WorldWideScience

Sample records for abnormal magnetic resonance

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, M.P.; Graham, T.P.; Mazer, M.J.; Campbell, R.M.; Partain, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging will not replace echocardiography as the simplest and most definitive method of establishing a noninvasive diagnosis in young patients with congenital cardiac malformations, nor will it replace radionuclide angiography for relatively noninvasive detection and quantitation of cardiac shunts. Magnetic resonance imaging is a complementary noninvasive imaging procedure that can answer some questions left in doubt by echocardiography (mainly extracardiac artery and vein assessments) or radionuclide angiography and used as a preferred follow-up imaging method in certain clinical circumstances. In addition, MRI can be a first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in older patients in whom adequate echo windows are not available. Angiocardiography remains necessary to provide vital physiological data, i.e., chamber pressures, shunt volumes, oxygen saturations, and pulmonary vascular resistance; however, MRI could negate some follow-up catheterizations in appropriate clinical circumstances. High-resolution proton MRI tomography should ultimately permit the accurate evaluation of ventricular volumes, myocardial mass, and the assessment of regional wall motion and ejection fractions. Paramagnetic substances such as manganese ion may ultimately provide a basis for myocardial perfusion imaging. The potential for MRI evaluation of tissue characterization, noninvasive blood-flow measurements, and myocardial metabolism assessment in intriguing and awaits clinical evaluation

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal pulmonary hila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.; Stark, D.D.; Moore, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hila were reviewed in 25 normal subjects and 12 patients with unilateral or bilateral hilar masses. On spin echo MR images in normal patients, collections of soft tissue large enough to be confused with an abnormally enlarged lymph node were seen in three locations. In patients with a hilar mass, the mass was differentiated from hilar vasculature more easily using MR than contrast-enhanced CT. However, because the spatial resolution of MR is inferior to that of CT, bronchi were difficult to evaulate using MR. Electrocardiographic-gated images showed better resolution of hilar structures but may not be necessary for large masses

  3. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos; Boasquevisque, Edson; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  4. Grey matter abnormalities in trichotillomania: morphometric magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Samuel R; Menzies, Lara A; Fineberg, Naomi A; Del Campo, Natalia; Suckling, John; Craig, Kevin; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W; Bullmore, Edward T; Sahakian, Barbara J

    2008-09-01

    Trichotillomania (repetitive hair-pulling) is an Axis I psychiatric disorder whose neurobiological basis is incompletely understood. Whole-brain trichotillomania neuroimaging studies are lacking. To investigate grey and white matter abnormalities over the whole brain in patients with trichotillomania. Eighteen patients with DSM-IV trichotillomania and 19 healthy controls undertook structural magnetic resonance imaging after providing written informed consent. Differences in grey and white matter were investigated using computational morphometry. Patients with trichotillomania showed increased grey matter densities in the left striatum, left amygdalo-hippocampal formation, and multiple (including cingulate, supplementary motor, and frontal) cortical regions bilaterally. Trichotillomania was associated with structural grey matter changes in neural circuitry implicated in habit learning, cognition and affect regulation. These findings inform animal models of the disorder and highlight key regions of interest for future translational research.

  5. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Younes-Mhenni; Mahdi, Kamoun; Baha, Zantour; Saida, Jerbi-Ommezine; Tahar, Sfar Mohamed; Habib, Sfar Mohamed

    2010-10-01

    A 15-yr-old male patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) was referred to our department with a one year history of gradual worsening of tremors. He was diagnosed with salt-wasting 21-hydroxylase deficiency CAH at 40 d old and was started on hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and salt. He was found to have hypertension at 8 yr of age. Detailed investigations failed to detect any cause for secondary hypertension. Physical findings on the current hospitalization objectified obesity, blood pressure of 150/80 mmHg, postural and action tremor, left cerebellar syndrome, reflex tetra pyramidal syndrome and mental decline. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral periventricular white matter hyperintensity that was more pronounced in the posterior regions and associated with cortico-subcortical atrophy and complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. All investigations for leukoencephalopathy were negative. A diagnosis of brain MRI abnormalities related to CAH was made, and the patient received symptomatic treatment of tremors. Our case report provides evidence of an increased frequency of brain MRI abnormalities in CAH. The literature suggests hormonal imbalance and exposure to excess exogenous glucocorticoids as main probable mechanisms. Thus, in clinical practice, CAH should be considered as one of the possible causes of brain white matter involvement associated with or without cerebral atrophy.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part I: Normal anatomy, imaging technique, and osseous abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Part I of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses normal elbow anatomy and the technical factors involved in obtaining high-quality magnetic resonance images of the elbow. Part I also discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with osseous abnormalities of the elbow. With proper patient positioning and imaging technique, magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the osseous structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and can be used to evaluate the size, location, stability, and viability of the osteochondritis dissecans fragment. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early stress injury to the proximal ulna in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect radiographically occult fractures of the elbow in both children and adults. Magnetic resonance imaging is also useful in children to further evaluate elbow fractures which are detected on plain-film radiographs. (orig.)

  7. Abnormal pulmonary vein drainage in upper right lobe associated with double aortic arch : magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busto, M.; Dolz, J.L.; Capdevilla, A.; Castanon, M.; Mulet, J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) findings in a case of abnormal pulmonary vein drainage from upper right lobe to superior vena cava, associated with double aortic arch, in a six-month-old boy. (Author) 9 refs

  8. Magnetic resonance image abnormality in migraine with aura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.K.; Batnitzky, S.; Barter, R.; McMillan, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 patients with migraine characterized by aura consisting of both visual symtoms and parasthesias. 15 headache-free individuals of the same age range were used as controls. Records were radomized and read in blind fashion by two neuroradiologists. Small subcortical white matter lesions were seen in three migraine cases and two controls. In one migraine case cortical infarctions were seen. In two controls, small areas of increased density similar to those in migraine were seen. No consistent correlation of migraine or its duration with cerebral atrophy was found. It is concluded that identification of both these MRI findings (small subcortical white lesions and cerebral atrophy) as significantly associated with migraine is doubtful. 21 refs., 2 figs

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, M. A.; Shakaouri Rad, A.; Motamedi, M.; Pakdaman, H.; Radue, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    :During the last two decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been widely used In the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of multiple sclerosis. MRI, both conventional and non conventional methods, has transformed all aspects of M S research and clinical practice in recent years. Although advanced imaging methods have added much more to our knowledge about pathogenesis and natural history of the disease but their cost, availability, complexity and lack of validation have limited their use in routine clinical practice. Conventional MR techniques including proton density, T1/T2-Weighted images and fluid- attenuated inversion recovery sequences are now accepted in standard protocols for diagnosis and treatment outcome measures in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis. This review will focus on the type, morphology and evolution of M S lesions regarding conventional MRI and their use for treatment monitoring in daily clinical practice

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Gallbladder: Spectrum of Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayes, K.M.; Oliveira, E.P.; Narra, V.R.; EL-Merhi, F.M.; Brown, J.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ of Michigan Health Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Various pathologies involving the gallbladder can manifest clinically, producing nonspecific clinical symptoms and making diagnosis difficult and challenging. Real-time sonography is the most widely used diagnostic study for the gallbladder and the primary screening examination of choice. With increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), gallbladder pathology is frequently seen. Understanding the basic patterns of various disease manifestations and appearance on MRI is the key to making an accurate diagnosis. Given its inherent tissue contrast and contrast sensitivity, MRI in conjunction with MRCP can be a very valuable test in evaluating gallbladder pathology. Gallbladder pathology can be classified into congenital (such as absence), inflammatory (acute, hemorrhagic, and chronic cholecystitis), traumatic, benign (polyps) and malignant tumors (gallbladder carcinoma and lymphoma), and other disease processes can be seen in cholelithiasis, cholesterosis, thickened gallbladder wall, and Mirrizzi syndrome.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okur, Gokcan [Etimesgut Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Chaney, Kimberly A. [Presence St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Elgin, IL (United States); Lomasney, Laurie M. [Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. The prevalence of post-vaccination complications is likely on the rise. Complications are well known to general clinicians, but are under-reported in the imaging literature. We present four cases of post-vaccination shoulder pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed. The most likely reason for a humeral intraosseous edema-like signal was presumed injection of vaccine substance directly into osseous structures that might lead to focal osteitis. In the published literature, there is little emphasis on the imaging of local injection site complications accompanying influenza vaccination. We intended to increase familiarity of MRI findings in the setting of prolonged or severe clinical symptoms following influenza vaccination through the imaging findings of these four cases. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, M. S.; Smit, L. M.; Barth, P. G.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C. E.; Brouwer, O. F.; Begeer, J. H.; de Coo, I. F.; Valk, J.

    1997-01-01

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderKnaap, MS; Smit, LME; Barth, PG; CatsmanBerrevoets, CE; Brouwer, OF; Begeer, JH; deCoo, IFM; Valk, J.

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (QID) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage abnormalities of the far posterior femoral condyle of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Shuhei; Huang, Thomas; Watanabe, Atsuya; Iranpour-Boroujeni, Tannaz; Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)), e-mail: hiroshi@uci.edu

    2010-01-15

    Background: Incidental articular cartilage lesions of the far posterior femoral condyle (FPFC) are commonly detected. Whether or not these cartilage lesions are symptomatic or clinically significant is unknown. Purpose: To characterize and assess prevalence of articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC and associated bone marrow edema (BME) and/or internal derangements through magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: 654 knee MR examinations were reviewed retrospectively. Sagittal fast spin-echo proton density-weighted images with and without fat suppression were acquired with a 1.5T scanner, and were evaluated by two readers by consensus. The following factors were assessed: 1) the prevalence of cartilage abnormalities, 2) laterality, 3) the type of cartilage abnormalities, 4) cartilage abnormality grading, 5) associated BME, 6) complications such as meniscal injury and cruciate ligament injury, and 7) knee alignment (femorotibial angle [FTA]). Results: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC were demonstrated in 157 of the 654 patients (24%). Of these, 40 patients demonstrated medial and lateral FPFC cartilage abnormalities and were thus counted as 80 cases. Focal lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 117 of 197 cases (59.4%), while diffuse lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 24 of 197 cases (12.2%). Focal medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 23 of 197 cases (11.6%), while diffuse medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 33 of 197 cases (16.8%). No statistically significant pattern of associated BME, FTA, or internal derangements including meniscal and cruciate ligament injury was demonstrated. Conclusion: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC are common and were demonstrated in 24% of patients or 30% of cases. Lateral FPFC abnormalities occur 2.5 times more frequently than medial FPFC abnormalities and were more frequently focal compared with medial cohorts. BME is associated in 36.5% of cases

  15. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  16. Vertebral venous system abnormalities identified with magnetic resonance imaging in sighthounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, John C; Durand, Alexane; Guevar, Julien; José-López, Roberto; Hammond, Gawain; Stalin, Catherine; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    In humans, abnormalities of the vertebral venous system are considered rare but significant causes of radiculopathy and myelopathy. Published information on abnormalities of the canine vertebral venous system is currently lacking. Aims of this retrospective descriptive study were to characterize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities of the vertebral venous system in a population of sighthounds, report prevalence of vertebral venous system abnormalities within that population and explore possible clinical significance. Our hospital database was searched over the period of 2002-2013 for sighthounds with MRI studies of the vertebral column. Medical records and MRI studies for included dogs were retrieved and findings were recorded by a single observer. A total of 92 sighthounds were sampled. Eleven cases (prevalence 12%) showed abnormal enlargement of the internal vertebral venous plexus (10/11 unilaterally, 1/11 bilaterally), external vertebral venous plexus (7/11 cases unilaterally), and/or intervertebral veins (8/11 unilaterally, 2/11 bilaterally, and 1/11 unilaterally and bilaterally at different sites). The majority of the abnormalities were right sided and the most common location for abnormalities was C6/7. Of the 11 cases, nine did not have a definitive diagnosis. Seven of those nine cases had an abnormality in a neuroanatomical localization that could wholly or partly explain the clinical signs. Findings indicated that, while the prevalence of vertebral venous system abnormalities was low in this sample of sighthounds, the majority of dogs with these abnormalities had clinical signs that matched the location of the abnormalities. Further prospective research is needed to investigate potential underlying aetiologies for vertebral venous system abnormalities in dogs and clarify their clinical significance. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  17. Magnetic resonance and cranial ultrasound characteristics of periventricular white matter abnormalities in newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Anne-Marie; Cornette, Luc; Ramenghi, Luca A.; Tanner, Steven F.; Arthur, Rosemary J.; Martinez, Delia; Levene, Malcolm I.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the range of abnormalities within the periventricular white matter (PVWM) in a cohort of newborns using magnetic resonance (MR) brain imaging and to compare the focal MR abnormalities with the cranial ultrasound (CUS) findings. METHODS: Retrospective study of MR brain and CUS findings of infants born in the 18-month period 1998-1999. PVWM abnormalities were identified by MR and focal lesions were characterized by size, number and distribution using a grading scale. Correspondence with CUS findings was assessed. RESULTS: 175 MR examinations corresponding to n = 105 preterm infants, (median GA 28, range 23-36 weeks) and n = 25 term infants (median GA 39, range 37-42 weeks) were analysed for PVWM abnormalities. In the preterm group, MR demonstrated a normal PVWM in n = 76, focal areas of altered signal intensity (SI) in PVWM in n = 26 and venous infarction inn 3. In the term group, MR demonstrated a normal PVWM in n = 15, focal areas of altered SI in PVWM in n = 4, oedematous PVWM in n = 2 and a middle cerebral artery infarction in n = 4. All infants with normal MR had normal CUS findings. A focal PVWM SI abnormality detectable on MR corresponded with an abnormality on CUS in only n = 10/30. CONCLUSIONS: MR appears considerably more sensitive than CUS in demonstrating the existence and extent of focal PVWM lesions in newborn infants. Satisfactory correspondence between the two imaging investigations is obtained only for cystic PVWM lesions. Childs, A.-M. et al. (2001)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of neonatal brain. Assessment of normal and abnormal findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Koh; Kadono, Naoko; Kawase, Shohji; Kihara, Minako; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Akihiko; Sawada, Tadashi (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-11-01

    To establish the normal MRI appearance of the neonatal brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 124 neonates who admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit. Degree of myelination, ventricular size, width of the extracerebral space and focal lesion in the brain were evaluated to investigate the relationship between MRI findings of neonatal brain and the neurological prognosis. 85 neonates underwent MRI both at neonatal period and at the corrected age of one year. The change of abnormal MRI findings was evaluated. 19 neonates had abnormal neurological outcome on subsequent examinations. Delayed myelination, ventriculomegaly and large extracerebral space were seen in 13, 7 and 9 neonates respectively. 4, 3 and 5 neonates out of them showed abnormal neurological prognosis respectively. Of the 19 neonates with focal lesion in MRI, 2 had parenchymal hematoma in the brain, 2 had subdural hematoma, 5 had chronic hematoma following subependymal hemorrhage, 6 had cystic formation following subependymal hemorrhage, 2 had subcortical leukomalacia, one had periventricular leukomalacia and one had cyst in the parenchyma of cerebellum. 4 neonates of 19 with focal lesion in MRI showed abnormal development. Of the neonates who had abnormal neurological prognosis, 7 neonates showed no abnormal finding in MRI at neonatal period. 3 of them had mild mental retardation. MRI shows promise in the neonatal period. It facilitates recognition of abnormalities of neonatal brain and may be used to predict abnormal neurologic outcome. However physiological change in the brain of neonates, especially of premature neonates, should be considered on interpreting these findings. Awareness of developmental features should help to minimize misinterpretation of normal changes in the neonatal brain. (author).

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of neonatal brain. Assessment of normal and abnormal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Koh; Kadono, Naoko; Kawase, Shohji; Kihara, Minako; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Akihiko; Sawada, Tadashi

    1994-01-01

    To establish the normal MRI appearance of the neonatal brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 124 neonates who admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit. Degree of myelination, ventricular size, width of the extracerebral space and focal lesion in the brain were evaluated to investigate the relationship between MRI findings of neonatal brain and the neurological prognosis. 85 neonates underwent MRI both at neonatal period and at the corrected age of one year. The change of abnormal MRI findings was evaluated. 19 neonates had abnormal neurological outcome on subsequent examinations. Delayed myelination, ventriculomegaly and large extracerebral space were seen in 13, 7 and 9 neonates respectively. 4, 3 and 5 neonates out of them showed abnormal neurological prognosis respectively. Of the 19 neonates with focal lesion in MRI, 2 had parenchymal hematoma in the brain, 2 had subdural hematoma, 5 had chronic hematoma following subependymal hemorrhage, 6 had cystic formation following subependymal hemorrhage, 2 had subcortical leukomalacia, one had periventricular leukomalacia and one had cyst in the parenchyma of cerebellum. 4 neonates of 19 with focal lesion in MRI showed abnormal development. Of the neonates who had abnormal neurological prognosis, 7 neonates showed no abnormal finding in MRI at neonatal period. 3 of them had mild mental retardation. MRI shows promise in the neonatal period. It facilitates recognition of abnormalities of neonatal brain and may be used to predict abnormal neurologic outcome. However physiological change in the brain of neonates, especially of premature neonates, should be considered on interpreting these findings. Awareness of developmental features should help to minimize misinterpretation of normal changes in the neonatal brain. (author)

  20. Usefulness of additional fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the prenatal diagnosis of congenital abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We, Ji Sun; Young, Lee; Park, In Yang; Shin, Jong Chul; Im, Soo Ah

    2012-12-01

    Our aim was to compare the value of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with detailed ultrasound in the prenatal diagnosis of congenital abnormalities. This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of pregnant women and their neonates who, after ultrasound, were suspected to have congenital abnormalities. They then underwent a detailed ultrasound examination and a fetal MRI in our institutions. Fetal MRI was performed in 81 cases. Each prenatal presumptive diagnosis, based on detailed ultrasound examination and fetal MRI, was compared with the postnatal confirmed diagnosis. In 58 cases, the data collected were confirmed by the postnatal diagnosis. Supplemental information from fetal MRI was useful in 17 of the 22 cases involving the central nervous system (CNS), two of two cases involving the thorax, nine of nine cases involving the genitourinary system, two of eight cases involving the gastrointestinal system, and ten of ten cases involving complex malformations. Fetal MRI did not provide significantly useful information or facilitate a more accurate diagnosis except for CNS abnormalities. Fetal MRI was not superior to an ultrasound examination in the prenatal detection of congenital abnormalities. A detailed ultrasound examination performed by experienced obstetricians had satisfactory accuracy in the diagnosis of fetal abnormalities compared with fetal MRI. Fetal MRI might be useful in appropriate cases in Korea. Greater effort is required to increase the ultrasound knowledge and skill of competent obstetricians.

  1. Uncomplicated obesity is associated with abnormal aortic function assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channon Keith M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims Obese subjects with insulin resistance and hypertension have abnormal aortic elastic function, which may predispose them to the development of left ventricular dysfunction. We hypothesised that obesity, uncomplicated by other cardiovascular risk factors, is independently associated with aortic function. Methods and results We used magnetic resonance imaging to measure aortic compliance, distensibility and stiffness index in 27 obese subjects (BMI 33 kg/m2 without insulin resistance and with normal cholesterol and blood pressure, and 12 controls (BMI 23 kg/m2. Obesity was associated with reduced aortic compliance (0.9 ± 0.1 vs. 1.5 ± 0.2 mm2/mmHg in controls, p -1 × 10-3, p Conclusion Aortic elastic function is abnormal in obese subjects without other cardiovascular risk factors. These findings highlight the independent importance of obesity in the development of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in congestive heart failure detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C W; Lee, J H; Kim, J J; Park, S W; Hong, M K; Kim, S T; Lim, T H; Park, S J

    1999-04-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we investigated cerebral metabolism and its determinants in congestive heart failure (CHF), and the effects of cardiac transplantation on these measurements. Few data are available about cerebral metabolism in CHF. Fifty patients with CHF (ejection fraction OGM) and parietal white matter (PWM). Absolute levels of the metabolites (N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol) were calculated. In PWM only creatine level was significantly lower in CHF than in control subjects, but in OGM all four metabolite levels were decreased in CHF. The creatine level was independently correlated with half-recovery time and duration of heart failure symptoms in PWM (r = -0.56, p OGM (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). Cerebral metabolic abnormalities were improved after successful cardiac transplantation. This study shows that cerebral metabolism is abnormally deranged in advanced CHF and it may serve as a potential marker of the disease severity.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nagata, Seiki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy. (author)

  4. Incidence and Evaluation of Incidental Abnormal Bone Marrow Signal on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan L. Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The increased use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has resulted in reports of incidental abnormal bone marrow (BM signal. Our goal was to determine the evaluation of an incidental abnormal BM signal on MRI and the prevalence of a subsequent oncologic diagnosis. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients over age 18 undergoing MRI between May 2005 and October 2010 at Tufts Medical Center (TMC with follow-up through November 2013. The electronic medical record was queried to determine imaging site, reason for scan, evaluation following radiology report, and final diagnosis. Results. 49,678 MRIs were done with 110 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Twenty two percent underwent some evaluation, most commonly a complete blood count, serum protein electrophoresis, or bone scan. With median follow-up of 41 months, 6% of patients were diagnosed with malignancies including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, and metastatic adenocarcinoma. One patient who had not undergone evaluation developed breast cancer 24 months after the MRI. Conclusions. Incidentally noted abnormal or heterogeneous bone marrow signal on MRI was not inconsequential and should prompt further evaluation.

  5. Prevalence of abnormal findings in magnetic resonance images of asymptomatic knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuta, Shoji; Masaki, Kunihiro; Korai, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    One hundred fifteen asymptomatic Japanese volunteers aged from 13 to 76 years were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate age-related meniscal degeneration and to determine the prevalence of discoid menisci. Each meniscus was graded in the anterior and posterior portions according to intrameniscal MRI signals. Discoid meniscus was diagnosed if a bow-tie configuration was noted on three or more contiguous sagittal sections. Meniscal abnormalities on MRI became more prevalent with age in both men and women. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus showed a significantly higher prevalence of degeneration than other parts of the meniscus. Discoid menisci were noted in 15 subjects (13% prevalence), always representing the lateral meniscus. Subchondral changes were observed in 13 subjects more than 40 years old, mostly women, and were located in the medial compartment. These abnormalities were not correlated with severity of degeneration in the posterior portion of the medial meniscus. This study demonstrates considerable prevalence of meniscal abnormalities in asymptomatic Japanese subjects. (author)

  6. Abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging in two patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Idit; Vinkler, Chana; Konen, Osnat; Kornreich, Liora; Steinberg, Tamar; Yeshaya, Josepha; Latarowski, Victoria; Shohat, Mordechai; Lev, Dorit; Baris, Hagit N

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable contiguous gene syndrome ascribed to an interstitial deletion in chromosome 17p11.2. Seventy percent of SMS patients have a common deletion interval spanning 3.5 megabases (Mb). Clinical features of SMS include characteristic mild dysmorphic features, ocular anomalies, short stature, brachydactyly, and hypotonia. SMS patients have a unique neurobehavioral phenotype that includes intellectual disability, self-injurious behavior and severe sleep disturbance. Little has been reported in the medical literature about anatomical brain anomalies in patients with SMS. Here we describe two patients with SMS caused by the common deletion in 17p11.2 diagnosed using chromosomal microarray (CMA). Both patients had a typical clinical presentation and abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. One patient had subependymal periventricular gray matter heterotopia, and the second had a thin corpus callosum, a thin brain stem and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. This report discusses the possible abnormal MRI images in SMS and reviews the literature on brain malformations in SMS. Finally, although structural brain malformations in SMS patients are not a common feature, we suggest baseline routine brain imaging in patients with SMS in particular, and in patients with chromosomal microdeletion/microduplication syndromes in general. Structural brain malformations in these patients may affect the decision-making process regarding their management. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Adrenal gland abnormalities detected by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, A A; El Desouky, S M; Awadallah, M Y; Megahed, D E

    2017-03-01

    Adrenal infarction is a rare complication of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The purpose of the current study is to detect and study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of adrenal glands in APS patients. In a cross-sectional study, the data of 20 patients with primary or secondary APS were compared to 20 SLE patients without antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) syndrome (controls). MRI of the abdomen showing the adrenal glands was performed. Of the patients, 80% were females with a mean age 32.45 ± 9.93 years, and mean disease duration of 46.65 ± 58.71 months. Adrenal gland abnormalities in the MRI study were detected in 35 % of APS patients vs. no abnormalities detected in the SLE controls. Adrenal gland enlargement was found in all patients (35 %). Capsular enhancement (infarction or hemorrhagic infarction) was found in 5 patients, increased stranding of the surrounding fat planes (inflammatory process) in 4 patients and increased signal on T1WI and T2WI (hemorrhage) in 3 patients. In patients with adrenal gland involvement, 71.4 % had triple aPL positivity compared to 23.1 % in patients with normal adrenal findings (p = 0.04). Adrenal gland abnormalities on MRI were detected in 35 % of the APS patients (whether primary or secondary); thus, increased focus on management is needed. This percentage is not small and needs to be focused on in terms of management.

  8. Abnormal Default-Mode Network Activation in Cirrhotic Patients: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jiang Zhang; Guifen Yang; Jianzhong Yin; Yawu Liu; Ji Qi [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin Medical Univ., Tianjin (China)

    2007-09-15

    Background: Recently, increasing numbers of studies have demonstrated that, in humans, a default-mode functional network exists in the resting state. Abnormal default-mode network in various diseases has been reported; however, no report concerning hepatic cirrhosis has been published to date. Purpose: To prospectively explore whether the resting-state network in patients with hepatic cirrhosis is abnormal or not, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Material and Methods: 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis (12 male, two female; 45{+-}9 years) and 14 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (12 male, two female; 42{+-}10 years) participated in a blocked-design fMRI study. A modified Stroop task with Chinese characters was used as the target stimulus. Statistical Parametric Mapping 99 software was employed to process the functional data. Individual maps and group data were generated for patients with hepatic cirrhosis and for healthy controls, respectively. Intergroup analysis between patients and healthy controls was also generated using the two-sample t-test model. Cluster analyses were done based on the group data, and an identical P value 0.01 with continuously connected voxels of no less than 10 was defined as significant deactivation. After fMRI scanning was complete, behavioral Stroop interference tests were performed on all subjects; reaction time and error number were recorded. Results: Functionally, deactivation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus was absent when subjects performed the incongruous word-reading task; deactivation of the PCC, precuneus, and ventral medial prefrontal cortex was increased when they performed the incongruous color-naming task. Conclusion: The functional as well as behavioral data suggest that cirrhotic patients may have an abnormal deactivation mode. The absence of deactivation in the PCC and precuneus may be a sensitive rather than specific marker in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

  9. Correlative magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of aortic and pulmonary artery abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risius, B.; O' Donnell, J.K.; Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; George, C.R.; Graor, R.A.; Moodie, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields excellent quality images of the cardiovascular system utilizing the inherent natural contrast between flowing blood and the surrounding anatomic structures. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of MRI in the noninvasive diagnosis of large vessel disorders, the authors have performed MRI on 40 pts with either aortic or pulmonary artery abnormalities (18 thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, 8 aorto-occlusive disease, 6 dissecting aneurysms, 4 Marfan's syndrome, 2 pulmonary artery aneurysms 1 pulmonary artery occlusion, 1 aortic coarctation). Images were obtained in the transverse, coronal and sagital body planes utilizing a 0.6T superconductive magnet. Cardiac and/or respiratory gating was employed in most cases. Correlation was made for all studies with conventional or digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography, and/or ultrasound. The diagnostic information obtained by MRI equaled or exceeded that obtained by other imaging techniques except for the few cases where cardiac arrhythmias precluded adequate gated acquisition. All aneurysms and their relationships to adjacent structures were readily demonstrated as were the presence or absence of mural thrombi and dissecting intimal flaps. Angiographically demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques and luminal stenoses were seen by MRI in all patients without arrhythmias. The authors concluded that MRI is a powerful noninvasive diagnostic aid in the delineation of large vessel disorders, especially where knowledge of anatomic interrelationships can guide surgical or other interventional planning.

  10. The spectrum of cranial ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, L. S.; Gunardi, H.; Barth, P. G.; Bok, L. A.; Verboon-Maciolek, M. A.; Groenendaal, F.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can lead to severe neurological sequelae and (progressive) sensorineural deafness. Neonatal imaging data is mainly based on cranial ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). The additional value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in

  11. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography; Alteracoes parenquimatosas na trombose venosa cerebral: aspectos da ressonancia magnetica e da angiorressonancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: csferreira@superig.com.br; Boasquevisque, Edson [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de [Hospital da Beneficencia Portuguesa do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Imagem. Setor de Ressonancia Magnetica

    2006-09-15

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  12. Reward abnormalities among women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric

    2011-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa show abnormal neural activation in response to food intake and anticipated food intake relative to healthy control women. Females with and without full/subthreshold bulimia nervosa recruited from the community (N = 26) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless control solution. Women with bulimia nervosa showed trends for less activation than healthy controls in the right anterior insula in response to anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake (vs. tasteless solution) and in the left middle frontal gyrus, right posterior insula, right precentral gyrus, and right mid dorsal insula in response to consumptions of milkshake (vs. tasteless solution). Bulimia nervosa may be related to potential hypofunctioning of the brain reward system, which may lead these individuals to binge eat to compensate for this reward deficit, though the hypo-responsivity might be a result of a history of binge eating highly palatable foods. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal visual system in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A.P.; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Rostrup, Egill

    2000-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in young children may provide information about the development of the visual cortex, and may have predictive value for later visual performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of fMRI for examining cerebral processing of visi...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of surgically proven medial meniscus root tear: tear configuration and associated knee abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Gu; Shim, Jae-Chan; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of medial meniscal root tear and the correlation of medial meniscal root tear with other associated knee abnormalities. We retrospectively assessed preoperative magnetic resonance images of 39 patients with arthroscopically confirmed medial meniscal root tear. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were retrospectively reviewed by 2 experienced musculoskeletal radiologists for consensus. We evaluated the configuration of meniscal root tear and the other associated knee abnormalities on MRI for direct correlation with arthroscopic findings. At arthroscopy, there were 36 radial tears and 3 complex tears involving the medial meniscal posterior horn roots. All 36 radial tears could be correctly diagnosed by MRI, with findings showing ghost sign on sagittal images in 100% (36/36), vertical linear defect on coronal images in 100% (36/36), and radial linear defect on axial image in 94% (34/36). However, all 3 complex tears were misdiagnosed as radial tears on MRI. Medial meniscal root tears displayed a strong association with degenerative joint disease in 97% (38/39). Medial meniscal root tears were also found in association with cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions (> or =3 mm) in 89% (34/38) and 67% (26/39), respectively. Medial meniscal root tears were usually posterior horn root radial tear. A high association with degenerative joint disease, cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle, and medial meniscal extrusions (>/=3 mm) were also noted.

  15. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan; Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth; Hollis, Sally; Yates, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal visual system in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A.P.; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Rostrup, Egill

    2000-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in young children may provide information about the development of the visual cortex, and may have predictive value for later visual performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of fMRI for examining cerebral processing of vision...... in very young infants and in infants with brain damage. We examined 15 preterm infants, 12 children suspected of having a cerebral visual impairment and 10 children with a normal visual system, all of whom were either spontaneously asleep or sedated with chloral hydrate. Cortical response to stroboscopic...... light stimulation could be demonstrated in all technically acceptable data sets from children with a post-menstrual age (PMA) of > 41 weeks, but not in younger infants. Children children...

  17. Thalamic metabolic abnormalities in patients with Huntington's disease measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casseb, R.F.; Castellano, G., E-mail: gabriela@ifi.unicamp.br [Cooperacao Interinstitucional de Apoio a Pesquisas sobre o Cerebro (Programa CInAPCe), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Dept. de Raios Cosmicos e Cronologia; D' Abreu, A.; Cendes, F. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia. Lab. de Neuroimagem; Cooperacao Interinstitucional de Apoio a Pesquisas sobre o Cerebro (Programa CInAPCe), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ruocco, H.H. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia. Lab. de Neuroimagem; Lopes-Cendes, I., E-mail: seixas.fk@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Genetica Medica; Cooperacao Interinstitucional de Apoio a Pesquisas sobre o Cerebro (Programa CInAPCe), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurologic disorder that is not completely understood; its fundamental physiological mechanisms and chemical effects remain somewhat unclear. Among these uncertainties, we can highlight information about the concentrations of brain metabolites, which have been widely discussed. Concentration differences in affected, compared to healthy, individuals could lead to the development of useful tools for evaluating the progression of disease, or to the advance of investigations of different/alternative treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the thalamic concentration of metabolites in HD patients and healthy individuals using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We used a 2.0-Tesla magnetic field, repetition time of 1500 ms, and echo time of 135 ms. Spectra from 40 adult HD patients and 26 control subjects were compared. Quantitative analysis was performed using the LCModel method. There were statistically significant differences between HD patients and controls in the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAA+NAAG; t-test, P,0.001), and glycerophosphocholine+phosphocholine (GPC+PCh; t-test, P=0.001) relative to creatine+phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr). The NAA+NAAG/Cr+PCr ratio was decreased by 9% and GPC+PCh/Cr+PCr increased by 17% in patients compared with controls. There were no correlations between the concentration ratios and clinical features. Although these results could be caused by T1 and T2 changes, rather than variations in metabolite concentrations given the short repetition time and long echo time values used, our findings point to thalamic dysfunction, corroborating prior evidence. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum abnormalities in patients with different subtypes of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Unlu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reductions in the size of the corpus callosum (CC have been described for schizophrenia patients, but little is known about the possible regional differences in schizophrenia subtypes (paranoid, disorganised, undifferentiated, residual.  Methods. We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions, CC length and total brain volume were compared between schizophrenia subtypes and controls. Five subregions were approximately matched to fibre pathways from cortical regions.  Results. Schizophrenia patients had reduced CC total area and length when compared with controls. Disorganised and undifferentiated schizophrenics had a smaller prefrontal area, while there was no significant difference for the paranoid and residual groups. The premotor/supplementary motor area was smaller in all schizophrenia subtypes. The motor area was smaller only in the disorganised group. A smaller sensory area was found in all subtypes except the residual group. Parietal, temporal and occipital areas were smaller in the paranoid and undifferentiated groups. Total brain volume was smaller in all schizophrenia subtypes compared with controls, but did not reach statistical significance.  Conclusion. These findings suggest that the heterogeneity of symptoms may lead to the different CC morphological characteristics in schizophrenia subtypes.

  19. In vivo magnetic resonance studies reveal neuroanatomical and neurochemical abnormalities in the serine racemase knockout mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Matthew D; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Jensen, J Eric; Gillis, Timothy E; Konopaske, Glenn T; Kaufman, Marc J; Coyle, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    Decreased availability of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist D-serine is thought to promote NMDAR hypofunction and contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, including neuroanatomical abnormalities, such as cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement, and neurochemical abnormalities, such as aberrant glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling. It is thought that these abnormalities directly relate to the negative symptoms and cognitive impairments that are hallmarks of the disorder. Because of the genetic complexity of schizophrenia, animal models of the disorder are extremely valuable for the study of genetically predisposing factors. Our laboratory developed a transgenic mouse model lacking serine racemase (SR), the synthetic enzyme of d-serine, polymorphisms of which are associated with schizophrenia. Null mutants (SR-/-) exhibit NMDAR hypofunction and cognitive impairments. We used 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton spectroscopy (MRS) to compare in vivo brain structure and neurochemistry in wildtype (WT) and SR-/- mice. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane for MRI and MRS scans. Compared to WT controls, SR-/- mice exhibited 23% larger ventricular volumes (pcomparable to those previously reported in humans with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal Spontaneous Brain Activity in Patients With Anisometropic Amblyopia Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Angcang; Chen, Taolin; Zhang, Junran; Gong, Qiyong; Liu, Longqian

    2017-09-01

    To explore the abnormality of spontaneous activity in patients with anisometropic amblyopia under resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Rs-fMRI). Twenty-four participants were split into two groups. The anisometropic amblyopia group had 10 patients, all of whom had anisometropic amblyopia of the right eye, and the control group had 14 healthy subjects. All participants underwent Rs-fMRI scanning. Measurement of amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the brain, which is a measure of the amplitudes of spontaneous brain activity, was used to investigate brain changes between the anisometropic amblyopia and control groups. Compared with an age- and gender-matched control group, the anisometropic amblyopia group showed increased amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of spontaneous brain activity in the left superior temporal gyrus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left pons, and the right inferior semi-lunar lobe. The anisometropic amblyopia group also showed decreased amplitude of low frequency fluctuations in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus. This study demonstrated abnormal spontaneous brain activities in patients with anisometropic amblyopia under Rs-fMRI, and these abnormalities might contribute to the neuropathological mechanisms of anisometropic amblyopia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54(5):303-310.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance in Anderson-Fabry disease. Evidence for a disease specific abnormality of the myocardial interstitium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James C C; Sachdev, Bhavesh; Elkington, Andrew G; McKenna, William J; Mehta, Atul; Pennell, Dudley J; Leed, Philip J; Elliott, Perry M

    2003-12-01

    Anderson-Fabry Disease (AFD), an X-linked disorder of sphingolipid metabolism, is a cause of idiopathic left ventricular hypertrophy but the mechanism of hypertrophy is poorly understood. Gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance can detect focal myocardial fibrosis. We hypothesised that hyperenhancement would be present in AFD. Eighteen males (mean 43+/-14 years) and eight female heterozygotes (mean 48+/-12 years) with AFD underwent cine and late gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Nine male (50%) had myocardial hyperenhancement ranging from 3.4% to 20.6% (mean 7.7+/-5.7%) of total myocardium; in males, percentage hyperenhancement related to LV mass index (r=0.78, P=0.0002) but not to ejection fraction or left ventricular volumes. Lesser hyperenhancement was also found in four (50%) heterozygous females (mean 4.6%). In 12 (92%) patients with abnormal gadolinium uptake, hyperenhancement occurred in the basal infero-lateral wall where, unlike myocardial infarction, it was not sub-endocardial. In two male patients with severe LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy) and systolic impairment there was additional hyperenhancement in other myocardial segments. These observations suggests that myocardial fibrosis occurs in AFD and may contribute to the hypertrophy and the natural history of the disease.

  2. Levothyroxine improves abnormal cardiac bioenergetics in subclinical hypothyroidism: a cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathil, Asgar; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Blamire, Andrew M; Razvi, Salman; Newton, Julia L; Taylor, Roy; Weaver, Jolanta U

    2015-04-01

    It is well established that subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is associated with mild cardiac dysfunction, but it is unknown whether there is an underlying impairment of cardiac bioenergetic function. The objective of the study was to quantify the cardiac phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate ratio (PCr to ATP) in SCH, compared with healthy controls, and to measure the effect of 6 months of levothyroxine treatment. This was a 6-month, prospective, case-controlled interventional study. The PCr to ATP ratio was measured using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in subjects with SCH at baseline and after levothyroxine therapy (1.6 μg/kg · d) and compared with age- and gender-matched euthyroid controls. All subjects were free of overt heart disease. Twenty-one subjects with SCH (normal free T4 and serum TSH between 4.1 and 10 mIU/L) and 17 controls were matched for age (mean age 40.5 vs 43.3 y) and sex (females 81% vs 82%) but differed in mean TSH (6.5 vs 2.1 mIU/L, P levothyroxine treatment, the PCr to ATP ratio improved (from 1.74 ± 0.24 to 1.91 ± 0.26, P = .004) and approached controls (borderline loss of significance, P = .051). On multivariate analysis, SCH was independently associated with a reduced PCr to ATP ratio, even after adjusting for confounding variables (body mass index and fasting glucose) (P = .001). Our results demonstrate early cardiac bioenergetic impairment in SCH, which is reversible with levothyroxine therapy. This mechanistic insight provides justification for longitudinal trials to determine whether improvement in bioenergetic function improves cardiovascular outcome.

  3. [Magnetic resonance imaging as a prenatal diagnostic tool supplementary to ultrasound in diagnosing fetal and gestational abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Shay; Agid, Ronit; Elchalal, Uriel; Ezra, Yossi; Gomori, J Moshe; Nadjari, Michelle

    2002-04-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as a prenatal and gestational imaging modality supplementary to ultrasound has become widespread with the advent of rapid MR sequences in the last few years. These sequences allow acquisition of high-resolution images of the fetus in a single breath-holding period of the mother, with minimal fetal motion artifacts. We describe our experience with this modality in the diagnosis of prenatal and gestational abnormalities. The study population consisted of 39 pregnant women who had a total of 40 MRI examinations from 7/1998 to 7/2000. The indication for all examinations was a suspected fetal or gestational abnormality as suggested by ultrasound scan, laboratory tests or by family history. In 31 cases (77.5%) a correlation was found between the ultrasound findings and the MR imaging, of which in 6 cases (15%) the MRI added new valuable information. In 9 cases (22.5%) the MRI ruled out findings suspected by ultrasound. The prenatal findings were compared with postnatal clinical follow-up, imaging or pathology report in 26 cases (66.6%). In two cases the clinical outcome and postnatal imaging were discordant with the prenatal imaging findings in ultrasound and MRI. Although not proven, MRI is considered safe during pregnancy because it does not use ionizing radiation. It depicts fetal anatomy and pathology well. Also uterine, placental and other maternal structures are well demonstrated. This tool is useful in cases in which there is a suspicion of a malformed fetus or abnormal placenta by an ultrasound examination or in cases in which an ultrasound examination is limited by technical factors. MRI was found to help parents and doctors decide about the fate of a suspected abnormal pregnancy by adding valuable information supplemental to ultrasound examination.

  4. Diffuse phalangeal signal abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging: phalangeal microgeodic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Emery, Kathleen H.; Merrow, Arnold C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Phalangeal microgeodic disease is a rare and benign self-limited condition involving the phalanges, often in the setting of cold exposure, with characteristic MR imaging abnormalities. Radiographic case descriptions are predominantly from Asia and Europe, with only seven cases using MR to characterize phalangeal microgeodic disease. In this study we describe the MR imaging appearance of unusual and striking phalangeal signal abnormality compatible with phalangeal microgeodic disease at our institution in North America. We retrospectively reviewed cases presenting at our institution with unusual or unexplained phalangeal signal abnormalities between 2001 and 2014. We reviewed the MR imaging appearances in conjunction with radiographs and any other available imaging investigations. Of 189 examinations reviewed during the study period, 8 imaging studies in 6 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Signal abnormality was present in 57 of 112 phalanges (51%), frequently involving the distal phalanges (70%, 28 of 40), followed by the middle phalanges (56%, 18 of 32) and the proximal phalanges (28%, 11 of 40). The pattern of involvement was most commonly diaphysis (38%), followed by metaphysis (32%) and epiphysis (30%). The extent of MR signal abnormality was greater than that suspected based on clinical presentation or on radiographs. The presence of unexplained diffuse characteristic marrow involvement of multiple painful phalanges on MR images, often in the setting of cold exposure, should raise the possibility of phalangeal microgeodic disease. Consideration of this diagnosis based on MR findings would lead to a more conservative management and avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging changes of sacroiliac joints in patients with recent-onset inflammatory back pain: inter-reader reliability and prevalence of abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuft-Dorenbosch, Liesbeth; Weijers, René; Landewé, Robert; van der Linden, Sjef; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2006-01-01

    To study the inter-reader reliability of detecting abnormalities of sacroiliac (SI) joints in patients with recent-onset inflammatory back pain by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to study the prevalence of inflammation and structural changes at various sites of the SI joints. Sixty-eight

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of carotid artery abnormalities in patients with sphenoid sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei Shan, Tao Yuan (Taiwan); Bilaniuk, L.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Simon, E.M.; Pollock, A.N. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Sphenoid sinusitis is unusual in children, but when it occurs, it can lead to serious intracranial complications. We show the value of MRI in demonstrating intracranial abnormalities due to sphenoid sinus infection, particularly those involving the internal carotid arteries and cavernous sinuses. We reviewed our imaging experience of sphenoid sinusitis and found four patients with ICA narrowing who had undergone MR evaluation including conventional and diffusion imaging. MR angiography was also performed in three patients to determine the extent of ICA narrowing. Narrowing of ICA was found in the cavernous segment in all patients and in the supraclinoid segment in three. Cerebral infarction was found in two patients. In one patient the cavernous sinus showed hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images and hypointensity on apparent diffusion coefficient map, suggesting reduced diffusion. Although infrequent in children, sphenoid sinus infection should be considered as a possible cause of intracranial infection, particularly in teenagers. Early recognition of cavernous sinus involvement and ICA narrowing may lead to prompt treatment and hence a more favorable outcome. (orig.)

  7. Metabolic abnormalities of gastrointestinal mucosa in celiac disease: An in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uma; Upadhyay, Deepti; Mewar, Sujeet; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Dwivedi, Sada Nand; Makharia, Govind K; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease (CeD) is a common autoimmune disorder in which ingestion of gluten and related proteins leads to inflammation in the small intestine. Although the histological findings in CeD are characteristic, they are not specific. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the differences in metabolic profile of duodenal mucosal biopsies of patients with CeD and controls to find out the biomarker/s of villous atrophy. Duodenal mucosal biopsies were collected from 29 CeD patients (mean age 26.2 ± 10.8 years) and 17 controls (mean age 34.1 ± 11.1 years) and were subjected to proton NMR spectroscopy following perchloric acid extraction. Assignment of metabolite resonances was carried out and their concentrations were determined. For comparison between the groups unpaired t-test/Wilcoxon rank sum test was used. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis was performed to study the clustering behavior of the samples from CeD patients and controls using the Unscrambler 10.2 software. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis clearly differentiated CeD patients from controls. Significantly higher concentrations of isoleucine, leucine, aspartate, succinate, and pyruvate, and lower concentration of glycerophosphocholine, were observed in the duodenal mucosa of CeD patients compared with controls. The results suggest abnormalities in glycolysis, Krebs cycle (energy deficiency), and amino acid metabolism, which may affect the biosynthetic pathways and consequently contribute to villous atrophy. NMR spectroscopy with multivariate analysis of duodenal mucosal biopsies revealed a characteristic metabolic profile in CeD patients. The work provided an insight in determining biomarker/s for villous atrophy and diagnosis of CeD patients. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Evolution of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signal Abnormality in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, With Histopathological Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmenger, Laura; Porter, Marie-Claire; Carswell, Christopher J; Thompson, Andrew; Mead, Simon; Rudge, Peter; Collinge, John; Brandner, Sebastian; Jäger, Hans R; Hyare, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases represent the archetype of brain diseases caused by protein misfolding, with the most common subtype being sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a rapidly progressive dementia. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has emerged as the most sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for the diagnosis of sCJD, but few studies have assessed the evolution of MRI signal as the disease progresses. To assess the natural history of the MRI signal abnormalities on DWI in sCJD to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and to investigate the potential of DWI as a biomarker of disease progression, with histopathological correlation. Gray matter involvement on DWI was assessed among 37 patients with sCJD in 26 cortical and 5 subcortical subdivisions per hemisphere using a semiquantitative scoring system of 0 to 2 at baseline and follow-up. A total brain score was calculated as the summed scores in the individual regions. In 7 patients, serial mean diffusivity measurements were obtained. Age at baseline MRI, disease duration, atrophy, codon 129 methionine valine polymorphism, Medical Research Council Rating Scale score, and histopathological findings were documented. The study setting was the National Prion Clinic, London, England. All participants had a probable or definite diagnosis of sCJD and had at least 2 MRI studies performed during the course of their illness. The study dates were October 1, 2008 to April 1, 2012. The dates of our analysis were January 19 to April 20, 2012. Correlation of regional and total brain scores with disease duration. Among the 37 patients with sCJD in this study there was a significant increase in the number of regions demonstrating signal abnormality during the study period, with 59 of 62 regions showing increased signal intensity (SI) at follow-up, most substantially in the caudate and putamen (P disease duration (r = 0.47, P = .003 at baseline and r = 0.35, P = .03 at follow-up), and the left

  9. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  10. Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients Without Severe Septal Hypertrophy: Implications of Mitral Valve and Papillary Muscle Abnormalities Assessed Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parag; Dhillon, Ashwat; Popovic, Zoran B; Smedira, Nicholas G; Rizzo, Jessica; Thamilarasan, Maran; Agler, Deborah; Lytle, Bruce W; Lever, Harry M; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-07-01

    In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction, but without basal septal hypertrophy, we sought to identify mitral valve (MV) and papillary muscle (PM) abnormalities that predisposed to LVOT obstruction, using echo and cardiac magnetic resonance. We studied 121 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (age, 49±17 years; 60% men; 57% on β-blockers) with a basal septal thickness of ≤1.8 cm who underwent echocardiography (rest+stress) and cine cardiac magnetic resonance. Echo measurements included maximal LVOT gradient (rest/provocable), MV leaflet length (parasternal long, 4 and 3-chamber views), and abnormal chordal attachment to mid/base of anterior MV. Cine cardiac magnetic resonance measurements included basal septal thickness, number/area of PM heads, and bifid PM mobility (in systole and diastole). Mean basal septal thickness, LVOT gradient, and LV ejection fraction were 1.5±0.3 cm, 72±54 mm Hg, and 61±6%, respectively. The number of anterolateral and posteromedial PM heads was 2.7±0.7 and 2.6±0.7, respectively. Anterolateral and posteromedial PM areas were 19.9±7 cm(2) and 17.1±6 cm(2), respectively. PM mobility was 11±6°. On multivariable analysis, predictors of maximal LVOT gradient were basal septal thickness, bifid PM mobility, anterior mitral leaflet length, and abnormal chordal attachment to base of anterior mitral leaflet. Forty-five patients underwent surgery to relieve LVOT obstruction, of which 52% needed an additional nonmyectomy (MV repair/replacement or PM reorientation) approach. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients without significant LV hypertrophy, in addition to basal septal thickness, anterior MV length, abnormal chordal attachment, and bifid PM mobility are associated with LVOT obstruction. In such patients, additional procedures on MV and PM (±myectomy) could be considered. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with echocardiography in the evaluation of pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with tetralogy of Fallot following palliative and corrective surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, S.B.; Crisci, K.L.; Koenig, P.; Robinson, B.; Anisman, P.; Russo, P. [St. Christopher`s Hospital for Children, Front Street at Erie Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19134 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Background. Abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries following palliative or corrective surgery for tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) are common. Our purpose was to compare the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography in the post- operative evaluation of the pulmonary arteries in children with TOF. Objective. Our hypothesis was that MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography in the detection of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with TOF. Materials and methods. Pulmonary artery MRI and echocardiography were performed in 20 children following palliative and/or corrective surgery for TOF. MRI and echocardiography were compared in their ability to detect abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries. Angiographic or surgical correlation was available in 15 children. A perfusion scan for confirmation of pulmonary artery patency was available in one additional child. Results. Abnormalities of the branch pulmonary arteries identified by MRI included: absence or occlusion (2), focal stenosis (15), hypoplasia (2), aneurysm (1), and non-confluence (1). Echocardiography could not adequately visualize the right and left branch pulmonary arteries in eight and ten children, respectively. Echocardiography missed stenosis in 13 branch pulmonary arteries, patency of hypoplastic pulmonary arteries in two children, non-confluence of the pulmonary arteries in one child, and a left pulmonary artery aneurysm in one child. Abnormalities identified by MRI were confirmed in 16 children by angiography, surgery or perfusion scan. Conclusion. MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography for the evaluation of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children following surgery for TOF. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 11 refs.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with echocardiography in the evaluation of pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with tetralogy of Fallot following palliative and corrective surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, S.B.; Crisci, K.L.; Koenig, P.; Robinson, B.; Anisman, P.; Russo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries following palliative or corrective surgery for tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) are common. Our purpose was to compare the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography in the post- operative evaluation of the pulmonary arteries in children with TOF. Objective. Our hypothesis was that MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography in the detection of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with TOF. Materials and methods. Pulmonary artery MRI and echocardiography were performed in 20 children following palliative and/or corrective surgery for TOF. MRI and echocardiography were compared in their ability to detect abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries. Angiographic or surgical correlation was available in 15 children. A perfusion scan for confirmation of pulmonary artery patency was available in one additional child. Results. Abnormalities of the branch pulmonary arteries identified by MRI included: absence or occlusion (2), focal stenosis (15), hypoplasia (2), aneurysm (1), and non-confluence (1). Echocardiography could not adequately visualize the right and left branch pulmonary arteries in eight and ten children, respectively. Echocardiography missed stenosis in 13 branch pulmonary arteries, patency of hypoplastic pulmonary arteries in two children, non-confluence of the pulmonary arteries in one child, and a left pulmonary artery aneurysm in one child. Abnormalities identified by MRI were confirmed in 16 children by angiography, surgery or perfusion scan. Conclusion. MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography for the evaluation of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children following surgery for TOF. (orig.)

  13. The value of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics and prediction of morbidity in cases of placenta previa with abnormal placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algebally, Ahmed M; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Badr, Sanaa Sayed Hussein; Al Obeidly, Amal; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Al Ibrahim, Abdullah A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostics and management of abnormal placentation in women with placenta previa and to compare the morbidity associated with that to placenta previa alone. The study includes 100 pregnant women with placenta previa with and without abnormal placentation. The results of MRI and US in abnormal placentation were compared with post-operative data. The patients' files were reviewed for assessment of operative and post-operative morbidity. The results of our statistical analysis were compared with data from the literature. US and MRI showed no significant difference in sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing abnormal placentation (97-100% and 94-100%, respectively). MRI was more sensitive than US for the detection of myometrial invasion and the type of abnormal placentation (73.5% and 47%, respectively). The difference between pre- and post-operative hemoglobin values and estimated blood loss were the most significant risk factors for abnormal placentation, added to risk factors known for placenta previa. Post-partum surgical complications and prolonged hospital stay were more common in the cases of placenta previa with abnormal placentation, however statistically insignificant. US and MRI are accurate imaging modalities for diagnosing abnormal placentation. MRI was more sensitive for the detection of the degree of placental invasion. The patient's morbidity increased in cases with abnormal placentation. There was no significant difference in post operative-complications and hospitalization time due to pre-operative planning when the diagnosis was established with US and MRI.

  14. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N.; MacManus, D.G.; Collinge, J.

    2006-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  15. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  16. Prognostic value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in near drowning patients: reversibility of the early metabolite abnormalities relates with a good outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragao, Maria de Fatima Vasco; Law, Meng; Prola Netto, Joao; Naidich, Thomas [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology], e-mail: aragao@truenet.com; Valenca, Marcelo Moraes [Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Studies

    2009-03-15

    In two children with near drowning hypoxic encephalopathy and normal-appearing structural MRI, acute proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) showed biochemical alterations that correctly indicated prognosis and helped to guide management decisions. Elevation of the lipid-lactate and glutamine-glutamate peaks, on the early (72 hour) {sup 1}H MRS, predicts a poor prognosis. Absence of lipid-lactate and glutamine-glutamate peaks on the early {sup 1}H MRS and reversibility of early mild metabolite abnormalities on follow up examination relates with good outcome. (author)

  17. Prognostic value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in near drowning patients: reversibility of the early metabolite abnormalities relates with a good outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, Maria de Fatima Vasco; Law, Meng; Prola Netto, Joao; Naidich, Thomas; Valenca, Marcelo Moraes

    2009-01-01

    In two children with near drowning hypoxic encephalopathy and normal-appearing structural MRI, acute proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) showed biochemical alterations that correctly indicated prognosis and helped to guide management decisions. Elevation of the lipid-lactate and glutamine-glutamate peaks, on the early (72 hour) 1 H MRS, predicts a poor prognosis. Absence of lipid-lactate and glutamine-glutamate peaks on the early 1 H MRS and reversibility of early mild metabolite abnormalities on follow up examination relates with good outcome. (author)

  18. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  19. Female emotional eaters show abnormalities in consummatory and anticipatory food reward: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric; Spoor, Sonja

    2009-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that emotional eaters show greater neural activation in response to food intake and anticipated food intake than nonemotional eaters and whether these differences are amplified during a negative versus neutral mood state. Female emotional eaters and nonemotional eaters (N = 21) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless control solution while in a negative and neutral mood. Emotional eaters showed greater activation in the parahippocampal gyrus and anterior cingulate (ACC) in response to anticipated receipt of milkshake and greater activation in the pallidum, thalamus, and ACC in response to receipt of milkshake during a negative relative to a neutral mood. In contrast, nonemotional eaters showed decreased activation in reward regions during a negative versus a neutral mood. Results suggest that emotional eating is related to increased anticipatory and consummatory food reward, but only during negative mood. (c) 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Clinical significance of abnormal high signal intensity of left ventricular myocardium by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koito, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Junichi; Nakamori, Hisato; Ohkubo, Naohiko; Wakayama, Yuka; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Inada, Mitsuo; Katoh, Tsumotu [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    The significance of abnormal high signal intensity observed in left ventricular myocardium by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients was assessed by comparison with T{sub 1}-weighted MR imaging, thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) myocardial scintigraphy, radionuclide angiocardiography, M-mode echocardiography, electrocardiography, and chest radiography. The 16 patients were divided into three groups: 8 patients (group I) with abnormal high signal intensity before and after Gd-DTPA enhancement, 4 (group II) with abnormal high signal intensity only after enhancement and 4 (group III) without abnormal high signal intensity. Thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed abnormalities of regional {sup 201}Tl uptake in the left ventricular myocardium in 4 patients in Group I, 3 in group II, and one in Group III. No significant difference in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was seen between groups I, II, and III (64{+-}13%, 67{+-}17% and 71{+-}7%) although 3 patients in group I had LVEF of less than 55%. Left ventricular peak filling rates (PFR) of groups I and II were significantly lower than group III (1.90{+-}0.44, 2.41{+-}0.43 and 3.37{+-}0.48 EDV/sec). Group I had larger end-diastolic left ventricular dimension (LVDd), significantly larger end-systolic left ventricular dimension (LVDs), and smaller % fractional shortening (%FS) than group III (49{+-}4 vs 42{+-}6 mm, 31{+-}5 vs 22{+-}4 mm, and 38{+-}8 vs 49{+-}4%). Abnormal high signal intensity in left ventricular myocardium in HCM seems to reflect myocardial ischemia and fibrosis due to small vessel disease, or myocardial degeneration and necrosis. We conclude that Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging may detect the early process of the dilated phase of HCM. (J.P.N.).

  1. Positional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for People With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or Suspected Craniovertebral or Cervical Spine Abnormalities: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disorder affecting the connective tissue. EDS can manifest with symptoms attributable to the spine or craniovertebral junction (CVJ). In addition to EDS, numerous congenital, developmental, or acquired disorders can increase ligamentous laxity in the CVJ and cervical spine. Resulting abnormalities can lead to morbidity and serious neurologic complications. Appropriate imaging and diagnosis is needed to determine patient management and need for complex surgery. Some spinal abnormalities cause symptoms or are more pronounced while patients sit, stand, or perform specific movements. Positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) allows imaging of the spine or CVJ with patients in upright, weight-bearing positions and can be combined with dynamic maneuvers, such as flexion, extension, or rotation. Imaging in these positions could allow diagnosticians to better detect spinal or CVJ abnormalities than recumbent MRI or even a combination of other available imaging modalities might allow. Objectives To determine the diagnostic impact and clinical utility of pMRI for the assessment of (a) craniovertebral or spinal abnormalities among people with EDS and (b) major craniovertebral or cervical spine abnormalities among symptomatic people. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 1998, to September 28, 2014. Review Methods Studies comparing pMRI to recumbent MRI or other available imaging modalities for diagnosis and management of spinal or CVJ abnormalities were reviewed. All studies of spinal or CVJ imaging in people with EDS were included as well as studies among people with suspected major CVJ or cervical spine abnormalities (cervical or craniovertebral spine instability, basilar invagination, cranial settling, cervical stenosis, spinal cord compression, Chiari

  2. Fractures of the distal phalanx and associated soft tissue and osseous abnormalities in 22 horses with ossified sclerotic ungual cartilages diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selberg, Kurt; Werpy, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    Ungual cartilage ossification in the forelimb is a common finding in horses. Subtle abnormalities associated with the ungual cartilages can be difficult to identify on radiographs. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of 22 horses (23 forelimbs) with a fracture of the distal phalanx and ossified ungual cartilage were characterized and graded. All horses had a forelimb fracture. Eleven involved a left forelimb (seven medial; four lateral), and 12 involved a right forelimb (five medial; seven lateral). All fractures were nonarticular, simple in configuration, and nondisplaced. The fractures were oriented in an axial proximal to abaxial distal and palmar to dorsal direction, and extended from the base of the ossified ungual cartilage into the distal phalanx. The fracture involved the fossa of the collateral ligament on the distal phalanx in 17 of 23 limbs. The palmar process and ossified ungual cartilage was abnormally mineralized in all horses. Ligaments and soft tissues adjacent to the ossified ungual cartilages were affected in all horses. The routine site of fracture in this study at the base of the ossified ungual cartilage extending into the distal phalanx suggests a biomechanical cause or focal stress point from cycling. The ligamentous structures associated with the ungual cartilages were often affected, showed altered signal intensity as well as enlargement and were thought to be contributing to the lameness. In conclusion, ossified ungual cartilages may lead to fracture of the palmar process of the distal phalanx and injury of the ungual cartilage ligaments. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance in condensed matter was discov- ered simultaneously by Edward Purcell at Harvard and Felix. Bloch at Stanford in 1946 using different instrumentation and techniques. Both groups observed the response of magnetic nuclei, placed in a uniform magnetic field, to a continuous radio frequency ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). ERCP is a diagnostic procedure that combines endoscopy , which uses an illuminated optical instrument to ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Biliary ...

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  10. Regional left ventricular myocardial contraction abnormalities and asynchrony in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy evaluated by magnetic resonance spatial modulation of magnetization myocardial tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishiro, Yuichiro; Oki, Takashi [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Iuchi, Arata [and others

    1999-06-01

    Global left ventricular (LV) pump function is generally preserved in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). However, it is unknown whether regional myocardial contractility is impaired, especially in nonhypertrophied regions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional LV myocardial contraction in patients with HCM using magnetic resonance (MR) spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM) myocardial tagging. The study group comprised 20 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (HCM group) and 16 age-matched normal patients (control group), and data were collected using transthoracic M-mode and 2-dimensional echocardiography, and MR SPAMM myocardial tagging. The systolic strain ratio, maximum systolic strain velocity, and time from end-diastole to maximum systolic strain ({Delta}T) in the anterior, ventricular septal, inferior and lateral regions for 2 LV short-axis sections at the levels of the chordae tendineae and papillary muscles were measured at 50-ms intervals by MR myocardial tagging. The end-diastolic anterior and ventricular septal wall thicknesses and LV mass index were significantly different between the HCM and control groups. The systolic strain ratio for all 4 walls, particularly the anterior and ventricular septal regions, was significantly lower in the HCM group. In the HCM group, the maximum systolic strain velocity was significantly lower and {Delta}T was significantly shorter for all 4 walls, particularly the anterior and ventricular septal regions. The standard deviation for the {Delta}T, calculated from the {Delta}T for the 8 regions of the 2 LV short-axis sections, was significantly greater in the HCM group. In conclusion, regional LV myocardial contraction is impaired in both hypertrophied and nonhypertrophied regions, and systolic LV wall asynchrony occurs in patients with HCM. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  14. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  18. Subclinical abnormal gyration pattern, a potential anatomic marker of epileptogenic zone in patients with magnetic resonance imaging negative frontal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regis, J.; Tamura, M.; Park, M.C.; McGonigal, A.; Riviere, D.; Coulon, O.; Bartolomei, F.; Girard, N.; Figarella-Branger, D.; Chauvel, P.; Mangin, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy surgery for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative patients has a less favorable outcome. Objective: Detection of subclinical abnormal gyration (SAG) patterns and their potential contribution to assessment of the topography of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is addressed in MRI-negative patients with frontal lobe epilepsy. Methods: Between September 1998 and July 2005, 12 MRI-negative frontal lobe epilepsy patients underwent stereo-electro-encephalography with postcorticectomy follow-up of longer than 1 year (average, 3.3 years). Original software (BrainVISA/Anatomist, http://brainvisa.info) trained on a database of normal volunteers was used to determine which sulci had morphology out of the normal range (SAG). Topography of the EZ, SAG pattern, corticectomy, postoperative seizure control, and histopathology were analyzed. Results: At last follow-up, 8 of 12 patients (66.7%) were Engel class I (7 IA and 1 IB), 2 class II, and 2 class IV. Small focal cortical dysplasia was histologically diagnosed in 9 of the 12 patients (75%), including 7 of 8 seizure-free patients (87.5%). A SAG pattern was found to be in the EZ area in 9 patients (75%), in the ipsilateral frontal lobe out of the EZ in 2, and limited to the contralateral hemisphere in 1. Conclusion: SAG patterns appear to be associated with the topography of the EZ in MRI-negative frontal lobe epilepsy and may have a useful role in preoperative assessment. Small focal cortical dysplasia not detected with MRI is often found on histopathological examination, particularly in the depth of the posterior part of the superior frontal sulcus and intermediate frontal sulcus, suggesting a specific developmental critical zone in these locations. (authors)

  19. Two patterns of cerebral metabolite abnormalities are detected on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in HIV-infected subjects commencing antiretroviral therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, Alan; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D. [Imperial College London, St. Mary' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Duncombe, Chris [HIV-NAT, Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok (Thailand); Li, Patrick C.K. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Gill, John M. [Calgary Regional Health Authority, Calgary (Canada); Kerr, Stephen J. [HIV-NAT, Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok (Thailand); University of New South Wales, National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Puls, Rebekah L.; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A. [University of New South Wales, National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Collaboration: for the Altair Study Group

    2012-12-15

    Cerebral function impairment remains problematic in subjects with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Using cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS), we aimed to determine if abnormalities could be detected in neurologically asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects electively commencing cART. Therapy-naive, HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected controls underwent {sup 1}H MRS in several anatomical voxels including the mid-frontal grey matter (FGM) and right basal ganglia (RBG). Differences in cerebral metabolite ratios between groups and correlations between immune and virological status were assessed. Forty-six subjects were recruited (26 HIV-infected and 20 control subjects). In the HIV-infected group, mean CD4+ count (SD, cells per microlitre) and plasma HIV RNA (SD, log10 copies per millilitre) were 192 (86) and 4.71 (0.64), respectively. Choline (Cho)/Creatine (Cr) and myoinositol (MI)/Cr ratios were significantly lower in the FGM in HIV-infected subjects compared to controls (0.67 (0.14) versus 0.88 (0.49), p = 0.036, and 0.94 (0.28) and 1.17 (0.26), p = 0.008, for Cho/Cr and MI/Cr, respectively) and Cho/Cr ratio associated with CD4+ lymphocyte count (p = 0.041). N-Acetyl-aspartate (NAA)/Cho ratio was significantly lower in the RBG in HIV-infected subjects compared to controls (2.27 (0.54) versus 2.63 (0.68), p = 0.002), and this was associated with greater plasma HIV RNA load (p = 0.014). Two patterns of cerebral metabolite abnormalities were observed in HIV-infected subjects electively commencing cART. Greater inflammatory metabolite ratios (Cho/Cr and MI/Cr) associated with lower markers of peripheral immune markers (CD4+ lymphocyte count) in the FGM and lower neuronal metabolite ratios (NAA/Cho) associated with greater HIV viraemia in the RBG were present in HIV-infected subjects. (orig.)

  20. Two patterns of cerebral metabolite abnormalities are detected on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in HIV-infected subjects commencing antiretroviral therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Alan; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; Duncombe, Chris; Li, Patrick C.K.; Gill, John M.; Kerr, Stephen J.; Puls, Rebekah L.; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral function impairment remains problematic in subjects with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Using cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS), we aimed to determine if abnormalities could be detected in neurologically asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects electively commencing cART. Therapy-naive, HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected controls underwent 1 H MRS in several anatomical voxels including the mid-frontal grey matter (FGM) and right basal ganglia (RBG). Differences in cerebral metabolite ratios between groups and correlations between immune and virological status were assessed. Forty-six subjects were recruited (26 HIV-infected and 20 control subjects). In the HIV-infected group, mean CD4+ count (SD, cells per microlitre) and plasma HIV RNA (SD, log10 copies per millilitre) were 192 (86) and 4.71 (0.64), respectively. Choline (Cho)/Creatine (Cr) and myoinositol (MI)/Cr ratios were significantly lower in the FGM in HIV-infected subjects compared to controls (0.67 (0.14) versus 0.88 (0.49), p = 0.036, and 0.94 (0.28) and 1.17 (0.26), p = 0.008, for Cho/Cr and MI/Cr, respectively) and Cho/Cr ratio associated with CD4+ lymphocyte count (p = 0.041). N-Acetyl-aspartate (NAA)/Cho ratio was significantly lower in the RBG in HIV-infected subjects compared to controls (2.27 (0.54) versus 2.63 (0.68), p = 0.002), and this was associated with greater plasma HIV RNA load (p = 0.014). Two patterns of cerebral metabolite abnormalities were observed in HIV-infected subjects electively commencing cART. Greater inflammatory metabolite ratios (Cho/Cr and MI/Cr) associated with lower markers of peripheral immune markers (CD4+ lymphocyte count) in the FGM and lower neuronal metabolite ratios (NAA/Cho) associated with greater HIV viraemia in the RBG were present in HIV-infected subjects. (orig.)

  1. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UltrasoundCT Head ScanElectrocardiogram (EKG or ECG)Pap Smear (Pap Test) Home Tests and Procedures Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ... SafetyRead Article >>Imaging and Medical Radiation SafetyPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ...

  5. Rapid automatic segmentation of abnormal tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance images for improved management of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Nyktari, Eva; Keegan, Jennifer; Pierce, Iain; Suman Horduna, Irina; Haldar, Shouvik; Pennell, Dudley J; Mohiaddin, Raad; Wong, Tom; Firmin, David N

    2015-10-07

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disorder. In order for late Gd enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE CMR) to ameliorate the AF management, the ready availability of the accurate enhancement segmentation is required. However, the computer-aided segmentation of enhancement in LGE CMR of AF is still an open question. Additionally, the number of centres that have reported successful application of LGE CMR to guide clinical AF strategies remains low, while the debate on LGE CMR's diagnostic ability for AF still holds. The aim of this study is to propose a method that reliably distinguishes enhanced (abnormal) from non-enhanced (healthy) tissue within the left atrial wall of (pre-ablation and 3 months post-ablation) LGE CMR data-sets from long-standing persistent AF patients studied at our centre. Enhancement segmentation was achieved by employing thresholds benchmarked against the statistics of the whole left atrial blood-pool (LABP). The test-set cross-validation mechanism was applied to determine the input feature representation and algorithm that best predict enhancement threshold levels. Global normalized intensity threshold levels T PRE  = 1 1/4 and T POST  = 1 5/8 were found to segment enhancement in data-sets acquired pre-ablation and at 3 months post-ablation, respectively. The segmentation results were corroborated by using visual inspection of LGE CMR brightness levels and one endocardial bipolar voltage map. The measured extent of pre-ablation fibrosis fell within the normal range for the specific arrhythmia phenotype. 3D volume renderings of segmented post-ablation enhancement emulated the expected ablation lesion patterns. By comparing our technique with other related approaches that proposed different threshold levels (although they also relied on reference regions from within the LABP) for segmenting enhancement in LGE CMR data-sets of AF patients, we illustrated that the cut-off levels employed by other centres

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  11. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  19. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of proximal histidyl residues in human normal and abnormal hemoglobins: a probe for the heme pocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.; Lin, A.K.L.; Ho, C.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 250 MHz has been used to investigate the conformations of proximal histidyl residues of human normal adult hemoglobin, hemoglobin Kempsey [K145(HC2) Tyr #betta# Asp], and hemoglobin McKees Rocks [K145(HC2) Tyr #betta# Term] around neutral pH in H 2 O at 27 0 C, all in the deoxy form. Two resonances that occur between 58 and 76 ppm downfield from the water proton signal have been assigned to the hyperfine shifted proximal histidyl NH-exchangeable protons of the J and K-chains of deoxyhemoglobin. These two resonances are sensitive to the quaternary state of hemoglobin, amino acid substitutions in the J 1 K 2 -subunit interface and in the carboxy-terminal region of the K-chain, and the addition of organic phosphates. The experimental results show that there are differences in the heme pockets among these four hemoglobins studied. The structural and dynamic information derived from the hyperfine shifted proximal histidyl NH-exchangeable proton resonances complement that obtained from the ferrous hyperfine shifted and exchangeable proton resonances of deoxyhemoglobin over the spectral region from 5 to 20 ppm downfield from H 2 O. The relationship between these findings and Perutz's stereochemical mechanism for the cooperative oxygenation of hemoglobin is discussed

  20. Blount's disease: magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducou le Pointe, H.; Mousselard, H.; Rudelli, A.; Montagne, J.P.; Filipe, G.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the information obtained by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the radiographic and MR investigations of nine patients treated for idiopathic tibia vara were reviewed in retrospect. There were six unilateral and three bilateral cases (12 tibiae). Initial radiographs of each patient were assigned a stage according to Catonne's classification. MR imaging was performed with a 0.5- or 1.5-T apparatus. Bony epiphyses were poorly developed in all cases. The cartilaginous component of the epiphyses compensated partially (6/12 cases) or completely (6/12 cases) for the collapse of the physes. In two cases an abnormal area was found between the medial meniscus and the cartilaginous portion of the epiphysis. An abnormally large medial meniscus was noted in four cases; an abnormal signal in the medial meniscus was seen in two cases. MR imaging has several advantages over plain film: it uses no ionizing radiation, it shows the shape of the ossified and cartilaginous epiphysis, and it demonstrates meniscal and physeal abnormalities. MR imaging may influence the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  3. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyszewski, E.A.; Raman, J.; Trupin, S.R.; McFarlin, B.L.; Dawson, M.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T W; Santos-Ramos, R; Cunningham, F G; Parkey, R

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with abnormal pregnancies were examined with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Three had a malformed fetus, 1 had a molar pregnancy, and 1 had an ovarian mass. Both maternal and fetal structures were clearly shown, although fetal motion may have resulted in image degradation in some cases. The authors suggest that MR may be useful in obstetric diagnosis.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  8. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  9. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the scanning room ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  19. Intrinsic brain abnormalities in young healthy adults with childhood trauma: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study of regional homogeneity and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaojia; Gao, Weijia; Wei, Zhaoguo; Wang, Dandan; Hu, Shaohua; Huang, Manli; Xu, Yi; Li, Lingjiang

    2017-06-01

    Childhood trauma confers great risk for the development of multiple psychiatric disorders; however, the neural basis for this association is still unknown. The present resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed to detect the effects of childhood trauma on brain function in a group of young healthy adults. In total, 24 healthy individuals with childhood trauma and 24 age- and sex-matched adults without childhood trauma were recruited. Each participant underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Intra-regional brain activity was evaluated by regional homogeneity method and compared between groups. Areas with altered regional homogeneity were further selected as seeds in subsequent functional connectivity analysis. Statistical analyses were performed by setting current depression and anxiety as covariates. Adults with childhood trauma showed decreased regional homogeneity in bilateral superior temporal gyrus and insula, and the right inferior parietal lobule, as well as increased regional homogeneity in the right cerebellum and left middle temporal gyrus. Regional homogeneity values in the left middle temporal gyrus, right insula and right cerebellum were correlated with childhood trauma severity. In addition, individuals with childhood trauma also exhibited altered default mode network, cerebellum-default mode network and insula-default mode network connectivity when the left middle temporal gyrus, right cerebellum and right insula were selected as seed area, respectively. The present outcomes suggest that childhood trauma is associated with disturbed intrinsic brain function, especially the default mode network, in adults even without psychiatric diagnoses, which may mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and psychiatric disorders in later life.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  1. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  6. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  8. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, France; Cognet, Francois; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krause, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases. (orig.)

  9. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in assessing venous vascular abnormalities in the head and neck: a demonstration of cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in a subset of multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mark Haacke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI and its impact on the development and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS remains controversial. Although the initial thrust in evaluating CCSVI was with ultrasound, other modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been used to study venous vascular abnormalities. This review focuses on the findings of a number of past MRI studies including a look at a combined study of four previous works with a cohort of 559 MS patients regarding structure and function of the extra-cranial vasculature. Strengths and limitations of each paper are discussed which give insight into conflicting reports of venous abnormalities in MS patients and healthy controls. Guidelines for data acquisition and analysis for future studies related to extra-cranial structure and flow, both arterial and venous, are discussed. This includes the grading of stenosis of the internal jugular veins (IJVs as well as normalized flows through major veins of the neck. The lack of agreement between most studies is likely due to inconsistent data acquisition and incomplete data analysis. Our own work over four independent sites shows good agreement, indicating that there is a high incidence of stenosis and structural venous abnormalities in the MS population and that this change results in reduced outflow of the IJVs and increased collateralization of venous return to the heart compared to healthy controls.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field ... and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with the blood vessels detect damage to the ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  13. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  18. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system or “scanner”. The powerful, constant magnetic field aligns a tiny fraction of subatomic particles called protons ... or bullet wounds Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets ...

  20. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine complex fractures top of page How should I prepare my child for the MRI? Your child ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  14. Combination of blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential recordings for abnormal visual cortex in two types of amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinmei; Cui, Dongmei; Zheng, Ling; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the different neuromechanisms of subjects with strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia compared with normal vision subjects using blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP). Methods Fifty-three subjects, age range seven to 12 years, diagnosed with strabismic amblyopia (17 cases), anisometropic amblyopia (20 cases), and normal vision (16 cases), were examined using the BOLD-fMRI and PR-VEP of UTAS-E3000 techniques. Cortical activation by binocular viewing of reversal checkerboard patterns was examined in terms of the calcarine region of interest (ROI)-based and spatial frequency–dependent analysis. The correlation of cortical activation in fMRI and the P100 amplitude in VEP were analyzed using the SPSS 12.0 software package. Results In the BOLD-fMRI procedure, reduced areas and decreased activation levels were found in Brodmann area (BA) 17 and other extrastriate areas in subjects with amblyopia compared with the normal vision group. In general, the reduced areas mainly resided in the striate visual cortex in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. In subjects with strabismic amblyopia, a more significant cortical impairment was found in bilateral BA 18 and BA 19 than that in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. The activation by high-spatial-frequency stimuli was reduced in bilateral BA 18 and 19 as well as BA 17 in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia, whereas the activation was mainly reduced in BA 18 and BA 19 in subjects with strabismic amblyopia. These findings were further confirmed by the ROI-based analysis of BA 17. During spatial frequency–dependent VEP detection, subjects with anisometropic amblyopia had reduced sensitivity for high spatial frequency compared to subjects with strabismic amblyopia. The cortical activation in fMRI with the calcarine ROI-based analysis of BA 17 was significantly correlated with the P100 amplitude in VEP

  15. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  18. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging may show abnormalities in the normal-appearing cervical spinal cord from patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Miraldi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord (NASC in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS compared to controls, using diffusion tensor MR imaging. Methods We studied 32 patients with MS and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results At C2, FA value was decreased in MS patients. Besides, RD value was higher in MS than in controls. At C7, MD values were increased in MS. Conclusion The NASC in the right column of the cervical spinal cord showed abnormal FA, RD and MD values, which is possibly related to demyelination, since the FA abnormality was related to the RD and not to the AD.

  19. Spectrum of biliary abnormalities in portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) secondary to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO)-a prospective magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Shumyla; Robbani, Irfan; Choh, Naseer A; Ashraf, Obaid; Shaheen, Feroze; Gojwari, Tariq; Gul, Sabeeha

    2016-12-01

    To characterize biliary abnormalities seen in portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) on MR cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) and elucidate certain salient features of the disease by collaborating our findings with those of previous studies. We prospectively enrolled 52 patients with portal cavernoma secondary to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, who underwent a standard MRCP protocol. Images were analyzed for abnormalities involving the entire biliary tree. Terms used were those proposed by the Indian National Association for Study of the Liver. Angulation of the common bile duct (CBD) was measured in all patients with cholangiopathy. Cholangiopathy was seen in 80.7% of patients on MRCP. Extrahepatic ducts were involved in 95% of patients either alone (26%) or in combination with the intrahepatic ducts (69%). Isolated involvement of the intrahepatic ducts was seen in 4.8% of patients. Abnormalities of the extrahepatic ducts included angulation (90%), scalloping (76.2%), extrinsic impression/indentation (45.2%), stricture (14.3%) and smooth dilatation (4.8%). The mean CBD angle was 113.2 ± 19.8°. Abnormalities of the intrahepatic ducts included smooth dilatation (40%), irregularity (28%) and narrowing (9%). Cholelithiasis, choledocholithiasis and hepatolithiasis were seen in 28.6% (12) patients, 14.3% (6) patients and 11.9% (5) patients, respectively. There was a significant association between choledocholithiasis and CBD stricture, with no significant association between choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis. A significant association was also seen between hepatolithiasis and choledocholithiasis. The spectrum of biliary abnormalities in PCC has been explored and some salient features of the disease have been elucidated, which allow a confident diagnosis of this entity. Advances in knowledge: PCC preferentially involves the extrahepatic biliary tree. Changes in the intrahepatic ducts generally occur as sequelae of involvement of the extrahepatic

  20. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  1. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  2. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of TMJ. Inter-observer influence on diagnosis or therapy and difference of interpretation regarding abnormal signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Hideto; Minowa, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Ichizou; Matsuda, Akemi; Kaneko, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of study was to evaluate the influence of a head and neck radiologist after MRI examinations of the temporomandibular joint on the therapeutic strategy in patients with temporomandibular disorders and, furthermore, to analyze interobserver agreement for defined MRI criteria. Eighteen patients including 36 TMJ (10 males and 8 females; age 15-53 years) were enrolled. All were clinically evaluated, diagnosed ''TMD'' and MRI examinations were performed. The medical and MRI records of 18 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Four MR images (proton density, T1, T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA enhanced sagittal images at the open and closed mouth) were obtained. Therapeutic strategies before and after performance of the MRI were compared. One radiologist and main dentist independently analyzed the sagittal MR images for position of the disk, position of the condyle, signal intensity of the disk and bilaminar zone, bone changes and several additional findings. Additionally, the agreement between one radiologist and main dentist with respect to the diagnoses was evaluated. There were 13 cases that the modification of diagnosis was needed after MRI examinations. In 10 of the 18 subjective symptom-free subjects, there were abnormal signs anatomically. Also in 1 subjective and objective symptom-free subjects, abnormal signs were seen on MRI. In 1 individual, MRI revealed larger abnormal signs in clinically asymptomatic TMJ as compared with symptomatic TMJ. Whereas as for 1 symptomatic subject, Abnormal signs could not be identified in any of the TMJs. There were no cases that the change of treatment methods was needed after MRI examinations, but as for 13 cases, the correction of treatment contents was needed, such as the changes of the therapeutic regimen and the form of the sprint were registered after MRI. The disagreement between one radiologist and main dentist was seen in: the bone change of condyle; 30 TMJs, the change of temporal bone ;6 TMJs, the relationship

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in clinically-definite multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.B.; Herkes, G.K.; Frith, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-two patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5-T instrument. Magnetic resonance imaging detected an abnormality in 90% of patients. In four patients, no lesions were demonstrated. The number, size and site of the lesions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with the patients' clinical status and other variables. The Kurtzke disability status scale score increased in patients with corpus callosum atrophy, brainstem and basal ganglia lesions, and correlated with the total number of lesions. No correlation was shown between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and disease duration, age, sex or pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. The variety of magnetic resonance images that could be obtained in patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis is highlighted. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The method- ology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for ... nance (NMR) is the experimental observation of the resonant absorption of ..... siveness, ranging from qualitative to quantitative. More signifi-.

  6. Non-contrast-enhanced whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in the general population: the incidence of abnormal findings in patients 50 years old and younger compared to older subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Cieszanowski

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess and compare the incidence of abnormal findings detected during non-contrast-enhanced whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI in the general population in two age groups: (1 50 years old and younger; and (2 over 50 years old. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis included 666 non-contrast-enhanced WB-MRIs performed on a 1.5-T scanner between December 2009 and June 2013 in a private hospital in 451 patients 50 years old and younger and 215 patients over 50 years old. The following images were obtained: T2-STIR (whole body-coronal plane, T2-STIR (whole spine-sagittal, T2-TSE with fat-saturation (neck and trunk-axial, T2-FLAIR (head-axial, 3D T1-GRE (thorax-coronal, axial, T2-TSE (abdomen-axial, chemical shift (abdomen-axial. Detected abnormalities were classified as: insignificant (type I, potentially significant, requiring medical attention (type II, significant, requiring treatment (type III. RESULTS: There were 3375 incidental findings depicted in 659 (98.9% subjects: 2997 type I lesions (88.8%, 363 type II lesions (10.8% and 15 type III lesions (0.4%, including malignant or possibly malignant lesions in seven subjects. The most differences in the prevalence of abnormalities on WB-MRI between patients 50 years old and younger and over 50 years old concerned: brain infarction (22.2%, 45.0% respectively, thyroid cysts/nodules (8.7%, 18.8%, pulmonary nodules (5.0%, 16.2%, significant degenerative disease of the spine (23.3%, 44.5%, extra-spinal degenerative disease (22.4%, 61.1%, hepatic steatosis (15.8%, 24.9%, liver cysts/hemangiomas (24%, 34.5%, renal cysts (16.9%, 40.6%, prostate enlargement (5.1% of males, 34.2% of males, uterine fibroids (16.3% of females, 37.9% of females. CONCLUSIONS: Incidental findings were detected in almost all of the subjects. WB-MRI demonstrated that the prevalence of the vast majority of abnormalities increases with age.

  7. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  8. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in experimental lymphatic filariasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, T.; Unger, E.; Witte, M; Crandall, C.; Witte, C.; Way, D.; Crandall, R.; Nayer, J.; Stuntz, M.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of lymphatic-associated soft tissue changes in lymphatic filariasis as well as non-filarial forms of lymphedema remains poorly understood in part because of a lack of noninvasive methods of lymphatic visualization. Prieviously, in ferrets chronically infected with filariasis by intrascrotal, inguinal or multiple footpad injections, the authors described whole-body lymphangioscintigraphic image patterns which correlated closely with structural findings of lymphatic obstruction and neocollateralization at operation or autopsy. To evaluate these acquired lymphatic abnormalities further, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used because of its high soft tissue resolution, versatility and specificity. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Sigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Tateno, Yukio; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive technique for visualization of the cardiovascular system, and is used to evaluate tissue characteristics, cardiac function and blood flow abnormalities, as well as to obtain morphological information. In this paper we presented results of clinical and laboratory research obtained using conventional spin echo MRI with regard to cardiovascular anatomy, tissue characterization and physiology. Furthermore, experience with two new techniques, cine-MRI and volume-selected MR spectroscopy, and their potential clinical usefulness in detecting cardiovascular diseases are documented. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  12. Cerebral fat embolism: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, A.; Barrena, R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Tejada, A.

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of 26-year-old man who presented clinical evidence of fat embolism following a traffic accident. Although computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed no abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed several scattered points of high intensity on T2-weighted and proton density (PD) images, with complete resolution of the lesions on follow-up scan. MRI is considered more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting these lesions, and may be useful for their diagnosis, correlating well with the clinical course. (Author) 10 refs

  13. Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) and technetium-99m-methoxyisonitrile (MIBI) scintigraphy to evaluate the abnormal parathyroid gland and PEIT efficacy for secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akihiko; Sugihara, Masaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kuroda, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) of the abnormal parathyroid gland is an effective treatment in patients with chronic renal failure with dialysis that tends to be unresponsive to medication. To evaluate the efficacy of PEIT, we investigated the correlation between serum intact PTH (iPTH), and the findings of MR imaging and 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy. PEIT was performed 32 times in 24 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Both MR imaging and MIBI scintigraphy were performed before and after PEIT. The detectability of parathyroid lesions was evaluated by MRI and MIBI scintigraphy with reference to ultrasound (B-mode) findings (as a standard) and the comparison of each treatment was done between imaging changes and serum iPTH levels. In the small parathyroid glands ( 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy. The reduction of high signal intensity area after PEIT on T2-weighted MR images is considered an useful therapeutic evaluation guideline than the reduction of MIBI accumulation on scintigraphy. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author)

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child may resume their usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. A few patients experience ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most strokes, ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  6. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  7. Delta Relaxation Enhanced Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Jamu K.

    Generally speaking, targeted molecular imaging has always been difficult to perform with magnetic resonance. The difficulty does not arise with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique or equipment itself, but rather with the targeted contrast agents, which the method requires. Also referred to as activatable contrast agents, or MRI probes, targeted contrast agents are pharmaceuticals that will selectively bind to a particular biological (target) molecule. They are used to highlight a certain tissue or the difference between healthy and diseased tissue. Unfortunately, nearly all MRI probes are non-specific, causing localized increases in MR image intensity in both the unbound and target-bound states. Therefore, brightening in a conventional MRI image, following probe injection, does not positively indicate the presence of the target molecule. Herein, a novel method known as delta relaxation enhanced magnetic resonance (dreMR, pronounced "dreamer") is presented that utilizes variable magnetic field technology to produce image contrast related to the dependence of the sample's longitudinal relaxation rates upon the strength of the main magnetic field of the MRI scanner. Since only bound contrast agent shows significant magnetic field dependence, it is an indicator of the bound probe, which is in turn a marker for the target molecule. This work details the development of the dreMR method, focusing on the specialized hardware necessary to provide a clinical, static-field MRI the ability to modulate its main magnetic field throughout an MRI sequence. All modifications were performed in such a manner that the host MRI system was not degraded or permanently modified in any way. The three parts of this technology are: the insertable electromagnet, the power supply system and the control system. The insertable electromagnet modifies the magnetic field, the power system drives the electromagnet, and the control system generates the magnetic field waveform envelope and

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  10. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  11. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Characterize a Rodent Model of Covert Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sheryl Lyn

    Covert stroke (CS) comprises lesions in the brain often associated by risk factors such as a diet high in fat, salt, cholesterol and sugar (HFSCS). Developing a rodent model for CS incorporating these characteristics is useful for developing and testing interventions. The purpose of this thesis was to determine if magnetic resonance (MR) can detect brain abnormalities to confirm this model will have the desired anatomical effects. Ex vivo MR showed brain abnormalities for rats with the induced lesions and fed the HFSCS diet. Spectra acquired on the fixed livers had an average percent area under the fat peak relative to the water peak of (20+/-4)% for HFSCS and (2+/-2)% for control. In vivo MR images had significant differences between surgeries to induce the lesions (p=0.04). These results show that applying MR identified abnormalities in the rat model and therefore is important in the development of this CS rodent model.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in hemosiderosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessing, P.H.L.; Falke, T.H.M.; Steiner, R.M.; Bloem, H.; Peters, A. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1985-01-15

    The case of a patient with iron deposition disease is presented to illustrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of this entity. The image characteristics of MRI are discussed and the results are compared with those of computer tomography (CT). The importance of a decrease in T2 relaxation time as the determinant parameter for signal intensity in MRI of the liver in such patients is emphasized.

  14. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  15. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Shoulder pain is the most common and well-documented site of musculoskeletal pain in elite swimmers. Structural abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of elite swimmers' symptomatic shoulders are common. Little has been documented about the association between MRI findings in the ...

  16. Magnetic resonance in hematological diseases. Imaging of bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive alternative to plain radiography, CT, and radionuclide studies for the imaging of normal and abnormal bone marrow. The cellularity and the corresponding fat/water ratio within the bone marrow show clear changes in haematological diseases. Thi...

  17. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  18. Detailed Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Analysis in Infantile Spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, Chellamani; Sharda, Sonal; Bergin, Ann Marie; Poduri, Annapurna; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Peters, Jurriaan M; Rakesh, Kshitiz; Kapur, Kush; Pearl, Phillip L; Prabhu, Sanjay P

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in infantile spasms, correlate them to clinical characteristics, and describe repeat imaging findings. A retrospective review of infantile spasm patients was conducted, classifying abnormal MRI into developmental, acquired, and nonspecific subgroups. MRIs were abnormal in 52 of 71 infantile spasm patients (23 developmental, 23 acquired, and 6 nonspecific) with no correlation to the clinical infantile spasm characteristics. Both developmental and acquired subgroups exhibited cortical gray and/or white matter abnormalities. Additional abnormalities of deep gray structures, brain stem, callosum, and volume loss occurred in the structural acquired subgroup. Repeat MRI showed better definition of the extent of existing malformations. In structural infantile spasms, developmental/acquired subgroups showed differences in pattern of MRI abnormalities but did not correlate with clinical characteristics.

  19. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in boxers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, B.D.; Zimmerman, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying traumatic injuries of the brain was compared in a referred population of 21 amateur and professional boxers. Three boxers displayed CT scans with equivocal findings that were verified as artifacts by MRI. Eleven boxers had both CT and MRI scans with normal findings, and 7 boxers had both CT and MRI scans with abnormal findings. There were no instances where abnormalities demonstrated on CT scanning were not detected by MRI. However, some abnormalities detected on MRI were not detected on CT scans. These included a subdural hematoma, white-matter changes, and a focal contusion. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be the neuroradiodiagnostic test of choice compared with CT

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: myocardial perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, E.; Al-Saadi, N.; Fleck, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, German Heart Inst. Berlin and Charite, Campus Virchow, Humboldt Univ. (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    There is growing evidence that the noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion with cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a valid and accurate tool for the assessment of ischemic heart disease and its introduction into routine clinical evaluation of patients is rapidly expected. Magnetic resonance measurements allow the evaluation of reversible and irreversible myocardial ischemia, the assessment of acute myocardial infarction, as well as the recognition and detection of viable myocardium. Magnetic resonance perfusion measurements are mainly performed with T1-shortening contrast agents such as gadolinium-DTPA either by visual analysis or based on the analyses of signal intensity time curves. For the detection of myocardial ischemia the first pass kinetics of a gadolinium-DTPA bolus and for the detection of myocardial necrosis and the definition of viable myocardium steady state distribution kinetics are assessed. Quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion can be performed but requires complex modeling due to the characteristics of gadolinium-DTPA. Thus, semi-quantitative parameters are preferred. There is accumulating evidence in the literature that magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detection of coronary artery stenosis with high diagnostic accuracy both with semi-quantitative or visual analysis. Myocardial infarction can be reliably detected and the infarcted area determined. Non-reperfused infarcted myocardium can be differentiated from reperfused myocardium by different enhancement patterns that correlates with viability. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MR) erlangt bei der nichtinvasiven Diagnostik der koronaren Herzerkrankung eine zunehmende Bedeutung. Mit dieser Technik koennen sowohl die globale und regionale Myokardfunktion als auch die myokardiale Perfusion exakt beurteilt werden. Bisher liegen die meisten Daten fuer die Analyse von Wandbewegungsstoerun-gen unter Belastung vor, wobei sich eine deutliche diagnostische

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance in cardiology: cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Claudio C.

    2003-01-01

    As a new gold standard for mass, volume and flow, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is probably the most rapidly evolving technique in the cardiovascular diagnosis. An integrated cardiac MRI examination allows the evaluation of morphology, global and regional function, coronary anatomy, perfusion, viability and myocardial metabolism, all of them in only one diagnostic test and in a totally noninvasive manner. The surgeons can obtain relevant information on all aspects of diseases of the heart and great vessels, which include anatomical details and relationships with the greatest field of view, and may help to reduce the number of invasive procedures required in pre and postoperative evaluation. However, despite these excellent advantages the present clinical utilization of MRI is still too often restricted to few pathologies or case studies in which other techniques fail to identify the cardiac or cardiovascular abnormalities. If magnetic resonance is an excellent method for diagnosing so many different cardiac conditions, why is so little it used in routine cardiac practice? Cardiologists are still not very familiar with the huge possibilities or cardiovascular MRI utilities. Our intention is to give a comprehensive survey of many of the clinical applications of this challenger technique in the study of the heart and great vessels. Those who continue to ignore this important and mature imaging technique will rightly fail to benefit. (author) [es

  4. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  5. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  6. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  7. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in fetus examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bo; Luo Boning; Zhang Zhongwei; Xie Hongning; Sun Gengxi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in fetus examination. Methods: The MR images of 8 women with complicated pregnancies discovered by ultrasonography were analyzed retrospectively and compared with ultrasonography. Results: Fetus heteroplasia included placenta previa (n=2), congenital diaphragmatic hernia (n=1), agenesis of kidney (n=1), lack of amniotic fluid (n=2), retroperitoneal teratoma (n=1) and agenesis of cerebellum (n=1). MRI could clearly display abnormities of fetus that suspected by ultrasound. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging plays a significant role in fetus examination and has become an adjuvant method when the fetus heteroplasia were suspected by ultrasonography

  8. Standard magnetic resonance imaging is inadequate for patients with refractory focal epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertzen, J. von; Urbach, H.; Jungbluth, S.; Kurthen, M.; Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with intractable epilepsy may benefit from epilepsy surgery especially if they have a radiologically demonstrable cerebral lesion. Dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols as performed at epilepsy surgery centres can detect epileptogenic abnormalities with great

  9. [Magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizova, N V; Spirin, N N; Maksimov, G A; Bakhtin, A L

    2004-01-01

    Fifty one patients with systemic lupus erythematous were examined using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to determine cerebral hemodynamic features. A comprehensive study revealed different cerebral circulatory changes in this abnormality.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  12. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  13. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  16. Hemifacial spasm. Study by magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittar, Miriam Salvadori; Staut, Claudio Cesar Vilela; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bacheschi, Luiz Alberto; Magalhaes, Alvaro Cebrian de Almeida

    1995-01-01

    Nine patients with idiopathic hemifacial spasm were evaluated with cranial magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Alterations of the posterior fossa vasculature, possibly related to the facial nerve irritation, were found in 8 patients (88%). Magnetic resonance angiography is a noninvasive procedure and appears to be a sensitive method to evaluate hemifacial spasm etiology. (author)

  17. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  19. A Bright Future for Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Does magnetic resonance have a bright future? Ever since magnetic resonance in condensed phase started in 1945, questions about its future prospects (or its imminent doom) have been asked time and again. Some, like Nicolaas Bloembergen, left the field at an early stage because they felt there was no hope to gather ...

  20. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and meningioma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine if intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging improves surgical resection and postoperative outcome of intracranial meningioma. Study design: Prospective, non-randomized, cohort study. Method: Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI) was used to evaluate patients with meningioma ...

  1. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans in the Eden and Central Karoo districts of the Western Cape Province, South Africa. ... South African Medical Journal ... Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked ...

  2. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Magnetic Resonance of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Corrado, L.; Monteleone, V.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been applied to muscoloskeletal pathoanatomy and has proved to be useful in the detection and characterization of knees and 8 normal knees were examined. The images were obtained in the Diagnostic Centre RMRC of Naples on a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic system, using a surface coil and a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE 600/28 ms). The examined limb was immobilized and bent at 8-10 grade, extrarotated for the examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) only. Images were obtained on a 256x256 matrix and had a 2 or 4-mm thickness. MRI cleary showed all the anatomical structures. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PAL) and tha patellar ligament were shown by sagittal SE images through the intercondylar notch; the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments (TCL and FCL) were evaluated on coronal SE images; the articular capsula and menisci on axial transverse SE images. Objective criteria for ACL and PCL tears were: lack of continuity of the signal and change in signal intensity; in meniscal pathology, menisci with small linear regions of increased signal or with grossly truncated shape were interpreted as tears. Preliminary results of this study indicate that MRI together with clinical evaluation may be an useful non-invasive procedure in the assessment of acute injuries of the knee

  4. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, France; Cognet, Francois; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krause, Denis [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Dijon Le Bocage University Hospital, 2 Blvd. Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, BP 1542, 21034 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ... necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal ... to: detect a variety of brain conditions and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... assess causes of arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate ... the presence of an otherwise hidden tumor or infection in a joint diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in ...

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  9. Pitfalls in magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, M.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee is a robust method for the evaluation of internal derangements. A knowledge of the well known technical and anatomical pitfalls avoids, in most cases, diagnostic errors. However, the differentiation between meniscocapsular separation and normal anatomy remains challenging. The high prevalence of abnormal MR findings, especially meniscal tears with up to 63% on the asymptomatic contralateral side, has to be considered in patient management. (orig.) [de

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of epilepsy at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, I.; Griffiths, P.D.; Hoggard, N.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy often have a structural cause for their seizures and may benefit from surgical resection. As recommended in the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to screen for structural abnormalities in these patients and there is increasing evidence that 3T MRI has better sensitivity and specificity than 1.5T. This article reviews the imaging findings of many of the common diseases that can cause epilepsy.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute ''wiiitis'' of the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nett, Michael P.; Sperling, John W.; Collins, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first reported case of acute ''wiiitis'', documented clinically and by imaging, of the upper extremity, caused by prolonged participation in a physically interactive virtual video-game. Unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated marked T2-weighted signal abnormality within several muscles of the shoulder and upper arm, without evidence of macroscopic partial- or full-thickness tearing of the muscle or of intramuscular hematoma. (orig.)

  12. Value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabon-Martin, C.

    1987-01-01

    The present study summarizes an experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of twelve patients with a variety of cardiac abnormalities (myocardial infarction, mural thrombi, obstructive cardiomyopathy, pericarditis). The results are compared with clinical data, with measurements from other techniques such as two-dimensional echocardiography and with the images in normal subjects. An anticipated advantage of MRI is the ability to provide better tissue characterization, than has been attained with other imaging techniques, by relaxation time measurement [fr

  13. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn ++ ). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  14. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn{sup ++}). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: current state of the art and novel approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postal, M; Lapa, A Tamires; Reis, F; Rittner, L; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease affecting 0.1% of the general population. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus have been more frequently recognized and reported in recent years, occurring in up to 75% of patients during the disease course. Magnetic resonance imaging is known to be a useful tool for the detection of structural brain abnormalities in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients because of the excellent soft-tissue contrast observed with MRI and the ability to acquire multiplanar images. In addition to conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques to evaluate the presence of atrophy and white matter lesions, several different magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been used to identify microstructural or functional abnormalities. This review will highlight different magnetic resonance imaging techniques, including the advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods used to determine central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  17. Magnetic resonance imagings of alobar and semilobar holoprosencephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Takashi; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Haruhiko; Kasahara, Eishi; Iwasaki, Mitsuyoshi; Tanaka, Osamu.

    1987-01-01

    We have experienced two patients with infant holoprosencephaly. These patients had no facial abnormalities except hypotelorism. The prosencephalon is one of the three primitive vesicles which proceeds to cleave sagittaily into the cerebral hemisphere and transversally into the telencephalon and diencephalon (cleavage). In holoprosencephaly such diverticulation on cleavage is disturbed and various patterns of the embryonic prosencephalon are retained. Up to this time, computed tomography (CT) was the first diagnostic procedure for these abnormalities. It is, however, insufficient for further evaluation and particularly for the differential diagnosis of diencephalic cyst, absence of the corpus callosum and hydranencephaly. Compared with CT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) proved to be advantageous in detecting a variety of cerebral abnormalities. The lack of ionizing radiation and other biologic hazards, coupled with its high level of tissue contrast, makes MRI particularly suited for pediatric neuroradiology. Therefore MRI is an excellent imaging method and could be used as the primary imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric cerebral abnormalities. (author)

  18. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahila, H.; Kivitie-Kallio, S.; Halmesmaki, E.; Valanne, L.; Autti, T. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dept. of Pediatrics, and Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process.

  19. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahila, H.; Kivitie-Kallio, S.; Halmesmaki, E.; Valanne, L.; Autti, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process

  20. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  1. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  3. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging safety guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, R.; Hurrell, M.; Tremewan, R.

    1996-01-01

    These guidelines are based on the findings and recommendations of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the National Radiological Protection Board (UK), the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), the US Food and Drug Administration, the International Electrotechnical Commission and the Society for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. They indicate circumstances under which examinations may proceed with no special precautions, and those where a nmore careful evaluation may be necessary. They do not displace the need to maintain a current knowledge of the relevant medical literature. The guidelines have been endorsed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (NZ Branch), the NZ Institute of Medical Radiation Technologists and the Royal Australasian College of Radiologists (NZ Branch) as being supportive of good practice in MRI. They are based on information available at the time of publication. MRI imaging is an evolving technique, and it is recognised that future research and experience may require modifications to these recommendations. In recognition of this fact, they will ceaseto be valid on 31 December 2001. It is intended that they should be reviewed and modified where necessary before that date. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Yoshitaka; Une, Humiho; Osame, Mitsuhiro

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was evaluated in 12 HAM (HTLV-I-associated myelopathy) patients (4 males and 8 females, mean age of 54 yrs) and compaired with 36 non-HAM controls (16 males and 20 females mean age of 52yrs). MRI of the brain was performed using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. Imaging in all patients was done with the long spin echo (TR=2,000msec, TE=100msec) sequences, and 10mm contiguous axial slices of the entire brain were obtained in all cases. Except for two cases, MRI of the brain was abnormal in 10 (83%) HAM patients, while in controls, 18 (50%) cases were abnormal. The abnormalities were high intensity lesions through SE 2000/100 sequences (T 2 weighted image), and consisted of small isolated hemisphere lesions in 9 patients, periventricular changes in 9 patients, bilateral thalamic lesions in 2 patients and pontine lesions in 3 patients. We found that the factor of age was very important. In patients with ages below 59 yrs, 6 of 8 HAM patients (75%) had abnormalities, while in control cases, 6 of 23 (23%) had abnormalities in periventricular area. And in isolated hemisphere, 6 of 8 HAM patients (75%) had abnormalities, while in control cases, 3 of 23 (13%) had abnormalities. On the other hand, in patients with ages over 60 yrs, 3 of 4 (75%) HAM patients had abnormalities in periventricular area, while in controls, 10 of 13 cases (77%) had abnormalities, and in isolated hemisphere, 3 of 4 (75%) HAM patients had abnormalities, and in controls, 10 of 13 cases (77%) had abnormalities. Our data suggest that HAM patients with ages below 59 years will show a greater percentage of abnormalities than controls. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of tumor oxygenation and metabolic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishna, Murali C.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is distinct from normal tissue as a result of abnormal vascular network characterized by hypoxia, low pH, high interstitial fluid pressure and elevated glycolytic activity. This poses a barrier to treatments including radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging methods...... which can characterize such features non-invasively and repeatedly will be of significant value in planning treatment as well as monitoring response to treatment. The three techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed here. Tumor pO2 can be measured by two MRI methods requiring...... an exogenous contrast agent: electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). Tumor metabolic profile can be assessed by a third method, hyperpolarized metabolic MR, based on injection of hyperpolarized biological molecules labeled with 13C or 15N and MR...

  7. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  9. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Breast Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikeda, Debra

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a unique magnetic resonance imaging multi voxel pulse sequence producing spectroscopic images of key metabolites found in breast cancer, and validated our work with in vitro spectra and pathology...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Medical Imaging Costs Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/ ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  13. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University MRI department. Subject: Seventy four consecutive patients.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & ... Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing that doctors use to see the body's organs ...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal ... discs evaluate the bones of the spine for congenital or acquired abnormalities determine the condition of nerve tissue within the ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in a total of 45 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), comprising 27 with brain symptoms and 18 without it. The results were compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Some of the 45 MS patients were also examined by neurophysiological studies for comparison. MRI showed demyelinating plaques of the brain in a total of 31 patients (69%) - 20 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients, MRI was capable of detecting brain lesions in 6 (86%) of 7 acute stage patients and 14 (70%) of 20 non-acute stage patients. It was also capable of detecting brain lesions in 21 (70%) of 30 clinically definite MR patients and 10 (67%) of 15 clinically probable MS patients. Concurrently available X-ray CT revealed brain lesions in 9 symptomatic patients (33%) and one asymptomatic patient (6%). Visual evoked potentials examined in 31 patients showed abnormality in one (11%) of 9 patients without symptoms of optic neuritis and all (100%) of the other 22 patients with symptoms. In 19 evaluable patients, auditory brainstem responses were abnormal in one (11%) of 9 patients without brainstem symptoms and 3 (30%) of 10 patients with symptoms. MRI of the brain was far superior to X-ray CT, visual evoked potentials and auditory brainstem responses in detecting clinically unsuspected lesions. We proposed new diagnostic criteria including MRI findings of the brain in the Japanese MS diagnostic criteria. MRI of the spinal cord was performed in 12 MS patients with spinal cord symptoms by sagittal and coronal images. It demonstrated demyelinating lesions within the cervical and superior thoracic cord in 8 MS acute stage patients. Spinal cord lesions were longitudinally continuous as long as many spinal segments, with swelling in 6 patients and atrophy in 2 patients. MRI of spinal cord was useful in deciding superior and inferior limits of cord lesions and in visualizing cord swelling or atrophy. (Namekawa, K)

  19. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  20. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Viera, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis [es

  1. Magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance of a magnetic tip excited by microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yukinori; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The present work proposes magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) based on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) modulation of a magnetic tip using microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator instead of using conventional microwave irradiation by an external antenna. In this MRFM, the coaxial resonator is electrically connected to the magnetic cantilever tip, which enables simple implementation of FMR excitation of a magnetic tip in conventional magnetic force microscopy. The FMR frequency of the tip can be easily extracted from the reflection spectrum of a transmission line connected to the magnetic tip. The excitation of tip FMR is confirmed from the microwave frequency dependence of the mechanical response of the tip oscillation. This MRFM is effective for extracting the magnetic interaction force near a sample surface without perturbation of its magnetic state. Nanometer-scale imaging of magnetic domain structures on a demagnetized thin-film permanent magnet is successfully demonstrated.

  2. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography; Anomalias de sistema nervoso central em defeitos de linha media facial com hipertelorismo detectados por ressonancia magnetica e tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dep. de Genetica Medica]. E-mail: vlopes@fcm.unicamp.br

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ... passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s ... material may be performed. The intravenous needle may cause your child some discomfort when it is inserted ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with the blood vessels detect damage to the brain caused by ... evaluate the structure of the heart and surrounding blood vessels assess causes of arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with MRI than with other ... than one in 20 require medication. It is normal for the area of your body being imaged ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with MRI than with other ... or TV show during the exam. It is normal for the area of your child’s body being ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence of an otherwise hidden tumor or infection in a joint diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help diagnose a wide range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a variety of brain conditions and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with the blood ... cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wide range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a ... detect damage to the brain caused by an injury or a stroke diagnose infectious or autoimmune diseases ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wide range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is often the best choice for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports- ... an otherwise hidden tumor or infection in a joint diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in children detect bone ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ... or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... congenital or acquired abnormalities determine the condition of nerve tissue within the spinal cord In the heart, ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of brain conditions and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with the blood vessels ... monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders monitor response to cancer treatment MRI is often the best choice for ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid ... early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis ... brain and spine is used to: detect a variety of brain conditions and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wide range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular ... your child to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , technologist or a ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there is a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if an abnormality is stable ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders monitor response to cancer treatment MRI is often the best choice for ... diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in children detect bone cancer inspect the marrow for leukemia and other diseases ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s ... of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the ...

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of transfusional hemosiderosis complicating thalassemia major

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasch, R.C.; Wesbey, G.E.; Gooding, C.A.; Koerper, M.A.

    1984-03-01

    Tissue deposits of hemosiderin, a paramagnetic iron-protein complex, resulted in marked abnormalities of magnetic resonance (MR) spin-echo signal intensity within the viscera of three children with transfusional hemosiderosis and thalassemia major. In all patients the liver and bone marrow demonstrated abnormally low spin-echo intensities and the kidneys and muscles had abnormally high intensities. These observations correlate with in vitro MR observation of ferric (Fe/sup +3/) solutions, in which concentrations of ferric salts greater than 20 mmol yielded higher intensities than did water alone. MR imaging is sensitive to the tissue deposition of hemosiderin, and MR intensity appears to provide a rough measure of the amount of iron deposited.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of transfusional hemosiderosis complicating thalassemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasch, R.C.; Wesbey, G.E.; Gooding, C.A.; Koerper, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Tissue deposits of hemosiderin, a paramagnetic iron-protein complex, resulted in marked abnormalities of magnetic resonance (MR) spin-echo signal intensity within the viscera of three children with transfusional hemosiderosis and thalassemia major. In all patients the liver and bone marrow demonstrated abnormally low spin-echo intensities and the kidneys and muscles had abnormally high intensities. These observations correlate with in vitro MR observation of ferric (Fe +3 ) solutions, in which concentrations of ferric salts greater than 20 mmol yielded higher intensities than did water alone. MR imaging is sensitive to the tissue deposition of hemosiderin, and MR intensity appears to provide a rough measure of the amount of iron deposited

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine in children with chronic constipation or non-retentive fecal incontinence: A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkali, N.; Hagebreuk, E. E. O.; Bongers, E. M.; van Rijn, R. R.; van Wijk, M. P.; Benninga, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of lumbosacral spine (LSS) abnormalities in children with defecation disorders, intractable constipation, or non-retentive fecal incontinence (NRFI) and evaluate whether LSS abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are clinically detected by neurologic

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in children detect bone cancer inspect the marrow for leukemia and other diseases assess bone loss examine complex fractures top of page How should I prepare my child for the MRI? Your child may be asked ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... skull and the bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine is used to: detect a variety of brain ... herniated spinal discs evaluate the bones of the spine for congenital or acquired abnormalities determine the condition ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with the blood vessels detect damage to the brain caused by an injury or a stroke diagnose infectious or autoimmune diseases like encephalopathy or encephalitis evaluate problems such as ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence of an otherwise hidden tumor or infection in a joint diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in children detect bone cancer inspect the marrow for leukemia ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s ... after trauma diagnose and monitor infectious or inflammatory ... (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to talk to your pediatrician ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ... determine the condition of nerve tissue within the spinal cord In the heart, MRI is often used in ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if an abnormality is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does ... time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if an abnormality is stable or changed ...

  12. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  13. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  14. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  15. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  16. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: p.boraschi@do.med.unipi.it; Salemi, S. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F. [Univ. of Pisa, Liver Transplant Unit of the Dept. of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, F. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bartolozzi, C. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T{sub 2}w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T{sub 1}w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  17. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will ... skin irritation at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with no reports of any ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam in the first ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... regular daily routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is ... routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require your ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment ... The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast material called ... The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... the MRI equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ... with the pituitary gland and brainstem assess the cause of developmental delay identify and evaluate degenerated or ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fluid spaces within the brain (ventricles) causes of epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into ... pain, he/she may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into ... severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  11. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  12. Magnetic resonance molecular imaging in cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Peihong; Wang Guohui

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging can be defined as the in vivo characterization and measurement of biologic processes at the molecular and gene level by the means of MR imaging science. The purpose of molecular imaging is to diagnose tumor more early and specifically and monitor the anti-tumor therapy response. The present researches of molecular imaging focus on the specific MR molecular probes, molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis, genetic imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, and so on. Because of it has high spatial resolution and functional imaging, the MR molecular imaging will play an important role in the tumor diagnosis and treatment in 21 century. (authors)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in traumatic hip subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Flanigan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Athletic traumatic hip subluxations are rare. Classic radiographic features have been well described. This case highlights the potential pitfalls of immediate magnetic resonance imaging. Femoral head contusions and acetabular rim fractures are common associated findings usually apparent with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. However, in this case an MRI done 3 hours post injury failed to show any edema in either location, making the appearance of these findings on subsequent MRIs difficult to interpret. An acute MRI more than 48 hours post injury may have been more helpful.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Toshio; Koseki, Keijiro

    1987-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus manifested by neurologic symptoms. The results were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT scans showed slight cerebral atrophy in four patients, including one with coexisting enlargement of the lateral ventricle. In three of them, MRI scans showed additional abnormal appearance, possibly reflecting cerebral infarction and reversible changes in water content of cerebral tissues. The findings of MRI and CT in a small series of patients was disappointing in the explanation of the occurrence of neurologic symptoms. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... on Contrast Media . Tell the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them. ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... able to see, hear and speak with your child at all times using a two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. ... to help your child pass the time. Some scanners are equipped with ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, such ...

  2. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  3. Brain magnetic resonance findings in infective endocarditis with neurological complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Asako; O'uchi, Toshihiro; Toyoda, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosing infective endocarditis and its complications can be difficult because of the nonspecific symptoms. We reviewed findings of intracranial abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 14 patients with neurological complications and herein discuss the overall intracranial MRI findings. We retrospectively reviewed patients with infective endocarditis from August 2004 to August 2006. Brain MRI, the causative bacteria, and abnormal neurological symptoms were reviewed for 14 patients with neurological complications. Of the 14 patients, 13 showed intracranial abnormalities on MRI. Embolization was seen in 10 patients, hemorrhage in 3, abscess formation in 3, and encephalitis in 2. Hyperintense lesions with a central hypointense area on T2-weighted and/or T2*-weighted imaging (Bull's-eye-like lesion) were seen in four patients. A combination of these intracranial abnormalities was observed in 6 patients. The MRI findings associated with infective endocarditis are wide-ranging: embolization, hemorrhage, meningitis, cerebritis, abscess, the bull's-eye-like lesion. Clinicians should consider the possibility of infective endocarditis in patients with unknown fever and neurological abnormality. Brain MRI should be promptly performed for those patients, and T2*-weighted imaging is recommended for an early diagnosis of infective endocarditis. (author)

  4. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Tyrosinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Ege Univ. Hospital, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-10-01

    A 3.5-year-old girl with tyrosinemia is reported. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatic nodules. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral high-signal changes confined to the globus pallidus on T2-weighted images. Globus pallidus lesions likely represented neuropathologic changes such as astocytosis, delayed myelination, and status spongiosus (myelin splitting and vacuolation)

  5. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant ...

  8. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, I.

    1958-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D 2 O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10 -5 on the D 2 O concentration. (author) [fr

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  10. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, J.; Soriano, G.; Zubieta, J.L.; Delgado, G.; Villanueva, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor for a mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any specific question you might have, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time and for your attention! Spotlight Recently posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, D.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Scholten, F.G.; Feldberg, N.A.M.; Postma, J.H.; Vis, H. van der

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having meniscal lesions, were examined bt magnetic resonance (MR) and arthroscopy, MR and arthroscopy corelate well for meniscal and cruciate ligament lesions. Damage of the articular cartilage was, however, not detected by MR (author). 15 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  14. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Tyrosinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sener, R.N.

    2005-01-01

    A 3.5-year-old girl with tyrosinemia is reported. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatic nodules. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral high-signal changes confined to the globus pallidus on T2-weighted images. Globus pallidus lesions likely represented neuropathologic changes such as astocytosis, delayed myelination, and status spongiosus (myelin splitting and vacuolation)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of hepatic adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, R J; Woldenberg, L S; Skeel, R T; Bishara, H M; Merrick, H W

    1990-03-01

    A case of hepatic adenoma imaged by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as with angiography, computed tomography, and radionuclide imaging is presented. Pathological correlation is also presented. Review of the literature of MRI of hepatic adenoma and related tumors is discussed.

  16. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with arthroscopy in the evaluation of rotator cuff pathology. ... Methods: Using the University of Nairobi and Kenyatta National Hospital Ethics Committee approved protocol medical records of thirty four randomly selected consecutive patients with shoulder pain were ...

  17. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7 (2010), s. 617-620 ISSN 1931-7360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : reconstruction methods * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  18. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  19. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soernes, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system

  20. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  1. Vascular anatomy in angiography for magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano; Rivera Gomez, Juan Enrique

    1998-01-01

    A review of basic anatomical concepts and main variants, as well as some anatomical anomalies of the central nervous system vascularity, these concepts are considered essential for the interpretation of magnetic resonance angiography with time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) methods

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  3. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization d...

  4. Adrenomyeloneuropathy, a dynamic progressive disorder: brain magnetic resonance imaging of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Yuan-Heng; Chen, Ya-Fang; Liu, Hon-Man [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, 100, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2004-04-01

    Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) is a phenotype variant of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We present two patients with adult-onset AMN who were initially suspected to have demyelinating disorders radiologically and finally diagnosed on the basis of laboratory data. The brain magnetic resonance images showed abnormal signal intensity at pyramidal tracts and cerebellar hemisphere bilaterally with abnormal enhancement after contrast medium administration. Review of the literature shows that the brain magnetic resonance findings of adrenomyeloneuropathy may include normal brain, tract demyelination, white matter demyelination, or brain atrophy. Disease progression was demonstrated by follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  7. The market for magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.

    1990-01-01

    The medical market is, at present, the most dominant market for low T c superconductors. Indeed, without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there would hardly be a low T c superconductor market at all. According to the author, any development that can expand the medical market for MRI machines would be a welcome one. This paper reports how the recent advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are such a development. While the principle of MRS has bee around as long as MRI, only recently have advances in technique, computer programming and magnet technology allowed MRS to advance to a point where it may become an important technology-one that could increase the medical market for superconductors. The author discussed how MRS can be used to analyze oil core samples for their oil content, oil/water ratios, how the oil is bound and how to extract it

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  9. Basic Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging with its superior soft tissue contrast resolution and absence of beam hardening artifacts, combined with its ability to perform multiplanar imaging, is now effective tool in diagnostic imagings. Magnetic resonance is primarily a phenomenon that involves atomic nuclei. It provides totally new clinical information with no known hazards through the use of very weak interactions with endogenous stable magnetic atomic nuclei. This article briefly summarized the basic mechanism of generation and detection of the signals and general sorts of tissue properties which can influence the signals and thereby give rise to tissue contrast. It also describes how the machine-operating parameters can be used to manipulate the tissue contrast observed in the image.

  10. Corpus callosum agenesis: Role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achour Radhouane

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Corpus callosum agenesis (CCA was evaluated by ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with many studies. Ultrasonography was able to suspect CCA by indirect signs but a definitive diagnosis of CCA was achieved in rare cases. MRI was able to diagnose complete CCA in majority of cases. Additional neurological abnormalities including heterotopia, gyration anomaly, asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres, and Dandy-Walker variant were documented, as well as an ocular anomaly which was described, by MRI examination. Prenatal counseling for fetal agenesis of the corpus callosum is difficult as the prognosis is uncertain. The association with other cerebral abnormalities increases the likelihood of a poor outcome and ultrasonographic assessment of the fetal brain is limited. We found MRI to be a safe and useful additional procedure to complement ultrasonographic diagnosis or suspicion of CCA.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging after traumatic dislocation of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Saegusa, Osamu; Saito, Masahito; Nishikawa, Satoru; Nishisu, Takashi; Kobayashi, Teruhisa; Shimizu, Kou.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from 24 patients with traumatic dislocation of the hip was retrospectively studied. Abnormal MR images due to bone contusion appeared in a high frequency in the early phase after dislocation, and most of them normalized within 3 months after injury. Influence of bone contusion was also observed in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which made the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head difficult. Therefore, absence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head is confirmed if normal MR images were obtained, while if there is abnormal images, careful follow-up should be continued paying special attention on the occurrence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. (S.Y.)

  12. Unravelling cardiovascular disease using four dimensional flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Vivian P; Westenberg, Jos J M; van der Palen, Roel L F; Blom, Nico A; de Roos, Albert; van der Geest, Rob; Elbaz, Mohammed S M; Roest, Arno A W

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of normal and abnormal flow patterns in the human cardiovascular system increases our understanding of normal physiology and may help unravel the complex pathophysiological mechanisms leading to cardiovascular disease. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a suitable technique that enables visualization of in vivo blood flow patterns and quantification of parameters that could potentially be of prognostic value in the disease process. In this review, current image processing tools that are used for comprehensive visualization and quantification of blood flow and energy distribution in the heart and great vessels will be discussed. Also, imaging biomarkers extracted from 4D flow CMR will be reviewed that have been shown to distinguish between normal and abnormal flow patterns. Furthermore, current applications of 4D flow CMR in the heart and great vessels will be discussed, showing its potential as an additional diagnostic modality which could aid in disease management and timing of surgical intervention.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  14. Brain magnetic resonance imaging examination in a patient with non-magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Nakai, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical dilemmas arise when patients with a non-magnetic resonance (MR conditional pacemaker are required to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We encountered a pacemaker patient with debilitating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson׳s disease, who required an MRI prior to deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery. MRI was performed safely without adverse events despite the presence of a conventional pacemaker.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance of calcified tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-04-01

    MRI of the human body is largely made possible by the favorable relaxation properties of protons of water and triacyl glycerides prevalent in soft tissues. Hard tissues - key among them bone - are generally less amenable to measurement with in vivo MR imaging techniques, not so much as a result of the lower proton density but rather due to the extremely short life-times of the proton signal in water bound to solid-like entities, typically collagen, or being trapped in micro-pores. Either mechanism can enhance T2 relaxation by up to three orders of magnitude relative to their soft-tissue counterparts. Detection of these protons requires solid-state techniques that have emerged in recent years and that promise to add a new dimension to the study of hard tissues. Alternative approaches to probe calcified tissues exploit their characteristic magnetic properties. Bone, teeth and extra-osseous calcium-containing biomaterials are unique in that they are more diamagnetic than all other tissues and thus yield information indirectly by virtue of the induced magnetic fields present in their vicinity. Progress has also been made in methods allowing very high-resolution structural imaging of trabecular and cortical bone relying on detection of the surrounding soft-tissues. This brief review, much of it drawn from work conducted in the author's laboratory, seeks to highlight opportunities with focus on early-stage developments for image-based assessment of structure, function, physiology and mechanics of calcified tissues in humans via liquid and solid-state approaches, including proton, deuteron and phosphorus NMR and MRI.

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F.; Cho, Aaron A.; Edward, Neeraj J.; Edward, Deepak P.; Fajardo, Roman G.

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Cho, Aaron A. [Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Edward, Neeraj J. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Edward, Deepak P. [King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fajardo, Roman G. [University of California, San Diego, Shiley Eye Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  1. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesch, C.; Issakainen, J.; Kewitz, G.; Kikinis, R.; Martin, E.; Boltshauser, E.

    1989-01-01

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesch, C.; Issakainen, J.; Kewitz, G.; Kikinis, R.; Martin, E.; Boltshauser, E.

    1989-01-01

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT. (orig.)

  4. Recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugurbil, K.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging permits the visualization of anatomical structures in the living human brain with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast. Recent developments, however, not only significantly improved anatomical imaging but have also added totally new and novel dimensions to MR imaging, namely the ability to measure and image functional, physiological, and metabolic parameters in the human brain. These applications are ultimately limited by signal-to-noise ratio of the MR methodology and therefore are helped by the recent introduction of high magnetic fields for the use of human studies

  5. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method [fr

  6. UK Biobank's cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Steffen E; Matthews, Paul M; Francis, Jane M; Robson, Matthew D; Zemrak, Filip; Boubertakh, Redha; Young, Alistair A; Hudson, Sarah; Weale, Peter; Garratt, Steve; Collins, Rory; Piechnik, Stefan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    UK Biobank's ambitious aim is to perform cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in 100,000 people previously recruited into this prospective cohort study of half a million 40-69 year-olds. We describe the CMR protocol applied in UK Biobank's pilot phase, which will be extended into the main phase with three centres using the same equipment and protocols. The CMR protocol includes white blood CMR (sagittal anatomy, coronary and transverse anatomy), cine CMR (long axis cines, short axis cines of the ventricles, coronal LVOT cine), strain CMR (tagging), flow CMR (aortic valve flow) and parametric CMR (native T1 map). This report will serve as a reference to researchers intending to use the UK Biobank resource or to replicate the UK Biobank cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol in different settings.

  7. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method.

  8. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lisa; Damodaram, Mellisa S; Allsop, Joanna M; McGuinness, Amy; Wylezinska, Marzena; Kumar, Sailesh; Rutherford, Mary A

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become an established technique in fetal medicine, providing complementary information to ultrasound in studies of the brain. MRI can provide detailed structural information irrespective of the position of the fetal head or maternal habitus. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) is based on the same physical principles as MRI but data are collected as a spectrum, allowing the biochemical and metabolic status of in vivo tissue to be studied in a non-invasive manner. (1)HMRS has been used to assess metabolic function in the neonatal brain but fetal studies have been limited, primarily due to fetal motion. This review will assess the technique and findings from fetal studies to date. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  10. The value of stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for patients referred from the adult congenital heart disease clinic: 5-year experience at the Toronto General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deva, Djeven P; Torres, Felipe S; Wald, Rachel M; Roche, S Lucy; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Oechslin, Erwin N; Crean, Andrew M

    2014-10-01

    Vasodilator stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is a clinically useful tool for detection of clinically significant myocardial ischaemia in adults. We report our 5-year retrospective experience with perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in a large, quarternary adult congenital heart disease centre. We reviewed all cases of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients referred from the adult congenital heart disease service. Dipyridamole stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance was undertaken on commercially available 1.5 and 3 T cardiovascular magnetic resonance scanners. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging was performed 8-10 minutes after completion of the rest perfusion sequence. Navigator whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography was also performed where feasible. RESULTS of stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance were correlated with complementary imaging studies, surgery, and clinical outcomes. Over 5 years, we performed 34 stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations (11 positive). In all, 84% of patients had further investigations for ischaemia in addition to cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Within a subgroup of 19 patients who had definitive alternative assessment of their coronary arteries, stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 100%. Of the 34 studies, two were false negatives, in which the aetiology of ischaemia was extrinsic arterial compression rather than intrinsic coronary luminal narrowing. Coronary abnormalities were identified in 71% of cases who had coronary magnetic resonance angiography. Stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a useful and accurate tool for investigation of myocardial ischaemia in an adult congenital heart disease population with suspected non-atherosclerotic coronary abnormalities.

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup....

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance - from molecules to man

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Initial observations of the physical phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) date back to the late 1940s. In the following two decades high-resolution NMR in solution became an indispensible analytical tool in chemistry, and solid state NMR had an increasingly important role in physics. Some of the potentialities of the method for investigations of complex biological systems had also long been anticipated, and initial experiments with biological specimens were described already 30 year...

  13. Force-detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Poggio, M.; Herzog, B. E.

    2017-01-01

    The drive to improve the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to smaller and smaller sample volumes has led to the development of a variety of techniques distinct from conventional inductive detection. In this chapter, we focus on the technique of force-detected NMR as one of the most successful in yielding sensitivity improvements. We review the rationale for the technique, its basic principles, and give a brief history of its most important results. We then cover in greater detai...

  14. Polyorchidism: Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A. Y.; Sahin, C.; Pocan, S.; Kizilkaya, E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyorchidism is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with maldescent testis, hernia, and torsion. Reports in the literature show an increased risk of testicular malignancy in the presence of polyorchidism. This entity has characteristic sonographic features and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging might also be used for the diagnosis, but is more helpful in cases associated with cryptorchism or neoplasia. A conservative approach is the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases

  15. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  16. Polyorchidism: Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A. Y.; Sahin, C.; Pocan, S.; Kizilkaya, E. [Gazi Univ. School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Polyorchidism is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with maldescent testis, hernia, and torsion. Reports in the literature show an increased risk of testicular malignancy in the presence of polyorchidism. This entity has characteristic sonographic features and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging might also be used for the diagnosis, but is more helpful in cases associated with cryptorchism or neoplasia. A conservative approach is the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.J. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway))

    1989-04-01

    The signal intensity of a hematoma at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is largely determined by the presence of paramagnetic substances derived from hemoglobin. Depending upon their structure and molecular mobility, paramagnetic substances may shorten the T1 and T2 of surrounding water protons and thus alter the MRI signal intensity and contrast. The article describes the evolution of intracranial hematomas and explains the relationship between the paramagnetic substance present and the result signal intensity at 1.5 T.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulen, R L; Budinger, T F; Higgins, C B

    1985-03-01

    To evaluate the safety of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prosthetic heart valves, nine different synthetic and tissue valves were studied ex vivo. Deflection was measured in 0.35-tesla (T) and 1.5-T superconducting magnets and at the edge of the bore of a 2.35-T electromagnet in field gradients of 5, 1.1, and 6.3 mT/cm, respectively. No valve deflected in the 0.35-T magnet; six synthetic valves deflected 0.25 degrees-3 degrees in the 1.5-T magnet; all valves deflected 1 degree-27 degrees at the edge of the 2.35-T magnet. Each valve was then submerged in a vial of water and the temperature was measured immediately before and after each of two spin-echo imaging sequences in the two superconducting magnets. No significant temperature rise followed exposure in either magnet. Image distortion varied from negligible to severe in both imagers; magnitude of distortion paralleled magnitude of deflection. These data suggest that patients with present-day prosthetic heart valves can be safely imaged in present-day MR imagers and that prosthesis-induced artifacts will not interfere with interpretation in most instances.

  19. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dias Barranhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate and describe indications, mainly diagnoses and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings observed in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Retrospective and descriptive study of cardiac magnetic resonance performed at a private hospital and clinic in the city of Niterói, RJ, Brazil, in the period from May 2007 to April 2011. Results The sample included a total of 1000 studies performed in patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.2 years and predominance for male gender (57.2%. The majority of indications were related to assessment of myocardial perfusion at rest and under pharmacological stress (507/1000; 51%, with positive results in 36.2% of them. Suspected myocarditis was the second most frequent indication (140/1000; 14%, with positive results in 63.4% of cases. These two indications were followed by study of arrhythmias (116/1000; 12%, myocardial viability (69/1000; 7% and evaluation of cardiomyopathies (47/1000; 5%. In a subanalysis, it was possible to identify that most patients were assessed on an outpatient basis (58.42%. Conclusion Cardiac magnetic resonance has been routinely performed in clinical practice, either on an outpatient or emergency/inpatient basis, and myocardial ischemia represented the main indication, followed by investigation of myocarditis, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and myocardial viability.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee osteonecrosis: a study of 19 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Daniel Leme da; Ribeiro, Elisio Jose Salgado; Domingues, Romeu Cortes, E-mail: danielc@predialnet.com.b [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pires Carvalho, Antonio Carlos [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2010-04-15

    Objective: to describe epidemiological, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteonecrosis in the distal femur and proximal tibia. Materials and methods: evaluation of 19 patients (12 women and 7 men), with no previous history of causative factors, with magnetic resonance imaging findings suggestive of osteonecrosis in the tibial plateau or femoral condyle. Results: osteochondral abnormalities were observed in 63.1% of the cases; in 73.6% of them, such abnormality was associated with ipsilateral meniscal lesion. Also, a significant association with bone marrow edema (grade III in 16 cases) was observed. Conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated to be a noninvasive method with good sensitivity in the diagnosis of knee osteonecrosis as well as of associated lesions which are most frequently found in women (63% of cases). (author)

  2. Advanced techniques in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children with ADHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastura, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.pastura@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Pediatria; Mattos, Paulo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Psiquiatria; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Radiologia; Araujo, Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Neuropediatria

    2011-04-15

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects about 5% of school-aged child. Previous published works using different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have demonstrated that there may be some differences between the brain of people with and without this condition. This review aims at providing neurologists, pediatricians and psychiatrists an update on the differences between the brain of children with and without ADHD using advanced techniques of magnetic resonance imaging such as diffusion tensor imaging, brain volumetry and cortical thickness, spectroscopy and functional MRI. Data was obtained by a comprehensive, non-systematic review of medical literature. The regions with a greater number of abnormalities are splenium of the corpus callosum, cingulated gyrus, caudate nucleus, cerebellum, striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. The brain regions where abnormalities are observed in studies of diffusion tensor, volumetry, spectroscopy and cortical thickness are the same involved in neurobiological theories of ADHD coming from studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee osteonecrosis: a study of 19 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Daniel Leme da; Ribeiro, Elisio Jose Salgado; Domingues, Romeu Cortes; Pires Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to describe epidemiological, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteonecrosis in the distal femur and proximal tibia. Materials and methods: evaluation of 19 patients (12 women and 7 men), with no previous history of causative factors, with magnetic resonance imaging findings suggestive of osteonecrosis in the tibial plateau or femoral condyle. Results: osteochondral abnormalities were observed in 63.1% of the cases; in 73.6% of them, such abnormality was associated with ipsilateral meniscal lesion. Also, a significant association with bone marrow edema (grade III in 16 cases) was observed. Conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated to be a noninvasive method with good sensitivity in the diagnosis of knee osteonecrosis as well as of associated lesions which are most frequently found in women (63% of cases). (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of true placenta accreta: a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Tarachkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available True placenta accreta is the attachment of chorionic villi to the myometrium, possibly penetrating into the thickness of the myometrium and its outside, including through the serous tunic. The main current diagnostic techniques are considered to be ultrasonography, laboratory diagnosis (elevated human chorionic gonadotropin and placental lactogen levels, and clinical data (pain and vaginal discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging is deemed to be an adjuvant technique. By using a clinical example, this paper considers the capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose this abnormality and to choose a right treatment policy. The abnormality is compared with the conditions (trophoblastic tumor and myoma with lysis that are similar in their diagnosis and magnetic resonance pattern. The disorder in question is rather rare and its detailed consideration, determination of the capabilities of various techniques, and comparison with externally similar cases areimportant for the development of diagnostic opportunities.

  5. Advanced techniques in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children with ADHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastura, Giuseppe; Mattos, Paulo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Araujo, Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos

    2011-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects about 5% of school-aged child. Previous published works using different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have demonstrated that there may be some differences between the brain of people with and without this condition. This review aims at providing neurologists, pediatricians and psychiatrists an update on the differences between the brain of children with and without ADHD using advanced techniques of magnetic resonance imaging such as diffusion tensor imaging, brain volumetry and cortical thickness, spectroscopy and functional MRI. Data was obtained by a comprehensive, non-systematic review of medical literature. The regions with a greater number of abnormalities are splenium of the corpus callosum, cingulated gyrus, caudate nucleus, cerebellum, striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. The brain regions where abnormalities are observed in studies of diffusion tensor, volumetry, spectroscopy and cortical thickness are the same involved in neurobiological theories of ADHD coming from studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  6. H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Rodiger, Lars A.; Meiners, Linda C.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.

    Context: In monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene deficiency, a syndrome combining thyroid and neurological abnormalities, the central nervous system has not yet been characterized by magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. Objective: We studied whether the degree of dysmyelinization in MCT8 gene

  7. Electro-mechanical resonant magnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temnykh, A.B.; Lovelace, R.V.E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor, which is termed as an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore, a high Q fundamental mode of frequency f 1 . An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type by using for the elastic element, a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light-emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001 G for an applied magnetic field of ∼1 G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of ∼10-100 by a more sensitive measurement of the elastic element motion and by having the element in vacuum to reduce the drag force

  8. Nuclear resonance apparatus including means for rotating a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus including magnet apparatus for generating a homogeneous static magnetic field between its magnetic poles, shims of a magnetic substance mounted on the magnetic poles to apply a first gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in a direction orthogonal as to the direction of line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field, gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus for generating a second gradient magnetic field having a gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in superimposition with the static magnetic field and for changing the magnetic field gradient of the first gradient magnetic field, an oscillator for generating an oscillating output having a frequency corresponding to the nuclear magnetic resonance condition of an atomic nucleus to be measured, a coil wound around a body to be examined for applying the output of said oscillator as electromagnetic waves upon the body, a receiver for detecting the nuclear magnetic resonance signals received by the coil, a gradient magnetic field controller making a magnetic field line equivalent to the combined gradient magnetic fields and for rotating the line along the section of the body to be examined by controlling said gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus and devices for recording the nuclear magnetic resonance signals, for reconstructing the concentration distribution of the specific atomic nuclei in the section of the body, and a display unit for depicting the result of reconstruction

  9. Agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging including phase-contrast magnetic resonance venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.; Oddo, F.; Diaine, B.; Padovani, B.; Baldini, E.; Peten, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Two cases of agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein are reported. This very rare vascular anomaly probably corresponds to an embryological variation rather than to an obstruction of the left portal vein. In almost all cases liver ultrasonography is sufficient for identifying such vascular abnormalities. It shows a large aberrant vessel emerging from a right anterior segmental portal branch and running transversely in the quadrate lobe towards the teres ligamentum from which the portal supply to the left lobe arises. It is important to be able to recognize the magnetic resonance imaging features of this vascular variation, as magnetic resonance imaging may be the initial imaging study, and ultrasound may be technically challenging. To our knowledge, we present the first description of these features, including an enhanced gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence, a turbo spin-echo T2-weighted sequence with fat saturation, and a three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance portography. (orig.)

  10. First national meeting of magnetic resonance and hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    Works performed at CNEA's: Magnetic Resonance Division; Moessbauer Spectroscopy; Solid State Physics Division; Nuclear magnetic Resonance Laboratory and Theoretical Physics Group; Mossbauer Spectroscopy Group; Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance; Physics and Materials Group; Perturbed Angular Correlation and Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Physics Department. (M.E.L.) [es

  11. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strózik-Kotlorz, D.

    2014-01-01

    I give a brief description of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the human brain examinations. MRS allows a noninvasive chemical analysis of the brain using a standard high field MR system. Nowadays, the dominant form of MR brain spectroscopy is proton spectroscopy. Two main techniques of MRS, which utilize the chemical shift of metabolites in the external magnetic field, are SVS (single voxel) and CSI (single slice). The major peaks in the spectrum of a normal brain include NAA, Cr, Cho and m-Ins, which are neuronal, energetic, membrane turnover and glial markers, respectively. In disease, two pathological metabolites can be found in the brain spectra: Lac, which is end product of anaerobic glycolysis and Lip, which is a marker of membrane breakdown, occurring in necrosis. The common way to analyze clinical spectra is to determine metabolite ratios, e.g. NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA. This analysis permits a safe and noninvasive examination of the brain tissue as each disease state has its own characteristic spectroscopic image. MRS is a valuable diagnostic tool in such clinical applications as detecting brain tumors and differentiating tumors from inflammatory and infectious processes. Proton MRS is also very helpful in diagnostic of ischemic lesions, Alzheimer's disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The MRS brain spectra should always be correlated with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results and alone cannot make neurological diagnosis.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  14. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M; Shames, A I; Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M; McDonough, J K; Mochalin, V N; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp 2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  15. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually exclusive and impingement might be a subtle, unrecognized cause of Achilles tendinopathy and subsequent rupture. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the male pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarque, J.L.; Rouanet, J.P.; Pujol, J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present their preliminary results in the investigation of the male pelvis by means of a 0.35 Tesla superconductor apparatus. They present the different sequences used. The signal of the various pelvic organs in man is analysed together with the different anatomical possibilities. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to present very important advantages. The authors consider that the major limitations involve the prostate: new sequences of investigation, in particular a long TR, should be used for the purposes of tissue differentiation [fr

  17. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodne, D.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, G.P.; Martin, B.; Tubiana, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed in 18 patients with proven endometriosis. MRI findings were analyzed and compared with laparoscopic or surgical findings; MRI accurately demonstrated ovarian endometrial cysts as well as ectopic foci of endometriosis. Adhesions may be also suggested. Contrary to laparoscopy, MRI easily depicts both deep lesions and endometrial implants under the peritoneum. Consequently, MRI appears as an useful adjunct to laparoscopy for initial diagnosis before starting a medical treatment and above all as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of the answer to treatment, avoiding iterative and often adhesions limited laparoscopies. (author). 7 refs.; 9 figs

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosa, Hirofumi; Yamano, Kouichirou; Ihara, Fumitoshi; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Maekawa, Masayuki; Tokuhisa, Ginichirou; Kuwano, Tadashi; Kamo, Yoshi; Nomura, Shigeharu (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Forty-three patients operated for cervical myelopathy were examined with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cord compression was demonstrated directly on the sagittal image in cases of cervical disc herniation, cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. Herniated disc material was seen positive on axial image. But factors of cord compression in cases of cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. were not clearly confirmed, so additional examinations such as myelogram, tomogram and CT was needed. (author).

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Alessandro; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  4. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S Hedgire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up.

  5. Lateral patellar luxation: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, V.; Pulpeiro, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the magnetic resonance (MR) findings associated with lateral patellar luxation. The series consisted of eight patients, all of whom presented joint effusion, damage to the medical retinaculum and cortical contusion or fracture of medical aspect of the patella or of anterolateral surface of the outer condyle. Five patients also presented patellar sub luxation. Diagnosis depends on the technique employed, with axial planes being very useful. Thus, it is recommended that they be used as the standard plane, especially in pathologies that are clinically unsuspicious as in this case. MR can also provide information that leads to surgical treatment rather than the standard conservative treatment. (Author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  7. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Bisset, G.S. III; Myer, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  9. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  10. Fast magnetic resonance imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; McLean, K.

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective comparison between fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences and conventional spin-echo in a series of 20 patients, gradient-echo imaging was found to be inferior to spin-echo, especially in the visualization of: spinal cord oedema, and the use of a rapid spin-echo sequence was limited by inferior visualization of hemorrhage. While the use of a combination of these two fast imaging techniques resulted in equivalent results to conventional spin-echo, the increased imaging time suggests that fast MRI cannot, as yet, replace conventional spin-echo techniques in acute spinal trauma. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  11. Magnetic resonance of the renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauquil, P.; Hiesse, C.; Say, C.; Verdier, J.P.; Cauquil, M.; Brunet, A.M.; Galindo, R.; Tessier, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for renal insufficiency. Progress of surgical techniques and immuno-suppression have lead to better results. One year graft survival rate are 80% in most series. In this article, the role of imaging in renal transplantation, is defined. In surgical complications (fluid collections, obstruction, vascular insufficiency) non invasive radiology and interventionnal radiologic procedures have a great impact. Despite the perspectives of duplex and magnetic resonance, sensibility and specificity are not yet specified in medical complications: rejection, acute tubular necrosis, infection, drug toxicity. Association of these lesions is frequent and complicate analysis of results. Finally, transplant biopsy is still necessary to confirm the diagnosis [fr

  12. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel GONZALO-DOMÍNGUEZ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of glenohumeral joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Rozing, P.; Doornbos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the application of oblique planes and flexible surface coil techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to be of great clinical value in the evaluation of a variety of pathologic conditions affecting the shoulder. In patients with joint effusions, the tendinous portion of the rotator cuff, glenoid labrum, and bicipital tendon can be readily visualized. This capability has particular relevance in patients with inflammatory disease and traumatic conditions. Rotator cuff atrophy and impingement of the coracoacromial arc upon the supraspinatus muscle and tendon can also be demonstrated. MRI is also useful in the evaluation of shoulder instability. (orig.)

  15. Nanoplatforms for magnetic resonance imaging of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywinska, M. A.; Grudzinski, I. P.; Cieszanowski, A.; Bystrzejewski, M.; Poplawska, M.

    2011-01-01

    The application of biomedical nanotechnology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is expect to have a major impact leading to the development of new contrast drug candidates on the nanoscale (1 - 100 nm) that are able to react with specific biological targets at a molecular level. One of the major challenges in this regard is the construction of nanomaterials, especially used in molecular MRI diagnostics of cancer in vivo, specialized antitumor drug delivery or real-time evaluation of the efficacy of the implemented cancer treatment. In this paper, we tried to gain further insights into current trends of nanomedicine, with special focus on preclinical MRI studies in translation cancer research. (authors)

  16. IMPROVING MAGNETIC RESONANCE RESOLUTION WITH SUPERVISED LEARNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Amod; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry L

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing improvements in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI), considerable clinical and, to a lesser extent, research data is acquired at lower resolutions. For example 1 mm isotropic acquisition of T 1 -weighted ( T 1 -w) Magnetization Prepared Rapid Gradient Echo (MPRAGE) is standard practice, however T 2 -weighted ( T 2 -w)-because of its longer relaxation times (and thus longer scan time)-is still routinely acquired with slice thicknesses of 2-5 mm and in-plane resolution of 2-3 mm. This creates obvious fundamental problems when trying to process T 1 -w and T 2 -w data in concert. We present an automated supervised learning algorithm to generate high resolution data. The framework is similar to the brain hallucination work of Rousseau, taking advantage of new developments in regression based image reconstruction. We present validation on phantom and real data, demonstrating the improvement over state-of-the-art super-resolution techniques.

  17. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  18. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  19. Shimadzu magnetic resonance imaging system, SMT-50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Shiro; Nishida, Takayuki; Fujio, Yasuo

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, as a new modality of medical imaging, has already been put to practical applications on many clinical sites, through which a lot of clinical data has been accumulated. It can offer a powerful new probe of internal anatomy of the human body and its functions. Now that the MRI has established its effectiveness in diagnosis, a really practical MRI system which features high efficiency and economical design with high patient throughput is strongly called for. Introduced in this article is a superconductive magnet MRI system, SMT-50, operating at 5000 Gauss. It has realized an excellent diagnostic capability with such functions as multi-slice multi-echo imaging, high sensitive, surface coil technique and so on. High resolution image display (1024 x 1024 pixcel) unit and separate console system (viewing console and scanning console) will assist high patient throughput. The outline of the SMT-50 and its clinical data are reported here. (author)

  20. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... that were synthesized in project I and II. In project I, Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly (ethylene glycol)-Folate Pefluorooctyl Bromide/Indocyanine green/ Doxorubicin (PLGA-PEG-Folate PFOB/ICG/Dox) has been formulated for the dual imaging NIR and 19F MRI as well as in the combination of Dox...

  1. Role of magnetic resonance urography in pediatric renal fusion anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Sherwin S. [Children' s Mercy Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Ntoulia, Aikaterini; Khrichenko, Dmitry [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Body Imaging, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Back, Susan J.; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Body Imaging, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tasian, Gregory E. [University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Thoracoabdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Renal fusion is on a spectrum of congenital abnormalities that occur due to disruption of the migration process of the embryonic kidneys from the pelvis to the retroperitoneal renal fossae. Clinically, renal fusion anomalies are often found incidentally and associated with increased risk for complications, such as urinary tract obstruction, infection and urolithiasis. These anomalies are most commonly imaged using ultrasound for anatomical definition and less frequently using renal scintigraphy to quantify differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. Functional magnetic resonance urography (fMRU) is an advanced imaging technique that combines the excellent soft-tissue contrast of conventional magnetic resonance (MR) images with the quantitative assessment based on contrast medium uptake and excretion kinetics to provide information on renal function and drainage. fMRU has been shown to be clinically useful in evaluating a number of urological conditions. A highly sensitive and radiation-free imaging modality, fMRU can provide detailed morphological and functional information that can facilitate conservative and/or surgical management of children with renal fusion anomalies. This paper reviews the embryological basis of the different types of renal fusion anomalies, their imaging appearances at fMRU, complications associated with fusion anomalies, and the important role of fMRU in diagnosing and managing children with these anomalies. (orig.)

  2. Role of magnetic resonance urography in pediatric renal fusion anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Sherwin S.; Ntoulia, Aikaterini; Khrichenko, Dmitry; Back, Susan J.; Darge, Kassa; Tasian, Gregory E.; Dillman, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Renal fusion is on a spectrum of congenital abnormalities that occur due to disruption of the migration process of the embryonic kidneys from the pelvis to the retroperitoneal renal fossae. Clinically, renal fusion anomalies are often found incidentally and associated with increased risk for complications, such as urinary tract obstruction, infection and urolithiasis. These anomalies are most commonly imaged using ultrasound for anatomical definition and less frequently using renal scintigraphy to quantify differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. Functional magnetic resonance urography (fMRU) is an advanced imaging technique that combines the excellent soft-tissue contrast of conventional magnetic resonance (MR) images with the quantitative assessment based on contrast medium uptake and excretion kinetics to provide information on renal function and drainage. fMRU has been shown to be clinically useful in evaluating a number of urological conditions. A highly sensitive and radiation-free imaging modality, fMRU can provide detailed morphological and functional information that can facilitate conservative and/or surgical management of children with renal fusion anomalies. This paper reviews the embryological basis of the different types of renal fusion anomalies, their imaging appearances at fMRU, complications associated with fusion anomalies, and the important role of fMRU in diagnosing and managing children with these anomalies. (orig.)

  3. State of the art and future of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    In less than 8 years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from a research tool to a diagnostic imaging modality of major clinical importance. No longer is MRI a supplementary examination. Due to its innate sensitivity to tissue abnormality, MRI should be the first imaging study for suspected intracranial tumor pathology either primary or metastatic. Many technological advances have occurred within the past year which promise to overcome some of MRI's limitations so that it not only compares favorably to but excels the capabilities of computerized tomography. The addition of many sophisticated technologies to a technology of such major clinical importance clearly indicates that the future of MRI is bright and that it is and will undoubtedly continue to be a major and important imaging modality. (Auth.)

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Sorantin, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: Current status, new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.; Holt, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    A number of techniques for magnetic resonance imaging of the knee are reviewed. Spin-echo imaging sequences are at present the most widely used and are capable of demonstrating a wide range of pathology including cruciate and collateral ligament tears, meniscal abnormalities, and synovial disease. Fast scan imaging provides effective T2-weighting without the time penalty of T2-weighted spin-echo imaging. These fast scan techniques have also permitted the development of novel sequences including radial techniques and three-dimensional Fourier transform/volume acquisition (which may potentially become the imaging technique of choice in the knee). Inversion recovery may play an important role in evaluating cartilage disorders in the future. The strengths of each technique are discussed together with possible clinical applications. (orig.)

  6. Central nervous system lymphoma: magnetic resonance imaging features at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schwingel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This paper aimed at studying presentations of the central nervous system (CNS lymphoma using structural images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: The MRI features at presentation of 15 patients diagnosed with CNS lymphoma in a university hospital, between January 1999 and March 2011, were analyzed by frequency and cross tabulation. RESULTS: All patients had supratentorial lesions; and four had infra- and supratentorial lesions. The signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images was predominantly hypo- or isointense. In the T2 weighted images, single lesions were associated with a hypointense signal component. Six patients presented necrosis, all of them showed perilesional abnormal white matter, nine had meningeal involvement, and five had subependymal spread. Subependymal spread and meningeal involvement tended to occur in younger patients. CONCLUSION: Presentations of lymphoma are very pleomorphic, but some of them should point to this diagnostic possibility.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of Achilles tendon xanthomas in familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, M.S.L.; Bloem, J.L.; Schipper, J.

    1992-01-01

    The demonstration of tendon xanthomas is helpful in diagnosing heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. We investigated the possibility the lipid element with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in seven patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and six controls. Although the mean relative signal intensities measured on long TR/TE spin echo sequences of the tendon were significantly higher in patients than in controls, the lack of such elevation does not rule out the presence of such lesions. MR imaging and US provide equal information on the anatomy of the Achilles tendon; as an abnormally increased signal intensity within the xanthoma on MRI was found in only a minority of our patients, the value of MRI in the demonstration of Achilles tendon xanthomas is limited when using conventional T1 and T2 spin echo sequences. (orig./DG)

  8. Localised proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confort-Gouny, S. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), URA, CNRS, Faculte de Medicine, 13 - Marseille (France); Vion-Dury, J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), URA, CNRS, Faculte de Medicine, 13 - Marseille (France); Cozzone, P.J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), URA, CNRS, Faculte de Medicine, 13 - Marseille (France); Chabrol, B. [Service de Neuropediatrie, Hospital d`Enfants, Centre Hospitalo Universitaire, 13 - Marseille (France); Nicoli, F. [Service de Neurologie, Hopital Ste Margeurite, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1995-10-01

    We have performed localised proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain on four patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The spectrum is characterised at the beginning of the disease by a decrease in N-acetylaspartate and phosphocreatine-creatine content. Choline is strongly increased, and lactate can be detected in some cases. A proton signal from the CH{sub 2} groups borne by free intracellular very long chain fatty acids can also be observed. Later in the disease, the levels of all metabolites, in particular NAA, decrease significantly. The progression of neurometabolism documented by MRS correlates well with MRI and clinical progression on follow-up study. In one case, the metabolic profile recorded by proton MRS was abnormal before any change occurred on MRI. Proton MRS of the brain might be the method of choice for monitoring patients with X-ALD, to screen presumed cases and to study the effects of treatment. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of normal and pathologic fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta, M; Burdi, N; Medicamento, N

    1998-01-01

    A total of 78 pregnant patients who had previously been studied by ultrasound (US) underwent magnetic resonance (MRI) because of suspected fetal abnormality. The first 20 cases were performed using fetal curarization. Even in the 27 cases in which the MR examination concerned other body regions, a brain study was always performed to analyze the normal anatomy at different gestational ages. There is a brief discussion on normal MRI anatomy of the fetal brain. There were 45 studies that concerned central nervous system pathology, and the most frequent malformative and neoplastic disorders were revealed. A comparison between MRI and US is proposed for each. In conclusion, MRI can be regarded as a complementary method that can be helpful in the rare cases when the US diagnosis is doubtful.

  10. Magnetic resonance findings in arrhythmogenic dysplasia of right ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramiro, E.; Villacastin, B. P.; Farre, J.

    1999-01-01

    To compare the magnetic resonance (MR) findings in patients with arrhythmogenic dysplasia of right ventricle (ADRV) with the images of right ventricle (RV) presenting normal morphology. Three groups of patients were studied by MR: a) a group of 20 healthy volunteers; b) 22 patients with ADRV diagnosed by other methods; and c) 11 patients presenting right ventricular tachycardia (VT) with no evidence of ADRV. When compared with the other two groups, the patients with ADRV were found to have an enlarged right atrium and RV, one wall of RV abnormally thin, changes in the myocardial signal and significant left ventricular involvement. MR is a noninvasive method that is useful in the assessment of RV dilation, ventricular wall thinning, deformities and sacculations and in the detection of changes in the myocardial MR signal produced by the replacement. It aids in the localization, characterization and quantification of morphological changes in RV. (Author) 36 refs

  11. Cerebellopontine angle lipomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Rafael S.; Domingues, Romeu C.; Gasparetto, Emerson L.

    2009-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas are the most common lesions of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), accounting for approximately 85-90% of the tumors seen in this location. Lipomas are rare at this topography, representing about 0.15% of the CPA lesions. These tumors are mal developmental masses that arise from abnormal differentiation of the meninx primitive. Clinically, CPA lipomas can cause slowly progressive neurological symptoms and signs affecting cranial nerves or brain stem. Because these lesions usually are strongly attached to the surrounding structures, any surgical attempts of complete resection can result in neural or vascular damage, reinforcing the importance of the pre-operative imaging diagnosis. Although the CT findings of CPA lipomas can be typical, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, especially the fat suppression sequences, had improved the identification of these lesions. We aimed to report two patients with a CPA lipoma, emphasizing the MR imaging findings. (author)

  12. Role of magnetic resonance imaging cephalometry in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, N L N; Reddy, P Navaneeth Sagar; Aruna, T; Chander, D Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is one of the most common public health problems in adults. Patients with OSA are prone for excessive adipose tissue deposition in the neck, which in turn, increases the upper airway narrowing. Of the imaging modalities available for assessing the upper airway, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is found to be useful technique for defining soft tissue abnormalities. We prospectively studied 50 patients presenting with OSA and 50 normal controls to evaluate the role of MRI cephalometry in the diagnosis of OSA and compared the cross-sectional area and antero-posterior diameter of the upper airway in the retro-palatal airway and retro-glossal areas by MRI cephalometry. In comparison with controls, cases had a significantly lower cross-sectional area and antero-posterior diameter of the upper airway in the retro-palatal airway and retro-glossal areas. Our observations suggest that MRI cephalometry is a sensitive technique for the diagnosis of OSA.

  13. The emerging role of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, P.L.; Vellet, A.D.; Romano, C.; Levin, M.F.; Harth, M.F.; Bell, D.A. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1994-08-01

    The current applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were reviewed, with special emphasis on rheumatoid practice. MRI was found to be the most powerful tool currently available for detecting avascular necrosis at a stage when the condition might still be reversible, especially for hip cases. MRI can also be used to visualize abnormal synovial tissue, effusion, and loose bodies and debris within the joint. Tendonitis and tendosynovitis are other applications for MRI because of the sensitivity of MRI to changes in free water content. Interest has recently increased in the use of MRI in the assessment of neuromuscular disorders, for example dermatomyositis. The fact that MRI is non-invasive makes it particularly suitable for the assessment of a large variety of other immunologic and musculoskeletal conditions. 5 figs., 44 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord trauma: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2006-04-15

    Assessing a patient with clinical signs of acute spinal cord trauma is an emergency. A radiological work-up is crucial in determining management, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice. It should therefore be performed immediately, preferably within 3 hours, even when plain radiography does not show an abnormality. By choosing an appropriate imaging protocol, it is possible to assess the spinal cord, joints, muscles, ligaments and bone marrow of the spine. Moreover, early MRI findings assist in determining functional prognosis. A major limitation to early MRI is that the examination is usually restricted to stable trauma patients because of the difficulties in monitoring ventilated patients during scanning. However, when an anaesthesiologist with experience in MRI and MR-compatible monitoring equipment is available, even these patients can be safely examined. MRI is also indicated for the evaluation of patients with late complications and sequelae following spinal cord trauma, since many of these chronic lesions are potentially treatable. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord trauma: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Assessing a patient with clinical signs of acute spinal cord trauma is an emergency. A radiological work-up is crucial in determining management, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice. It should therefore be performed immediately, preferably within 3 hours, even when plain radiography does not show an abnormality. By choosing an appropriate imaging protocol, it is possible to assess the spinal cord, joints, muscles, ligaments and bone marrow of the spine. Moreover, early MRI findings assist in determining functional prognosis. A major limitation to early MRI is that the examination is usually restricted to stable trauma patients because of the difficulties in monitoring ventilated patients during scanning. However, when an anaesthesiologist with experience in MRI and MR-compatible monitoring equipment is available, even these patients can be safely examined. MRI is also indicated for the evaluation of patients with late complications and sequelae following spinal cord trauma, since many of these chronic lesions are potentially treatable. (orig.)

  16. Cerebellopontine angle lipomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Rafael S. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Brito, Cecilia Castelo Branco [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Carvalho, Gustavo A. [Clinica Bambina, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Neurocirurgia; Hospital Silvestre, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinicas CDPI e Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Clinicas CDPI e Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas are the most common lesions of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), accounting for approximately 85-90% of the tumors seen in this location. Lipomas are rare at this topography, representing about 0.15% of the CPA lesions. These tumors are mal developmental masses that arise from abnormal differentiation of the meninx primitive. Clinically, CPA lipomas can cause slowly progressive neurological symptoms and signs affecting cranial nerves or brain stem. Because these lesions usually are strongly attached to the surrounding structures, any surgical attempts of complete resection can result in neural or vascular damage, reinforcing the importance of the pre-operative imaging diagnosis. Although the CT findings of CPA lipomas can be typical, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, especially the fat suppression sequences, had improved the identification of these lesions. We aimed to report two patients with a CPA lipoma, emphasizing the MR imaging findings. (author)

  17. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus. Imagerie en resonance magnetique et neurolupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M. (Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (FR))

    1990-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T{sub 1} weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones.

  19. Prospects for neutron probed magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granroth, Garrett E.

    2009-01-01

    The information gained from magnetic resonance imaging has provided useful insight into many insulators. Extending this technique to conductors requires an alternative means of spin manipulation besides electromagnetic radiation. A method to use neutron measurement of the Zeeman splitting to measure the relaxation time is described. The Zeeman splitting is observed by a neutron spectrometer as an incoherent signal with an energy transfer equal to the Zeeman energy. This energy scale is so small that fields in excess of 15 T are required to sufficiently separate this line from other incoherent processes. Once the Zeeman splitting is observed, a perturbation of the system is required to enable measurement of the nuclear spin relaxation time; the physical quantity measured in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiment. The proposed perturbation is a pulsed field of 10 T. The relaxation of the Zeeman splitting back to the 15 T condition is then recorded as a function of time. The resultant data is the aforementioned measure of the relaxation time. With the ability to measure the relaxation times the image map can be created by rastering the sample with respect to the beam.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  2. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  5. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  6. Resonances and dipole moments in dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A.; Arslanagic, Samel; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis of metamat......An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author)

  8. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in relapsing neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Gómez, José A; Quevedo-Sotolongo, L; González-Quevedo, A; Lima, S; Real-González, Y; Cristófol-Corominas, M; Romero-García, K; Ugarte-Sánchez, C; Jordán-González, J; de la Nuez, J E González; Lahera, J García; Tellez, R; Pedroso-Ibañez, I; Roca, R Rodríguez; Cabrera-Núñez, A Y

    2007-03-01

    Some studies showed abnormalities in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of relapsing neuromyelitis optica (R-NMO) from 12 to 46%. These abnormalities are described as compatible/non-compatible with multiple sclerosis (MS). To describe the abnormal brain MRI lesions in R-NMO with imaging studies conducted with more sensitive white matter change techniques. Thirty patients with R-NMO were selected. All MRI brain studies were performed with a 1.5-T Siemens MRI system according to the Standardized MR Imaging Protocol for Multiple Sclerosis from the Consortium of MS Centers Consensus Guidelines. Brain MRI images were evaluated in 29 R-NMO cases because in one case the MRI images were not appropriate for the study. Of these 29 brain MRI studies, 19 cases (65.5%) had at least one or more lesions (1-57) and 10 were negative (34.4%). Brain MRI findings in 19 cases were characterized in T2/fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) by the presence of subcortical/deep white matter lesions in 16 (84.2%) cases (1-50), most of them 3 mm, were observed in 4 (21.05%) cases without cerebellar involvement. T1 studies demonstrated absence of hypointense regions. Optic nerve enhancement was observed in 6/19 patients (31.5%). None of the brain MRI abnormalities observed were compatible with Barkhof et al. criteria of MS. This study, based on a Cuban patient population, with long duration of disease, good sample size and detailed characterization by MRI, demonstrated the brain MRI pattern of R-NMO patients, which is different from MS.

  9. Chiral discrimination in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a fundamental property of molecules whose spatial symmetry is characterized by the absence of improper rotations, making them not superimposable to their mirror image. Chiral molecules constitute the elementary building blocks of living species and one enantiomer is favoured in general (e.g. L-aminoacids and D-sugars pervade terrestrial homochiral biochemistry) because most chemical reactions producing natural substances are enantioselective. Since the effect of chiral chemicals and drugs on living beings can be markedly different between enantiomers, the quest for practical spectroscopical methods to scrutinize chirality is an issue of great importance and interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a topmost analytical technique, but spectrometers currently used are ‘blind’ to chirality, i.e. unable to discriminate the two mirror-image forms of a chiral molecule, because, in the absence of a chiral solvent, the spectral parameters, chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants are identical for enantiomers. Therefore, the development of new procedures for routine chiral recognition would offer basic support to scientists. However, in the presence of magnetic fields, a distinction between true and false chirality is mandatory. The former epitomizes natural optical activity, which is rationalized by a time-even pseudoscalar, i.e. the trace of a second-rank tensor, the mixed electric dipole/magnetic dipole polarizability. The Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism and magnetic optical activity are instead related to a time-odd axial vector. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to discriminate enantiomers via NMR spectroscopy, with the focus on the deep connection between chirality and symmetry properties under the combined set of fundamental discrete operations, namely charge conjugation, parity (space inversion) and time (motion) reversal.

  10. Magnetic resonance enteroclysis: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possess several virtues including superb soft-tissue contrast, absence of radiation exposure, cross-sectional and projectional imaging capabilities in all three dimensions and multiple contrast sources, that may favour a comprehensive morphologic and functional evaluation of the small bowel (SB). Ultrafast pulse sequences should be utilized to reduce motion related artifacts arising from physiological motion (respiration and peristalsis). the spatial resolution of these sequences should be high enough to permit demonstration of small lesions i.e. ulcers, that are usually present in small bowel diseases. MRI examination protocols of the small bowel usually comprise T1- and T2- weighted sequences on axial and coronal planes. Both T1- and T2- weighted sequences should be fast enough to allow comfortable breath-hold acquisition times and reduce the motion related artifacts. For T1- weighted images, most authors are using gradient echo sequences in 2D and 3D acquisition modes with or without fat saturation prepulses, while for T2-weighted images, TCE and HASTE sequences are commonly employed. True FISP sequence has been successfully applied in SB imaging, providing high resolution images of the bowel wall and additional information from the mesenteries. Fat suppressed TSE or STIR sequences have been also applied to access Crohn disease activity. True FISP sequence was introduced for MR examination of the small bowel after duodenal intubation. the contrast in true FISP images is somewhat more complex and invoke both T1 and T2 contributions in the form of the T2/T1 ratio. True FISP sequence is excellent in demonstrating the mesenteries, due to high contrast resolution between the bright peritoneal fat and the dark vessels and lymph nodes. Motion related artifacts are minimal on true FISP images due to short acquisition time. As opposed to HASTE sequences, true FISP is insensitive to intraluminal flow voids, due to its balanced

  11. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-01-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  12. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Functional imaging of the human placenta with magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siauve, Nathalie; Chalouhi, Gihad E; Deloison, Benjamin; Alison, Marianne; Clement, Olivier; Ville, Yves; Salomon, Laurent J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal placentation is responsible for most failures in pregnancy; however, an understanding of placental functions remains largely concealed from noninvasive, in vivo investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is safe in pregnancy for magnetic fields of up to 3 Tesla and is being used increasingly to improve the accuracy of prenatal imaging. Functional MRI (fMRI) of the placenta has not yet been validated in a clinical setting, and most data are derived from animal studies. FMRI could be used to further explore placental functions that are related to vascularization, oxygenation, and metabolism in human pregnancies by the use of various enhancement processes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is best able to quantify placental perfusion, permeability, and blood volume fractions. However, the transplacental passage of Gadolinium-based contrast agents represents a significant safety concern for this procedure in humans. There are alternative contrast agents that may be safer in pregnancy or that do not cross the placenta. Arterial spin labeling MRI relies on magnetically labeled water to quantify the blood flows within the placenta. A disadvantage of this technique is a poorer signal-to-noise ratio. Based on arterial spin labeling, placental perfusion in normal pregnancy is 176 ± 91 mL × min(-1) × 100 g(-1) and decreases in cases with intrauterine growth restriction. Blood oxygen level-dependent and oxygen-enhanced MRIs do not assess perfusion but measure the response of the placenta to changes in oxygen levels with the use of hemoglobin as an endogenous contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted imaging and intravoxel incoherent motion MRI do not require exogenous contrast agents, instead they use the movement of water molecules within tissues. The apparent diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction are significantly lower in placentas of growth-restricted fetuses when compared with normal pregnancies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the ability to extract

  14. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  15. Optimal experiment design for magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Zhao; Haldar, Justin P; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is an emerging quantitative MR imaging technique that simultaneously acquires multiple tissue parameters in an efficient experiment. In this work, we present an estimation-theoretic framework to evaluate and design MR fingerprinting experiments. More specifically, we derive the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB), a lower bound on the covariance of any unbiased estimator, to characterize parameter estimation for MR fingerprinting. We then formulate an optimal experiment design problem based on the CRB to choose a set of acquisition parameters (e.g., flip angles and/or repetition times) that maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio efficiency of the resulting experiment. The utility of the proposed approach is validated by numerical studies. Representative results demonstrate that the optimized experiments allow for substantial reduction in the length of an MR fingerprinting acquisition, and substantial improvement in parameter estimation performance.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, L.W.; Grover, J.S.; Seeger, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of normal knee anatomy and the role of MRI in the evaluation of knee trauma. Images acquired in the sagittal plane are the most useful. A combination of T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo pulse sequences is most commonly employed. A meniscal tear is identified by an intrameniscal signal which extends to the joint surface. MR and arthroscopic findings agree in more than 90% of patients. It is important to be familiar with the MRI appearance of normal anatomic variants that may be confused with meniscal tears: the transverse geniculate ligament, the hiatus of the popliteal tendon sheath, and the meniscofemoral ligaments. Tears in the anterior cruciate, posterior, cruciate, and collateral ligaments are also depicted. (orig.)

  18. Valuation for magnetic resonance of neuro tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar c, Guillermo; Delgado, Jorge A; Toro Nancy

    1997-01-01

    The increased incidence of neuro tuberculosis (NTB), due to the world epidemic of resistant strains and AIDS, has made of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the study of choice for the early detection of lesions that lead the clinicians to an effective treatment. We present our experience with six cases of NTB, with meningoencephalic (4 cases), spinal, (1 case) and epidural (1 case) involvement. We identified basal arachnoiditis that was also seen on CT. Two cases demonstrated non-classifying tuberculomas, the spinal lesion consisted of casseifying tuberculoma that responded to treatment and disappeared on a follow up MR study. Epidural involvement consisted of Pott's disease with displacement and edema of the spinal cord. The differential diagnosis of these lesions includes mycoses, cysticercosis, sarcoidosis and leptomeningeal metastases

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao; Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).