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Sample records for abnormal head position

  1. Ocular Causes of Abnormal Head Position: Strabismus Clinic Data

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    Kadriye Erkan Turan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the most common ocular causes and types of abnormal head position (AHP and describe their clinical features. Materials and Methods: Patients with AHP who had been followed in the strabismus unit were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic features and orthoptic characteristics were recorded. Results: A total of 163 patients including 61 women (37.4% and 102 men (62.6%, with a mean age of 19.9±18.3 were recruited. The most common causes of AHP were determined as fourth cranial nerve palsy (33.7%, Duane retraction syndrome (21.5%, sixth cranial nerve palsy (11%, nystagmus blockage syndrome (9.8% and Brown syndrome (6.7%. Other less frequent causes were A-V pattern strabismus, comitant strabismus, thyroid orbitopathy and third cranial nerve palsy. The most common types of AHP were head tilt (45.4% and face turn (36.8%. Out of 142 patients whose visual acuity could be evaluated, 28.2% had amblyopia. The frequency of amblyopia varied depending on the diagnosis (p<0.001, while there was no relation between amblyopia and different types of AHP (p=0.497. Stereopsis and fusion could be tested in 128 patients and 43.8% of them had stereopsis and fusion. The presence of stereopsis and fusion was found to be related with the diagnosis (p=0.001, whereas it was not related with the types of AHP (p=0.580. The presence of amblyopia was not significantly associated with fusion (p=1.000 or stereopsis (p=0.602. Conclusion: There are many ocular pathologies that cause AHP. Patients with similar diagnoses may have different types of AHP. Patients may have amblyopia and impaired binocularity despite AHP. Therefore, all patients with AHP should be examined in detail and these points should be considered in the treatment plan.

  2. Characteristics of infants with positional abnormal head shapes and their physiotherapy service at an Australian community health facility

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    Leung A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Amy Leung,1 Pauline Watter,2 John Gavranich31Department of Physiotherapy, Royal Children's Hospital, 2Physiotherapy Division, School of Health Rehabilitation Science, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 3Child and Family Health Services, West Moreton Health Service District, Queensland, AustraliaPurpose: There is limited biographic information regarding infants presenting with abnormal head shape in Australia and little discussion of the effect of different cutoff values for diagnosis of plagiocephaly. This study aimed to 1 describe the biographic characteristics of infants with positional abnormal head shapes referred for physiotherapy management; 2 explore their access to physiotherapy services and intervention outcomes; and 3 explore the impact of using different modified Cranial Vault Asymmetry Index (mCVAI cutoff points in plagiocephaly classification.Patients and methods: This retrospective community health record audit included the total cohort of infants referred over concerns about abnormal head shape to a pediatric physiotherapy service at a community health center in Australia from January 2004 to December 2007 (N=126 valid cases. Data retrieved included: demographic data; birth history; positioning; initial physiotherapy assessment; and factors associated with physiotherapy intervention and outcomes.Results: Of the 126 charts (65 males, 106 infants (84.1% presented with plagiocephaly, ten (7.9% with brachycephaly, and ten (7.9% with combined deformities. Most biographic data from this study were similar to those reported in the literature. The mean age ± standard deviation (SD of infants at referral was 11.29±7.84 weeks, with about 4-weeks wait for assessment. For the plagiocephalic group, there was significant reduction in mCVAI mean value from assessment (-5.44%±2.95% to discharge (-4.41%±2.66% (t[df=60] =-5.396; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.66%, -0.76%; P<0.001 and significant change in the

  3. Abnormal Position and Presentation of the Fetus

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    ... Delivery Introduction to Complications of Labor and Delivery Abnormal Position and Presentation of the Fetus Amniotic Fluid Embolism Excessive Uterine Bleeding at Delivery Fetal Distress Inverted Uterus Labor That ...

  4. Posição viciosa de cabeça por astigmatismo mal corrigido: relato de caso Abnormal head position caused by incorrect prescription for astigmatism: case report

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    Flávia Augusta Attié de Castro

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A posição viciosa de cabeça é uma condição compensatória que visa proporcionar aos pacientes melhor rendimento visual. Pode ser causada por problemas oftalmológicos, como distúrbios oculomotores (nistagmos, estrabismos e altos astigmatismos. No entanto, compromete a estética e, a longo prazo, pode causar transtornos ortopédicos (coluna cervical e assimetrias faciais. Relatamos o caso de uma garota, JL, 8 anos, com cabeça inclinada para esquerda havia vários anos. Fazia uso de óculos prescritos em outro serviço para correção de astigmatismo misto: OD= +2,00 DE Ç -5,50 DC a 180º e OE= +2,25 DE Ç -5,75 DC a 180º. No exame oftálmico, a paciente apresentava cabeça inclinada para a esquerda e acuidade visual com correção de 0,5 no OD e 0,7 OE. Os testes de cobertura simples e alternado não evidenciaram desvio ocular. Rotações oculares, biomicroscopia e fundoscopia também não mostraram alterações. Na refratometria sob cicloplegia e teste de lentes foram encontrados: OD= +3,50 DE Ç -6,00 DC a 10º e OE= +3,50 DE Ç -6,00 DC a 170º, com acuidade visual igual a 1,0 nos olhos direito e esquerdo. Foram prescritas as lentes encontradas no exame e a paciente retornou com a correção nova sem a inclinação de cabeça. Erros refracionais mal corrigidos também podem gerar torcicolo e, muitas vezes, passam despercebidos. Refratometria sob cicloplegia e teste de lentes são fundamentais para um diagnóstico preciso.Abnormal head position is a compensatory condition which improves patients' vision. It can be caused by ophthalmological problems such as oculomotor imbalances (strabismus, nystagmus and high astigmatisms. However, it results in esthetic impairment, orthopedic trouble and facial asymmetries. We describe a case of a girl, JL, 8 years, with abnormal head position tilted to the left since the last glasses were prescribed. The correction used by the patient was: right eye = +2.00 sph à -5.5 cyl 180° and left eye = +2

  5. Head and neck position sense.

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    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  6. Natural head position: An overview.

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    Meiyappan, N; Tamizharasi, S; Senthilkumar, K P; Janardhanan, K

    2015-08-01

    Cephalometrics has given us a different perspective of interpreting various skeletal problems in the dentofacial complex. Natural head position (NHP) is a reproducible, physiologically determined aspect of function. To determine NHP, a horizontal or vertical reference line outside the crania was used, but preference was given generally to the horizontal. Various intra and extracranial cephalometric horizontal reference planes have been used to formulate diagnosis and plan individualized treatment for an integrated correction of the malocclusion cephalometrics is constantly undergoing refinements in its techniques and analyses to improve the clinical applications. Even though various methods for establishing NHP have been proposed, still it remains a challenge to the clinicians to implement the concept of NHP thoroughly in all the stages of treatment because of practical difficulties in the clinical scenario.

  7. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

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    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise

    2007-01-01

    (lemon-shaped), 18.4% with aneuploidy (mostly strawberry-shaped). 19.5% were dolicocephalic, most secondary to fetal position or oligohydramnios (see table). 13 had confirmed craniosynostosis, including thanatophoric dysplasia, Craniofrontonasal dysplasia, Aperts syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, I...

  8. [Abnormal head turn in a patient with Brown's syndrome].

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    van Waveren, M; Krzizok, T; Besch, D

    2008-08-01

    We report on an eight-year-old boy, who was presented in our clinic because of head turn. The cause of the tortecollis (ocular or general) in this case was and still cannot be explained. Only by applying extensive prism adaptation tests it was possible to prove the ocular character of the head turn. An eight-year-old boy with Brown's syndrome was referred to us because of a head tilt to the left side. Six months previously surgery on the M. obl. superior of the right eye was performed in another clinic. No improvement of the head tilt could be observed after the operation. In addition, an exotropia became decompensated. Under a 3-day occlusion of one eye, no change of the head turn and the squint could be measured. No other cause of the head turn could be found by an orthopaedist and a paediatrist. Under a prism of 20 cm/m basis in and 10 cm/m basis against the positive vertical deviation, the head tilt decreased, so that we decided to do a second surgery. The head tilting had not resumed at one year after the surgery. Although the initial diagnostic findings ruled out an ocular cause, it was possible to lessen the head tilting with the aid of the prism adaptation test. This case study emphasises the usefulness of a prism adaptation test of several days duration in order to validate an ocular cause of head turn and to determine an adequate indication for surgery.

  9. Association between temporomandibular disorders and abnormal head postures

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    Evandro Francisco FAULIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possible correlation between the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and different head postures in the frontal and sagittal planes using photographs of undergraduate students in the School of Dentistry at the Universidade de Brasília - UnB, Brazil. In this nonrandomized, cross-sectional study, the diagnoses of TMD were made with the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD axis I. The craniovertebral angle was used to evaluate forward head posture in the sagittal plane, and the interpupillary line was used to measure head tilt in the frontal plane. The measurements to evaluate head posture were made using the Software for the Assessment of Posture (SAPO. Students were divided into two study groups, based on the presence or absence of TMD. The study group comprised 46 students and the control group comprised 80 students. Data about head posture and TMD were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 13. Most cases of TMD were classified as degenerative processes (group III, followed by disk displacement (group II and muscle disorders (group I. There was no sex predominance for the type of disorder. No association was found between prevalence rates for head postures in the frontal plane and the occurrence of TMD. The same result was found for the association of TMD diagnosis with craniovertebral angle among men and women, and the group that contained both men and women. Abnormal head postures were common among individuals both with and without TMD. No association was found between head posture evaluated in the frontal and sagittal planes and TMD diagnosis with the use of RDC/TMD.

  10. Head position modulates optokinetic nystagmus.

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    Pettorossi, V E; Ferraresi, A; Botti, F M; Panichi, R; Barmack, N H

    2011-08-01

    Orientation and movement relies on both visual and vestibular information mapped in separate coordinate systems. Here, we examine how coordinate systems interact to guide eye movements of rabbits. We exposed rabbits to continuous horizontal optokinetic stimulation (HOKS) at 5°/s to evoke horizontal eye movements, while they were statically or dynamically roll-tilted about the longitudinal axis. During monocular or binocular HOKS, when the rabbit was roll-tilted 30° onto the side of the eye stimulated in the posterior → anterior (P → A) direction, slow phase eye velocity (SPEV) increased by 3.5-5°/s. When the rabbit was roll-tilted 30° onto the side of the eye stimulated in the A → P direction, SPEV decreased to ~2.5°/s. We also tested the effect of roll-tilt after prolonged optokinetic stimulation had induced a negative optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN II). In this condition, the SPEV occurred in the dark, "open loop." Modulation of SPEV of OKAN II depended on the direction of the nystagmus and was consistent with that observed during "closed loop" HOKS. Dynamic roll-tilt influenced SPEV evoked by HOKS in a similar way. The amplitude and the phase of SPEV depended on the frequency of vestibular oscillation and on HOKS velocity. We conclude that the change in the linear acceleration of the gravity vector with respect to the head during roll-tilt modulates the gain of SPEV depending on its direction. This modulation improves gaze stability at different image retinal slip velocities caused by head roll-tilt during centric or eccentric head movement.

  11. [Natural head position's reproducibility on photographs].

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    Eddo, Marie-Line; El Hayeck, Émilie; Hoyeck, Maha; Khoury, Élie; Ghoubril, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the reproducibility of natural head position with time on profile photographs. Our sample is composed of 96 students (20-30 years old) at the department of dentistry of Saint Joseph University in Beirut. Two profile photographs were taken in natural head position about a week apart. No significant differences were found between T0 and T1 (E = 1.065°). Many studies confirmed this reproducibility with time. Natural head position can be adopted as an orientation for profile photographs in orthodontics. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  12. Head-positioning scintillation camera and head holder therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A holder for immobilizing the head of a patient undergoing a vertex brain scan by a Gamma Scintillation Camera is described. The holder has a uniquely designed shape capable of comfortably supporting the head. In addition, this holder can be both adjustably and removably utilized in combination with the scintillation camera so as to enable the brain scan operation to take place while the patient is in the seated position

  13. 3-Dimensional Reproducibility of Natural Head Position

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    2012-04-12

    the “Six Elements to Orofacial Harmony”. He advocated using his Element II Analysis with natural head orientation for treatment planning, since “it...temporomandibular disorders, neck pain , headache, dentofacial structures, mandibular length, mandibular position, mandibular divergency and overjet (Cuccia, 2009

  14. Ametropia, retinal anatomy, and OCT abnormality patterns in glaucoma. 2. Impacts of optic nerve head parameters

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    Baniasadi, Neda; Wang, Mengyu; Wang, Hui; Jin, Qingying; Elze, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    Clinicians use retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an adjunct to glaucoma diagnosis. Ametropia is accompanied by changes to the optic nerve head (ONH), which may affect how OCT machines mark RNFLT measurements as abnormal. These changes in abnormality patterns may bias glaucoma diagnosis. Here, we investigate the relationship between OCT abnormality patterns and the following ONH-related and ametropia-associated parameters on 421 eyes of glaucoma patients: optic disc tilt and torsion, central retinal vessel trunk location (CRVTL), and nasal and temporal retinal curvature adjacent to ONH, quantified as nasal/temporal slopes of the inner limiting membrane. We applied multivariate logistic regression with abnormality marks as regressands to 40,401 locations of the peripapillary region and generated spatial maps of locations of false positive/negative abnormality marks independent of glaucoma severity. Effects of torsion and temporal slope were negligible. The effect of tilt could be explained by covariation with ametropia. For CRVTL/nasal slope, abnormality pattern shifts at 7.2%/23.5% of the peripapillary region were detected, respectively, independent of glaucoma severity and ametropia. Therefore, CRVTL and nasal curvature should be included in OCT RNFLT norms. Our spatial location maps may aid clinicians to improve diagnostic accuracy.

  15. Clinical Symptoms of Minor Head Trauma and Abnormal Computed Tomography Scan

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    Maghsoudi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Minor head trauma accounts for 70% to 90% of all head traumas. Previous studies stated that minor head traumas were associated with 7% - 20% significant abnormal findings in brain computed tomography (CT-scans. Objectives The aim of this study was to reevaluate clinical criteria of taking brain CT scan in patients who suffered from minor head trauma. Patients and Methods We enrolled 680 patients presented to an academic trauma hospital with minor head trauma in a prospective manner. All participants underwent brain CT scan if they met the inclusion criteria and the results of scans were compared with clinical examination finding. Results Loss of consciousness (GCS drop or amnesia was markedly associated with abnormal brain CT scan (P < 0.05. Interestingly, we found 7 patients with normal clinical examination but significant abnormal brain CT scan. Conclusions According to the results of our study, we recommend that all patients with minor head trauma underwent brain CT scan in order not to miss any life-threatening head injuries.

  16. A case of linear nevus sebaceous syndrome showing abnormalities by head CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoshio; Kuraya, Kazue; Sumiyoshi, Minoru; Seki, Shuichiro; Murakami, Naoki

    1982-01-01

    A female baby weighing 2,702 g, who was delivered spontaneously after 37 weeks of gestation, showed linear nevus sebaceous syndrome with abnormalities on EEG and head CT scan. Immediately after birth, the baby showed abnormalities of the skin in the left half of the body, especially from the head to the face. At the same time, EEG showed a low voltage on the affected side, and head CT scan showed expansion of the lateral ventricle. Funduscopic findings showed retinochoroidal toxoplasmosis-like degeneration. This disease has been rarely reported. An early diagnosis is seemed to be important since the skin lesion per se was premalignant, and generalized abnormalities including those of the central nervous system occurred concurrently. (Chiba, N.)

  17. Ventricular shape and relative position abnormalities in preterm neonates

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    N. Paquette

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging findings have highlighted the impact of premature birth on subcortical development and morphological changes in the deep grey nuclei and ventricular system. To help characterize subcortical microstructural changes in preterm neonates, we recently implemented a multivariate tensor-based method (mTBM. This method allows to precisely measure local surface deformation of brain structures in infants. Here, we investigated ventricular abnormalities and their spatial relationships with surrounding subcortical structures in preterm neonates. We performed regional group comparisons on the surface morphometry and relative position of the lateral ventricles between 19 full-term and 17 preterm born neonates at term-equivalent age. Furthermore, a relative pose analysis was used to detect individual differences in translation, rotation, and scale of a given brain structure with respect to an average. Our mTBM results revealed broad areas of alterations on the frontal horn and body of the left ventricle, and narrower areas of differences on the temporal horn of the right ventricle. A significant shift in the rotation of the left ventricle was also found in preterm neonates. Furthermore, we located significant correlations between morphology and pose parameters of the lateral ventricles and that of the putamen and thalamus. These results show that regional abnormalities on the surface and pose of the ventricles are also associated with alterations on the putamen and thalamus. The complementarity of the information provided by the surface and pose analysis may help to identify abnormal white and grey matter growth, hinting toward a pattern of neural and cellular dysmaturation.

  18. Abnormal position of lymph nodes in a freemartin sheep

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    Salazar PA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Angela M Gonella-Diaza, Luz Zoraya Duarte, Sergio Dominguez, Pedro A SalazarClínica de Grandes Animales, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y de Zootecnia, Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Santander, ColombiaAbstract: In this freemartin case report the authors present the clinical and morphological findings of a freemartin ewe with an abnormal position of two lymph nodes. Freemartins, infertile females from mixed-sex twin pregnancies, are chimeras, having two cell populations: one of their own (XX DNA and one from their male twin (XY DNA. Freemartins can have varying degrees of phenotypic masculinization, including, in some cases, having active male gonads and exhibiting male behaviors such as heat detection and aggressiveness. During the clinical examination of the freemartin ewe, a morphological abnormality of the vulva, the presence of scrotal sacs, and a lack of mammary tissue development were noted. On inspection of the vaginal channel, an extremely enlarged clitoris, resembling a penis, was found. The clinical evidence suggested freemartinism. After the karyotyping diagnosis confirmation, a necropsy was performed and samples were taken for histology and immunohistochemistry. There were two structures found in the scrotal sacs; however, these were found to be lymph nodes, not testicles, and this was confirmed by CD3 lymph protein coloration. On histological study, the phallic structure showed corpus cavernosum and tunica albuginea. The testicles were found retained inside the abdominal cavity, with the presence of atrophic seminiferous tubules. Although the position of the testicles in freemartins has been reported as highly variable, this is the first time, to the best of the authors' knowledge, that a case has been reported where lymph nodes have been found inside the scrotal sacs. It is possible that these were the inguinal lymph nodes, trapped inside the scrotum during fetal growth and development.Keywords: freemartinism

  19. Pharyngeal diameter in various head and neck positions during exercise in sport horses

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    2014-01-01

    Background In equine athletes, dynamic stenotic disorders of the upper airways are often the cause for abnormal respiratory noises and/or poor performance. There are hypotheses, that head and neck flexion may influence the morphology and function of the upper airway and thus could even induce or deteriorate disorders of the upper respiratory tract. Especially the pharynx, without osseous or cartilaginous support is prone to changes in pressure and airflow during exercise. The objective of this study was to develop a method for measuring the pharyngeal diameter in horses during exercise, in order to analyse whether a change of head-neck position may have an impact on the pharyngeal diameter. Results Under the assumption that the width of the epiglottis remains constant in healthy horses, the newly developed method for calculating the pharyngeal diameter in horses during exercise is unsusceptible against changes of the viewing-angle and distance between the endoscope and the structures, which are to be assessed. The quotient of the width of the epiglottis and the perpendicular from a fixed point on the dorsal pharynx to the epiglottis could be used to determine the pharyngeal diameter. The percentage change of this quotient (pharynx-epiglottis-ratio; PE-ratio) in the unrestrained head-neck position against the reference position was significantly larger than that of any other combination of the head-neck positions investigated. A relation between the percentage change in PE-ratio and the degree of head and neck flexion could not be confirmed. Conclusions It could be shown, that the pharyngeal diameter is reduced through the contact position implemented by the rider in comparison to the unrestrained head and neck position. An alteration of the pharyngeal diameter depending on the degree of head and neck flexion (represented by ground and withers angle) could not be confirmed. PMID:24886465

  20. [Clinical research of the otolith abnormal migration during canalith repositioning procedures for posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

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    Ou, Yongkang; Zheng, Yiging; Zhu, Honglei; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Junwei; Tang, Xiaowu; Huang, Qiuhong; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the risk factor,type and characteristic nystagmus of the otolith abnormal migration during diagnosis and treatment for posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PSC-BPPV). The therapy and prevention is also discussed. Four hundred and seventy-nine patients with PSC-BPPV were treated by Epley's canalith repositioning procedures(CRP) from March 2009 to March 2012. We observed otolith abnormal migration complicating during diagnosis and treatment. According the type of otolith abnormal migration, the additional repositioning maneuver was performed. The rate of complication was 8. 1%(39/479), with canal conversion in 5.4%(26/479) and primarily canal reentry in 2.7%(13/479). The rate of incidence of conversion to horizontal canal conversion and anterior canal were 4. 8%(23/479)and 0. 6%(3/479) respectively. All the patient was cured in follow up. The risk factors were unappropriated head movement during or after CRP, including another Dix-Hallpike were performed immediately. To prevent the complications,the pathognostic positioning sequence and angle of head rotation are commenced during CRP. Appropriate short time postural restrictions post-treatment is necessary. Careful observation of nystagrnus variation is crucial to determine the otolith abnormal migration.

  1. Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Abnormalities in Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Pilot Study

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    Tayyebe Fallahnezhad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, involving the semicircular canals, is one of the most common diseases of the inner ear. The video head impulse test (vHIT is a new test that examines the function of the canals. This study aimed to investigate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain, gain asymmetry and saccades after stimulating all six canals in patients definitively diagnosed with posterior semicircular canal BPPV (PSC-BPPV.   Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine unilateral PSC-BPPV patients with normal oculographic and caloric results were enrolled in this study. vHIT was performed on six canals, and VOR gain, gain asymmetry and saccades were measured.   Results: Sixteen (55.17% patients had abnormal posterior canal VOR gains in the ipsilesional ear. VOR gains in both horizontal canals were within normal limits. Superior canal VOR gains were mostly lower than normal and were not correlated to PSC abnormalities (P>0.05. No corrective saccades could be observed.   Conclusion: VOR gain in the direction of the posterior semicircular canal may be reduced in PSC-BPPV patients. Evaluation of PSC-VOR parameters could be beneficial, although superior canal measurements should be interpreted with caution.

  2. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities by Actively Keeping the Head in an Upright Position with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller through the Control of an Environmental Stimulation

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    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Chia-Ju; Shih, Ching-Tien

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology by applying the Nintendo Wii Remote Controller to the correction of hyperactive limb behavior. This study extended Wii Remote Controller functionality for improper head position (posture) correction (i.e. actively adjusting abnormal head posture) to assess whether two people with multiple…

  3. Characterization of Abnormal Optic Nerve Head Morphology in Albinism Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

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    Mohammad, Sarim; Gottlob, Irene; Sheth, Viral; Pilat, Anastasia; Lee, Helena; Pollheimer, Ellen; Proudlock, Frank Anthony

    2015-07-01

    To characterize abnormalities in three-dimensional optic nerve head (ONH) morphology in people with albinism (PWA) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and to determine whether ONH abnormalities relate to other retinal and clinical abnormalities. Spectral-domain OCT was used to obtain three-dimensional images from 56 PWA and 60 age- and sex-matched control subjects. B-scans were corrected for nystagmus-associated motion artefacts. Disc, cup, and rim ONH dimensions and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (ppRNFL) thickness were calculated using Copernicus and ImageJ software. Median disc areas were similar in PWA (median = 1.65 mm2) and controls (1.71 mm2, P = 0.128), although discs were significantly elongated horizontally in PWA (P < 0.001). In contrast, median optic cup area in PWA (0.088 mm2) was 23.7% of that in controls (0.373 mm2, P < 0.001), with 39.4% of eyes in PWA not demonstrating a measurable optic cup. This led to significantly smaller cup to disc ratios in PWA (P < 0.001). Median rim volume in PWA (0.273 mm3) was 136.6% of that in controls (0.200 mm3). The ppRNFL was significantly thinner in PWA compared with controls (P < 0.001), especially in the temporal quadrant. In PWA, ppRNFL thickness was correlated to ganglion cell thickness at the central fovea (P = 0.007). Several ONH abnormalities, such as cup to disc ratio, were related to higher refractive errors in PWA. In PWA, ocular maldevelopment is not just limited to the retina but also involves the ONH. Reduced ppRNFL thickness is consistent with previous reports of reduced ganglion cell numbers in PWA. The thicker rim volumes may be a result of incomplete maturation of the ONH.

  4. Comparison of Natural Head Position in Different Anteroposterior Malocclusions

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    Zohreh Hedayati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The facial esthetics after orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery may be affected by the patient’s natural head position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the natural head position for the three skeletal classes of malocclusion.Materials and Methods: Our sample consisted of 102 lateral cephalometric radiographs of patients aged 15 to 18 years; class I (n=32, class II (n=40 and class III (n=30. Nine landmarks of the craniofacial skeleton and three landmarks of the cervical vertebrae were determined. Variables consisted of two angles for cervical posture (OPT/Hor and CVT/Hor, three angles for craniofacial posture (SN/Ver, PNS-ANS/Ver, and ML/Ver and five for craniofacial angulation (SN/OPT, SN/CVT, PNS-ANS/OPT, PNS-ANS/CVT, ML/CVT. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and post hoc tests.Results: PNS-ANS/Ver and SN/Ver differed significantly (p<0.05 among the three groups. There were no significant differences between class I and class II malocclusions for the indicator angles of cranial posture except for ML/Ver. The SN/CVT was significantly different for class I compared to class III patients. A head posture camouflaging the underlying skeletal class III was observed in our population.Conclusion: A more forward head posture was observed in skeletal class III participants compared to skeletal class I and II and that class III patients tended to incline their head more ventral compared to class I participants. These findings may have implications for the amount of jaw movements during surgery particularly in patients with a class III malocclusion

  5. False-positive head-impulse test in cerebellar ataxia

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    Olympia eKremmyda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The objective of this study was to compare the findings of the bedside head impulse test (HIT, passive head rotation gain, and caloric irrigation in patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA. In 16 patients with CA and bilaterally pathological bedside HIT, VOR gains were measured during HIT and passive head rotation by scleral search coil technique. Eight of the patients had pathologically reduced caloric responsiveness, while the other eight had normal caloric responses. Those with normal calorics showed a slightly reduced HIT gain (mean±SD: 0.73±0.15. In those with pathological calorics, gains 80ms and 100 ms after the HIT as well as the passive rotation VOR gains were significantly lower. The corrective saccade after head turn occurred earlier in patients with pathological calorics (111±62 ms after onset of the HIT than in those with normal calorics. (191±17 ms, p=0.0064 We indentified two groups of patients with CA: those with an isolated moderate HIT deficit only, probably due to floccular dysfunction, and those with combined HIT, passive rotation and caloric deficit, probably due to a peripheral vestibular deficit. From a clinical point of view, these results show that the bedside HIT alone can be false positive for establishing a diagnosis of a bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit in patients with CA.

  6. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  7. A patient positioning system in head and neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormann, U.; Strauch, B.; Schmitt, G.

    1986-01-01

    A holding system is presented which allows a good, easy, and reproducable positioning of the patient in percutanous head and neck radiotherapy. The patients are lying comfortably on a neck support and are fixed in such a way that they are not able to turn in a lateral or longitudinal direction. The distance chin-jugulum can be easily determined by an integrated measuring tape. Due to the use of UV ink and UV lamps, the field marking of the patient's skin cannot be seen in the spectrum of visible light. (orig.) [de

  8. Developmental abnormalities of the optic nerve head in mouse fetuses caused by simultaneous irradiation of x-rays and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Shoichiro; Yuguchi, Shuji; Majima, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Eye abnormalities in mouse fetuses caused by irradiation of X-rays alone, or simultaneous irradiation of X-rays and ultrasound on day 7 of gestation were histologically studied on day 18 of gestation. Developmental abnormalities of the optic nerve head were examined in the present experiment, and the following results were obtained: 1. Developmental abnormalities of the optic nerve head associated with developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were detected in 4 fetuses (5 eyes). In all cases, excessive mesenchymal tissue of components of the primary vitreous was found from the optic nerve head to the vitreous cavity. It was impossible to distinguish between the neuroectodermal tissue of Bergmeister's papilla and the mesodermal tissue of components of the primary vitreous. 2. In 3 fetuses (4 eyes), the fetal fissure involving the optic nerve head was open. At the peripapillary region, the inner layer of the optic cup was everted and hyperplastic. The inner neuroblastic layer of the everted portion contacted the outer coat of the eyeball, directly. In these cases, the optic nerve entrance was very wide. 3. The relation between the congenital optic nerve head anomalies encountered clinically and those observed experimentally in the mouse fetuses was discussed. It was considered that the pathogenesis of congenital optic nerve head anomalies consists of the malformation of the primitive epithelial papilla, the faulty closure of the proximal end of the fetal fissure, the anomalies of Bergmeister's papilla, the anomalies of the hyaloid system, or the abnormal differentiation and growth of the neuroectodermal cells of the optic cup. (author)

  9. Tackler’s head position relative to the ball carrier is highly correlated with head and neck injuries in rugby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Shiota, Yuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Maki, Nobukazu; Matsuura, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the tackler’s head position during one-on-one tackling in rugby and to determine the incidence of head, neck and shoulder injuries through analysis of game videos, injury records and a questionnaire completed by the tacklers themselves. Methods We randomly selected 28 game videos featuring two university teams in competitions held in 2015 and 2016. Tackles were categorised according to tackler’s head position. The ‘pre-contact phase’ was defined; its duration and the number of steps taken by the ball carrier prior to a tackle were evaluated. Results In total, 3970 tackles, including 317 (8.0%) with the tackler’s head incorrectly positioned (ie, in front of the ball carrier) were examined. Thirty-two head, neck or shoulder injuries occurred for an injury incidence of 0.8% (32/3970). The incidence of injury in tackles with incorrect head positioning was 69.4/1000 tackles; the injury incidence with correct head positioning (ie, behind or to one side of the ball carrier) was 2.7/1000 tackles. Concussions, neck injuries, ‘stingers’ and nasal fractures occurred significantly more often during tackles with incorrect head positioning than during tackles with correct head positioning. Significantly fewer steps were taken before tackles with incorrect head positioning that resulted in injury than before tackles that did not result in injury. Conclusion Tackling with incorrect head position relative to the ball carrier resulted in a significantly higher incidence of concussions, neck injuries, stingers and nasal fractures than tackling with correct head position. Tackles with shorter duration and distance before contact resulted in more injuries. PMID:29162618

  10. Head position and spinal position as determinants of perceived emotional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouwstra, S J; Hoogstraten, J

    1995-10-01

    A sample of 60 first-year psychology students judged the emotional state of 21 drawn figures and completed the Adjective Checklist and a mood questionnaire. The judgments were affected by the interaction between head position and spinal position of the figure. Each figure was associated with a unique pattern of emotions, and the judgments given were not influenced by the subjects' own emotional state.

  11. The Influence of Natural Head Position on the Cervical Sagittal Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study investigated the relationship between the parameters related to the natural head position and cervical segmental angles and alignment of patients with neck pain. Material and Methods. The lateral radiographs of the cervical spine were collected from 103 patients and were used to retrospectively analyze the correlation between the natural head position, cervical local sagittal angles, and alignment. Sagittal measurements were as follows: cervical curvature classification, slope of McGregor’s line (McGS, local sagittal angles (C0–C2 angle, C2–C5 angle, C5–C7 angle, and C2–C7 angle, T1 slope, center of gravity of the head to sagittal vertical axis (CG–C7 SVA, and local sagittal alignment (C0–C2 SVA and C2–C7 SVA. Results. McGS was significantly correlated to C0–C2 angle (r=0.57, C0–C2 SVA (r=−0.53, C2–C7 SVA (r=−0.28, and CG–C7 SVA (r=−0.47. CG–C7 SVA was also significantly correlated to curvature type (r=0.27, C5–C7 angle (r=−0.37, and C2–C7 angle (r=−0.39. Conclusions. A backward shift with an extended head position may accompany a relatively normal curvature of the cervical spine. The effect of posture control in relieving abnormal mechanical state of the cervical spine needs to be further confirmed by biomechanical analysis.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of positioning treatments in infants with positional head shape deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, B Lynne; Stewart, Alistair W; De Chalain, Tristan B; Mitchell, Edwin A

    2010-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials of treatment for deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly have been lacking in the literature. Infants (n = 126) presenting to a plagiocephaly clinic were randomized to either positioning strategies or to positioning plus the use of a Safe T Sleep™ positioning wrap. Head shape was measured using a digital photographic technique, and neck function was assessed. They were followed up at home 3, 6 and 12 months later. There was no difference in head shape outcomes for the two treatment groups after 12 months of follow-up, with 42% of infants having head shapes in the normal range by that time. Eighty per cent of children showed good improvement. Those that had poor improvement were more likely to have both plagiocephaly and brachycephaly and to have presented later to clinic. Most infants improved over the 12-month study period, although the use of a sleep positioning wrap did not increase the rate of improvement. © 2010 The Author(s)/Journal Compilation © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  13. Binocular vision and abnormal head posture in children when watching television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the association between the binocular vision and an abnormal head posture (AHP when watching television (TV in children 7-14y of age. METHODS: Fifty normal children in the normal group and 52 children with an AHP when watching TV in the AHP group were tested for spherical equivalents, far and near fusional convergence (FC and fusional divergence (FD amplitudes, near point of convergence, far and near heterophoria, accommodative convergence/ accommodation ratio and stereoacuity. The values of these tests were compared between the two groups. The independent t test was applied at a confidence level of 95%. RESULTS: The far and near FC amplitudes and far FD amplitudes were lower in the AHP group (the far FC amplitudes: break point 13.6±5.4△, recovery point 8.7±5.4△. The near FC amplitudes: break point 14.5±7.3△, recovery point 10.3±5.1△. The far FD amplitudes: break point 3.9±2.7△, recovery point 2.6±2.3△ compared with those in the normal group (the far FC amplitudes: break point 19.1±6.2△, recovery point 12.4±4.5△. The near FC amplitudes: break point 22.3±8.0△, recovery point 16.1±5.7△. The far FD amplitudes: break point 7.0±2.1△, recovery point 4.6±1.9△. Other tests presented no statistically significant differences. CONCLUSION: An association between the reduced FC and FD amplitudes and the AHP in children when watching TV is proposed in the study. This kind of AHP is considered to be an anomalous manifestation which appears in a part of puerile patients of fusional vergence dysfunction.

  14. X-y interactions underlie sperm head abnormality in hybrid male house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Polly; Nachman, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    The genetic basis of hybrid male sterility in house mice is complex, highly polygenic, and strongly X linked. Previous work suggested that there might be interactions between the Mus musculus musculus X and the M. m. domesticus Y with a large negative effect on sperm head morphology in hybrid males with an F1 autosomal background. To test this, we introgressed the M. m. domesticus Y onto a M. m. musculus background and measured the change in sperm morphology, testis weight, and sperm count across early backcross generations and in 11th generation backcross males in which the opportunity for X-autosome incompatibilities is effectively eliminated. We found that abnormality in sperm morphology persists in M. m. domesticus Y introgression males, and that this phenotype is rescued by M. m. domesticus introgressions on the X chromosome. In contrast, the severe reductions in testis weight and sperm count that characterize F1 males were eliminated after one generation of backcrossing. These results indicate that X-Y incompatibilities contribute specifically to sperm morphology. In contrast, X-autosome incompatibilities contribute to low testis weight, low sperm count, and sperm morphology. Restoration of normal testis weight and sperm count in first generation backcross males suggests that a small number of complex incompatibilities between loci on the M. m. musculus X and the M. m. domesticus autosomes underlie F1 male sterility. Together, these results provide insight into the genetic architecture of F1 male sterility and help to explain genome-wide patterns of introgression across the house mouse hybrid zone.

  15. Role of taurine as a treatment for oxidative damage and sperm head abnormalities in irradiated mice and their male offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dawy, H.; Tawfik, S.S.; EI-Khafif, M.; Ragab, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of taurine therapy in treatment of male mice exposed to a dose of (3 Gy) whole body gamma irradiation and their male offspring was studied. Irradiated mice showed significant increase in plasma malonaldehyde (MDA) level and sperm head abnormality counts in all experiment interval times 1, 3 and 5 weeks. Administration of taurine (1% in drinking water) post-irradiation resulted in significant decrease in the effect of irradiation on MDA level and sperm head abnormalities count. The efficiency of taurine as radiotherapeutic agent is greatly dependent on its chemical properties as strong oxidants scavenger and biological activities as osmoregulator and membrane stabilizer. The probable mechanism of taurine was discussed, as it is a sulphydryl, heterocyclic-nitrogenous and pharmacological therapy

  16. Association of a Guardian's Report of a Child Acting Abnormally With Traumatic Brain Injury After Minor Blunt Head Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Holmes, James F; Dayan, Peter S; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    Increased use of computed tomography (CT) in children is concerning owing to the cancer risk from ionizing radiation, particularly in children younger than 2 years. A guardian report that a child is acting abnormally is a risk factor for clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI) and may be a driving factor for CT use in the emergency department. To determine the prevalence of ciTBIs and TBIs in children younger than 2 years with minor blunt head trauma and a guardian report of acting abnormally with (1) no other findings or (2) other concerning findings for TBI. Secondary analysis of a large, prospective, multicenter cohort study that included 43 399 children younger than 18 years with minor blunt head trauma evaluated in 25 emergency departments. The study was conducted on data obtained between June 2004 and September 2006. Data analysis was performed between August 21, 2014, and March 9, 2015. A guardian report that the child was acting abnormally after minor blunt head trauma. The prevalence of ciTBI (defined as death, neurosurgery, intubation for >24 hours, or hospitalization for ≥2 nights in association with TBI on CT imaging) and TBI on CT imaging in children with a guardian report of acting abnormally with (1) no other findings and (2) other concerning findings for TBI. Of 43 399 children in the cohort study, a total of 1297 children had reports of acting abnormally, of whom 411 (31.7%) had this report as their only finding. Reported as percentage (95% CI), 1 of 411 (0.2% [0-1.3%]) had a ciTBI, and 4 TBIs were noted on the CT scans in 185 children who underwent imaging (2.2% [0.6%-5.4%]). In children with reports of acting abnormally and other concerning findings for TBI, 29 of 886 (3.3% [2.2%-4.7%]) had ciTBIs and 66 of 674 (9.8% [7.7%-12.3%]) had TBIs on CT. Clinically important TBIs are very uncommon, and TBIs noted on CT are uncommon in children younger than 2 years with minor blunt head trauma and guardian reports of the child acting

  17. Investigating the correspondence between driver head position and glance location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonbum Lee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between a driver’s glance orientation and corresponding head rotation is highly complex due to its nonlinear dependence on the individual, task, and driving context. This paper presents expanded analytic detail and findings from an effort that explored the ability of head pose to serve as an estimator for driver gaze by connecting head rotation data with manually coded gaze region data using both a statistical analysis approach and a predictive (i.e., machine learning approach. For the latter, classification accuracy increased as visual angles between two glance locations increased. In other words, the greater the shift in gaze, the higher the accuracy of classification. This is an intuitive but important concept that we make explicit through our analysis. The highest accuracy achieved was 83% using the method of Hidden Markov Models (HMM for the binary gaze classification problem of (a glances to the forward roadway versus (b glances to the center stack. Results suggest that although there are individual differences in head-glance correspondence while driving, classifier models based on head-rotation data may be robust to these differences and therefore can serve as reasonable estimators for glance location. The results suggest that driver head pose can be used as a surrogate for eye gaze in several key conditions including the identification of high-eccentricity glances. Inexpensive driver head pose tracking may be a key element in detection systems developed to mitigate driver distraction and inattention.

  18. Clinical values for abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the head and neck region of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwan Seo [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Jong-Lyel, E-mail: rohjl@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptakes in the head and neck (HN) region can be carefully interpreted as being index primary, second primary cancer (SP) or benign. • {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT identified 91.9% primary HN squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). • The specificity and negative predictive value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for identification of SP were as high as 98.7% and 99.3%, respectively. • Proper detection of primary tumors and SP in the HN region may promote appropriate therapeutic planning of HNSCC patients. - Abstract: Purpose: Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is used to identify index or second primary cancer (SP) of the head and neck (HN) through changes in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. However, both physiologic and abnormal lesions increase {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, we evaluated {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the HN region to determine clinical values of abnormal tracer uptake. Methods: A prospective study approved by the institutional review board was conducted in 314 patients with newly diagnosed HN squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and informed consent was obtained from all enrolled patients. The patients received initial staging workups including {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and biopsies. All lesions with abnormal HN {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were recorded and most of those were confirmed by biopsies. Diagnostic values for abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were calculated. Results: Abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was identified in primary tumors from 285 (91.9%) patients. False-negative results were obtained for 22.3% (23/103) T1 tumors and 2.2% (2/93) T2 tumors (P < 0.001). Thirty-eight regions of abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were identified in 36 (11.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 13), maxillary sinus (n = 7), palatine tonsil (n = 6), nasopharynx (n = 5), parotid gland (n = 2) and others (n = 5). Synchronous SP of the HN was identified in eight (2.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 5), palatine

  19. Clinical values for abnormal 18F-FDG uptake in the head and neck region of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwan Seo; Kim, Jae Seung; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Abnormal 18 F-FDG uptakes in the head and neck (HN) region can be carefully interpreted as being index primary, second primary cancer (SP) or benign. • 18 F-FDG PET/CT identified 91.9% primary HN squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). • The specificity and negative predictive value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for identification of SP were as high as 98.7% and 99.3%, respectively. • Proper detection of primary tumors and SP in the HN region may promote appropriate therapeutic planning of HNSCC patients. - Abstract: Purpose: Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is used to identify index or second primary cancer (SP) of the head and neck (HN) through changes in 18 F-FDG uptake. However, both physiologic and abnormal lesions increase 18 F-FDG uptake. Therefore, we evaluated 18 F-FDG uptake in the HN region to determine clinical values of abnormal tracer uptake. Methods: A prospective study approved by the institutional review board was conducted in 314 patients with newly diagnosed HN squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and informed consent was obtained from all enrolled patients. The patients received initial staging workups including 18 F-FDG PET/CT and biopsies. All lesions with abnormal HN 18 F-FDG uptake were recorded and most of those were confirmed by biopsies. Diagnostic values for abnormal 18 F-FDG uptake were calculated. Results: Abnormal 18 F-FDG uptake was identified in primary tumors from 285 (91.9%) patients. False-negative results were obtained for 22.3% (23/103) T1 tumors and 2.2% (2/93) T2 tumors (P < 0.001). Thirty-eight regions of abnormal 18 F-FDG uptake were identified in 36 (11.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 13), maxillary sinus (n = 7), palatine tonsil (n = 6), nasopharynx (n = 5), parotid gland (n = 2) and others (n = 5). Synchronous SP of the HN was identified in eight (2.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 5), palatine tonsil (n = 2), and epiglottis (n = 1). The sensitivity and

  20. Clinical manifestations that predict abnormal brain computed tomography (CT in children with minor head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Alharthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography (CT used in pediatric pediatrics brain injury (TBI to ascertain neurological manifestations. Nevertheless, this practice is associated with adverse effects. Reports in the literature suggest incidents of morbidity and mortality in children due to exposure to radiation. Hence, it is found imperative to search for a reliable alternative. Objectives: The aim of this study is to find a reliable clinical alternative to detect an intracranial injury without resorting to the CT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients (1-14 years with blunt head injury and having a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 13-15 who had CT performed on them. Using statistical analysis, the correlation between clinical examination and positive CT manifestation is analyzed for different age-groups and various mechanisms of injury. Results: No statistically significant association between parameteres such as Loss of Consciousness, ′fall′ as mechanism of injury, motor vehicle accidents (MVA, more than two discrete episodes of vomiting and the CT finding of intracranial injury could be noted. Analyzed data have led to believe that GCS of 13 at presentation is the only important clinical predictor of intracranial injury. Conclusion: Retrospective data, small sample size and limited number of factors for assessing clinical manifestation might present constraints on the predictive rule that was derived from this review. Such limitations notwithstanding, the decision to determine which patients should undergo neuroimaging is encouraged to be based on clinical judgments. Further analysis with higher sample sizes may be required to authenticate and validate findings.

  1. Prevalence of anal cytological abnormalities in women with positive cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calore, Edenilson E; Giaccio, Claudia Maria Serafim; Nadal, Sidney R

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cytological abnormalities of the anal mucosa in women with positive cervical cytology, but without macroscopic anal lesion. Ultimately we postulated if the anal mucosa may be a reservoir of HPV, which would allow the reinfection of cervix. Forty-nine patients with abnormal cervical cytology were selected for this work. In a period not exceeding one week of collecting cervix cytology, two swab specimens of the anal canal were also collected. Women diagnosed with cervical HSIL by Pap smear were referred for colposcopy with biopsy of the lesions, to confirm the cytologic diagnosis and ablation of the lesion. We demonstrated a high prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions in patients with cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (29 of the total of 49 patients = 59.2%). Of the 20 cases of cervical LSIL, 11 (55%) had abnormal anal cytology. Of the 26 cases with cervical HSIL, 16 (61.5%) had abnormal anal cytology. So, there was a discrete higher prevalence of abnormal anal cytology in cases of high-grade cervical squamous lesions (cervical HSIL). These results help to support the hypothesis that the anal mucosa is a reservoir of HPV, which can be a source of re-infection for the cervix. However, there was no significant association between the practice of anal sex and the prevalence of anal cytological abnormalities. These facts are epidemiologically important for future programs for population eradication of cervical lesions related to HPV. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2011;39:323-327. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Positive predictive value of abnormal mammographic findings and role of assessment procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menna, S.; Marra, V.; Di Virgilio, M.R.; Macchia, G.; Frigerio, A.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the positive predictive value for cancer of abnormal mammographic findings and the role of assessment, the authors reviewed a series of 962 patients recalled and examined in the first breast screening center of Turin (Italy), out of 18996 women aged 50-59 from 1991 to 1995, within a population-based mammography program. The results of this study confirm the accuracy of mammography in the early detection of breast cancer and the different role of assessment procedures in the various abnormal mammographic findings. The improvement in positive predictive value for screening demonstrates the importance of the learning curve within the screening team. Most of this improvement could be referred to refined diagnostic criteria for calcifications [it

  3. Effect of head rotation on cerebral blood velocity in the prone position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Jakob; Sandmand, Marie; Sonne, Morten

    2012-01-01

    for cerebral blood flow. We tested in healthy subjects the hypothesis that rotating the head in the prone position reduces cerebral blood flow. Methods. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined, together with the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V...... V(mean) ~10% in spite of an elevated MAP. Prone positioning with rotated head affects both CBF and cerebrovenous drainage indicating that optimal brain perfusion requires head centering....

  4. Relationship between vertebral artery blood flow in different head positions and vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz Server, Ela; Edizer, Deniz Tuna; Yiğit, Özgür; Yasak, Ahmet Görkem; Erdim, Çağrı

    2018-01-01

    To identify the vertebral artery blood flow in different head positions in patients with positional vertigo with no specific diagnosis. Patients with history of vestibular symptoms associated with changes in head position were enrolled into the study. Healthy volunteers were evaluated as control group. Doppler ultrasonography examination of the cervical segment of the vertebral arteries was performed under three different head positions: (i) supine position, (ii) head hyperextended and rotated to the right side and (iii) head hyperextended and rotated to the left side. In the study group, right and left vertebral artery blood flow was significantly lower in the ipsilateral hyperextended position compared to standard supine position (respectively p = .014; p = .001), but did not differ significantly when compared between the standard supine and contralateral hyperextended positions (respectively = .959; p = .669). In the control group, left and right vertebral artery blood flow did not differ significantly when the head was hyperextended to the right or left sides compared to standard supine position (p > .05). Our data demonstrated that the etiology of vestibular complaints in patients with undiagnosed positional vertigo might be related to impairment in vertebral artery blood flow according to head positions.

  5. The value of HEAD-US system in detecting subclinical abnormalities in joints of patients with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Corte-Rodriguez, Hortensia; Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Alvarez-Roman, M Teresa; Martin-Salces, Mónica; Martinoli, Carlo; Jimenez-Yuste, Víctor

    2018-03-01

    Prevention of hemarthrosis is the key factor in the adequate management of people with hemophilia (PWH). If hemarthrosis occurs, early diagnosis of joint damage is essential to make personalized treatments. This study is aimed at gaining an understanding of the ability of point-of-care ultrasound (US) using the `Hemophilia Early Arthropathy Detection with Ultrasound´ (HEAD-US) protocol to detect abnormalities in joints without history of hemarthrosis and clinically asymptomatic joints of PWH. The sample included 976 joints from 167 PWH (mean age 24.86 years). Data were collected from routine practice over a 3-year period and analyzed based on history of hemarthrosis and results of clinical (HJHS 2.1) and HEAD-US examinations. In our series, 14% of patients exhibited HEAD-US signs of incipient arthropathy in joints with no history of bleeding and with a HJHS 2.1 score of 0. The most severely involved joint was the right ankle. Synovitis, articular cartilage and subchondral bone damage scores in joints with subclinical findings were slower than in joints with previous hemarthroses or HJHS 2.1 > 1 Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that HEAD-US is better than hemarthrosis records and the HJHS 2.1 scale in detecting the early signs of joint damage in PWH.

  6. Liposomal treatment of xerostomia, odor, and taste abnormalities in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Hofauer, Benedikt; Scherer, Elias; Schukraft, Johannes; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Smell and taste disorders, sicca symptoms, can be detected in patients with head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of local liposomal application in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancers. Ninety-eight patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. The groups were defined as: group 1 = only surgery; group 2 = surgery + adjuvant radiochemotherapy; and group 3 = primarily radiochemotherapy. All patients had finished cancer treatment and received liposomal sprays for the nose and mouth for 2 months (LipoNasal, LipoSaliva; Optima Pharmaceutical GmbH, Germany) and suffered from taste and smell disorders. We performed tests with "Sniffin' Sticks," "Taste Strips," and a xerostomia questionnaire before and after treatment. After application of liposomes, patients demonstrated a statistically significant increase in smell and taste, and reduced xerostomia. Our results demonstrate that using nonpharmaceutical liposomal sprays improve smell, taste, and symptoms of xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1232-E1237, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. PENGARUH LARGE POSITIVE ABNORMAL BOOK-TAX DIFFERENCES TERHADAP PERSISTENSI LABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Aisyah Rachmawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of Large Positive Abnormal Book-Tax Differences (LPABTD on earnings persistence and accruals persistence. This study used unbalanced panel data of listed companies in Indonesia Stock Exchange from 2006-2011. It is hypothesized that firms with LPABTD exhibit lower earnings and accruals persistence than other firms with Large Positive Normal Book-Tax Differences (LPNBTD. The results provide evidence which is consistent with the hypotheses. It is shown that firms with LPABTD exhibit lower earnings quality than other firms with LPNBTD.

  8. Head position affects the direction of occlusal force during tapping movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Minami, I; Wada, J; Ikawa, Y; Wakabayashi, N

    2018-05-01

    Despite numerous reports describing the relationship between head position and mandibular movement in human subjects, the direction and magnitude of force at the occlusal contacts have not been investigated in relation to head position. The objective was to investigate the effect of head position on the direction of occlusal force while subjects performed a tapping movement. Twenty-three healthy adult subjects were asked to sit on a chair with their back upright and to perform 15 tapping movements in five different head positions: natural head position (control); forward; backward; and right and left rolled. The direction and magnitude of force were measured using a small triaxial force sensor. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Bonferroni test were used to compare head positions in each angle of the anteroposterior axis direction and the lateral axis direction with respect to the superior axis. The force element in the anteroposterior axis shifted to the forward direction in the head position pitched backward, compared with control, pitched forward and rolled left positions (P = .02, tapping movement can be performed in a relaxed position without anteroposterior and lateral loading. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection & cervical abnormalities in HIV-positive women in eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Chakravarty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: India has the third highest burden of HIV and highest number of cervical cancer in the world. A cross-sectional study was performed to determine the prevalence and types of human papillomavirus (HPV infection, and the factors associated with HPV infection and abnormal cervical cytology in HIV-positive women attending the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART Centre in a tertiary care hospital in eastern India. Methods: We screened 216 HIV- positive women with Papanicolau smear cytology and HPV testing. HPV DNA was detected by using consensus primers followed by sequencing. Results: Of the 216 HIV-positive women screened, 58 (26.85% were HPV-positive; 56 (25.9% were of high-risk (HR HPV type. The most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (7.9%; non 16 and 18 HPV types were present in 17.6 per cent patients. Age ≤ 35 yr [(OR, 2.56 (1.26-5.19], illiteracy [OR, 2.30 (1.19-4.46], rural residence [OR, 3.99 (1.27-12.56] and CD4 ≤350/µl [OR, 2.46 (1.26-4.83] were associated with increased risk of acquisition of HPV. One hundred thirty nine (74.33% patients had normal/ negative for intraepithelial lesions (NILM cytology, three (1.60% had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS, 32 (17.11% had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, 10 (5.35% had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL and three (1.60% had carcinoma cervix. WHO clinical Stage III and IV [OR, 2.83 (1.07-7.49] and CD4 ≤350/µl [OR, 2.84 (1.30-6.20] were risk factors for abnormal cytology. Interpretation &conclusions: Our study showed 26.85 per cent HPV positivity in HIV infected women in this region, with HPV-16 as the commonest genotype. Abnormal cervical cytology was seen in about 25 per cent women. Regular Pap smear screening as recommended by the National AIDS Control Organization will help in early detection of cervical abnormalities in HIV- positive women.

  10. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection & cervical abnormalities in HIV-positive women in eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Chourasia, Ankita; Thakur, Minaxi; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Agrawal, Nisha Rani

    2016-01-01

    India has the third highest burden of HIV and highest number of cervical cancer in the world. A cross-sectional study was performed to determine the prevalence and types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the factors associated with HPV infection and abnormal cervical cytology in HIV-positive women attending the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Centre in a tertiary care hospital in eastern India. We screened 216 HIV- positive women with Papanicolau smear cytology and HPV testing. HPV DNA was detected by using consensus primers followed by sequencing. Of the 216 HIV-positive women screened, 58 (26.85%) were HPV-positive; 56 (25.9%) were of high-risk (HR) HPV type. The most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (7.9%); non 16 and 18 HPV types were present in 17.6 per cent patients. Age ≤ 35 yr [(OR), 2.56 (1.26-5.19)], illiteracy [OR, 2.30 (1.19-4.46)], rural residence [OR, 3.99 (1.27-12.56)] and CD4 ≤ 350/µl [OR, 2.46 (1.26-4.83)] were associated with increased risk of acquisition of HPV. One hundred thirty nine (74.33%) patients had normal/ negative for intraepithelial lesions (NILM) cytology, three (1.60%) had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 32 (17.11%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 10 (5.35%) had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and three (1.60%) had carcinoma cervix. WHO clinical Stage III and IV [OR, 2.83 (1.07-7.49)] and CD4 ≤ 350/µl [OR, 2.84 (1.30-6.20)] were risk factors for abnormal cytology. Our study showed 26.85 per cent HPV positivity in HIV infected women in this region, with HPV-16 as the commonest genotype. Abnormal cervical cytology was seen in about 25 per cent women. Regular Pap smear screening as recommended by the National AIDS Control Organization will help in early detection of cervical abnormalities in HIV- positive women.

  11. ESTRO ACROP guidelines for positioning, immobilisation and position verification of head and neck patients for radiation therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leech

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Over the last decade, the management of locally advanced head and neck cancers (HNCs has seen a substantial increase in the use of chemoradiation. These guidelines have been developed to assist Radiation TherapisTs (RTTs in positioning, immobilisation and position verification for head and neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: A critical review of the literature was undertaken by the writing committee.Based on the literature review, a survey was developed to ascertain the current positioning, immobilisation and position verification methods for head and neck radiation therapy across Europe. The survey was translated into Italian, German, Greek, Portuguese, Russian, Croatian, French and Spanish.Guidelines were subsequently developed by the writing committee. Results: Results from the survey indicated that a wide variety of treatment practices and treatment verification protocols are in operation for head and neck cancer patients across Europe currently.The guidelines developed are based on the experience and expertise of the writing committee, remaining cognisant of the variations in imaging and immobilisation techniques used currently in Europe. Conclusions: These guidelines have been developed to provide RTTs with guidance on positioning, immobilisation and position verification of HNC patients. The guidelines will also provide RTTs with the means to critically reflect on their own daily clinical practice with this patient group. Keywords: Head and neck, Immobilisation, Positioning, Verification

  12. Resting position of the head and malocclusion in a group of patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mihi, Victoria; Orellana, Lorena M.; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy are found as a result of these disorders, along with associated neuromuscular functional alterations that affect the resting position of the head. In this context, the resting position of the head could be responsible for several skeletal and dental occlusal disorders among patients with cerebral palsy. Objective: To assess the presence of malocclusions in patients with cerebral palsy, define the most frequent types of malocclusions, and evaluate how the resting position of the head may be implicated in the development of such malocclusions. Study design: Forty-four patients aged between 12-55 years (18 males and 26 females) were studied. Occlusal conditions, the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), changes in the resting position of the head, and breathing and swallowing functions were assessed. Results: Orthodontic treatment was required by 70.8% of the patients, the most frequent malocclusions being molar class II, open bite and high overjet. These individuals showed altered breathing and swallowing functions, as well as habit and postural disorders. The resting position of the head, especially the hyperextended presentation, was significantly correlated to high DAI scores. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that patients with cerebral palsy are more susceptible to present malocclusions, particularly molar class II malocclusion, increased open bite, and high overjet. Such alterations in turn are more common in patients with a hyperextended position of the head. Key words:Cerebral palsy, malocclusion, head position, disabled patients. PMID:24596627

  13. Analysis of sperm quality in recombinant inbred mouse strains: correlation of sperm head shape with sperm abnormalities and with the incidence of supplementary spermatozoa in the perivitelline space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzanowska, H; Styrna, J; Wabik-Sliz, B

    1995-07-01

    Recombinant inbred strains were developed from reciprocal crosses between two inbred strains of mice (CBA and KE) differing in sperm head shape, proportion of normal sperm heads (CBA, 95%; KE, 78%) and fertilization efficiency (CBA, 100% of fertilized ova; KE, 72%), to determine whether the indices of sperm morphology and function were correlated. The following parameters were analysed in recombinant inbred and progenitor strains: index of sperm head shape (head width in the middle of its length/head length), percentage of abnormal sperm heads, percentage of spermatozoa with progressive movements, efficiency of penetration of hyaluronic acid polymer (Sperm Select) and percentage of fertilized ova after mating males from the tested strains with females from an outbred stock. For each investigated character, recombinant inbred strains, recombinant inbred EXCB and CBXE, could be divided into at least three categories: KE-like, CBA-like and intermediate, suggesting that in each case a minimum of two genes was involved. Recombinant strains derived from the reciprocal crosses of progenitor strains differed only with respect to the proportion of abnormal sperm heads, showing the involvement of the Y chromosome in determining this character. Penetration into Sperm Select was significantly correlated both with fertilization efficiency and sperm motility, while correlation with the proportion of normal spermatozoa did not reach the level of significance. However, there was a significant negative correlation of both sperm abnormalities and the incidence of supplementary spermatozoa in the perivitelline space with the index of sperm head shape.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The percentage of migration as indicator of femoral head position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekloef, O.; Ringertz, H.; Samuelsson, L.; Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm; Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm

    1988-01-01

    In childhood subluxation of one or both hips may develop rather insidiously. For lack of generally accepted objective methods of assessment, ambiguous interpretations of findings in serial examinations are common. Many subluxations are overlooked during the early stages. In order to overcome such disadvantages, determination of the percentage of migration seems to be a reasonably easy and reliable technique facilitating evaluation of impending dislocation. This investigation was carried out in order to estabilsh norms applicable to patients in the pediatric age interval. The 98th percentile of migration increases with age from 16% in patients < 4 years of age to 24% in patients ≥ 12 years. Higher figures represent subluxation. If the migration exceeds 80% a manifest luxation is present. A difference in migration between the two hips larger than 12% indicates abnormality calling for clinical and radiologic follow-up. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of a head support system to prevent pediatric out-of-position: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Forman, Jason L; Ash, Joseph H; Kent, Richard; Alba, Juan J; Segui-Gomez, Maria

    Head injuries are the most common severe injuries sustained by pediatric occupants in road traffic crashes. Preventing children from adopting positions that can result in an increased injury risk due to unfavorable interactions with the restraints is fundamental. The objective of this paper was to assess the effect of a head support system (SS) on the lateral position of the head, the vertical position of the sternum and the shoulder belt fit. Thirty pediatric rear-seat passengers were exposed to two 75-minute trials. Volunteers were restrained by a three-point belt and, if needed, used the appropriate child restraint system for their anthropometry (high-back booster, low-back booster, no booster). A case crossover study was designed in which the volunteers used the head support system (SS) during one of the trials, acting as their own controls (No SS) in the other. Compared to the control group, the head support reduced significantly the 90(th) percentile value of the absolute value of the relative lateral motion of the head, regardless of the restraint used. The system also reduced the maximum downward position of the sternal notch within the low-back booster group. As for the belt fit, the use of the head support improved significantly the position of the shoulder belt on the occupant in the low-back booster and in the no booster groups.

  16. Evaluation of the maxillary sinus and adjacent structures on the orthopantomograph to the head positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Kim, Jae Duck

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utilization of the orthopantomogrph as a diagnostic aid to observe maxillary sinus and adjacent structures. For achieving this goal, the lead plates were attached to the five walls of the maxillary sinus of a human dry skull. The dry skull was placed in fourteen different positions ; standard, 20 mm forward, 20 mm backward, 10 degree upward, 10 degree downward, 20 mm lateral, forward and upward, forward and lateral, backward and upward, backward and downward, backward and lateral, upward and lateral, downward and lateral position. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The image of the medial wall was observed very differently according to the head positions. 2. The image of the anterior wall was observed at medial third to half of the maxillary sinus in each head position. 3. The image of the posterior wall was always observed at lateral third of the maxillary sinus in all head positions and more obviously in the downward-lateral position. 4. The image of the superior wall was observed at the inferior third to half of the orbit in each head position. 5. The image of the inferior wall was always observed at the inferior third of maxillary sinus in all head positions and observed more obviously in the standard and downward-lateral positions. 6. The image of the zygomatic process, zygomatic arch and zygomaticotemporal suture were observed very well in the downward-lateral position.

  17. Carrying Position Independent User Heading Estimation for Indoor Pedestrian Navigation with Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-An Deng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel heading estimation approach for indoor pedestrian navigation using the built-in inertial sensors on a smartphone. Unlike previous approaches constraining the carrying position of a smartphone on the user’s body, our approach gives the user a larger freedom by implementing automatic recognition of the device carrying position and subsequent selection of an optimal strategy for heading estimation. We firstly predetermine the motion state by a decision tree using an accelerometer and a barometer. Then, to enable accurate and computational lightweight carrying position recognition, we combine a position classifier with a novel position transition detection algorithm, which may also be used to avoid the confusion between position transition and user turn during pedestrian walking. For a device placed in the trouser pockets or held in a swinging hand, the heading estimation is achieved by deploying a principal component analysis (PCA-based approach. For a device held in the hand or against the ear during a phone call, user heading is directly estimated by adding the yaw angle of the device to the related heading offset. Experimental results show that our approach can automatically detect carrying positions with high accuracy, and outperforms previous heading estimation approaches in terms of accuracy and applicability.

  18. Head midline position for preventing the occurrence or extension of germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsik, Olga; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Bruschettini, Matteo

    2017-07-20

    of cystic periventricular leukomalacia (one study; RR 3.25, 95% CI 0.14 to 76.01; RD 0.04, 95% CI -0.07 to 0.15), retinopathy of prematurity (one study; RR 2.27, 95% CI 0.85 to 6.11; RD 0.25, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.53), and severe retinopathy of prematurity (one study; RR 2.73, 95% CI 0.31 to 24.14; RD 0.09, 95% CI -0.09 to 0.26). None of the included trials reported on the other specified outcomes of this review (i.e., cerebellar hemorrhage, brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, impairment in cerebral hemodynamics, long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes, and major neurodevelopmental disability). The quality of evidence supporting these findings is limited owing to the imprecision of the estimates. We identified no ongoing studies. Given the imprecision of the estimate, results of this systematic review are consistent with beneficial or detrimental effects of a supine head midline position versus a lateral position and do not provide a definitive answer to the review question.

  19. Radiographic study on the interrelation between bone deformans and condylar head position in the TMJ arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1981-01-01

    The author analysed the interrelation between the morphologic changes of bone structures and the position of condylar head from the routine radiographs of 134 cases of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of bone deformity and condylar head positional change were examined. Also, the positional changes of condylar head and the direction of condylar movement in relation to the kind of bone deformities were observed. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 52.65 per cent of total cases, the site of positional change of condylar head was coincided with the site of bone deformans. The frequencies of the coincidence between these in the five items among seven items examined were above 53 per cent. From the results, it seems that the positional changes of condylar head were related with the morphological change of bone structure. 2. Eburnation and erosion revealed frequently positional changes in the opening and closing position of the mouth, although in the early stages of the TMJ arthrosis. 3. In the bone deformans, during open position of the mouth 44.81 per cent of total cases revealed backward movement and 37.74 per cent showed forward movement. In closed position of the mouth, downward movement was revealed in 35.23 percent of total cases and upward movement 28.41 percent of total cases.

  20. Radiographic study on the interrelation between bone deformans and condylar head position in the TMJ arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-11-15

    The author analysed the interrelation between the morphologic changes of bone structures and the position of condylar head from the routine radiographs of 134 cases of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of bone deformity and condylar head positional change were examined. Also, the positional changes of condylar head and the direction of condylar movement in relation to the kind of bone deformities were observed. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 52.65 per cent of total cases, the site of positional change of condylar head was coincided with the site of bone deformans. The frequencies of the coincidence between these in the five items among seven items examined were above 53 per cent. From the results, it seems that the positional changes of condylar head were related with the morphological change of bone structure. 2. Eburnation and erosion revealed frequently positional changes in the opening and closing position of the mouth, although in the early stages of the TMJ arthrosis. 3. In the bone deformans, during open position of the mouth 44.81 per cent of total cases revealed backward movement and 37.74 per cent showed forward movement. In closed position of the mouth, downward movement was revealed in 35.23 percent of total cases and upward movement 28.41 percent of total cases.

  1. Relationship between head posture and lumbar curve in a sitting position: a biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozilene Maria Cota Aroeira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The sitting position routinely used for a wide variety of tasks increases the potential of developing forward head posture, which can seriously compromise the health of different systems in the human body. Objective: A static equilibrium analysis was conducted, comparing the position of the head with the lumbar curve in three different sitting positions. Methods: The approximate force and flexion moment of the head extensor muscles in static equilibrium was calculated in each of the following positions: (A without a backrest; (B using a backrest with a 100° tilt angle; (C using a 100° tilted backrest associated with a cylindrical lumbar support cushion at the level of the L3 vertebra. Results: The C7-tragus angles were 43°, 50° and 52°; Frankfort horizontal plane (FH angles were 5°, 9° and 9°; force of the head extensor muscles was 53.0N, 59.7N and 43.5N and flexion moments were 2.60Nm, 2.05Nm and 1.78Nm, in positions A, B and C, respectively. Conclusion: The results revealed that the sitting position using a 100° tilted backrest and lumbar support with the smallest L3-tragus horizontal distance required less effort by the head and neck extensor muscles to retain the head in equilibrium. This study demonstrated the need to preserve the physiology of the lumbar spine, characterized by the position of the L3 vertebra, in order to ensure good head position.

  2. Position and Attitude Alternate of Path Tracking Heading Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baocheng Tan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The path tracking control algorithm is one of the key problems in the control system design of autonomous vehicle. In this paper, we have conducted dynamic modeling for autonomous vehicle, the relationship between course deviation and yaw rate and centroid deflection angle. From the angle of the dynamics and geometrical, this paper have described the path tracking problem, analyzed the emergence of the eight autonomous vehicles pose binding - position and attitude alternate control methods to identify the relationship between posture and the controlling variables, and design a controller, the experimental results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of this control method.

  3. Naturalistic driving study of rear seat child occupants: Quantification of head position using a Kinect™ sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Kim, Jinyong; Loeb, Helen; Kuo, Jonny; Koppel, Sjaan; Bohman, Katarina; Charlton, Judith L

    2016-09-01

    Restraint performance is evaluated using anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) positioned in prescribed, optimal seating positions. Anecdotally, humans-children in particular-assume a variety of positions that may affect restraint performance. Naturalistic driving studies (NDSs), where cameras and other data acquisition systems are placed in a vehicle used by participants during their regular transportation, offer means to collect these data. To date, these studies have used conventional video and analysis methods and, thus, analyses have largely been qualitative. This article describes a recently completed NDS of child occupants in which their position was monitored using a Kinect sensor to quantify their head position throughout normal, everyday driving trips. A study vehicle was instrumented with a data acquisition system to measure vehicle dynamics, a set of video cameras, and a Kinect sensor providing 3D motion capture at 1 Hz of the rear seat occupants. Participant families used the vehicle for all driving trips over 2 weeks. The child occupants' head position was manually identified via custom software from each Kinect color image. The 3D head position was then extracted and its distribution summarized by seat position (left, rear, center) and restraint type (forward-facing child restraint system [FFCRS], booster seat, seat belt). Data from 18 families (37 child occupants) resulted in 582 trips (with children) for analysis. The average age of the child occupants was 45.6 months and 51% were male. Twenty-five child occupants were restrained in FFCRS, 9 in booster seats, and 3 in seat belts. As restraint type moved from more to less restraint (FFCRS to booster seat to seat belt), the range of fore-aft head position increased: 218, 244, and 340 mm on average, respectively. This observation was also true for left-right movement for every seat position. In general, those in the center seat position demonstrated a smaller range of head positions. For the first

  4. Settling time of dental x-ray tube head after positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol; Wang, Se Myung; Koh, Chang Sung

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a method of obtaining the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube heads relative to time using an accelerometer. An Accelerometer, Piezotron type 8704B25 (Kistler Instrument Co., Amherst, NY, USA) was utilized to measure the horizontal oscillation of the x-ray tube head immediately after positioning the tube head for an intraoral radiograph. The signal from the sensor was transferred to a dynamic signal analyzer, which displayed the magnitude of the acceleration on the Y-axis and time lapse on the X-axis. The horizontal oscillation of the tube head was measured relative to time, and the settling time was also determined on the basis of the acceleration graphs for 6 wall type, 5 floor-fixed type, and 4 mobile type dental x-ray machines. The oscillation graphs showed that tube head movement decreased rapidly over time. The settling time varied with x-ray machine types. Wall-type x-ray machines had a settling time of up to 6 seconds, 5 seconds for fixed floor-types, and 11 seconds for the mobile-types. Using an accelerometer, we obtained the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube head relative to time. The oscillation graph with time can guide the operator to decide upon the optimum exposure moment after xray tube head positioning for better radiographic resolution.

  5. Settling time of dental x-ray tube head after positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Se Myung; Koh, Chang Sung [Department of Mechatronics, Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce a method of obtaining the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube heads relative to time using an accelerometer. An Accelerometer, Piezotron type 8704B25 (Kistler Instrument Co., Amherst, NY, USA) was utilized to measure the horizontal oscillation of the x-ray tube head immediately after positioning the tube head for an intraoral radiograph. The signal from the sensor was transferred to a dynamic signal analyzer, which displayed the magnitude of the acceleration on the Y-axis and time lapse on the X-axis. The horizontal oscillation of the tube head was measured relative to time, and the settling time was also determined on the basis of the acceleration graphs for 6 wall type, 5 floor-fixed type, and 4 mobile type dental x-ray machines. The oscillation graphs showed that tube head movement decreased rapidly over time. The settling time varied with x-ray machine types. Wall-type x-ray machines had a settling time of up to 6 seconds, 5 seconds for fixed floor-types, and 11 seconds for the mobile-types. Using an accelerometer, we obtained the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube head relative to time. The oscillation graph with time can guide the operator to decide upon the optimum exposure moment after xray tube head positioning for better radiographic resolution.

  6. Metabolic abnormalities associated with weight loss during chemoirradiation of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Alexander; Jabbari, Siavash; Worden, Francis P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Liao, Jay J.; Nyquist, Gurston G.; Tsien, Christina; Schipper, Matthew J.; Urba, Susan; Wolf, Gregory T.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Weight loss caused by acute mucositis and dysphagia is common during concurrent chemoirradiation (chemo-RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. The metabolic consequences of weight loss during chemo-RT were investigated. Patients and Methods: Ninety-six patients with locally advanced HN cancer were treated from 1995 to 2001 on protocols that consisted of 1 to 2 cycles of induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil followed by irradiation (70 Gy over 7 weeks) concurrent with cisplatin (100 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks). Body weights and metabolic evaluations were obtained before and during induction chemotherapy and chemo-RT. Greatest percent changes in weight and in the laboratory values were calculated for each phase of therapy. Results: During induction chemotherapy, significant changes were found in BUN, BUN:creatinine ratio, HCO 3 , Mg, and albumin, but not in creatinine, Na, K, or weight. During chemo-RT, significant additional changes were observed in all parameters measured, including increases in BUN, creatinine, BUN: creatinine ratio, and HCO 3 and decreases in Mg, albumin, Na, K, and weight. The magnitude of most of these changes was significantly greater during chemo-RT than during induction chemotherapy. During chemo-RT, 35% of the patients had more than 10% body weight loss and 6 patients had an increase in creatinine of more than 100%, including 5 patients with Grade 2 nephrotoxicity, all of whom had weight loss 10% or more. Significant correlations were found between weight loss and creatinine (p < 0.0001) or BUN (p = 0.0002) rises, but not with BUN:creatinine ratio or other metabolic changes. Age, gender, tobacco history, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus were not significant predictors of nephrotoxicity. Conclusions: Weight loss during cisplatin-containing chemo-RT was found to be associated with reduced kidney function. These findings do not establish cause-effect relationships; however, they highlight the importance of intensive supportive measures of

  7. Determining the Position of Head and Shoulders in Neurological Practice with the use of Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kutílek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The posture of the head and shoulders can be influenced negatively by many diseases of the nervous system, visual and vestibular systems. We have designed a system and a set of procedures for evaluating the inclination (roll, flexion (pitch and rotation (yaw of the head and the inclination (roll and rotation (yaw of the shoulders. A new computational algorithm allows non-invasive and non-contact head and shoulder position measurement using two cameras mounted opposite each other, and the displacement of the optical axis of the cameras is also corrected.

  8. Head position in the MEG helmet affects the sensitivity to anterior sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, K; Cox, B; Reid, K; Halgren, E

    2004-11-30

    Current MEG instruments derive the whole-head coverage by utilizing a helmet-shaped opening at the bottom of the dewar. These helmets, however, are quite a bit larger than most people's heads so subjects commonly lean against the back wall of the helmet in order to maintain a steady position. In such cases the anterior brain sources may be too distant to be picked up by the sensors reliably. Potential "invisibility" of the frontal and anterior temporal sources may be particularly troublesome for the studies of cognition and language, as they are subserved significantly by these areas. We examined the sensitivity of the distributed anatomically-constrained MEG (aMEG) approach to the head position ("front" vs. "back") secured within a helmet with custom-tailored bite-bars during a lexical decision task. The anterior head position indeed resulted in much greater sensitivity to language-related activity in frontal and anterior temporal locations. These results emphasize the need to adjust the head position in the helmet in order to maximize the "visibility" of the sources in the anterior brain regions in cognitive and language tasks.

  9. Cress oil modulates radiation-induced hormonal, histological, genetic disorders and sperm head abnormalities in albino rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; Azab, KH.SH.; Soliman, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale) is an aquatic perennial herb of mustard family. The plant is rich in glucosinolates, specially gluconasturtin, which can be hydrolyzed to 2- phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and known to activate detoxification enzymes. Cress oil (0.1 ml/kg/day) was given to rats, receiving a standard diet, by gavage for 2 weeks before whole body gamma irradiation at 7 Gy (single dose) and treatment was continued one week after irradiation. The results obtained showed that cress oil treatment significantly diminished the radiation-induced alterations in levels of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin in serum and also blunted the increased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in serum and testes. Histopathological examination of testicular tissue showed that radiation exposure leads to atrophic testis with marked loss of germ cells, remaining tall pink Sertoli cells, peri tubular fibrosis and interstitial fibrosis. Cress oil treatments ameliorated the intensity of these changes where signs of partial recovery were observed in the histological configuration of leydig cells, seminiferous tubules, spermatocytes and in the structure of interstitial cells. Moreover, administration of cress oil significantly reduced the score of sperm head abnormalities and chromosomal aberration frequencies. It could be concluded that watercress may have a bio protective effect on radiation-induced oxidative stress where phytochemicals present in watercress could protect against hormone-dependent disease

  10. Position displacement effect on the doses in the peripheral head regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortesniemi, M.; Seppaelae, T.; Bjugg, H.; Seren, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Auterinen, I.; Parkkinen, R.; Savolainen, S.

    2000-01-01

    Patient positioning is a challenging task in BNCT-treatments due to the use of multiple fields and a static horizontal beam construction. Positioning accuracy of 5 mm is required for acceptable dose delivery within appropriate limits of dose uncertainty (up to 10% of point dose in target volume). The aim of this study was to determine if a patient head position creating a clear gap between the beam port and the head would have a significant effect on the doses to the peripheral regions of the head, e.g. to the eyes. The gamma dose rates were measured in a water filled ellipsoidal phantom with an ionisation chamber (IC). Mn activation wires were used to determine the Mn-55(n, γ) reaction rates. Twelve measurement points were chosen in the phantom and two phantom positions were applied. According to this study the 35 mm position change and the resulting gap has an obvious effect on the peripheral doses in BNCT. The Mn activation reaction rates were on the average 80% higher in the deviation position than in the reference position. Increasing depth from the surface inside the phantom diminished the gamma dose difference between the two positions. Scattering environment changes with position displacement and resulting gap causes differences in neutron fluences and gamma doses. (author)

  11. Automated recognition of rear seat occupants' head position using Kinect™ 3D point cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Helen; Kim, Jinyong; Arbogast, Kristy; Kuo, Jonny; Koppel, Sjaan; Cross, Suzanne; Charlton, Judith

    2017-12-01

    Child occupant safety in motor-vehicle crashes is evaluated using Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) seated in optimal positions. However, child occupants often assume suboptimal positions during real-world driving trips. Head impact to the seat back has been identified as one important injury causation scenario for seat belt restrained, head-injured children (Bohman et al., 2011). There is therefore a need to understand the interaction of children with the Child Restraint System to optimize protection. Naturalistic driving studies (NDS) will improve understanding of out-of-position (OOP) trends. To quantify OOP positions, an NDS was conducted. Families used a study vehicle for two weeks during their everyday driving trips. The positions of rear-seated child occupants, representing 22 families, were evaluated. The study vehicle - instrumented with data acquisition systems, including Microsoft Kinect™ V1 - recorded rear seat occupants in 1120 driving 26 trips. Three novel analytical methods were used to analyze data. To assess skeletal tracking accuracy, analysts recorded occurrences where Kinect™ exhibited invalid head recognition among a randomly-selected subset (81 trips). Errors included incorrect target detection (e.g., vehicle headrest) or environmental interference (e.g., sunlight). When head data was present, Kinect™ was correct 41% of the time; two other algorithms - filtering for extreme motion, and background subtraction/head-based depth detection are described in this paper and preliminary results are presented. Accuracy estimates were not possible because of their experimental nature and the difficulty to use a ground truth for this large database. This NDS tested methods to quantify the frequency and magnitude of head positions for rear-seated child occupants utilizing Kinect™ motion-tracking. This study's results informed recent ATD sled tests that replicated observed positions (most common and most extreme), and assessed the validity of child

  12. Set-membership fault detection under noisy environment with application to the detection of abnormal aircraft control surface positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Houda Thabet, Rihab; Combastel, Christophe; Raïssi, Tarek; Zolghadri, Ali

    2015-09-01

    The paper develops a set membership detection methodology which is applied to the detection of abnormal positions of aircraft control surfaces. Robust and early detection of such abnormal positions is an important issue for early system reconfiguration and overall optimisation of aircraft design. In order to improve fault sensitivity while ensuring a high level of robustness, the method combines a data-driven characterisation of noise and a model-driven approach based on interval prediction. The efficiency of the proposed methodology is illustrated through simulation results obtained based on data recorded in several flight scenarios of a highly representative aircraft benchmark.

  13. Frequency of head-impact-related outcomes by position in NCAA division I collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christine M; Kiernan, Patrick T; Kroshus, Emily; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Montenigro, Philip H; McKee, Ann C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Concussions and subconcussive impacts sustained in American football have been associated with short- and long-term neurological impairment, but differences in head impact outcomes across playing positions are not well understood. The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine has identified playing position as a key risk factor for concussion in football and one for which additional research is needed. This study examined variation in head impact outcomes across primary football playing positions in a group of 730 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Series athletes, using a self-report questionnaire. Although there were no significant differences between position groups in the number of diagnosed concussions during the 2012 football season, there were significant differences between groups in undiagnosed concussions (p=0.008) and "dings" (pfootball season, with offensive linemen reporting significantly more symptoms compared to most other groups. There were also positional differences in frequency of returning to play while symptomatic (p<0.001) and frequency of participating in full-contact practice (p<0.001). Offensive linemen reported having returned to play while experiencing symptoms more frequently and participating in more full-contact practices than other groups. These findings suggest that offensive linemen, a position group that experiences frequent, but low-magnitude, head impacts, develop more postimpact symptoms than other playing positions, but do not report these symptoms as a concussion.

  14. Frequency of Head-Impact–Related Outcomes by Position in NCAA Division I Collegiate Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Patrick T.; Kroshus, Emily; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Montenigro, Philip H.; McKee, Ann C.; Stern, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Concussions and subconcussive impacts sustained in American football have been associated with short- and long-term neurological impairment, but differences in head impact outcomes across playing positions are not well understood. The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine has identified playing position as a key risk factor for concussion in football and one for which additional research is needed. This study examined variation in head impact outcomes across primary football playing positions in a group of 730 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Series athletes, using a self-report questionnaire. Although there were no significant differences between position groups in the number of diagnosed concussions during the 2012 football season, there were significant differences between groups in undiagnosed concussions (p=0.008) and “dings” (pfootball season, with offensive linemen reporting significantly more symptoms compared to most other groups. There were also positional differences in frequency of returning to play while symptomatic (p<0.001) and frequency of participating in full-contact practice (p<0.001). Offensive linemen reported having returned to play while experiencing symptoms more frequently and participating in more full-contact practices than other groups. These findings suggest that offensive linemen, a position group that experiences frequent, but low-magnitude, head impacts, develop more postimpact symptoms than other playing positions, but do not report these symptoms as a concussion. PMID:25155288

  15. Observational study of differences in head position for high notes in famous classical and non-classical male singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarante Andrade, Pedro; Švec, Jan G

    2016-07-01

    Differences in classical and non-classical singing are due primarily to aesthetic style requirements. The head position can affect the sound quality. This study aimed at comparing the head position for famous classical and non-classical male singers performing high notes. Images of 39 Western classical and 34 non-classical male singers during live performances were obtained from YouTube. Ten raters evaluated the frontal rotational head position (depression versus elevation) and transverse head position (retraction versus protraction) visually using a visual analogue scale. The results showed a significant difference for frontal rotational head position. Most non-classical singers in the sample elevated their heads for high notes while the classical singers were observed to keep it around the neutral position. This difference may be attributed to different singing techniques and phonatory system adjustments utilized by each group.

  16. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in HIV positive patients-an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    26 consecutive patients (37 hips) with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head treated surgically at our institution from 1999 to 2008 were reviewed . The aims of the study were to evaluate the risk factors associated with AVN in HIV positive and HIV negative individuals, and assess early response to total hip ...

  17. Simple technique to achieve a natural position of the head for cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damstra, Janalt; Fourie, Zacharias; Ren, Yijin

    We developed a modified laser level technique to record the natural position of the head in all three planes of space. This is a simple method for use with three-dimensional images and may be valuable in routine craniofacial assessment.

  18. Tilt angles and positive response of head-up tilt test in children with orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Yuli; Ochs, Todd; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at examining three tilt angle-based positive responses and the time to positive response in a head-up tilt test for children with orthostatic intolerance, and the psychological fear experienced at the three angles during head-up tilt test. A total of 174 children, including 76 boys and 98 girls, aged from 4 to 18 years old (mean 11.3±2.8 years old), with unexplained syncope, were randomly divided into three groups, to undergo head-up tilt test at the angles of 60°, 70° and 80°, respectively. The diagnostic rates and times were analysed, and Wong-Baker face pain rating scale was used to access the children's psychological fear. There were no significant differences in diagnostic rates of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and vasovagal syncope at different tilt angles during the head-up tilt test (p>0.05). There was a significant difference, however, in the psychological fear at different tilt angles utilising the Kruskal-Wallis test (χ2=36.398, ptest (ptest for vasovagal syncope or for postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Hence, it is suggested that a tilt angle of 60° and head-up tilt test time of 45 minutes should be suitable for children with vasovagal syncope.

  19. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: effects of treatment with chemotherapy and radiation to the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, N.; Toth, B.B.; Hoar, R.E.; Ried, H.L.; Sullivan, M.P.; McNeese, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-eight long-term survivors of childhood cancer were evaluated for dental and maxillofacial abnormalities. Forty-five patients had received maxillofacial radiation for lymphoma, leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and miscellaneous tumors. Forty-three of the 45 patients and the remaining 23 who had not received maxillofacial radiation also received chemotherapy. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities were detected in 37 of the 45 (82%) radiated patients. Dental abnormalities comprised foreshortening and blunting of roots, incomplete calcification, premature closure of apices, delayed or arrested tooth development, and caries. Maxillofacial abnormalities comprised trismus, abnormal occlusal relationships, and facial deformities. The abnormalities were more severe in those patients who received radiation at an earlier age and at higher dosages. Possible chemotherapeutic effects in five of 23 patients who received treatment for tumors located outside the head and neck region comprised acquired amelogenesis imperfecta, microdontia of bicuspid teeth, and a tendency toward thinning of roots with an enlarged pulp chamber. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities should be recognized as a major consequence of maxillofacial radiation in long-term survivors of childhood cancer, and attempts to minimize or eliminate such sequelae should involve an effective interaction between radiation therapists, and medical and dental oncologists

  20. Optimization of Ion Source Head Position in the Central Region of DECY-13 Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Silakhuddin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the ion source head position of the DECY-13 Cyclotron in the central region has been carried out based on simulation process using a particle tracking program written in Scilab 5.2.1. The simulated particle was the H- ion that was accelerated in DECY-13 Cyclotron. The input for the program were the magnetic field and the electric field in the central region that were calculated by Opera-3D software package and TOSCA module. The optimized position of ion source head position is in a radius of 2 cm relative to the zero point of the magnet and at a distance of 4 mm relative to the puller. This result can be useful for determining the configuration of the parts in the central region when it is tested for generating the first ion beam in the future.

  1. Positional change of the condylar heads after wearing complete denture on dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Ho; Kim, Jae Duk; Chung, Chae Heon

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in the position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa by a CBCT after wearing complete denture (CD). CBCT of 34 temporomandibular joints were taken from 9 male and 8 female patients with CB Mercuray TM (Hitachi, Japan) before and after wearing a CD for rehabilitation. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated with Vimplant2.0 TM (CyberMed, Korea) on the central parasagittal view and curved panoramic coronal view of the condylar head. A statistical evaluation was done with SPSS. The range of anteroposterior positional rate (AP) of condylar head within articular fossa was -16-5 and -10-12 respectively on the right and left sides. Before wearing CD, the AP rate showed discrepancy between right and left sides (p<0.05). After wearing CD, both condyles showed a tendency to decrease in posterior condylar position (right side; p<0.05). The average discrepancy between right and left side in mediolateral positional rate (MD) was 15.5 and 4.5 respectively before and after wearing CD. The improvement was observed in mediolateral relationship of both condylar heads after wearing CD (p<0.01). Before wearing CD, the average horizontal angle of long axis of condylar head was 79.6 ± 2.7 .deg. C and 80.1 ± 5.7 .deg. C respectively on the right and left sides. After wearing CD, both condyles were rotated in the same direction in average on axial plane. We observed with CBCT the significant clinical evidence in case of positional change of mandibular condyle after wearing complete denture.

  2. A study of requested CT head examinations and their positive yield rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Requests for CT examinations are ever increasing, partly due to the excellent clinical information they can provide for patient management and partly due to a perceived need for 'evidence' that everything has been done to diagnose a patient correctly. This has led to many CT examinations being done on patients where many of the radiology community does not necessarily feel CT will yield a positive finding, i.e. in their eyes - a possible unjustified use of radiation. To determine whether this was in fact true, or merely a perception, a study was performed by medical imaging and physics staff at the Royal Brisbane Hospital to determine statistics of positive yield for CT head exams. 600 CT head examinations from the Emergency Department at the Royal Brisbane Hospital were retrospectively examined and their findings were tabulated under various clinical categories to determine positive yield statistics. These categories were also tabulated with the radiologists advice as to whether they would have expected a positive finding. For several categories the positive yield for CT head exams was so low as to be considered negligible. Other categories, although low were still considered significant. These will be presented to the emergency department along with a suggested protocol for requesting CT head exams. It was unfortunate that this study had to be performed to prove to clinical staff that medical imaging staff members do in general have an excellent idea of what will show up in an x-ray and what will not! However, it was useful to be able to categorise 'positive yield' statistics into such specific classes. The next step is to try and communicate these findings to staff to create more trust and better communication between departments. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  3. The Effect of Head Positioning and Head Tilting on the Incidence of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Very Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bijl-Marcus, Karen A; Brouwer, Annemieke J; de Vries, Linda S; van Wezel-Meijler, Gerda

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care, germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GMH-IVH) remains a frequent, serious complication of premature birth. Neutral head position and head tilting have been suggested to reduce the risk of GMH-IVH in preterm infants during the first 72 h of life. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic review of the effect of neutral head positioning and head tilting on the incidence of GMH-IVH in very preterm infants (gestational age ≤30 weeks). In addition, we reviewed their effect on cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation. Literature was searched (June 2016) in the following electronic databases: CINAHL, Embase, Medline, SCOPUS, and several trial registers. One underpowered trial studied the effect of head positioning on the incidence of GMH-IVH. This randomized controlled trial enrolled 48 preterm infants and found no effect on the occurrence of GMH-IVH. Three observational studies investigated the effect of head rotation and/or tilting on cerebral oxygenation in 68 preterm infants in total. Their results suggest that cerebral oxygenation is not significantly affected by changes in head positioning. The effect of head positioning and/or tilting on cerebral hemodynamics was described in 2 observational studies of 28 preterm infants and found no significant effect. There is insufficient evidence regarding the effect of head positioning and tilting on the incidence of GMH-IVH and cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in preterm infants. We recommend further research in this field, especially in extremely preterm and clinically unstable infants during the first postnatal days. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Simple device for the positioning and fixation of the head in radiotherapy of cerebral tumors in frontal and lateral position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, M.; Uhlmann, U.; Schnabel, K.; Lehmann, W.; Leetz, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    In radiotherapy of cerebral tumors in the occipital, central and parietal area it can be favourable to fix the patient's head in frontal or lateral position. It is true that this problem can be solved by manufacturing individual face masks of PVC with the vacuum deep-drawing method, but this method is very time- and cost-consuming. The present study suggests a simplified method using the thermoplastic polyester 'Orifit'. Such a mask provides a good immobilization and can be manufactured in 10 to 15 minutes without bothering much the patient. Simulation and computed tomography are not substantially affected by the material. (orig.) [de

  5. Cluster-Randomized, Crossover Trial of Head Positioning in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Craig S; Arima, Hisatomi; Lavados, Pablo; Billot, Laurent; Hackett, Maree L; Olavarría, Verónica V; Muñoz Venturelli, Paula; Brunser, Alejandro; Peng, Bin; Cui, Liying; Song, Lily; Rogers, Kris; Middleton, Sandy; Lim, Joyce Y; Forshaw, Denise; Lightbody, C Elizabeth; Woodward, Mark; Pontes-Neto, Octavio; De Silva, H Asita; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Pandian, Jeyaraj D; Mead, Gillian E; Robinson, Thompson; Watkins, Caroline

    2017-06-22

    The role of supine positioning after acute stroke in improving cerebral blood flow and the countervailing risk of aspiration pneumonia have led to variation in head positioning in clinical practice. We wanted to determine whether outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke could be improved by positioning the patient to be lying flat (i.e., fully supine with the back horizontal and the face upwards) during treatment to increase cerebral perfusion. In a pragmatic, cluster-randomized, crossover trial conducted in nine countries, we assigned 11,093 patients with acute stroke (85% of the strokes were ischemic) to receive care in either a lying-flat position or a sitting-up position with the head elevated to at least 30 degrees, according to the randomization assignment of the hospital to which they were admitted; the designated position was initiated soon after hospital admission and was maintained for 24 hours. The primary outcome was degree of disability at 90 days, as assessed with the use of the modified Rankin scale (scores range from 0 to 6, with higher scores indicating greater disability and a score of 6 indicating death). The median interval between the onset of stroke symptoms and the initiation of the assigned position was 14 hours (interquartile range, 5 to 35). Patients in the lying-flat group were less likely than patients in the sitting-up group to maintain the position for 24 hours (87% vs. 95%, P<0.001). In a proportional-odds model, there was no significant shift in the distribution of 90-day disability outcomes on the global modified Rankin scale between patients in the lying-flat group and patients in the sitting-up group (unadjusted odds ratio for a difference in the distribution of scores on the modified Rankin scale in the lying-flat group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 1.10; P=0.84). Mortality within 90 days was 7.3% among the patients in the lying-flat group and 7.4% among the patients in the sitting-up group (P=0.83). There were

  6. Death in head-down position in a heavily intoxicated obese man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Donno, A; De Fazio, A; Greco, M G; Introna, F; Maglietta, R A G

    2008-07-01

    Dying in a head-down position is rare, and autopsy may reveal no morphological findings which can sufficiently explain the cause of death. The authors describe a case of positional asphyxia of a 78-year-old man, found dead hanging in head-down position inside a blackberry bush. The subject was suspended by his left leg and wedged inside a thick blackberry bush, while his right leg was free and inflected. Investigation revealed that the elderly man had last been seen after lunch in the early afternoon (about 2.00 p.m.), two days before being found. The subject had no pre-existing physical or mental condition which might have explained his death. He was 164 cm tall and weighed 90 kg (BMI: 33.4). External examination of the body revealed abrasions on the head and multiple superficial scratch marks on the hands; no external signs of violence were observed. The deceased's head was cyanotic and revealed marked petechial haemorrhages of the conjunctiva. Rigor mortis was fully developed and reddish fixed livor was observed on the face, neck and upper chest. The distribution of livor was consistent with the position of the body at the scene. Autopsy revealed marked pulmonary and cerebral oedema; the liver showed fatty vacuolization with a mild increase of connective tissue and thickening of the walls of the central veins and centrilobular sinusoids. The heart was enlarged, particularly the left ventricle, with a slight, calcified, diffuse and increased thickness of the aortic and coronary arteries. The remains of meat and vegetables in the initial phase of digestion were found inside the stomach, and there was a strong smell of alcohol. The blood alcohol concentration, ascertained by GC (Gas Chromatography), was 2.10 g/l. Toxicological assays for addictive drugs (cocaine, heroin, THC) yielded negative results. There were no features suggesting that the deceased had been the victim of an assault. The authors of this case report illustrate the main pathophysiological and

  7. Review of the patient positioning reproducibility in head-and-neck radiotherapy using Statistical Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah J; Herst, Patries M; Louwe, Robert J W

    2018-05-01

    A remarkable improvement in patient positioning was observed after the implementation of various process changes aiming to increase the consistency of patient positioning throughout the radiotherapy treatment chain. However, no tool was available to describe these changes over time in a standardised way. This study reports on the feasibility of Statistical Process Control (SPC) to highlight changes in patient positioning accuracy and facilitate correlation of these changes with the underlying process changes. Metrics were designed to quantify the systematic and random patient deformation as input for the SPC charts. These metrics were based on data obtained from multiple local ROI matches for 191 patients who were treated for head-and-neck cancer during the period 2011-2016. SPC highlighted a significant improvement in patient positioning that coincided with multiple intentional process changes. The observed improvements could be described as a combination of a reduction in outliers and a systematic improvement in the patient positioning accuracy of all patients. SPC is able to track changes in the reproducibility of patient positioning in head-and-neck radiation oncology, and distinguish between systematic and random process changes. Identification of process changes underlying these trends requires additional statistical analysis and seems only possible when the changes do not overlap in time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Positive correlation between pesticide sales and central nervous system and cardiovascular congenital abnormalities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes Asmus, Carmen I R; Camara, Volney M; Raggio, Ronir; Landrigan, Philip J; Claudio, Luz

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the association between pesticide exposure in Brazil (2005-2013) with rates of central nervous system (CNS) and cardiovascular system (CVS) congenital abnormalities in 2014. An exposure variable was established from data on production and sales of pesticides (kg) per crop area (ha) for 2012 and 2013 years. The Brazilian states were divided into three categories: high, medium, and low pesticide use and rate ratios were estimated for each group of states (CI: 95 %). In 2013 and 2014, the high use group presented a 100 and a 75 % increase, and the medium group a 65 and 23 % increase, respectively, in the risk of CNS and CVS congenital abnormalities at birth, compared to the low use group. These findings suggest that pesticide exposure could be associated with increased risk of congenital malformations at birth in Brazil.

  9. Adaptive Changes in the Perception of Fast and Slow Movement at Different Head Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Roberto; Occhigrossi, Chiara; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Lucertini, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2017-05-01

    This paper examines the subjective sense of orientation during asymmetric body rotations in normal subjects. Self-motion perception was investigated in 10 healthy individuals during asymmetric whole-body rotation with different head orientations. Both on-vertical axis and off-vertical axis rotations were employed. Subjects tracked a remembered earth-fixed visual target while rotating in the dark for four cycles of asymmetric rotation (two half-sinusoidal cycles of the same amplitude, but of different duration). The rotations induced a bias in the perception of velocity (more pronounced with fast than with slow motion). At the end of rotation, a marked target position error (TPE) was present. For the on-vertical axis rotations, the TPE was no different if the rotations were performed with a 30° nose-down, a 60° nose-up, or a 90° side-down head tilt. With off-vertical axis rotations, the simultaneous activation of the semicircular canals and otolithic receptors produced a significant increase of TPE for all head positions. This difference between on-vertical and off-vertical axis rotation was probably partly due to the vestibular transfer function and partly due to different adaptation to the speed of rotation. Such a phenomenon might be generated in different components of the vestibular system. The adaptive process enhancing the perception of dynamic movement around the vertical axis is not related to the specific semicircular canals that are activated; the addition of an otolithic component results in a significant increase of the TPE.Panichi R, Occhigrossi C, Ferraresi A, Faralli M, Lucertini M, Pettorossi VE. Adaptive changes in the perception of fast and slow movement at different head positions. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(5):463-468.

  10. Comparison of different patient positioning strategies to minimize shoulder girdle artifacts in head and neck CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stefan; Meindl, Thomas; Treitl, Marcus; Pfeifer, Klaus-Jürgen; Reiser, Maximilian

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze different patient positioning strategies for minimizing artifacts of the shoulder girdle in head and neck CT. Standardized CT examinations of three positioning groups were compared (P: patients pushed their shoulders downwards; D: similar optimization by a pulling device; N: no particular positioning optimization). Parameters analyzed were the length of the cervical spine not being superimposed by the shoulder girdle as well as noise in the supraclavicular space. In groups P and D, the portion of the cervical spine not superimposed was significantly larger than in group N (P: 10.4 cm; D: 10.6 cm; N: 8.5 cm). At the supraclavicular space, noise decreased significantly (P: 12.5 HU; D: 12.1 HU; N: 17.7 HU). No significant differences between the two position-optimized groups (P and D) were detected. Optimized shoulder positioning by the patient increases image quality in CT head and neck imaging. The use of a pulling device offers no additional advantages.

  11. Vertical eye position-dependence of the human vestibuloocular reflex during passive and active yaw head rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurtell, M J; Black, R A; Halmagyi, G M; Curthoys, I S; Aw, S T

    1999-05-01

    Vertical eye position-dependence of the human vestibuloocular reflex during passive and active yaw head rotations. The effect of vertical eye-in-head position on the compensatory eye rotation response to passive and active high acceleration yaw head rotations was examined in eight normal human subjects. The stimuli consisted of brief, low amplitude (15-25 degrees ), high acceleration (4,000-6,000 degrees /s2) yaw head rotations with respect to the trunk (peak velocity was 150-350 degrees /s). Eye and head rotations were recorded in three-dimensional space using the magnetic search coil technique. The input-output kinematics of the three-dimensional vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) were assessed by finding the difference between the inverted eye velocity vector and the head velocity vector (both referenced to a head-fixed coordinate system) as a time series. During passive head impulses, the head and eye velocity axes aligned well with each other for the first 47 ms after the onset of the stimulus, regardless of vertical eye-in-head position. After the initial 47-ms period, the degree of alignment of the eye and head velocity axes was modulated by vertical eye-in-head position. When fixation was on a target 20 degrees up, the eye and head velocity axes remained well aligned with each other. However, when fixation was on targets at 0 and 20 degrees down, the eye velocity axis tilted forward relative to the head velocity axis. During active head impulses, the axis tilt became apparent within 5 ms of the onset of the stimulus. When fixation was on a target at 0 degrees, the velocity axes remained well aligned with each other. When fixation was on a target 20 degrees up, the eye velocity axis tilted backward, when fixation was on a target 20 degrees down, the eye velocity axis tilted forward. The findings show that the VOR compensates very well for head motion in the early part of the response to unpredictable high acceleration stimuli-the eye position- dependence of the

  12. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  13. Neurological abnormalities in localized scleroderma of the face and head: a case series study for evaluation of imaging findings and clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Święty, Anna; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia; Arasiewicz, Hubert

    2017-09-01

    Localized scleroderma (LoS) of the face and head is often associated with neurological manifestations and/or imaging abnormalities in the central nervous system (CNS). We present an analysis of 20 cases of LoS affecting the face and head. The CNS symptoms and/or abnormalities in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were observed in 12 patients (60%). In addition to the mild and unspecific disorders (e.g. headaches), serious neurological complications probably in the course of vasculitis were revealed: epilepsy (in two patients), epilepsy and pyramidal sings (in one patient). Neurological disorders and LoS occurred at the same time (in three patients) or at the course of the disease (nine patients) and no later than 29 years since the onset of the disease. No link between neurological disorders and the LoS clinical morphology, immunological and other laboratory parameters has been established. CNS involvement is not correlated with the clinical course of the facial and head LoS and may occur years after the disease initial symptomatology. Imaging follow-up is not required if there is not any emerging neurological symptom. In some cases, however, both HRCT and MRI are useful for monitoring disease evolution and addressing therapeutic choices.

  14. The variation of the strength of neck extensor muscles and semispinalis capitis muscle size with head and neck position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezasoltani, A; Nasiri, R; Faizei, A M; Zaafari, G; Mirshahvelayati, A S; Bakhshidarabad, L

    2013-04-01

    Semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) is a massive and long cervico-thoracic muscle which functions as a main head and neck extensor muscle. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of head and neck positions on the strength of neck extensor muscles and size of SECM in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy women students voluntarily participated in this study. An ultrasonography apparatus (Hitachi EUB 525) and a system of tension-meter were used to scan the right SECM at the level of third cervical spine and to measure the strength of neck extensor muscles at three head and neck positions. Neck extensor muscles were stronger in neutral than flexion or than extension positions while the size of SECM was larger in extension than neutral or than flexion position. The force generation capacity of the main neck extensor muscle was lower at two head and neck flexion and extension positions than neutral position. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Relationship between the prone position and achieving head control at 3 months].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Machado, J L; Rodríguez-Fuentes, G

    2013-10-01

    Owing to the significant increase of mild motor delays and the strong intolerance of infants to be placed on prone position observed in the Physiotherapy Unit of the Maternal and Children's University Hospital of the Canaries (HUMIC), a study was conducted to determine whether positioning infants in the prone position while awake affected the achievement and quality of head control at three months. A prospective comparative practice-based study of a representative sample of 67 healthy infants born in the HUMIC, and divided into an experimental group (n = 35) and control group (n = 32). The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and a parent questionnaire were used as measurement tools. The intervention consisted of regular home visits to the experimental group (from the first to the third month). The two groups were evaluated in their homes at the end of 3 months. The differences in mean raw score of the AIMS at 3 months were, 16.26 in the experimental group and 10.38 in control group (P<.001). The percentile mean was 94 in the experimental group, and less than 50 (42) in the control group. All of the experimental group babies achieved the head control, with only 8 in the control group (25%). The significant findings suggest a direct relationship between the time spent in the prone position when the baby is awake and the achievement of head control at three months. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Objective classification of different head and neck positions and their influence on the radiographic pharyngeal diameter in sport horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Various head and neck positions in sport horses are significant as they can interfere with upper airway flow mechanics during exercise. Until now, research has focused on subjectively described head and neck positions. The objective of this study was to develop an objective, reproducible method for quantifying head and neck positions accurately. Results Determining the angle between the ridge of the nose and the horizontal plane (ground angle) together with the angle between the ridge of nose and the line connecting the neck and the withers (withers angle) has provided values that allow precise identification of three preselected head and neck positions for performing sport horses. The pharyngeal diameter, determined on lateral radiographs of 35 horses, differed significantly between the established flexed position and the remaining two head and neck positions (extended and neutral). There was a significant correlation between the pharyngeal diameter and the ground angle (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient −0.769, p horses. The ground angle and the withers angle show significant correlation with the measured pharyngeal diameter in resting horses. Hence, these angles provide an appropriate method for assessing the degree of head and neck flexion. Further research is required to examine the influence of increasing head and neck flexion and the related pharyngeal diameter on upper airway function in exercising horses. PMID:24886564

  17. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  18. Radiographic study of bone deformans on charged condylar head position in TMJ arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1983-01-01

    The author analyzed the morphologic changes of bone structure from 848 radiographics (424 joints) of 212 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and ortho pantomography. The interrelation of the bone changes and condylar head positions the results were as follows: 1. In the 212 patients with TMJ arthrosis, 210 patients (99.05%) show the condylar positional changes. Among them, 187 patients (89.05%) show the bone changes. 2. In TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes, 108 patients (57.75%) show both the condylar positional changes and bone changes. 66 patients show the condylar positional changes bilaterally and bone changes unilaterally. On the other hand, 11 patients (5.88%) show the condylar positional changes unilaterally and bone change bilaterally. 3. The bone changes in the TMJ arthrosis patients with the condylar positional changes were as follows: There were the flattening of articular surface in 103 cases (26.55%) the erosion in 99 cases (25.52%), and the erosion in 88 cases (22.68%). There were not much differences among the three types of bone changes. And the deformity in 70 cases (18.04%), the sclerosis in 22 cases (5.67%), the marginal proliferation in 6 cases (1.55%) were seen. 4. The regions of bone changes in TMJ arthrosis patients with condylar positional changes were as follows: They occurred at the condyle head (51.04%), the articular eminence (39.20%) and the articular fossa (9.60%) in that order. The condylar positional changes and bone changes according to the regions were as follows: a) In the bone changes at the condylar head, the flattening (34.63%) was a most frequent finding and the deformity (27.63%) the erosion (34.63%) in the order. In the condylar positional changes, the downward positioning of condyle (41.44%) was a most frequent finding in the mouth closed state and the restricted movement within the articular fossa (35.46%) in the mouth open state. b) In

  19. Radiographic study of bone deformans on charged condylar head position in TMJ arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-11-15

    The author analyzed the morphologic changes of bone structure from 848 radiographics (424 joints) of 212 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral transcranial projection and ortho pantomography. The interrelation of the bone changes and condylar head positions the results were as follows: 1. In the 212 patients with TMJ arthrosis, 210 patients (99.05%) show the condylar positional changes. Among them, 187 patients (89.05%) show the bone changes. 2. In TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes, 108 patients (57.75%) show both the condylar positional changes and bone changes. 66 patients show the condylar positional changes bilaterally and bone changes unilaterally. On the other hand, 11 patients (5.88%) show the condylar positional changes unilaterally and bone change bilaterally. 3. The bone changes in the TMJ arthrosis patients with the condylar positional changes were as follows: There were the flattening of articular surface in 103 cases (26.55%) the erosion in 99 cases (25.52%), and the erosion in 88 cases (22.68%). There were not much differences among the three types of bone changes. And the deformity in 70 cases (18.04%), the sclerosis in 22 cases (5.67%), the marginal proliferation in 6 cases (1.55%) were seen. 4. The regions of bone changes in TMJ arthrosis patients with condylar positional changes were as follows: They occurred at the condyle head (51.04%), the articular eminence (39.20%) and the articular fossa (9.60%) in that order. The condylar positional changes and bone changes according to the regions were as follows: a) In the bone changes at the condylar head, the flattening (34.63%) was a most frequent finding and the deformity (27.63%) the erosion (34.63%) in the order. In the condylar positional changes, the downward positioning of condyle (41.44%) was a most frequent finding in the mouth closed state and the restricted movement within the articular fossa (35.46%) in the mouth open state. b) In

  20. Tribology and wear of metal-on-metal hip prostheses: influence of cup angle and head position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sophie; Leslie, Ian; Isaac, Graham; Jin, Zhongmin; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2008-08-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that the angular position of the acetabular cup may influence wear in metal-on-metal total hip bearings. A high cup angle in comparison to the anatomical position may lead to the head being constrained by the superior lateral surface and rim of the cup, thus potentially changing the location of the contact zone between the head and the cup. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that both a steep cup angle and a lateralized position of the head can increase head contact on the superior rim of the cup, with the consequence of increased wear. Hip-joint simulator studies of metal-on-metal bearings were undertaken with cup angles of 45 degrees and 55 degrees . The femoral head was either aligned to the center of the cup or placed in a position of microlateralization. Wear was measured gravimetrically over 5 million cycles. A steep cup angle of 55 degrees showed significantly higher long-term steady-state wear than a standard cup angle of 45 degrees (p < 0.01). The difference was fivefold. Microlateralization of the head resulted in a fivefold increase in steady-state wear compared with a centralized head. The combination of a steep cup angle and a microlateralized head increased the steady-state wear rate by tenfold compared with a standard cup angle with a centralized head. These studies support the hypothesis that both an increased cup angle and a lateral head position increase wear in metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

  1. A clinical technique for virtual articulator mounting with natural head position by using calibrated stereophotogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Walter Y H; Hsung, Richard T C; Choi, Winnie W S; Luk, Henry W K; Cheng, Leo Y Y; Pow, Edmond H N

    2017-09-29

    Accurate articulator-mounted casts are essential for occlusion analysis and for fabrication of dental prostheses. Although the axis orbital plane has been commonly used as the reference horizontal plane, some clinicians prefer to register the horizontal plane with a spirit level when the patient is in the natural head position (NHP) to avoid anatomic landmark variations. This article presents a digital workflow for registering the patient's horizontal plane in NHP on a virtual articulator. An orientation reference board is used to calibrate a stereophotogrammetry device and a 3-dimensional facial photograph with the patient in NHP. The horizontal plane can then be automatically registered to the patient's virtual model and aligned to the virtual articulator at the transverse horizontal axis level. This technique showed good repeatability with positional differences of less than 1 degree and 1 mm in 5 repeated measurements in 1 patient. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HPV Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Molecular Pathogenesis and Evolving Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüveyda Dok

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a highly heterogeneous disease that is the result of tobacco and/or alcohol abuse or infection with high-risk Human papillomaviruses. Despite the fact that HPV positive HNSCC cancers form a distinct clinical entity with better treatment outcome, all HNSCC are currently treated uniformly with the same treatment modality. At present, biologic basis of these different outcomes and their therapeutic influence are areas of intense investigation. In this review, we will summarize the molecular basis for this different outcome, novel treatment opportunities and possible biomarkers for HPV positive HNSCC. In particular, the focus will be on several molecular targeted strategies that can improve the chemoradiation response by influencing DNA repair mechanisms.

  3. Tracing Back to the Onset of Abnormal Head Circumference Growth in Italian Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Filippo; Calderoni, Sara; Apicella, Fabio; Filippi, Tiziana; Santocchi, Elisa; Calugi, Simona; Cosenza, Angela; Tancredi, Raffaella; Narzisi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective study aims to describe head circumference (HC) developmental course during the first year of life in 50 Italian children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in a control group of 100 typically developing children (TD). To this end, we use anthropometric measurements (HC, body height, body weight) obtained at birth (T0), 1-2…

  4. Prediction value of the Canadian CT head rule and the New Orleans criteria for positive head CT scan and acute neurosurgical procedures in minor head trauma: a multicenter external validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouida, Wahid; Marghli, Soudani; Souissi, Sami; Ksibi, Hichem; Methammem, Mehdi; Haguiga, Habib; Khedher, Sonia; Boubaker, Hamdi; Beltaief, Kaouthar; Grissa, Mohamed Habib; Trimech, Mohamed Naceur; Kerkeni, Wiem; Chebili, Nawfel; Halila, Imen; Rejeb, Imen; Boukef, Riadh; Rekik, Noureddine; Bouhaja, Bechir; Letaief, Mondher; Nouira, Semir

    2013-05-01

    The New Orleans Criteria and the Canadian CT Head Rule have been developed to decrease the number of normal computed tomography (CT) results in mild head injury. We compare the performance of both decision rules for identifying patients with intracranial traumatic lesions and those who require an urgent neurosurgical intervention after mild head injury. This was an observational cohort study performed between 2008 and 2011 on patients with mild head injury who were aged 10 years or older. We collected prospectively clinical head CT scan findings and outcome. Primary outcome was need for neurosurgical intervention, defined as either death or craniotomy, or the need of intubation within 15 days of the traumatic event. Secondary outcome was the presence of traumatic lesions on head CT scan. New Orleans Criteria and Canadian CT Head Rule decision rules were compared by using sensitivity specifications and positive and negative predictive value. We enrolled 1,582 patients. Neurosurgical intervention was performed in 34 patients (2.1%) and positive CT findings were demonstrated in 218 patients (13.8%). Sensitivity and specificity for need for neurosurgical intervention were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI] 90% to 100%) and 60% (95% CI 44% to 76%) for the Canadian CT Head Rule and 82% (95% CI 69% to 95%) and 26% (95% CI 24% to 28%) for the New Orleans Criteria. Negative predictive values for the above-mentioned clinical decision rules were 100% and 99% and positive values were 5% and 2%, respectively, for the Canadian CT Head Rule and New Orleans Criteria. Sensitivity and specificity for clinical significant head CT findings were 95% (95% CI 92% to 98%) and 65% (95% CI 62% to 68%) for the Canadian CT Head Rule and 86% (95% CI 81% to 91%) and 28% (95% CI 26% to 30%) for the New Orleans Criteria. A similar trend of results was found in the subgroup of patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. For patients with mild head injury, the Canadian CT Head Rule had higher

  5. Antitopoisomerase antibody positivity predates nailfold capillaroscopy abnormalities in scleroderma. Postulated classification of 'prescleroderma'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, H; Champion, D; Wu, J C; Giallussi, J; McGrath, M; Manolios, N

    2011-02-01

    In a patient with early topoisomerase antibody-positive scleroderma, antinuclear antibody positivity was fortuitously observed to predate nailfold capillaroscopy changes. Using this case as a template, the prediagnostic phase of the presumed multifactorial disease may be divided into 5 temporal phases--phase 1 representing conception and intrauterine environment, phase 2 representing the extrauterine environment predating environmental exposure; phase 3 representing the early post-environmental exposure interval with no detectable perturbed body status; phase 4 representing the post-environmental exposure interval characterized by autoantibody production and microvascular changes, and phase 5, the symptomatic clinical prediagnostic interval (Raynaud's, skin, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiorespiratory) prompting scleroderma diagnosis. Temporal classification of prescleroderma aids in both the understanding and definition of scleroderma 'onset'. If altered nailfold capillaries and autoantibodies develop at comparable rates, and if the findings from this case--that autoantibody changes precede microvascular changes--are truly representative of the preclinical disease phase, then these findings argue that the evolution of the disease is from within the vessel outwards, rather than vice versa. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. Socioeconomic position and stage at diagnosis of head and neck cancer - a nationwide study from DAHANCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Maja Halgren; Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl; Kjær, Trille Kristina

    2015-01-01

    socioeconomic position and advanced stage HNSCC at diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Men and women with HNSCC diagnosed between 1992 and 2008 were identified in the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) database, which contains detailed information on all cases of HNSCC treated in Denmark. Individual...... information on the following four socioeconomic indicators: highest attained educational level, cohabitation status, disposable income and degree of urbanisation were obtained from Statistics Denmark. For the 9683 cases on which there was full information, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) for a diagnosis...... for hypopharynx cancer patients living in rural areas or provincial cities. Having one or more comorbid conditions was associated with an increased OR for advanced stage oral cancer but with a decreased OR for oropharynx cancer. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide population-based study, socioeconomic differences...

  7. Radiosensitivity and effect of hypoxia in HPV positive head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Busk, Morten; Olthof, Nadine; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Horsman, Michael R.; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a distinct subgroup of HNSCC characterized by a favorable prognosis and a distinct molecular biology. Previous data from the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial indicated that HPV positive tumors did not benefit from hypoxic modifications by Nimorazole during radiotherapy, whereas a significant benefit was observed in the HPV negative tumors. However, more studies have demonstrated equal frequencies of hypoxic tumors among HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors. The aim of the present study was to determine radiosensitivity, the impact of hypoxia and the effect of Nimorazole in HPV positive and HPV negative cell lines. Materials and method: The used cell lines were: UDSCC2, UMSCC47 and UPCISCC90 (HPV positive) and FaDu DD , UTSCC33 and UTSCC5 (HPV negative). Cells were cultured under normoxic or hypoxic conditions, and gene expression levels of previously established hypoxia induced genes were assessed by qPCR. Cells were irradiated with various doses under normoxia, hypoxia or hypoxia +1 mM Nimorazole, and the clonogenic survival was determined. Results: The HPV positive and HPV negative cell lines exhibited similar patterns of upregulation of hypoxia induced genes in response to hypoxia. The HPV positive cell lines were up to 2.4 times more radiation sensitive than HPV negative cell lines. However, all HPV positive cells displayed the same response to hypoxia in radiosensitivity, with an OER in the range 2.3–2.9, and a sensitizer effect of Nimorazole of 1.13–1.29, similar to HPV negative cells. Conclusions: Although HPV positive cells had a markedly higher radiosensitivity compared to HPV negative cells, they displayed the same relative radioresistance under hypoxia and the same relative sensitizer effect of Nimorazole. The clinical observation that HPV positive patients do not seem to benefit from Nimorazole treatment is not due to inherent differences in hypoxia sensitivity

  8. Whole-brain functional connectivity during emotional word classification in medication-free Major Depressive Disorder: Abnormal salience circuitry and relations to positive emotionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-José; Veer, Ilya M.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Aleman, André; van Buchem, Mark A.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.; Johnstone, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with biased processing and abnormal regulation of negative and positive information, which may result from compromised coordinated activity of prefrontal and subcortical brain regions involved in evaluating emotional information. We tested whether

  9. Whole-brain functional connectivity during emotional word classification in medication-free Major Depressive Disorder : Abnormal salience circuitry and relations to positive emotionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veer, Ilya M.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Aleman, Andre; van Buchem, Mark A.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.; Johnstone, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with biased processing and abnormal regulation of negative and positive information, which may result from compromised coordinated activity of prefrontal and subcortical brain regions involved in evaluating emotional information. We tested whether

  10. Using a smartphone as a tool to measure compensatory and anomalous head positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle de Lima Farah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe a new method for measuring anomalous head positions by using a cell phone. Methods: The photo rotation feature of the iPhone® PHOTOS application was used. With the patient seated on a chair, a horizontal stripe was fixed on the wall in the background and a sagittal stripe was fixed on the seat. Photographs were obtained in the following views: front view (photographs A and B; with the head tilted over one shoulder and upper axial view (photographs C and D; viewing the forehead and nose (A and C are without camera rotation, and B and D are with camera rotation. A blank sheet of paper with two straight lines making a 32-degree angle was also photographed. Thirty examiners were instructed to measure the rotation required to align the reference points with the orthogonal axes. In order to set benchmarks to be compared with the measurements obtained by the examiners, blue lines were digitally added to the front and upper view photographs. Results: In the photograph of the sheet of paper (p=0.380 and a=5%, the observed values did not differ statistically from the known value of 32 degrees. Mean measurements were as follows: front view photograph A, 22.8 ± 2.77; front view B, 21.4 ± 1.61; upper view C, 19.6 ± 2.36; and upper view D, 20.1 ± 2.33 degrees. The mean difference in measurements for the front view photograph A was -1.88 (95% CI -2.88 to -0.88, front view B was -0.37 (95% CI -0.97 to 0.17, upper view C was 1.43 (95% CI 0.55 to 2.24, and upper view D was 1.87 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.77. Conclusion: The method used in this study for measuring anomalous head position is reproducible, with maximum variations for AHPs of 2.88 degrees around the X-axis and 2.77 degrees around the Y-axis.

  11. Using a smartphone as a tool to measure compensatory and anomalous head positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Michelle de Lima; Santinello, Murillo; Carvalho, Luis Eduardo Morato Rebouças de; Uesugui, Carlos Fumiaki; Barcellos, Ronaldo Boaventura

    2018-01-01

    To describe a new method for measuring anomalous head positions by using a cell phone. The photo rotation feature of the iPhone® PHOTOS application was used. With the patient seated on a chair, a horizontal stripe was fixed on the wall in the background and a sagittal stripe was fixed on the seat. Photographs were obtained in the following views: front view (photographs A and B; with the head tilted over one shoulder) and upper axial view (photographs C and D; viewing the forehead and nose) (A and C are without camera rotation, and B and D are with camera rotation). A blank sheet of paper with two straight lines making a 32-degree angle was also photographed. Thirty examiners were instructed to measure the rotation required to align the reference points with the orthogonal axes. In order to set benchmarks to be compared with the measurements obtained by the examiners, blue lines were digitally added to the front and upper view photographs. In the photograph of the sheet of paper (p=0.380 and a=5%), the observed values did not differ statistically from the known value of 32 degrees. Mean measurements were as follows: front view photograph A, 22.8 ± 2.77; front view B, 21.4 ± 1.61; upper view C, 19.6 ± 2.36; and upper view D, 20.1 ± 2.33 degrees. The mean difference in measurements for the front view photograph A was -1.88 (95% CI -2.88 to -0.88), front view B was -0.37 (95% CI -0.97 to 0.17), upper view C was 1.43 (95% CI 0.55 to 2.24), and upper view D was 1.87 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.77). The method used in this study for measuring anomalous head position is reproducible, with maximum variations for AHPs of 2.88 degrees around the X-axis and 2.77 degrees around the Y-axis.

  12. Decreasing the effective radiation dose in pediatric craniofacial CT by changing head position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Kuang, Anna A.; Schwartz, Daniel L.; Selden, Nathan R.; Stevens, Donna M.; Bardo, Dianna M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Children are exposed to ionizing radiation during pre- and post-operative evaluation for craniofacial surgery. The primary purpose of the study was to decrease effective radiation dose while preserving the diagnostic quality of the study. In this prospective study 49 children were positioned during craniofacial CT (CFCT) imaging with their neck fully extended into an exaggerated sniff position, parallel to the CT gantry, to eliminate the majority of the cervical spine and the thyroid gland from radiation exposure. Image-quality and effective radiation dose comparisons were made retrospectively in age-matched controls (n = 49). When compared to CT scans reviewed retrospectively, the prospective examinations showed a statistically significant decrease in z-axis length by 16% (P < 0.0001) and delivered a reduced effective radiation dose by 18% (P < 0.0001). The subjective diagnostic quality of the exams performed in the prospective arm was maintained despite a slight decrease in the quality of the brain windows. There was statistically significant improvement in the quality of the bone windows and three-dimensional reconstructed images. Altering the position of the head by extending the neck during pediatric craniofacial CT imaging statistically reduces the effective radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  13. Abnormal positioning of multiple abdominal organs with anomalous direct drainage of hepatic vein into the right atrium in a post operative omphalocele patient: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Su Jeong; Cho, Bum Sang; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Seung Young; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik

    2012-01-01

    An omphalocele is a rare congenital anomaly in which the infant's intestines protrude through the navel. Additional anomalies that are associated with omphalocele remain present in as many as 50% of cases, and these anomalies vary greatly from patient to patient. However, the persistent anomalies or abnormal position of the abdominal organs in post operative omphalocele patients have not reported previously. Herein, we report the case of an omphalocele patient with abnormal positioning of the liver, spleen and both kidneys, as well as abnormal drainage of the hepatic vein into the right atrium, which was found during a routine, postoperative follow-up computed tomography scan

  14. Ablation of Mrds1/Ofcc1 Induces Hyper-γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidasemia without Abnormal Head Development and Schizophrenia-Relevant Behaviors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Yamada, Kazuo; Watanabe, Akiko; Ohba, Hisako; Sakaguchi, Toru; Honma, Yota; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Maekawa, Motoko; Watanabe, Kazutada; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla D.; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the Opo gene result in eye malformation in medaka fish. The human ortholog of this gene, MRDS1/OFCC1, is a potentially causal gene for orofacial cleft, as well as a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia, a devastating mental illness. Based on this evidence, we hypothesized that this gene could perform crucial functions in the development of head and brain structures in vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we created Mrds1/Ofcc1-null mice. Mice were examined thoroughly using an abnormality screening system referred to as “the Japan Mouse Clinic”. No malformations of the head structure, eye or other parts of the body were apparent in these knockout mice. However, the mutant mice showed a marked increase in serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), a marker for liver damage, but no abnormalities in other liver-related measurements. We also performed a family-based association study on the gene in schizophrenia samples of Japanese origin. We found five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located across the gene that showed significant transmission distortion, supporting a prior report of association in a Caucasian cohort. However, the knockout mice showed no behavioral phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. In conclusion, disruption of the Mrds1/Ofcc1 gene elicits asymptomatic hyper-γ-glutamyl-transpeptidasemia in mice. However, there were no phenotypes to support a role for the gene in the development of eye and craniofacial structures in vertebrates. These results prompt further examination of the gene, including its putative contribution to hyper-γ-glutamyl transpeptidasemia and schizophrenia. PMID:22242126

  15. Ablation of Mrds1/Ofcc1 induces hyper-γ-glutamyl transpeptidasemia without abnormal head development and schizophrenia-relevant behaviors in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Opo gene result in eye malformation in medaka fish. The human ortholog of this gene, MRDS1/OFCC1, is a potentially causal gene for orofacial cleft, as well as a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia, a devastating mental illness. Based on this evidence, we hypothesized that this gene could perform crucial functions in the development of head and brain structures in vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we created Mrds1/Ofcc1-null mice. Mice were examined thoroughly using an abnormality screening system referred to as "the Japan Mouse Clinic". No malformations of the head structure, eye or other parts of the body were apparent in these knockout mice. However, the mutant mice showed a marked increase in serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, a marker for liver damage, but no abnormalities in other liver-related measurements. We also performed a family-based association study on the gene in schizophrenia samples of Japanese origin. We found five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located across the gene that showed significant transmission distortion, supporting a prior report of association in a Caucasian cohort. However, the knockout mice showed no behavioral phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. In conclusion, disruption of the Mrds1/Ofcc1 gene elicits asymptomatic hyper-γ-glutamyl-transpeptidasemia in mice. However, there were no phenotypes to support a role for the gene in the development of eye and craniofacial structures in vertebrates. These results prompt further examination of the gene, including its putative contribution to hyper-γ-glutamyl transpeptidasemia and schizophrenia.

  16. Effect of standardized orders and provider education on head-of-bed positioning in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Donald L; Sherner, John H; Fitzpatrick, Thomas M; Callender, Marcia E; Shorr, Andrew F

    2003-09-01

    Semirecumbent head-of-bed positioning in mechanically ventilated patients decreases the risk of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The purpose of this study was to determine whether the addition of a standardized order followed by the initiation of a provider education program would increase the frequency with which our patients were maintained in the semirecumbent position. Prospective, pre-, and postintervention observational study. A tertiary care, U.S. Army teaching hospital. Mechanically ventilated medical and surgical intensive care unit patients. The first intervention involved the addition of an order for semirecumbent head-of-bed positioning to our intensive care unit order sets. This was followed 2 months later with a second intervention, which was a nurse and physician education program emphasizing semirecumbent positioning. Data regarding head-of-bed positioning were collected on 100 patient observations at baseline and at 1 and 2 months after each of our interventions. The mean angle of head of bed increased from 24 +/- 9 degrees at baseline to 35 +/- 9 degrees (p 45 degrees increased from 3% to 16% 2 months after the standardized order (p patients with head of bed >45 degrees was 29% (p = NS compared with values after the first intervention). Data collected 6 months after completion of our education programs showed that these improvements were maintained. Standardizing the process of care via the addition of an order specifying head-of-bed position significantly increased the number of patients who were placed in the semirecumbent position. In an era of cost-conscious medicine, interventions that utilize protocols and education programs should be emphasized.

  17. Contribution of Head Position, Standing Surface, and Vision to Postural Control in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pociask, Fredrick D; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Goldberg, Allon; Adamo, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    Postural control requires the integration of sensorimotor information to maintain balance and to properly position and orient the body in response to external stimuli. Age-related declines in peripheral and central sensory and motor function contribute to postural instability and falls. This study investigated the contribution of head position, standing surface, and vision on postural sway in 26 community-dwelling older adults. Participants were asked to maintain a stable posture under conditions that varied standing surface, head position, and the availability of visual information. Significant main and interaction effects were found for all three factors. Findings from this study suggest that postural sway responses require the integration of available sources of sensory information. These results have important implications for fall risks in older adults and suggest that when standing with the head extended and eyes closed, older adults may place themselves at risk for postural disequilibrium and loss of balance. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  18. Head Position in Stroke Trial (HeadPoST)--sitting-up vs lying-flat positioning of patients with acute stroke: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Venturelli, Paula; Arima, Hisatomi; Lavados, Pablo; Brunser, Alejandro; Peng, Bin; Cui, Liying; Song, Lily; Billot, Laurent; Boaden, Elizabeth; Hackett, Maree L; Heritier, Stephane; Jan, Stephen; Middleton, Sandy; Olavarría, Verónica V; Lim, Joyce Y; Lindley, Richard I; Heeley, Emma; Robinson, Thompson; Pontes-Neto, Octavio; Natsagdorj, Lkhamtsoo; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Watkins, Caroline; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-06-05

    Positioning a patient lying-flat in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke may improve recovery and reduce disability, but such a possibility has not been formally tested in a randomised trial. We therefore initiated the Head Position in Stroke Trial (HeadPoST) to determine the effects of lying-flat (0°) compared with sitting-up (≥ 30°) head positioning in the first 24 hours of hospital admission for patients with acute stroke. We plan to conduct an international, cluster randomised, crossover, open, blinded outcome-assessed clinical trial involving 140 study hospitals (clusters) with established acute stroke care programs. Each hospital will be randomly assigned to sequential policies of lying-flat (0°) or sitting-up (≥ 30°) head position as a 'business as usual' stroke care policy during the first 24 hours of admittance. Each hospital is required to recruit 60 consecutive patients with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS), and all patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) (an estimated average of 10), in the first randomised head position policy before crossing over to the second head position policy with a similar recruitment target. After collection of in-hospital clinical and management data and 7-day outcomes, central trained blinded assessors will conduct a telephone disability assessment with the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. The primary outcome for analysis is a shift (defined as improvement) in death or disability on this scale. For a cluster size of 60 patients with AIS per intervention and with various assumptions including an intracluster correlation coefficient of 0.03, a sample size of 16,800 patients at 140 centres will provide 90 % power (α 0.05) to detect at least a 16 % relative improvement (shift) in an ordinal logistic regression analysis of the primary outcome. The treatment effect will also be assessed in all patients with ICH who are recruited during each treatment study period. HeadPoST is a large international clinical trial in

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of oral HPV detection for HPV-positive head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Brooke J; Robbins, Hilary A; Fakhry, Carole; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of HPV-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HPV-HNSCC) is increasing. Oral samples are easy and non-invasive to collect, but the diagnostic accuracy of oral HPV detection methods for classifying HPV-positive HNSCC tumors has not been well explored. In a systematic review, we identified eight studies of HNSCC patients meeting our eligibility criteria of having: (1) HPV detection in oral rinse or oral swab samples, (2) tumor HPV or p16 testing, (3) a publication date within the last 10 years (January 2007-May 2017, as laboratory methods change), and (4) at least 15 HNSCC cases. Data were abstracted from each study and a meta-analysis performed to calculate sensitivity and specificity. Eight articles meeting inclusion criteria were identified. Among people diagnosed with HNSCC, oral HPV detection has good specificity (92%, 95% CI = 82-97%) and moderate sensitivity (72%, 95% CI = 45-89%) for HPV-positive HNSCC tumor. Results were similar when restricted to studies with only oropharyngeal cancer cases, with oral rinse samples, or testing for HPV16 DNA (instead of any oncogenic HPV) in the oral samples. Among those who already have HNSCC, oral HPV detection has few false-positives but may miss one-half to one-quarter of HPV-related cases (false-negatives). Given these findings in cancer patients, the utility of oral rinses and swabs as screening tests for HPV-HNSCC among healthy populations is probably limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Dreffke, Kirstin

    2014-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive cell lines progressed faster through S-phase showing a more distinct accumulation in G2/M. The abnormal cell cycle checkpoint activation was accompanied by a more pronounced increase of cell death after x-irradiation and a higher number of residual and unreleased DSBs. The enhanced responsiveness of HPV-related HNSCC to radiotherapy might be caused by a higher cellular radiosensitivity due to cell cycle dysregulation and impaired DNA DSB repair. (orig.) [de

  1. Automatic Detection and Reproduction of Natural Head Position in Stereo-Photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsung, Tai-Chiu; Lo, John; Li, Tik-Shun; Cheung, Lim-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an automatic orientation calibration and reproduction method for recording the natural head position (NHP) in stereo-photogrammetry (SP). A board was used as the physical reference carrier for true verticals and NHP alignment mirror orientation. Orientation axes were detected and saved from the digital mesh model of the board. They were used for correcting the pitch, roll and yaw angles of the subsequent captures of patients' facial surfaces, which were obtained without any markings or sensors attached onto the patient. We tested the proposed method on two commercial active (3dMD) and passive (DI3D) SP devices. The reliability of the pitch, roll and yaw for the board placement were within ±0.039904°, ±0.081623°, and ±0.062320°; where standard deviations were 0.020234°, 0.045645° and 0.027211° respectively. Orientation-calibrated stereo-photogrammetry is the most accurate method (angulation deviation within ±0.1°) reported for complete NHP recording with insignificant clinical error.

  2. Highly preserved consensus gene modules in human papilloma virus 16 positive cervical cancer and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Cha, In-Ho; Kim, Ki-Yeol

    2017-12-26

    In this study, we investigated the consensus gene modules in head and neck cancer (HNC) and cervical cancer (CC). We used a publicly available gene expression dataset, GSE6791, which included 42 HNC, 14 normal head and neck, 20 CC and 8 normal cervical tissue samples. To exclude bias because of different human papilloma virus (HPV) types, we analyzed HPV16-positive samples only. We identified 3824 genes common to HNC and CC samples. Among these, 977 genes showed high connectivity and were used to construct consensus modules. We demonstrated eight consensus gene modules for HNC and CC using the dissimilarity measure and average linkage hierarchical clustering methods. These consensus modules included genes with significant biological functions, including ATP binding and extracellular exosome. Eigengen network analysis revealed the consensus modules were highly preserved with high connectivity. These findings demonstrate that HPV16-positive head and neck and cervical cancers share highly preserved consensus gene modules with common potentially therapeutic targets.

  3. Positive Rates and Factors Associated with Abnormal Lung Function of Greenhouse Workers in China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Gao, Panjun; Gu, Yishuo; Xiao, Pei; Liu, Mengxuan; Chen, Juan; Cen, Yacai; Ma, Wenjun; Li, Tao

    2017-08-24

    Since the number of greenhouse workers are increasing in China, this observational cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate lung function and discuss the potential risk factors, to provide evidence in the surveillance of greenhouse workers' health. 678 greenhouse workers in Gansu Province, China were enrolled. A questionnaire which included demographic and occupational information was used. Vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), and FEV₁:FVC ratios (FEV₁/FVC), maximal expiratory flow after 50% of the FVC has not been exhaled (MEF 50 ), maximal expiratory flow after 25% of the FVC has not been exhaled (MEF 25 ) and maximal mid-expiratory flow curve (MMEF) were measured as lung function indicators. The mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of VC% predicted, FVC% predicted, FEV₁% predicted and FEV₁/FVC ratio were 106.07 ± 13.36, 107.60 ± 13.95, 97.19 ± 14.80 and 89.76 ± 10.78 respectively. The positive rates of above four and abnormal lung ventilation function were 2.9%, 2.8%, 11.2%, 4.6% and 6.5% respectively. Gender, age, BMI and number of greenhouses owned were influence factors of lung ventilation function ( p greenhouses owned were influence factors for small airway function ( p greenhouse might influence lung function of the workers. Small airway function indicators could be used as priority indicators for the surveillance of greenhouse workers' health.

  4. Intraocular pressure measurements in relation to head position and through soft contact lenses: comparison of three portable instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ainat; Shemesh, Gabi; Loewenstein, Anat; Kurtz, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    to compare the reproducibility of three portable instruments-the Tono-Pen tonometer (Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments, Depew, NY), the Phosphene tonometer (Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY), and the TERT (Through Eyelid Russian Tonometer; Rjazan State Instrument Making, Rjazan, Russia)-in the measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) with and without soft contact lenses and in different head positions. twenty-six eyes of healthy volunteers were examined by the three instruments while the subjects were sitting, recumbent, and hyperextending their heads, and with and without contact lenses. IOP measurements were compared and the effects of head position and presence of contact lenses on the resultant values were analyzed. the average difference between the recumbent and sitting positions was 3.56, 2.68, and 2.62 mm Hg for the Tono-Pen tonometer, Phosphene tonometer, and TERT, respectively. There was an increase of 5.60, 2.78, and 2.63 mm Hg in hyperextension compared to sitting for the Tono-Pen tonometer, Phosphene tonometer, and TERT, respectively. The difference in the IOP values obtained in the presence and absence of therapeutic contact lens for the three instruments in the three positions was between -1.23 and +1.47 mm Hg. IOP measurements of bedridden patients are only slightly higher than those of sitting patients except for the Tono-Pen tonometer in the hyperextension position. The presence of contact lenses does not affect IOP values obtained by the three evaluated instruments.

  5. Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Peter H.; Ahn, Andrew I.; Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: With 54 o of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck

  6. Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Peter H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)], E-mail: phahn@mdanderson.org; Ahn, Andrew I [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (United States); Lee, C Joe; Jin, Shen; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

  7. Toward positional cloning of Fhb1, a major QTL for Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, S. X.; Pumphrey, M. O.; Gill, B. S.; Trick, H. N.; Zhang, J. X.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Chalhoub, B.; Anderson, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 36, suppl. B (2008), s. 195-201 ISSN 0133-3720 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : map-based cloning * Fusarium head blight * Fhb1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.190, year: 2007

  8. Does sentinel lymph node biopsy have a role in node- positive head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10.1097/MOO.0b013e3283293631]. 6. Taylor RJ, Wahl RL, Sharma PK, et al. Sentinel node localization in oral cavity and oropharynx squamous cell cancer. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2001;127(8):970-974. 7. Nieuwenhuis EJ, Pijpers R, ...

  9. Long-term results of positron emission tomography-directed management of the neck in node-positive head and neck cancer after organ preservation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjövall, Johanna; Chua, Benjamin; Pryor, David; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Foote, Matthew C; Panizza, Benedict; Burmeister, Bryan H; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2015-03-01

    The current study presents the long-term results from a study designed to evaluate a restaging positron emission tomography (PET) directed policy whereby neck dissections were omitted in all node positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (N+HNSCC) patients with PET-negative lymph nodes after definitive radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy. A post-therapy nodal response assessment with PET and computed tomography (CT) was performed in patients who achieved a complete response at the primary site after definitive radiotherapy. Patients with PET-negative lymph nodes were observed regardless of residual CT abnormalities. One hundred and twelve patients, the majority of whom (83 patients, 74%) had oropharyngeal primaries, were treated on protocol. Median follow-up was 62months. Negative and positive predictive values for the restaging PET was 97.1% and 77.8% respectively, with only one patient who was PET-negative after treatment experiencing an isolated nodal relapse. PET-guided management of the neck following organ preservation therapy effectively spares neck dissections in patients with N+HNSCC without compromising isolated nodal control or overall survival. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of MLC leaf position errors on simple and complex IMRT plans for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, G; Ludlum, E; Xia, P

    2008-01-01

    The dosimetric impact of random and systematic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf position errors is relatively unknown for head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) patients. In this report we studied 17 head and neck IMRT patients, including 12 treated with simple plans ( 100 segments). Random errors (-2 to +2 mm) and systematic errors (±0.5 mm and ±1 mm) in MLC leaf positions were introduced into the clinical plans and the resultant dose distributions were analyzed based on defined endpoint doses. The dosimetric effect was insignificant for random MLC leaf position errors up to 2 mm for both simple and complex plans. However, for systematic MLC leaf position errors, we found significant dosimetric differences between the simple and complex IMRT plans. For 1 mm systematic error, the average changes in D 95% were 4% in simple plans versus 8% in complex plans. The average changes in D 0.1cc of the spinal cord and brain stem were 4% in simple plans versus 12% in complex plans. The average changes in parotid glands were 9% in simple plans versus 13% for the complex plans. Overall, simple IMRT plans are less sensitive to leaf position errors than complex IMRT plans

  11. SU-E-T-589: Optimization of Patient Head Angle Position to Spare Hippocampus During the Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, G; Kang, Y [Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S; Kim, T; Kim, D; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Hippocampus is one of the important organs which controls emotions, behaviors, movements the memorizing and learning ability. In the conventional head & neck therapy position, it is difficult to perform the hippocampal-sparing brain radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate optimal head angle which can save the hippocampal-sparing and organ at risk (OAR) in conformal radiation therapy (CRT), Intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods: Three types of radiation treatment plans, CRT, IMRT and Tomotherapy plans, were performed for 10 brain tumor patients. The image fusion between CT and MRI data were used in the contour due to the limited delineation of the target and OAR in the CT scan. The optimal condition plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the each plan with the use of various parameters which include three different techniques (CRT, IMRT, HT) and 4 angle (0, 15, 30, 40 degree). The each treatment plans of three different techniques were compared with the following parameters: conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage, dose in the OARs, monitor units (MU), beam on time and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: HI, CI and target coverage was most excellent in head angle 30 degree among all angle. When compared by modality, target coverage and CI showed good results in IMRT and TOMO than compared to the CRT. HI at the head angle 0 degrees is 1.137±0.17 (CRT), 1.085±0.09 (IMRT) and 1.077±0.06 (HT). HI at the head angle 30 degrees is 1.056±0.08 (CRT), 1.020±0.05 (IMRT) and 1.022±0.07 (HT). Conclusion: The results of our study show that when head angle tilted at 30 degree, target coverage, HI, CI were improved, and the dose delivered to OAR was reduced compared with conventional supine position in brain radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid

  12. SU-E-T-589: Optimization of Patient Head Angle Position to Spare Hippocampus During the Brain Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, G; Kang, Y; Kang, S; Kim, T; Kim, D; Suh, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hippocampus is one of the important organs which controls emotions, behaviors, movements the memorizing and learning ability. In the conventional head & neck therapy position, it is difficult to perform the hippocampal-sparing brain radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate optimal head angle which can save the hippocampal-sparing and organ at risk (OAR) in conformal radiation therapy (CRT), Intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods: Three types of radiation treatment plans, CRT, IMRT and Tomotherapy plans, were performed for 10 brain tumor patients. The image fusion between CT and MRI data were used in the contour due to the limited delineation of the target and OAR in the CT scan. The optimal condition plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the each plan with the use of various parameters which include three different techniques (CRT, IMRT, HT) and 4 angle (0, 15, 30, 40 degree). The each treatment plans of three different techniques were compared with the following parameters: conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage, dose in the OARs, monitor units (MU), beam on time and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: HI, CI and target coverage was most excellent in head angle 30 degree among all angle. When compared by modality, target coverage and CI showed good results in IMRT and TOMO than compared to the CRT. HI at the head angle 0 degrees is 1.137±0.17 (CRT), 1.085±0.09 (IMRT) and 1.077±0.06 (HT). HI at the head angle 30 degrees is 1.056±0.08 (CRT), 1.020±0.05 (IMRT) and 1.022±0.07 (HT). Conclusion: The results of our study show that when head angle tilted at 30 degree, target coverage, HI, CI were improved, and the dose delivered to OAR was reduced compared with conventional supine position in brain radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid

  13. Hyoid bone position and head posture comparison in skeletal Class I and Class II subjects: A retrospective cephalometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawankumar Dnyandeo Tekale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the hyoid bone position and the head posture using lateral cephalograms in subjects with skeletal Class I and skeletal Class II pattern and to investigate the gender differences. Materials and Methods: The study used lateral cephalograms of 40 subjects (20 skeletal Class I pattern; 20 skeletal Class II pattern. Lateral cephalograms were traced and analyzed for evaluation of the hyoid bone position and the head posture using 34 parameters. Independent sample t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups and between genders in each group. Statistical tests were performed using NCSS 2007 software (NCSST, Kaysville, Utah, USA. Results: The linear measurements between the hyoid bone (H and cervical spine (CV2ia, the nasion-sella line, palatal line nasion line, the anterior nasal spine (ANS to perpendicular projection of H on the NLP (NLP- Nasal Linear Projection (H-NLP/ANS as well as the posterior cranial points (Bo, Ar and S points were found to be less in skeletal Class II subjects. The measurement H-CV2ia was found to be less in males with skeletal Class I pattern and H-CV4ia was found to be less in males with skeletal Class II pattern. The natural head posture showed no significant gender differences. Conclusion: The position of hyoid bone was closer to the cervical vertebra horizontally in skeletal Class II subjects when compared with skeletal Class I subjects. In males, the hyoid bone position was closer to the cervical vertebra horizontally both in skeletal Class I and skeletal Class II subjects.

  14. Diagnostic Role of Head-Bending and Lying-Down Tests in Lateral Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetiser, Sertac; Ince, Dilay

    2015-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of the head-bending test (HBT), lying-down positioning test (LDPT) and patient's report to identify the affected canal in video-nystagmographically (VNG) confirmed patients with lateral canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (LC-BPPV). Case series with chart review. Head-bending, lying-down positioning and the head-roll maneuver (HRM) under VNG guidance. The data were collected in a referral community hospital. Seventy-eight patients (32 apogeotropic and 46 geotropic nystagmus) with LC-BPPV who had been recruited between 2009 and 2013 were enrolled in the study. Patients were tested with the HRM and then were asked about subjectively worse side. Later, they were subjected to HBT when sitting and the LDPT. The results were compared and studied with the 1-way ANOVA and chi-square tests. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Affected side was identified by HRM in 75% of patients with apogeotropic nystagmus and 95.6% of patients with geotropic nystagmus. Approximately 65.6% of patients with apogeotropic and 52% of patients with geotropic nystagmus had nystagmus during LDPT. However, its comparability with HRM was low. However, treatment plan based on LDPT results alone provided relief of symptoms in additional 12.5% of patients with apogeotropic and in 2.2% of patients with geotropic nystagmus. Approximately 63% of patients with apogeotropic and 56% of patients with geotropic nystagmus were able to tell the worse side. Nystagmus comparable with HRM during HBT was low and not diagnostic. HRM has the greatest diagnostic value of positioning tests in LC-BPPV in this study. LDPT provides some contribution in the diagnosis of LC-BPPV but much less than HRM. Patients' subjective feeling of vertigo was also a useful test. However, HBT was not as sensitive as other measures in uncertain cases.

  15. H1N1 influenza in an Irish population: patterns of chest radiograph abnormality in patients testing positive.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K

    2012-02-29

    The winter of 2010\\/2011 saw a second peak in the number of H1N1 cases detected in Ireland. The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiological characteristics of patients diagnosed during this period. A retrospective analysis of these cases was performed. Chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. A total of 37 patients were included. Of these, 22 (59%) of chest radiographs were abnormal and 15 (41%) were normal. In the 7 paediatric patients, 4 (57%) had a perihilar distribution of disease, 2 (28%) had peripherally based disease with 1 (14%) having a mixed distribution. A series of radiographs was available for 9 patients, 6 of these showed a radiographic deterioration from the initial study. The majority of chest radiographs of patients with confirmed H1N1 infection will be abnormal. In children, disease is more likely to be perihilar in distribution. Chest radiography is an important initial investigation in patients with H1N1 infection and is useful to track progression of disease in the subset of patients requiring hospitalization for severe disease.

  16. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in management of patients with head and neck somatostatin receptor positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlic, Mate; Tezak, Stanko

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the value of technetium-99m-hydrazinonicotinyl-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-ED-DA/HYNIC-TOC) in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSR) positive tumors of head and neck region. A total number of 16 patients were enrolled in this study. Planar whole body (WB) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were acquired at 2 and 4 hours after the injection of approximately 670 MBq of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. Additional single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images of the head and neck region were acquired at 4h post tracer injection. Clinical and imaging follow up were taken as the reference standard. There were 10 female and 6 male patients of age 57.7 ± 12.9 years (58.5; 32-78) years. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) was TP in 13 patients, TN in two and FP in one. Follow up period for SRS was 31.1 ± 19.4 (29; 2-63) months. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy provided additional information in 50% of patients, with impact on patient management in the same percentage of patients. Distant metastases were found in nine out of 16 patients (56%). 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC SRS had sensitivity of 100% (75.3-100%), specificity of 66.7% (9.4-99.2%), accuracy of 93.7%, positive predictive value of 92.9% (66.1-99.8%), and negative predictive value of 100% (15.8-100%). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is very useful imaging method in the evalu-ation of patients with SSR positive tumors of head and neck region.

  17. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ho Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres.

  18. Three-dimensional accuracy and interfractional reproducibility of patient fixation and positioning using a stereotactic head mask system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Christian P.; Jaekel, Oliver; Debus, Juergen; Kuhn, Sabine; Hartmann, Guenther H.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiotherapy in the head and neck region requires precise and reproducible patient setup. The definition of safety margins around the clinical target volume has to take into account uncertainties of fixation and positioning. Data are presented to quantify the involved uncertainties for the system used. Methods and Materials: Interfractional reproducibility of fixation and positioning of a target point in the brain was evaluated by biplanar films. 118 film pairs obtained at 52 fractions in 4 patients were analyzed. The setup was verified at the actual treatment table position by diagnostic X-ray units aligned to the isocenter and by a stereotactic X-ray localization technique. The stereotactic coordinates of the treated isocenter, of fiducials on the mask, and of implanted internal markers within the patient were measured to determine systematic and random errors. The data are corrected for uncertainty of the localization method. Results: Displacements in target point positioning were 0.35±0.41 mm, 1.22±0.25 mm, and -0.74±0.32 mm in the x, y, and z direction, respectively. The reproducibility of the fixation of the patient's head within the mask was 0.48 mm (x), 0.67 mm (y), and 0.72 mm (z). Rotational uncertainties around an axis parallel to the x, y, and z axis were 0.72 deg., 0.43 deg., and 0.70 deg., respectively. A simulation, based on the acquired data, yields a typical radial overall uncertainty for positioning and fixation of 1.80±0.60 mm. Conclusions: The applied setup technique showed to be highly reproducible. The data suggest that for the applied technique, a safety margin between clinical and planning target volume of 1-2 mm along one axis is sufficient for a target at the base of skull

  19. Dosimetric comparison of the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM) to 14 anatomical head models using a novel definition for the mobile phone positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Christ, Andreas; Kellom, Tocher; Seidman, Seth; Nikoloski, Neviana; Beard, Brian; Kuster, Niels

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new definitions for obtaining reproducible results in numerical phone dosimetry. Numerous numerical dosimetric studies have been published about the exposure of mobile phone users which concluded with conflicting results. However, many of these studies lack reproducibility due to shortcomings in the description of the phone positioning. The new approach was tested by two groups applying two different numerical program packages to compare the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM) to 14 anatomically correct head models. A novel definition for the positioning of mobile phones next to anatomically correct head models is given along with other essential parameters to be reported. The definition is solely based on anatomical characteristics of the head. A simple up-to-date phone model was used to determine the peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) of mobile phones in SAM and in the anatomically correct head models. The results were validated by measurements. The study clearly shows that SAM gives a conservative estimate of the exposure in anatomically correct head models for head only tissue. Depending on frequency, phone position and head size the numerically calculated 10 g averaged SAR in the pinna can be up to 2.1 times greater than the peak spatial SAR in SAM. Measurements in small structures, such as the pinna, will significantly increase the uncertainty; therefore SAM was designed for SAR assessment in the head only. Whether SAM will provide a conservative value for the pinna depends on the pinna SAR limit of the safety standard considered

  20. Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects: the role of head position and neck proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Roberto; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Kyriakareli, Artemis; Schieppati, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2011-04-01

    Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100 Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Position modification and actual radiation dose in parotids for head and neck cancers treated with TomoTherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Huayong; Zhang Yongqian; Wang Yadi; Xu Weidong; Gao Junmao; Zhang Fuli; Yao Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the impact of parotid's position and volume changing on radiation dose for head and neck cancer treated with TomoTherapy. Methods: Totally 12 patients with head and neck cancer were treated with TomoTherapy. Before the treatment, the dose distribution was recalculated with MVCT images, which would obtain the parameters of position, volume and actual radiation dose for parotids. Results: The volume of parotids in Plan2 was significantly lower than in Plan1, and the percentage reduction was 29.06% and 31.78% for left and right parotid, respectively (Z = 6.77, 3.06, P < 0.05). Distance between the COM(center of mass) of parotids and the midline of body was significantly smaller in Plan2 than in Plan1, and the percentage reduction was 6.72% and 6.19% (t = 5.14, 5.80, P < 0.05) at left and right side, respectively. Average dose and V_2_6 for both parotids were higher than those in Plan1, increasing by an average of 37.74%, 25.08% (Z = -6.03, -5.31, P < 0.05) for left parotid and 30.45%, 19.33% (Z = -5.43, -3.26, P < 0.05) for right parotid, respectively. Conclusions: The actual radiation dose to parotids was significantly increased during the radiation therapy for patients with head and neck cancer. There was a linear correlation between the decrease of distance between the COM of parotids and the midline of body and the percentage increase of parotids' radiation dose. No correlation between the reduction of parotids' volume and dose to parotids. In order to reduce the parotids' radiation dose, modification of treatment plan at the appropriate time is essential. (authors)

  2. Efficacy of Positive Thinking Training on the Family Process and Subjective Wellbeing of Female Heads of Household

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    محمد خدایاری فرد

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of positive thinking training on family process and subjective wellbeing of female heads of household. The method was a semi-experimental with pretest-posttest and control group; and the study population included all female heads of household residing in Chaharbagh, Alborz province, who have at least one primary school-kid.  Using available sampling method, 50 women were selected among school-students’ mothers, and were randomly assigned into two equal groups of experimental and control groups. Both groups filled Self-Report Family Process Scale (SFPS and Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (SWQ. The experimental group received positive thinking training for eight 2-hours-sessions. Then, all participants were assessed again as the posttest. The data were analyzed by covariance analysis method. Findings showed that after the intervention family process scores of experimental group had been significantly improved, while subjective wellbeing scores had not significantly enhanced. Therefore, it can be told that the present program was effective in increasing the family process, though it went ineffective in improving subjective wellbeing in these irritable individuals. Thus, altering and enriching the program and conducting further investigations seems necessary.

  3. Is ExacTrac x-ray system an alternative to CBCT for positioning patients with head and neck cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Stefania; Chiumento, Costanza; Fiorentino, Alba; Cozzolino, Mariella; Oliviero, Caterina; Califano, Giorgia; Caivano, Rocchina; Fusco, Vincenzo; Simeon, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a six-degrees-of freedom (6D) correction using ExacTrac robotics system in patients with head-and-neck (HN) cancer receiving radiation therapy.Methods: Local setup accuracy was analyzed for 12 patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patient position was imaged daily upon two different protocols, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and ExacTrac (ET) images correction. Setup data from either approach were compared in terms of both residual errors after correction and punctual displacement of selected regions of interest (Mandible, C2, and C6 vertebral bodies).Results: On average, both protocols achieved reasonably low residual errors after initial correction. The observed differences in shift vectors between the two protocols showed that CBCT tends to weight more C2 and C6 at the expense of the mandible, while ET tends to average more differences among the different ROIs.Conclusions: CBCT, even without 6D correction capabilities, seems preferable to ET for better consistent alignment and the capability to see soft tissues. Therefore, in our experience, CBCT represents a benchmark for positioning head and neck cancer patients

  4. Passive Removal of Silicone Oil with Temporal Head Position through Two 23-Gauge Cannulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report a new approach for removal of silicone oil. Methods. All surgeries were performed using 23-gauge vitrectomy system with two transconjunctival sutureless cannulas. At the beginning, most of the silicone oil was removed by traditional microinvasive vitrectomy system through inferior-temporal cannula. Then, the blood transfusion tube is removed from the inferior-temporal cannula, and the fluid-air exchange is performed. A passive fluid-air exchange was performed to aspirate the residual silicone oil after gradually turning the patient’s head temporally by approximately 90° gradually. Results. After the surgery, all patients had a clear anterior chamber and vitreous cavity on slit lamp and B scan examination, respectively. The mean time taken for silicone oil removal and total surgery was 8.0±1.4 minutes and 12.4±2.5 minutes, respectively. The mean intraocular pressure 1 day, 3 days, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after surgery was 9.0±5.8 mmHg, 11.3±7.6 mmHg, 16.1±6.9 mmHg, 17.7±4.8 mmHg, and 17.1±3.5 mmHg, respectively. Conclusion. This new approach may provide a safe and fast method to remove the silicone oil.

  5. Head shape at age 36 months among children with and without a history of positional skull deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Brent R; Leroux, Brian G; Wallace, Erin R; Gallagher, Emily; Shao, Jason; Speltz, Matthew L

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, the authors examined head shape through age 36 months for children with and without a history of positional plagiocephaly and/or brachycephaly (PPB). METHODS Infants with PPB (cases) were identified through a craniofacial clinic at the time of diagnosis. Infants without diagnosed PPB were identified through a participant registry. Clinician ratings of 3D cranial images were used to confirm the presence or absence of PPB. The cohort included 235 case infants (diagnosed PPB, confirmed with 3D imaging), 167 unaffected controls (no diagnosed PPB, no deformation detected), and 70 affected controls (no diagnosed PPB, discernible skull deformation). Participants were seen in infancy (age 7 months, on average) and again at ages 18 and 36 months. At each visit, automated 3D measures of skull deformation quantified posterior flattening and generated an absolute asymmetry score. The authors also used automated 2D measures to approximate overall asymmetry (approximate oblique cranial length ratio) and calculate the cephalic index. They used linear regression to compare cases to unaffected controls and to compare affected versus unaffected controls on all measures. They also calculated the proportion of children in each group with "persistent PPB," defined as one or more head shape measures above the 95th percentile relative to unaffected controls at 36 months. RESULTS Head shape became more rounded and symmetric for children with and without PPB, particularly between infancy and age 18 months. However, children with PPB continued to show greater skull deformation and asymmetry than unaffected controls at age 36 months. These differences were large in magnitude, ranging from 1 to 2 standard deviations (SDs), and in most (85.6%) of the cases, there was evidence of persistent PPB at 36 months. Similarly, although differences were more modest (i.e., 0.26-0.94 SD), affected controls continued to exhibit skull deformation on most measures relative to

  6. Positive identification by a skull with multiple epigenetic traits and abnormal structure of the neurocranium, viscerocranium, and the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuharić, Josip; Kovacic, Natasa; Marusic, Petar; Marusic, Ana; Petrovecki, Vedrana

    2011-05-01

    Wormian bones are small ossicles appearing within the cranial sutures in more than 40% of skulls, most commonly at the lambdoid suture and pterion. During the skeletal analysis of an unidentified male war victim, we observed multiple wormian bones and a patent metopic suture. Additionally, the right elbow was deformed, probably as a consequence of an old trauma. The skull was analyzed by cranial measurements and computerized tomography, revealing the presence of cranial deformities including hyperbrachicrania, localized reduction in hemispheral widths, increased cranial capacity, and sclerosis of the viscerocranium. Besides unique anatomical features and their anthropological value, such skeletal abnormalities also have a forensic value as the evidence to support the final identification of the victim. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation as a rare complication from head positioning in otologic surgery: Report of two cases in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaida, Hiroshi; Akeda, Koji; Sudo, Akihiro; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation is a condition in which the first and second vertebrae of the cervical spine become interlocked in a rotated position. This condition can result in serious consequences and thus have a significant impact on patients, especially when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Some cases of atlantoaxial rotatory fixation have been described in association with otologic surgery or plastic surgery involving the ear. We present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed atlantoaxial rotatory fixation following otologic surgery and we review the relevant literature. One patient was a 7-year-old boy who underwent tympanoplasty for cholesteatoma. The other patient was a 5-year-old girl with profound sensorineural hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation. Both patients developed atlantoaxial rotatory fixation on the day after surgery, and they were treated conservatively. Our literature search using relevant terms identified 12 similar published cases. Thus, a total of 14 patients, including our 2 patients, were evaluated. Most of the patients were children and typically they complained of painful torticollis and exhibited a characteristic posture called the "cock-robin" position on the day after surgery. Mostly, the direction of torticollis was opposite to the side of surgery. Most of the patients received conservative treatment alone, but three underwent surgical treatment. The correlation between the direction of torticollis and the side of surgery suggests that rotation of the head during surgery has an impact on development of postoperative atlantoaxial rotatory fixation. Thus, children undergoing otologic surgery are thought to be at a risk of postoperative atlantoaxial rotatory fixation. Although rare, the surgical team needs to be aware of this adverse event and pay close attention to this possibility throughout the perioperative period. Perioperative management should include informed consent, preoperative assessment of the

  8. Initial clinical experience with an interactive, video-based patient-positioning system for head and neck treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.; Hadley, Scott W.; Milliken, Barrett D.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Nguyen, Ai; Chen, George T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an interactive, video-based system for positioning head and neck patients. Materials and Methods: System hardware includes two B and W CCD cameras (mounted to provide left-lateral and AP-inferior views), zoom lenses, and a PC equipped with a frame grabber. Custom software is used to acquire and archive video images, as well as to display real-time subtraction images revealing patient misalignment in multiple views. Live subtraction images are obtained by subtracting a reference image (i.e., an image of the patient in the correct position) from real-time video. As seen in the figure, darker regions of the subtraction image indicate where the patient is currently, while lighter regions indicate where the patient should be. Adjustments in the patient's position are updated and displayed in less than 0.07s, allowing the therapist to interactively detect and correct setup discrepancies. Patients selected for study are treated BID and immobilized with conventional litecast straps attached to a baseframe which is registered to the treatment couch. Morning setups are performed by aligning litecast marks and patient anatomy to treatment room lasers. Afternoon setups begin with the same procedure, and then live subtraction images are used to fine-tune the setup. At morning and afternoon setups, video images and verification films are taken after positioning is complete. These are visually registered offline to determine the distribution of setup errors per patient, with and without video assistance. Results: Without video assistance, the standard deviation of setup errors typically ranged from 5 to 7mm and was patient-dependent. With video assistance, standard deviations are reduced to 1 to 4mm, with the result depending on patient coopertiveness and the length of time spent fine-tuning the setups. At current levels of experience, 3 to 4mm accuracy is easily achieved in about 30s, while 1 to 3mm accuracy is achieved in about 1 to 2 minutes. Studies

  9. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A.; Harris, Stephen L.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers

  10. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A. [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harris, Stephen L. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Manchester, New Hampshire (United States); Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  11. A study of the positioning errors of head and neck in the process of intensity modulation radiated therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chengguang; Lin Liuwen; Liu Bingti; Liu Xiaomao; Li Guowen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the positioning errors of head and neck during intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Nineteen patients with middle-advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-3 M 0 ), treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy, underwent repeated CT during their 6-week treatment course. All the patients were immobilized by head-neck-shoulder thermoplastic mask. We evaluated their anatomic landmark coordinated in a total of 66 repeated CT data sets and respective x, y, z shifts relative to their position in the planning CT. Results: The positioning error of the neck was 2.44 mm ± 2.24 mm, 2.05 mm ± 1.42 mm, 1.83 mm ± 1.53 mm in x, y, z respectively. And that of the head was 1.05 mm ± 0.87 mm, 1.23 mm ± 1.05 mm, 1.17 mm ± 1.55 mm respectively. The positioning error between neck and head have respectively statistical difference (t=-6.58, -5.28, -3.42, P=0.000, 0.000, 0.001). The system error of the neck was 2.33, 1.67 and 1.56 higher than that of the head, respectively in left-right, vertical and head-foot directions; and the random error of neck was 2.57, 1.34 and 0.99 higher than that of head respectively. Conclusions: In the process of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with the immobilization by head-neck-shoulder thermoplastic mask, the positioning error of neck is higher than that of head. (authors)

  12. Neck dissection following chemo radiation for node positive head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, J.; Thariat, J.; Marcy, P.Y.; Bozec, A.; Peyrade, F.; Hofman, P.; Hamoir, M.; Janot, F.; De Mones, E.; Marcy, P.Y.; Carrier, P.; Bozec, I.; Guevara, J.; Santini, J.; Albert, S.; Vedrine, P.O.; Graff, P.; Peyrade, F.; Hofman, P.; Bourhis, J.; Lapeyre, M.

    2009-01-01

    The optimal timing and extent of neck dissection in the context of chemo radiation for head and neck cancer remains controversial. For some institutions, it is uncertain whether neck dissection should still be performed up front especially for cystic nodes. For others, neck dissection can be performed after chemo radiation and can be omitted for N1 disease as long as a complete response to chemo radiation is obtained. The question is debated for N2 and N3 disease even after a complete response as the correlation between radiological and clinical assessment and pathology may not be reliable. Response rates are greater than or equal to 60% and isolated neck failures are less than or equal to 10% with current chemo radiation protocols. Some therefore consider that systematic up front or planned neck dissection would lead to greater than or equal to 50% unnecessary neck dissections for N2-N3 disease. Positron-emission tomography (PET) scanning to assess treatment response and have shown a very high negative predictive value of greater than or equal to 95% when using a standard uptake value of 3 for patients with a negative PET at four months after the completion of therapy. These data may support the practice of observing PET-negative necks. More evidence-based data are awaited to assess the need for neck dissection on PET. Selective neck dissection based on radiological assessment and preoperative findings and not exclusively on initial nodal stage may help to limit morbidity and to improve the quality of life without increasing the risk of neck failure. Adjuvant regional radiation boosts might be discussed on an individual basis for aggressive residual nodal disease with extra-capsular spread and uncertain margins but evidence is missing. Medical treatments aiming at reducing the metastatic risk especially for N3 disease are to be evaluated

  13. Positional skull deformation in infants: heading towards evidence-based practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Renske

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a young infant’s skull can deform as a result of prolonged external forces. The prevalence of positional skull deformation increased dramatically during the last decades. The primary aim of this dissertation was to provide a stronger evidence base for the treatment of skull deformation.

  14. Effect of relative head position on the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block during endodontic treatment of patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Miglani, Sanjay

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized single-blind clinical trial was to evaluate the effect of tilting the head on the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Ninety-two patients were divided into two groups: the first group received IANB and the head was tilted in the direction of the block for 15 min, whereas the second group received IANB and the head was tilted to the opposite side. Access cavity preparation was initiated after 15 min. Success was defined as no pain or faint/weak/mild pain during endodontic access preparation and instrumentation. The anesthetic success rates were analyzed by Pearson chi-square test at 5% significance levels. The same side position and opposite side position yielded 41% and 30% anesthetic success rates, respectively; there was no significant difference between the two sides. Relative head position has no effect on the anesthetic success rate of IANB.

  15. SU-F-T-303: Quantification of MLC Positioning Accuracy in VMAT Delivery of Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X; Yang, F [University Of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Knowing MLC leaf positioning error over the course of treatment would be valuable for treatment planning, QA design, and patient safety. The objective of the current study was to quantify the MLC positioning accuracy for VMAT delivery of head and neck treatment plans. Methods: A total of 837 MLC log files were collected from 14 head and neck cancer patients undergoing full arc VMAT treatment on one Varian Trilogy machine. The actual and planned leaf gaps were extracted from the retrieved MLC log files. For a given patient, the leaf gap error percentage (LGEP), defined as the ratio of the actual leaf gap over the planned, was evaluated for each leaf pair at all the gantry angles recorded over the course of the treatment. Statistics describing the distribution of the largest LGEP (LLGEP) of the 60 leaf pairs including the maximum, minimum, mean, Kurtosis, and skewness were evaluated. Results: For the 14 studied patients, their PTV located at tonsil, base of tongue, larynx, supraglottis, nasal cavity, and thyroid gland with volume ranging from 72.0 cm{sup 3} to 602.0 cm{sup 3}. The identified LLGEP differed between patients. It ranged from 183.9% to 457.7% with a mean of 368.6%. For the majority of the patients, the LLGEP distributions peaked at non-zero positions and showed no obvious dependence on gantry rotations. Kurtosis and skewness, with minimum/maximum of 66.6/217.9 and 6.5/12.6, respectively, suggested relatively more peaked while right-skewed leaf error distribution pattern. Conclusion: The results indicate pattern of MLC leaf gap error differs between patients of lesion located at similar anatomic site. Understanding the systemic mechanisms underlying these observed error patterns necessitates examining more patient-specific plan parameters in a large patient cohort setting.

  16. Assessment of shoulder position variation and its impact on IMRT and VMAT doses for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Emily

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For radiotherapy of the head and neck, 5-point mask immobilization is used to stabilize the shoulders. Still, the daily position of the shoulders during treatment may be different from the position in the treatment plan despite correct isocenter setup. The purpose of this study was to determine the interfractional displacement of the shoulders relative to isocenter over the course of treatment and the associated dosimetric effect of this displacement. Methods The extent of shoulder displacements relative to isocenter was assessed for 10 patients in 5-point thermoplastic masks using image registration and daily CT-on-rails scans. Dosimetric effects on IMRT and VMAT plans were evaluated in Pinnacle based on simulation CTs modified to represent shoulder shifts between 3 and 15 mm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left directions. The impact of clinically observed shoulder shifts on the low-neck dose distributions was examined. Results Shoulder motion was 2-5 mm in each direction on average but reached 20 mm. Superior shifts resulted in coverage loss, whereas inferior shifts increased the dose to the brachial plexus. These findings were generally consistent for both IMRT and VMAT plans. Over a course of observed shifts, the dose to 99% of the CTV decreased by up to 101 cGy, and the brachial plexus dose increased by up to 72 cGy. Conclusions he position of the shoulder affects target coverage and critical structure dose, and may therefore be a concern during the setup of head and neck patients, particularly those with low neck primary disease.

  17. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Philipps-University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, BMFZ - Biomedical Research Center, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus [Justus Liebig University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Giessen (Germany); Dreffke, Kirstin [Philipps-University, Institute for Radiobiology and Molecular Radiooncology, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive cell lines progressed faster through S-phase showing a more distinct accumulation in G2/M. The abnormal cell cycle checkpoint activation was accompanied by a more pronounced increase of cell death after x-irradiation and a higher number of residual and unreleased DSBs. The enhanced responsiveness of HPV-related HNSCC to radiotherapy might be caused by a higher cellular radiosensitivity due to cell cycle dysregulation and impaired DNA DSB repair. (orig.) [German] Fuer Patienten mit HPV-assoziierten Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist im Vergleich zu Patienten mit nicht-HPV-assoziierten Tumoren ein besseres Ueberleben nach Radiotherapie gesichert. Ziel der Untersuchung war die Identifizierung von Unterschieden in der zellulaeren DNA-Schadensantwort von HPV-positiven und HPV-negativen Zelllinien, wodurch die bereits in Erprobung stehende Deeskalation einer Radiotherapie bei Patienten mit HPV-assoziierten HNSCC durch experimentelle Daten abgesichert werden koennte. Klonogenes Ueberleben, Induktion von Apoptose, DNA-Doppelstrang-Reparatur und Zellzyklusverhalten wurden in vier HPV-positiven (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) und vier HPV

  18. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Na Young; Lee, Keun-Wook; Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Ah Kim, In

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy

  19. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  20. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  1. Proteins associated with critical sperm functions and sperm head shape are differentially expressed in morphologically abnormal bovine sperm induced by scrotal insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saadi, H.A.S.; Riemsdijk, van E.L.C.; Dance, A.L.; Rajamanickam, G.D.; Kastelic, J.P.; Thundathil, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to investigate expression patterns of proteins in pyriform sperm, a common morphological abnormality in bull sperm. Ejaculates were collected from sexually mature Holstein bulls (n = 3) twice weekly for 10 weeks (pre-thermal insult samples). Testicular temperature was elevated in

  2. Emergency CT head and neck imaging: effects of swimmer's position on dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueck, Fabian G.; Roesch, Sebastian; Geyer, Lucas; Scherr, Michael; Seidenbusch, Michael; Stahl, Robert; Deak, Zsuzsanna; Wirth, Stefan [LMU Klinikum Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2014-05-15

    To compare the effects of different arm positions on dose exposure and image quality (IQ) in cervical spine CT after trauma in different patient groups. Patients in standard (STD = 126) and in swimmer's position (SWIM = 254) were included. Body mass index (BMI subgroup 1 = underweight to subgroup 4 = obese), anterior-posterior diameter (AP), left-right diameter (LR), area of an ellipse (AoE) and angle between the humeral heads (optimal STD < 3 , optimal SWIM > 10 ) were used as grouping criteria. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was documented. Two radiologists rated the IQ at three levels (CV1/2, CV4/5, CV7/T1) using a semi-quantitative scale (0 = not diagnostic, 1 = diagnostic with limitations, 2 = diagnostic without limitations). The Mann-Whitney U test correlations of grouping criteria with dose effects and intra-class correlation (ICC) were calculated. ICC was 0.87. BMI grouping showed the strongest correlation with dose effects: CTDI of optimal STD versus optimal SWIM positioning was 3.17 mGy versus 2.46 mGy (subgroup 1), 5.47 mGy versus 3.97 mGy (subgroup 2), 7.35 mGy versus 5.96 mGy (subgroup 3) and 8.71 mGy versus 8.18 mGy (subgroup 4). Mean IQ at CV7/T1 was 1.65 versus 1.23 (subgroup 1), 1.27 versus 1.46 (subgroup 2), 1.06 versus 1.46 (subgroup 3), 0.79 versus 1.5 (subgroup 4). Patients with a BMI > 20 kg/m{sup 2} benefited from both potential dose reduction and improved image quality at the critical cervicothoracic junction when swimmer's position was used. (orig.)

  3. Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

  4. Plant abnormality inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plant abnormality inspection device for conducting remote or automatic patrolling inspection in a plant and, more particularly, relates to such a device as capable of detecting abnormal odors. That is, the device comprises a moving device for moving to a predetermined position in the plant, a plurality of gas sensors for different kind of gases to be inspected mounted thereon, a comparator for comparing the concentration of a gas detected by the gas sensor with the normal gas concentration at the predetermined position and a judging means for judging the absence or presence of abnormality depending on the combination of the result of the comparison and deliverying a signal if the state is abnormal. As a result, a slight amount of gas responsible to odors released upon abnormality of the plant can be detected by a plurality of gas sensors for different kinds gases to rapidly and easily find abnormal portions in the plant. (I.S.)

  5. Abnormal origins of the long head of the biceps tendon can lead to rotator cuff pathology: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alan L; Gates, Cameron H; Link, Thomas M; Ma, C Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Previous case reports have highlighted various anomalous origins of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) that do not originate from the superior glenoid labrum or supraglenoid tubercle. Yet, these cases were all reported as incidental findings and were not thought to cause any significant shoulder pathology. We present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical treatment of two cases where aberrant intra-articular origins of the long head of the biceps tendon from the anterior edge of the supraspinatus tendon may have contributed to symptomatic rotator cuff pathology. Arthroscopy confirmed MR findings of partial articular-sided supraspinatus lesions in close proximity to the anomalous origins and treatment with tenodesis of the LHBT successfully relieved symptoms. Although rare occurrences with subtle and potentially misleading imaging findings, it is important to be aware of aberrant origins of the LHBT that may contribute to concomitant rotator cuff pathology.

  6. Evaluation of the positional accuracy and dosimetric properties of a three-dimensional printed device for head and neck immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kiyokazu; Yanagawa, Isao; Takeda, Ken; Dobashi, Suguru; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Ito, Kengo; Chiba, Mizuki; Jingu, Keiichi; Kishi, Kazuma

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of a three-dimensional (3D)-printed head-and-neck (HN) immobilization device by comparing its positional accuracy and dosimetric properties with those of a conventional immobilization device (CID). We prepared a 3D-printed immobilization device (3DID) consisting of a mask and headrest with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resin developed from the computed tomography data obtained by imaging a HN phantom. For comparison, a CID comprising a thermoplastic mask and headrest was prepared using the same HN phantom. We measured the setup error using the ExacTrac X-ray image system. Furthermore, using the ionization chamber and the water-equivalent phantom, we measured the changes in the dose due to the difference in the immobilization device material from the photon of 4 MV and 6 MV. The positional accuracy of the two devices were almost similar in each direction except in the vertical, lateral, and pitch directions (t-test, p<0.0001), and the maximum difference was 1 mm, and 1deg. The standard deviations were not statistically different in each direction except in the longitudinal (F-test, p=0.034) and roll directions (F-test, p<0.0001). When the thickness was the same, the dose difference was almost similar at a 50 mm depth. At a 1 mm depth, the 3DID-plate had a 2.9-4.2% lower dose than the CID-plate. This study suggested that the positional accuracy and dosimetric properties of 3DID were almost similar to those of CID. (author)

  7. Analysis of carotid artery deformation in different head and neck positions for maxillofacial catheter navigation in advanced oral cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohya Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve the accuracy of catheter navigation, it is important to develop a method to predict shifts of carotid artery (CA bifurcations caused by intraoperative deformation. An important factor affecting the accuracy of electromagnetic maxillofacial catheter navigation systems is CA deformations. We aimed to assess CA deformation in different head and neck positions. Methods Using two sets of computed tomography angiography (CTA images of six patients, displacements of the skull (maxillofacial segments, C1–C4 cervical vertebrae, mandible (mandibular segment, and CA along with its branches were analyzed. Segmented rigid bones around CA were considered the main causes of CA deformation. After superimposition of maxillofacial segments, C1–C4 and mandible segments were superimposed separately for displacement measurements. Five bifurcation points (vA–vE were assessed after extracting the CA centerline. A new standardized coordinate system, regardless of patient-specific scanning positions, was employed. It was created using the principal axes of inertia of the maxillofacial bone segments of patients. Position and orientation parameters were transferred to this coordinate system. CA deformation in different head and neck positions was assessed. Results Absolute shifts in the center of gravity in the bone models for different segments were C1, 1.02 ± 0.9; C2, 2.18 ± 1.81; C3, 4.25 ± 3.85; C4, 5.90 ± 5.14; and mandible, 1.75 ± 2.76 mm. Shifts of CA bifurcations were vA, 5.52 ± 4.12; vB, 4.02 ± 3.27; vC, 4.39 ± 2.42; vD, 4.48 ± 1.88; and vE, 2.47 ± 1.32. Displacements, position changes, and orientation changes of C1–C4 segments as well as the displacements of all CA bifurcation points were similar in individual patients. Conclusions CA deformation was objectively proven as an important factor contributing to errors in maxillofacial navigation. Our study results suggest that

  8. Influence of Head and Neck Position on Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure and Cuff Position with the ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway and the I-Gel: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures and cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods. After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension, and lateral rotation (left. The oropharyngeal leak pressures, fibreoptic view of glottis, ventilation scores, and delivered tidal volumes and end tidal CO2 were noted in all positions. Results. In both groups compared with neutral position, oropharyngeal leak pressures were significantly higher with flexion and lower with extension but similar with rotation of head and neck. However the oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for ProSeal LMA compared with the I-gel in all positions. Peak airway pressures were significantly higher with flexion in both groups (however this did not affect ventilation, lower with extension in ProSeal group, and comparable in I-gel group but did not change significantly with rotation of head and neck in both groups. Conclusion. Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal LMA and I-gel with head in all the above positions. ProSeal LMA has a better margin of safety than I-gel due to better sealing pressures except in flexion where the increase in airway pressure is more with the former. Extreme precaution should be taken in flexion position in ProSeal LMA.

  9. Establishing the accuracy and acceptability of abdominal ultrasound to define the foetal head position in the second stage of labour: a validation study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramphul, Meenakshi

    2012-09-01

    To compare the diagnosis of the foetal head position in the second stage of labour by ultrasound scan performed by a novice sonographer and by clinical assessment, to that of an expert sonographer (gold standard); and to evaluate the acceptability of ultrasound in the second stage of labour to women and clinicians.

  10. Effect of different head and neck positions on behaviour, heart rate variability and cortisol levels in lunged Royal Dutch Sport horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smiet, E.; Van Dierendonck, M. C.; Sleutjens, J.; Menheere, P. P C A; van Breda, E.; de Boer, D.; Back, W.; Wijnberg, I. D.; Van Der Kolk, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Different head-and-neck positions (HNPs) are discussed in relation to potential welfare issues. To evaluate the effect on welfare, seven Royal Dutch Sport horses were studied in five predetermined HNPs: (1) unrestrained (HNP1); (2) neck raised, bridge of nose around the vertical (HNP2); (3) neck

  11. Evaluation of a leaf position optimization tool for intensity modulated radiation therapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, Filip; Gersem, Werner de; Vanhoutte, Ilse; Duthoy, Wim; Remouchamps, Vincent; Wagter, Carlos de; Neve, Wilfried de

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Since 1996, patients are treated at Ghent University Hospital with a multi-segment technique using MultiLeaf Collimators. The segments were obtained by using the Beam's eye view projections of the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OARs), after which the segments weights were optimized. To investigate if optimization of the leaf positions would further improve the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, a tool optimizing leaf positions and segment weights simultaneously, was developed. This tool is called SOWAT, which is the acronym for segment outline and weight adapting tool. Material and methods: The tool evaluates the effects of changing the position of each collimating leaf of all segments on the value of the objective function. Only changes that improve the value of the objective function are retained. Between December 1999 and January 2001, 30 head and neck patients were treated with IMRT. Two patient groups were distinguished: pharyngeal and laryngeal tumors (n=17) and sinonasal tumors (n=13). A specific set of physical endpoints was evaluated for each group. Dose statistics of the treatment plans without and with SOWAT were analyzed. Results: When using SOWAT for the pharyngeal and laryngeal cases, the PTV dose homogeneity increased with a median of 11% (range 2-27%), while the maximum dose to the spinal cord was decreased for 14 of the 17 patients. In four plans where parotid function preservation was a goal, the parotid mean dose was lower than 26 Gy in one plan without SOWAT, and in four plans with SOWAT. For the sinonasal tumors, the PTV dose homogeneity increased with a median of 7% (range 1-14%). SOWAT lowered the mean dose to 53 of the 63 optic pathway structures (retina, optic nerve and optic chiasm). SOWAT leaves the number of segments unchanged and has little or no effect on the delivery time. Conclusions: SOWAT is a powerful tool to perform the final optimization of IMRT plans, without

  12. Positive Factors Influencing the Advancement of Women to the Role of Head Athletic Trainer in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Eason, Christianne M

    2016-07-01

    Research suggests that women do not pursue leadership positions in athletic training due to a variety of reasons, including family challenges, organizational constraints, and reluctance to hold the position. The literature has been focused on the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting, limiting our full understanding. To examine factors that help women as they worked toward the position of head athletic trainer. Qualitative study. Divisions II and III. Seventy-seven women who were employed as head athletic trainers at the Division II or III level participated in our study. Participants were 38 ± 9 (range = 24-57) years old and had an average of 14 ± 8 (range = 1-33) years of athletic training experience. We conducted online interviews. Participants journaled their reflections to a series of open-ended questions pertaining to their experiences as head athletic trainers. Data were analyzed using a general inductive approach. Credibility was secured by peer review and researcher triangulation. Three organizational facilitators emerged from the data, workplace atmosphere, mentors, and past work experiences. These organizational factors were directly tied to aspects within the athletic trainer's employment setting that allowed her to enter the role. One individual-level facilitator was found: personal attributes that were described as helpful for women in transitioning to the role of the head athletic trainer. Participants discussed being leaders and persisting toward their career goals. Women working in Divisions II and III experience similar facilitators to assuming the role of head athletic trainer as those working in the Division I setting. Divisions II and III were viewed as more favorable for women seeking the role of head athletic trainer, but like those in the role in the Division I setting, women must have leadership skills.

  13. The clinical application of head-ring type posture pad used for prone position in performing the placement of central venous catheter in patients with tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Meiqian; Wang Chunmei; Chen Feiyin; Zhang Lubing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to observe the effectiveness of head-ring type posture pad used for prone position in performing the procedure of peripheral insertion of central catheter (PICC) via the dorsal forearm vein in patients with neoplasm. Methods: A total of 80 consecutive tumor patients were randomly divided into two groups. PICC was carried out in all patients in prone position. In control group (n=38) PICC was performed with patient's head inclining to one side, while in study group (n=42) PICC was performed with the help of head-ring type pad to keep the patient in comfortable posture. The comfortableness, breathing rhythm, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and the change of heart rate during the procedure were observed. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: The results is study group were much better than those in control group. Statistically significant difference in the comfortableness, breathing rhythm, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and heart rate existed between the two groups. Conclusion: The head-ring type posture pad used for prone position can make the patients more comfortable in performing peripheral insertion of central venous catheter via the dorsal forearm vein. (authors)

  14. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, Rodney D; Wen Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: rwiersma@uchicago.edu

    2010-01-21

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  15. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, Rodney D; Wen Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  16. Negligible Egg Positive Rate of Enterobius vermicularis and No Detection of Head Lice among Orphanage Children in Busan and Ulsan, Korea (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Son, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Sang Hwa; Park, Mi Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Sang Kyun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Park, Jung Ha; Yu, Hak-Sun

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether pinworm infections and head lice infestations spread among children in orphanages, 117 children from 4 orphanages in Busan-si and Ulsan-si, Korea, were examined for enterobiasis and head lice infestation between January and February 2014. The overall rate of Enterobius vermicularis egg positivity was 0.85%, whereas none of the children had head lice infestations. The rate of pinworm infection was much lower among the orphanage children compared to the rates observed in previous studies among kindergarten and primary school students. Moreover, the risk factors for enterobiasis were less frequent among these subjects than previously reported. The personal hygiene and health of the orphanage children were supervised by a regular, employed nurse through a health education program. In conclusion, pinworm infection was efficiently controlled among the children in orphanages, and this might be related to good personal hygiene practices in Korea.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  18. [Head posture in orthodontics: physiopathology and clinical aspects 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caltabiano, M; Verzi, P; Scire Scappuzzo, G

    1989-01-01

    The Authors review in orthodontic respects present knowledges about head posture involvement in craniofacial morphogenesis and pathology. Relationships between craniofacial morphology, craniocervical posture, craniomandibular posture, cervical spine curvature, hyoid bone position and posture of whole body in space are shown, in attempt to explain conditions such as "forward head posture", mouth breathing and some occlusal disorders. Main methods to evaluate craniocervical relations on lateral skull radiographs are analysed. Pathogenesis of pain syndromes associated with abnormal craniocervical and craniomandibular mechanics are also briefly treated.

  19. Brain structural abnormalities and mental health sequelae in South Vietnamese ex-political detainees who survived traumatic head injury and torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Richard F; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Chernoff, Miriam C; Bui, Hoan X; Lavelle, James; Yoon, Sujung J; Kim, Jieun E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2009-11-01

    A pilot study of South Vietnamese ex-political detainees who had been incarcerated in Vietnamese reeducation camps and resettled in the United States disclosed significant mental health problems associated with torture and traumatic head injury (THI). To identify structural brain alterations associated with THI and to investigate whether these deficits are associated with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Cross-sectional neuroimaging study. Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital. A subsample of Vietnamese ex-political detainees (n = 42) and comparison subjects (n = 16) selected from a community study of 337 ex-political detainees and 82 comparison subjects. Scores on the Vietnamese versions of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL) and Harvard Trauma Questionnaire for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, respectively; cerebral regional cortical thickness; and manual volumetric morphometry of the amygdala, hippocampus, and thalamus. Ex-political detainees exposed to THI (n = 16) showed a higher rate of depression (odds ratio, 10.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-90.0) than those without THI exposure (n = 26). Ex-political detainees with THI had thinner prefrontotemporal cortices than those without THI exposure (P brain map) in the left dorsolateral prefrontal and bilateral superior temporal cortices, controlling for age, handedness, and number of trauma/torture events (left superior frontal cortex [SFC], P = .006; left middle frontal cortex, P = .01; left superior temporal cortex [STC], P = .007; right STC, P = .01). Trauma/torture events were associated with bilateral amygdala volume loss (left, P = .045; right, P = .003). Cortical thinning associated with THI in the left SFC and bilateral STC was related to HSCL depression scores in THI-exposed (vs non-THI-exposed) ex-political detainees (left SFC, P for interaction = .007; left STC, P for interaction = .03; right STC, P for interaction = .02). Structural deficits in

  20. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head trauma Brain tumor Stroke Cerebral palsy Cervical spondylosis with myelopathy (a problem with the vertebrae in ... spinal cord) Steppage gait: Guillain-Barre syndrome Herniated lumbar disk Multiple sclerosis Muscle weakness of the tibia ...

  1. Supraesophageal Reflux: Correlation of Position and Occurrence of Acid Reflux-Effect of Head-of-Bed Elevation on Supine Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Simon, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Supraesophageal reflux of gastric contents can contribute to perennial nasopharyngitis, cough, and asthma. However, effective treatment strategies for supraesophageal reflux disease (SERD) remain inadequately defined. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence and timing of SERD and to investigate the efficacy of head-of-bed elevation in its treatment. A retrospective chart review of patients seen at Scripps Clinic Division of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology was performed who had undergone overnight nasopharyngeal pH monitoring with a commercially available nasopharyngeal pH-monitoring device, Dx-pH Measurement System from Restech, San Diego, Calif. Subjects with reflux were classified based on the position of reflux as either supine only, upright only, or both supine and upright. In a subset of subjects with supine-only reflux, pH monitoring was compared before and after elevating the head of bed 6 inches. Adequate nasopharyngeal pH-monitoring data were obtained for 235 patients. Reflux was detected in 113 (48%) patients. The pattern of reflux observed was 62 (55%) supine only, 4 (4%) upright only, and 47 (42%) upright and supine. Sequential overnight nasopharyngeal pH monitoring before and after head-of-bed elevation was obtained in 13 individuals with supine-only reflux. Ten subjects demonstrated significant improvement, 8 of whom demonstrated complete resolution of supine reflux with 6 inches of head-of-bed elevation. This study provides new evidence that SERD frequently occurs in the supine position and that 6 inches of head-of-bed elevation is effective in reducing supine SERD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results.

  3. Prospective observer and software-based assessment of magnetic resonance imaging quality in head and neck cancer: Should standard positioning and immobilization be required for radiation therapy applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Yang, Jinzhong; Colen, Rivka R; Frank, Steven J; Wang, Jihong; Wassal, Eslam Y; Wang, Wenjie; Kantor, Michael E; Balter, Peter A; Rosenthal, David I; Lai, Stephen Y; Hazle, John D; Fuller, Clifton D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a head and neck magnetic resonance simulation and immobilization protocol on reducing motion-induced artifacts and improving positional variance for radiation therapy applications. Two groups (group 1, 17 patients; group 2, 14 patients) of patients with head and neck cancer were included under a prospective, institutional review board-approved protocol and signed informed consent. A 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was used for anatomic and dynamic contrast-enhanced acquisitions with standard diagnostic MRI setup for group 1 and radiation therapy immobilization devices for group 2 patients. The impact of magnetic resonance simulation/immobilization was evaluated qualitatively by 2 observers in terms of motion artifacts and positional reproducibility and quantitatively using 3-dimensional deformable registration to track intrascan maximum motion displacement of voxels inside 7 manually segmented regions of interest. The image quality of group 2 (29 examinations) was significantly better than that of group 1 (50 examinations) as rated by both observers in terms of motion minimization and imaging reproducibility (P quality of head and neck MRI in terms of motion-related artifacts and positional reproducibility was greatly improved by use of radiation therapy immobilization devices. Consequently, immobilization with external and intraoral fixation in MRI examinations is required for radiation therapy application. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of 4-Horizontal Rectus Muscle Tenotomy on Visual Function and Eye Movement Records in Patients with Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome without Abnormal Head Posture and Strabismus: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ameri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tenotomy on visual function and eye movement records in patients with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS without abnormal head posture (AHP and strabismusMethods: A prospective interventional case-series of patients with INS with no AHP or strabismus. Patients underwent 4-horizontal muscle tenotomy. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and eye movement recordings were compared pre and postoperatively.Results: Eight patients were recruited in this study with 3 to 15.5 months of follow-up. Patients showed significant improvement in their visual function. Overall nystagmus amplitude and velocity was decreased 30.7% and 19.8%, respectively. Improvements were more marked at right and left gazes. Conclusion: Tenotomy improves both visual function and eye movement records in INS with no strabismus and eccentric null point. The procedure has more effect on lateral gazes with worse waveforms, thus can broaden area with better visual function. We recommend this surgery in patients with INS but no associated AHP or strabismus.

  5. Influence of different chromosomal abnormalities in Ph-positive bone marrow cells on the chronic myeloid leukemia course during tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Vinogradova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The additional molecular and chromosomal abnormalities (ACA in Phositive cells usually considered as a genetic marker of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML progression. 457 patients in different CML phases received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (1st and 2nd generation were studied. During therapy 50 cases with additional chromosomal abnormalities in Ph+ clone (22 of them in chronic CML phase were revealed (median follow-up from CML diagnosis – 117 months, median imatinib therapy – 62 months. 86 % of patients in chronic phase with Ph+- cell abnormalities were cytogenetic resistance, and their 5-years overall survival was 80 % which was significantly lower than in patients without ACA (p < 0.005. The treatment results depend on chromosomal abnormalities detected. In patients with additional chromosome 8 imatinib therapy is effective, although complete cytogenetic response (CCR is achieved only in the later therapy stages. In patients with additional translocations CCR also achieved with imatinib or 2nd generation TKI. Only a third of patients with additional Ph-chromosome or BCR/ABL amplification achieved complete suppression of Ph+ clone using 2nd generation TKI. The presence of additional chromosome 7 abnormalities and complex karyotype disorders involving isochromosome i(17(q10 are poor prognostic factors of TKI treatment failures.

  6. Comparative yield of positive brain Computed Tomography after implementing the NICE or SIGN head injury guidelines in two equivalent urban populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, R.; Macduff, R.; Davis, R.; Sambrook, M.; Britton, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To compare the yield of positive computed tomography (CT) brain examinations after the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) or the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) guidelines, in comparable urban populations in two teaching hospitals in England and Scotland. Materials and methods: Four hundred consecutive patients presenting at each location following a head injury who underwent a CT examination of the head according to the locally implemented guidelines were compared. Similar matched populations were compared for indication and yield. Yield was measured according to (1) positive CT findings of the sequelae of trauma and (2) intervention required with anaesthetic or intensive care unit (ICU) support, or neurosurgery. Results: The mean ages of patients at the English and Scottish centres were 49.9 and 49.2 years, respectively. Sex distribution was 64.1% male and 66.4% male respectively. Comparative yield was 23.8 and 26.5% for positive brain scans, 3 and 2.75% for anaesthetic support, and 3.75 and 2.5% for neurosurgical intervention. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 10% yield of positive scans. The choice of guideline to follow should be at the discretion of the local institution. The indications GCS <13 and clinical or radiological evidence of a skull fracture are highly predictive of intracranial pathology, and their presence should be an absolute indicator for fast-tracking the management of the patient.

  7. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  8. On two abnormal sharks from Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalan, U.K.

    The description of the two abnormal sharks, Carchariaswalbeehmi and Eulamia dussumieri collected from Gujarat, India, is given Of these C walbeehmi was double-headed The other shark E dussumieri had thumb snouted albino...

  9. Close or positive margins after surgical resection for the head and neck cancer patient: the addition of brachytherapy improves local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitler, Jonathan J.; Smith, Richard V.; Silver, Carl E.; Quish, Astrid; Deore, Shivaji M.; Mullokandov, Eduard; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Wadler, Scott; Hayes, Mary Katherine; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Microscopically positive or close margins after surgical resection results in an approximately 21-26% local failure rate despite excellent postoperative external radiation therapy. We sought to demonstrate improved local control in head and neck cancer patients who had a resection with curative intent, and had unexpected, microscopically positive or close surgical margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with microscopically close or positive margins after curative surgery were given definitive, adjuvant external radiation therapy and 125 I brachytherapy. All 29 patients had squamous cell cancer and tonsil was the most common subsite within the head and neck region. After external radiation therapy and thorough discussions with the attending surgeon and pathologists, the slides, gross specimens, and appropriate radiographs were reviewed and a target volume was determined. The target volume was the region of the margin in question and varied in size based on the surgery and pathologic results. Once the target volume was identified the patient was taken back to the operating room for insertion of 125 I seeds. Activity implanted (range 2.9-21.5 millicuries) was designed to administer a cumulative lifetime dose of 120-160 Gy. Results: Twenty-nine patients were followed for a median of 26 months (range 5-86 months). Two-year actuarial local control was 92%. Conclusion: 125 I, after external radiation therapy, is an excellent method to improve local control in the subset of patients with unexpectedly unsatisfactory margins

  10. Comparative yield of positive brain Computed Tomography after implementing the NICE or SIGN head injury guidelines in two equivalent urban populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerfield, R., E-mail: ruth.summerfield@uhns.nhs.u [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom); Macduff, R. [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF (United Kingdom); Davis, R. [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom); Sambrook, M. [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF (United Kingdom); Britton, I. [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aims: To compare the yield of positive computed tomography (CT) brain examinations after the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) or the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) guidelines, in comparable urban populations in two teaching hospitals in England and Scotland. Materials and methods: Four hundred consecutive patients presenting at each location following a head injury who underwent a CT examination of the head according to the locally implemented guidelines were compared. Similar matched populations were compared for indication and yield. Yield was measured according to (1) positive CT findings of the sequelae of trauma and (2) intervention required with anaesthetic or intensive care unit (ICU) support, or neurosurgery. Results: The mean ages of patients at the English and Scottish centres were 49.9 and 49.2 years, respectively. Sex distribution was 64.1% male and 66.4% male respectively. Comparative yield was 23.8 and 26.5% for positive brain scans, 3 and 2.75% for anaesthetic support, and 3.75 and 2.5% for neurosurgical intervention. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <13 (NICE) and GCS {<=}12 and radiological or clinical evidence of skull fracture (SIGN) demonstrated the greatest statistical association with a positive CT examination. Conclusion: In a teaching hospital setting, there is no significant difference in the yield between the NICE and SIGN guidelines. Both meet the SIGN standard of >10% yield of positive scans. The choice of guideline to follow should be at the discretion of the local institution. The indications GCS <13 and clinical or radiological evidence of a skull fracture are highly predictive of intracranial pathology, and their presence should be an absolute indicator for fast-tracking the management of the patient.

  11. Study protocol. IDUS - Instrumental delivery & ultrasound: a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of ultrasound assessment of the fetal head position versus standard care as an approach to prevent morbidity at instrumental delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental deliveries are commonly performed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with rates of 12 - 17% in most centres. Knowing the exact position of the fetal head is a pre-requisite for safe instrumental delivery. Traditionally, diagnosis of the fetal head position is made on transvaginal digital examination by delineating the suture lines of the fetal skull and the fontanelles. However, the accuracy of transvaginal digital examination can be unreliable and varies between 20% and 75%. Failure to identify the correct fetal head position increases the likelihood of failed instrumental delivery with the additional morbidity of sequential use of instruments or second stage caesarean section. The use of ultrasound in determining the position of the fetal head has been explored but is not part of routine clinical practice.

  12. Study Protocol. IDUS -- Instrumental delivery & ultrasound. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of ultrasound assessment of the fetal head position versus standard care as an approach to prevent morbidity at instrumental delivery

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-09-13

    AbstractBackgroundInstrumental deliveries are commonly performed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with rates of 12 – 17% in most centres. Knowing the exact position of the fetal head is a pre-requisite for safe instrumental delivery. Traditionally, diagnosis of the fetal head position is made on transvaginal digital examination by delineating the suture lines of the fetal skull and the fontanelles. However, the accuracy of transvaginal digital examination can be unreliable and varies between 20% and 75%. Failure to identify the correct fetal head position increases the likelihood of failed instrumental delivery with the additional morbidity of sequential use of instruments or second stage caesarean section. The use of ultrasound in determining the position of the fetal head has been explored but is not part of routine clinical practice.Methods\\/DesignA multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in two large maternity units in Ireland with a combined annual birth rate of 13,500 deliveries. It will involve 450 nulliparous women undergoing instrumental delivery after 37 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be incorrect diagnosis of the fetal head position. A study involving 450 women will have 80% power to detect a 10% difference in the incidence of inaccurate diagnosis of the fetal head position with two-sided 5% alpha.DiscussionIt is both important and timely to evaluate the use of ultrasound to diagnose the fetal head position prior to instrumental delivery before routine use can be advocated. The overall aim is to reduce the incidence of incorrect diagnosis of the fetal head position prior to instrumental delivery and improve the safety of instrumental deliveries.Trial registrationCurrent Controlled Trials ISRCTN72230496

  13. Study Protocol. IDUS – Instrumental delivery & ultrasound. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of ultrasound assessment of the fetal head position versus standard care as an approach to prevent morbidity at instrumental delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Deirdre J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instrumental deliveries are commonly performed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with rates of 12 – 17% in most centres. Knowing the exact position of the fetal head is a pre-requisite for safe instrumental delivery. Traditionally, diagnosis of the fetal head position is made on transvaginal digital examination by delineating the suture lines of the fetal skull and the fontanelles. However, the accuracy of transvaginal digital examination can be unreliable and varies between 20% and 75%. Failure to identify the correct fetal head position increases the likelihood of failed instrumental delivery with the additional morbidity of sequential use of instruments or second stage caesarean section. The use of ultrasound in determining the position of the fetal head has been explored but is not part of routine clinical practice. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in two large maternity units in Ireland with a combined annual birth rate of 13,500 deliveries. It will involve 450 nulliparous women undergoing instrumental delivery after 37 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be incorrect diagnosis of the fetal head position. A study involving 450 women will have 80% power to detect a 10% difference in the incidence of inaccurate diagnosis of the fetal head position with two-sided 5% alpha. Discussion It is both important and timely to evaluate the use of ultrasound to diagnose the fetal head position prior to instrumental delivery before routine use can be advocated. The overall aim is to reduce the incidence of incorrect diagnosis of the fetal head position prior to instrumental delivery and improve the safety of instrumental deliveries. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN72230496

  14. Cerebral vasoreactivity in response to a head-of-bed position change is altered in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori-Pla, Clara; Cotta, Gianluca; Blanco, Igor; Zirak, Peyman; Giovannella, Martina; Mola, Anna; Fortuna, Ana; Durduran, Turgut; Mayos, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can impair cerebral vasoreactivity and is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. Unfortunately, an easy-to-use, non-invasive, portable monitor of cerebral vasoreactivity does not exist. Therefore, we have evaluated the use of near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy to measure the microvascular cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to a mild head-of-bed position change as a biomarker for the evaluation of cerebral vasoreactivity alteration due to chronic OSA. Furthermore, we have monitored the effect of two years of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on the cerebral vasoreactivity. CBF was measured at different head-of-bed position changes (supine to 30° to supine) in sixty-eight patients with OSA grouped according to severity (forty moderate to severe, twenty-eight mild) and in fourteen control subjects without OSA. A subgroup (n = 13) with severe OSA was measured again after two years of CPAP treatment. All patients and controls showed a similar CBF response after changing position from supine to 30° (p = 0.819), with a median (confidence interval) change of -17.5 (-10.3, -22.9)%. However, when being tilted back to the supine position, while the control group (p = 0.091) and the mild patients with OSA (p = 0.227) recovered to the initial baseline, patients with moderate and severe OSA did not recover to the baseline (9.8 (0.8, 12.9)%, p < 0.001) suggesting altered cerebral vasoreactivity. This alteration was correlated with OSA severity defined by the apnea-hypopnea index, and with mean nocturnal arterial oxygen saturation. The CBF response was normalized after two years of CPAP treatment upon follow-up measurements. In conclusion, microvascular CBF response to a head-of-bed challenge measured by diffuse correlation spectroscopy suggests that moderate and severe patients with OSA have altered cerebral vasoreactivity related to OSA severity. This may normalize after two years of CPAP

  15. ''Watch-and-see'' policy for the clinically positive neck in head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Akihiro; Furuta, Yasushi; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is becoming more widely used for head and neck cancer. However, there are conflicting theories regarding the best management options for patients with advanced nodal disease. From 1990 to 1999, we treated 96 patients with N1-N2 neck disease by concomitant CRT for organ preservation, using weekly carboplatin or a low daily dose of cisplatin, followed by a ''watch-and-see'' policy for the neck. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed the treatment outcome in 63 of these patients who received definitive CRT for primary and neck diseases and were monitored for neck disease for more than 2 years. In 12 of the 22 (55%) N1 patients, CRT successfully controlled the neck disease. CRT was successful in 18 of the 41(44%) patients with N2 disease. In 6 (60%) of 10 patients with residual or recurrent N1 disease, salvage surgery was successful. Of the 23 patients with residual or recurrent N2 disease, salvage surgery was successful in 8 patients (35%). The group of patients who showed a clinical complete response (CCR) to CRT had an overall survival rate of 62.4% (33 patients), whereas for those with a less than complete response (< CCR), the figure was 13.3% (30 patients; P<0.001). Among the < CCR-neck group, patients who underwent neck dissection (ND) as well (n=20) did not have a significantly better overall survival than those who did not undergo ND (n=10; P=0.069). We propose a treatment plan for neck disease that involves observing the neck closely following CRT. ND should be planned only when there is evidence that neck disease exists. (author)

  16. [Reduction of pressure sores during prone positioning of ventilated intensive care patients by the prone-head support system: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebio, Michael; Katz-Papatheophilou, Elfriede; Heindl, Werner; Gelbmann, Herbert; Burghuber, Otto C

    2005-02-01

    Prone positioning in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome is a well-known method to improve oxygenation. The aim of our study was to evaluate a new device for prone positioning, the prone-head support system (PHS system), with regard to reduction of cutaneous pressure sores. In a pilot study we randomized 8 patients with ARDS in two groups: 180 degrees standard prone positioning (group without mask) and prone positioning with the PHS system (group with mask). The PHS system consists of a facemask support, which is connected to an adapted air suspension bed. The patients of both groups were intermittently proned for several days. We evaluated the pressure sores on head and neck before turning the patients prone for the first time and after each period of prone positioning. We documented the quantity, the size, the type and the localization of the pressure sores. There was no significant difference in the mean duration of prone positioning (27.1+/-14.7 hours in the group with mask versus 24.5+/-18.7 h in the group without mask). In the group with mask there were 1.5+/-0.8 new pressure sores by each proning, whereas in the group without mask there were 2.37+/-1.6 new pressure sores, which was lower, but not significantly. The overall area of pressure sores (798 mm2 versus 3184 mm2, p=0.004), the area of pressure sores per patient (199.5+/-104.7 mm2 versus 796+/-478 mm2, p=0.03) and the increase of the area of pressure sores per proning (79.8+/-52.0 mm2 versus 398.0+/-214.3 mm2, p=0.004) were significantly lower in the group with mask in comparison to the group without mask. The lips were the most effected localization in both groups. The pressure sores in the group with mask were less severe and showed a homogenous distribution in comparison to the group without mask. Blisters dominated in the group with mask in comparison to erosions, necrosis and ulcers in the group without mask. The PHS system with its face mask is able to reduce the extent and the

  17. Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation as a rare complication from head positioning in otologic surgery: Report of two cases in young children

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaida, Hiroshi; Akeda, Koji; Sudo, Akihiro; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Background Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation is a condition in which the first and second vertebrae of the cervical spine become interlocked in a rotated position. This condition can result in serious consequences and thus have a significant impact on patients, especially when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Some cases of atlantoaxial rotatory fixation have been described in association with otologic surgery or plastic surgery involving the ear. We present the cases of two pediatric patient...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  20. Acid sphingomyelinase activity as an indicator of the cell stress in HPV-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerle, Mirko; Medina, Tuula Peñate; Gülses, Aydin; Chu, Hanwen; Naujokat, Hendrik; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya

    2018-03-21

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, especially HPV-16 and HPV-18, has been increasingly associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The treatment of HPV-positive squamous cell carcinoma has a better response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy and presents a better prognosis for the patient. Defining the underlying mechanism of the difference might help in developing future treatment options and could be an important factor in personal therapy planning. Endogenously secreted acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) levels in the cellular stress caused by irradiation and cisplatin were investigated. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the viability of the treated cells. Keratinocytes were used to evaluate the effects of radiation on normal tissues. Irradiation caused a dose-dependent increase in ASMase activity in both SCC9 HPV-negative, and UDSCC2 HPV-positive cells. ASMase activity in UDSCC2 cells was significantly higher than that in SCC9 cells. UDSCC cells were more sensitive to cisplatin treatment than SCC cells, and the dose-response in the activity was observed in long-time treatments when high doses of cisplatin were used. The results of the current study have clearly showed that HPV positivity should be considered as one of the determinative factors which should be considered when tumor treatments are planned. However, further studies are needed to determine the differences in cellular responses and pathways among HPV-negative and HPV-positive cells.

  1. Comparison of measurement methods with a mixed effects procedure accounting for replicated evaluations (COM3PARE): method comparison algorithm implementation for head and neck IGRT positional verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha; Fuller, Clifton D; Rosenthal, David I; Thomas, Charles R

    2015-08-28

    Comparison of imaging measurement devices in the absence of a gold-standard comparator remains a vexing problem; especially in scenarios where multiple, non-paired, replicated measurements occur, as in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). As the number of commercially available IGRT presents a challenge to determine whether different IGRT methods may be used interchangeably, an unmet need conceptually parsimonious and statistically robust method to evaluate the agreement between two methods with replicated observations. Consequently, we sought to determine, using an previously reported head and neck positional verification dataset, the feasibility and utility of a Comparison of Measurement Methods with the Mixed Effects Procedure Accounting for Replicated Evaluations (COM3PARE), a unified conceptual schema and analytic algorithm based upon Roy's linear mixed effects (LME) model with Kronecker product covariance structure in a doubly multivariate set-up, for IGRT method comparison. An anonymized dataset consisting of 100 paired coordinate (X/ measurements from a sequential series of head and neck cancer patients imaged near-simultaneously with cone beam CT (CBCT) and kilovoltage X-ray (KVX) imaging was used for model implementation. Software-suggested CBCT and KVX shifts for the lateral (X), vertical (Y) and longitudinal (Z) dimensions were evaluated for bias, inter-method (between-subject variation), intra-method (within-subject variation), and overall agreement using with a script implementing COM3PARE with the MIXED procedure of the statistical software package SAS (SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA). COM3PARE showed statistically significant bias agreement and difference in inter-method between CBCT and KVX was observed in the Z-axis (both p - value<0.01). Intra-method and overall agreement differences were noted as statistically significant for both the X- and Z-axes (all p - value<0.01). Using pre-specified criteria, based on intra-method agreement, CBCT was deemed

  2. Definitive radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with radiographically positive retropharyngeal nodes: Incomplete radiographic response does not necessarily indicate failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Mancuso, Anthony A.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to report the control rate of radiographically positive retropharyngeal (RP) nodes with radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate posttreatment imaging with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer had radiographically positive RP nodes (size >1 cm in largest axial dimension, or presence of focal enhancement, lucency, or calcification), and both pre-RT and post-RT image sets available for review. An additional 21 patients with unconfirmed radiographically positive RP nodes had post-RT imaging, which consisted of computed tomography (CT) at a median of 4 weeks after completing RT. Patients with positive post-RT RP nodes underwent observation with serial imaging. Results: Of 16 patients with pre-RT and post-RT images available for review, 9 (56%) had a radiographic complete response, and of 21 patients with unconfirmed positive RP nodes with post-RT images available for review, 14 (67%) had a radiographic complete response. In all, 14 patients with incomplete response on post-RT imaging experienced control of their disease with no further therapy, and no RP node or neck failures were noted during a median follow-up of 2.8 years. Six patients with positive post-RT RP nodes had serial imaging available for review, and none demonstrated radiographic progression of disease. Conclusions: Radiographic response at 4 weeks may not accurately reflect long-term locoregional control, as RP nodes may continue to resolve over time. The highest index of suspicion should be reserved for patients with progressive changes in size, focal lucency, or focal enhancement on serial imaging after RT

  3. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connect with Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... HEADS UP on your web site! Create a culture of safety for young athletes Officials, learn how you can ... UP to Providers HEADS UP to Youth Sports HEADS UP to School Sports HEADS UP to ...

  4. Comparison of two threshold detection criteria methodologies for determination of probe positivity for intraoperative in situ identification of presumed abnormal 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Gregg J; Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Lee, Robert; Martin, Edward W

    2014-09-13

    Intraoperative in situ identification of (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery remains a significant challenge for surgeons. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method versus the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method for determination of gamma detection probe positivity for intraoperative in situ identification of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites in a manner that was independent of the specific type of gamma detection probe used. From among 52 patients undergoing appropriate in situ evaluation of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during (18)F-FDG-directed surgery using 6 available gamma detection probe systems, a total of 401 intraoperative gamma detection probe measurement sets of in situ counts per second measurements were cumulatively taken. For the 401 intraoperative gamma detection probe measurement sets, probe positivity was successfully met by the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method in 150/401 instances (37.4%) and by the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method in 259/401 instances (64.6%) (P < 0.001). Likewise, the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method detected true positive results at target-to-background ratios much lower than the 1.5-to-1 target-to-background ratio of the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method. The three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method was significantly better than the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method for determination of gamma detection probe positivity for intraoperative in situ detection of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery. This finding may be extremely important for reshaping the ongoing and future research and development of gamma detection probe systems that are necessary for optimizing the in situ detection of radioisotopes of higher-energy gamma photon emissions used during radioguided oncologic surgery.

  5. Screening for human papillomavirus, cervical cytological abnormalities and associated risk factors in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukanyangezi, M F; Sengpiel, V; Manzi, O; Tobin, G; Rulisa, S; Bienvenu, E; Giglio, D

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the major cause of death from cancer in Africa. We wanted to assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and associated risk factors and to determine whether HPV testing could serve as a screening method for squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) in Rwanda. We also wanted to obtain a broader understanding of the underlying risk factors for the establishment of HPV infection in Rwanda. A total of 206 HIV-positive women, 172 HIV-negative women and 22 women with unknown HIV status were recruited at the University Teaching Hospitals of Kigali (UTHK) and of Butare (UTHB) in Rwanda. Participants underwent an interview, cervical sampling for a Thinprep Pap test and a screening test analysing 37 HPV strains. Only 27% of HIV-positive women and 7% of HIV-negative women had been screened for cervical cancer before. HPV16 and HPV52 were the most common HPV strains. HIV-positive women were more commonly infected with high-risk (HR) HPV and multitype HPV than HIV-negative women. The sensitivity was 78% and the specificity 87% to detect high-grade SIL (HSIL) with HPV screening. Among HIV-negative women, being divorced was positively associated with HR-HPV infection, while hepatitis B, Trichomonas vaginalis infection and HR-HPV infection were factors positively associated with SILs. Ever having had gonorrhoea was positively associated with HR-HPV infection among HIV-positive women. HR-HPV infection and the number of live births were positively associated with SILs. The currently used quadrivalent vaccine may be insufficient to give satisfactory HPV coverage in Rwanda. HPV Screening may be effective to identify women at risk of developing cervical cancer, particularly if provided to high-risk patients. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  6. The influence of positive margins and nerve invasion in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck treated with surgery and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Morrison, William H.; Ang, K. Kian; Peters, Lester J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Surgery is the primary treatment for adenoid cystic carcinomas arising from major and minor salivary glands of the head and neck. However, local recurrence is frequent because of the infiltrative growth pattern and perineural spread associated with these tumors. At UTMDACC, we have had a long-standing policy of using postoperative radiotherapy to reduce the risk of local recurrence and to avoid the need for radical surgery; this 30-year retrospective study analyzes the results of this combined modality approach. Methods and Materials: Between 1962 and 1991, 198 patients ages 13-82 years, with adenoid cystic carcinomas of the head and neck, received postoperative radiotherapy for known or suspected microscopic residual disease following surgery. Distribution of primary sites was: parotid: 30 patients; submandibular/sublingual: 41 patients; lacrimal: 5 patients; and minor salivary glands: 122 patients. Eighty-three patients (42%) had microscopic positive margins and an additional 55 (28%) had close (≤5 mm) or uncertain margins. One hundred thirty-six patients (69%) had perineural spread with invasion of a major (named) nerve in 55 patients (28%). Using radiation techniques appropriate to the primary site, a median dose of 60 Gy (range 50-69 Gy) was delivered to the tumor bed. Follow-up ranged from 5-341 months (median, 93 months). All surviving patients had a minimum of 2 years follow-up. Results: Twenty-three patients (12%) had local recurrences with 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial local control rates of 95%, 86%, and 79%, respectively. Fifteen of the 83 patients (18%) with positive margins developed local recurrences, compared to 5 of 55 patients (9%) with close or uncertain margins, and 3 of 60 patients (5%) with negative margins (p 0.02). Patients with and without a major (named) nerve involved had crude failure rates of 18% (10 out of 55) and 9% (13 out of 143), respectively (p 0.02). There was a trend toward better local control with increasing dose

  7. The influence of positive margins and nerve invasion in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck treated with surgery and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, Adam S; Weber, Randal S; Morrison, William H; Ang, K Kian; Peters, Lester J

    1995-06-15

    Purpose: Surgery is the primary treatment for adenoid cystic carcinomas arising from major and minor salivary glands of the head and neck. However, local recurrence is frequent because of the infiltrative growth pattern and perineural spread associated with these tumors. At UTMDACC, we have had a long-standing policy of using postoperative radiotherapy to reduce the risk of local recurrence and to avoid the need for radical surgery; this 30-year retrospective study analyzes the results of this combined modality approach. Methods and Materials: Between 1962 and 1991, 198 patients ages 13-82 years, with adenoid cystic carcinomas of the head and neck, received postoperative radiotherapy for known or suspected microscopic residual disease following surgery. Distribution of primary sites was: parotid: 30 patients; submandibular/sublingual: 41 patients; lacrimal: 5 patients; and minor salivary glands: 122 patients. Eighty-three patients (42%) had microscopic positive margins and an additional 55 (28%) had close ({<=}5 mm) or uncertain margins. One hundred thirty-six patients (69%) had perineural spread with invasion of a major (named) nerve in 55 patients (28%). Using radiation techniques appropriate to the primary site, a median dose of 60 Gy (range 50-69 Gy) was delivered to the tumor bed. Follow-up ranged from 5-341 months (median, 93 months). All surviving patients had a minimum of 2 years follow-up. Results: Twenty-three patients (12%) had local recurrences with 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial local control rates of 95%, 86%, and 79%, respectively. Fifteen of the 83 patients (18%) with positive margins developed local recurrences, compared to 5 of 55 patients (9%) with close or uncertain margins, and 3 of 60 patients (5%) with negative margins (p 0.02). Patients with and without a major (named) nerve involved had crude failure rates of 18% (10 out of 55) and 9% (13 out of 143), respectively (p 0.02). There was a trend toward better local control with increasing dose

  8. Positive environmental modification of depressive phenotype and abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in female C57BL/6J mice during abstinence from chronic ethanol consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Y Pang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a commonly reported co-morbidity during rehabilitation from alcohol use disorders and its presence is associated with an increased likelihood of relapse. Interventions which impede the development of depression could be of potential benefit if incorporated into treatment programs. We previously demonstrated an ameliorative effect of physical exercise on depressive behaviours in a mouse model of alcohol abstinence. Here, we show that environmental enrichment (cognitive and social stimulation has a similar beneficial effect. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a key physiological system regulating stress responses and its dysregulation has been separably implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and addiction disorders. We performed a series of dexamethasone challenges and found that mice undergoing 2 weeks of alcohol abstinence had significantly greater corticosterone and ACTH levels following a DEX-CRH challenge compared to water controls. Environmental enrichment during alcohol abstinence corrected the abnormal DEX-CRH corticosterone response despite a further elevation of ACTH levels. Examination of gene expression revealed abstinence-associated alterations in glucocorticoid receptor (Gr, corticotrophin releasing hormone (Crh and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc1 mRNA levels which were differentially modulated by environmental enrichment. Overall, our study demonstrates a benefit of environmental enrichment on alcohol abstinence-associated depressive behaviours and HPA axis dysregulation.

  9. Bonafide, type-specific human papillomavirus persistence among HIV-positive pregnant women: predictive value for cytological abnormalities, a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela RI Meyrelles

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the rate of human papillomavirus (HPV persistence, associated risk factors, and predictors of cytological alteration outcomes in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women over an 18-month period. HPV was typed through L1 gene sequencing in cervical smears collected during gestation and at 12 months after delivery. Outcomes were defined as nonpersistence (clearance of the HPV in the 2nd sample, re-infection (detection of different types of HPV in the 2 samples, and type-specific HPV persistence (the same HPV type found in both samples. An unfavourable cytological outcome was considered when the second exam showed progression to squamous intraepithelial lesion or high squamous intraepithelial lesion. Ninety patients were studied. HPV DNA persistence occurred in 50% of the cases composed of type-specific persistence (30% or re-infection (20%. A low CD4+T-cell count at entry was a risk factor for type-specific, re-infection, or HPV DNA persistence. The odds ratio (OR was almost three times higher in the type-specific group when compared with the re-infection group (OR = 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 0.43-22.79. Our findings show that bonafide (type-specific HPV persistence is a stronger predictor for the development of cytological abnormalities, highlighting the need for HPV typing as opposed to HPV DNA testing in the clinical setting.

  10. Knowledge and screening of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwojak, Sunshine; Deschler, Daniel; Sargent, Michele; Emerick, Kevin; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Petereit, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We established the level of awareness of risk factors and early symptoms of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota and determined whether head and neck cancer screening detected clinical findings in this population. We used the European About Face survey. We added questions about human papillomavirus, a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and demographics. Surveys were administered at 2 public events in 2011. Participants could partake in a head and neck cancer screening at the time of survey administration. Of the 205 American Indians who completed the survey, 114 participated in the screening. Mean head and neck cancer knowledge scores were 26 out of 44. Level of education was the only factor that predicted higher head and neck cancer knowledge (b = 0.90; P = .01). Nine (8%) people had positive head and neck cancer screening examination results. All abnormal clinical findings were in current or past smokers (P = .06). There are gaps in American Indian knowledge of head and neck cancer risk factors and symptoms. Community-based head and neck cancer screening in this population is feasible and may be a way to identify early abnormal clinical findings in smokers.

  11. Testing for HPV as an objective measure for quality assurance in gynecologic cytology: positive rates in equivocal and abnormal specimens and comparison with the ASCUS to SIL ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Vincent; Nanji, Shabin; Tambouret, Rosemary H; Wilbur, David C

    2007-04-25

    Inappropriate use of the category of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) can result in overtreatment or undertreatment of patients, which may decrease the cost effectiveness of screening. Quality assurance tools, such as the ASCUS to squamous intraepithelial lesion ratio (ASCUS:SIL) and case review, are imperfect. High-risk HPV (hrHPV) testing is an objective test for a known viral carcinogen, and hrHPV may be more useful in monitoring the quality of ASCUS interpretations. hrHPV rates for cytologic diagnoses and patient age groups were calculated for a 2-year period. All hrHPV results for ASCUS and SIL over a 17-month period were analyzed by patient age group, over time, and by individual cytopathologist to compare hrHPV rates with the corresponding ASCUS:SIL. The hrHPV positive rate for SIL was >90%, and it was 32.6% for ASCUS. Stratification by patient age showed that approximately 50% of patients younger than 30 years and older than 70 years of age were hrHPV positive, whereas other patients had a lower rate ranging from 14% to 34%. The overall ASCUS:SIL was 1.42, and the overall hrHPV positive rate was 39.9%. Over time and by individual cytopathologist, the hrHPV rate performed similarly to the ASCUS:SIL. The analysis by patient age showed a high statistical correlation (R(2) = 0.9772) between the 2 methods. Despite differences between these techniques, the hrHPV rate closely recapitulates the ASCUS:SIL. When used together, the 2 methods can complement each other. The desirable hrHPV-positive range appears to be 40% to 50%; however, this may vary based on the patient population. The hrHPV rate is as quick and cost effective as determining the ASCUS:SIL. (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  12. Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in an effort to redirect the growth. Never purchase or use any devices like these without first having your child seen by a doctor. Only a small percentage of babies wear helmets. The decision to use helmet therapy is made on a ...

  13. Comparison and modeling of households food expenditures in Slovakia with regard to the economic status and job position of the head of household

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Kubicová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper focuses on analysis and development of nominal and real cash income as well as modeling of real cash household food expenditures in Slovakia. From the view of the head of household and his job position, paper compares the level and development of real money incomes and food expenditures, in terms of real money incomes quantifies the income elasticity and available demand saturation level for food in families of employees, self-employed persons and pensioners. Generally expected outcome of economic growth is raising standard of living of the population. Its measurement is based on the basic macroeconomic aggregates such as GDP growth and GDP per capita. Such indicators, despite their clearly accepted significance, have a number of limitations that undermine their informational value. These indicators are the product of highly aggregated data. Therefore submitted paper focuses on the analysis of the income situation of the population. This approach allows to obtain objective indicators of the true state income differentiation, respectively income inequality in particular social groups. Society with substantial income differentiation is less resistant against various extreme impact of globalization. The analysis results show that in the years 2004–2011 the real income increased least in the group of self-employed persons by an average of 4.89% (k’ = 1.0489, while in the group of pensioners, the real income increased by an average of 7.08 % (k’ = 1.0708.

  14. Effect of different head and neck positions on behaviour, heart rate variability and cortisol levels in lunged Royal Dutch Sport horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiet, E; Van Dierendonck, M C; Sleutjens, J; Menheere, P P C A; van Breda, E; de Boer, D; Back, W; Wijnberg, I D; van der Kolk, J H

    2014-10-01

    Different head-and-neck positions (HNPs) are discussed in relation to potential welfare issues. To evaluate the effect on welfare, seven Royal Dutch Sport horses were studied in five predetermined HNPs: (1) unrestrained (HNP1); (2) neck raised, bridge of nose around the vertical (HNP2); (3) neck lowered and considerably flexed, bridge of nose pointing towards the chest (HNP4); (4) neck raised and extended, bridge of nose in front of the vertical (HNP5), and (5) neck lowered and flexed, bridge of nose pointing towards the carpus (HNP7). A standardised exercise test (SET) of 34 min consisted of trot, canter and walk. Behaviour was recorded with a pre-defined ethogram and R-R intervals measured using telemetry. Cortisol concentrations were taken at the start, 5 and 30 min after the SET. Behaviour around the SET was scored separately. Conflict behaviours increased significantly during HNP2 when compared with HNP1, HNP4 and HNP7 during the SET, and there was significant negative anticipation before HNP2 and HNP7. The heart rate variability (HRV) frequency domain for HNP2 showed a significantly increased low frequency peak (LFpeak) compared with other HNPs, and there was a decrease in very low frequency (VLF%) compared with HNP1. HNP4 showed a significant increase in LF% and decrease in VLF% compared with HNP1. Saliva cortisol concentrations were significantly increased in HNP2 at 5 and 30 min after exercise. Increased conflict behaviour was mostly observed in HNP2, but there was a raised HRV suggesting a sympathetic shift in HNP2 and HNP4, and increased cortisol concentrations during HNP2 indicated a stress response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bottom head assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs

  16. [The exploding head syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, K M; ter Bruggen, J P; Franke, C L

    1991-04-06

    The case is reported of a 47-year old female suffering from the exploding head syndrome. This syndrome consists of a sudden awakening due to a loud noise shortly after falling asleep, sometimes accompanied by a flash of light. The patient is anxious and experiences palpitations and excessive sweating. Most patients are more than fifty years of age. Further investigations do not reveal any abnormality. The pathogenesis is unknown, and no therapy other than reassurance is necessary.

  17. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, M.; Knottenbelt, J. D.; Peden, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess risk factors for important neurosurgical effects in patients who reattend after head injury. DESIGN--Retrospective study. SUBJECTS--606 patients who reattended a trauma unit after minor head injury. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Intracranial abnormality detected on computed tomography or the need for neurosurgical intervention. RESULTS--Five patients died: two from unrelated causes and three from raised intracranial pressure. On multiple regression analysis the only significant predictor for both abnormality on computed tomography (14.4% of reattenders) and the need for operation (5% of reattenders) was vault fracture seen on the skull radiograph (P personality change, and seizures were significantly associated only with abnormality on computed tomography. Headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting were common in reattenders but were found to have no independent significance. CONCLUSIONS--All patients who reattend after head injury should undergo computed tomography as at least 14% of scans can be expected to yield positive results. Where this facility is not available patients with predictors for operation should be urgently referred for neurosurgical opinion. Other patients can be readmitted and need referral only if symptoms persist despite symptomatic treatment or there is neurological deterioration while under observation. These patients are a high risk group and should be treated seriously. PMID:8520273

  18. The influence of non-rigid anatomy and patient positioning on endoscopy-CT image registration in the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, W Scott; Yang, Jinzhong; Wendt, Richard; Beadle, Beth M; Rao, Arvind; Wang, Xin A; Court, Laurence E

    2017-08-01

    To assess the influence of non-rigid anatomy and differences in patient positioning between CT acquisition and endoscopic examination on endoscopy-CT image registration in the head and neck. Radiotherapy planning CTs and 31-35 daily treatment-room CTs were acquired for nineteen patients. Diagnostic CTs were acquired for thirteen of the patients. The surfaces of the airways were segmented on all scans and triangular meshes were created to render virtual endoscopic images with a calibrated pinhole model of an endoscope. The virtual images were used to take projective measurements throughout the meshes, with reference measurements defined as those taken on the planning CTs and test measurements defined as those taken on the daily or diagnostic CTs. The influence of non-rigid anatomy was quantified by 3D distance errors between reference and test measurements on the daily CTs, and the influence of patient positioning was quantified by 3D distance errors between reference and test measurements on the diagnostic CTs. The daily CT measurements were also used to investigate the influences of camera-to-surface distance, surface angle, and the interval of time between scans. Average errors in the daily CTs were 0.36 ± 0.61 cm in the nasal cavity, 0.58 ± 0.83 cm in the naso- and oropharynx, and 0.47 ± 0.73 cm in the hypopharynx and larynx. Average errors in the diagnostic CTs in those regions were 0.52 ± 0.69 cm, 0.65 ± 0.84 cm, and 0.69 ± 0.90 cm, respectively. All CTs had errors heavily skewed towards 0, albeit with large outliers. Large camera-to-surface distances were found to increase the errors, but the angle at which the camera viewed the surface had no effect. The errors in the Day 1 and Day 15 CTs were found to be significantly smaller than those in the Day 30 CTs (P projective measurement errors. In general, these errors are largest when the camera is in the superior pharynx, where it sees large distances and a lot of muscle motion. The

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  20. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  1. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. www. ...

  2. CT scanning in pediatric head trauma: correlation of clinical features with CT scan diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkoncel, Mary Ann P.; Posadas, Ma. Belen A.

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective review was conducted on 205 cases of pediatric head trauma for which cranial computed tomography scans were done at the Makati Medical Center, to determine which clinical features might positively predict an abnormality on CT scan. The clinical findings of loss of consciousness, GCS < 12, vomiting headache, seizures, and focal abnormalities on Neurologic Examination were significantly associated with abnormal findings on CT scan. However, a significant discrepancy does exist as to how accurately clinical findings do in fact predict normal and abnormal CT scan findings. Such a discrepancy allows us to conclude that a more liberal use of CT Scanning in cases of pediatric head trauma must be stressed to insure proper diagnosis. This study shows that when a patient presents with the aforementioned positive signs and symptoms, or with a focal neurologic deficit, or in combination, a 60-100 % positive prediction of abnormal CT Scan can be made. However, prediction of normal CT Scan is only 0-40%. (Author)

  3. Therapeutic Efficacy Comparison of 5 Major EGFR-TKIs in Advanced EGFR-positive Non-Small-cell Lung Cancer: A Network Meta-analysis Based on Head-to-Head Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaxiong; Zhang, Zhonghan; Huang, Xiaodan; Kang, Shiyang; Chen, Gang; Wu, Manli; Miao, Siyu; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2017-09-01

    Five major first- and second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), including erlotinib, gefitinib, icotinib, afatinib, and dacomitinib, are currently optional for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who harbor EGFR mutations. However, there was no head-to-head-based network meta-analysis among all the TKIs in EGFR-mutated populations. Eligible literature was searched from an electronic database. Data of objective response rate, disease control rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were extracted from enrolled studies. Multiple treatment comparisons based on Bayesian network integrated the efficacy of all included treatments. Six phase III randomized trials involving 1055 EGFR-mutated patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. Multiple treatment comparisons showed that 5 different EGFR-TKIs shared equivalent therapeutic efficacy in terms of all outcome measures. Rank probabilities indicated that dacomitinib and afatinib had potentially better efficacy compared with erlotinib, gefitinib, and icotinib in the EGFR-mutated patients. When compared with other agents, potential survival benefits (progression-free and overall survival) were observed in dacomitinib, whereas afatinib showed a better rank probability in overall response rate and disease control rate. Our study indicated a preferable therapeutic efficacy in the second-generation TKIs (dacomitinib and afatinib) when compared with the first-generation TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, and icotinib). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nontraumatic femoral head necrosis. Classification of bone scintigraphic findings and diagnostic value of SPECT following planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Anzai, Yoshimi; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine bone scintigraphic findings in nontraumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and diagnostic value of SPECT imaging following a conventional planar imaging. Forty-three femoral heads in twenty-six cases with idiopathic femoral head necrosis (n=2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=22), aplastic anemia (n=1), and renal transplantation (n=1) were studied. The diagnosis for femoral head necrosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging as well as other diagnostic studies in all cases. Scintigraphic findings of planar and SPECT images were classified into six categories: normal (N); cold or decrease (C); partial increase with cold or decrease (PH+C); ring-like increase with a cold center (RH+C); partial increase (PH); diffuse and/or irregular increase (DH). Avascular necrosis was confirmed in twenty-four femoral heads, in which planar and SPECT images showed scintigraphic findings of N (n=3, 2), C (n=1, 3), PH+C (n=2, 8), RH+C (n=2, 3), PH (n=9, 2), and DH (n=7, 6), respectively. Femoral heads without avascular necrosis demonstrated planar and SPECT findings of N (n=16, 12), C (n=0, 6), and DH (n=3, 1), respectively. When considering C, PH+C, and RH+C as diagnostic findings for avascular necrosis, sensitivities of planar and SPECT images were 21% and 58%, and specificities were 100% and 68%, respectively. In nineteen femoral heads with normal planar findings (N), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in two femoral heads and misidentified six normal femoral heads as avascular necrosis. In nineteen femoral heads with nondiagnostic abnormalities (PH, DH), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in seven femoral heads and showed no false positive. Diagnostic planar findings in five femoral heads were concordant with SPECT diagnosis. These results indicate that SPECT imaging is most valuable when planar images show nondiagnostic abnormalities based on the proposed classification of scintigraphic findings. (author).

  5. Nontraumatic femoral head necrosis. Classification of bone scintigraphic findings and diagnostic value of SPECT following planar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Anzai, Yoshimi; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine bone scintigraphic findings in nontraumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and diagnostic value of SPECT imaging following a conventional planar imaging. Forty-three femoral heads in twenty-six cases with idiopathic femoral head necrosis (n=2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=22), aplastic anemia (n=1), and renal transplantation (n=1) were studied. The diagnosis for femoral head necrosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging as well as other diagnostic studies in all cases. Scintigraphic findings of planar and SPECT images were classified into six categories: normal (N); cold or decrease (C); partial increase with cold or decrease (PH+C); ring-like increase with a cold center (RH+C); partial increase (PH); diffuse and/or irregular increase (DH). Avascular necrosis was confirmed in twenty-four femoral heads, in which planar and SPECT images showed scintigraphic findings of N (n=3, 2), C (n=1, 3), PH+C (n=2, 8), RH+C (n=2, 3), PH (n=9, 2), and DH (n=7, 6), respectively. Femoral heads without avascular necrosis demonstrated planar and SPECT findings of N (n=16, 12), C (n=0, 6), and DH (n=3, 1), respectively. When considering C, PH+C, and RH+C as diagnostic findings for avascular necrosis, sensitivities of planar and SPECT images were 21% and 58%, and specificities were 100% and 68%, respectively. In nineteen femoral heads with normal planar findings (N), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in two femoral heads and misidentified six normal femoral heads as avascular necrosis. In nineteen femoral heads with nondiagnostic abnormalities (PH, DH), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in seven femoral heads and showed no false positive. Diagnostic planar findings in five femoral heads were concordant with SPECT diagnosis. These results indicate that SPECT imaging is most valuable when planar images show nondiagnostic abnormalities based on the proposed classification of scintigraphic findings. (author)

  6. Head injury in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Makoto; Mori, Nobuhiko; Yokosuka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Imanaga, Hirohisa

    1981-01-01

    Findings of computerized tomography (CT) in 183 cases of head injury in children were investigated with special reference to CT findings of mild head injury. As was expected, CT findings of mild head injury fell within the normal range, in almost all cases. However, abnormal findings were noticed in 4 out of 34 cases (12%) in acute stage and 7 out of 76 cases (9%) in chronic stage. They were 3 cases of localized low density area in acute stage and 6 cases of mild cerebral atrophy in chronic stage, etc. There were some cases of mild head injury in which CT findings were normal while EEG examination revealed abnormality. Also in some cases, x-ray study demonstrated linear skull fracture which CT failed to show. These conventional techniques could be still remained as useful adjunct aid in diagnosis of head injury. CT findings of cases of cerebral contusion in their acute stage were divided as follows; normal, low density, small ventricle and ventricular and/or cisternal hemorrhage, frequency of incidence being 38, 17, 22, 11% respectively. These findings were invariably converted to cerebral atrophy from 10 days to 2 months after the impacts. In the cases with intracranial hematoma revealed by CT, only 32% of them showed clinical signs of Araki's type IV in their acute stage and 63% of them showed no neurological defects, that is Araki's type I and II. A case of extreme diffuse cerebral atrophy which followed acute subdural hematoma caused by tear of bridging veins without cortical contusion was presented. (author)

  7. Presence of High-Risk HPV mRNA in Relation to Future High-Grade Lesions among High-Risk HPV DNA Positive Women with Minor Cytological Abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Johansson

    Full Text Available Continuous expression of E6- and E7-oncogenes of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV types is necessary for the development and maintenance of the dysplastic phenotype. The aim of the study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the APTIMA HPV mRNA assay (Hologic in predicting future development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN among high-risk HPV-DNA-positive women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS or low-grade squamous epithelial lesion (LSIL cytology.Archived SurePath cervical samples of women ≥ 35 years of age with high-risk HPV DNA-positive ASCUS (n = 211 or LSIL, (n = 131 were tested for the presence of high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA using the APTIMA HPV assay, and the women were monitored for development of histopathologically verified CIN2+.Twenty-nine percent (61/211 of the women in the ASCUS group, and 34.3% (45/131 in the LSIL group developed CIN2+ within 4.5 years of follow-up. The prevalence of HPV mRNA was 90.0% (95% CI 85.9-94.0 among women with ASCUS and 95.4% (95% CI 91.8-99.0 among women with LSIL. The presence of HPV E6/E7 mRNA was associated with future development of CIN2+ among women with ASCUS and LSIL (p=0.02. The mRNA assay demonstrated high sensitivity in predicting future CIN2+ and CIN3 for index ASCUS (96.7%; 95% CI 87.6-99.4 and 100%; 95% CI 82.2-100, respectively and LSIL (97.8%, 95% CI 86.8-99.9 and 100%, 95% CI 79.9-100, respectively. The corresponding specificity was low, 12.7% (95% CI 7.9-19.3 and 5.8% (95% CI 2.2-13.6, for future CIN2+, respectively. The negative predictive value of the HPV mRNA assay for detecting future CIN3 was 100%, since no mRNA-negative woman developed CIN3 (0/27 as compared to 13.6% (43/315 of the mRNA-positive women (p = 0.03.The APTIMA mRNA assay demonstrated high sensitivity but low specificity in predicting future CIN2+ among women with minor cytological abnormalities. The assay had high negative predictive value for future

  8. Presence of High-Risk HPV mRNA in Relation to Future High-Grade Lesions among High-Risk HPV DNA Positive Women with Minor Cytological Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Hanna; Bjelkenkrantz, Kaj; Darlin, Lotten; Dilllner, Joakim; Forslund, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Objective Continuous expression of E6- and E7-oncogenes of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types is necessary for the development and maintenance of the dysplastic phenotype. The aim of the study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the APTIMA HPV mRNA assay (Hologic) in predicting future development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) among high-risk HPV-DNA-positive women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous epithelial lesion (LSIL) cytology. Methods Archived SurePath cervical samples of women ≥ 35 years of age with high-risk HPV DNA-positive ASCUS (n = 211) or LSIL, (n = 131) were tested for the presence of high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA using the APTIMA HPV assay, and the women were monitored for development of histopathologically verified CIN2+. Results Twenty-nine percent (61/211) of the women in the ASCUS group, and 34.3% (45/131) in the LSIL group developed CIN2+ within 4.5 years of follow-up. The prevalence of HPV mRNA was 90.0% (95% CI 85.9-94.0) among women with ASCUS and 95.4% (95% CI 91.8-99.0) among women with LSIL. The presence of HPV E6/E7 mRNA was associated with future development of CIN2+ among women with ASCUS and LSIL (p=0.02). The mRNA assay demonstrated high sensitivity in predicting future CIN2+ and CIN3 for index ASCUS (96.7%; 95% CI 87.6-99.4 and 100%; 95% CI 82.2-100, respectively) and LSIL (97.8%, 95% CI 86.8-99.9 and 100%, 95% CI 79.9-100, respectively). The corresponding specificity was low, 12.7% (95% CI 7.9-19.3) and 5.8% (95% CI 2.2-13.6), for future CIN2+, respectively. The negative predictive value of the HPV mRNA assay for detecting future CIN3 was 100%, since no mRNA-negative woman developed CIN3 (0/27) as compared to 13.6% (43/315) of the mRNA-positive women (p = 0.03). Conclusion The APTIMA mRNA assay demonstrated high sensitivity but low specificity in predicting future CIN2+ among women with minor cytological abnormalities. The assay had

  9. Radiographic temporomandibular joint abnormality in adults with micrognathia and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larheim, T.A.; Haanaes, H.R.; Dale, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway))

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic findings of the upper and lower jaw bone of 20 adult patients with micrognathia, bird face, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are reported. In all patients a symmetrically underdeveloped mandible with the chin posteriorly positioned was found at cephalometry. Arthritic lesion of the temporomandibular joint, mostly symmetric, with limitation of movement and secondary arthrosis, was observed in all patients. Complete absence of the mandibular head was frequent (75%). The fossa was generally flat, probably due to growth disturbance of the tubercle. Abnormal anterior position of the mandibular head occurred in almost half of the patients. The degree of mandibular growth disturbance seemed to be correlated to the severity of the arthritis, indicating the arthritis to be a causal mechanism of micrognathia.

  10. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nits. You should also use hot water to wash any bed linens, towels, and clothing recently worn by the person who had head lice. Vacuum anything that can’t be washed, such as the couch, carpets, your child’s car seat, and any stuffed animals. Because head lice ...

  11. Abnormal I-123 HIPDM images in various disease entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.J.; Magoun, S.; Coupal, J.J.; Clark, D.B.; Dekosky, S.T.; Kung, H.F.; Beihn, R.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Eighty patients who were referred from neurology service for evaluation of stroke, Alzheimer disease (AD), and/or other neurologic diseases underwent the study. Four views of planar images were obtained following the intravenous injection of 3-5 mCi of I-123 HIPDM. SPECT images were then obtained using a camera interfaced to a PDP-11 computer. Forty of the 80 patients had scintigraphic findings of stroke, which correlated well with head CT/cerebral angiogram. Sixteen patients with AD had good correlation between the degree of temporoparietal abnormality in the images. Severe AD and severe stroke patients almost always had a positive planar image. Normal I-123 HIPDM localization in the brain requires intact cerebral flow and cerebral neuronal function. A focal area of decreased I-123 HIPDM localization may represent either interruption of blood flow or neurochemical dysfunction

  12. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  13. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Aoki, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with the clinical diagnosis of or suspicious of avascular necrosis (AN) of the femoral head were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In all patients with AN confirmed from clinical symptoms, past history and plain radiographs, MRI demonstrated abnormal low intensity area in the necrosed femoral head. The abnormal findings on MRI were divided into three patterns: low signal intensity occupying the greater part of the femoral head (type A), low signal intensity localized in the periphery (type B), ring-shaped or band-like low signal intensity (type C). No correlation was found among MRI patterns, radiographic findings and radionuclide bone scan images, except that the type C was not found in the stage IV determined radiographically. In the patients suspicious of AN, the positive rate of MRI was higher than that of radionuclide scan. Abnormal findings on only MRI may not necessarily indicate AN. However, such a patient must be kept under observation, because the possibility exists that only MRI detects early or asymptomatic AN of the femoral head. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Aoki, Shigeki

    1987-05-01

    Thirty-seven patients with the clinical diagnosis of or suspicious of avascular necrosis (AN) of the femoral head were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In all patients with AN confirmed from clinical symptoms, past history and plain radiographs, MRI demonstrated abnormal low intensity area in the necrosed femoral head. The abnormal findings on MRI were divided into three patterns: low signal intensity occupying the greater part of the femoral head (type A), low signal intensity localized in the periphery (type B), ring-shaped or band-like low signal intensity (type C). No correlation was found among MRI patterns, radiographic findings and radionuclide bone scan images, except that the type C was not found in the stage IV determined radiographically. In the patients suspicious of AN, the positive rate of MRI was higher than that of radionuclide scan. Abnormal findings on only MRI may not necessarily indicate AN. However, such a patient must be kept under observation, because the possibility exists that only MRI detects early or asymptomatic AN of the femoral head.

  16. SPERM MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES AS INDICATORS OF DNA FRAGMENTATION AND FERTILIZATION IN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dariš

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determine the relationship between sperm morphological abnormalities, DNA fragmentation and fertilization rate in IVF and ICSI. Methods. Sperm samples from 10 IVF and 20 ICSI cycles were analyzed. Morphology was assessed according to strict criteria, and DNA fragmentation was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL using a flow cytometry. Results. There was a significant difference in the amount of morphological abnormalities between sperm samples with low (< 20 % and high (≥ 20 % degree of DNA fragmentation. The percentages of amorphous heads (10 vs. 4 % and overall head abnormalities (42 vs. 30 % were significantly higher in sperm samples with elevated degree of DNA fragmentation. No correlation was found between sperm DNA fragmentation and fertilization rate after IVF and ICSI. When the predominant morphological abnormality in sperm samples was determined, a negative correlation was found between the percentage of spermatozoa with elongated heads and fertilization rate in ICSI (r = –0.45, P < 0.05. The fertilization rate after IVF was lower in the case of acrosomal abnormalities (35.3 %, compared to the cases of other predominant morphological abnormalities. Conclusions. Head abnormalities, especially amorphous heads, are related to elevated degree of DNA fragmentation. Predominant abnormal form in sperm samples, such as elongated heads and acrosomal abnormalities, may affect fertilization in ART.

  17. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a severe blow to the head can still knock the brain into the side of the skull ... following certain precautions and taking a break from sports and other activities that make symptoms worse. Playing ...

  18. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of Delineation Variability of Soft Tissue Volume and Position in Head-And-Neck Between Two T1-Weighted Pulse Sequences Using An MR-Simulator with Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, O; Lo, G; Yuan, J; Law, M; Ding, A; Cheng, K; Chan, K; Cheung, K; Yu, S [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing interests in applying MR-simulator(MR-sim) in radiotherapy but MR images subject to hardware, patient and pulse sequence dependent geometric distortion that may potentially influence target definition. This study aimed to evaluate the influence on head-and-neck tissue delineation, in terms of positional and volumetric variability, of two T1-weighted(T1w) MR sequences on a 1.5T MR-sim Methods: Four healthy volunteers were scanned (4 scans for each on different days) using both spin-echo (3DCUBE, TR/TE=500/14ms, TA=183s) and gradient-echo sequences (3DFSPGR, TE/TR=7/4ms, TA=173s) with identical coverage, voxel-size(0.8×0.8×1.0mm3), receiver-bandwidth(62.5kHz/pix) and geometric correction on a 1.5T MR-sim immobilized with personalized thermoplastic cast and head-rest. Under this setting, similar T1w contrast and signal-to-noise ratio were obtained, and factors other than sequence that might bias image distortion and tissue delineation were minimized. VOIs of parotid gland(PGR, PGL), pituitary gland(PIT) and eyeballs(EyeL, EyeR) were carefully drawn, and inter-scan coefficient-of-variation(CV) of VOI centroid position and volume were calculated for each subject. Mean and standard deviation(SD) of the CVs for four subjects were compared between sequences using Wilcoxon ranksum test. Results: The mean positional(<4%) and volumetric(<7%) CVs varied between tissues, majorly dependent on tissue inherent properties like volume, location, mobility and deformability. Smaller mean volumetric CV was found in 3DCUBE, probably due to its less proneness to tissue susceptibility, but only PGL showed significant difference(P<0.05). Positional CVs had no significant differences for all VOIs(P>0.05) between sequences, suggesting volumetric variation might be more sensitive to sequence-dependent delineation difference. Conclusion: Although 3DCUBE is considered less prone to tissue susceptibility-induced artifact and distortion, our preliminary data showed

  19. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  20. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  1. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some ... Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality ...

  3. Kinematics of the AM-50 heading machine cutting head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W; Bak, K; Klich, R [Politechnika Slaska, Gliwice (Poland). Instytut Mechanizacji Gornictwa

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes motion of the cutter head of the AM-50 heading machine. Two types of head motion are comparatively evaluated: planar motion and spatial motion. The spatial motion consists of the head rotational motion and horizontal or vertical feed motion, while planar motion consists of rotational motion and vertical feed motion. Equations that describe head motion under conditions of cutter vertical or horizontal feed motion are derived. The angle between the cutting speed direction and working speed direction is defined. On the basis of these formulae variations of cutting speed depending on the cutting tool position on a cutter head are calculated. Calculations made for 2 extreme cutting tools show that the cutting speed ranges from 1,205 m/s to 3,512 m/s. 4 refs.

  4. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  5. High-grade acute organ toxicity as positive prognostic factor in primary radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Bosch, Jan; Hennies, Steffen; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Jung, Klaus [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Overbeck, Tobias [Dept. of Haematology and Oncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Matthias, Christoph; Roedel, Ralph M. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: to test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radio(chemo)therapy and treatment outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and methods: from 05/1994 to 01/2009, 216 HNSCC patients were treated with radio(chemo)therapy in primary approach. They received normofractionated (2 Gy/fraction) irradiation including associated nodal drainage sites to a cumulative dose of 70 Gy. 151 patients received additional concomitant chemotherapy (111 patients 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin C, 40 patients cisplatin-based). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), and any toxicity grade CTC {>=} 3 of mucositis, dysphagia or skin reaction was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: a statistically significant coherency between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival as well as locoregional control was found: patients with CTC {>=} 3 acute organ toxicity had a 5-year overall survival rate of 4% compared to 8% in patients without (p < 0.01). Thereby, multivariate analyses revealed that the correlation was independent of other possible prognostic factors or factors that may influence treatment toxicity, especially concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy technique or treatment-planning procedure. Conclusion: these data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, as high-grade acute organ toxicity during radio(chemo)therapy showed to be an independent prognostic marker in the own patient population. However, the authors are aware of the fact that a multivariate analysis in a retrospective study generally has statistical limitations. Therefore, their hypothesis should be further analyzed on biomolecular and clinical levels and other tumor entities in prospective trials. (orig.)

  6. OPTIMIZING THE PLACEMENT OF A WORK-PIECE AT A MULTI-POSITION ROTARY TABLE OF TRANSFER MACHINE WITH VERTICAL MULTI-SPINDLE HEAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Guschinski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of minimizing the weight of transfer machine with a multi-position rotary table by placing of a work-piece at the table for processing of homogeneous batch of work-pieces is considered. To solve this problem the mathematical model and heuristic particle swarm optimization algorithm are proposed. The results of numerical experiments for two real problems of this type are given. The experiments revealed that the particle swarm optimization algorithm is more effective for the solution of the problem compared to the methods of random search and LP-search.

  7. Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  8. pitx2 Deficiency results in abnormal ocular and craniofacial development in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Human PITX2 mutations are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that involves ocular anterior segment defects, dental hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphism and umbilical abnormalities. Characterization of the PITX2 pathway and identification of the mechanisms underlying the anomalies associated with PITX2 deficiency is important for better understanding of normal development and disease; studies of pitx2 function in animal models can facilitate these analyses. A knockdown of pitx2 in zebrafish was generated using a morpholino that targeted all known alternative transcripts of the pitx2 gene; morphant embryos generated with the pitx2(ex4/5 splicing-blocking oligomer produced abnormal transcripts predicted to encode truncated pitx2 proteins lacking the third (recognition helix of the DNA-binding homeodomain. The morphological phenotype of pitx2(ex4/5 morphants included small head and eyes, jaw abnormalities and pericardial edema; lethality was observed at ∼6-8-dpf. Cartilage staining revealed a reduction in size and an abnormal shape/position of the elements of the mandibular and hyoid pharyngeal arches; the ceratobranchial arches were also decreased in size. Histological and marker analyses of the misshapen eyes of the pitx2(ex4/5 morphants identified anterior segment dysgenesis and disordered hyaloid vasculature. In summary, we demonstrate that pitx2 is essential for proper eye and craniofacial development in zebrafish and, therefore, that PITX2/pitx2 function is conserved in vertebrates.

  9. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  10. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.).

  11. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  12. Intra-pulp temperature increase of equine cheek teeth during treatment with motorized grinding systems: influence of grinding head position and rotational speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, Silvia; Luepke, Matthias; Seifert, Hermann; Staszyk, Carsten

    2014-02-21

    In equine practice, teeth corrections by means of motorized grinding systems are standard procedure. The heat resulting from that treatment may cause irreparable damage to the dental pulp. It has been shown that a 5.5°C temperature rise may cause severe destruction in pulp cells. Hence, the capability to continuously form secondary dentine is lost, and may lead, due to equine-typical occlusal tooth abrasion, to an opening of the pulp cavity.To obtain reliable data on the intra-pulp increase in temperature during corrective treatments, equine cheek teeth (CT) were modified in a way (occlusal surface smoothed, apical parts detached, pulp horns standardized) that had been qualified in own former published studies. All parameters influencing the grinding process were standardized (force applied, initial temperatures, dimensions of pulp horns, positioning of grinding disk, rotational speed). During grinding experiments, imitating real dental treatments, the time span for an intra-pulp temperature increase of 5.5°C was determined. The minimum time recorded for an intra-pulp temperature increase of 5.5°C was 38 s in mandibular CT (buccal grinding, 12,000 rpm) and 70 s in maxillary CT (flat occlusal grinding, 12,000 rpm). The data obtained showed that doubling the rotational speed of the disk results in halving the time span after which the critical intra-pulp temperature increase in maxillary CT is reached. For mandibular CT, the time span even drops by two thirds. The use of standardized hypsodont CT enabled comparative studies of intra-pulp heating during the grinding of occlusal tooth surfaces using different tools and techniques. The anatomical structure of the natural vital hypsodont tooth must be kept in mind, so that the findings of this study do not create a deceptive sense of security with regard to the time-dependent heating of the native pulp.

  13. SU-E-J-220: Assessment of MRI Geometric Distortion in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Scanned in Immobilized Radiation Treatment Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, C; Mohamed, A; Weygand, J; Ding, Y; Fuller, C; Frank, S; Wang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uncertainties about geometric distortion have somewhat hindered MRI simulation in radiation therapy. Most of the geometric distortion studies were performed with phantom measurements but another major aspect of MR distortion is patient related. We studied the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their MRI scans with the corresponding CT, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Ten H&N cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective IRB approved study. All patients had their treatment planning CT done on the same day or within one week of the MRI. MR Images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (1×1×2.5mm voxel size) in the same immobilization position as in the CT scans. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was done by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images by two observers. Several skin to skin (9 landmarks), bone to bone (8 landmarks), and soft tissue (3 landmarks) were measured at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Results: The mean distortion for all landmark measurements in all scans was 1.8±1.9mm. For each patient 11 measurements were done in the horizontal plane while 9 were done in the vertical plane. The measured geometric distortion were significantly lower in the horizontal axis compared to the vertical axis (1.3±0.16 mm vs 2.2±0.19 mm, respectively, P=0.003*). The magnitude of distortion was lower in the bone to bone landmarks compared to the combined soft tissue and skin to skin landmarks (1.2±0.19 mm vs 2.3±0.17 mm, P=0.0006*). The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared toobserver 2 (2.3 vs 2.4 mm, P=0.4). Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were quantified in H&N patients with mean error of less than 2 mm. JW received a corporate sponsored research grant from Elekta.

  14. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16INK4A expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan; Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim; Burfeind, Peter; Reichardt, Holger M.; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16 INK4A expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16 INK4A expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16 INK4A expression only, and patients without p16 INK4A expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16 INK4A expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16 INK4A expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16 INK4A expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [de

  15. Flued head replacement alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetters, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses flued head replacement options. Section 2 discusses complete flued head replacement with a design that eliminates the inaccessible welds. Section 3 discusses alternate flued head support designs that can drastically reduce flued head installation costs. Section 4 describes partial flued head replacement designs. Finally, Section 5 discusses flued head analysis methods. (orig./GL)

  16. Device for diagnoising abnormalities of equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiroshi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the collision energy easily and at high accuracy by applying impact shocks at known collision energy from a simulated acoustic wave generator and using the generated acoustic signal as reference data. Constitution: A plurality of acoustic detectors are attached to the surface of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. These acoustic detectors are connected respectively to an abnormality diagnosis device for equipments. Then, when metal obstacles collide against the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel, acoustic signals generated upon collision are detected by the acoustic detectors and acoustic information thus obtained from the acoustic detectors determines the colliding position of the metal obstacles by means of the abnormality diagnosis device and then the collision energy is measured. In this case, by applying impact shocks at known collision energy near the colliding position of metal obstacles determined by the abnormality diagnosis device, collision energy can be determined at a higher accuracy. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use......Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  18. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  19. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  20. Goniometer head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  1. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  3. Otolith function in patients with head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Dae; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don; Park, Ji Yun; Lee, Tae Kyung; Sung, Ki-Bum

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the otolith function of patients with head trauma, postulating that otolith dysfunction is a cause of nonspecific dizziness after head trauma. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients referred within 3 months after head trauma between March 2007 and December 2009. Pure tone audiometry, caloric testing and otolith function tests, including cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and subjective visual vertical (SVV) tests, were performed on all patients. The relationship between otolith function and otologic symptoms was analyzed. Of the 28 patients with head trauma, 18 complained of dizziness and 12 experienced hearing loss, including 6 patients who complained of both. On defining otolith dysfunction as an abnormal cVEMP or abnormal SVV, a significant difference in otolith dysfunction existed between the groups with and without dizziness [72 (13/18) vs. 20% (2/10)]. In contrast, no significant difference in otolith dysfunction was detected between the abnormal and normal hearing groups. A significant number of the patients who complained of nonspecific dizziness after trauma had abnormal otolith function. After trauma, when patients complain of dizziness, vestibular function tests, including otolith function tests, should be considered.

  4. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  5. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  6. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  7. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Umbilical cord abnormalities Umbilical cord abnormalities Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. ... blood supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where ...

  8. Further observations on the "bobble-headed doll syndrome".

    OpenAIRE

    Dell, S

    1981-01-01

    Two patients are presented with a head-bobblng "tic" classically associated with a suprasellar cyst. The first of these showed hypothalamic, neuroendocrinological and limbic abnormalities not previously described, although with a classic arachnoidal suprasellar cyst. The second of these patients showed head-bobbling behaviour during the first years of life as a manifestation of one out of many episodes of ventricular shunt obstruction. This case is therefore the first reported whose head bobb...

  9. Posture of the head and pharyngeal swallowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, O.

    1986-01-01

    Closure of the laryngeal vestibule during swallowing is important for protection of the airways. The present investigation included 53 patients with dysphagia examined cineradiographically with the head held in resting posture, flexion and extension. The ability to protect the airways by the downward movement of the epiglottis and by obliteration of the laryngeal vestibule was studied in different postures of the head. Of 35 patients with normal laryngeal obliteration with the head in resting position 10 showed a defective closure at swallowing in extension. In 18 patients with defective closure of the laryngeal vestibule in resting position 9 were improved on flexion and two on extension of the head. In one patient with defectie closure of the laryngeal vestibule in resting position swallowing in flexion showed an aggravated dysfunction. In our other patients the defective closure became more marked on extension. Four patients had less effective downward movement of the epiglottis with the head in extension. Of 10 patients with defective epiglottic movement with the head in resting position two were improved on tilting the head forwards. The results show that the position of the head influences the closure of the airways during swallowing. Patients with defective protection of the laryngeal vestibule should be instructed to swallow with the head tilted forwards. (orig.)

  10. Normal and abnormal growth plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Madewell, J.E.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Skeletal growth is a dynamic process. A knowledge of the structure and function of the normal growth plate is essential in order to understand the pathophysiology of abnormal skeletal growth in various diseases. In this well-illustrated article, the authors provide a radiographic classification of abnormal growth plates and discuss mechanisms that lead to growth plate abnormalities

  11. Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology – Current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Christoph; Herrmann, Ingo F.; Rohrbach, Saskia; Schwemmle, Cornelia; Nawka, Tadeus

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration-induced pneumonia and malnutrition. In addition, quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract, and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities. Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatricians are asked for diagnostics and therapy, and will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings. A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom-oriented treatment is necessary for these mostly complex disorders. Integration of non-medical staff such as speech therapists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over in close cooperation. In particular, an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff of intensive care medicine is essential. The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists. Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently, substitution of the physician is excluded. PMID:26770277

  12. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1992. Five abnormal occurrences are discussed in this report. One involved an extended loss of high-head safety injection capability at the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant. The other four involved medical misadministrations (three therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating a previously reported abnormal occurrence

  14. Roentgenologic abnormalities in Down's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takehiko; Russell, W J; Komatsuda, Michio; Neriishi, Shotaro

    1968-07-25

    Roentgenograms of 28 patients with Down's syndrome were reviewed with emphasis on all previously reported abnormalities and any possible additional ones. Most of the abnormalities occurred with the same frequency as previously reported, but some less frequently reported findings were also seen. One abnormal vertebral measurement found in this series may be an additional stigma of Down's syndrome. All of the 27 cases studied cytogenetically had chromosomal abnormalities consistent with this disease. This study emphasizes the need for roentgenologic norms for the Japanese, and the desirability of combining chromosome studies with roentgenological abnormalities and clinical observations in diagnosing Down's syndrome. 19 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...... care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young...... patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios...

  16. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  17. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  18. Head and neck injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing at four hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Buch, Karen; Sung, Edward; Abujudeh, Hani; Sakai, Osamu; Aaron, Sodickson; Lev, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the imaging findings of head and neck injuries in patients from the Boston Marathon bombing. A total of 115 patients from the Boston Marathon bombing presenting to four hospitals who underwent imaging to evaluate for head and neck injuries were included in the study. Twelve patients with positive findings on radiography or cross-sectional imaging were included in the final analysis. The radiographic, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of these patients were evaluated for the presence of shrapnel and morphological abnormality. Head and neck injuries were seen in 12 out of 115 patients presenting to the four hospitals. There were secondary blast injuries to the head and neck in eight patients, indicated by the presence of shrapnel on imaging. In the four patients without shrapnel, there were two with subgaleal hematomas, one with facial contusion and one with mastoid injury. There were two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, one with brain contusion, one with cerebral laceration, and one with globe rupture. There was frontal bone, nasal bone, and orbital wall fracture in one patient each. Imaging identified 26 shrapnel fragments, 21 of which were ball bearings. Injuries to the head and neck region identified on imaging from the Boston Marathon bombing were not common. The injuries seen were predominantly secondary blast injuries from shrapnel, and did not result in calvarial penetration of the shrapnel fragments.

  19. Failure Analysis of a Modern High Performance Diesel Engine Cylinder Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbin Guo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a failure analysis on a modern high performance diesel engine cylinder head made of gray cast iron. Cracks appeared intensively at the intersection of two exhaust passages in the cylinder head. The metallurgical examination was conducted in the crack origin zone and other zones. Meanwhile, the load state of the failure part of the cylinder head was determined through the Finite Element Analysis. The results showed that both the point of the maximum temperature and the point of the maximum thermal-mechanical coupling stress were not in the crack position. The excessive load was not the main cause of the failure. The large cooling rate in the casting process created an abnormal graphite zone that existed below the surface of the exhaust passage (about 1.1 mm depth, which led to the fracture of the cylinder head. In the fractured area, there were a large number of casting defects (dip sand, voids, etc. and inferior graphite structure (type D, type E which caused stress concentration. Moreover, high temperature gas entered the cracks, which caused material corrosion, material oxidization, and crack propagation. Finally, premature fracture of the cylinder head took place.

  20. An abattoir survey of equine dental abnormalities in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinkangsadarn, T; Wilson, G J; Greer, R M; Pollitt, C C; Bird, P S

    2015-06-01

    A cadaver study to estimate the prevalence of dental disorders in horses presented at an abattoir in Queensland, Australia. Cadaver heads at a Queensland abattoir were examined for the presence of dental abnormalities and categorised into age groups. The prevalence of abnormalities was analysed by binomial observation of observed proportion, Pearson's Chi-square test or Fisher's exact correlation test. Strength of association was evaluated using Cramer's V test. Heads from horses (n=400) estimated to be between 1 and 30 years of age were placed into four age groups. The most common abnormalities were sharp enamel points (55.3%) and hooks (43%). The highest frequency of dental diseases and abnormalities were in horses 11-15 years old (97.5%). Common abnormalities were found in all groups and the prevalence increased with age. This study suggests that all horses should have regular complete dental examinations to detect and treat dental disorders in order to limit more severe dental pathologies later in life. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  1. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16{sup INK4A} expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim [University Medical Center, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Burfeind, Peter [University Medical Center, Institute for Human Genetics, Goettingen (Germany); Reichardt, Holger M. [University Medical Center, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, Martin [Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16{sup INK4A} expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16{sup INK4A} expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression only, and patients without p16{sup INK4A} expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16{sup INK4A} expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16{sup INK4A} expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [German] Ein besseres Therapieansprechen von humanen Papillomavirus (HPV)-positiven Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist durch Studien belegt. Weniger Beachtung hat bisher die Relevanz unerwuenschter

  2. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  3. Prospective analysis of in vivo landmark point-based MRI geometric distortion in head and neck cancer patients scanned in immobilized radiation treatment position: Results of a prospective quality assurance protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah S.R. Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Uncertainties related to geometric distortion are a major obstacle for effectively utilizing MRI in radiation oncology. We aim to quantify the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their in-treatment position MRIs with the corresponding planning CTs, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Twenty-one head and neck cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective Institutional Review Board approved study. MR images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (0.5 × 0.5 × 2.5 mm voxel size in the same immobilization position as in the CTs. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was assessed by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images. Several landmark measurements were obtained including; skin to skin (STS, bone to bone, and soft tissue to soft tissue at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Inter-observer variability was assessed and interclass correlation (ICC was calculated. Results: A total of 430 landmark measurements were obtained. The median distortion for all landmarks in all scans was 1.06 mm (IQR 0.6–1.98. For each patient 48% of the measurements were done in the right-left direction and 52% were done in the anteroposterior direction. The measured geometric distortion was not statistically different in the right-left direction compared to the anteroposterior direction (1.5 ± 1.6 vs. 1.6 ± 1.7 mm, respectively, p = 0.4. The magnitude of distortion was higher in the STS peripheral landmarks compared to the more central landmarks (2.0 ± 1.9 vs. 1.2 ± 1.3 mm, p < 0.0001. The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared to observer 2, 3, and 4 (1.05, 1.23, 1.06 and 1.05 mm, respectively, p = 0.4 with ICC = 0.84. Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were

  4. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic head holder is a device intended to position the patient's head during a... device is also exempt from the current good manufacturing practice requirements of the quality system...

  5. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  6. Triage of HR-HPV positive women with minor cytological abnormalities: a comparison of mRNA testing, HPV DNA testing, and repeat cytology using a 4-year follow-up of a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K Miriam; Brismar Wendel, Sophia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA) to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. Liquid-based (PreservCyt) cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. Nine of 25 (36%) women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36%) women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74%) women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100%) and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8%) groups, although specificity was insufficient (cytology were more specific than APTIMA. The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL.

  7. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  8. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  9. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  10. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  11. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Takeshi; Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Itai, Yuji; Iio, Masahiro; Mitamura, Tadayuki

    1990-01-01

    T1-weighted MR images of thirty-six hips in 25 patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head were obtained two to five times during the course of 2 to 26 months. We investigated these MR images in the light of the chronological change and compared them with plain radiographs. MR images changes in 16 femoral head; in general, the abnormal low intensity area in the femoral head reduced in extent and the internal high intensity area became smaller of disappeared. Thirteen femoral heads among them became more flattened on plain radiographs in the same period. It is noted that four different zones are defined in the femoral head after bone necrosis takes place: the dead bone marrow, the dead marrow which still contains fat, the reactive interface and the hyperemic bone marrow. In T1-weighted MR images, the dead bone marrow, the reactive interface and the hyperemic bone marrow are demonstrated as low intensity area, while the dead marrow containing fat may remain high in intensity. On the basis of this knowledge of histopathology and MR images of this disease, we suggest that reduction of the abnormal low intensity area and disappearance of the internal high intensity area on MR images can be regarded as diminution of hyperemia in the living bone marrow and loss of fat in the dead bone marrow, respectively. (author)

  12. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  13. Bird-Headed Dwarf of Seckel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Vardhan B

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is an extremely rare inherited disorder characterized by growth delays prior to birth resulting in low birth weight. Growth delays continue after birth resulting in short stature (dwarfism. This syndrome is associated with an abnormally small head, varying degrees of mental retardation and unusual "beak like" protrusion of nose. Other facial features may include abnormally large eyes, a narrow face, malformed ears and an unusually small jaw. This syndrome has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. A case of the Seckel syndrome is presented.

  14. Investigating the persistence of earnings components and pricing test of abnormal changes in cash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Ahmadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the persistence of earnings components and pricing test of abnormal changes in cash for selected firms listed on Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE. The proposed study gathers the necessary data from 166 firms over the period 2004-2012 from firms whose shares were actively traded on TSE market. The study uses Panel data and with the implementation of linear regression technique examines four hypotheses. The results indicate that abnormal negative changes in cash are more persistence than positive abnormal changes. In addition, both positive and negative abnormal changes are more persistence than accruals. Market also has a good perception on abnormal positive and negative changes in cash.

  15. Head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  16. Lung volumes and emphysema in smokers with interstitial lung abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washko, George R; Hunninghake, Gary M; Fernandez, Isis E; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Ross, James C; Estépar, Raúl San José; Lynch, David A; Brehm, John M; Andriole, Katherine P; Diaz, Alejandro A; Khorasani, Ramin; D'Aco, Katherine; Sciurba, Frank C; Silverman, Edwin K; Hatabu, Hiroto; Rosas, Ivan O

    2011-03-10

    Cigarette smoking is associated with emphysema and radiographic interstitial lung abnormalities. The degree to which interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with reduced total lung capacity and the extent of emphysema is not known. We looked for interstitial lung abnormalities in 2416 (96%) of 2508 high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) scans of the lung obtained from a cohort of smokers. We used linear and logistic regression to evaluate the associations between interstitial lung abnormalities and HRCT measurements of total lung capacity and emphysema. Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 194 (8%) of the 2416 HRCT scans evaluated. In statistical models adjusting for relevant covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with reduced total lung capacity (-0.444 liters; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.596 to -0.292; Ppulmonary disease (COPD) (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.76; P<0.001). The effect of interstitial lung abnormalities on total lung capacity and emphysema was dependent on COPD status (P<0.02 for the interactions). Interstitial lung abnormalities were positively associated with both greater exposure to tobacco smoke and current smoking. In smokers, interstitial lung abnormalities--which were present on about 1 of every 12 HRCT scans--were associated with reduced total lung capacity and a lesser amount of emphysema. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Parker B. Francis Foundation; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00608764.).

  17. MRI for early diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Itai, Yuji; Iio, Masahiro; Mitamura, Tadayuki

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in forty patients on long-term oral steroid therapy for early detection of avascular necrosis (AN) of the femoral head. In 13 patients, AN was diagnosed in the unilateral femoral head from abnormal plain radiographs while the contralateral femoral head was normal radiographically. In the other 27 patients, radiographs were normal. A total of 67 femoral heads with normal radiographs is studied in this paper. In 36 of 67 femoral heads (54 %), MRI demonstrated abnormal low intensity area. The abnormal findings on MRI were divided into five patterns: whole type (type A), peripheral type (type B), ring or band type (type C), small change type (type D) and distal type (type E). Type A, B, C, D and E were found in 2, 11, 5, 16 and 2 femoral heads, respectively. In cases to be followed up over 6 months, AN was manifested radiographically in 4 femoral heads of 5 in type C and in one of 14 in type D. Meanwhile, in 6 of 41 femoral heads examined (15 %), bone scintigrams was abnormal. Followed-up study over 6 months revealed that AN was manifested radiographically in one femoral head of 6 with abnormal scintigram. However, in 4 of 30 with normal scintigram, AN was manifested subsequently. MRI was a better diagnostic modality for early AN. Ring or band-like low intensity (type C) on MRI was considered to be characteristic pattern of early AN. (author)

  18. MRI for early diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Itai, Yuji; Iio, Masahiro; Mitamura, Tadayuki

    1988-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in forty patients on long-term oral steroid therapy for early detection of avascular necrosis (AN) of the femoral head. In 13 patients, AN was diagnosed in the unilateral femoral head from abnormal plain radiographs while the contralateral femoral head was normal radiographically. In the other 27 patients, radiographs were normal. A total of 67 femoral heads with normal radiographs is studied in this paper. In 36 of 67 femoral heads (54 %), MRI demonstrated abnormal low intensity area. The abnormal findings on MRI were divided into five patterns: whole type (type A), peripheral type (type B), ring or band type (type C), small change type (type D) and distal type (type E). Type A, B, C, D and E were found in 2, 11, 5, 16 and 2 femoral heads, respectively. In cases to be followed up over 6 months, AN was manifested radiographically in 4 femoral heads of 5 in type C and in one of 14 in type D. Meanwhile, in 6 of 41 femoral heads examined (15 %), bone scintigrams was abnormal. Followed-up study over 6 months revealed that AN was manifested radiographically in one femoral head of 6 with abnormal scintigram. However, in 4 of 30 with normal scintigram, AN was manifested subsequently. MRI was a better diagnostic modality for early AN. Ring or band-like low intensity (type C) on MRI was considered to be characteristic pattern of early AN.

  19. Heidbreder to head Office of Legal Counsel

    OpenAIRE

    Hincker, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Kay Heidbreder of Blacksburg, has been appointed University Counsel by the Virginia Attorney General and will head the university's legal office. Heidbreder, who holds the position of assistant attorney general, has been associate general counsel at Virginia Tech since 1985.

  20. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation with methadone and benzodiazepines.

  1. HEAD MOVEMENT DURING WALKING IN THE CAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZUBAIR, HUMZA N.; BELOOZEROVA, IRINA N.; SUN, HAI; MARLINSKI, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20–90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40–90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ~1.5 cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ~3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ~1 cm and 1.5–3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10–30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5–1 m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ~0.05 and ~0.1 m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ~0.05 m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20–50 °/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3–0.5 cm taller and held their head 0.5–2 cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25–100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ~20 °/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role. PMID:27339731

  2. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franquet, T.; Gimenez, A.; Alegret, X.; Sanchis, E.; Rivas, A.

    1997-01-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  3. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Position detectors, methods of detecting position, and methods of providing positional detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David M.; Harding, L. Dean; Larsen, Eric D.

    2002-01-01

    Position detectors, welding system position detectors, methods of detecting various positions, and methods of providing position detectors are described. In one embodiment, a welding system positional detector includes a base that is configured to engage and be moved along a curved surface of a welding work piece. At least one position detection apparatus is provided and is connected with the base and configured to measure angular position of the detector relative to a reference vector. In another embodiment, a welding system positional detector includes a weld head and at least one inclinometer mounted on the weld head. The one inclinometer is configured to develop positional data relative to a reference vector and the position of the weld head on a non-planar weldable work piece.

  5. White matter abnormalities in gene-positive myoclonus-dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Johan N.; Beukers, Richard J.; van der Salm, S. M. A.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2012-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia is an autosomal dominantly inherited movement disorder clinically characterized by myoclonic jerks and dystonic movements of the upper body. Functional imaging and structural gray matter imaging studies in M-D suggest defective sensorimotor integration and an association between

  6. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a patient's...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures. (b...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ... necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations ...

  9. Infrared Non-Contact Head Sensor for Control of Wheelchair Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Vie; Garcia, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new human-machine interface for controlling a wheelchair by head movements. The position of the head is determined by use of infrared sensors, with no parts attached to the head of the user. The placement of the infrared sensors are behind the head of the user, so that the f......This paper presents a new human-machine interface for controlling a wheelchair by head movements. The position of the head is determined by use of infrared sensors, with no parts attached to the head of the user. The placement of the infrared sensors are behind the head of the user, so...

  10. An in vivo evaluation of induction of abnormal sperm morphology by ivermectin MSD (Mectizan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otubanjo, O A; Mosuro, A A; Ladipo, T F

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo effects of orally administered ivermectin (Mectizan) on sperm head morphology of albino mice were evaluated. Four different dose levels of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 x the human therapeutic dose of 150 g kg(-1) body weight, were administered to the animals. The animals were exposed to a single oral treatment. The sperm of the mice from the cauda epididymes were examined 5 and 7 weeks after treatment. Ivermectin (Mectizan) induced sperm head abnormalities; however, the induction was not significantly elevated above the negative control value. Furthermore, the induction of the sperm head abnormalities was not strictly dose-dependent and there was also no correlation between dose level of administered drug and incidence of abnormal sperms. This indicates that the drug might not be mutagenic.

  11. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, F.; Eder, V.; Pottier, J.M.; Baulieu, J.L.; Fournier, P.; Legros, B.; Chiaroni, P.; Dalonneau, M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  12. Head injury - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other ... aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  17. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  18. Abnormal biodistribution of radiogallium in persons treated with phenytoin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.; Starreveld, Elout; Catz, Zolly; Penney, Heather; Turner, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    After incidentally observing a patient in whom abnormal uptake of gallium-67 citrate appeared to be explained by treatment with phenytoin, we have conducted a prospective study. Of sixteen persons with a seizure disorder treated with phenytoin, five (31 percent) had abnormal uptake of radiogallium either in the mediastinum, pulmonary hilum or both. Of nineteen historical control patients only one had such abnormal uptake. Phenytoin may thus cause the false-positive uptake of radiogallium in lymph nodes; this finding may also prove to have nosological importance in identifying patients at particular risk of the side-effects of this drug

  19. Sperm ultrastructure, morphometry, and abnormal morphology in American black bears (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, L F C; Sertich, P L; Stull, G B; Rives, W; Knobbe, M

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe sperm ultrastructure, morphometry, and abnormal morphology in American black bears. Electroejaculation was successful in 53.8% (7/13) of the attempts, but urine contamination was common. Epididymal sperm samples were also obtained from five bears. Sperm had a paddle-like head shape and the ultrastructure was similar to that of most other mammals. The most striking particularity of black bear sperm ultrastructure was a tightening of the nucleus in the equatorial region. Although the differences were not significant in all bears, the overall decrease in sperm nucleus dimensions during transport from the caput epididymis to the cauda suggested increasing compaction of the nucleus during maturation. For ejaculated sperm, nucleus length, width, and base width were 4.9, 3.7, and 1.8 μm, respectively, whereas sperm head length, width, and base width were 6.6, 4.8, and 2.3 μm, and midpiece, tail (including midpiece), and total sperm lengths were 9.8, 68.8, and 75.3 μm. Evaluation of sperm cytoplasmic droplets in the epididymis revealed that proximal droplets start migrating toward a distal position in the caput epididymis and that the process was mostly completed by the time sperm reached the cauda epididymis. The proportion of morphologically normal sperm in the ejaculate was 35.6%; the most prevalent sperm defects were distal cytoplasmic droplets and bent/coiled tails. The morphology of abnormal sperm and the underlying ultrastructural defects were similar to that in other large domestic animals thus suggesting similar underlying pathogenesis of specific sperm defects and similar effects on fertility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  1. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  2. Non‐invasive prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non‐invasive prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities using circulating cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma: Current applications, limitations and ... fetal DNAtesting is a matter of concern, because of the low positive predictive value for these changes, and the associated significant cumulative false-positive rate.

  3. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  4. CT of the neonatal head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S.; Rogan, E.A.; Batty, R.; Raghavan, A.; Whitby, E.H.; Hart, A.R.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used less often than other techniques on neonatal units. However, in the acute setting, CT can be invaluable in diagnosing or excluding potentially life-threatening conditions and guiding initial management in neonates. Common indications for scanning include trauma, suspected non-accidental injury, infection, or an acute hypoxic or metabolic event. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the normal neonatal head at CT and compare this to the common pathological abnormalities. Several key features of each condition will be highlighted. It is important to note that some pathological conditions can have overlapping features at CT and, therefore, the clinical history and additional investigations are also of key importance in determining the diagnosis

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  6. Effects of Soccer Heading on Brain Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Carolina; Lasmar, Rodrigo Pace; Caramelli, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with more than 265 million players worldwide, including professional and amateur ones. Soccer is unique in comparison to other sports, as it is the only sport in which participants purposely use their head to hit the ball. Heading is considered as an offensive or defensive move whereby the player’s unprotected head is used to deliberately impact the ball and direct it during play. A soccer player can be subjected to an average of 6–12 incidents of heading the ball per competitive game, where the ball reaches high velocities. Moreover, in practice sessions, heading training, which involves heading the ball repeatedly at low velocities, is common. Although the scientific community, as well as the media, has focused on the effects of concussions in contact sports, the role of subconcussive impacts, as it can occur during heading, has recently gained attention, considering that it may represent an additional mechanism of cumulative brain injury. The purpose of this study is to review the existing literature regarding the effects of soccer heading on brain structure and function. Only in the last years, some investigations have addressed the impact of heading on brain structure, by using neuroimaging techniques. Similarly, there have been some recent studies investigating biochemical markers of brain injury in soccer players. There is evidence of association between heading and abnormal brain structure, but the data are still preliminary. Also, some studies have suggested that subconcussive head impacts, as heading, could cause cognitive impairment, whereas others have not corroborated this finding. Questions persist as to whether or not heading is deleterious to cognitive functioning. Further studies, especially with longitudinal designs, are needed to clarify the clinical significance of heading as a cause of brain injury and to identify risk factors. Such investigations might contribute to the establishment of safety

  7. Effects of soccer heading on brain structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Oliveira Rodrigues

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with more than 265 million players worldwide, including professional and amateur ones. Soccer is unique in comparison to other sports, as it is the only sport in which participants purposely use their head to hit the ball. Heading is considered an offensive or defensive move whereby the player’s unprotected head is used to deliberately impact the ball and direct it during play. A soccer player can be subjected to an average of six to twelve incidents of heading the ball per competitive game, where the ball reaches high velocities. Moreover, in practice sessions, heading training, which involves heading the ball repeatedly at low velocities, is common. Although the scientific community, as well as the media, has focused on the effects of concussions in contact sports, the role of subconcussive impacts, as it can occur during heading, has recently gained attention, considering that it may represent an additional mechanism of cumulative brain injury. The purpose of this study is to review the existing literature regarding the effects of soccer heading on brain structure and function. Only in the last years some investigations have addressed the impact of heading on brain structure, by using neuroimaging techniques. Similarly, there have been some recent studies investigating biochemical markers of brain injury in soccer players. There is evidence of association between heading and abnormal brain structure, but the data are still preliminary. Also, some studies have suggested that subconcussive head impacts, as heading, could cause cognitive impairment, whereas others have not corroborated this finding. Questions persist as to whether or not heading is deleterious to cognitive functioning. Further studies, especially with longitudinal designs, are needed to clarify the clinical significance of heading as a cause of brain injury and to identify risk factors. Such investigations might contribute to the

  8. Detection of radiation-induced genetic damage using sperm abnormality assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazume, Masayuki; Okamoto, Masanori; Nakai, Sayaka

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative experiment on radiation-induced sperm abnormalities was made with mice, golden hamsters, and crab-eating monkeys. Sperm sites showing morphological abnormalities following irradiation were divided into head, neck, head plus neck, and others (including middle piece and tail). Local x-ray irradiation (200 KVp at a rate of 30 rad min) to the testes was undertaken in mice and golden hamsters, and local gamma-ray irradiation ( 137 Cs at a rate of 30 rad min) to the testes were undertaken in crab-eating monkeys. The head and neck were sensitive to radiation, showing morphological abnormalities. The number of abnormal sperms reached the peak at 5 - 6 wk after irradiation in mice and golden hamsters; at 6 wk with 300 rad and at 8 wk with 100 and 200 rad in crab-eating monkeys. Doubling doses for sperm abnormalities were 30 rad in mice and approximately 50 rad in golden hamsters. The dose-response curves on sperm abnormalities in crab-eating monkeys approximated to those in golden hamsters. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Diagnostic value of an abnormal smear in non-pregnant women. Evaluation of positive smear from the surface of the portio obtained by the cottonswab method or by the dry wooden Ayre spatula and the relevance of positive smear from the endocervix and/or from the surface of the portio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, L; Højgaard, L L; Højgaard, K

    1990-01-01

    During a 3-4 year period, 324 women with a positive smear were registered consecutively and prospectively and divided into two groups according to the design of the investigation. In one group the smear was taken with an Ayre spatula and in the other group with a cotton swab. The purpose of this ...

  10. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  11. Abnormalities of hippocampal signal intensity in patients with familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coan A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is associated with hippocampal atrophy and hippocampal signal abnormalities. In our series of familial MTLE (FMTLE, we found a high proportion of hippocampal abnormalities. To quantify signal abnormalities in patients with FMTLE we studied 152 individuals (46 of them asymptomatic with FMTLE. We used NIH-Image® for volumetry and signal quantification in coronal T1 inversion recovery and T2 for all cross-sections of the hippocampus. Values diverging by 2 or more SD from the control mean were considered abnormal. T2 hippocampal signal abnormalities were found in 52% of all individuals: 54% of affected subjects and 48% of asymptomatic subjects. T1 hippocampal signal changes were found in 34% of all individuals: 42.5% of affected subjects and 15% of asymptomatic subjects. Analysis of the hippocampal head (first three slices revealed T2 abnormalities in 73% of all individuals (74% of affected subjects and 72% of asymptomatic subjects and T1 abnormalities in 59% (67% of affected subjects and 41% of asymptomatic subjects. Affected individuals had smaller volumes than controls (P < 0.0001. There was no difference in hippocampal volumes between asymptomatic subjects and controls, although 39% of asymptomatic patients had hippocampal atrophy. Patients with an abnormal hippocampal signal (133 individuals had smaller ipsilateral volume, but no linear correlation could be determined. Hippocampal signal abnormalities in FMTLE were more frequently found in the hippocampal head in both affected and asymptomatic family members, including those with normal volumes. These results indicate that subtle abnormalities leading to an abnormal hippocampal signal in FMTLE are not necessarily related to seizures and may be determined by genetic factors.

  12. Head impact in a snowboarding accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, N; Llari, M; Donnadieu, T; Masson, C; Arnoux, P J

    2017-09-01

    To effectively prevent sport traumatic brain injury (TBI), means of protection need to be designed and tested in relation to the reality of head impact. This study quantifies head impacts during a typical snowboarding accident to evaluate helmet standards. A snowboarder numerical model was proposed, validated against experimental data, and used to quantify the influence of accident conditions (speed, snow stiffness, morphology, and position) on head impacts (locations, velocities, and accelerations) and injury risk during snowboarding backward falls. Three hundred twenty-four scenarios were simulated: 70% presented a high risk of mild TBI (head peak acceleration >80 g) and 15% presented a high risk of severe TBI (head injury criterion >1000). Snow stiffness, speed, and snowboarder morphology were the main factors influencing head impact metrics. Mean normal head impact speed (28 ± 6 km/h) was higher than equivalent impact speed used in American standard helmet test (ASTM F2040), and mean tangential impact speed, not included in standard tests, was 13.8 (±7 km/h). In 97% of simulated impacts, the peak head acceleration was below 300 g, which is the pass/fail criteria used in standard tests. Results suggest that initial speed, impacted surface, and pass/fail criteria used in helmet standard performance tests do not fully reflect magnitude and variability of snowboarding backward-fall impacts. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Shielding of the child's head during x-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmach, Eh.U.

    1985-01-01

    Three devices for X-ray shielding of child's head are suggested; the first one is a protective attachment for shielding a child being in horizontal position on an X-ray table; the second one is a protective stand for shielding head and body at roentgenofraphy of upper extremities of a child sitting near the X-ray table; the third one is a prot ctive suspension for shielding the head of a child being in vertical position

  14. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... His height. mass. intelligence and genitalia were normal. The aSSOCiatIOn between deafness and disturbance of cardiac conduction and between pigmented skin lesions and cardiac abnormalities, has been well described. Should. ~I patient present with multiple lentigines and/or familial sensineural ...

  15. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  16. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  17. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  18. An analysis of true- and false-positive results of vocal fold uptake in positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, N; Burkill, G; Harries, M

    2018-03-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose has a major role in the investigation of head and neck cancers. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose is not a tumour-specific tracer and can also accumulate in benign pathology. Therefore, positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan interpretation difficulties are common in the head and neck, which can produce false-positive results. This study aimed to investigate patients detected as having abnormal vocal fold uptake on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were identified over a 15-month period where reports contained evidence of unilateral vocal fold uptake or vocal fold pathology. Patients' notes and laryngoscopy results were analysed. Forty-six patients were identified as having abnormal vocal fold uptake on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Twenty-three patients underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography and flexible laryngoscopy: 61 per cent of patients had true-positive positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans and 39 per cent had false-positive scan results. Most patients referred to ENT for abnormal findings on positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans had true-positive findings. Asymmetrical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose uptake should raise suspicion of vocal fold pathology, accepting a false-positive rate of approximately 40 per cent.

  19. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  20. Spin Transfer in Polymer Degradation of Abnormal Linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianrong; Tian, Chuanjin; Liu, Xizhe; Wang, Jia; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-07-01

    The degradation of polymer materials plays an important role in production and life. In this work, the degradation mechanism of poly-α-methylstyrene (PAMS) tetramers with abnormal linkage was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). Calculated results indicate that the head-to-head and the tail-to-tail reactions needed to overcome the energy barriers are about 0.15 eV and about 1.26 eV, respectively. The broken C-C bond at the unsaturated end of the chain leads to the dissociation of alpha-methylstyrene (AMS) monomers one by one. Furthermore, the analyses of bond characteristics are in good agreement with the results of energy barriers. In addition, the spin population analysis presents an interesting net spin transfer process in depolymerization reactions. We hope that the current theoretical results provide useful help to understand the degradation mechanism of polymers.

  1. Thyroid abnormality secondary to tortuous carotid artery. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, R.T.; Siddiqui, A.R.

    1986-05-01

    A 59-year-old man was referred to the nuclear medicine service for a thyroid scan, as his neck was thick and the thyroid was not palpable. In the past the patient had undergone head and neck irradiation for acne. A /sup 123/I-thyroid scan was interpreted as a ''cold'' nodule in the lower pole of the right lobe, but thyroid ultrasound showed no thyroid abnormality. Repeat ultrasound examination eventually showed a tortuous carotid artery behind the lower pole of the right lobe of the thyroid that corresponded to the ''cold'' defect.

  2. Diagnostic efficacy and pitfalls of a 64-raw multislice computed tomography scan for mild head injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Uozumi, Youichi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the usefulness of 64-raw multislice computed tomography (CT) scans and bone images of three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) scans for evaluation of mild head injuries in children. Thirteen children (9 boys and 4 girls, less than or equal to 15 years old) with mild head injury were included in the study. Head CT scans obtained within 24 hours after injury. All children had no episodes of loss of consciousness, amnesia, epilepsy, vomiting, and no neurological abnormality on arrival at hospital. We detected 9 positive findings on CT scans, which looked like fracture lines at the frontal bone in 7 cases. The bone images of CT axial views revealed a true fracture in one case in which a skull X-ray could not demonstrate a fracture line, but, other positive findings turned out to be a diploic vein surrounded by a thin bone cortex. All false positive findings were detected in the patients under the age of 6. By the 3D-reconstructive CT scan, it is easier to detect not only the intracranial lesions but also the cranial fracture. But, the diploic vein is apt to be misdiagnosed as the fracture line, especially in patients under the age of 6. (author)

  3. Non-invasive head fixation for external irradiation of tumors of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, R.J.; Sweeney, R.; Nevinny, M.; Auer, T.; Bluhm, A.; Lukas, P.; Vogele, M.; Thumfart, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To fully utilize the technical capabilities of radiation diagnostics and planning, a precise and reproducible method of head fixation is a prerequisite. Method: We have adapted the Vogele-Bale-Hohner (VBH) head holder (Wellhoefer Dosimetrie, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), originally designed for frameless stereotactic operations, to the requirements of external beam radiotherapy. A precise and reproducible head fixation is attained by an individualized vacuum upper-dental cast which is connected over 2 hydraulic arms to an adjustable head- and rigid base-plate. Radiation field and patient alignment lasers are marked on a relocatable clear PVC localization box. Results: The possibility of craniocaudal adjustment of the head plate on the base plate allows the system to adapt to the actucal position of the patient on the raditherapy couch granting tensionless repositioning. The VBH head holder has proven itself to be a precise yet practicable method of head fixation. Duration of mouthpiece production and daily repositioning is comparable to that of the thermoplastic mask. Conclusion: The new head holder is in routine use at our hospital and quite suitable for external beam radiation of patients with tumors of the head and neck. (orig.) [de

  4. MR imaging of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Wan; Cho, Won Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Hae Kyung; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    We evaluated the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of femoral heads in 20 normal and 45 abnormal patients. The bone marrow in the healthy adults consisted of a combination of hematopoietic and fatty marrow, which showed age-related dirtribation, that is the component of fatty marrow was increased and the marrow vascularity was decreased with age. Avascular necrosis (AVN) showed a decreased bone marrow signal within an normal appearing femoral head on T1 and T2 -weighted images. In addition, we could see inhomogeneous low signal intensive (31 cases), a ring of low intensive with central normal signal intensity (25 cases), focal low signal intensity (12 case), or a band of low signal intensity (4 cases). MRI findings were abnormal in 10 cases with normal radiographic findings as well as in all the cases with abnormal ones. In conclusion, MRI should be the choice of the imaging modality for the evaluation of early bone marrow changes of AVN.

  5. MR imaging of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Wan; Cho, Won Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Hae Kyung; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of femoral heads in 20 normal and 45 abnormal patients. The bone marrow in the healthy adults consisted of a combination of hematopoietic and fatty marrow, which showed age-related dirtribation, that is the component of fatty marrow was increased and the marrow vascularity was decreased with age. Avascular necrosis (AVN) showed a decreased bone marrow signal within an normal appearing femoral head on T1 and T2 -weighted images. In addition, we could see inhomogeneous low signal intensive (31 cases), a ring of low intensive with central normal signal intensity (25 cases), focal low signal intensity (12 case), or a band of low signal intensity (4 cases). MRI findings were abnormal in 10 cases with normal radiographic findings as well as in all the cases with abnormal ones. In conclusion, MRI should be the choice of the imaging modality for the evaluation of early bone marrow changes of AVN

  6. A Pilot Study of Abnormal Growth in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Peters, Cindy T. R.; Oosterling, Iris J.; Visser, Janne C.; Bons, Danielle; van Steijn, Daphne J.; Draaisma, Jos; van der Gaag, Rutger-Jan; Buitelaar, Jan. K.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine whether early growth abnormalities are (a) comparable in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other childhood psychiatric disorders, and (b) specific to the brain or generalized to the whole body. Head circumference, height, and weight were measured during the first 19 months of life in 129 children…

  7. A Systematic Review of the Usefulness of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein for Predicting Acute Intracranial Lesions following Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu M. Luoto

    2017-12-01

    .ConclusionIntracranial CT-positive trauma lesions were associated with elevated GFAP levels in the majority of studies. Methodological heterogeneity in GFAP assessments and the lack of well-designed diagnostic studies with commercially validated GFAP platforms hinder the level of evidence, and variability in levels of GFAP with no clearly established cutoff for abnormality limit the clinical usefulness of the biomarker. However, blood-based GFAP holds promise as a means of screening for acute traumatic CT-positive lesion following head trauma.

  8. Effect of head restraint backset on head-neck kinematics in whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2006-03-01

    Although head restraints were introduced in the 1960s as a countermeasure for whiplash, their limited effectiveness has been attributed to incorrect positioning. The effect of backset on cervical segmental angulations, which were previously correlated with spinal injury, has not been delineated. Therefore, the practical restraint position to minimize injury remains unclear. A parametric study of increasing head restraint backset between 0 and 140mm was conducted using a comprehensively validated computational model. Head retraction values increased with increasing backset, reaching a maximum value of 53.5mm for backsets greater than 60mm. Segmental angulation magnitudes, greatest at levels C5-C6 and C6-C7, reached maximum values during the retraction phase and increased with increasing backset. Results were compared to a previously published head restraint rating system, wherein lower cervical extension magnitudes from this study exceeded mean physiologic limits for restraint positions rated good, acceptable, marginal, and poor. As head restraint contact was the limiting factor in head retraction and segmental angulations, the present study indicates that minimizing whiplash injury may be accomplished by limiting head restraint backset to less than 60mm either passively or actively after impact.

  9. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined

  10. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodulfo Garcia, Maikel; Tornes Perez, Victor Manuel; Castellanos Tardo, Juan Ramon

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  13. Goldenhar syndrome and urogenital abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Marulaiah

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Goldenhar syndrome (oculo-auriculo-vertebral syn-drome or 1st and 2nd branchial arch syndrome is a com-plex of craniofacial anomalies. It has been associated with anomalies in other systems and with abnormalities of the urogenital system. We present a case of Goldenhar syn-drome with multiple renal anomalies and a urogenital si-nus, which has not been reported before.

  14. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  15. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  16. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis. (orig.)

  17. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  18. Unilateral otolith centrifugation by head tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Stephanie M; Bos, Jelte E; Klis, Sjaak F L

    2014-01-01

    To test for otolith asymmetries, several studies described horizontal translation of the body and head en bloc during fast vertical axis rotation. This stimulus causes one otolithic organ to rotate on-axis, and the other to experience centripetal acceleration. To test a new, more simple method of unilateral stimulation with head tilt and the body remaining on axis. During stationary and during 360 deg/s rotation, 12 healthy blindfolded subjects had their heads tilted 30 degrees sideways, positioning one otolithic organ on the axis of rotation after the other. The haptic subjective vertical (SV) was recorded several times by means of a manually adjustable rod. It was found that during stationary the SV tilted about 4 degrees on average in the direction of the head. During rotation, the SV tilted about 9 degrees on average. We therefore estimate the effect of eccentric otolith rotation to be 5 degrees on average. Tilt of the subjective vertical induced by head tilt during on-axis body rotation can provide a relatively uncomplicated alternative to test unilateral otolithic function as compared to body and head translation during rotation. Moreover, unlike eccentric rotation of the entire body, somatosensory cues are minimized by keeping the body fixed on axis and by subtracting the effect of head tilt per se.

  19. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  20. Hemostatic abnormalities in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artoni, Andrea; Selicorni, Angelo; Passamonti, Serena M; Lecchi, Anna; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Cerutti, Marta; Cianci, Paola; Gianniello, Francesca; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-05-01

    A bleeding diathesis is a common feature of Noonan syndrome, and various coagulation abnormalities have been reported. Platelet function has never been carefully investigated. The degree of bleeding diathesis in a cohort of patients with Noonan syndrome was evaluated by a validated bleeding score and investigated with coagulation and platelet function tests. If ratios of prothrombin time and/or activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, the activity of clotting factors was measured. Individuals with no history of bleeding formed the control group. The study population included 39 patients and 28 controls. Bleeding score was ≥2 (ie, suggestive of a moderate bleeding diathesis) in 15 patients (38.5%) and ≥4 (ie, suggestive of a severe bleeding diathesis) in 7 (17.9%). Abnormal coagulation and/or platelet function tests were found in 14 patients with bleeding score ≥2 (93.3%) but also in 21 (87.5%) of those with bleeding score Noonan syndrome had a bleeding diathesis and >90% of them had platelet function and/or coagulation abnormalities. Results of these tests should be taken into account in the management of bleeding or invasive procedures in these patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Reactor head shielding apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukei, G.E.; Roebelen, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor head shielding apparatus for mounting on spaced reactor head lifting members radially inwardly of the head bolts. It comprises a frame of sections for mounting on the lifting members and extending around the top central area of the head, mounting means for so mounting the frame sections, including downwardly projecting members on the frame sections and complementary upwardly open recessed members for fastening to the lifting members for receiving the downwardly projecting members when the frame sections are lowered thereto with lead shielding supported thereby on means for hanging lead shielding on the frame to minimize radiation exposure or personnel working with the head bolts or in the vicinity thereof

  2. Leadership styles in ethical dilemmas when head nurses make decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydziunaite, V; Lepaite, D; Suominen, T

    2013-06-01

    The overlooked aspect in Lithuania is the dearth of leaders among head nurses, who bear the responsibility for decisions in ethical dilemmas. Understanding the application of leadership styles is fundamental to ensuring head nurses' abilities to influence outcomes for healthcare providers and patients. To identify the leadership styles applied by head nurses in decision making in ethical dilemmas on hospital wards. The data were collected by questionnaires completed by head nurses (n = 278) working in five major state-funded hospitals in each of the five regions of Lithuania. The data were analysed using SPSS 16.0, calculating descriptive statistics and analysis of variance. Head nurses apply democratic, affiliative, transformational and sustainable leadership styles when resolving ethical dilemmas. The application of leadership styles is associated not only with specific situations, but also with certain background factors, such as years of experience in a head nurse's position, ward specialization and the incidence of ethical dilemmas. Nurses having been in a head nurse's position over 10 years use primitive leadership styles, notably bureaucratic leadership, more often than do those head nurses with only a few years of experience in such a position. The results highlight the need for head nurses to reflect on their practices and to find new ways of learning from practice, colleagues and patients. Head nurses' managerial decisions due to their 'executive power' can turn into a new state-of-the-art leadership in nursing. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Right thalamic infarction after closed head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Takashi; Doi, Terushige; Katsumata, Tsuguo; Kuwayama, Naoto

    1986-01-01

    We reported a case of right thalamic infarction after a closed head injury. A 12-year-old boy was hit by an autotruck. He was semi-comatose, with left temporal scalp swelling and excoriation in the left lower limb. Three days after the accident, he exhibited left hemiparesis. CT scans on the day of the accident showed no abnormality, but on the following day, right thalamic infarction appeared. Right carotid angiography showed only an irregular vascular shadow in the cisternal segment of the right internal carotid artery. Vascular obstruction after closed head injury is rare, especially in the intracranial vessels, and several pathogeneses may be postulated. The right thalamic infarction in this case was supposed to be due to the damage of the perforators from the right posterior communicating artery and the right posterior cerebral artery, which were struck as a contre-coup by the force from the left side. (author)

  4. Special report on abnormal climate in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    This reports on abnormal climate in 2010 with impact on the each field. It is comprised of four chapters, which deal with Introduction with purpose of publish and background, current situation and cause of abnormal climate in 2010 on abnormal climate around the world and Korea, Action and impact against abnormal climate in 2010 to agriculture, industry and energy, prevention of disasters, forest, fishery products, environment and health, Evaluation and policy proposal. It also has an appendix about occurrence and damage on abnormal climate of the world in 2010 and media reports on abnormal climate in Korea in 2010.

  5. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Nguyen Nguyen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  6. Abnormal peri-operative haemorrhage in asymptomatic patients is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accordingly, we undertook two studies to detertnine whether it could be justified in patients without a history of abnormal bleeding. In the first of these, 45 of 159 patients were excluded because of aspirin ingestion and a further 3 because of positive bleeding history so that prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin ...

  7. MRI of Neurosyphilis Presenting as Mesiotemporal Abnormalities: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yu Mi; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University, Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    The high signal intensities in bilateral mesiotemporal lobes on T2-weighted images are typical findings of herpes encephalitis or paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. We report a case of neurosyphilis with mesiotemporal involvement on MRI. Positive antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when MRI results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities.

  8. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  9. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B.; Dias, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  10. Cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundley, Kshama; Chowdhury, D.; Lele, V.R.; Lele, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Twelve human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients were studied by SPECT cerebral perfusion imaging 1 hour post injection of 15 mCi of 99m Tc-ECD under ideal conditions with a triple head gamma camera (Prism 3000 X P LEUHR), fanbeam collimators followed by Folstein Mini Mental Status Examination (FMMSE) and AIDS dementia complex (ADC) staging on the same day. All 12 patients were male, in the age range of 23-45 y (mean 31 y). The infected status was diagnosed by ELISA (10 patients) or Western blot (5 patients). The interval between diagnosis and imaging ranged from 1 month - 35 months (mean 15.3 months). Two patients were alcoholic and 2 were smokers. None of them had CNS disorder clinically. ADC staging and FMMSE could be performed in 4 patients. Two patients were normal (stage 0) and 2 were subclinical (stage 0.5) on ADC staging. FMMSE revealed normal or near normal status (mean score 35; maximum score 36). Cerebral perfusion images were interpreted simultaneously by 3 observers blind towards history and examination using semi-quantitative and quantitative methods by consensus. It revealed multiple areas of hypoperfusion, viz. temporal (11 patients (91 %), parietal 10 patients (83%), frontal 9 patients (75%, pre and post central gyrus 7 patients (58%), occipital 6 patients (50%) cingulate gyrus and cerebellum 5 patients (41%) and thalamic in 2 patients (16%). Hyper perfusion in caudate nuclei was noted in 10 patients (83%). The study reveals presence of multiple perfusion abnormalities on cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients who have normal/near normal mental status suggesting precedence of perfusion abnormality over clinically apparent mental deficit

  11. Are patient specific meshes required for EIT head imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Markus; Aristovich, Kirill; Faulkner, Mayo; Holder, David

    2016-06-01

    Head imaging with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is usually done with time-differential measurements, to reduce time-invariant modelling errors. Previous research suggested that more accurate head models improved image quality, but no thorough analysis has been done on the required accuracy. We propose a novel pipeline for creation of precise head meshes from magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans, which was applied to four different heads. Voltages were simulated on all four heads for perturbations of different magnitude, haemorrhage and ischaemia, in five different positions and for three levels of instrumentation noise. Statistical analysis showed that reconstructions on the correct mesh were on average 25% better than on the other meshes. However, the stroke detection rates were not improved. We conclude that a generic head mesh is sufficient for monitoring patients for secondary strokes following head trauma.

  12. A new 3-dimensional head fixation device for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Yoshioka, Seiro; Ono, Shuichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori; Akaizawa, Takashi; Koyama, Masamichi; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new head fixation device for studies of brain function. This device was designed to immobilize subject's heads during image scanning and to precisely reproduce the head position for two different imaging modalities such as MRI and PET. The device consists of a plastic frame, a pillow filled with beads of styrene foam, and a face mask of thermoplastic resin which was originally intended for application in radiotherapy. A bridge for biting was incorporated into the mask for stable fixation. The device enables immobilization of subject's heads with good reproducibility of position at the practical level. Our results indicate that this head fixation system is useful for fixation of head during activation studies using PET. (author)

  13. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  14. Protective head of sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, K.; Anton, P.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery concerns the protective heads of diagnostic assemblies of nuclear power plants for conductors of the sensors from the fuel and control parts of the said assemblies. A detailed description is presented of the design of the protective head which, as compared with the previous design, allows quick and simple assembly with reduced risk of damaging the sensors. The protective head may be used for diagnostic assemblies both in power and in research reactors and it will be used for WWER reactor assemblies. (A.K.). 3 figs

  15. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna ... conditions: Abnormal folds or location of the pinna Low-set ears No opening to the ear canal ...

  16. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Kadri, Farid

    2016-01-01

    of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... for pregnant women unless medically necessary because of potential risk to the baby. This risk is, however, ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  19. MR imaging of abnormal synovial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Sanchez, R.; Murray, W.T.; Silbiger, M.L.; Ogden, J.; Cochran, C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging can directly image abnormal synovium. The authors reviewed over 50 cases with abnormal synovial processes. The abnormalities include Baker cysts, semimembranous bursitis, chronic shoulder bursitis, peroneal tendon ganglion cyst, periarticular abscesses, thickened synovium from rheumatoid and septic arthritis, and synovial hypertrophy secondary to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. MR imaging has proved invaluable in identifying abnormal synovium, defining the extent and, to a limited degree, characterizing its makeup

  20. Control rod position control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubukata, Shinji.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a control rod position control device which stores data such as of position signals and driving control rod instruction before and after occurrence of abnormality in control for the control rod position for controlling reactor power and utilized the data effectively for investigating the cause of abnormality. Namely, a plurality of individual control devices have an operation mismatching detection circuit for outputting signals when difference is caused between a driving instruction given to the control rod position control device and the control rod driving means and signals from a detection means for detecting an actual moving amount. A general control device collectively controls the individual control devices. In addition, there is also disposed a position storing circuit for storing position signals at least before and after the occurrence of the control rod operation mismatching. With such procedures, the cause of the abnormality can be determined based on the position signals before and after the occurrence of control rod mismatching operation stored in the position storing circuit. Accordingly, the abnormality cause can be determined to conduct restoration in an early stage. (I.S.)

  1. Axis of eye rotation changes with head-pitch orientation during head impulses about earth-vertical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C; Clendaniel, Richard A; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C; Minor, Lloyd B; Zee, David S

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how the axis of head rotation, Listing's law, and eye position influence the axis of eye rotation during brief, rapid head rotations. We specifically asked how the axis of eye rotation during the initial angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) changed when the pitch orientation of the head relative to Earth-vertical was varied, but the initial position of the eye in the orbit and the orientation of Listing's plane with respect to the head were fixed. We measured three-dimensional eye and head rotation axes in eight normal humans using the search coil technique during head-and-trunk (whole-body) and head-on-trunk (head-only) "impulses" about an Earth-vertical axis. The head was initially oriented at one of five pitch angles (30 degrees nose down, 15 degrees nose down, 0 degrees, 15 degrees nose up, 30 degrees nose up). The fixation target was always aligned with the nasooccipital axis. Whole-body impulses were passive, unpredictable, manual, rotations with peak-amplitude of approximately 20 degrees , peak-velocity of approximately 80 degrees /s, and peak-acceleration of approximately 1000 degrees /s2. Head-only impulses were also passive, unpredictable, manual, rotations with peak-amplitude of approximately 20 degrees , peak-velocity of approximately 150 degrees /s, and peak-acceleration of approximately 3000 degrees /s2. During whole-body impulses, the axis of eye rotation tilted in the same direction, and by an amount proportional (0.51 +/- 0.09), to the starting pitch head orientation (P rotation could be predicted from vectorial summation of the gains (eye velocity/head velocity) obtained for rotations about the pure yaw and roll head axes. Thus, even when the orientation of Listing's plane and eye position in the orbit are fixed, the axis of eye rotation during the VOR reflects a compromise between the requirements of Listing's law and a perfectly compensatory VOR.

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  3. Exploding head syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    Exploding head syndrome is characterized by the perception of abrupt, loud noises when going to sleep or waking up. They are usually painless, but associated with fear and distress. In spite of the fact that its characteristic symptomatology was first described approximately 150 y ago, exploding head syndrome has received relatively little empirical and clinical attention. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature using Medline, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and PubMed was undertaken. After first discussing the history, prevalence, and associated features, the available polysomnography data and five main etiological theories for exploding head syndrome are summarized. None of these theories has yet reached dominance in the field. Next, the various methods used to assess and treat exploding head syndrome are discussed, as well as the limited outcome data. Finally, recommendations for future measure construction, treatment options, and differential diagnosis are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary because of potential risk to the baby. This risk is, however, minimal with head CT ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  5. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for ... Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  10. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  12. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. ... typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused ...

  14. The exploding head syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M W

    2001-06-01

    This article reviews the features of an uncommon malady termed "the exploding head syndrome." Sufferers describe terrorizing attacks of a painless explosion within their head. Attacks tend to occur at the onset of sleep. The etiology of attacks is unknown, although they are considered to be benign. Treatment with clomipramine has been suggested, although most sufferers require only reassurance that the spells are benign in nature.

  15. Operator training for the abnormal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzec, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Training of nuclear power plant control room operators, on actions to be taken for an abnormal event, has classically been limited to discussion, on-shift and/or during requalification training classes, of symptoms, logical thought processes, systems analysis, and operator experience. The prerequisites for these discussions are a common technical vocabulary, and a minimum basic comprehension of nuclear power plant fundamentals, plant component theory of operation, system configuration, system control philosophy and operating procedures. Nuclear power plant control room operators are not the only personnel who are or should be involved in these discussions. The shift supervisors, operations management, and auxiliary equipment operators require continuing training in abnormal operations, as well. More in-depth training is necessary for shift supervisors and control room operators. The availability of vendor simulators has improved the effectiveness of training efforts for these individuals to some extent by displaying typical situations and plant performance characteristics and by providing a degree of ''hands on'' experience. The evolution of in-depth training with these simulators is reviewed

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography for patients with positional vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Fujiki, Hiroya; Kumoi, Takeo.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) can image the blood vessels without invasion. Using MRA, we studied the vascular morphology of the vertebral artery in patients with positional nystagmus and vertigo. Fifteen patients without vestibular disorder such as benign positional vertigo were examined. Six cases underwent conventional vertebral angiography, including digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for comparison with MRA. In all cases. we observed the vertebral artery from the bifurcation to the basilar artery with MRA. In 12 cases, abnormal findings of elongation, bending, narrowing or obstruction of the vertebral artery were found. In five cases, arterial compression and elongation increased in association with head rotation. A difference in the vessel diameter on each side was observed in 4 cases. Accordingly, some abnormal vessels were found in 14 of 15 cases in our study. This rate was very close to previous results obtained with conventional angiography. In two cases, MRA findings differed from conventional angiography due to peculiar artifacts of MRA. Therefore, MRA may be the first choice for the patients with vertigo, followed by conventional angiography, if necessary. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance angiography for patients with positional vertigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Fujiki, Hiroya (Takarazuka City Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Kumoi, Takeo

    1993-11-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) can image the blood vessels without invasion. Using MRA, we studied the vascular morphology of the vertebral artery in patients with positional nystagmus and vertigo. Fifteen patients without vestibular disorder such as benign positional vertigo were examined. Six cases underwent conventional vertebral angiography, including digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for comparison with MRA. In all cases. we observed the vertebral artery from the bifurcation to the basilar artery with MRA. In 12 cases, abnormal findings of elongation, bending, narrowing or obstruction of the vertebral artery were found. In five cases, arterial compression and elongation increased in association with head rotation. A difference in the vessel diameter on each side was observed in 4 cases. Accordingly, some abnormal vessels were found in 14 of 15 cases in our study. This rate was very close to previous results obtained with conventional angiography. In two cases, MRA findings differed from conventional angiography due to peculiar artifacts of MRA. Therefore, MRA may be the first choice for the patients with vertigo, followed by conventional angiography, if necessary. (author).

  18. GPK heading machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krmasek, J.; Novosad, K.

    1981-01-01

    This article evaluates performance tests of the Soviet made GPK heading machine carried out in 4 coal mines in Czechoslovakia (Ostrava-Karvina region and Kladno mines). GPK works in coal seams and rocks with compression strength of 40 to 50 MPa. Dimensions of the tunnel are height 1.8 to 3.8 m and width 2.6 to 4.7 m, tunnel gradient plus to minus 10 degrees. GPK weighs 16 t, its conical shaped cutting head equipped with RKS-1 cutting tools is driven by an electric motor with 55 kW capacity. Undercarriage of the GPK, gathering-arm loader, hydraulic system, electric system and dust supression system (water spraying or pneumatic section) are characterized. Specifications of GPK heading machines are compared with PK-3r and F8 heading machines. Reliability, number of failures, dust level, noise, productivity depending on compression strength of rocks, heading rate in coal and in rocks, energy consumption, performance in inclined tunnels, and cutting tool wear are evaluated. Tests show that GPK can be used to drive tunnels in coal with rock constituting up to 50% of the tunnel crosscut, as long as rock compression strength does not exceed 50 MPa. In rocks characterized by higher compression strength cutting tool wear sharply increases. GPK is characterized by higher productivity than that of the PK-3r heading machine. Among the weak points of the GPK are: unsatisfactory reliability and excessive wear of its elements. (4 refs.) (In Czech)

  19. A case study of occipital outgrowth: a rare suboccipital abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushkin, A Y; Gubin, A V; Ulrich, E V; Snischuk, V P

    2016-05-01

    To describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of uncommon upper cervical spine abnormality in children. Clinical and diagnostic characteristics of three patients aged 6-12 years with a similar uncommon type of occipital anomaly are described. The patients were admitted in 2007, 2009, and 2014, respectively. All patients were clinically and radiologically examined. In each case the massive, additional unilateral outgrowth of the occipital bone (os occipitale) was visualized. The signs and symptoms included torticollis, acute brain ischemia, and limited head motion. Two of the three patients underwent surgical treatment: an occipital-cervical fusion was performed in the first patient, and the outgrowth was removed in the second patient. After 1 year of follow-up the results were estimated as good for both patients, with better functional outcome for the second patient. The parents of the third patient did not consent for the surgical treatment. The unique features of this abnormality distinguish it from previous descriptions of the manifestation of pro-atlas, atlas, or atlanto-occipital synostosis. The presented abnormality had different manifestation of various severity in each case, from torticollis to acute vascular disorder. Clinical case series. IV.

  20. Computed tomography of the trachea: normal and abnormal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamsu, G.; Webb, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The trachea was investigated by means of computed tomography (CT) in 50 patients without tracheal or mediastinal abnormalities and in 39 patients with various diseases of the trachea. The variations in the normal CT appearance of the trachea and surrounding structures are described. CT did not provide additional information in the detection of characterization of tracheal stenosis beyond that obtained from more conventional studies, including tomography and positive-contrast tracheography. In patients with a saber-sheath trachea, CT demonstrated the abnormal configuration of the tracheal cartilages and abnormal collapse of the trachea on forced expiration. In patients with primary or secondary neoplasms involving the trachea, CT was most accurate in defining the intraluminal presence of tumor, the degree of airway compression, and the extratracheal extension of tumor. CT can be of value in determining the resectability of primary tracheal neoplasms and the planning of radiation therapy in metastatic lesions to the trachea and surrounding mediastinum

  1. Utility of FMISO PET in advanced head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation incorporating a hypoxia-targeting chemotherapy agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Rischin, Danny [University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Fisher, Richard [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [Austin Hospital, Centre for PET, and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne (Australia); Peters, Lester J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology, Melbourne (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET in advanced head and neck cancer during hypoxia-targeting therapy. Fifteen of 16 patients in a phase I trial of chemoradiation plus tirapazamine (specific cytotoxin for hypoxic cells) in advanced (T3/4 and/or N2/3) head and neck cancer underwent serial [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and FMISO PET. We have previously reported excellent early clinical outcome of these patients and now review FMISO PET results in the context of longer follow-up of this patient cohort. Based on blinded qualitative scoring by two readers, FMISO PET was positive in 13/15 patients at baseline: 12/15 of primary sites and 8/13 neck nodes were scored as positive. All sites of corresponding FDG and FMISO abnormality at baseline showed marked qualitative reduction of uptake within 4 weeks of commencing therapy, consistent with effective hypoxia-targeted therapy. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there have been only four locoregional failures, while three other patients have died of metachronous lung cancer. The 5-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI 27-73%), the 5-year failure-free survival was 44% (95% CI 22-68%) and the 5-year freedom from locoregional failure was 68% (95% CI 38-88%). The high prevalence of hypoxia demonstrated on FMISO PET imaging is consistent with the advanced disease stage of these patients and would be expected to predict an adverse prognosis. Evidence of the early resolution of FMISO abnormality during treatment, associated with excellent locoregional control in this patient cohort, supports further investigation of hypoxia-targeting agents in advanced head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  2. Utility of FMISO PET in advanced head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation incorporating a hypoxia-targeting chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, Rodney J.; Rischin, Danny; Fisher, Richard; Binns, David; Scott, Andrew M.; Peters, Lester J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET in advanced head and neck cancer during hypoxia-targeting therapy. Fifteen of 16 patients in a phase I trial of chemoradiation plus tirapazamine (specific cytotoxin for hypoxic cells) in advanced (T3/4 and/or N2/3) head and neck cancer underwent serial [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and FMISO PET. We have previously reported excellent early clinical outcome of these patients and now review FMISO PET results in the context of longer follow-up of this patient cohort. Based on blinded qualitative scoring by two readers, FMISO PET was positive in 13/15 patients at baseline: 12/15 of primary sites and 8/13 neck nodes were scored as positive. All sites of corresponding FDG and FMISO abnormality at baseline showed marked qualitative reduction of uptake within 4 weeks of commencing therapy, consistent with effective hypoxia-targeted therapy. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there have been only four locoregional failures, while three other patients have died of metachronous lung cancer. The 5-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI 27-73%), the 5-year failure-free survival was 44% (95% CI 22-68%) and the 5-year freedom from locoregional failure was 68% (95% CI 38-88%). The high prevalence of hypoxia demonstrated on FMISO PET imaging is consistent with the advanced disease stage of these patients and would be expected to predict an adverse prognosis. Evidence of the early resolution of FMISO abnormality during treatment, associated with excellent locoregional control in this patient cohort, supports further investigation of hypoxia-targeting agents in advanced head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  3. Abnormal sex chromosome constitution and longitudinal growth: serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF binding protein-3, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone in 109 males with 47,XXY, 47,XYY, or sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY)-positive 46,XX karyotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, L.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Juul, A.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of abnormal chromosome constitution...... and elevated LH levels after puberty, whereas the sex hormone secretion of the 47,XYY boys remained normal. CONCLUSION: We found accelerated growth in early childhood in boys with 47,XXY and 47,XYY karyotypes, whereas 46,XX-males were shorter than controls. These abnormal growth patterns were not reflected...

  4. Abnormality diagnosis device for nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsunomiya, Kazuhiro; Oyama, Shinmi; Sakaba, Hideo

    1989-02-21

    According to the present invention, abnormality such as abnormal increase of temperature in a nuclear reactor is detected to send a signal to control rod drives, etc. thereby stopping the operation of the nuclear reactor. Receiving/transmission device transmits a signal for conducting normal operation of an abnormality information section, as well as receives an echo signal from the abnormality information section to transmit an abnormal signal to a reactor protection system. The abnormality information section is disposed to fuel assemblies, receives a signal from the receiving/transmission device for conducting the normal operation to transmit a normal echo signal, as well as changes the echo signal when detecting the nuclear reactor abnormality. By the foregoing method, since the abnormality information section is disposed to the fuel assemblies, various effects can be attained such as: (1) there is no response delay from the occurrence of abnormality to emergency counter measure after detection, (2) high burnup degree for fuels can thus be possible to improve the economical property, (3) the abnormality information section can be taken out from the reactor container together with fuel assemablies by an existent take-out mechanism and (4) since wireless transmission and reception are established between the receiving/transmission device and the abnormality information section, cables are not required in the container. (K.M.).

  5. Head Impact Biomechanics in Women's College Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, Robert C; Clark, Michael D; Grand, Erin E; Stucker, Jaclyn C; Littleton, Ashley C; Aguilar, Alain J; Petschauer, Meredith A; Teel, Elizabeth F; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    There are limited nonlaboratory soccer head impact biomechanics data. This is surprising given soccer's global popularity. Epidemiological data suggest that female college soccer players are at a greater concussion injury risk than their male counterparts. Therefore, the purposes of our study were to quantify head impact frequency and magnitude during women's soccer practices and games in the National Collegiate Athletic Association and to characterize these data across event type, playing position, year on the team, and segment of game (first and second halves). Head impact biomechanics were collected from female college soccer players (n = 22; mean ± SD age = 19.1 ± 0.1 yr, height = 168.0 ± 3.5 cm, mass = 63.7 ± 6.0 kg). We employed a helmetless head impact measurement device (X2 Biosystems xPatch) before each competition and practice across a single season. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were categorized based on impact magnitude and subsequently analyzed using appropriate nonparametric analyses. Overall, women's college soccer players experience approximately seven impacts per 90 min of game play. The overwhelming majority (~90%) of all head impacts were categorized into our mildest linear acceleration impact classification (10g-20g). Interestingly, a higher percentage of practice impacts in the 20g-40g range compared with games (11% vs 7%) was observed. Head impact biomechanics studies have provided valuable insights into understanding collision sports and for informing evidence-based rule and policy changes. These have included changing the football kickoff, ice hockey body checking ages, and head-to-head hits in both sports. Given soccer's global popularity, and the growing public concern for the potential long-term neurological implications of collision and contact sports, studying soccer has the potential to impact many athletes and the sports medicine professionals caring for them.

  6. Influence of Functional Head Postures on the Dynamic Functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The dentist utilizes supine position during therapeutic procedures, while the patients assumes extended head posture during mastication. It is critical for the restorative dentist to evaluate and understand the possible effect of change in head posture on occlusal contacts. An understanding of the possible effect ...

  7. Isolated posterior dislocation of the radial head in an adult.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negi A

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated posterior dislocation of the radial head was detected on X-ray in a patient following a vehicular accident. Such a dislocation without an associated fracture is extremely rare in adults. Immobilization of the elbow in full pronation and 90 degrees flexion for 4 weeks normalized the position of the head of the radius.

  8. Pocket Proteins Suppress Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myeong-Kyun; Pitot, Henry C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is a common cancer in humans long known to be caused by tobacco and alcohol use, but now an increasing percentage of HNSCC is recognized to be caused by the same human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that cause cervical and other anogenital cancers. HPV-positive HNSCCs differ remarkably from HPV-negative HNSCCs in their clinical response and molecular properties. From studies in mice, we know that E7 is the dominant HPV oncoprotein in head and neck cancer. E7 is best known for its ability to inactivate pRb, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor susceptibility gene. However loss of pRb function does not fully account for E7’s potency in causing head and neck cancer. In this study, we characterized the cancer susceptibility of mice deficient in the expression of pRb and either of two related “pocket” proteins, p107 and p130, that are also inactivated by E7. pRb/p107 deficient mice developed head and neck cancer as frequently as do HPV16 E7 transgenic mice. The head and neck epithelia of the pRb/p107 deficient mice also displayed the same acute phenotypes and biomarker readouts as observed in the epithelia of E7 transgenic mice. Mice deficient for pRb and p130 in their head and neck epithelia showed intermediate acute and tumor phenotypes. We conclude that pRb and p107 act together to efficiently suppress head and neck cancer, and are therefore highly relevant targets of HPV16 E7 in its contribution to HPV-positive HNSCC. PMID:22237625

  9. Coagulation abnormalities in patients with chronic liver disease in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, S.A.; Ghani, M.H.; Ghori, M.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the coagulation abnormalities and relationship between abnormal clotting tests and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) among chronic liver disease (CLD) patients admitted at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methods: Adult CLD patients admitted at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro, during Nov 2004 - Oct 2005, were included in the study. The patients blood were tested for coagulation abnormalities including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), platelet count and plasma fibrinogen. Association was seen between the abnormal clotting tests and the gastrointestinal bleeding by calculating relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval. Results: PT was prolonged in 88% and aPTT was raised in 71% cases of CLD. Both PT and aPTT were prolonged in 67% CLD cases. Approximately 37% CLD cases had decreased platelet count and 15% cases had decreased serum fibrinogen level. Relative risk of GI bleeding with abnormal clotting tests in CLD cases were weakly positive for PT (RR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.49-2.10), negative for aPTT (RR=0.83; 95% CI, 0.47-1.45), strongly positive for decreased platelet counts (RR = 1.96; 95% CI, 1.08-3.56) and also for decreased fibrinogen level (RR = 1.47; 95% CI, 0.64-3.35). Conclusion: Coagulation abnormalities were profound in CLD. Decrease platelet counts and fibrinogen levels were related with GI bleeding but PT and aPTT were not significantly related with GI bleeding in patients with chronic liver disease. Nevertheless, these parameters (PT and aPTT) were still used as prognostic markers. (author)

  10. Abnormal lung function at preschool age asthma in adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, Katariina; Kalliola, Satu; Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, Anne; Sarna, Seppo; Malmberg, L Pekka; Pelkonen, Anna S; Mäkelä, Mika J

    2018-05-01

    Asthma often begins early in childhood. However, the risk for persistence is challenging to evaluate. This longitudinal study relates lung function assessed with impulse oscillometry (IOS) in preschool children to asthma in adolescence. Lung function was measured with IOS in 255 children with asthma-like symptoms aged 4-7 years. Baseline measurements were followed by exercise challenge and bronchodilation tests. At age 12-16 years, 121 children participated in the follow-up visit, when lung function was assessed with spirometry, followed by a bronchodilation test. Asthma symptoms and medication were recorded by a questionnaire and atopy defined by skin prick tests. Abnormal baseline values in preschool IOS were significantly associated with low lung function, the need for asthma medication, and asthma symptoms in adolescence. Preschool abnormal R5 at baseline (z-score ≥1.645 SD) showed 9.2 odds ratio (95%CI 2.7;31.7) for abnormal FEV1/FVC, use of asthma medication in adolescence, and 9.9 odds ratio (95%CI 2.9;34.4) for asthma symptoms. Positive exercise challenge and modified asthma-predictive index at preschool age predicted asthma symptoms and the need for asthma medication, but not abnormal lung function at teenage. Abnormal preschool IOS is associated with asthma and poor lung function in adolescence and might be utilised for identification of asthma persistence. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  15. Partial duplication of head--a rare congenital anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandran, Manikkapurath; Radotra, Bishan Dass

    2004-10-01

    Duplication of notochord results in rare congenital anomalies like double headed monsters, with or without trunk/limb duplication, depending upon the extent of notochordal abnormality. Here we describe the morphological abnormalities in a case of partial duplication of cranial structures with fusion of the two. Autopsy findings suggest that the bifurcation of the neural tube took place around 4th to 6th week of gestation. There are only few reports in English literature describing the autopsy findings of such an anomaly, which is termed as Diprosopus triophthalmus in the modern literature.

  16. Long memory of abnormal investor attention and the cross-correlations between abnormal investor attention and trading volume, volatility respectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoqian; Yuan, Ying; Zhuang, Xintian; Jin, Xiu

    2017-03-01

    Taking Baidu Index as a proxy for abnormal investor attention (AIA), the long memory property in the AIA of Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE) 50 Index component stocks was empirically investigated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method. The results show that abnormal investor attention is power-law correlated with Hurst exponents between 0.64 and 0.98. Furthermore, the cross-correlations between abnormal investor attention and trading volume, volatility respectively are studied using detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) and the DCCA cross-correlation coefficient (ρDCCA). The results suggest that there are positive correlations between AIA and trading volume, volatility respectively. In addition, the correlations for trading volume are in general higher than the ones for volatility. By carrying on rescaled range analysis (R/S) and rolling windows analysis, we find that the results mentioned above are effective and significant.

  17. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmody, R.F.; Seeger, J.F.; Smith, R.L.; Horsley, W.W.; Miller, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally. (orig.)

  18. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, R F; Seeger, J F; Smith, R L; Horsley, W W; Miller, R W

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally.

  19. Head Rotation Detection in Marmoset Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhadri, Sravanthi

    Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and closing of the chamber door. All of these conditions were tested with either house light on or off. Infra-red camera with a frame rate of 90 Hz was used to capture of the head movement of monkeys. To assist the signal detection, two circular markers were attached to the top of monkey head. The data analysis used an image-based marker detection scheme. Images were processed using the Computation Vision Toolbox in Matlab. The markers and their positions were detected using blob detection techniques. Based on the frame-by-frame information of marker positions, the angular position, velocity and acceleration were extracted in horizontal and vertical planes. Adaptive Otsu Thresholding, Kalman filtering and bound setting for marker properties were used to overcome a number of challenges encountered during this analysis, such as finding image segmentation threshold, continuously tracking markers during large head movement, and false alarm detection. The results show that the blob detection method together with Kalman filtering yielded better performances than other image based techniques like optical flow and SURF features .The median of the maximal head turn in the horizontal plane was in the range of 20 to 70 degrees and the median of the maximal velocity in horizontal plane was in the range of a few hundreds of degrees per

  20. Measuring How the Head of Department Measures Up: Development of an Evaluation Framework for the Head of Department Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Chad

    2011-01-01

    The head of department position has been an integral role in the organisational structure of colleges and universities for over a hundred years. Recently, many institutions of higher education have called on department heads to provide advancing quality management and leadership to academic units in response to an increasingly complex and…

  1. Unusual head and neck injury in elevator: autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, B; Türkmen, N; Dokgöz, H

    2012-10-01

    Industrial injuries related to auto-load-carrying vehicles were not frequently reported in the literature. Presented case was, 31-year-old male furniture worker. Deceased was found in awkward position in furniture workshop. Victim was observed on his knees in front of the elevator, head and neck lodged within openings of the elevator, and head and neck structures compressed-guillotined by the lower platform of the elevator were detected. We presented rare case of head and neck compression by elevator. Key words: head - neck - accidents - elevator - autopsy.

  2. Anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and positional downbeating nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Molina, Maria I; Gamiz, Maria J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features and video-oculographic findings in patients with anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This is a prospective case series. The study was set at an outpatient clinic in a general hospital. Fourteen individuals with symptoms of BPPV and positional downbeating nystagmus (pDBN) were included in the study. The diagnosis was based on a history of brief episodes of vertigo and the presence of pDBN confirmed in the video-oculographic examination during Dix-Hallpike test (DH) or head-hanging maneuver. Patients were treated by particle repositioning maneuver and the effectiveness was evaluated at 7, 30, and 180 days posttreatment. The treatment was repeated up to 4 times if pDBN was persistent. The main outcome measure is the number of patients without pDBN at 30 and 180 days. Video-oculography showed a predominant pDBN in response to DH. Of the 14 patients, 7 had arterial hypertension, and 5 of 14 cases presented abnormalities on the caloric test. Horizontal spontaneous nystagmus was found in 3 of 14 individuals. Positional nystagmus at different positional test was observed in 5 of 14 individuals, suggesting the involvement of several canals. Of the 14 patients, 10 (71%) did not present vertigo, and the positional tests were negative at 30 days. However, 3 cases presented a positive DH with persistence of BPPV episodes and pDBN at 30 days, and another developed a contralateral posterior canal affectation. One of the patients maintained a persistent pDBN at 180 days despite the repeated maneuvers. Video-oculography demonstrates that anterior canal BPPV is characterized by a predominant downbeating nystagmus in response to DH. These individuals may show alterations in the vestibular caloric, and they can have multicanal affectation.

  3. Review of Positional Nystagmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio BENITO-OREJAS

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Any change of position of the head (dynamic or static can trigger a nystagmus or increase the spontaneous. This nystagmus we call it positional. We intend to review in this chapter its definition, clinical features, etiology and the way of exploring it. Method: narrative review. Results: Positional vertigo is the most frequent vestibular disorder, and most of the times of peripheral cause. Characteristics of nystagmus or its association with other neurological symptoms are sufficient grounds to request a magnetic resonance, which will provide additional information on very few occasions. Discussion: The study of the positional nystagmus as a procedure to rule out central pathology has lost much of its relevance. Signs that Nylén defined mixed findings peripheral and central, making complex classification. Conclusion: Regardless of how to bring the patient change position (very slow or fast, if it appears an atypical nystagmus should rule out a central origin.

  4. Glutamatergic system abnormalities in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kenji; Noguchi, Hiroko; Hamazaki, Kei; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Matsuoka, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests involvement of the glutamatergic system in the biological mechanisms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but few studies have demonstrated an association between glutamatergic system abnormalities and PTSD diagnosis or severity. We aimed to examine whether abnormalities in serum glutamate and in the glutamine/glutamate ratio were associated with PTSD diagnosis and severity in severely injured patients at risk for PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD). This is a nested case-control study in TPOP (Tachikawa project for prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder with polyunsaturated fatty acid) trial. Diagnosis and severity of PTSD were assessed 3 months after the accidents using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. The associations of glutamate levels and the glutamine/glutamate ratio with diagnosis and severity of PTSD and MDD were investigated by univariate and multiple linear regression analyses. Ninety-seven of 110 participants (88 %) completed assessments at 3 months. Serum glutamate levels were significantly higher for participants with full or partial PTSD than for participants without PTSD (p = 0.049) and for participants with MDD than for participants without MDD (p = 0.048). Multiple linear regression analyses showed serum glutamate levels were significantly positively associated with PTSD severity (p = 0.02) and MDD severity (p = 0.03). The glutamine/glutamate ratio was also significantly inversely associated with PTSD severity (p = 0.03), but not with MDD severity (p = 0.07). These findings suggest that the glutamatergic system may play a major role in the pathogenesis of PTSD and the need for new treatments targeting the glutamatergic system to be developed for PTSD.

  5. COAGULATION PROFILE IN PATIENTS PRESENTING WITH MALIGNANCIES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCES TO HEAD AND NECK EPITHELIAL CANCERS, LEUKAEMIAS AND LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaberee Bhuyan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cancer can cause activation of coagulation in many ways and there is definite evidence of abnormalities in haemostatic mechanism which is seen by the presence of one or more circulating markers of haemostatic activation & this is found to be potentiated by the release of tissue factors or procoagulants from normal tissue destructions during tumour development. OBJECTIVES • To evaluate the range of different types of haemostatic abnormalities in haematological and epithelial malignancies, especially the head and neck epithelial malignancies. • To look for the differences in the grades of these abnormalities in metastatic & non-metastatic malignancies. • To understand the prognostic value of routine tests of coagulation while predicting the outcome of the patient. • MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted in the Department of Pathology, Gauhati Medical College & Hospital, Guwahati from July 2004 to June 2005. 70 cases comprising of head and neck epithelial malignancies, leukaemias and lymphomas without clinical presentation of haemorrhage or thrombosis were selected and coagulation profiles were seen. RESULTS AND OBSERVATION Out of 70 cases of both sexes & different age groups prior to therapeutic intervention, metastatic cases were 22, non-metastatic cases were 29, and 19 cases belonged to leukaemias and lymphomas. The commonest age group affected was 51–60 yrs. and male: female was 3.7: 1. The most frequent abnormality was 41 cases (58.57% of FDP positivity in the serum followed by 36 cases (51.43% of hyperfibrinogenaemia; 32 cases (45.71% shortened bleeding time, etc. DISCUSSION Activated coagulation in cancer leads to increased fibrin deposition stimulated by the destroyed tissues; increased FDPs being a strong marker of coagulation and fibrinolytic activation; increased platelet aggregation by the micro vesicles shed by tumour cells; prolonged PT & APTT being well known markers for disseminated intravascular

  6. Profile injuries and musculoskeletal abnormalities of elite wushu athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Changizi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the profile of sports injuries and postural abnormalities of elite wushu athletes. Participants were recruited purposefully (n = 51, age 16.3 (4.9 years, height 165.4 (13.9 cm and weight 52.6 (14.7 kg and informed consent participated in the study. Injury report form (including type, anatomic site, etiology and mechanism of injury was used to record the damage. Posture was assesses using Grid Chart, flexible ruler, calipers and mirror box were performed. In order to analyze the data, descriptive and inferential statistical methods, chi-square was used. 166 injuries and 167 postural abnormalities were recorded. Injury type, anatomical location, and mechanism of injury and abnormalities in elite status was significantly different (P>0.05. 6.85 injuries per 1000 hours exposure and the risk of 8.91 injuries per 1000 athlete exposures was estimated. The most common types of injury were contusion (36.7%, hematoma (20.5% and abrasions (13.3% respectively. Based on the anatomic site of injury, lower extremities (47.6%, head and face (25.9%, upper extremities (13.9% and trunk (12.7% were injured mostly respectively. Opponent's Blow down technique (24.7%, previous injury (16.3%, lack of physical fitness (12.7% and fatigue (12% were in top priority. Receiving kicks (21%, Receiving punches (13.8% and throwing technique by opponent (12% were the most common mechanisms of injury. Flat foot (29.3%, uneven shoulders (25.7% and scoliosis (16.2% were the most common postural abnormalities.

  7. [Positioning diagnosis of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo by VNG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Chen, Taisheng; Lin, Peng; Song, Wei; Dong, Hong

    2009-07-01

    To analyze the value of positioning diagnosis of VNG (Videonystagmograph) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). One hundred and twenty-six patients with BPPV were enrolled in this retrospective study. Their positional nystagmus recorded by VNG in Dix-Hallpike and roll tests were analyzed to summarize the characteristics of nystagmus on nystagmography of various BPPV. Of 126 patients with BPPV diagnosed in our center, the posterior semicircular canals (PSC) were involved in 98 patients (77.8%), whereas the horizontal semicircular canal (HSC) and anterior semicircular canal (ASC) were involved in 17 (13.5%) and 5 (3.9%), respectively. Six patients (4.8%) confirmed combined-BPPV had HSC-BPPV and ipsilateral PSC-BPPV. Twenty-eight patients with PSC-BPPV had reversal phase on nystagmography. The nystagmus of patients with P/ASC-canalithiasis showed upward/downward on the vertical phase of nystagmography and orientated the opposite side on horizontal phase in the head hanging position, and the nystagmus reversed when returned to sit. Nystagmus on horizontal phase could be provoked when the head turned to both sides of the roll tests in patients with HSC-BPPV. If the nystagmus and the head-turning shared the same direction, then HSC-canalithiasis was confirmed, and the direction of the head-turning which provoked the stronger nystagmus indicates the lesion side. If the nystagmus and the head-turning had the opposite direction, then HSC-cupulolithiasis was confirmed, and the direction of the head-turning which provoked the weaker nystagmus indicates the lesion side. Positional nystagmus can be recorded objectively using VNG, According to which positioning the semicircular canal involved would be easier and more accurate. The recording conserved also could be helpful for clinical diagnosis and repositioning of BPPV.

  8. Diagnostic value of saline contrast sonohysterography comparing with hysteroscopy for detecting endometrial abnormalities in women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Goharzad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presentation of uterine abnormalities among premenopausal and postmenopausal women.Objective: To evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of saline contrast sonohysterography and hysteroscopy for detecting the cause of abnormal uterine bleeding.Materials and Methods: A total of 65 women with abnormal uterine bleeding were enrolled in this study. A prior saline contrast sonohysetrography followed by a hysteroscopy was performed in all cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and test accuracy were calculated.Results: As the most common abnormality, SCSH showed hyperplasia in 19 patients while hysteroscopy diagnosed polyp in 15 cases. A sensitivity of 73.3%, 71.4% and 90.9% were reported for polyp, hyperplasia and submucous myoma respectively whereas the specificity was calculated 96% for polyps, 82.3% for hyperplasia and 90.7% for submucous myoma.Conclusion: Comparing with hysteroscopy, sonohysterography showed a high sensitivity and specificity for detecting submucous myoma but not for endometrial polyp and endometrial hyperplasia

  9. [Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children and adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, C; Herrmann, I F; Rohrbach, S; Schwemmle, C; Nawka, T

    2015-03-01

    Position Paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - Current State of Clinical and Endoscopic Diagnostics, Evaluation, and Therapy of Swallowing Disorders in Children and AdultsSwallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration induced pneumonia and malnutrition. On the other hand quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities.Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatrists, are asked for diagnostics and therapy who will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings.A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom oriented treatment is necessary for the mostly complex disorders. The integration of non-medical personnel such as logopeds (speech language pathologists), physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over by them in close cooperation.In particular an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff from intensive care medicine is indispensable.The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists.Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently substitution of the physician is precluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Avaliação cefalométrica radiográfica da posição craniocervical de pacientes orientados em posição natural da cabeça pré e pós-expansão rápida da maxila Cephalometric radiographic evaluation of the craniocervical position of patients oriented in natural head position before and after the rapid maxillary expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belini Augusto Villalba Freire-Maia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a eventual alteração na posição craniocervical de pacientes orientados na Posição Natural da Cabeça (PNC, após o procedimento de expansão rápida da maxila (ERM. Utilizaram-se telerradiografias em norma lateral, selecionadas do acervo de documentação da Clínica de Ortodontia Preventiva da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, de 20 pacientes, com idades entre 5 a 11 anos (média de 9,0 anos, sendo 7 do gênero masculino e 13 do feminino, obtidas no início do tratamento e imediatamente após a fase ativa da expansão da maxila. Os pacientes eram portadores de atresia da maxila e foram tratados com aparelho disjuntor tipo Biederman modificado. A partir dos cefalogramas pré e pós-ERM foram obtidas as grandezas angulares craniovertical (SN.VER, craniocervical (OPT.SN e CVT.SN, cervicohorizontal (OPT.HOR, CVT.HOR e o ângulo da curvatura cervical (OPT.CVT. Após análise estatística e interpretação dos resultados obtidos concluímos que a posição da cabeça não apresentou alteração estatisticamente significativa. Não foram observadas diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre os gêneros quando comparadas as fases pré e pós-ERM para as grandezas estudadas. O método de obtenção de telerradiografias laterais em Orientação Natural da Cabeça mostrou-se confiável e reproduzível na amostra estudada, mesmo na presença de intervenção ortodôntica-ortopédica entre as séries de radiografias.The aim of this study was to evaluate the eventual alteration in the craniocervical position of patients, oriented in the Natural Head Position (NHP, after the rapid maxillary expansion (RME procedure. We have used lateral radiographs, selected from the documentation file of the Preventive Orthodontics Clinic, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo. Our sample consisted of 20 patients (7M:13F, with ages ranging from 5.08 up to 11.08 years (mean of 9,0. The

  11. A curious abnormally developed embryo of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Villers, 1789

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Janssen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an abnormally developed embryo (ADE of the common pill millipede Glomeris marginata. This ADE represents a modified case of Duplicitas posterior, in which two posterior ends are present, but only one anterior end. While the major posterior germ band of the embryo appears almost normally developed, the minor posterior germ band is heavily malformed, has no clear correlation to the single head, little or no ventral tissue, and a minute amount of yolk. The anterior end of the minor germ band is fused to the ventral side of the major germ band between the first and second trunk segment. At least one appendage of the second trunk segment appears to be shared by the two germ bands. Morphology and position of the minor germ band suggest that the ADE may be the result of an incorrectly established single cumulus [the later posterior segment addition zone (SAZ]. This differs from earlier reports on D. posterior type ADEs in G. marginata that are likely the result of the early formation of two separate cumuli.

  12. Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii distal to the glenohumeral joint: plain film radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A B

    1989-11-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful condition related to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals; it favors large joints. The shoulder, specifically the tendons of the rotator cuff and the insertion of the long head of the biceps on the superior glenoid rim, is a well-recognized location for this abnormality. The purpose of this article is to describe a second site of calcific tendinitis of the biceps, distal to the joint and corresponding to the junction of the tendon and muscle. Radiographs in 119 cases of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, obtained between 1980 and 1988, were reviewed. Twenty had calcific tendinitis in the region of the tendon of the long head of the biceps (nine at the glenoid insertion and 11 adjacent to the humeral shaft). All 11 patients with calcific tendinitis at the more distal site had a small, homogeneous deposit adjacent to the proximal humeral shaft. The densities in these 11 cases followed the normal course of the tendon of the long head of the biceps and were therefore medial to the proximal humeral shaft on the internal rotation view, lateral to the proximal humeral shaft on the external rotation view, and anterior to the proximal humeral shaft on the axillary projection. The major differential diagnosis of calcific tendinitis of the tendon of the long head of the biceps is loose bodies trapped in the biceps tendon sheath. Although the position of the soft-tissue densities in these two entities is similar, loose bodies have an appearance of bone, and their source (degenerative arthritis or recurrent dislocations) is usually apparent. A site of calcific tendinitis distal to the glenohumeral joint that is detectable on plain films is reviewed. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the anatomy of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. The clinical charts of the 11 patients also are summarized, with emphasis on the association between the roentgen finding and bicipital tendinitis and impingement syndrome.

  13. Head first Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Rebecca M

    2008-01-01

    Ajax is no longer an experimental approach to website development, but the key to building browser-based applications that form the cornerstone of Web 2.0. Head First Ajax gives you an up-to-date perspective that lets you see exactly what you can do -- and has been done -- with Ajax. With it, you get a highly practical, in-depth, and mature view of what is now a mature development approach. Using the unique and highly effective visual format that has turned Head First titles into runaway bestsellers, this book offers a big picture overview to introduce Ajax, and then explores the use of ind

  14. Head First Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  15. Genetic and infectious profiles influence cerebrospinal fluid IgG abnormality in Japanese multiple sclerosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yoshimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal intrathecal synthesis of IgG, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF oligoclonal IgG bands (OBs and increased IgG index, is much less frequently observed in Japanese multiple sclerosis (MS cohorts compared with Western cohorts. We aimed to clarify whether genetic and common infectious backgrounds influence CSF IgG abnormality in Japanese MS patients. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed HLA-DRB1 alleles, and IgG antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA, and varicella zoster virus (VZV in 94 patients with MS and 367 unrelated healthy controls (HCs. We defined CSF IgG abnormality as the presence of CSF OBs and/or increased IgG index (>0.658. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CSF IgG abnormality was found in 59 of 94 (62.8% MS patients. CSF IgG abnormality-positive patients had a significantly higher frequency of brain MRI lesions meeting the Barkhof criteria compared with abnormality-negative patients. Compared with HCs, CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients showed a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 1501, whereas CSF IgG abnormality-negative patients had a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 0405. CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients had a significantly higher frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies compared with CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients, although there was no difference in the frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies between HCs and total MS patients. Compared with HCs, anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies were detected significantly less frequently in the total MS patients, especially in CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients. The frequencies of antibodies against EBNA and VZV did not differ significantly among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: CSF IgG abnormality is associated with Western MS-like brain MRI features. DRB1 1501 and C. pneumoniae infection confer CSF IgG abnormality, while DRB1 0405 and H. pylori infection are positively and negatively

  16. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  17. [Cognitive abnormalities and cannabis use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowij, Nadia; Pesa, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Evidence that cannabis use impairs cognitive function in humans has been accumulating in recent decades. The purpose of this overview is to update knowledge in this area with new findings from the most recent literature. Literature searches were conducted using the Web of Science database up to February 2010. The terms searched were: "cannabi*" or "marijuana", and "cogniti*" or "memory" or "attention" or "executive function", and human studies were reviewed preferentially over the animal literature. Cannabis use impairs memory, attention, inhibitory control, executive functions and decision making, both during the period of acute intoxication and beyond, persisting for hours, days, weeks or more after the last use of cannabis. Pharmacological challenge studies in humans are elucidating the nature and neural substrates of cognitive changes associated with various cannabinoids. Long-term or heavy cannabis use appears to result in longer-lasting cognitive abnormalities and possibly structural brain alterations. Greater adverse cognitive effects are associated with cannabis use commencing in early adolescence. The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulatory neural mechanisms that modulate processes underlying a range of cognitive functions that are impaired by cannabis. Deficits in human users most likely therefore reflect neuroadaptations and altered functioning of the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  18. Screening for fetal chromosome abnormalities during the second trimester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hui; Li Ming; Li Ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a pre -natal screening program for fetal chromosome abnormalities based on risk values calculated from maternal serum markers levels during the second trimester. Methods: Serum levels of AFP, β-HCG, uE 3 were determined with CLIA in 1048 pregnant women during 14-21w gestation period and the results were analyzed with a specific software (screening program for Down' s syndrome developed by Beckman) for the risk rate. In those women defined as being of high risk rate, cells from amniotic fluid or umbilical cord blood were studied for karyotype analysis. Results: Of these 1048 women, 77 were designated as being of high risk rate for several chromosome abnormalities i.e. Down's syndrome, open spina bifida and trisomy -18 syndrome (overall positive rate 7.3%). Further fetal chromosome study in 31 of them revealed three proven cases of abnormality. Another cord blood study was performed in a calculated low risk rate case but with abnormal sonographic finding at 31 w gestation and proved to be abnormal (software study false negative). The remaining 46 high risk rate cases either refused future study (n=35) or were lost for follow-up (n=11). Fortunately, all the 35 women refused further study gave birth to normal babies without any chromosome abnormalities discovered on peripheral blood study. Besides, in a trial study, five high risk rate women were again evaluated a few weeks later but with tremendous difference between the results. Conclusion: The present program proves to be clinically useful but needs further study and revision. Many factors may influence the result of the analysis and the duration of gestation period in weeks should be as accurate as possible. At present, in order to avoid getting false negatives, we don't advise a second check in 'high risk' cases. (authors)

  19. Report on abnormal climate in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports of impact on abnormal climate in 2011. It has Introduction with purpose and background of publish and summary of this report. The cause and current state on abnormal climate of the world and Korea in 2011, Measurement and impact against abnormal climate in 2011 to agriculture, land and maritime, industry and energy, prevention of disasters, environment and health, assessment and advice on the policy. It lists the appendix about occurrence and damage on abnormal climate of the world and Korea in 2011 and media report data.

  20. Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common Trombophilic Mutations in Cases with Recurrent Miscarriage. Ahmet Karatas, Recep Eroz, Mustafa Albayrak, Tulay Ozlu, Bulent Cakmak, Fatih Keskin ...

  1. Silva as the Head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The head of the performance design programme is substituted by a sister's academy delegate. this performance situation formed part of a week of semesterstart where the students and professors visited Sister's Academy, Malmø. I participated in the Sister's Academy as visiting researcher and here i...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  5. The Twente humanoid head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Visser, L.C.; Bennik, J.; Carloni, Raffaella; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This video shows the results of the project on the mechatronic development of the Twente humanoid head. The mechanical structure consists of a neck with four degrees of freedom (DOFs) and two eyes (a stereo pair system) which tilt on a common axis and rotate sideways freely providing a three more

  6. Abnormal sex chromosome constitution and longitudinal growth: serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF binding protein-3, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone in 109 males with 47,XXY, 47,XYY, or sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY)-positive 46,XX karyotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, L.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Juul, A.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of abnormal chromosome constitution for longitu......CONTEXT: Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of abnormal chromosome constitution...... and sitting height, serum levels of reproductive hormones, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 were measured. RESULTS: In boys with 47,XXY and 47,XYY karyotypes, growth was accelerated already in childhood, compared with healthy boys. 46,XX-males were significantly shorter than healthy boys but matched the stature of healthy...... and elevated LH levels after puberty, whereas the sex hormone secretion of the 47,XYY boys remained normal. CONCLUSION: We found accelerated growth in early childhood in boys with 47,XXY and 47,XYY karyotypes, whereas 46,XX-males were shorter than controls. These abnormal growth patterns were not reflected...

  7. Head-Disk Interface Technology: Challenges and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo

    Magnetic hard disk drive (HDD) technology is believed to be one of the most successful examples of modern mechatronics systems. The mechanical beauty of magnetic HDD includes simple but super high accuracy positioning head, positioning technology, high speed and stability spindle motor technology, and head-disk interface technology which keeps the millimeter sized slider flying over a disk surface at nanometer level slider-disk spacing. This paper addresses the challenges and possible approaches on how to further reduce the slider disk spacing whilst retaining the stability and robustness level of head-disk systems for future advanced magnetic disk drives.

  8. Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre including abnormal dental development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, M; Lauesen, S R; Daugaard-Jensen, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre (SCS) is a rare skin condition, where dense collagen is deposited in a localised groove of the head and neck area resembling the stroke of a sabre. The SCS may involve the oral cavity, but the severity and relation to this skin abnormality is unknow...... with a left-sided skin defect (SCS) and a left-sided local malformation in her dentition. It is possible that there is a developmental connection between these two left-sided defects, both with an ectodermal origin.......-UP: The patient has been regularly controlled and treated since she was first diagnosed. A surgical and orthodontic treatment was performed to ensure optimal occlusion, space and alveolar bone development. The present age of the patient is 14 years and 10 months. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrated a patient...

  9. Profile of hematological abnormalities of Indian HIV infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Aman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection. These abnormalities increase as the disease advances. Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection. Methods Two hundred HIV infected individual were screened for hematological abnormalities from March 2007–March 2008. Absolute CD4 cell count analysis was carried out by flowcytometry. Depending on the results of the primary screening further investigations were performed, like iron studies, hemolytic work up, PNH work up and bone marrow evaluation. Other investigations included coagulation profile, urine analysis, blood culture (bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, serology for Epstein Barr virus (EBV, Cytomegalovirus (CMV, Hepatitis B and C, and Parvo B19 infection. Results The most common hematological abnormality was anemia, seen in 65.5% (131/200 patients. Iron deficiency anemia was seen in 49.2% (/200 cases while anemia of chronic disease occurred in 50.7% (/200 cases. Bone marrow evaluation was carried out in 14 patients out of which staging marrow was performed in 2 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL and did not show any bone marrow infiltration. In remaining12 cases bone marrow was done for evaluation of pancytopenia. Among patients with pancytopenia 50% (6/12 showed granulomas (4 were positive for AFB, 2 were positive for fungal cryptococci, 25% (3/12 showed hemophagocytosis. There was a strong negative correlation between anemia and CD4 counts in this study. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 7% (14/200 cases and had no significant correlation with CD4 counts. No patient had absolute neutrophil count (ANC Conclusion Anemia in HIV patients can be a good clinical indicator to predict and access the underlying immune status. Patients should be investigated for hematological manifestations and appropriate steps should be taken to identify and treat the reversible factors.

  10. Caregivers' attitudes regarding portion sizes served to children at Head Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head Start caregivers are responsible for educating and feeding preschoolers enrolled in the Head Start program. Amongst pre-school aged children, portion size served is positively associated with intake of those foods. Researchers conducted eight focus groups with Hispanic and African American Head...

  11. Moneyball for Head Start: Using Data, Evidence, and Evaluation to Improve Outcomes for Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Sara; Mitchel, Ashley LiBetti

    2016-01-01

    Head Start is a valuable federal program that improves the lives of our nation's most vulnerable children and their families. Research shows that Head Start programs improve children's learning at school entry and have a positive impact on long-term life outcomes. Research also suggests that Head Start could have a stronger impact on children's…

  12. Parental Book Reading and Social-Emotional Outcomes for Head Start Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghee; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the associations between parental book reading and social-emotional outcomes for Head Start children in foster care. Despite no main Head Start impact on parental book reading, subgroup effects were found. Foster parents in Head Start provided more book reading for children with disabilities but less for children with low preacademic scores. Head Start enhanced social-emotional outcomes for children in foster care. The positive impacts of Head Start on children's social-emotional outcomes were greater when parents read books frequently. Head Start should include more foster families and provided parenting skills to enhance social-emotional outcomes for children in foster care.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ... necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations ...

  14. Usefulness of FDG PET for nodal staging using a dual head coincidence camera in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seok Nam; Park, Chan H.; Lee, Myoung Hoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Staging of lung cancer requires an accurate evaluation of the mediastinum. Positron imaging with dual head cameras may be not as sensitive as dedicated PET. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluated the usefulness of F-18 FDG coincidence (CoDe) PET using a dual-head gamma camera in the nodal staging of the lung cancer. CoDe-PET studies were performed in 51 patients with histologically proven non small cell lung cancer. CoDe-PET began 60 minutes after the injection of 111-185 MBq of F-18 FDG. CoDe-PET was performed using a dual-head gamma camera equipped with coincidence detection circuitry (Elscints Varicam, Haifa, lsrael). There was no attenuation correction made and reconstruction was done using a filtered back-projection. Surgery was performed in 49 patients CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. Any focal increased uptake was considered abnormal. The nodal stating of CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. Any focal increased uptake was considered abnormal. The nodal staging of CoDe-PET and of CT were compared with the nodal stating of surgical (49) and mediastinoscopical (2) pathology. All primary lung lesions were hypermetabolic and easily visualized. Compared with surgical nodal staging as a gold standard, false positives occurred in 13 CoDe PET and 17 CT studies and false negative occurred in 5 CoDe-PET and 4 CT studies. Assessment of lymph node involvement by CoDe-PET depicted a sensitivity of 67%, specificity of 64% and accuracy of 65%. CT revealed a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 53% and accuracy of 59% in the assessment of lymph node involvement. The detection of primary lesions were 100% but nodal staging was suboptimal for routine clinical use. This is mainly due to limited resolution of our system

  15. Computerized tomography and head growth curve infantile macrocephaly with normal psychomotor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eda, Isematsu; Kitahara, Tadashi; Takashima, Sachio; Takeshita, Kenzo

    1982-01-01

    Macrocephaly was defined as a head measuring larger than 98th percentile. We have evaluated CT findings and head growth curves in 25 infants with large heads. Ten (40%) of 25 infants with large heads were normal developmentally and neurologically. Five (20%) of those were mentally retarded. The other 10 infants (40%) included hydrocephalus (4 cases), malformation syndrome (3 cases), brain tumor (1 case), metabolic disorder (1 case) and degenerative disorder (1 case). Their head growth curves were typed as (I), (II) and (III): Type (I) (excessive head growth curve to 2 SDs above normal); Type (II) (head growth curve gradually approached to 2 SDs above normal); Type (III) (head growth curve parallel to 2 SDs above normal). Ten of macrocephaly with normal psychomotor development were studied clinically and radiologically in details. They were all male. CT pictures of those showed normal or various abnormal findings: ventricular dilatations, wide frontal and temporal subdural spaces, wide interhemispheric fissures, wide cerebral sulci, and large sylvian fissures. CT findings in 2 of those, which because normal after repeated CT examinations, resembled benign subdural collection. CT findings in one of those were external hydrocephalus. Head growth curves were obtained from 8 of those. Six cases revealed type (II) and two cases did type (III). The remaining 2 cases could not be followed up. We consider that CT findings of infants showed macrocephaly with normal psychomotor development reveals normal or various abnormal (ventricular dilatations, benign subdural collection, external hydrocephalus) and their head growth curves are not at least excessive. Infants with mental retardation showed similar CT findings and head growth curves as those with normal psychomotor development. It was difficult to distinguish normal from mentally retarded infants by either CT findings or head growth curves. (author)

  16. Head up tilt test in the diagnosis of neurocardiogenic syncope in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Vrajesh; Bavdekar, Manisha; Karia, Samir

    2004-06-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) is a common paroxysmal disorder that is often misdiagnosed as a seizure disorder. Head up tilt test (HUTT) has been used to confirm this diagnosis. There is no data available of its use in children / adolescents from India. To study the usefulness of the HUTT in children and adolescents with suspected NCS. This was a part retrospective and later prospective study set in a tertiary child neurology outpatient department (OPD). Patients with a strong clinical suspicion of syncope were recruited for the study. Clinical and treatment details were either retrieved from the chart or prospectively recorded in later patients. The HUTT was then carried out at baseline and after provocation and the results correlated with the clinical diagnosis. Eighteen children with a mean age of 10.8 years were studied. Eight had precipitating factors. Thirteen had premonitory symptoms. Pallor, temperature change, diaphoresis, headache, tonic / clonic movements, post-ictal confusion and peri-ictal headache were symptoms noticed. Sixteen had a positive HUTT. Seven were on long-term anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Two had epileptiform abnormalities on their electroencephalogram (EEG). The diagnosis of syncope is often confused with epilepsy. Head up tilt test has a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of NCS in children / adolescents. It is fairly safe and easy to perform.

  17. Polyurethane - positioning aids in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzen, G.; Boeck, E.G.; Thelen, M.; Kutzner, J.

    1985-01-01

    A simple and cheap method is described for the manufacturing of individual positioning aids made of foamed polyurethane. Some examples are given to demonstrate the applicability of these positioning aids for the irradiation of different body regions. The reproducibility of the radiation field in the head and neck area was investigated with and without positioning aid. It was proved that the field is adjusted more exactly when positioning aids are applied. The dosimetric investigations performed showed a negligible influence of foamed polyurethane on the radiation quality. So the positioning aids could be left within the radiation field when drawing the field borders. (orig.) [de

  18. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  2. Head Lice: Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Prevention & Control Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of head lice: Avoid head-to- ...

  3. Effects of theophylline administration and intracranial abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine effects of theophylline therapy for recurrent apnoea of prematurity and abnormal early (within the first 24 hours) cranial ultrasound abnormalities on protective neck turning response in preterm infants. Design: A cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: The Neonatal Unit of Hammersmith Hospital, ...

  4. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  5. Prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tile prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities was studied in a group of 256 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (104 coloureds, 100 whites and 52 blacks). The most common biochemical abnormalities detected were a reduction in the serum creatinine value (43,4%), raised globulins (39,7%), raised serum ...

  6. Contrast sensitivity abnormalities in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khorrami-Nejad

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Hearing impaired boys are at a greater risk for contrast sensitivity abnormalities than boys with normal hearing. The larger frequency of contrast sensitivity abnormalities in high spatial frequencies than in other frequencies may demonstrate greater defects in the central visual system compared with the periphery in individuals with hearing loss.

  7. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of relevant risk factors is a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a family history of diabetes could be a risk factor for lipid abnormalities in healthy individuals. This study is a ...

  8. Occurrence of Sperm Abnormality of Beef Cattle at Several Artificial Insemination Centers in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Purwantara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the most species studied sperm abnormalities have long been associated with male infertility and sterility. This study evaluated the sperm morphology (normality and abnormality of beef cattle at several Artificial Insemination centers in Indonesia. Total of 142 bulls were used in this study; an ejaculate from each bull was examined. A drop of semen was placed on 3-4 glass slides, and smears were prepared and air-dried. The smears were stained with carbolfluchsin-eosin (Williams stain. Types of morphological abnormalities were recorded from 500 cells on each sample. It was recorded that 77.46% samples had low primary sperm abnormalities (10% was found in 5.63% samples. Pear shaped was the most frequently type of abnormality found on examined samples (2.24 ± 2.94%; while double head was the lowest (0.01 ± 0.04%. (Animal Production 12(1: 44-49 (2010 Key words : sperm abnormality, beef catlle, artificial insemination center

  9. Motor Control Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Pietro; Shabbott, Britne; Cortés, Juan Camilo

    2012-01-01

    The primary manifestations of Parkinson’s disease are abnormalities of movement, including movement slowness, difficulties with gait and balance, and tremor. We know a considerable amount about the abnormalities of neuronal and muscle activity that correlate with these symptoms. Motor symptoms can also be described in terms of motor control, a level of description that explains how movement variables, such as a limb’s position and speed, are controlled and coordinated. Understanding motor symptoms as motor control abnormalities means to identify how the disease disrupts normal control processes. In the case of Parkinson’s disease, movement slowness, for example, would be explained by a disruption of the control processes that determine normal movement speed. Two long-term benefits of understanding the motor control basis of motor symptoms include the future design of neural prostheses to replace the function of damaged basal ganglia circuits, and the rational design of rehabilitation strategies. This type of understanding, however, remains limited, partly because of limitations in our knowledge of normal motor control. In this article, we review the concept of motor control and describe a few motor symptoms that illustrate the challenges in understanding such symptoms as motor control abnormalities. PMID:22675667

  10. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January through March 1993. There is one abnormal occurrence at a nuclear power plant disposed in this report that involved a steam generator tube rupture at Palo Verde Unit 2, and none for fuel cycle facilities. Three abnormal occurrences involving medical misadminstrations (two therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities are also discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  11. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  12. Where is Russia heading?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Pliskevič

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the proceedings from the collection Where is Russia Heading? (= Куда идёт Россия?, published between 1994 and 1998 in connection with the international symposium held under this name each year in Moscow. The symposia and their proceeding, involving leading Russian and foreign experts, were significant in that they encompassed a wide range of themes – social, economic, political, legislative, cultural and other transformations that have been occurring in Russia during the past decades. The author, however, limits her review to contributions dealing with ethno-political and socio-cultural transformations in Russia. She concludes that the question – “Where is Russia heading?” – still remains open to answers.

  13. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  14. "Head versus heart"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this study that American adults and undergraduates are substantially less likely to acknowledge magical effects when the judgments involve money (amount willing to pay to avoid an ``unpleasant'' magical contact than they are when using preference or rating measures. We conclude that in ``head-heart'' conflicts of this type, money tips the balance towards the former, or, in other words, that money makes the mind less magical.

  15. Muscle-tendon-related abnormalities detected by ultrasonography are common in symptomatic hip dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Bolvig, Lars; Hölmich, Per

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hip dysplasia is characterized by reduced acetabular coverage of the femoral head leading to an increased mechanical load on the hip joint and the acting hip muscles. Potentially, the muscles and tendons functioning close to the hip joint may present with overuse......-related ultrasonography findings. The primary aim was to report the prevalence of muscle-tendon-related abnormalities detected by ultrasonography in 100 patients with symptomatic hip dysplasia. The secondary aim was to investigate correlations between muscle-tendon-related abnormalities detected by ultrasonography......-tendon-related abnormalities detected by ultrasonography in the hip and groin region are common in patients with symptomatic hip dysplasia, and the ultrasonography findings of the iliopsoas and gluteus medius/minimus tendons are weakly to moderately correlated to pain related to muscles and tendons in these structures. Both...

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermik, Tevfik F.; Kaya, Meryem; Bedel, Deniz; Berkarda, Sakir; Yigitbasi, Oemer N.; Ugur-Altun, Betuel

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) before parathyroidectomy by semiquantitative analysis of brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Included in this prospective study were 14 patients (mean age 47.6 ± 10.4 years; 3 male, 11 female) and 10 control subjects (mean age 36.0 ± 8.5 years, 6 male, 4 female) were SPECT imaging was performed using a dual-headed gamma camera 60-90 min after intravenous administration of 925 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO. The corticocerebellar rCBF ratios were calculated from 52 brain areas and reference lower values (RLVs) were calculated from the rCBF ratios of control subjects. The regional ratios that were below the corresponding RLV were considered abnormal (hypoperfused). Hypoperfusion was shown in 171 out of 728 regions (23%) and there was a significant correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions in the patient group (R = 0.75 and P = 0.001, and R = 0.75, P = 0.001, respectively). Significantly reduced rCBF were found in the following cortical regions: bilateral cingulate cortex, superior and inferior frontal cortex, anterior temporal cortex, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus and parietal cortex, and right posterior temporal cortex. Our results indicate that alterations in rCBF in patients with PHP can be demonstrated with brain SPECT. The correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions indicates that there may be a strong relationship between rCBF abnormalities and increased levels of serum calcium and PTH. In addition, the degree of rCBF abnormalities could be determined by brain SPECT in PHP patients with or without psychiatric symptoms. (orig.)

  17. Tumor disease and associated congenital abnormalities on prenatal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Stefan F; Horcher, Ernst; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Bettelheim, Dieter; Amann, Gabriele; Nemec, Ursula; Rotmensch, Siegfried; Rimoin, David L; Graham, John M; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-02-01

    Fetal tumors can have a devastating effect on the fetus, and may occur in association with congenital malformations. In view of the increasing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to prenatal ultrasonography (US), we sought to demonstrate the visualization of fetal tumors, with regard to congenital abnormalities, on MRI. This retrospective study included 18 fetuses with tumors depicted on fetal MRI after suspicious US findings. An MRI standard protocol was used to diagnose tumors judged as benign or malignant. All organ systems were assessed for tumor-related complications and other congenital malformations. Available US results and histopathology were compared with MRI. There were 13/18 (72.2%) benign and 5/18 (27.8%) malignant tumors diagnosed: a cerebral primitive neuroectodermal tumor in 1/18, head-neck teratomas in 4/18; ventricular rhabdomyomas in 4/18; a cardiac teratoma in 1/18; a hepatoblastoma in 1/18; neuroblastomas in 2/18; a cystic hemorrhagic adrenal hyperplasia in 1/18; a pelvic leiomyoma in 1/18; sacrococcygeal teratomas in 3/18. Tumor-related complications were present in 13/18 (72.2%) cases; other congenital abnormalities in 3/18 (16.7%). MRI diagnosis and histology were concordant in 8/11 (72.7%) cases. In 6/12 (50%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were concordant, and, in 6/12 (50%) cases, additional MRI findings changed the US diagnosis. Our MRI results demonstrate the visualization of fetal tumors, with frequently encountered tumor-related complications, and other exceptional congenital abnormalities, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Compared to prenatal US, MRI may add important findings in certain cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermik, Tevfik F. [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Trakya Universitesi Hastanesi, Nukleer Tip Anabilim Dali, Gullapoglu Yerleskesi, Edirne (Turkey); Kaya, Meryem; Bedel, Deniz; Berkarda, Sakir; Yigitbasi, Oemer N. [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Ugur-Altun, Betuel [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We assessed the alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) before parathyroidectomy by semiquantitative analysis of brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Included in this prospective study were 14 patients (mean age 47.6 {+-} 10.4 years; 3 male, 11 female) and 10 control subjects (mean age 36.0 {+-} 8.5 years, 6 male, 4 female) were SPECT imaging was performed using a dual-headed gamma camera 60-90 min after intravenous administration of 925 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO. The corticocerebellar rCBF ratios were calculated from 52 brain areas and reference lower values (RLVs) were calculated from the rCBF ratios of control subjects. The regional ratios that were below the corresponding RLV were considered abnormal (hypoperfused). Hypoperfusion was shown in 171 out of 728 regions (23%) and there was a significant correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions in the patient group (R = 0.75 and P = 0.001, and R = 0.75, P = 0.001, respectively). Significantly reduced rCBF were found in the following cortical regions: bilateral cingulate cortex, superior and inferior frontal cortex, anterior temporal cortex, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus and parietal cortex, and right posterior temporal cortex. Our results indicate that alterations in rCBF in patients with PHP can be demonstrated with brain SPECT. The correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions indicates that there may be a strong relationship between rCBF abnormalities and increased levels of serum calcium and PTH. In addition, the degree of rCBF abnormalities could be determined by brain SPECT in PHP patients with or without psychiatric symptoms. (orig.)

  19. Where are we heading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry's participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  20. "Head versus heart"

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Rozin; Heidi Grant; Stephanie Weinberg; Scott Parker

    2007-01-01

    Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach) are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this ...

  1. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Her...

  2. Pigeons (C. livia Follow Their Head during Turning Flight: Head Stabilization Underlies the Visual Control of Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo G. Ros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar flight control principles operate across insect and vertebrate fliers. These principles indicate that robust solutions have evolved to meet complex behavioral challenges. Following from studies of visual and cervical feedback control of flight in insects, we investigate the role of head stabilization in providing feedback cues for controlling turning flight in pigeons. Based on previous observations that the eyes of pigeons remain at relatively fixed orientations within the head during flight, we test potential sensory control inputs derived from head and body movements during 90° aerial turns. We observe that periods of angular head stabilization alternate with rapid head repositioning movements (head saccades, and confirm that control of head motion is decoupled from aerodynamic and inertial forces acting on the bird's continuously rotating body during turning flapping flight. Visual cues inferred from head saccades correlate with changes in flight trajectory; whereas the magnitude of neck bending predicts angular changes in body position. The control of head motion to stabilize a pigeon's gaze may therefore facilitate extraction of important motion cues, in addition to offering mechanisms for controlling body and wing movements. Strong similarities between the sensory flight control of birds and insects may also inspire novel designs of robust controllers for human-engineered autonomous aerial vehicles.

  3. Head-to-head comparison between {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography in clinically recurrent head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimburger, Celine; Hubele, Fabrice; Namer, Izzie Jacques [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg (France); CNRS/University of Strasbourg, ICube, UMR 7357, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, FMTS, Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Veillon, Francis; Riehm, Sophie; Cavalcanti, Marcela [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Inserm UMR1068 Marseille Cancerology Research Center, Marseille (France); Goichot, Bernard; Chabrier, Gerard [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Internal Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Petit-Thomas, Julie; Charpiot, Anne [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Otolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Strasbourg (France); Averous, Gerlinde [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Pathology, Strasbourg (France); Imperiale, Alessio [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg (France); CNRS/University of Strasbourg, ICube, UMR 7357, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, FMTS, Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Hautepierre University Hospital, Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2017-06-15

    Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) can relapse after primary treatment. Optimal imaging protocols have not yet been established for posttreatment evaluation. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography (MRA/CTA) in HNPGL patients with clinical relapse during their follow-up. Sixteen consecutive patients presenting with local pain, tinnitus, dysphagia, hoarse voice, cranial nerve involvement, deafness, or retrotympanic mass appearing during follow-up after the initial treatment of HNPGLs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent both {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA (15 patents) or CTA (1 patent). Both methods were first assessed under blinded conditions and afterwards correlated. Head and neck imaging abnormalities without histological confirmation were considered true-positive results based on a consensus between radiologists and nuclear physicians and on further {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and/or MRA. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA were concordant in 14 patients and in disagreement in 2 patients. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA identified, respectively, 12 and 10 presumed recurrent HNPGLs in 12 patients. The two lesions diagnosed by PET/CT only were confirmed during follow-up by otoscopic examination and MRA performed 29 and 17 months later. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT images were only slightly influenced by the posttreatment sequelae, showing a better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA. Finally, in 2 of the 16 studied patients, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT detected two additional synchronous primary HNPGLs. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT is highly sensitive in posttreatment evaluation of patients with HNPGLs, and also offers better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA and whole-body examination. We therefore suggest that {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT is performed as the first diagnostic imaging modality in symptomatic patients with suspicion of HNPGL relapse after primary treatment when {sup 68

  4. Head-to-head comparison between "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography in clinically recurrent head and neck paragangliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimburger, Celine; Hubele, Fabrice; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Veillon, Francis; Riehm, Sophie; Cavalcanti, Marcela; Taieb, David; Goichot, Bernard; Chabrier, Gerard; Petit-Thomas, Julie; Charpiot, Anne; Averous, Gerlinde; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) can relapse after primary treatment. Optimal imaging protocols have not yet been established for posttreatment evaluation. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography (MRA/CTA) in HNPGL patients with clinical relapse during their follow-up. Sixteen consecutive patients presenting with local pain, tinnitus, dysphagia, hoarse voice, cranial nerve involvement, deafness, or retrotympanic mass appearing during follow-up after the initial treatment of HNPGLs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent both "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA (15 patents) or CTA (1 patent). Both methods were first assessed under blinded conditions and afterwards correlated. Head and neck imaging abnormalities without histological confirmation were considered true-positive results based on a consensus between radiologists and nuclear physicians and on further "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT and/or MRA. "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA were concordant in 14 patients and in disagreement in 2 patients. "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA identified, respectively, 12 and 10 presumed recurrent HNPGLs in 12 patients. The two lesions diagnosed by PET/CT only were confirmed during follow-up by otoscopic examination and MRA performed 29 and 17 months later. "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT images were only slightly influenced by the posttreatment sequelae, showing a better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA. Finally, in 2 of the 16 studied patients, "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT detected two additional synchronous primary HNPGLs. "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT is highly sensitive in posttreatment evaluation of patients with HNPGLs, and also offers better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA and whole-body examination. We therefore suggest that "1"8F-FDOPA PET/CT is performed as the first diagnostic imaging modality in symptomatic patients with suspicion of HNPGL relapse after primary treatment when "6"8Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues are

  5. Influence of history of head trauma and epilepsy on delinquents in a juvenile classification home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideki; Fujiki, Masumi; Shibata, Arihiro; Ishikawa, Kenji

    2005-12-01

    Juvenile delinquents often show poor impulse control and cognitive abnormalities, which may be related to disturbances in brain development due to head trauma and/or epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of head trauma and/or epilepsy on delinquent behavior. We examined 1,336 juvenile delinquents (1,151 males and 185 females) who had been admitted to the Nagoya Juvenile Classification Home, Aichi, Japan. Among them, 52 subjects with a history of epilepsy, convulsion or loss of consciousness, head injury requiring neurological assessment and/or treatment, or neurosurgical operation (head trauma/epilepsy group), were examined by electroencephalography and compared to subjects without these histories (control group) with respect to types of crime, history of amphetamine use, psychiatric treatment, child abuse, and family history. Among the 52 subjects, 43 (82.7%) showed abnormal findings. The head trauma/epilepsy group had significantly higher rates of psychiatric treatment (Phistory of drug abuse (Pdelinquents who had a history of head trauma and/or epilepsy showed a high prevalence of electroencephalograph abnormality, and higher rates of psychiatric treatment and family history of drug abuse, and were more likely to be sent to juvenile training school by the family court.

  6. Complications of Fluoroscopically Guided Percutaneous Gastrostomy With Large-bore Balloon-retained Catheter in Patients With Head and Neck Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Cheung Chan

    2010-08-01

    Conclusion: FPG is a safe method with low mortality and complication rate for constructing long-term enteral access in patients with head and neck cancer and esophageal abnormalities, who have no endoscopic access to the stomach.

  7. CT findings and outcome in head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, Akira

    1984-12-01

    CT findings and outcome were discussed in head injuries. Parenchymal findings were classified into 5 categories; ''normal'', ''hemispheric (isodense) swelling'', ''hemorrhagic lesions'', ''diffuse cerebral swelling'', and ''low density''. The worst outcome (73% mortality) was seen in ''hemispheric swelling''. This abnormality was quite often associated with acute subdural hematoma. Multiple ''hemorrhagic lesions'' were associated with much poorer outcome than single lesions. The older groups had more acute subdural hematomas and more ''hemorrhagic lesions''. And ''hemorrhagic lesions'' were more often multiple and larger in the older group. (author).

  8. Computed tomography in acute head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T; Inagawa, T; Yamada, T; Sota, K [Shimane Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan)

    1981-01-01

    After the introduction of CT (GE-CT/T) in January, 1980, we experienced 81 cases of head injury. We diagnosed these cases into normal in 50 cases, epidural hematoma in 8 cases, subdural hematoma in 5 cases, intracerebral hematoma in 3 cases, cerebral contusion or cerebral swelling in 14 cases and combined hematoma in 1 case, based on CT findings. We diagnose normal, when no abnormal finding is present intracranially. Epidural hematoma is visualized as a bicrescent-shaped high density area on CT scan. Subdural hematoma appears as a crescent-shaped high density area on CT finding. Intracranial hematoma is visualized as a high density area in the brain tissue on CT scan. Cerebral contusion presents as salt and pepper appearance on CT scan representing area of high and low density complex. Brain swelling is visualized as disappearance or compression of ventricles, cisterns, sulci and gyri.

  9. Head movements and postures as pain behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Walter, Steffen; Traue, Harald C.

    2018-01-01

    Pain assessment can benefit from observation of pain behaviors, such as guarding or facial expression, and observational pain scales are widely used in clinical practice with nonverbal patients. However, little is known about head movements and postures in the context of pain. In this regard, we analyze videos of three publically available datasets. The BioVid dataset was recorded with healthy participants subjected to painful heat stimuli. In the BP4D dataset, healthy participants performed a cold-pressor test and several other tasks (meant to elicit emotion). The UNBC dataset videos show shoulder pain patients during range-of-motion tests to their affected and unaffected limbs. In all videos, participants were sitting in an upright position. We studied head movements and postures that occurred during the painful and control trials by measuring head orientation from video over time, followed by analyzing posture and movement summary statistics and occurrence frequencies of typical postures and movements. We found significant differences between pain and control trials with analyses of variance and binomial tests. In BioVid and BP4D, pain was accompanied by head movements and postures that tend to be oriented downwards or towards the pain site. We also found differences in movement range and speed in all three datasets. The results suggest that head movements and postures should be considered for pain assessment and research. As additional pain indicators, they possibly might improve pain management whenever behavior is assessed, especially in nonverbal individuals such as infants or patients with dementia. However, in advance more research is needed to identify specific head movements and postures in pain patients. PMID:29444153

  10. Transvaginal sonography in abnormal uterine bleeding and correlation to hysteroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, S.; Shah, S.; Ali, H.; Khan, S.; Ehsan, N.; Ahmed, S.Z.

    2017-01-01

    To correlate results of Transvaginal sonography with those of hysteroscopy and biopsy in abnormal uterine bleeding to estimate the accuracy and analytical values of non-invasive transvaginal sonography in abnormal uterine bleeding. Methodology: This cross-sectional Study was carried out at BMCH, Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan from March 2013 to February 2014 and included 200 patients of abnormal uterine bleeding. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy, virginity, local bleeding of perineal or vaginal origin. Hysteroscopy and biopsy and Transvaginal Ultrasound (TVS) were performed in all. Result: The most common type of bleeding was found to be menorrhagia in 39% while the least common type was postmenopausal bleeding in 9%. Mean endometrial thickness was 11.64 mm and it was noted that at less than 14mm thickness no serious pathology was found. Sensitivity of TVS for endometrial hyperplasia was found to be 66.66% while specificity was 100%. Positive analytical value was 100% while negative value was 100%. Overall sensitivity calculated for TVS was 94.44%, specificity 98.55%, PPV was 81.93% and NPV 98.55%. Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity of TVS were lower than hysteroscopy and biopsy but the difference was not significant. TVS can be used as first line investigation while hysteroscopy and biopsy may be left for cases of high risk or in those cases where some positive findings could be found on TVS. (author)

  11. Radiofrequency ablation of two femoral head chondroblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petsas, Theodore [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece); Megas, Panagiotis [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Patras (Greece)]. E-mail: panmegas@med.upatras.gr; Papathanassiou, Zafiria [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece)

    2007-07-15

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous bone tumor. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for pain relief and prevention of further growth. Open surgical techniques are associated with complications, particularly when the tumors are located in deep anatomical sites. The authors performed RF ablation in two cases of subarticular femoral head chondroblastomas and emphasize its positive impact. The clinical course, the radiological findings and the post treatment results are discussed.

  12. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xiong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG. In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes, our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes, blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI.

  13. Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Anne-Sylvie Catherin has been appointed Head of the Human Resources Department with effect from 1 August 2009. Mrs Catherin is a lawyer specialized in International Administration and joined CERN in 1996 as legal advisor within the Office of the HR Department Head. After having been promoted to the position of Group Leader responsible for social and statutory conditions in 2000, Mrs Catherin was appointed Deputy of the Head of the Human Resources Department and Group Leader responsible for Strategy, Management and Development from 2005 to date. Since 2005, she has also served as a member of CCP and TREF. In the execution of her mandate as Deputy HR Department Head, Mrs Catherin closely assisted the HR Department Head in the organization of the Department and in devising new HR policies and strategies. She played an instrumental role in the last five-yearly review and in the revision of the Staff Rules and Regulations.

  14. Prediction of heart abnormality using MLP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan; Januar, Yulni; Mat, Muhammad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Awang, Mat Kamil

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality does not choose gender, age and races when it strikes. With no warning signs or symptoms, it can result to a sudden death of the patient. Generally, heart's irregular electrical activity is defined as heart abnormality. Via implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network, this paper tries to develop a program that allows the detection of heart abnormality activity. Utilizing several training algorithms with Purelin activation function, an amount of heartbeat signals received through the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be employed to condition the MLP network.

  15. Hysterosalpingography: analysis of 473 abnormal examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petta, C.A.; Costa-Paiva, L.H.S. da; Pinto-Neto, A.M.; Martins, R.; Souza, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors reviewed the reports of 4/3 abnormal hysterosalpingographies from 1,200 medical records of patients at the sterility and infertility out-patient clinic of the School of Medical Sciences of the State University of Campinas (Unicamp), from July, 1974 to December, 1981. The objective was to evaluate the incidence and main alterations diagnosed by hysterosalpingography. The most frequent findings were tuboperitoneal factors in 91% of the examinations, uterine cavity abnormalities in 17.4% and cervical factor in 6.3% of the cases. The examinations showed a great incident of tuboperitoneal abnormalities as cause of sterility from lower social classes. (author) [pt

  16. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Brain and bone abnormalities of thanatophoric dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elka; Blaser, Susan; Shannon, Patrick; Widjaja, Elysa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the imaging findings of skeletal and brain abnormalities in thanatophoric dwarfism, a lethal form of dysplastic dwarfism. The bony abnormalities associated with thanatophoric dwarfism include marked shortening of the tubular bones and ribs. Abnormal temporal lobe development is a common associated feature and can be visualized as early as the second trimester. It is important to assess the brains of fetuses with suspected thanatophoric dwarfism because the presence of associated brain malformations can assist in the antenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dwarfism.

  18. Abnormal Event Detection Using Local Sparse Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality measurem...... is found that satisfies: the distance between its local space and the normal space is large. We evaluate our method on two public benchmark datasets: UCSD and Subway Entrance datasets. The comparison to the state-of-the-art methods validate our method's effectiveness....

  19. Preliminary study on the head-injury by using SPECT with 99mTc-HMPAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Yihui; Liu Yongchang; Lin Xiangtong

    1994-01-01

    After the acute period of head trauma some cases of patients may have some symptoms, such as headache, poor memory, vertigo, et al. In this study, among 42 patients most of whom had normal CT or MRI abnormal findings of brain perfusion imaging were seen in 33 patients (78.6%). Multiple perfusion defects were observed in some patients (13/42). These indicate that the head-injury syndrome is closely related to brain blood perfusion. authors' conclusion is that the brain SPECT is able to find out the etiology of head injury syndrome

  20. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...