1953) Watson-Crick conjecture. Maurice Wilkin's early acceptance of DNA as the genetic material and his recognition that it had structures that could and should be tackled by X-ray diffraction analyses, not necessarily under his exclusive control, was important in ensuring that the essence of DNA's structure was discovered as early as it was. His success in resolving patiently and successfully all the technical problems, great and small, that arose unpredictably in the course of his work on DNA and RNA was substantial. He was less successful in defending himself against the slings and arrows that unjustly assail those involved in momentous exercises. His pacific acceptance of these misfortunes was typical of a life that had priorities beyond the laboratory and required him to do as one would be done by.

  8. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, tungsten crucibles were successfully spun for use in laboratory-scale experiments. Corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys in PDPM environments was done. Ceramic substrates were successfully coated with tungsten. Solubility measurements were made to determine Cd/Mg alloy composition and temperature at which dissolved Th will precipitate. Experiments were started to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/ with Ca in a molten metal-molten salt system. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO was started. Equipment for determining phase diagrams for U-Cu-Mg system was set up. The reaction of UO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ was studied as part of a project to identify chemically feasible nonaqueous fuel reprocessing methods. Work was continued on development of a flowsheet for reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting actinides into ammonium chloro-aluminate (and alternative salts) from a bismuth solution. Preparation of Th, U, and Pu nitrides after dissolution of spent fuel elements in molten tin is being studied. Leach rates of glass beads, pulverized beads, and beads encapsulated in a lead matrix with no protective envelope were studied. A method (employing no pressure or vacuum systems) of encapsulating various solid wastes in a lead metal matrix was developed and tested. A preliminary integration was made of earlier data on effects of impacts on metal-matrix waste forms.Leach migration experiments were compared with conventional infiltration experiments as methods of evaluating geologic formations as barriers to nuclide migration. The effect of the streaming potential on the rates of transport of radioactive I/sup -/ and Na/sup +/ through kaolinite columns was measured, as well as adsorption of iodide and iodate by several compounds; implications of the results upon the disposal of radioactive iodine are discussed.

  10. Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

  11. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  12. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollahalli, S.R.; Butuk, N.

    1996-03-01

    The objectives of the project were: (i) to understand the effects of heating one of the streams on the characteristics of shear layers, (ii) to investigate the changes in the characteristics of large scale vortex structures in the shear layer caused by the introduction of inert solid particles in one of the feed streams; (iii) to understand the effects of pyrolyzing solids on the shear layer behavior; and (iv) to study the effects of combustion of particles and their pyrolysis products on the shear layer structure, heat release rate, and pollutant emission characteristics. An experimental facility for generating two-dimensional shear layers containing vortex structures has been designed and fabricated. The experimental facility is essentially a low speed wind tunnel designed to (i) provide two gas streams, initially with uniform velocity profiles and isotropic turbulence, mixing at the end of a splitter plate, (ii) introduce vorticity by passively perturbing one of the streams, (iii) allow heating of one of the streams to temperatures high enough to cause pyrolysis of coal particles, and (iv) provide a natural gas flame in one of the streams to result in ignition and burning of coal particles.

  13. Nuclear waste criticality analysis. Quarterly progress report, 1 October--31 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culbreth, W.G.

    1996-01-19

    The work to date includes the preparation of a report related to criticality in spent fuel, a report on the Oklo reactors and their relevance to Yucca Mountain, and the creation of a computer program to model the Oklo reactors. The objective of the program includes a computational model of the only known natural analogue to an underground nuclear waste repository and the possible application of the model to predict the long-term behavior of Yucca Mountain. A final summary of all work completed will be presented after the end of the project on February 29, 1996.

  14. Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1996-06-01

    Objectives for this quarter were to attempt to develop a model to predict the molecular diffusion coefficients to a high degree of accuracy so the authors may be able to predict both the molecular diffusion coefficient and thus the effective diffusivity a priori. They are working on a semi-empirical equation based on the rough hard sphere theory to predict diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids. In addition, they planned to take additional data in order to extend the database available for development of the predictive equation. The paper discusses accomplishments and problems related to the diffusion coefficients of F-T products in supercritical fluids. Data are presented on the diffusion coefficients of 1-octene in ethane, propane, and hexane.

  15. Coal materials handling: classifier evaluation. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The desire and need to reduce energy requirements is, of course, the first and foremost reason for seeking a better understanding of the role of classification in closed circuit coal grinding. A better understanding of classifiers typically used in conjunction with coal grinding circuits would result in the ability to better utilize energies expended in coal grinding. In addition, the ability to better control the product size distribution is of major importance to many new processes being introduced to our energy conscious economy. Such processes include coal-oil mixture production, the production of coal-water slurries of pipelines, coal gasification and the production of solvent refined coal. All of these processes call for the use of pumpable and high concentrate slurries. In all cases the particle size distribution has a direct effect on the pumpability and percent by weight solids concentration that is reasonably attainable. Recognizing the need for a better technical understanding of classifiers used in coal grinding, the United States Department of Energy and the Kennedy Van Saun Corporation conceived the present project to evaluate various classifiers currently being used in air swept coal grinding systems. The classifiers under consideration include a twin cone classifier, an expansion chamber type (vari-mesh) classifier and a new centrifugal classifier recently introduced by Hukki. The objectives of this evaluation are to compare the classifiers with respect to their effect on closed circuit grinding system performance and to provide data that will allow a preliminary evaluation of classifier design with respect to separation on the basis of sulfur and ash content.

  16. Products of motor burnout. Second quarterly technical report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley-Fedder, R.

    1995-01-15

    The OSP (Operating Safety Procedure) required for performance of electrical arc testing of CFC replacement fluids was renewed. Electrical breakdown tests at one atmosphere pressure have been performed for R-22, R-134a, and R-125/R-143a (50:50 blend; R-507), and breakdown products identified. No differences in HCFC breakdown products are seen in the presence or absence of lubricant oils. The design of the high pressure-high temperature test stand has been finalized, and construction initiated during this quarter. Three motor stators and rotors were received from Tecumseh Products Company for use in motor burnout tests. A test plan for the motor breakdown tests is in preparation.

  17. Cure rate study of isothermally aged Sylgard 182, (an addendum). Progress report, October--December 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clink, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    Isothermal aging of freshly prepared Sylgard 182 at 21/sup 0/C has been completed. Chemical analysis through NMR procedures, and hardness determinations through Shore durometer measurements are reported.

  18. ONRASIA Scientific Information Bulletin. Volume 16, Number 4, October - December 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    University Park Fax: +61-3-565-4403 ( ANSTO ) outside Sydney has just Hotel at Bond University, jointlyspon- received a Fujitsu VP2200 (as of the sored by the...This is a joint venture between This is on Australia’s Gold Coast south ests, as are others in his department, ANSTO and Fujitsu.) of Brisbane...Australian participation, termed Smoothed Part Hydrodynam- for more cycles in other places. ifonly to learn. Jerard Barry ( ANSTO ) ics (SPH method), and this

  19. The Magic Background of Pearl Harbor. Volume 4 (October 17, 1941 - December 7, 1941)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Xl TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 512. Japan, Manchuria , and China Plan Exchange Broadcasts n_nnnn nnn_n_n...question of the three American missionaries interned by the Manchurian authorities at Harbin . Secretary Hull declared that similar situations...theory. However, he requested that Ambassador attitude toward the matter.95 imprisonment of American missionaries in Harbin . Reminding Ambassador Nomura

  20. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 3, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, S.N. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The Beamlet Front End: Prototype of a new pulse generation system;imaging biological objects with x-ray lasers; coherent XUV generation via high-order harmonic generation in rare gases; theory of high-order harmonic generation; two-dimensional computer simulations of ultra- intense, short-pulse laser-plasma interactions; neutron detectors for measuring the fusion burn history of ICF targets; the recirculator; and lasnex evolves to exploit computer industry advances.

  1. Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges: Narrative report for the period September, October, November, December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges (Petit Bois National Wildlife Refuge, Horn Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Breton National...

  2. Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges: Narrative report for the period September, October, November, December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges (Petit Bois National Wildlife Refuge, Horn Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Breton National...

  3. MHD generator electrode development. Quarterly report, October-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, J W; Cadoff, L H; Dietrick, D L

    1981-01-01

    This program is directed towards the engineering development of cold metallic electrodes which are alternatives to the use of platinum as an anode clad material for MHD generators. Results of continuing laboratory screening tests are presented. Improvements in the anode arc test methodology and test setup, which have resulted in improved reproducibility as well as test simplification, are discussed. Laboratory electrochemical corrosion testing has been initiated using aqueous and molten salts as the aggressive constituent in the electrolyte. Initial results from these tests are reported. On the basis of these test results, electrochemical corrosion tests using a molten salt are preferred. As a result of ongoing laboratory screening tests, acceptance criteria, which are interim in nature and are likely to change based on future test results have been defined for the anode arc and electrochemical corrosion tests. Reflecting the initial laboratory test results, a listing of candidate advanced alloys which should demonstrate improved corrosion resistance has been defined. Upon completion of WESTF modifications, facility checkout and activation operations have been initiated. Progress, as well as those difficulties which have been encountered, in completing WESTF activation is reported. Detailed engineering and test planning activities in support of WESTF tests are reported.

  4. Chemicals for enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.S. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Studies on the salinity range in which three liquid phases are observed for systems containing a tall oil ethoxylate or related nonionic surfactant, a cosurfactant, aqueous NaCl, and a hydrocarbon were extended. Increasing hydrophile-lipophile balance, HLB, causes an increase in the salinity needed to effect the transition of the surfactant from the lower to the upper phase. However, other factors besides HLB seem to be involved. Addition of the nonionic surfactant increases optimal salinity by an amount which depends on its hydrophilic character. Sodium-2-methyloleate,-2-butyloleate, -2-hexyloleate, -2,2-dimethyloleate, and -2,2-diethyloleate were synthesized and its phase behavior in aqueous/hydrocarbon systems studied. Adsorption of a commercial petroleum sulfonate from 0.1 M NaCl on the sodium form of montmorillonite was reduced a factor of ten by caustic extract from bleaching of wood pulp. In a comparison of several pulping wastes or byproducts as sacrificial agents, caustic extract and weak black liquor appeared most effective, and lignosulfonate only slightly less effective. Plugging tests of the filtrates obtained in the biomass-polymer separations indicated that polish filtration probably would be required. The microscreen is the most economical of the biomass separation methods. Small fermenter tests indicate that Sclerotium rolfsii cultures are able to tolerate salinity of 2 to 4% w/v NaCl in the fermentation broth makeup water; however, the organism was unable to grow in 6% w/v NaCl.

  5. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, October--December 1994. Volume 5, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included in this issue include: system description and initial performance results for beamlet, design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers and optical switch, beamlet pulse-generation and wavefront-control system, large-aperture, high- damage-threshold optics for beamlet, beamlet pulsed power system, beamlet laser diagnostics, and beam propagation and frequency conversion modeling for the beamlet laser.

  6. Northeast regional biomass program. First quarter report, October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    This progress report presents summaries of various projects which were in operation or being planned during this quarter period. Projects included testing the efficiency of using wood chips as fuel in heating systems, barriers to commercial development of wood pellet fuels, studies of more efficient and less polluting wood stoves, work on landfill gas utilization, directories of facilities using biomass fuels, surveys of biomass conversion processes to liquid fuels, for commercial development, etc.

  7. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1–December 30, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. Progress report on the Pegasus plow, October--December 1996 and January--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This is a progress report on a contract related to the invention of a plow which will bury organic waste from farm fields, either in the form of shredded stubble or as whole stalks. The report addresses completion of various tasks in the contract, primarily related to field testing and trying to move the product into the market place.

  9. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report: October--December 1995. Volume 6, Number 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEachern, R.L.; Carpenter, J.; Miguel, A.; Murphy, P.; Perez, J.; Schleich, D. [eds.

    1996-07-01

    This issue presents recent results from the ICF program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in areas ranging from cryogenics to plasma instabilities. The article ``Metastable Crystal Structures of Solid Hydrogen`` describes primarily Raman spectroscopy studies of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} films deposited at various rates and temperatures. All ignition target designs for ICF require a cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layer of uniform thickness and acceptable roughness. Solid DT layers, in particular, are easier to support in the presence of gravity and self-symmetrize due to self heating from the beta decay of tritium. The roughness of these films is closely related to their crystal structure, so it is important to understand film morphology under different deposition conditions. Three articles present different approaches to the study of plasma instabilities that lead to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In ``Modeling of Self-Focusing Experiments by Beam Propagation Codes,`` the authors describe the use of computer codes to model nonlinear effects during the propagation of laser beams through optical elements. Such codes have played a key role in the design of high-power lasers for ICF, both historically and for the NIF. The article ``Optical Scatter--A Diagnostic Tool to Investigate Laser Damage in KDP and DKDP`` examines the important problem of characterizing single crystals of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and deuterated KDP. These materials are used as optical switches, for frequency conversion in the Nova laser, and will be required for the NIF. The use of soft x-rays as a plasma probe is the topic of ``Soft X-Ray Interferometry.`` Interferometry of laser-produced plasmas presents a significant challenge, especially at electron densities exceeding 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}. The authors compare x-ray and optical interferometry of plasmas and show experimental results from a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  10. Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 7, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1977-12-01

    Progress in work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is reported. Work on the first element of the program management plan (problem definition) was completed and a report issued. The materials development and property verification phases of the plan are in progress. Plans for the down-hole testing phase of the program are being formulated. The most promising high temperature polymer cement (PC) system identified to date consists of a cross-linked mixture of styrene, acrylonitrile, and acrylamide in conjunction with a sand-cement filler. A study is in progress to optimize the concentrations of the mix components with respect to properties. Work to determine the pumpability of the system is in progress. Samples of PC have been removed after exposure at The Geysers to dry steam at 460/sup 0/F (238/sup 0/C) for 2 yrs. Visual inspection of the specimens indicated little apparent deterioration. The appendix includes five reports from contributing researchers on the development of high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells.

  11. ONR Far East Scientific Bulletin, Volume 12, Number 4, October-December 1987,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) 𔃻 ONR FAR EAST SCIENTIFIC BULLETIN 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S George B. Wright, Director; Sandy...34 "The Gates of 100,000 AU from the sun that supplies Paradise," "Land of Promise," and comets when disturbed by passing " Danton ," Mr. Wajda has used...scientific research achievements and " Danton " in France and "A Love in enthusiasm, which has let him continue Germany" in Germany. his work to this

  12. Amorphous silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 1, 1 October 1980-31 December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D.E.; Balberg, I.; Crandall, R.S.; Dresner, J.; Goldstein, B.; Hanak, J.J.; Schade, H.E.; Staebler, D.L.; Weakliem, H.A.

    1981-02-01

    Progress is reported on the following: theoretical modeling, deposition and doping studies, experimental methods for the characterization of a-Si:H, formation of solar-cell structures, theoretical and experimental evaluation of solar-cell parameters, and stability studies. (MHR)

  13. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. ONR Far East Scientific Bulletin, Volume 7, Number 4, October-December 1982,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    as the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Technology Research Association ( Choo LSI Gijutsu Kenkyuu Kumiai). Money was provided to the Association in...Stanford University Press, 1982. Japan: The Government-Busineea Relationehip. Eugene J. Kaplan. U.S. Depart- ment of Commerce, 1972. "The Japanese

  15. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

  16. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) Reports, October, November, December 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    gallbladder epithelial cells. SR88-38: Holahan , E. V., Blakely, W. F., and Walden, T. L. Effect of PGE2 on radiation response of chinese hamster V79 cells in...constituents of the so- called "slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis" (SRS-A) (1,3). Like many other cell types, the mast cell can incorporate exogenous...this, our preliminary data has also sug8ested the presence of a phoepholipase A2 activity in the ast call granule, and its presence has enabled us to

  17. Fingerprinting of groundwater by ICP-MS. Progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetzenbach, K.

    1992-12-31

    Enclosed in this report are the results of the analyses for the trace metals of the third sampling of Ash Meadows and Death Valley springs. The samples were analyzed for a total 66 constituents, including: major cations, major union, and rare earth elements. The data are complete except for the lanthanum and cerium results for the Ash Meadows springs. There was significant, but as yet an undetermined source of contamination for these two elements. We are presently attempting to determine the source of the contamination. The results of the major cations and anions will be included in the next report.

  18. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1982 on Energy Conversion Research and Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the continued design work for the low mass flow train superheater. The detailed design of this component continued and the overall arrangement drawing for the superheater and air heater was finalized. The air heater procurement reached the point of contract award, but the actual purchase order award was held up pending receipt of additional funding from the Department of Energy. Testing activity reported includes two additional tests in the LMF1C series, which concludes this test series. Test data are presented, along with preliminary analyses for the combustor, nozzle, diagnostic channel, diffuser, radiant furnace/secondary combustor and Materials Test Module. In addition to the nitrogen oxide test measurements, corrosion and erosion rates for the boiler tube specimens and the materials test module are reported.

  19. Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskanzer, A.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Lofdahl, J.B. (eds.)

    1991-04-01

    This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  20. /sup 238/Pu fuel-form processes. Quarterly report, October-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    Progress in the Savannah River /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Program is summarized. Work during this period concentrated on the extensive cracking of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel form prior to encapsulation in the iridium containment shell for heat sources. This cracking results in increased recycle cost and decreased production efficiency. To better understand this cracking, Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has made an extensive review of the development of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel forms from small-scale Multi-hundred Watt (MHW) pellets through the current GPHS full-scale pellet production. Historically, /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel has almost always been uncracked after hot pressing in a graphite die, but has emerged cracked and fragile from the final heat-treatment furnace. The cracking tendency depends on the microstructure of the fuel form and on the hot pressing conditions used to fabricate it. In general, a microstructure of large intershard porosity is more desirable because it allows internal gas to escape more readily and it can absorb more reoxidation strain. Studies of the GPHS microstructure showed that the internal structures of typical GPHS Pellets fabricated at LANL and in the PEF differed significantly. The LANL pellets had severe density gradients and were extensively cracked.

  1. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, October--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-12-31

    Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins offers a means of liquefying coal at low severity conditions. Lower temperature, 350{degrees}C, and lower hydrogen pressure, 500 psi, have been used to perform liquefaction reactions. The presence of the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, made a substantial difference in the conversion of Illinois No. 6 coal at these low severity conditions. The Researchperformed this quarter was a parametric evaluation of the effect of different parameters on the coal conversion and product distribution from coal. The effect of the parameters on product distribution from hexahydroanthracene was also determined. The work planned for next quarter includes combining the most effective parametric conditions for the low severity reactions and determining their effect. The second part ofthe research performed this quarter involved performing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using cyclic olefins. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using FTIR and a heated cell to determine the reaction pathway that occurs in the hydrogen donation reactions from cyclic olefins. The progress made to date includes evaluating the FTIR spectra of cyclic olefins and their expected reaction products. This work is included in this progress report.

  2. Technical progress report for the quarter 1 October-31 December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments on the commercial nuclear waste management programs and on the geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The program is organized into eight tasks: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management. (DLC)

  3. Calorimetry Sample Exchange analysis of data report for October--December, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1989-12-31

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are to: discuss measurement differences; review and improve analytical measurements and methods; discuss new measurement capabilities; provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences; provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants; and provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not bee collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. The six participating laboratories are Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, MRC-Mound, Westinghouse Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River.

  4. The Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program Fourth Quarter 2000 (October thru December 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-08-02

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during fourth quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program.

  5. 77 FR 13637 - Notice of Quarterly Report (October 1, 2011-December 31, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... portfolio at risk >90 days of microfinance institutions at the national level. Operational self- sufficiency... of MFIs inspected by Cellule Supervision Microfinance. Access to Justice Project...........

  6. 75 FR 18889 - Notice of Quarterly Report (October 1, 2009-December 31, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... portfolio at risk >90 days of microfinance institutions at the national level. Operational self- sufficiency... research grants launched. Average portfolio at risk among Alatona microfinance institutions. Average...

  7. Modeling of solar heating and air conditioning. Progress report, October 31, 1974--December 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffie, J.A.; Beckman, W.A.

    1975-12-31

    The principal objective of the research is to develop the means to identify and optimize practical systems for heating and cooling of buildings with solar energy in the United States. This will be done through simulation methods. Secondary objectives are to: extend and refine TRNSYS (a modular solar energy system simulation program); develop the means of supporting TRNSYS users in other laboratories; use TRNSYS (and other simulation programs) to develop design procedures for solar heating and cooling processes; design and evaluate an experimental solar heating system on a Wisconsin farm residence.

  8. Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 4, October--December, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, K.

    1994-01-25

    This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

  9. 76 FR 19131 - Notice of Quarterly Report (October 1, 2010-December 31, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... become CPA. Number of Central Bank branches capable of accepting auction tenders. Outstanding value of... (MFI) loans recorded in the Central Bank database. ] Agricultural Business $13,687,987 Improve $13,582... wholesale. Average price of fish at ports. ] Artisan and Fez Medina Project. $111,873,858 Increase value...

  10. DOE/KEURP site operator program. Year 3, Second Quarter Report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has procured two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. During calendar year 1994, the Kansas` electric vehicle program expects to purchase a minimum of four and a maximum of eleven additional electric vehicles. The G-Van was signed in order for the public to be aware that it was an electric vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. The Soleq EvCorts have not been signed. In order to demonstrate the technology as feasible, the EvCorts were deliberately not signed. The goal is to generate a public perception that this vehicle is no different from any similar internal combustion engine vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged.

  11. Sources and delivery of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 1977--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, M.; Perlich, H.; Robinson, R.; Shah, M.; Zimmerman, F.

    1978-12-01

    Results are presented from a comprehensive study by Pullman Kellogg, with assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and National Cryo-Chemics Incorporated (NCI), of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. A survey of carbon dioxide sources within the geographic areas of potential EOR are shown on four regional maps with the tabular data for each region to describe the sources in terms of quantity and quality. Evaluation of all the costs, such as purchase, production, processing, and transportation, associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination are presented. Specific cases to illustrate the use of the maps and cost charts generated in this study have been examined.

  12. ONRASIA Scientific Information Bulletin. Volume 17, Number 4, October-December 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Ishii NEC Corp. Mr. S. Mineo and Mr. Y. Kobayashi 99 SIB 17 (4) 92 The following cases comprised the benchmark problem the opera- Cray multi-CPU...114 Nagoya Aerospace Systems 3-196 Hitachi Sawa and Toga Works 3-101 Takasago Research and 2-079 Hitachi-Seiki 3-144 Development Center Hitachi Systems

  13. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] quarterly technical report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are described for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

  14. Aquaculture Asia, vol. 8, no. 4, pp.1-52, October - December 2003

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    CONTENTS: Freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium nobilii a promising candidate for rural nutrition, by Pitchimuthu Mariappan, P. Balamurugan, and Chellam Balasundaram. Snapshots of a clean, innovative, socially responsible fishfarm in Sri Lanka, by Pedro Bueno. Introduction of rainbow trout Onchorynchus mykiss in Nepal: Constraints and prospects, by Tek Bahadur Gurung, Sadhu Ram Basnet. Tilapia seed production in Ho Chi Minh City, Southern Vietnam, by H. P. V. Huy, A. MacNiven, N. V....

  15. Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 11, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1979-06-01

    In a one month shake-down test at East Mesa, 32 cement formulations were exposed to flowing brine at 150/sup 0/C and 95 psig. Based upon the results from this test, 15 formulations were selected for evaluation in a 2 year test. Experimental work indicates that none of the cements under consideration cause severe corrosion to steel casing. Compared with the possible corrosive attack on the steel casing by the geothermal environment, the corrosive effects of the cement are minimal. A promising cementing composition has been sent to the National Bureau of Standards for additional tests, and at least one more composition will be submitted. Pumpability tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate several formulations that are pumpable for at least 2 hr at 316/sup 0/C. Polymer concrete samples containing 50 wt% styrene - 35 wt% acrylonitrile - 5 wt% acrylamide - 10 wt% divinyl benzene have not shown any reduction in strength after exposure to 25% brine at 240/sup 0/C for 8 months. This is the highest strength formulation to date and is the first formulation that has not exhibited any strength reduction after brine exposure. Strengths of 204 MPa and 162 MPa were measured at 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, after 8 months in brine.

  16. Twenty-three Asteroids Lightcurves at Observadores de Asteroides (OBAS): 2015 October - December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar Macias, Amadeo; Carreno Garcerain, Alfonso; Arce Mansego, Enrique; Brines Rodriguez, Pedro; Lozano de Haro, Juan; Fornas Silva, Alvaro; Fornas Silva, Gonzalo; Mas Martinez, Vicente; Rodrigo Chiner, Onofre

    2016-04-01

    We report on the photometric analysis results for 23 main-belt asteroids (MBA) done by Observadores de Asteroides (OBAS). This work is part of the Minor Planet Photometric Database that was initiated by a group of Spanish amateur astronomers. We have managed to obtain a number of accurate, complete lightcurves as well as some additional incomplete lightcurves to help analysis at future oppositions.

  17. Large area silicon sheet by EFG. Fourth quarterly report, October 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, F.V.

    1978-01-15

    A detailed economic evaluation is presented of several EFG ribbon growth technology scenarios using the ''SAMICS'' interim price estimation guidelines. It is concluded that the growth of 10 ribbons from a double five ribbon furnace of the general type represented by the existing Machine 3A would meet the requirements of producing ribbon at a price below $20/m/sup 2/ the 1986 goal. The technology requirements are that one operator can operate 2 of the 5 ribbon growth stations in which each ribbon grows at a speed of 7.5 cm/min and is also 7.5 cm wide. The machines also would have to achieve a duty cycle of 67% at minimum and yields above 75%. Finally, silicon must be available at $10 to approximately $25/kg, depending on the yield assumed. These conclusions are the final results of the economic analysis. The progress towards the growth of 7.5 cm wide ribbon at 7.5 cm/min is discussed. Also, fluid flow phenomena have been investigated and it is shown that by utilization of such phenomena the impurity distribution in the ribbon may be manipulated to a significant extent. Also, using a somewhat novel ''EBIC'' technique it was demonstrated that the internal grain structure found previously in some ribbons grown at high speeds has virtually no influence on the performance of the material when made into a solar cell.

  18. Update: nuclear power program information and data, October-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.