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Sample records for abnormal gene dosage

  1. Gene dosage methods as diagnostic tools for the identification of chromosome abnormalities.

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    Gouas, L; Goumy, C; Véronèse, L; Tchirkov, A; Vago, P

    2008-09-01

    Cytogenetics is the part of genetics that deals with chromosomes, particularly with numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, and their implications in congenital or acquired genetic disorders. Standard karyotyping, successfully used for the last 50 years in investigating the chromosome etiology in patients with infertility, fetal abnormalities and congenital disorders, is constrained by the limits of microscopic resolution and is not suited for the detection of subtle chromosome abnormalities. The ability to detect submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements that lead to copy-number changes has escalated progressively in recent years with the advent of molecular cytogenetic techniques. Here, we review various gene dosage methods such as FISH, PCR-based approaches (MLPA, QF-PCR, QMPSF and real time PCR), CGH and array-CGH, that can be used for the identification and delineation of copy-number changes for diagnostic purposes. Besides comparing their relative strength and weakness, we will discuss the impact that these detection methods have on our understanding of copy number variations in the human genome and their implications in genetic counseling.

  2. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Associated with Abnormal Gene Dosage: Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski Syndromes.

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    Neira-Fresneda, Juanita; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are reciprocal contiguous gene syndromes within the well-characterized 17p11.2 region. Approximately 3.6 Mb microduplication of 17p11.2, known as PTLS, represents the mechanistically predicted homologous recombination reciprocal of the SMS microdeletion, both resulting in multiple congenital anomalies. Mouse model studies have revealed that the retinoic acid-inducible 1 gene (RAI1) within the SMS and PTLS critical genomic interval is the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the major phenotypic features in these disorders. Even though PTLS and SMS share the same genomic region, clinical manifestations and behavioral issues are distinct and in fact some mirror traits may be on opposite ends of a given phenotypic spectrum. We describe the neurobehavioral phenotypes of SMS and PTLS patients during different life phases as well as clinical guidelines for diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach once diagnosis is confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization or RAI1 gene sequencing. The main goal is to increase awareness of these rare disorders because an earlier diagnosis will lead to more timely developmental intervention and medical management which will improve clinical outcome.

  3. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Associated with Abnormal Gene Dosage: Smith–Magenis and Potocki–Lupski Syndromes

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    Neira-Fresneda, Juanita; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki–Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are reciprocal contiguous gene syndromes within the well-characterized 17p11.2 region. Approximately 3.6 Mb microduplication of 17p11.2, known as PTLS, represents the mechanistically predicted homologous recombination reciprocal of the SMS microdeletion, both resulting in multiple congenital anomalies. Mouse model studies have revealed that the retinoic acid–inducible 1 gene (RAI1) within the SMS and PTLS critical genomic interval is the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the major phenotypic features in these disorders. Even though PTLS and SMS share the same genomic region, clinical manifestations and behavioral issues are distinct and in fact some mirror traits may be on opposite ends of a given phenotypic spectrum. We describe the neurobehavioral phenotypes of SMS and PTLS patients during different life phases as well as clinical guidelines for diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach once diagnosis is confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization or RAI1 gene sequencing. The main goal is to increase awareness of these rare disorders because an earlier diagnosis will lead to more timely developmental intervention and medical management which will improve clinical outcome. PMID:27617127

  4. Epilepsy caused by an abnormal alternative splicing with dosage effect of the SV2A gene in a chicken model.

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    Marine Douaud

    Full Text Available Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is caused by the combination of an individual's enhanced sensitivity with relevant light stimuli, such as stroboscopic lights or video games. This is the most common reflex epilepsy in humans; it is characterized by the photoparoxysmal response, which is an abnormal electroencephalographic reaction, and seizures triggered by intermittent light stimulation. Here, by using genetic mapping, sequencing and functional analyses, we report that a mutation in the acceptor site of the second intron of SV2A (the gene encoding synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A is causing photosensitive reflex epilepsy in a unique vertebrate model, the Fepi chicken strain, a spontaneous model where the neurological disorder is inherited as an autosomal recessive mutation. This mutation causes an aberrant splicing event and significantly reduces the level of SV2A mRNA in homozygous carriers. Levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug, is known to bind SV2A, and SV2A knock-out mice develop seizures soon after birth and usually die within three weeks. The Fepi chicken survives to adulthood and responds to levetiracetam, suggesting that the low-level expression of SV2A in these animals is sufficient to allow survival, but does not protect against seizures. Thus, the Fepi chicken model shows that the role of the SV2A pathway in the brain is conserved between birds and mammals, in spite of a large phylogenetic distance. The Fepi model appears particularly useful for further studies of physiopathology of reflex epilepsy, in comparison with induced models of epilepsy in rodents. Consequently, SV2A is a very attractive candidate gene for analysis in the context of both mono- and polygenic generalized epilepsies in humans.

  5. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

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    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  6. Mammalian X chromosome inactivation evolved as a dosage-compensation mechanism for dosage-sensitive genes on the X chromosome.

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    Pessia, Eugénie; Makino, Takashi; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; McLysaght, Aoife; Marais, Gabriel A B

    2012-04-03

    How and why female somatic X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) evolved in mammals remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that XCI is a dosage-compensation mechanism that evolved to equalize expression levels of X-linked genes in females (2X) and males (1X), with a prior twofold increase in expression of X-linked genes in both sexes ("Ohno's hypothesis"). Whereas the parity of X chromosome expression between the sexes has been clearly demonstrated, tests for the doubling of expression levels globally along the X chromosome have returned contradictory results. However, changes in gene dosage during sex-chromosome evolution are not expected to impact on all genes equally, and should have greater consequences for dosage-sensitive genes. We show that, for genes encoding components of large protein complexes (≥ 7 members)--a class of genes that is expected to be dosage-sensitive--expression of X-linked genes is similar to that of autosomal genes within the complex. These data support Ohno's hypothesis that XCI acts as a dosage-compensation mechanism, and allow us to refine Ohno's model of XCI evolution. We also explore the contribution of dosage-sensitive genes to X aneuploidy phenotypes in humans, such as Turner (X0) and Klinefelter (XXY) syndromes. X aneuploidy in humans is common and is known to have mild effects because most of the supernumerary X genes are inactivated and not affected by aneuploidy. Only genes escaping XCI experience dosage changes in X-aneuploidy patients. We combined data on dosage sensitivity and XCI to compute a list of candidate genes for X-aneuploidy syndromes.

  7. Gene expression dosage regulation in an allopolyploid fish.

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    I Matos

    Full Text Available How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ''diploidization'' could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles' samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression. Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5. Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock

  8. Complexity of Gene Expression Evolution after Duplication: Protein Dosage Rebalancing

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    Igor B. Rogozin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing debates about functional importance of gene duplications have been recently intensified by a heated discussion of the “ortholog conjecture” (OC. Under the OC, which is central to functional annotation of genomes, orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes at the same level of sequence divergence. However, a recent study challenged the OC by reporting a greater functional similarity, in terms of gene ontology (GO annotations and expression profiles, among within-species paralogs compared to orthologs. These findings were taken to indicate that functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context of the genes, rather than evolutionary history. Subsequent studies suggested that the OC appears to be generally valid when applied to mammalian evolution but the complete picture of evolution of gene expression also has to incorporate lineage-specific aspects of paralogy. The observed complexity of gene expression evolution after duplication can be explained through selection for gene dosage effect combined with the duplication-degeneration-complementation model. This paper discusses expression divergence of recent duplications occurring before functional divergence of proteins encoded by duplicate genes.

  9. Noise reduction facilitated by dosage compensation in gene networks

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    Peng, Weilin; Song, Ruijie; Acar, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Genetic noise together with genome duplication and volume changes during cell cycle are significant contributors to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. How can cells buffer the effects of these unavoidable epigenetic and genetic variations on phenotypes that are sensitive to such variations? Here we show that a simple network motif that is essential for network-dosage compensation can reduce the effects of extrinsic noise on the network output. Using natural and synthetic gene networks with and without the network motif, we measure gene network activity in single yeast cells and find that the activity of the compensated network is significantly lower in noise compared with the non-compensated network. A mathematical analysis provides intuitive insights into these results and a novel stochastic model tracking cell-volume and cell-cycle predicts the experimental results. Our work implies that noise is a selectable trait tunable by evolution. PMID:27694830

  10. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

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    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  11. Robust Yet Fragile: Expression Noise, Protein Misfolding, and Gene Dosage in the Evolution of Genomes.

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    Pires, J Chris; Conant, Gavin C

    2016-11-23

    The complex manner in which organisms respond to changes in their gene dosage has long fascinated geneticists. Oddly, although the existence of dominance implies that dosage reductions often have mild phenotypes, extra copies of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy) are generally strongly deleterious. Even more paradoxically, an extra copy of the genome is better tolerated than is aneuploidy. We review the resolution of this paradox, highlighting the roles of biochemistry, protein aggregation, and disruption of cellular microstructure in that explanation. Returning to life's curious combination of robustness and sensitivity to dosage changes, we argue that understanding how biological robustness evolved makes these observations less inexplicable. We propose that noise in gene expression and evolutionary strategies for its suppression play a role in generating dosage phenotypes. Finally, we outline an unappreciated mechanism for the preservation of duplicate genes, namely preservation to limit expression noise, arguing that it is particularly relevant in polyploid organisms.

  12. Measuring the toxic effects of high gene dosage on yeast cells.

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    Daniel, J

    1996-12-13

    A novel method, which is rapid, reliable and quantitative, is presented for measuring the toxic effects on yeast cells of high dosage of any given gene. It is based on the possibility of monitoring the presence in cells of a plasmid carrying the ADE2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by direct observation of colonies, the construction of this particular plasmid being easily made by marked homologous recombination in yeast. Four yeast regulatory genes tested were found to result in various degrees of toxicity at high dosage. Possible implications of the measurement of gene toxicity for eukaryotic cell regulatory mechanisms and for the use of novel general approaches to gene selection, such as the gene-gene interference method, are discussed.

  13. Subfunctionalization reduces the fitness cost of gene duplication in humans by buffering dosage imbalances

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    Fernández Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driven essentially by random genetic drift, subfunctionalization has been identified as a possible non-adaptive mechanism for the retention of duplicate genes in small-population species, where widespread deleterious mutations are likely to cause complementary loss of subfunctions across gene copies. Through subfunctionalization, duplicates become indispensable to maintain the functional requirements of the ancestral locus. Yet, gene duplication produces a dosage imbalance in the encoded proteins and thus, as investigated in this paper, subfunctionalization must be subject to the selective forces arising from the fitness bottleneck introduced by the duplication event. Results We show that, while arising from random drift, subfunctionalization must be inescapably subject to selective forces, since the diversification of expression patterns across paralogs mitigates duplication-related dosage imbalances in the concentrations of encoded proteins. Dosage imbalance effects become paramount when proteins rely on obligatory associations to maintain their structural integrity, and are expected to be weaker when protein complexation is ephemeral or adventitious. To establish the buffering effect of subfunctionalization on selection pressure, we determine the packing quality of encoded proteins, an established indicator of dosage sensitivity, and correlate this parameter with the extent of paralog segregation in humans, using species with larger population -and more efficient selection- as controls. Conclusions Recognizing the role of subfunctionalization as a dosage-imbalance buffer in gene duplication events enabled us to reconcile its mechanistic nonadaptive origin with its adaptive role as an enabler of the evolution of genetic redundancy. This constructive role was established in this paper by proving the following assertion: If subfunctionalization is indeed adaptive, its effect on paralog segregation should scale with the dosage

  14. Widespread transcriptional autosomal dosage compensation in Drosophila correlates with gene expression level.

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    McAnally, Ashley A; Yampolsky, Lev Y

    2009-12-23

    Little is known about dosage compensation in autosomal genes. Transcription-level compensation of deletions and other loss-of-function mutations may be a mechanism of dominance of wild-type alleles, a ubiquitous phenomenon whose nature has been a subject of a long debate. We measured gene expression in two isogenic Drosophila lines heterozygous for long deletions and compared our results with previously published gene expression data in a line heterozygous for a long duplication. We find that a majority of genes are at least partially compensated at transcription, both for (1/2)-fold dosage (in heterozygotes for deletions) and for 1.5-fold dosage (in heterozygotes for a duplication). The degree of compensation does not vary among functional classes of genes. Compensation for deletions is stronger for highly expressed genes. In contrast, the degree of compensation for duplications is stronger for weakly expressed genes. Thus, partial transcriptional compensation appears to be based on regulatory mechanisms that insure high transcription levels of some genes and low transcription levels of other genes, instead of precise maintenance of a particular homeostatic expression level. Given the ubiquity of transcriptional compensation, dominance of wild-type alleles may be at least partially caused by of the regulation at transcription level.

  15. Dominance and gene dosage balance in health and disease: why levels matter!

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    Veitia, Reiner A; Birchler, James A

    2010-01-01

    The classical concept of genetic dominance is a simplification of a more quantitative reality. This is clearly exemplified by aneuploid syndromes, of which the best known case is trisomy 21. Moreover, there is an increasing number of clinical conditions due to reduced dosage (haploinsufficiency) of genes encoding transcription factors and other proteins involved in signal transduction and macromolecular complexes. In such genetic diseases, a high degree of phenotypic variability is observed, which calls for an explanation. The sources of dominance are heterogeneous and difficult to cover in a brief review. Here, we will focus on the molecular bases of dosage-sensitive syndromes from the perspective of the gene dosage balance hypothesis, which postulates that stoichiometric alterations of macromolecular complexes or cellular networks are responsible for dominant phenotypes, because of the existing non-linear relationships between the genotypic and phenotypic values with which they are associated.

  16. Compensatory Drift and the Evolutionary Dynamics of Dosage-Sensitive Duplicate Genes.

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    Thompson, Ammon; Zakon, Harold H; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Dosage-balance selection preserves functionally redundant duplicates (paralogs) at the optimum for their combined expression. Here we present a model of the dynamics of duplicate genes coevolving under dosage-balance selection. We call this the compensatory drift model. Results show that even when strong dosage-balance selection constrains total expression to the optimum, expression of each duplicate can diverge by drift from its original level. The rate of divergence slows as the strength of stabilizing selection, the size of the mutation effect, and/or the size of the population increases. We show that dosage-balance selection impedes neofunctionalization early after duplication but can later facilitate it. We fit this model to data from sodium channel duplicates in 10 families of teleost fish; these include two convergent lineages of electric fish in which one of the duplicates neofunctionalized. Using the model, we estimated the strength of dosage-balance selection for these genes. The results indicate that functionally redundant paralogs still may undergo radical functional changes after a prolonged period of compensatory drift.

  17. The Intolerance of Regulatory Sequence to Genetic Variation Predicts Gene Dosage Sensitivity.

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    Slavé Petrovski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding sequence contains pathogenic mutations. Yet, compared with mutations in protein-coding sequence, pathogenic regulatory mutations are notoriously difficult to recognize. Most fundamentally, we are not yet adept at recognizing the sequence stretches in the human genome that are most important in regulating the expression of genes. For this reason, it is difficult to apply to the regulatory regions the same kinds of analytical paradigms that are being successfully applied to identify mutations among protein-coding regions that influence risk. To determine whether dosage sensitive genes have distinct patterns among their noncoding sequence, we present two primary approaches that focus solely on a gene's proximal noncoding regulatory sequence. The first approach is a regulatory sequence analogue of the recently introduced residual variation intolerance score (RVIS, termed noncoding RVIS, or ncRVIS. The ncRVIS compares observed and predicted levels of standing variation in the regulatory sequence of human genes. The second approach, termed ncGERP, reflects the phylogenetic conservation of a gene's regulatory sequence using GERP++. We assess how well these two approaches correlate with four gene lists that use different ways to identify genes known or likely to cause disease through changes in expression: 1 genes that are known to cause disease through haploinsufficiency, 2 genes curated as dosage sensitive in ClinGen's Genome Dosage Map, 3 genes judged likely to be under purifying selection for mutations that change expression levels because they are statistically depleted of loss-of-function variants in the general population, and 4 genes judged unlikely to cause disease based on the presence of copy number variants in the general population. We find that both noncoding scores are highly predictive of dosage sensitivity using any of these criteria. In a similar way to ncGERP, we assess two ensemble-based predictors of regional noncoding

  18. The Intolerance of Regulatory Sequence to Genetic Variation Predicts Gene Dosage Sensitivity.

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    Petrovski, Slavé; Gussow, Ayal B; Wang, Quanli; Halvorsen, Matt; Han, Yujun; Weir, William H; Allen, Andrew S; Goldstein, David B

    2015-09-01

    Noncoding sequence contains pathogenic mutations. Yet, compared with mutations in protein-coding sequence, pathogenic regulatory mutations are notoriously difficult to recognize. Most fundamentally, we are not yet adept at recognizing the sequence stretches in the human genome that are most important in regulating the expression of genes. For this reason, it is difficult to apply to the regulatory regions the same kinds of analytical paradigms that are being successfully applied to identify mutations among protein-coding regions that influence risk. To determine whether dosage sensitive genes have distinct patterns among their noncoding sequence, we present two primary approaches that focus solely on a gene's proximal noncoding regulatory sequence. The first approach is a regulatory sequence analogue of the recently introduced residual variation intolerance score (RVIS), termed noncoding RVIS, or ncRVIS. The ncRVIS compares observed and predicted levels of standing variation in the regulatory sequence of human genes. The second approach, termed ncGERP, reflects the phylogenetic conservation of a gene's regulatory sequence using GERP++. We assess how well these two approaches correlate with four gene lists that use different ways to identify genes known or likely to cause disease through changes in expression: 1) genes that are known to cause disease through haploinsufficiency, 2) genes curated as dosage sensitive in ClinGen's Genome Dosage Map, 3) genes judged likely to be under purifying selection for mutations that change expression levels because they are statistically depleted of loss-of-function variants in the general population, and 4) genes judged unlikely to cause disease based on the presence of copy number variants in the general population. We find that both noncoding scores are highly predictive of dosage sensitivity using any of these criteria. In a similar way to ncGERP, we assess two ensemble-based predictors of regional noncoding importance, nc

  19. Sex-dimorphic gene expression and ineffective dosage compensation of Z-linked genes in gastrulating chicken embryos

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    Mathur Sachin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of sex determination and dosage compensation mechanisms in model organisms such as C. elegans, Drosophila and M. musculus. Strikingly, the mechanism involved in sex determination and dosage compensation are very different among these three model organisms. Birds present yet another situation where the heterogametic sex is the female. Sex determination is still poorly understood in birds and few key determinants have so far been identified. In contrast to most other species, dosage compensation of bird sex chromosomal genes appears rather ineffective. Results By comparing microarrays from microdissected primitive streak from single chicken embryos, we identified a large number of genes differentially expressed between male and female embryos at a very early stage (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 4, long before any sexual differentiation occurs. Most of these genes are located on the Z chromosome, which indicates that dosage compensation is ineffective in early chicken embryos. Gene ontology analyses, using an enhanced annotation tool for Affymetrix probesets of the chicken genome developed in our laboratory (called Manteia, show that among these male-biased genes found on the Z chromosome, more than 20 genes play a role in sex differentiation. Conclusions These results corroborate previous studies demonstrating the rather inefficient dosage compensation for Z chromosome in birds and show that this sexual dimorphism in gene regulation is observed long before the onset of sexual differentiation. These data also suggest a potential role of non-compensated Z-linked genes in somatic sex differentiation in birds.

  20. Gene dosage, expression, and ontology analysis identifies driver genes in the carcinogenesis and chemoradioresistance of cervical cancer.

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    Lando, Malin; Holden, Marit; Bergersen, Linn C; Svendsrud, Debbie H; Stokke, Trond; Sundfør, Kolbein; Glad, Ingrid K; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lyng, Heidi

    2009-11-01

    Integrative analysis of gene dosage, expression, and ontology (GO) data was performed to discover driver genes in the carcinogenesis and chemoradioresistance of cervical cancers. Gene dosage and expression profiles of 102 locally advanced cervical cancers were generated by microarray techniques. Fifty-two of these patients were also analyzed with the Illumina expression method to confirm the gene expression results. An independent cohort of 41 patients was used for validation of gene expressions associated with clinical outcome. Statistical analysis identified 29 recurrent gains and losses and 3 losses (on 3p, 13q, 21q) associated with poor outcome after chemoradiotherapy. The intratumor heterogeneity, assessed from the gene dosage profiles, was low for these alterations, showing that they had emerged prior to many other alterations and probably were early events in carcinogenesis. Integration of the alterations with gene expression and GO data identified genes that were regulated by the alterations and revealed five biological processes that were significantly overrepresented among the affected genes: apoptosis, metabolism, macromolecule localization, translation, and transcription. Four genes on 3p (RYBP, GBE1) and 13q (FAM48A, MED4) correlated with outcome at both the gene dosage and expression level and were satisfactorily validated in the independent cohort. These integrated analyses yielded 57 candidate drivers of 24 genetic events, including novel loci responsible for chemoradioresistance. Further mapping of the connections among genetic events, drivers, and biological processes suggested that each individual event stimulates specific processes in carcinogenesis through the coordinated control of multiple genes. The present results may provide novel therapeutic opportunities of both early and advanced stage cervical cancers.

  1. Dosage effect of high-amylose modifier gene(s) on the starch structure of maize amylose-extender mutant.

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    Jiang, Hongxin; Campbell, Mark; Wu, Yusheng; Du, Shuangkui; Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to investigate how dosages of high-amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) affected the structure of maize amylose extender (ae) mutant starch. GEMS-0067 (G), a homozygous mutant of ae and the HAM gene(s), and H99ae (H), an ae single mutant, were self-pollinated or inter-crossed to produce maize endosperms of G/G, G/H, H/G, and H/H with 3, 2, 1, and 0 doses of HAM gene(s), respectively. Endosperm starch was fractionated into amylopectin, amylose, and intermediate component (IC) of large and small molecular weights using 1-butanol precipitation of amylose followed by gel-permeation chromatography. Increases in the dosage of HAM gene(s) from 0 to 3 decreased the amylopectin content. The HAM-gene dosage significantly changed the branch chain-length of small-molecular-weight IC, but had little effect on the branch chain-length distributions of amylopectin and large-molecular-weight IC and the molecular structure of amylose.

  2. Gene dosage effects of the imprinted delta-like homologue 1 (dlk1/pref1 in development: implications for the evolution of imprinting.

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    Simao Teixeira da Rocha

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a normal process that causes genes to be expressed according to parental origin. The selective advantage conferred by imprinting is not understood but is hypothesised to act on dosage-critical genes. Here, we report a unique model in which the consequences of a single, double, and triple dosage of the imprinted Dlk1/Pref1, normally repressed on the maternally inherited chromosome, can be assessed in the growing embryo. BAC-transgenic mice were generated that over-express Dlk1 from endogenous regulators at all sites of embryonic activity. Triple dosage causes lethality associated with major organ abnormalities. Embryos expressing a double dose of Dlk1, recapitulating loss of imprinting, are growth enhanced but fail to thrive in early life, despite the early growth advantage. Thus, any benefit conferred by increased embryonic size is offset by postnatal lethality. We propose a negative correlation between gene dosage and survival that fixes an upper limit on growth promotion by Dlk1, and we hypothesize that trade-off between growth and lethality might have driven imprinting at this locus.

  3. Evolution of dosage compensation in Diptera: the gene maleless implements dosage compensation in Drosophila (Brachycera suborder) but its homolog in Sciara (Nematocera suborder) appears to play no role in dosage compensation.

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    Ruiz, M F; Esteban, M R; Doñoro, C; Goday, C; Sánchez, L

    2000-12-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster and in Sciara ocellaris dosage compensation occurs by hypertranscription of the single male X chromosome. This article reports the cloning and characterization in S. ocellaris of the gene homologous to maleless (mle) of D. melanogaster, which implements dosage compensation. The Sciara mle gene produces a single transcript, encoding a helicase, which is present in both male and female larvae and adults and in testes and ovaries. Both Sciara and Drosophila MLE proteins are highly conserved. The affinity-purified antibody to D. melanogaster MLE recognizes the S. ocellaris MLE protein. In contrast to Drosophila polytene chromosomes, where MLE is preferentially associated with the male X chromosome, in Sciara MLE is found associated with all chromosomes. Anti-MLE staining of Drosophila postblastoderm male embryos revealed a single nuclear dot, whereas Sciara male and female embryos present multiple intranuclear staining spots. This expression pattern in Sciara is also observed before blastoderm stage, when dosage compensation is not yet set up. The affinity-purified antibodies against D. melanogaster MSL1, MSL3, and MOF proteins involved in dosage compensation also revealed no differences in the staining pattern between the X chromosome and the autosomes in both Sciara males and females. These results lead us to propose that different proteins in Drosophila and Sciara would implement dosage compensation.

  4. Klinefelter syndrome comorbidities linked to increased X chromosome gene dosage and altered protein interactome activity

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    Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza; Russo, Francesco; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2017-01-01

    Jak-STAT pathway, dysregulated genes important for disturbed immune system (IL4), energy balance (POMC and LEP) and erythropoietin signalling in KS. We present an extended epidemiological study that links KS comorbidities to the molecular level and identify potential causal players in the disease...... of co-expressed modules as well as central hubs and gene dosage perturbed protein complexes in a KS comorbidity network build from known disease proteins and their protein-protein interactions. The systems biology approaches together pointed to novel aspects of KS disease phenotypes including perturbed...

  5. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

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    Murdoch, Brenda; Owen, Nichole; Stevense, Michelle; Smith, Helen; Nagaoka, So; Hassold, Terry; McKay, Michael; Xu, Huiling; Fu, Jun; Revenkova, Ekaterina; Jessberger, Rolf; Hunt, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  6. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

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    Brenda Murdoch

    Full Text Available Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  7. [Cytogenetic abnormalities and gene mutations in myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    Myeloid leukemia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. Cytogenetic studies have revealed specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as translocations, and inversions. Fusion proteins derived from these abnormalities were identified in various subtypes of leukemia. Because most of these fusion proteins were not sufficient to induce leukemia by themselves in mouse models, additional oncogenic events have been thought to be necessary for leukemogenesis. Recently, a hypothesis called "two-hit model" for leukemia has been proposed. Two broad classes of mutations that proliferative or survival advantage of hematopoietic progenitors and impaired differentiation are required for inducing leukemia. In this article, we summarize some typical chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations associated with myeloid leukemia on the basis of this hypothesis.

  8. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  9. Genes and brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jeffrey J; Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2015-11-05

    Neuronal positioning is a fundamental process during brain development. Abnormalities in this process cause several types of brain malformations and are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Little is known about the pathogenesis of developmental brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning, which has hindered research into potential treatments. However, recent advances in neurogenetics provide clues to the pathogenesis of aberrant neuronal positioning by identifying causative genes. This may help us form a foundation upon which therapeutic tools can be developed. In this review, we first provide a brief overview of neural development and migration, as they relate to defects in neuronal positioning. We then discuss recent progress in identifying genes and brain malformations associated with aberrant neuronal positioning during human brain development.

  10. Analysis of SRY Gene in 8 Cases of Sex Abnormality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧; 腾云; 田虹; 陈燕; 杨真荣; 唐艳平

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between sex dysplasia and sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene, 8 patients with sexual abnormality were analyzed by cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using PY3.4, X alpha satellite, and SRY probes was performed in each case to analyze the sex chromosome translocation and gene translocation. SRY gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its mutation was detected by direct sequencing. The results showed that among 8 patients, 5 were positive for SRY and the remaining negative for SRY. In the patients positive for SRY genes, 3 presented testes and the left 2streak ovaries. In the patients negative for SRY, only one case presented testes, while 2 ovaries.Direct sequencing demonstrated that all SRY genes were normal in the patients positive for SRY genes. FISH technique demonstrated that SRY genes translocated from Ypter to Xpter in 2 46,XX phenotypic males positive for SRY genes. It was concluded that SRY gene is strongly involved in.male sex determination, while a sequence of other genes may be taken into account in sexual development.

  11. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function.

  12. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal’s sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function. PMID:27356611

  13. MCTP2 is a dosage-sensitive gene required for cardiac outflow tract development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Seema R.; Ware, Stephanie M.; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys; Tian, Qi; Franco, Luis M.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Bucasas, Kristine; Scott, Daryl A.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Hanchard, Neil; Umaña, Luis; Cast, Ashley; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W.; McBride, Kim L.; Bray, Molly; Craig Chinault, A.; Boggs, Barbara A.; Huang, Miao; Baker, Mariah R.; Hamilton, Susan; Towbin, Jeff; Jefferies, John L.; Fernbach, Susan D.; Potocki, Lorraine; Belmont, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) have been reported in rare individuals with large terminal deletions of chromosome 15q26. However, no single gene important for left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) development has been identified in this region. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified two half-siblings with CoA with a 2.2 Mb deletion on 15q26.2, inherited from their mother, who was mosaic for this deletion. This interval contains an evolutionary conserved, protein-coding gene, MCTP2 (multiple C2-domains with two transmembrane regions 2). Using gene-specific array screening in 146 individuals with non-syndromic LVOT obstructive defects, another individual with HLHS and CoA was found to have a de novo 41 kb intragenic duplication within MCTP2, predicted to result in premature truncation, p.F697X. Alteration of Mctp2 gene expression in Xenopus laevis embryos by morpholino knockdown and mRNA overexpression resulted in the failure of proper OT development, confirming the functional importance of this dosage-sensitive gene for cardiogenesis. Our results identify MCTP2 as a novel genetic cause of CoA and related cardiac malformations. PMID:23773997

  14. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-09-15

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X-linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation.

  15. Gene Dosage Analysis in a Clinical Environment: Gene-Targeted Microarrays as the Platform-of-Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Love

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of gene deletion and duplication in the aetiology of disease has become increasingly evident over the last decade. In addition to the classical deletion/duplication disorders diagnosed using molecular techniques, such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Type 1A, the significance of partial or whole gene deletions in the pathogenesis of a large number single-gene disorders is becoming more apparent. A variety of dosage analysis methods are available to the diagnostic laboratory but the widespread application of many of these techniques is limited by the expense of the kits/reagents and restrictive targeting to a particular gene or portion of a gene. These limitations are particularly important in the context of a small diagnostic laboratory with modest sample throughput. We have developed a gene-targeted, custom-designed comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH array that allows twelve clinical samples to be interrogated simultaneously for exonic deletions/duplications within any gene (or panel of genes on the array. We report here on the use of the array in the analysis of a series of clinical samples processed by our laboratory over a twelve-month period. The array has proven itself to be robust, flexible and highly suited to the diagnostic environment.

  16. Feeding-Related Traits Are Affected by Dosage of the foraging Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Aaron M; Anreiter, Ina; Neville, Megan C; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2017-02-01

    Nutrient acquisition and energy storage are critical parts of achieving metabolic homeostasis. The foraging gene in Drosophila melanogaster has previously been implicated in multiple feeding-related and metabolic traits. Before foraging's functions can be further dissected, we need a precise genetic null mutant to definitively map its amorphic phenotypes. We used homologous recombination to precisely delete foraging, generating the for(0) null allele, and used recombineering to reintegrate a full copy of the gene, generating the {for(BAC)} rescue allele. We show that a total loss of foraging expression in larvae results in reduced larval path length and food intake behavior, while conversely showing an increase in triglyceride levels. Furthermore, varying foraging gene dosage demonstrates a linear dose-response on these phenotypes in relation to foraging gene expression levels. These experiments have unequivocally proven a causal, dose-dependent relationship between the foraging gene and its pleiotropic influence on these feeding-related traits. Our analysis of foraging's transcription start sites, termination sites, and splicing patterns using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and full-length cDNA sequencing, revealed four independent promoters, pr1-4, that produce 21 transcripts with nine distinct open reading frames (ORFs). The use of alternative promoters and alternative splicing at the foraging locus creates diversity and flexibility in the regulation of gene expression, and ultimately function. Future studies will exploit these genetic tools to precisely dissect the isoform- and tissue-specific requirements of foraging's functions and shed light on the genetic control of feeding-related traits involved in energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. The non-dosage compensated Lsp1α gene of Drosophila melanogaster escapes acetylation by MOF in larval fat body nuclei, but is flanked by two dosage compensated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Maxwell J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila melanogaster dosage compensation of most X-linked genes is mediated by the male-specific lethal (MSL complex, which includes MOF. MOF acetylates histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac. The X-linked Larval serum protein one α (Lsp1α gene has long been known to be not dosage compensated. Here we have examined possible explanations for why the Lsp1α gene is not dosage compensated. Results Quantitative RNase protection analysis showed that the genes flanking Lsp1α are expressed equally in males and females and confirmed that Lsp1α is not dosage compensated. Unlike control X-linked genes, Lsp1α was not enriched for H4K16ac in the third instar larval fat body, the tissue in which the gene is actively expressed. X-linked Lsp1α promoter-lacZ reporter transgenes are enriched for H4K16ac in third instar larval fat body. An X-linked reporter gene bracketed by Lsp1α flanking regions was dosage compensated. One of the genes flanking Lsp1α is expressed in the same tissue. This gene shows a modest enrichment for H4K16ac but only at the part of the gene most distant from Lsp1α. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences of the genomes of 12 Drosophila species shows that Lsp1α is only present within the melanogaster subgroup of species. Conclusion Lsp1α is not modified by the MSL complex but is in a region of the X chromosome that is regulated by the MSL complex. The high activity or tissue-specificity of the Lsp1α promoter does not prevent regulation by the MSL complex. The regions flanking Lsp1α do not appear to block access by the MSL complex. Lsp1α appears to have recently evolved within the melanogaster subgroup of Drosophila species. The most likely explanation for why Lsp1α is not dosage compensated is that the gene has not evolved a mechanism to independently recruit the MSL complex, possibly because of its recent evolutionary origin, and because there appears to be a low level of bound MSL complex in a nearby gene

  18. Gene dosage analysis identifies large deletions of the FECH gene in 10% of families with erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Sharon D; Mason, Nicola G; Holme, S Alexander; Anstey, Alex V; Elder, George H; Badminton, Michael N

    2007-12-01

    Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is an inherited cutaneous porphyria characterized by partial deficiency of ferrochelatase (FECH), accumulation of protoporphyrin IX in erythrocytes, skin, and liver, and acute photosensitivity. Genetic counseling in EPP requires identification of FECH mutations, but current sequencing-based procedures fail to detect mutations in about one in six families. We have used gene dosage analysis by quantitative PCR to identify large deletions of the FECH gene in 19 (58%) of 33 unrelated UK patients with EPP in whom mutations could not be detected by sequencing. Seven deletions were identified, six of which were previously unreported. Breakpoints were identified for six deletions (c.1-7887-IVS1+2425insTTCA; c.1-9629-IVS1+2437; IVS2-1987-IVS4+352del; c.768-IVS7+244del; IVS7+2784-IVS9+108del; IVS6+2350-TGA+95del). Five breakpoints were in intronic repeat sequences (AluSc, AluSq, AluSx, L1MC4). The remaining deletion (Del Ex3-4) is likely to be a large insertion-deletion. Combining quantitative PCR with routine sequencing increased the sensitivity of mutation detection in 189 unrelated UK patients with EPP from 83% (95% CI: 76-87%) to 93% (CI: 88-96%) (P=0.003). Our findings show that large deletions of the FECH gene are an important cause of EPP. Gene dosage analysis should be incorporated into routine procedures for mutation detection in EPP.

  19. Replication-associated gene dosage effects shape the genomes of fast-growing bacteria but only for transcription and translation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Etienne; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2006-03-01

    The bidirectional replication of bacterial genomes leads to transient gene dosage effects. Here, we show that such effects shape the chromosome organisation of fast-growing bacteria and that they correlate strongly with maximal growth rate. Surprisingly the predicted maximal number of replication rounds shows little if any phylogenetic inertia, suggesting that it is a very labile trait. Yet, a combination of theoretical and statistical analyses predicts that dozens of replication forks may be simultaneously present in the cells of certain species. This suggests a strikingly efficient management of the replication apparatus, of replication fork arrests and of chromosome segregation in such cells. Gene dosage effects strongly constrain the position of genes involved in translation and transcription, but not other highly expressed genes. The relative proximity of the former genes to the origin of replication follows the regulatory dependencies observed under exponential growth, as the bias is stronger for RNA polymerase, then rDNA, then ribosomal proteins and tDNA. Within tDNAs we find that only the positions of the previously proposed 'ubiquitous' tRNA, which translate the most frequent codons in highly expressed genes, show strong signs of selection for gene dosage effects. Finally, we provide evidence for selection acting upon genome organisation to take advantage of gene dosage effects by identifying a positive correlation between genome stability and the number of simultaneous replication rounds. We also show that gene dosage effects can explain the over-representation of highly expressed genes in the largest replichore of genomes containing more than one chromosome. Together, these results demonstrate that replication-associated gene dosage is an important determinant of chromosome organisation and dynamics, especially among fast-growing bacteria.

  20. Excitation/inhibition balance and learning are modified by Dyrk1a gene dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayçal; Sahún, Ignasi; Duchon, Arnaud; Daubigney, Fabrice; Badel, Anne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barallobre, Maria Jose; Dierssen, Mara; Yu, Eugene; Herault, Yann; Arbones, Mariona; Janel, Nathalie; Créau, Nicole; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Down syndrome (DS) have been linked to increased synaptic inhibition, leading to an imbalance of excitation/inhibition (E/I). Various mouse models and studies from human brains have implicated an HSA21 gene, the serine/threonine kinase DYRK1A, as a candidate for inducing cognitive dysfunction. Here, consequences of alterations in Dyrk1a dosage were assessed in mouse models with varying copy numbers of Dyrk1a: mBACtgDyrk1a, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey (with 3 gene copies) and Dyrk1a(+/-) (one functional copy). Molecular (i.e. immunoblotting/immunohistochemistry) and behavioral analyses (e.g., rotarod, Morris water maze, Y-maze) were performed in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Increased expression of DYRK1A in mBACtgDyrk1a induced molecular alterations in synaptic plasticity pathways, particularly expression changes in GABAergic and glutaminergic related proteins. Similar alterations were observed in models with partial trisomy of MMU16, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey, and were reversed in the Dyrk1a(+/-) model. Dyrk1a overexpression produced an increased number and signal intensity of GAD67 positive neurons, indicating enhanced inhibition pathways in three different models: mBACtgDyrk1a, hYACtgDyrk1a and Dp(16)1Yey. Functionally, Dyrk1a overexpression protected mice from PTZ-induced seizures related to GABAergic neuron plasticity. Our study shows that DYRK1A overexpression affects pathways involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity and influences E/I balance toward inhibition. Inhibition of DYRK1A activity offers a therapeutic target for DS, but its inhibition/activation may also be relevant for other psychiatric diseases with E/I balance alterations.

  1. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  2. Gene dosage as a relevant mechanism contributing to the determination of ovarian function in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronovo, Chiara; Rossetti, Raffaella; Rusconi, Daniela; Recalcati, Maria P.; Cacciatore, Chiara; Beccaria, Elena; Calcaterra, Valeria; Invernizzi, Pietro; Larizza, Daniela; Finelli, Palma; Persani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    array-CGH analysis and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR, including a BMP15 gene duplication at Xp11.22, a deletion interrupting the PAPPA gene at 9q33.1, and an intragenic duplication involving the PDE8A gene at 15q25.3. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION This is a pilot study on a relatively small sample size and confirmation in larger TS cohorts may be required. The ovarian tissue could not be studied in any patients and in a subgroup of patients, the mosaicism was estimated in tissues of different embryonic origin. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The combined determination of X chromosome mosaicism by molecular and molecular-cytogenetic techniques may become useful for the prediction of SM in TS. The detection of CNVs in both X-linked and autosomal ovary-related genes further suggests gene dosage as a relevant mechanism contributing to the ovarian phenotype of TS patients. These CNVs may pinpoint novel candidates relevant to female fertility and generate further insights into the mechanisms contributing to ovarian function. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This study was funded by Telethon Foundation (grant no: GGP09126 to L.P.), the Italian Ministry of the University and Research (grant number: 2006065999 to P.F.) and a Ministry of Health grant ‘Ricerca Corrente’ to IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano (grant number: 08C704-2006). The authors have no conflict of interest to declare. PMID:24324027

  3. H4K20me1 contributes to downregulation of X-linked genes for C. elegans dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielle, Anne; Lang, Jackie; Dong, Yan; Ercan, Sevinc; Kotwaliwale, Chitra; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Appert, Alex; Chen, Q Brent; Dose, Andrea; Egelhofer, Thea; Kimura, Hiroshi; Stempor, Przemyslaw; Dernburg, Abby; Lieb, Jason D; Strome, Susan; Ahringer, Julie

    2012-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans dosage compensation complex (DCC) equalizes X-chromosome gene dosage between XO males and XX hermaphrodites by two-fold repression of X-linked gene expression in hermaphrodites. The DCC localizes to the X chromosomes in hermaphrodites but not in males, and some subunits form a complex homologous to condensin. The mechanism by which the DCC downregulates gene expression remains unclear. Here we show that the DCC controls the methylation state of lysine 20 of histone H4, leading to higher H4K20me1 and lower H4K20me3 levels on the X chromosomes of XX hermaphrodites relative to autosomes. We identify the PR-SET7 ortholog SET-1 and the Suv4-20 ortholog SET-4 as the major histone methyltransferases for monomethylation and di/trimethylation of H4K20, respectively, and provide evidence that X-chromosome enrichment of H4K20me1 involves inhibition of SET-4 activity on the X. RNAi knockdown of set-1 results in synthetic lethality with dosage compensation mutants and upregulation of X-linked gene expression, supporting a model whereby H4K20me1 functions with the condensin-like C. elegans DCC to repress transcription of X-linked genes. H4K20me1 is important for mitotic chromosome condensation in mammals, suggesting that increased H4K20me1 on the X may restrict access of the transcription machinery to X-linked genes via chromatin compaction.

  4. Sexual Dimorphism of Body Size Is Controlled by Dosage of the X-Chromosomal Gene Myc and by the Sex-Determining Gene tra in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr Mathews, Kristina; Cavegn, Margrith; Zwicky, Monica

    2017-01-06

    Drosophila females are larger than males. In this paper, we describe how X chromosome dosage drives sexual dimorphism of body size through two means: first, through unbalanced expression of a key X-linked growth regulating gene and second, through female-specific activation of the sex-determination pathway. X-chromosome dosage determines phenotypic sex by regulating the genes of the sex-determining pathway. In the presence of two sets of X-chromosome signal elements (XSEs), Sex-lethal (Sxl) is activated in female (XX) but not male (XY) animals. Sxl activates transformer (tra), a gene that encodes a splicing factor essential for female-specific development. It has previously been shown that null mutations in the tra gene result in only a partial reduction of body size of XX animals, which shows that other factors must contribute to size determination. We tested whether X dosage directly affects animal size by analyzing males with duplications of X chromosomal segments. Upon tiling across the X chromosome, we found four duplications that increase male size by over 9%. Within these, we identified several genes that promote growth as a result of duplication. Only one of these, Myc, was found not to be dosage compensated. Together, our results indicate that both Myc dosage and tra expression play crucial roles in determining sex-specific size in Drosophila larvae and adult tissue. Since Myc also acts as an XSE that contributes to tra activation in early, development, a double dose of Myc in females serves at least twice in development to promote sexual size dimorphism.

  5. [Heterogenous abnormality polymorphism of gene PDGFRB in myeloid neoplasms and its clinical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan-Shun; Gao, Li; Jing, Yu; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Yang, Hua; Yu, Li

    2012-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRB gene are a new kind of myeloid disorders in the revised 2008 WHO classification. Out of detected 2000 cases of myeloid cell abnormalities in our hospital, 12 cases of myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRB were found. This study was purposed to summarize and analyze the clinical and laboratorial characteristics of the 12 cases with PDGFRB gene abnormalities. The results indicated that among 12 cases of myeloid neoplasms with PDGFRB abnormalities, 5 cases with TEL/PDGFRB fusion gene, 2 cases with HEPI/PDGFRB, 1 case with PDGFRB mutation, 1 case with RABAPTIN-5/PDGFRB, 1 case with GIT2/PDGFRB, 1 case with TP53/PDGFRB, 1 case with WDR43/PDGFRB fusion gene were detected, showing the polymorphism of PDGFRB gene abnormalities. Among this kind of myeloid neoplasm patients, almost all patients manifested monocytosis and eosinophilia in different degree, the thrombocytosis mainly was observed in atypical myeloid neoplasms, acute leukemia, chromic myelo-monocytic leukemia patients. The treatment with imatinib mesylate for this kind of patients was effective in some cases. It is concluded that the myeloid neoplasms with PDGFRB gene abnormalities are a kind of heterogenetic myeloid neoplasms, their gene abnormal types and clinical manifestations show polymorphism too. The monocytosis and eosinophilia appear in this kind myeloid neoplasms which may be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib mesylate.

  6. Dosage compensation in birds

    OpenAIRE

    McQueen, H A; McBride, D; Miele, G; Bird, A.P.; Clinton, M

    2001-01-01

    The Z and W sex chromosomes of birds have evolved independently from the mammalian X and Y chromosomes [1]. Unlike mammals, female birds are heterogametic (ZW), while males are homogametic (ZZ). Therefore male birds, like female mammals, carry a double dose of sex-linked genes relative to the other sex. Other animals with nonhomologous sex chromosomes possess "dosage compensation" systems to equalize the expression of sex-linked genes. Dosage compensation occurs in animals as diverse as mamma...

  7. Evidence that sex chromosome asynapsis, rather than excess Y gene dosage, is responsible for the meiotic impairment of XYY mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, T A; Burgoyne, P S

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive evidence for the existence of a meiotic checkpoint that acts to eliminate spermatocytes that fail to achieve full sex chromosome synapsis at the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase. XYY mice are nearly always sterile, with clear signs of meiotic impairment, and sex chromosome asynapsis has been proposed to underlie this impairment. However, a study of XYY*(X) mice (mice having three sex chromosomes but only a single dose of Y genes) revealed that these mice are fertile, and thus implicated Y gene dosage as a major factor in the sterility of XYY mice. To address this question further, sex chromosome synapsis and spermatogenic proficiency were compared between XYY*(X) and XYY mice generated in the same litters. This established that differences in spermatogenic proficiency within and between the two genotypes correlated with the frequency of radial trivalent formation (full sex chromosome synapsis); XYY*(X) males, as a group, had double the radial trivalent frequency of XYY males. This observation provides strong support for the view that sex chromosome asynapsis (or some consequence thereof), rather than Y gene dosage, is the major factor leading to the meiotic impairment of XYY mice.

  8. Dosage compensation on the active X chromosome minimizes transcriptional noise of X-linked genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shanye; Wang, Ping; Deng, Wenjun; Zheng, Hancheng; Hu, Landian; Hurst, Laurence D; Kong, Xiangyin

    2009-01-01

    Theory predicts that haploid-expressed genes should have noisier expression than comparable diploid-expressed ones with the same expression level. However, in mammals there are several classes of gene that are monoallelically expressed, including X-linked genes, imprinted genes and some other autosomal genes. Does it follow that the evolution of X chromosomes in eukaryotes comes at the cost of increased transcriptional noise in the heterogametic sex? Moreover, is escaping X-inactivation in mammalian females associated with an increase in transcriptional variation? To address these questions, we analyze gene expression variation between replicate samples of diverse mammalian cell lines in steady-state using microarray data. We observe that transcriptional variation of X-linked genes is no different to that of autosomal genes both before and after control for transcript abundance. By contrast, autosomal genes subject to allelic exclusion do have unusually high noise levels even allowing for their low transcript abundance. The prior theory we suggest was insufficient, at least as regards X-chromosomes, as it failed to appreciate the regulatory complexity of gene expression, not least the effects of genomic neighborhood. These results suggest that high noise is not a necessary consequence of haploid expression and emphasize the primacy of expression level as a determinant of noise. The latter has consequences for understanding the etiology of haplo-insufficiency and the evolution of gene expression levels. Given the coupling between expression level and noise on the X-chromosome, we suggest that part of the selective advantage of dosage compensation is noise abatement of X-linked genes.

  9. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Putative Susceptibility Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Gilling

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a significant genetic component as shown by family and twin studies. However, only a few genes have repeatedly been shown to be involved in the development of ASDs. The aim of this study has been...... to identify possible ASD susceptibility genes. Genome screens in ASD patients suggest possible susceptibility gene regions on almost every chromosome. We identified four ASD patients with chromosomal rearrangements, two of which were familial rearrangements involving one of these putative susceptibility gene......) was performed for all four patients. By combination of these methods we identified several putative susceptibility genes for ASDs. Expression patterns were established for several of these genes by Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) or in situ hybridization and one gene was sequenced in 157 ASD patients. Our results...

  10. Centrosomal and mitotic abnormalities in cell lines derived from papillary thyroid cancer harboring specific gene alterations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maric, Irena; Viaggi, Silvia; Caria, Paola; Frau, Daniela V; Degan, Paolo; Vanni, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated the centrosome status and mitotic abnormalities in three thyroid carcinoma-derived cell lines, each maintaining the specific, biologically relevant gene alteration harbored by the parental tumors...

  11. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Rebecca J; Belikoff, Esther J; Scott, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes.

  12. Non-Canonical and Sexually Dimorphic X Dosage Compensation States in the Mouse and Human Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrithi, Mahesh N; Royo, Helene; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Ojarikre, Obah; Bhaw, Leena; Sesay, Abdul; Peters, Antoine H F M; Stadler, Michael; Turner, James M A

    2017-02-06

    Somatic X dosage compensation requires two mechanisms: X inactivation balances X gene output between males (XY) and females (XX), while X upregulation, hypothesized by Ohno and documented in vivo, balances X gene with autosomal gene output. Whether X dosage compensation occurs in germ cells is unclear. We show that mouse and human germ cells exhibit non-canonical X dosage states that differ from the soma and between the sexes. Prior to genome-wide reprogramming, X upregulation is present, consistent with Ohno's hypothesis. Subsequently, however, it is erased. In females, erasure follows loss of X inactivation, causing X dosage excess. Conversely, in males, erasure leads to permanent X dosage decompensation. Sex chromosomally abnormal models exhibit a "sex-reversed" X dosage state: XX males, like XX females, develop X dosage excess, while XO females, like XY males, develop X dosage decompensation. Thus, germline X dosage compensation states are determined by X chromosome number, not phenotypic sex. These unexpected differences in X dosage compensation states between germline and soma offer unique perspectives on sex chromosome infertility.

  13. Sola dosis facit venenum. Leukemia in gene therapy trials: a question of vectors, inserts and dosage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, F J T; Pike-Overzet, K; Ng, Y Y; van Dongen, J J M

    2008-10-01

    In clinical gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, the development of leukemia has come up as a severe adverse effect. In all five cases, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) occurred as a direct consequence of insertional mutagenesis by the retrovirus used to deliver the therapeutic gene. Here, we review the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis, the function of the Il2RG gene and the future developments in the field. New lentiviral and gamma retroviral vectors can significantly improve the safety profile of the tools used but still carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis, as shown in this issue of Leukemia. Finally, the unfortunate side effects of gene therapy have given more insight into the development of human T-ALL.

  14. Impact of gene dosage on the production of lipase from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Chong; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Li, Fei; Xu, Yan

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the high-level expression of the lipase r27RCL was achieved by optimization of the lipase gene copy number in the host strain Pichia pastoris. The copy number of the lipase gene proRCL from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and a range of Mut(+) P. pastoris strains carrying one, three, five, and six copies of proRCL were obtained. The maximum lipase activity was achieved at 12,500 U/mL by the five-copy recombinant strain after 96 h of methanol induction in the 7-L fermenter. However, the enzyme activity of the six-copy recombinant strain decreased remarkably. By transcription analysis of proRCL, ERO1, and PDI, it suggested that unfolded protein response seemed to be triggered in the highest copy recombinant strain after 24 h. Thus, elaborate optimization of foreign gene dosage was very important for the high-level expression of foreign proteins in P. pastoris.

  15. Gene dosage compensation calibrates four regulatory RNAs to control Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Sine L; Tu, Kimberly C; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2009-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinately regulate gene expression in response to changes in cell-population density. At the core of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal transduction pathway reside four homologous small RNAs (sRNAs), named...

  16. Life-history strategies and carbon metabolism gene dosage in the Nakaseomyces yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Judith; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Bourgais, Aurélie; Fairhead, Cécile; Sicard, Delphine

    2016-03-01

    The Nakaseomyces clade consists of a group of six hemiascomyceteous yeasts (Candida glabrata, Nakaseomyces delphensis, C. nivarensis, C. bracarensis, C. castelli, N. bacillisporus), phylogenetically close to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, their representative being the well-known pathogenic yeast C. glabrata. Four species had been previously examined for their carbon assimilation properties and found to have similar properties to S. cerevisiae (repression of respiration in high glucose-i.e. Crabtree positivity-and being a facultative anaerobe). We examined here the complete set of the six species for their carbon metabolic gene content. We also measured different metabolic and life-history traits (glucose consumption rate, population growth rate, carrying capacity, cell size, cell and biomass yield). We observed deviations from the glycolytic gene redundancy observed in S. cerevisiae presumed to be an important property for the Crabtree positivity, especially for the two species C. castelli and N. bacillisporus which frequently have only one gene copy, but different life strategies. Therefore, we show that the decrease in carbon metabolic gene copy cannot be simply associated with a reduction of glucose consumption rate and can be counterbalanced by other beneficial genetic variations.

  17. CNTNAP2 gene dosage variation is associated with schizophrenia and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedman, J. I.; Vrijenhoek, T.; Markx, S.; Janssen, I. M.; Van der Vliet, W. A.; Faas, B. H. W.; Knoers, N. V.; Cahn, W.; Kahn, R. S.; Edelmann, L.; Davis, K. L.; Silverman, J. M.; Brunner, H. G.; Van Kessel, A. Geurts; Wijmenga, C.; Ophoff, R. A.; Veltman, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    A homozygous mutation of the CNTNAP2 gene has been associated with a syndrome of focal epilepsy, mental retardation, language regression and other neuropsychiatric problems in children of the Old Order Amish community. Here we report genomic rearrangements resulting in haploinsufficiency of the CNTN

  18. [Recent advances of studies on abnormal HOX gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and its molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin-Yan; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2015-02-01

    HOX gene encodes a group of homeodomain transcription factors which are highly conserved. The caudal-type homeobox (CDX) , ten-eleven translocation (TET) genes and polycomb group (PcG) , trithorax group (TrxG) proteins act as upstream regulators of HOX genes that manipulate the targeted gene expression through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The abnormal expression of HOX genes and their fusions contribute to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation and NUP98-HOX translocation serve as molecular mediators of dysfunction in MDS which can be used for the evaluation of biology and therapy. This article provides an overview of recent advances of studies on HOX gene and its abnormal molecular mechanisms, as well as potential correlation with MDS.

  19. Systematic yeast synthetic lethal and synthetic dosage lethal screens identify genes required for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Measday, Vivien; Baetz, Kristin; Guzzo, Julie; Yuen, Karen; Kwok, Teresa; Sheikh, Bilal; Ding, Huiming; Ueta, Ryo; Hoac, Trinh; Cheng, Benjamin; Pot, Isabelle; Tong, Amy; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Boone, Charles; Hieter, Phil

    2005-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires the execution and coordination of many processes during mitosis, including DNA replication, sister chromatid cohesion, and attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules via the kinetochore complex. Additional pathways are likely involved because faithful chromosome segregation also requires proteins that are not physically associated with the chromosome. Using kinetochore mutants as a starting point, we have identified genes with roles in chromosom...

  20. Effects of starch synthase IIa gene dosage on grain, protein and starch in endosperm of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konik-Rose, Christine; Thistleton, Jenny; Chanvrier, Helene; Tan, Ihwa; Halley, Peter; Gidley, Michael; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Wang, Hong; Larroque, Oscar; Ikea, Joseph; McMaugh, Steve; Regina, Ahmed; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew; Li, Zhongyi

    2007-11-01

    Starch synthases (SS) are responsible for elongating the alpha-1,4 glucan chains of starch. A doubled haploid population was generated by crossing a line of wheat, which lacks functional ssIIa genes on each genome (abd), and an Australian wheat cultivar, Sunco, with wild type ssIIa alleles on each genome (ABD). Evidence has been presented previously indicating that the SGP-1 (starch granule protein-1) proteins present in the starch granule in wheat are products of the ssIIa genes. Analysis of 100 progeny lines demonstrated co-segregation of the ssIIa alleles from the three genomes with the SGP-1 proteins, providing further evidence that the SGP-1 proteins are the products of the ssIIa genes. From the progeny lines, 40 doubled haploid lines representing the eight possible genotypes for SSIIa (ABD, aBD, AbD, ABd, abD, aBd, Abd, abd) were characterized for their grain weight, protein content, total starch content and starch properties. For some properties (chain length distribution, pasting properties, swelling power, and gelatinization properties), a progressive change was observed across the four classes of genotypes (wild type, single nulls, double nulls and triple nulls). However, for other grain properties (seed weight and protein content) and starch properties (total starch content, granule morphology and crystallinity, granule size distribution, amylose content, amylose-lipid dissociation properties), a statistically significant change only occurred for the triple nulls, indicating that all three genes had to be missing or inactive for a change to occur. These results illustrate the importance of SSIIa in controlling grain and starch properties and the importance of amylopectin fine structure in controlling starch granule properties in wheat.

  1. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  2. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  3. Impact of gene dosage on gene expression, biological processes and survival in cervical cancer: a genome-wide follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Martinez, Ingrid; Barrón, Valeria; Roman-Bassaure, Edgar; Juárez-Torres, Eligia; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Espinosa, Ana María; Bermudez, Miriam; Fernández, Fernando; Venegas-Vega, Carlos; Orozco, Lorena; Zenteno, Edgar; Kofman, Susana; Berumen, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of tumor copy number (CN)-altered genome (CN-AG) in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer (CC), especially its effect on gene expression, biological processes, and patient survival. Fifty-nine human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-positive CCs were investigated with microarrays-31 for mapping CN-AG and 55 for global gene expression, with 27 CCs in common. Five-year survival was investigated in 55 patients. Deletions and amplifications >2.5 Mb were defined as CN alterations. The %CN-AG varied from 0 to 32.2% (mean = 8.1±8.9). Tumors were classified as low (mean = 0.5±0.6, n = 11), medium (mean = 5.4±2.4, n = 10), or high (mean = 19.2±6.6, n = 10) CN. The highest %CN-AG was found in 3q, which contributed an average of 55% of all CN alterations. Genome-wide, only 5.3% of CN-altered genes were deregulated directly by gene dosage. In contrast, the rate in fully duplicated 3q was twice as high. Amplification of 3q explained 23.2% of deregulated genes in whole tumors (r2 = 0.232, p = 0.006; analysis of variance), including genes located in 3q and other chromosomes. A total of 862 genes were deregulated exclusively in high-CN tumors, but only 22.9% were CN altered. This suggests that the remaining genes are not deregulated directly by gene dosage, but by mechanisms induced in trans by CN-altered genes. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-dependent proteasome proteolysis, glycolysis, and apoptosis were upregulated, whereas cell adhesion and angiogenesis were downregulated exclusively in high-CN tumors. The high %CN-AG and upregulated gene expression profile of APC/C-dependent proteasome proteolysis were associated with poor patient survival (p0.38, p<0.01, Spearman test). Therefore, inhibition of APC/C-dependent proteasome proteolysis and glycolysis could be useful for CC treatment. However, whether they are indispensable for tumor growth remains to be demonstrated.

  4. Impact of gene dosage on gene expression, biological processes and survival in cervical cancer: a genome-wide follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Medina-Martinez

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of tumor copy number (CN-altered genome (CN-AG in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer (CC, especially its effect on gene expression, biological processes, and patient survival. Fifty-nine human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16-positive CCs were investigated with microarrays-31 for mapping CN-AG and 55 for global gene expression, with 27 CCs in common. Five-year survival was investigated in 55 patients. Deletions and amplifications >2.5 Mb were defined as CN alterations. The %CN-AG varied from 0 to 32.2% (mean = 8.1±8.9. Tumors were classified as low (mean = 0.5±0.6, n = 11, medium (mean = 5.4±2.4, n = 10, or high (mean = 19.2±6.6, n = 10 CN. The highest %CN-AG was found in 3q, which contributed an average of 55% of all CN alterations. Genome-wide, only 5.3% of CN-altered genes were deregulated directly by gene dosage. In contrast, the rate in fully duplicated 3q was twice as high. Amplification of 3q explained 23.2% of deregulated genes in whole tumors (r2 = 0.232, p = 0.006; analysis of variance, including genes located in 3q and other chromosomes. A total of 862 genes were deregulated exclusively in high-CN tumors, but only 22.9% were CN altered. This suggests that the remaining genes are not deregulated directly by gene dosage, but by mechanisms induced in trans by CN-altered genes. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C-dependent proteasome proteolysis, glycolysis, and apoptosis were upregulated, whereas cell adhesion and angiogenesis were downregulated exclusively in high-CN tumors. The high %CN-AG and upregulated gene expression profile of APC/C-dependent proteasome proteolysis were associated with poor patient survival (p0.38, p<0.01, Spearman test. Therefore, inhibition of APC/C-dependent proteasome proteolysis and glycolysis could be useful for CC treatment. However, whether they are indispensable for tumor growth remains to be demonstrated.

  5. Preparation of Concentrated Chitosan/DNA Nanoparticle Formulations by Lyophilization for Gene Delivery at Clinically Relevant Dosages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Daniel; Nelea, Monica; Biniecki, Kristof; Lavertu, Marc; Buschmann, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan/DNA polyplexes have been optimized for efficient and safe in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. Clinical application of this technology requires the development of formulations with higher concentrations to reach therapeutic dosages. Polyplexes were prepared using chitosan and EGFPLuc plasmids. Freeze-thawing and freeze-drying studies were performed to identify and optimize lyoprotectant and buffer contents in formulations. Freeze-dried samples were rehydrated in reduced volumes to increase their final DNA dose. Nanoparticle physicochemical properties were analyzed, and their transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity were measured in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Data showed that 3.5 mM histidine buffer (pH 6.5) combined with one of 0.5% wt/vol sucrose, dextran 5 kDa, or trehalose was required to prevent polyplex aggregation during freeze-drying. Optimal formulations could be concentrated 20-fold, to a clinically desired ∼1 mg of DNA/mL, while maintaining near physiological pH and tonicity. Polyplexes were predominantly spherical, with diameters below 200 nm, polydispersity indexes below 0.32, and zeta potentials above +19 mV. Rehydrated formulations had transfection efficiencies no less than 65% of fresh polyplexes without excipients and had no effect on viability and metabolic activity of human embryonic kidney 293 cells. These concentrated formulations represent an important step toward clinical use of chitosan-based gene delivery systems.

  6. Analysis of RNA splicing defects in PITX2 mutants supports a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semina Elena V

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene that encodes a homeobox transcription factor. Several intronic PITX2 mutations have been reported in Axenfeld-Rieger patients but their effects on gene expression have not been tested. Methods We present two new families with recurrent PITX2 intronic mutations and use PITX2c minigenes and transfected cells to address the hypothesis that intronic mutations effect RNA splicing. Three PITX2 mutations have been analyzed: a G>T mutation within the AG 3' splice site (ss junction associated with exon 4 (IVS4-1G>T, a G>C mutation at position +5 of the 5' (ss of exon 4 (IVS4+5G>C, and a previously reported A>G substitution at position -11 of 3'ss of exon 5 (IVS5-11A>G. Results Mutation IVS4+5G>C showed 71% retention of the intron between exons 4 and 5, and poorly expressed protein. Wild-type protein levels were proportionally expressed from correctly spliced mRNA. The G>T mutation within the exon 4 AG 3'ss junction shifted splicing exclusively to a new AG and resulted in a severely truncated, poorly expressed protein. Finally, the A>G substitution at position -11 of the 3'ss of exon 5 shifted splicing exclusively to a newly created upstream AG and resulted in generation of a protein with a truncated homeodomain. Conclusion This is the first direct evidence to support aberrant RNA splicing as the mechanism underlying the disorder in some patients and suggests that the magnitude of the splicing defect may contribute to the variability of ARS phenotypes, in support of a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  7. Dosage Effect of Zinc Glycine Chelate on Zinc Metabolism and Gene Expression of Zinc Transporter in Intestinal Segments on Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danping; Hu, Qiaoling; Fang, Shenglin; Feng, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in various fundamental biological processes. The focus of this research was to investigate the dosage effect of zinc glycine chelate (Zn-Gly) on zinc metabolism and the gene expression of zinc transporters in intestinal segments. A total of 30 4-week-old SD rats were randomized into five treatment groups. The basal diets for each group were supplemented with gradient levels of Zn (0, 30, 60, 90, and 180 mg/kg) from Zn-Gly. After 1-week experiment, the results showed that serum and hepatic zinc concentration were elevated linearly with supplemental Zn levels from 0 to 180 mg Zn/kg. Serum Cu-Zn SOD activities resulted in a significant (P zinc levels (P zinc content and was significantly higher (P zinc levels and the activities of Cu-Zn SOD and AKP on rats. Dietary Zn-Gly has a certain effect on MT1, Zip4, Zip5, and ZnT1 expression, which expressed differently in intestinal segments with different levels of Zn-Gly load. Besides, Zn-Gly also could regulate PepT1 expression in intestinal segments.

  8. Sonic Hedgehog: A Good Gene Gone Bad? Detection and Treatment of Genetic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaich, Lauren E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of a baby born with the genetic condition holoprosencephaly in which students explore the "Sonic hedgehog" gene, signal transduction, and the ethics of body and tissue donation. Presents a two-part assignment that features students writing an informed consent document that explains the science behind this congenital abnormality,…

  9. An Investigation of Voice Quality in Individuals with Inherited Elastin Gene Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Christopher R.; Awan, Shaheen N.; Marler, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    The human elastin gene (ELN) is responsible for the generation of elastic fibres in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue throughout the body, including the vocal folds. Individuals with Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) and Williams syndrome (WS) lack one normal ELN allele due to heterozygous ELN abnormalities, resulting in a…

  10. Variation in the X:Autosome Distribution of Male-Biased Genes among Drosophila melanogaster Tissues and Its Relationship with Dosage Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huylmans, Ann Kathrin; Parsch, John

    2015-06-24

    Genes that are expressed differently between males and females (sex-biased genes) often show a nonrandom distribution in their genomic location, particularly with respect to the autosomes and the X chromosome. Previous studies of Drosophila melanogaster found a general paucity of male-biased genes on the X chromosome, although this is mainly limited to comparisons of whole flies or body segments containing the reproductive organs. To better understand the chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes in various tissues, we used a common analysis framework to analyze microarray and RNA sequence data comparing male and female gene expression in individual tissues (brain, Malpighian tubule, and gonads), composite structures (head and gonadectomized carcass), and whole flies. Although there are relatively few sex-biased genes in the brain, there is a strong and highly significant enrichment of male-biased genes on the X chromosome. A weaker enrichment of X-linked male-biased genes is seen in the head, suggesting that most of this signal comes from the brain. In all other tissues, there is either no departure from the random expectation or a significant paucity of male-biased genes on the X chromosome. The brain and head also differ from other tissues in that their male-biased genes are significantly closer to binding sites of the dosage compensation complex. We propose that the interplay of dosage compensation and sex-specific regulation can explain the observed differences between tissues and reconcile disparate results reported in previous studies.

  11. Increased RPA1 gene dosage affects genomic stability potentially contributing to 17p13.3 duplication syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Outwin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel microduplication syndrome involving various-sized contiguous duplications in 17p13.3 has recently been described, suggesting that increased copy number of genes in 17p13.3, particularly PAFAH1B1, is associated with clinical features including facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and autism spectrum disorder. We have previously shown that patient-derived cell lines from individuals with haploinsufficiency of RPA1, a gene within 17p13.3, exhibit an impaired ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR. Here, we show that cell lines from patients with duplications specifically incorporating RPA1 exhibit a different although characteristic spectrum of DDR defects including abnormal S phase distribution, attenuated DNA double strand break (DSB-induced RAD51 chromatin retention, elevated genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Using controlled conditional over-expression of RPA1 in a human model cell system, we also see attenuated DSB-induced RAD51 chromatin retention. Furthermore, we find that transient over-expression of RPA1 can impact on homologous recombination (HR pathways following DSB formation, favouring engagement in aberrant forms of recombination and repair. Our data identifies unanticipated defects in the DDR associated with duplications in 17p13.3 in humans involving modest RPA1 over-expression.

  12. Dosage compensation of X-chromosome inactivation center-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos: Non-chromosome-wide initiation of X-chromosome inactivation in blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Oh, Jong-Nam; Park, Chi-Hun; Lee, Dong-Kyung; Lee, Chang-Kyu

    2015-11-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an epigenetic mechanism that occurs in the eutherian embryo development to equalize the dosage of X-linked genes between males and females. This event is regulated by various factors, and the genes located in the X-chromosome inactivation center (XIC), which is known to be an evolutionary conserved region, are associated with XCI; however, a number of studies regarding this epigenetic event and genomic region are primarily performed in mouse models despite its species-specific features. Thus, in this study, the porcine XIC was identified, and we analyzed the expression of XIC-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that the porcine XIC is synteny with that of human and the non-coding RNAs were less conserved compared with the protein coding genes in the XIC. Among the XIC-linked genes, the expression levels of CHIC1 and RLIM were decreased from morula to blastocyst development and their dosage was compensated between the male and female blastocysts. Additionally, the CpG sites of CHIC1 were approximately 50% methylated in parthenote blastocysts. Contrary to these genes, XIST and LOC102165544, an uncharacterized non-coding gene, showed dramatically increased expression levels after the morula stage and preferential female expression in blastocysts. Imprinted XIST expression was not observed, and their CpG sites were hypo-methylated in parthenogenic blastocysts. These results demonstrate that the porcine XIC consists of an evolutionary conserved structure with fewer sequences conserved non-coding RNAs. In addition, a few XIC-linked genes would likely achieve dosage compensation, but XCI would not be completed in porcine blastocysts.

  13. Enhancement of lipase r27RCL production in Pichia pastoris by regulating gene dosage and co-expression with chaperone protein disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Chong; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Lin, Nai-Xin; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Yan

    2013-12-10

    Pichia pastoris has been successfully used in the production of many secreted and intracellular recombinant proteins, but there is still a large room of improvement for this expression system. Two factors drastically influence the lipase r27RCL production from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021, which are gene dosage and protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Regarding the effect of gene dosage, the enzyme activity for recombinant strain with three copies lipase gene was 1.95-fold higher than that for recombinant strain with only one copy lipase gene. In addition, the lipase production was further improved by co-expression with chaperone PDI involved in the disulfide bond formation in the ER. Overall, the maximum enzyme activity reached 355U/mL by the recombinant strain with one copy chaperone gene PDI plus five copies lipase gene proRCL in shaking flasks, which was 2.74-fold higher than that for the control strain with only one copy lipase gene. Overall, co-expression with PDI vastly increased the capacity for processing proteins of ER in P. pastoris.

  14. Chromosome abnormalities, mental retardation and the search for genes in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, D H R; Thiagarajah, T; Malloy, P; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2008-10-01

    Genetic factors contribute to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and linkage and association studies have been successful in identifying several candidate genes. However these genes explain only a very small part of the total population risk and the psychoses appear to be very heterogeneous with several models of genetic inheritance relevant to different groups of patients, including some cases caused by multiple common genetic variants, while others are single gene disorders. Studying chromosomal abnormalities is a useful strategy for identifying genes in illness, and patients with both mental retardation and psychosis form a special group where large chromosomal abnormalities detected by routine cytogenetic analysis are more prevalent than in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder alone, or in the general population. Studying these patients provides valuable opportunities to identify genes contributing to psychoses. This review of the literature on large chromosomal rearrangements in patients with mental retardation and psychotic illness illustrates how schizophrenia and bipolar phenotypes are associated with a large number of different chromosomal disruptions. Recent genome wide association studies have identified an excess of small chromosomal deletions and duplications in schizophrenia, adding further support to the importance of chromosomal structural variation in psychotic illness. The genes GRIK4 and NPAS3, each associated with psychosis in patients with mental retardation are discussed to illustrate the value of rare cytogenetic events as a means to signpost neurobiological pathways of general importance for illness in the wider population.

  15. Combined effect of the methanol utilization (Mut) phenotype and gene dosage on recombinant protein production in Pichia pastoris fed-batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cos, Oriol; Serrano, Alicia; Montesinos, José Luis; Ferrer, Pau; Cregg, James M; Valero, Francisco

    2005-04-06

    An important number of heterologous proteins have been produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the alcohol oxidase promoter. Two factors that drastically influence protein production and cultivation process development in this system are gene dosage and methanol assimilation capacity of the host strain (Mut phenotype). Using a battery of four strains which secrete a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL), the combined effects of gene dosage and Mut phenotype on recombinant protein production in Pichia pastoris was studied in fed-batch cultures. Regarding the effect of phenotype, the specific productivity and the Y(P/X) were 1.29- and 2.34-fold higher for Mut(s)ROL single copy strain than for Mut+ROL single copy strain. On the contrary, the productivity of Mut+ROL single copy strain was 1.34-fold higher than Mut(s)ROL single copy strain. An increase in ROL gene dosage seems to negatively affect cell's performance in bioreactor cultures, particularly in Mut(s) strains. Overall, the Mut(s) strain may be still advantageous to use because it allows for easier process control strategies.

  16. The ABNORMAL GAMETOPHYTES (AGM) gene product of Arabidopsis demonstrates a role in mitosis during gamete development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Anna-Marie; Kroeber, Sandra; Saedler, Heinz

    2004-07-01

    Screening a T-DNA mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana for reduced seed set and segregation distortion led to the isolation of the ABNORMAL GAMETOPHYTES (AGM) mutant. Homozygous plants were never recovered, but heterozygous plants showed mitotic defects during gametogenesis resulting in approximately 50% abortion of both the male and female gametes. Isolation of the genomic sequence flanking the co-segregating T-DNA element led to the identification of a gene located on chromosome 5, predicted to encode a transmembrane protein. BLAST homology searches identified two homologous proteins that are not redundant, as is clear from the existence of the agm mutant. Unexpectedly, expression studies using the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene suggest that AGM and its closest Arabidopsis homolog are mostly expressed in cells undergoing mitosis. Thus, AGM is not a gametophytic gene as originally speculated on the basis of segregation distortion, but rather classified as an essential gene crucial to the process of mitosis in plants.

  17. The deficit of male-biased genes on the D. melanogaster X chromosome is expression-dependent: a consequence of dosage compensation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Charlesworth, Brian

    2009-05-01

    In Drosophila, there is a consistent deficit of male-biased genes on the X chromosome. It has been suggested that male-biased genes may evolve from initially unbiased genes as a result of increased expression levels in males. If transcription rates are limited, a large increase in expression in the testis may be harder to achieve for single-copy X-linked genes than for autosomal genes, because they are already hypertranscribed due to dosage compensation. This hypothesis predicts that the larger the increase in expression required to make a male-biased gene, the lower the chance of this being achievable if it is located on the X chromosome. Consequently, highly expressed male-biased genes should be located on the X chromosome less often than lowly expressed male-biased genes. This pattern is observed in our analysis of publicly available data, where microarray data or EST data are used to detect male-biased genes in D. melanogaster and to measure their expression levels. This is consistent with the idea that limitations in transcription rates may prevent male-biased genes from accumulating on the X chromosome.

  18. [Detecting the abnormal expression of PDGFRA gene in eosinophilia by FISH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Fang; Xi, Lian-Yong; Wang, Hua; Dong, Fei; Zhao, Wei; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the abnormal expression of PDGFRA gene in eosinophilia by FISH. Translocations of PDGFRA gene in 13 patients with eosinophilia were detected by using 4q12 three-color probe and FISH technology. Fifteen people were used as control to establish the normal cut-off value of fluorescence signal of PDGFRA. The results indicated that 1 out of 13 patients with eosinophilia was corrected and was diagnosed as CML. The fusion gene of FIP1L1-PDGFRA (F/P) was found in 2 patients and the positive rate of F/P fusion gene detected by probe 4q12 was 17% in the 12 patients with eosinophilia. Other translocation forms involving PDGFRA gene were not found. It is concluded that a variety of translocation forms of PDGFRA gene can be detected in patients with eosinophilia by using 4q12 three-color probe and FISH technology, which can provide important information for assessing diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Relationship between abnormality of FHIT gene and EBV infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ping Xiao; Cheng-Bo Han; Xiao-Yun Mao; Jin-Yi Li; Lei Xu; Chang-Shan Ren; Yan Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the aberrant expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene and protein in gastric cancer, and to evaluate the role of FHIT gene and the relationship between FHIT gene and EBV infection in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: FHIT transcripts were detected by nested RT PCR in 30 cases of gastric cancer and their products were sequenced. FHIT protein was detected by Western blot.EBV infection was detected by PCR method in 50 cases of gastric cancer.RESULTS: The wild type transcripts were detected in all 30 matched normal tissues of gastric cancer. Aberrant transcripts were found in 11/30 (36.7%) gastric cancerous tissues. Sequencing analysis of the aberrant fragments found an RT-PCR product missing exons 5-7 in one case of gastric cancer, and another product missing exons 4-7. Four of ten (40.0%) cases of primary gastric cancer showed absent or decreased expression of FHIT protein as compared with their matched normal tissues. EBV was detected in 5/50 (10%) gastric cancers, among which 4/5 (80%) had aberrant transcripts of FHIT gene. CONCLUSION: Loss of FHIT gene or FHIT protein p1ays an important role in carcinogenesis, development and progression of gastric cancer. EBV infection might influence carcinogenesis of gastric cancer by inducing the abnormality of FHIT gene.

  20. Abnormal β-catenin gene expression with invasiveness of primary hepatocellular carcinoma in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Cui; Xin-Da Zhou; Yin-Kun Liu; Zhao-You Tang; Maija H Zile

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study the abnormal expression of β-catenin gene and its relationship with invasiveness of primary hepatocellular carcinoma among Chinese people. METHODS Thirty-four hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens and adjacent para-cancerous tissues, 4 normal liver tissues were immunohistochemically stained to study subcellular distribution of β-catenin. Semiquantitive analysis of expression of β-catenin gene exon 3 mRNA was examined by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. The relationship between expressions of both β-catenin protein, mRNA and clinicopathological characteristics of HCC was also analyzed. RESULTS Immunohistochemistry showed that all normal liver tissues and para-cancerous tissues examined displayed membranous type staining for β-catenin protein,occasionally with weak expression in the cytoplasm.While 21 cases (61.8%) of HCC examined showed accumulated type in cytoplasms or nuclei. The accumuled type Labling Index (LI) of cancer tissue and paracancarous tissue was (59.9 ± 26.3) and (18.3 ± 9.7)respectively (P<0.01). Higher accumulated type LI was closely related with invasiveness of HCC. Results of RTPCR showed the β-catenin gene exon 3 mRNA Expression Index (El) of 34 HCCs was higher than that of paracancerous tissue and normal liver tissue. Using in situ hybridization, the signal corresponding to β-catenin gene exon 3 mRNA was particularly strong in cytoplasm of HCC when compared with those of para-cancerous and normal liver tissues. Over expression of β-catenin exon 3 was also found to be correlated with high metastatic potential of HCC. CONCLUSION Abnormal expression of β-catenin gene may contribute importantly to the invasiveness of HCC among Chinese people.

  1. Dissecting the phenotype of supernumerary marker chromosome 20 in a patient with syndromic Pierre Robin sequence: combinatorial effect of gene dosage and uniparental disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Kubota, Noriko; Arakawa, Michiko; Takayama, Masayoshi; Harada, Yukiko; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Nishi, Eriko; Hidaka, Eiko

    2015-06-01

    Clinical phenotypes in individuals with a supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC) are mainly caused by gene dosage effects due to the genes located on the SMC. An additional effect may result from uniparental disomy (UPD). Consequently, the occurrence of UPD may be a confounding factor in identifying genotype-phenotype correlations in SMC syndromes. Here, we report on a patient that illustrates this problem; the phenotype of this patient was a consequence of a combined effect of gene dosage and UPD. The proband showed facial dysmorphisms, growth retardation and developmental delay. G-band karyotype of the proband's peripheral blood showed the presence of mosaic SMC. A SNP array analysis documented maternal UPD20 and 20p duplication. It is known that maternal UPD20 causes prenatal onset growth retardation and feeding difficulties. By contrast, duplication of 20p causes facial dysmorphisms, micrognathia, cleft palate, developmental delay and vertebral anomalies. Our classification of the proband's phenotype showed a mixture of these two effects. Therefore, we suggest the routine use of genome-wide SNP array towards the detailed genotype-phenotype correlations for SMC syndromes.

  2. Impact of three ampicillin dosage regimens on selection of ampicillin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae and excretion of blaTEM genes in swine feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbal, D; Dupouy, V; Ferré, J P; Toutain, P L; Fayet, O; Prère, M F; Bousquet-Mélou, A

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of three ampicillin dosage regimens on ampicillin resistance among Enterobacteriaceae recovered from swine feces by use of phenotypic and genotypic approaches. Phenotypically, ampicillin resistance was determined from the percentage of resistant Enterobacteriaceae and MICs of Escherichia coli isolates. The pool of ampicillin resistance genes was also monitored by quantification of bla(TEM) genes, which code for the most frequently produced beta-lactamases in gram-negative bacteria, using a newly developed real-time PCR assay. Ampicillin was administered intramuscularly and orally to fed or fasted pigs for 7 days at 20 mg/kg of body weight. The average percentage of resistant Enterobacteriaceae before treatment was between 2.5% and 12%, and bla(TEM) gene quantities were below 10(7) copies/g of feces. By days 4 and 7, the percentage of resistant Enterobacteriaceae exceeded 50% in all treated groups, with some highly resistant strains (MIC of >256 microg/ml). In the control group, bla(TEM) gene quantities fluctuated between 10(4) and 10(6) copies/g of feces, whereas they fluctuated between 10(6) to 10(8) and 10(7) to 10(9) copies/g of feces for the intramuscular and oral routes, respectively. Whereas phenotypic evaluations did not discriminate among the three ampicillin dosage regimens, bla(TEM) gene quantification was able to differentiate between the effects of two routes of ampicillin administration. Our results suggest that fecal bla(TEM) gene quantification provides a sensitive tool to evaluate the impact of ampicillin administration on the selection of ampicillin resistance in the digestive microflora and its dissemination in the environment.

  3. Combined cardiological and neurological abnormalities due to filamin A gene mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Marie Claire Y.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Lequin, Maarten H.; Halley, Dicky J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac defects can be the presenting symptom in patients with mutations in the X-linked gene FLNA. Dysfunction of this gene is associated with cardiac abnormalities, especially in the left ventricular outflow tract, but can also cause a congenital malformation of the cerebral cortex. We noticed that some patients diagnosed at the neurogenetics clinic had first presented to a cardiologist, suggesting that earlier recognition may be possible if the diagnosis is suspected. Methods and results From the Erasmus MC cerebral malformations database 24 patients were identified with cerebral bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) without other cerebral cortical malformations. In six of these patients, a pathogenic mutation in FLNA was present. In five a cardiac defect was also found in the outflow tract. Four had presented to a cardiologist before the cerebral abnormalities were diagnosed. Conclusions The cardiological phenotype typically consists of aortic or mitral regurgitation, coarctation of the aorta or other left-sided cardiac malformations. Most patients in this category will not have a FLNA mutation, but the presence of neurological complaints, hyperlaxity of the skin or joints and/or a family history with similar cardiac or neurological problems in a possibly X-linked pattern may alert the clinician to the possibility of a FLNA mutation. PMID:20730588

  4. Expression of a begomoviral DNAβ gene in transgenic Nicotiana plants induced abnormal cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xiao-feng; LI Yun-qin; HU Dong-wei; ZHOU Xue-ping

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of monopartite begomoviruses are being identified that a satellite molecule (DNAβ) is required to induce typical symptoms in host plants. DNAβ encodes a single gene (termed βC1) encoded in the complementary-sense. We have produced transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum plants expressing theβC1 gene of a DNAβ associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Transgenic plants expressing βC1 showed severe developmental abnormalities in both species. Microscopic analysis of sections of both transgenic and non-transgenic N. tabacum leaves showed abnormal outgrowths of transgenic N. tabacum to be due to disorganized cell division (hyperplasia) of spongy and palisade parenchyma. Immuno-gold labeling of sections with a polyclonal antibody against the βC1 protein showed that the βC1 protein accumulated in the nuclei of cells. The possible biological function of the βC1 protein was discussed.

  5. Methylation and expression analyses of Pallister-Killian syndrome reveal partial dosage compensation of tetrasomy 12p and hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Josef; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-03-03

    To ascertain the epigenomic features, i.e., the methylation, non-coding RNA, and gene expression patterns, associated with gain of i(12p) in Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), we investigated single cell clones, harboring either disomy 12 or tetrasomy 12p, from a patient with PKS. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed a characteristic expression and methylation signature. Of all the genes on 12p, 13% were overexpressed, including the ATN1, COPS7A, and NECAP1 genes in 12p13.31, a region previously implicated in PKS. However, the median expression fold change (1.3) on 12p was lower than expected by tetrasomy 12p. Thus, partial dosage compensation occurs in cells with i(12p). The majority (89%) of the significantly deregulated genes were not situated on 12p, indicating that global perturbation of gene expression is a key pathogenetic event in PKS. Three genes-ATP6V1G1 in 9q32, GMPS in 3q25.31, and TBX5 in 12q24.21-exhibited concomitant hypermethylation and decreased expression. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed global hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p, a footprint previously associated with constitutional and acquired gains of whole chromosomes as well as with X-chromosome inactivation in females. We hypothesize that this non-genic hypomethylation is associated with chromatin processing that facilitates cellular adaptation to excess genetic material.

  6. Variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor genes in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Carlo; Greco, Annalisa; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Hribal, Marta Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  7. Variants of Insulin-Signaling Inhibitor Genes in Type 2 Diabetes and Related Metabolic Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo de Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  8. Ablation of XP-V gene causes adipose tissue senescence and metabolic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Wen; Harris, Robert A; Hatahet, Zafer; Chou, Kai-ming

    2015-08-18

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have evolved to be major health issues throughout the world. Whether loss of genome integrity contributes to this epidemic is an open question. DNA polymerase η (pol η), encoded by the xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V) gene, plays an essential role in preventing cutaneous cancer caused by UV radiation-induced DNA damage. Herein, we demonstrate that pol η deficiency in mice (pol η(-/-)) causes obesity with visceral fat accumulation, hepatic steatosis, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intolerance. In comparison to WT mice, adipose tissue from pol η(-/-) mice exhibits increased DNA damage and a greater DNA damage response, indicated by up-regulation and/or phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), and poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Concomitantly, increased cellular senescence in the adipose tissue from pol η(-/-) mice was observed and measured by up-regulation of senescence markers, including p53, p16(Ink4a), p21, senescence-associated (SA) β-gal activity, and SA secretion of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as early as 4 wk of age. Treatment of pol η(-/-) mice with a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, reduced adipocyte senescence and attenuated the metabolic abnormalities. Furthermore, elevation of adipocyte DNA damage with a high-fat diet or sodium arsenite exacerbated adipocyte senescence and metabolic abnormalities in pol η(-/-) mice. In contrast, reduction of adipose DNA damage with N-acetylcysteine or metformin ameliorated cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities. These studies indicate that elevated DNA damage is a root cause of adipocyte senescence, which plays a determining role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance.

  9. Knockout of Lysosomal Enzyme-Targeting Gene Causes Abnormalities in Mouse Pup Isolation Calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Terra D.; Holy, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Humans lacking a working copy of the GNPTAB gene suffer from the metabolic disease Mucolipidosis type II (MLII). MLII symptoms include mental retardation, skeletal deformities and cartilage defects as well as a speech delay with most subjects unable to utter single words (Otomo et al., 2009; Cathey et al., 2010; Leroy et al., 2012). Here we asked whether mice lacking a copy of Gnptab gene exhibited vocal abnormities. We recorded ultrasonic vocalizations from 5 to 8 day old mice separated from their mother and littermates. Although Gnptab−/− pups emitted a similar number of calls, several features of the calls were different from their wild type littermates. Gnptab−/− mice showed a decrease in the length of calls, an increase in the intra-bout pause duration, significantly fewer pitch jumps with smaller mean size, and an increase in the number of isolated calls. In addition, Gnptab−/− mice vocalizations had less power, particularly in the higher frequencies. Gnptab+/− mouse vocalizations did not appear to be affected. We then attempted to classify these recordings using these features to determine the genotype of the animal. We were able to correctly identify 87% of the recordings as either Gnptab−/− or Gnptab+/+ pup, significantly better than chance, demonstrating that genotype is a strong predictor of vocalization phenotype. These data show that deletion of genes in the lysosomal enzyme targeting pathway affect mouse pup isolation calls.

  10. CALL interrupted in a patient with non-specific mental retardation: gene dosage-dependent alteration of murine brain development and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frints, Suzanna G M; Marynen, Peter; Hartmann, Dieter; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Steyaert, Jean; Schachner, Melitta; Rolf, Bettina; Craessaerts, Katleen; Snellinx, An; Hollanders, Karen; D'Hooge, Rudi; De Deyn, Peter P; Froyen, Guy

    2003-07-01

    Investigation of MR patients with 3p aberrations led to the identification of the translocation breakpoint in intron five of the neural Cell Adhesion L1-Like (CALL or CHL1) gene in a man with non-specific mental retardation and 46,Y, t(X;3)(p22.1;p26.3). The Xp breakpoint does not seem to affect a known or predicted gene. Moreover, a fusion transcript with the CALL gene could not be detected and no mutations were identified on the second allele. CALL is highly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, like the mouse ortholog 'close homolog to L1' (Chl1). Chl1 expression levels in the hippocampus of Chl1(+/-) mice were half of those obtained in wild-type littermates, reflecting a gene dosage effect. Timm staining and synaptophysin immunohistochemistry of the hippocampus showed focal groups of ectopic mossy fiber synapses in the lateral CA3 region, outside the trajectory of the infra-pyramidal mossy fiber bundle in Chl1(-/-) and Chl1(+/-) mice. Behavioral assessment demonstrated mild alterations in the Chl1(-/-) animals. In the probe trial of the Morris Water Maze test, Chl1(-/-) mice displayed an altered exploratory pattern. In addition, these mice were significantly more sociable and less aggressive as demonstrated in social exploration tests. The Chl1(+/-) mice showed a phenotypic spectrum ranging from wild-type to knockout behavior. We hypothesize that a 50% reduction of CALL expression in the developing brain results in cognitive deficits. This suggests that the CALL gene at 3p26.3 is a prime candidate for an autosomal form of mental retardation. So far, mutation analysis of the CALL gene in patients with non-specific MR did not reveal any disease-associated mutations.

  11. An altered antioxidant balance occurs in Down syndrome fetal organs: implications for the "gene dosage effect" hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, J B; Susil, B; Pritchard, M; Kola, I

    2003-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the congenital birth defect responsible for the greatest number of individuals with mental retardation. It arises due to trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) or part thereof. To date there have been limited studies of HSA21 gene expression in trisomy 21 conceptuses. In this study we investigate the expression of the HSA21 antioxidant gene, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) in various organs of control and DS aborted conceptuses. We show that SOD1 mRNA levels are elevated in DS brain, lung, heart and thymus. DS livers show decreased SOD1 mRNA expression compared with controls. Since non-HSA21 antioxidant genes are reported to be concomitantly upregulated in certain DS tissues, we examined the expression of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1) in control and DS fetal organs. Interestingly, GPX1 expression was unchanged in the majority of DS organs and decreased in DS livers. We examined the SOD1 to GPX1 mRNA ratio in individual organs, as both enzymes form part of the body's defense against oxidative stress, and because a disproportionate increase of SOD1 to GPX1 results in noxious hydroxyl radical damage. All organs investigated show an approximately 2-fold increase in the SOD1 to GPX1 mRNA ratio. We propose that it is the altered antioxidant ratio that contributes to certain aspects of the DS phenotype.

  12. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5′-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, “R2-Δ2” analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30–40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5′-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  13. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

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    Lemieux, N. (Universite de Montreal (Canada)); Malfoy, B. (Institut Curie Section de Biologie, Paris (France)); Forrest, G.L. (Beckman Research Institute at the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. A novel SYBR-based duplex qPCR for the detection of gene dosage: detection of an APC large deletion in a familial adenomatous polyposis patient with an unusual phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrezan Giovana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome caused by a loss of function of the APC gene. Large deletions in APC are a common cause of FAP; despite the existence of a variety of gene dosage detection methodologies, most are labor intensive and time and resource consuming. Methods We describe a new duplex qPCR method for gene dosage analysis based on the coamplification of a target and a reference gene in a SYBR Green reaction, followed by a comparison of the ratio between the target and the reference peaks of the melting curve for the test (patient and control samples. The reliability of the described duplex qPCR was validated for several genes (APC, HPRT1, ATM, PTEN and BRCA1. Results Using this novel gene dosage method, we have identified an APC gene deletion in a FAP patient undergoing genetic testing. Comparative genomic hybridization based on microarrays (aCGH was used to confirm and map the extent of the deletion, revealing a 5.2 MB rearrangement (5q21.3-q22.3 encompassing the entire APC and 19 additional genes. Conclusion The novel assay accurately detected losses and gains of one copy of the target sequences, representing a reliable and flexible alternative to other gene dosage techniques. In addition, we described a FAP patient harboring a gross deletion at 5q21.3-q22.3 with an unusual phenotype of the absence of mental impairment and dysmorphic features.

  15. Tfap2a-dependent changes in mouse facial morphology result in clefting that can be ameliorated by a reduction in Fgf8 gene dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca M; Feng, Weiguo; Phang, Tzulip; Fish, Jennifer L; Li, Hong; Spritz, Richard A; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hooper, Joan; Jamniczky, Heather; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Williams, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Failure of facial prominence fusion causes cleft lip and palate (CL/P), a common human birth defect. Several potential mechanisms can be envisioned that would result in CL/P, including failure of prominence growth and/or alignment as well as a failure of fusion of the juxtaposed epithelial seams. Here, using geometric morphometrics, we analyzed facial outgrowth and shape change over time in a novel mouse model exhibiting fully penetrant bilateral CL/P. This robust model is based upon mutations in Tfap2a, the gene encoding transcription factor AP-2α, which has been implicated in both syndromic and non-syndromic human CL/P. Our findings indicate that aberrant morphology and subsequent misalignment of the facial prominences underlies the inability of the mutant prominences to fuse. Exencephaly also occured in some of the Tfap2a mutants and we observed additional morphometric differences that indicate an influence of neural tube closure defects on facial shape. Molecular analysis of the CL/P model indicates that Fgf signaling is misregulated in the face, and that reducing Fgf8 gene dosage can attenuate the clefting pathology by generating compensatory changes. Furthermore, mutations in either Tfap2a or Fgf8 increase variance in facial shape, but the combination of these mutations restores variance to normal levels. The alterations in variance provide a potential mechanistic link between clefting and the evolution and diversity of facial morphology. Overall, our findings suggest that CL/P can result from small gene-expression changes that alter the shape of the facial prominences and uncouple their coordinated morphogenesis, which is necessary for normal fusion.

  16. THE ROLE OF IGF-1 GENE EXPRESSION ABNORMALITY IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李剑波; 汪承亚; 陈家伟; 李晓璐; 冯振卿; 马洪太

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To explore the role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)gene expression abnormality in neurotrophic causes of diabetic peripheral neurophathy.Methods. Diabetes was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by alloxan. The parameters were measured as follows: IGF-1 mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); IGF-1 peptide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); electrophysiological parameters of nerves by evoked electromyogram; morphometric evaluation of sciatic nerves under light microscope and transmission electron microscope.Results. During early diabetic stage, IGF-1 mRNA [(0.430±0.031)vs. (0.370±0.016), P <0.01,(0.430 ± 0.031 ) vs. (0.280 ± 0.010) , P <0.001, respectively], IGF - 1 peptide contents [ (38.44 ± 3.60)ng/mgvs. (30.06±2.41) ng/mg, P <0.01, (38.44±3.6) ng/mgvs. (3.71 +2.70) ng/mg, P <0.001,respectively] in sciatic nerve tissue reduced in diabetic rats with hyperglycemia and varied with severity of diabetic state when compared with non-diabetic control rats, and further gradually down-regulated in the diabetic rats with duration of diabetes [IGF-1 mRNA (0. 320 ± 0. 021) ~ (0. 230 + 0. 060); IGF-1 peptide (28.80 ± 3.30) ~(19. 51 + 1.80)ng/mg]. Furthermore, they correlated with nerve functional (sensory nerve conduction velocity:r = 0. 741, P <0. 001; amplitude ofevokedpotential: r = 0. 716, P <0. 001, respectively)andstructuralabnormality (axonal areas r = 0. 81, P < 0. 001 ) of sciatic nerve. No difference was found in the above parameters between diabetic rats with euglycemia and non-diabetic control group.Conclusion. IGF-1 gene expression in tissues was down-regulated from early diabetic stage, and varied with the severity and duration of diabetic state. The decrement in IGF-1 level might contribute to the initiation and development of diabetic neuropathy via autocrine or paracrine pathway.

  17. Effect of Cyp27A1 gene dosage on atherosclerosis development in ApoE-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkinden, Line; Solcà, Curzio; Vögeli, Isabelle A; Vogt, Bruno; Ackermann, Daniel; Erickson, Sandra K; Frey, Felix J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Escher, Geneviève

    2014-03-01

    In humans, sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) deficiency leads to cholesterol deposition in tendons and vasculature. Thus, in addition to its role in bile acid synthesis, where it converts cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC), CYP27A1 may also be atheroprotective. Cyp27A1-deficient (Cyp27A1(-/-)) mice were crossed with apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice. Cyp27A1(+/+)/apoE(-/-) [ApoE-knockout (KO)], Cyp27A1(+/-)/apoE(-/-) heterozygous (het), and Cyp27A1(-/-)/apoE(-/-) [double-knockout (DKO)] mice were challenged with a Western diet (WD) for 3 and 6 mo. ApoE-KO mice fed a chow diet or a WD were used as the control. The severity of atherosclerosis in DKO mice was reduced 10-fold. Compared with the control, the DKO mice had no 27-OHC, total plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein and very low density lipoprotein (LDL/VLDL) concentrations were reduced 2-fold, and HDL was elevated 2-fold. Expression of hepatic CYP7A1, CYP3A, and CYP8B1 were 5- to 10-fold higher. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity increased 4-fold. Fecal cholesterol was increased. In contrast, het mice fed a WD developed accelerated atherosclerosis and severe skin lesions, possibly because of reduced reverse cholesterol transport due to diminished 27-OHC production. CYP27A1 activity is involved in the control of cholesterol homeostasis and development of atherosclerosis with a distinct gene dose-dependent effect.

  18. Mirror extreme BMI phenotypes associated with gene dosage at the chromosome 16p11.2 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemont, Sébastien; Reymond, Alexandre; Zufferey, Flore; Harewood, Louise; Walters, Robin G; Kutalik, Zoltán; Martinet, Danielle; Shen, Yiping; Valsesia, Armand; Beckmann, Noam D; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Belfiore, Marco; Bouquillon, Sonia; Campion, Dominique; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B A; Esko, Tõnu; Fernandez, Bridget A; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Gratacòs, Mònica; Guilmatre, Audrey; Hoyer, Juliane; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kooy, R Frank; Kurg, Ants; Le Caignec, Cédric; Männik, Katrin; Platt, Orah S; Sanlaville, Damien; Van Haelst, Mieke M; Villatoro Gomez, Sergi; Walha, Faida; Wu, Bai-Lin; Yu, Yongguo; Aboura, Azzedine; Addor, Marie-Claude; Alembik, Yves; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Arveiler, Benoît; Barth, Magalie; Bednarek, Nathalie; Béna, Frédérique; Bergmann, Sven; Beri, Mylène; Bernardini, Laura; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Bonneau, Dominique; Bottani, Armand; Boute, Odile; Brunner, Han G; Cailley, Dorothée; Callier, Patrick; Chiesa, Jean; Chrast, Jacqueline; Coin, Lachlan; Coutton, Charles; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Cuvellier, Jean-Christophe; David, Albert; de Freminville, Bénédicte; Delobel, Bruno; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Demeer, Bénédicte; Descamps, Dominique; Didelot, Gérard; Dieterich, Klaus; Disciglio, Vittoria; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Drunat, Séverine; Duban-Bedu, Bénédicte; Dubourg, Christèle; El-Sayed Moustafa, Julia S; Elliott, Paul; Faas, Brigitte H W; Faivre, Laurence; Faudet, Anne; Fellmann, Florence; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Fisher, Richard; Flori, Elisabeth; Forer, Lukas; Gaillard, Dominique; Gerard, Marion; Gieger, Christian; Gimelli, Stefania; Gimelli, Giorgio; Grabe, Hans J; Guichet, Agnès; Guillin, Olivier; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heron, Délphine; Hippolyte, Loyse; Holder, Muriel; Homuth, Georg; Isidor, Bertrand; Jaillard, Sylvie; Jaros, Zdenek; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Helas, Géraldine Joly; Jonveaux, Philippe; Kaksonen, Satu; Keren, Boris; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Knoers, Nine V A M; Koolen, David A; Kroisel, Peter M; Kronenberg, Florian; Labalme, Audrey; Landais, Emilie; Lapi, Elisabetta; Layet, Valérie; Legallic, Solenn; Leheup, Bruno; Leube, Barbara; Lewis, Suzanne; Lucas, Josette; MacDermot, Kay D; Magnusson, Pall; Marshall, Christian; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; McCarthy, Mark I; Meitinger, Thomas; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Merla, Giuseppe; Moerman, Alexandre; Mooser, Vincent; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Mucciolo, Mafalda; Nauck, Matthias; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Nordgren, Ann; Pasquier, Laurent; Petit, Florence; Pfundt, Rolph; Plessis, Ghislaine; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Rauch, Anita; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Reis, Andre; Renieri, Alessandra; Richart, Cristobal; Ried, Janina S; Rieubland, Claudine; Roberts, Wendy; Roetzer, Katharina M; Rooryck, Caroline; Rossi, Massimiliano; Saemundsen, Evald; Satre, Véronique; Schurmann, Claudia; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Stefansson, Hreinn; Tengström, Carola; Thorsteinsdóttir, Unnur; Tinahones, Francisco J; Touraine, Renaud; Vallée, Louis; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Waeber, Gérard; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Witwicki, Robert M; Zwolinksi, Simon; Andrieux, Joris; Estivill, Xavier; Gusella, James F; Gustafsson, Omar; Metspalu, Andres; Scherer, Stephen W; Stefansson, Kari; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Beckmann, Jacques S; Froguel, Philippe

    2011-08-31

    Both obesity and being underweight have been associated with increased mortality. Underweight, defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 18.5 kg per m(2) in adults and ≤ -2 standard deviations from the mean in children, is the main sign of a series of heterogeneous clinical conditions including failure to thrive, feeding and eating disorder and/or anorexia nervosa. In contrast to obesity, few genetic variants underlying these clinical conditions have been reported. We previously showed that hemizygosity of a ∼600-kilobase (kb) region on the short arm of chromosome 16 causes a highly penetrant form of obesity that is often associated with hyperphagia and intellectual disabilities. Here we show that the corresponding reciprocal duplication is associated with being underweight. We identified 138 duplication carriers (including 132 novel cases and 108 unrelated carriers) from individuals clinically referred for developmental or intellectual disabilities (DD/ID) or psychiatric disorders, or recruited from population-based cohorts. These carriers show significantly reduced postnatal weight and BMI. Half of the boys younger than five years are underweight with a probable diagnosis of failure to thrive, whereas adult duplication carriers have an 8.3-fold increased risk of being clinically underweight. We observe a trend towards increased severity in males, as well as a depletion of male carriers among non-medically ascertained cases. These features are associated with an unusually high frequency of selective and restrictive eating behaviours and a significant reduction in head circumference. Each of the observed phenotypes is the converse of one reported in carriers of deletions at this locus. The phenotypes correlate with changes in transcript levels for genes mapping within the duplication but not in flanking regions. The reciprocal impact of these 16p11.2 copy-number variants indicates that severe obesity and being underweight could have mirror aetiologies

  19. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene M F; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype-phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies.

  20. Mirror extreme BMI phenotypes associated with gene dosage at the chromosome 16p11.2 locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemont, Sébastien; Reymond, Alexandre; Zufferey, Flore; Harewood, Louise; Walters, Robin G.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Martinet, Danielle; Shen, Yiping; Valsesia, Armand; Beckmann, Noam D.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Belfiore, Marco; Bouquillon, Sonia; Campion, Dominique; De Leeuw, Nicole; De Vries, Bert B. A.; Esko, Tõnu; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Gratacòs, Mònica; Guilmatre, Audrey; Hoyer, Juliane; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kooy, Frank R.; Kurg, Ants; Le Caignec, Cédric; Männik, Katrin; Platt, Orah S.; Sanlaville, Damien; Van Haelst, Mieke M.; Villatoro Gomez, Sergi; Walha, Faida; Wu, Bai-Lin; Yu, Yongguo; Aboura, Azzedine; Addor, Marie-Claude; Alembik, Yves; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Arveiler, Benoît; Barth, Magalie; Bednarek, Nathalie; Béna, Frédérique; Bergmann, Sven; Beri, Mylène; Bernardini, Laura; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Bonneau, Dominique; Bottani, Armand; Boute, Odile; Brunner, Han G.; Cailley, Dorothée; Callier, Patrick; Chiesa, Jean; Chrast, Jacqueline; Coin, Lachlan; Coutton, Charles; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Cuvellier, Jean-Christophe; David, Albert; De Freminville, Bénédicte; Delobel, Bruno; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Demeer, Bénédicte; Descamps, Dominique; Didelot, Gérard; Dieterich, Klaus; Disciglio, Vittoria; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Drunat, Séverine; Duban-Bedu, Bénédicte; Dubourg, Christèle; El-Sayed Moustafa, Julia S.; Elliott, Paul; Faas, Brigitte H. W.; Faivre, Laurence; Faudet, Anne; Fellmann, Florence; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Fisher, Richard; Flori, Elisabeth; Forer, Lukas; Gaillard, Dominique; Gerard, Marion; Gieger, Christian; Gimelli, Stefania; Gimelli, Giorgio; Grabe, Hans J.; Guichet, Agnès; Guillin, Olivier; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heron, Délphine; Hippolyte, Loyse; Holder, Muriel; Homuth, Georg; Isidor, Bertrand; Jaillard, Sylvie; Jaros, Zdenek; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Joly Helas, Géraldine; Jonveaux, Philippe; Kaksonen, Satu; Keren, Boris; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Koolen, David A.; Kroisel, Peter M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Labalme, Audrey; Landais, Emilie; Lapi, Elisabetta; Layet, Valérie; Legallic, Solenn; Leheup, Bruno; Leube, Barbara; Lewis, Suzanne; Lucas, Josette; Macdermot, Kay D.; Magnusson, Pall; Marshall, Christian R.; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Mccarthy, Mark I.; Meitinger, Thomas; Antonietta Mencarelli, Maria; Merla, Giuseppe; Moerman, Alexandre; Mooser, Vincent; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Mucciolo, Mafalda; Nauck, Matthias; Coumba Ndiaye, Ndeye; Nordgren, Ann; Pasquier, Laurent; Petit, Florence; Pfundt, Rolph; Plessis, Ghislaine; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica; Paolo Ramelli, Gian; Rauch, Anita; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Reis, Andre; Renieri, Alessandra; Richart, Cristobal; Ried, Janina S.; Rieubland, Claudine; Roberts, Wendy; Roetzer, Katharina M.; Rooryck, Caroline; Rossi, Massimiliano; Saemundsen, Evald; Satre, Véronique; Schurmann, Claudia; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Tengström, Carola; Thorsteinsdóttir, Unnur; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Touraine, Renaud; Vallée, Louis; Van Binsbergen, Ellen; Van Der Aa, Nathalie; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Vulto-Van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Waeber, Gérard; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Witwicki, Robert M.; Zwolinksi, Simon; Andrieux, Joris; Estivill, Xavier; Gusella, James F.; Gustafsson, Omar; Metspalu, Andres; Scherer, Stephen W.; Stefansson, Kari; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Froguel, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Both underweight and obesity have been associated with increased mortality1,2. Underweight, defined as body mass index (BMI) ≤ 18,5 kg/m2 in adults 3 and ≤ −2 standard deviations (SD) in children4,5, is the main sign of a series of heterogeneous clinical conditions such as failure to thrive (FTT) 6–8, feeding and eating disorder and/or anorexia nervosa9,10. In contrast to obesity, few genetic variants underlying these clinical conditions have been reported 11, 12. We previously demonstrated that hemizygosity of a ~600 kb region on the short arm of chromosome 16 (chr16:29.5–30.1Mb), causes a highly-penetrant form of obesity often associated with hyperphagia and intellectual disabilities13. Here we show that the corresponding reciprocal duplication is associated with underweight. We identified 138 (132 novel cases) duplication carriers (108 unrelated carriers) from over 95,000 individuals clinically-referred for developmental or intellectual disabilities (DD/ID), psychiatric disorders or recruited from population-based cohorts. These carriers show significantly reduced postnatal weight (mean Z-score −0.6; p=4.4×10−4) and BMI (mean Z-score −0.5; p=2.0×10−3). In particular, half of the boys younger than 5 years are underweight with a probable diagnosis of FTT, while adult duplication carriers have an 8.7-fold (p=5.9×10−11; CI_95=[4.5–16.6]) increased risk of being clinically underweight. We observe a significant trend towards increased severity in males, as well as a depletion of male carriers among non-medically ascertained cases. These features are associated with an unusually high frequency of selective and restrictive feeding behaviours and a significant reduction in head circumference (mean Z-score −0.9; p=7.8×10−6). Each of the observed phenotypes is the converse of one reported in carriers of deletions at this locus, correlating with changes in transcript levels for genes mapping within the duplication but not within flanking

  1. Opposing phenotypes in mice with Smith-Magenis deletion and Potocki-Lupski duplication syndromes suggest gene dosage effects on fluid consumption behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Detlef H; Gu, Wenli; Cao, Ying; Qi, Shuhua; Lacaria, Melanie; Lupski, James R

    2012-11-01

    A quantitative long-term fluid consumption and fluid-licking assay was performed in two mouse models with either an ∼2 Mb genomic deletion, Df(11)17, or the reciprocal duplication copy number variation (CNV), Dp(11)17, analogous to the human genomic rearrangements causing either Smith-Magenis syndrome [SMS; OMIM #182290] or Potocki-Lupski syndrome [PTLS; OMIM #610883], respectively. Both mouse strains display distinct quantitative alterations in fluid consumption compared to their wild-type littermates; several of these changes are diametrically opposing between the two chromosome engineered mouse models. Mice with duplication versus deletion showed longer versus shorter intervals between visits to the waterspout, generated more versus less licks per visit and had higher versus lower variability in the number of licks per lick-burst as compared to their respective wild-type littermates. These findings suggest that copy number variation can affect long-term fluid consumption behavior in mice. Other behavioral differences were unique for either the duplication or deletion mutants; the deletion CNV resulted in increased variability of the licking rhythm, and the duplication CNV resulted in a significant slowing of the licking rhythm. Our findings document a readily quantitated complex behavioral response that can be directly and reciprocally influenced by a gene dosage effect.

  2. Genetic basis for dosage sensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle M Henry

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy, the relative excess or deficiency of specific chromosome types, results in gene dosage imbalance. Plants can produce viable and fertile aneuploid individuals, while most animal aneuploids are inviable or developmentally abnormal. The swarms of aneuploid progeny produced by Arabidopsis triploids constitute an excellent model to investigate the mechanisms governing dosage sensitivity and aneuploid syndromes. Indeed, genotype alters the frequency of aneuploid types within these swarms. Recombinant inbred lines that were derived from a triploid hybrid segregated into diploid and tetraploid individuals. In these recombinant inbred lines, a single locus, which we call SENSITIVE TO DOSAGE IMBALANCE (SDI, exhibited segregation distortion in the tetraploid subpopulation only. Recent progress in quantitative genotyping now allows molecular karyotyping and genetic analysis of aneuploid populations. In this study, we investigated the causes of the ploidy-specific distortion at SDI. Allele frequency was distorted in the aneuploid swarms produced by the triploid hybrid. We developed a simple quantitative measure for aneuploidy lethality and using this measure demonstrated that distortion was greatest in the aneuploids facing the strongest viability selection. When triploids were crossed to euploids, the progeny, which lack severe aneuploids, exhibited no distortion at SDI. Genetic characterization of SDI in the aneuploid swarm identified a mechanism governing aneuploid survival, perhaps by buffering the effects of dosage imbalance. As such, SDI could increase the likelihood of retaining genomic rearrangements such as segmental duplications. Additionally, in species where triploids are fertile, aneuploid survival would facilitate gene flow between diploid and tetraploid populations via a triploid bridge and prevent polyploid speciation. Our results demonstrate that positional cloning of loci affecting traits in populations containing ploidy and

  3. Abnormal immunity and gene mutation in patients with severe hepatitis-B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Yan Wang; Pei Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the abnormal immunity and gene mutation at precore 1896 site in patients with severe hepatitis-B.METHODS: This study included 23 patients with severe hepatitis-B, 22 patients with acute hepatitis-B and 20 controls.Mutation at precore 1896 site of HBV gene was confirmed with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.Cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-y, IL-6, and IL-8 were measured with ELISA, and T subgroups were detected with alkaline phosphatase anti alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) technique.RESULTS: In patients with severe hepatitis-B, the infective rate of HBV mutant strain was 52.5% (12/23), and only one patient with acute hepatitis-B was infected with the mutant strain. The percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte was obviously lower (0.16±0.02%) and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ was obviously higher (2.35±0.89) in mutant group than in wildtype group (0.28±0.05% and 1.31±0.18%, respectively,P<0.01 or P<0.05). The levels of cytokines in patients with severe hepatitis-B were higher (TNF-α 359.0±17.2 ng/L, IFNγ 234.7±16.5 ng/L, IL-6 347.5±31.3 ng/L, IL-8 181.1±19.6ng/L) than those in acute hepatitis-B (TNF-α 220.6±8.9ng/L, IFN-γ 174.9±12.0 ng/L, IL-6 285.8±16.5 ng/L, IL-8118.4±5.1 ng/L, P<0.01 or 0.05). In patients with severe hepatitis-B, the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 were higher in mutant group (273.4±26.6 ng/L, 387.7±32.5 ng/L) than in wild-type group (207.8±12.8 ng/L, 300.9±16.3 ng/L). The mortality of patients infected with HBV mutant strain was higher (100%)than that with wild-type (0.9%).CONCLUSION: In severe hepatitis-B, the infective rate of HBV mutant strain was high. The mutant strain induces more severe immune disorders in host, resulting in the activation of lymphocyte and release of cytokines. HBV DNA mutates easily in response to the altered immunity. Ultimately liver damage is more prominent.

  4. CAFE: an R package for the detection of gross chromosomal abnormalities from gene expression microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Sander; Leddin, Mathias; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Mah, Nancy

    2014-05-15

    The current methods available to detect chromosomal abnormalities from DNA microarray expression data are cumbersome and inflexible. CAFE has been developed to alleviate these issues. It is implemented as an R package that analyzes Affymetrix *.CEL files and comes with flexible plotting functions, easing visualization of chromosomal abnormalities. CAFE is available from https://bitbucket.org/cob87icW6z/cafe/ as both source and compiled packages for Linux and Windows. It is released under the GPL version 3 license. CAFE will also be freely available from Bioconductor. sander.h.bollen@gmail.com or nancy.mah@mdc-berlin.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Aberrant gene expression patterns in placentomes are associated with phenotypically normal and abnormal cattle cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Robin E; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Razzak, Anthony; Hue, Isabelle; Green, Cheryl A; Oliveira, Rosane; Vignon, Xavier; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Tian, X Cindy; Yang, Xiangzhong; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A

    2008-03-14

    Transcription profiling of placentomes derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, n = 20), in vitro fertilization (IVF, n = 9), and artificial insemination (AI, n = 9) at or near term development was performed to better understand why SCNT and IVF often result in placental defects, hydrops, and large offspring syndrome (LOS). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to distinguish the effects of SCNT, IVF, and AI on gene expression, taking into account the effects of parturition (term or preterm), sex of fetus, breed of dam, breed of fetus, and pathological finding in the offspring (hydrops, normal, or other abnormalities). Differential expression of 20 physiologically important genes was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The largest effect on placentome gene expression was attributable to whether placentas were collected at term or preterm (i.e., whether the collection was because of disease or to obtain stage-matched controls) followed by placentome source (AI, IVF, or SCNT). Gene expression in SCNT placentomes was dramatically different from AI (n = 336 genes; 276 >2-fold) and from IVF (n = 733 genes; 162 >2-fold) placentomes. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that IVF has significant effects on genes associated with cellular metabolism. In contrast, DEG associated with SCNT are involved in multiple pathways, including cell cycle, cell death, and gene expression. Many DEG were shared between the gene lists for IVF and SCNT comparisons, suggesting that common pathways are affected by the embryo culture methods used for IVF and SCNT. However, the many unique gene functions and pathways affected by SCNT suggest that cloned fetuses may be starved and accumulating toxic wastes due to placental insufficiency caused by reprogramming errors. Many of these genes are candidates for hydrops and LOS.

  6. Differential gene expression profile associated with the abnormality of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in aplastic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Li

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia (AA is generally considered as an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome with defective hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and marrow microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated the defective HSCs and aberrant T cellular-immunity in AA using a microarray approach. However, little is known about the overall specialty of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. In the present study, we comprehensively compared the biological features and gene expression profile of BM-MSCs between AA patients and healthy volunteers. In comparison with healthy controls, BM-MSCs from AA patients showed aberrant morphology, decreased proliferation and clonogenic potential and increased apoptosis. BM-MSCs from AA patients were susceptible to be induced to differentiate into adipocytes but more difficult to differentiate into osteoblasts. Consistent with abnormal biological features, a large number of genes implicated in cell cycle, cell division, proliferation, chemotaxis and hematopoietic cell lineage showed markedly decreased expression in BM-MSCs from AA patients. Conversely, more related genes with apoptosis, adipogenesis and immune response showed increased expression in BM-MSCs from AA patients. The gene expression profile of BM-MSCs further confirmed the abnormal biological properties and provided significant evidence for the possible mechanism of the destruction of the bone marrow microenvironment in AA.

  7. Characterization of oil palm MADS box genes in relation to the mantled flower abnormality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syed Alwee, S.; Linden, van der C.G.; Schoot, van der J.; Folter, de S.; Angenent, G.C.; Cheah, S.C.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro propagation of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) frequently induces a somaclonal variant called `mantled¿ abnormality, in which the stamens of both male and female flowers are transformed into carpels. This leads to a reduced yield or complete loss of the harvest of palm oil. The high

  8. Integration of gene dosage and gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer, identification of HSP90 as potential target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariëlle I Gallegos Ruiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer causes approximately 1.2 million deaths per year worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents 85% of all lung cancers. Understanding the molecular events in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is essential to improve early diagnosis and treatment for this disease. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to identify novel NSCLC related genes, we performed a genome-wide screening of chromosomal copy number changes affecting gene expression using microarray based comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression arrays on 32 radically resected tumor samples from stage I and II NSCLC patients. An integrative analysis tool was applied to determine whether chromosomal copy number affects gene expression. We identified a deletion on 14q32.2-33 as a common alteration in NSCLC (44%, which significantly influenced gene expression for HSP90, residing on 14q32. This deletion was correlated with better overall survival (P = 0.008, survival was also longer in patients whose tumors had low expression levels of HSP90. We extended the analysis to three independent validation sets of NSCLC patients, and confirmed low HSP90 expression to be related with longer overall survival (P = 0.003, P = 0.07 and P = 0.04. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with an HSP90 inhibitor had potent antiproliferative activity in NSCLC cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that targeting HSP90 will have clinical impact for NSCLC patients.

  9. Cumulative Epigenetic Abnormalities in Host Genes with Viral and Microbial Infection during Initiation and Progression of Malignant Lymphoma/Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Takashi, E-mail: oka@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Sato, Hiaki [Department of Medical Technology, Graduate School of Health Science, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Ouchida, Mamoru [Department of Molecular Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Utsunomiya, Atae [Department of Hematology, Imamura Bun-in Hospital, 11-23 Kamoike Shinnmachi, Kagoshima, 890-0064 (Japan); Yoshino, Tadashi [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2011-02-04

    Although cancers have been thought to be predominantly driven by acquired genetic changes, it is becoming clear that microenvironment-mediated epigenetic alterations play important roles. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation is a prevalent phenomenon in human cancers as well as malignant lymphoma/leukemia. Tumor suppressor genes become frequent targets of aberrant hypermethylation in the course of gene-silencing due to the increased and deregulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). The purpose of this article is to review the current status of knowledge about the contribution of cumulative epigenetic abnormalities of the host genes after microbial and virus infection to the crisis and progression of malignant lymphoma/leukemia. In addition, the relevance of this knowledge to malignant lymphoma/leukemia assessment, prevention and early detection will be discussed.

  10. Male-specific lethal 2, a dosage compensation gene of Drosophila, undergoes sex-specific regulation and encodes a protein with a RING finger and a metallothionein-like cysteine cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S; Yang, Y; Scott, M J; Pannuti, A; Fehr, K C; Eisen, A; Koonin, E V; Fouts, D L; Wrightsman, R; Manning, J E

    1995-06-15

    In Drosophila the equalization of X-linked gene products between males and females, i.e. dosage compensation, is the result of a 2-fold hypertranscription of most of these genes in males. At least four regulatory genes are required for this process. Three of these genes, maleless (mle), male-specific lethal 1 (msl-1) and male-specific lethal 3 (msl-3), have been cloned and their products have been shown to interact and to bind to numerous sites on the X chromosome of males, but not of females. Although binding to the X chromosome is negatively correlated with the function of the master regulatory gene Sex lethal (Sxl), the mechanisms that restrict this binding to males and to the X chromosome are not yet understood. We have cloned the last of the known autosomal genes involved in dosage compensation, male-specific lethal 2 (msl-2), and characterized its product. The encoded protein (MSL-2) consists of 769 amino acid residues and has a RING finger (C3HC4 zinc finger) and a metallothionein-like domain with eight conserved and two non-conserved cysteines. In addition, it contains a positively and a negatively charged amino acid residue cluster and a coiled coil domain that may be involved in protein-protein interactions. Males produce a msl-2 transcript that is shorter than in females, due to differential splicing of an intron of 132 bases in the untranslated leader. Using an antiserum against MSL-2 we have shown that the protein is expressed at a detectable level only in males, where it is physically associated with the X chromosome. Our observations suggest that MSL-2 may be the target of the master regulatory gene Sxl and provide the basic elements of a working hypothesis on the function of MSL-2 in mediating the 2-fold increase in transcription that is characteristic of dosage compensation.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of gene expression profiles of stomach carcinoma reveal abnormal expression of mitotic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hongfei; Wang, Jisheng; Chen, Hui; Wang, Zhaohong; Fan, Henwei; Ni, Zhonglin

    2017-02-01

    In order to explore the etiology of gastric cancer on global gene expression level, we developed advanced bioinformatic analysis to investigate the variations of global gene expression and the interactions among them. We downloaded the dataset GSE63288 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database which included 22 human gastric cancer and 22 healthy control samples. We identified the differential expression genes, and explored the Gene ontology (GO) and pathways of the differentially expressed genes. Furthermore, integrative interaction network and co-expression network were employed to identify the key genes which may contribute to gastric cancer progression. The results indicated that 5 kinases including BUB1, TTK protein kinase, Citron Rho-interacting kinase (CIT), ZAK and NEK2 were upregulated in gastric cancer. Interestingly, BUB1, TTK, CIT and NEK2 have shown high expression similarities and bound with each other, and participated in multiple phases of mitosis. Moreover, a subnet of co-expression genes e.g. KIF14, PRC1, CENPF and CENPI was also involved in mitosis which was functionally coupled with the kinases above. By validation assays, the results indicated that CIT, PRC1, TTK and KIF14 were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer. These evidences have suggested that aberrant expression of these genes may drive gastric cancer including progression, invasion and metastasis. Although the causal relationships between gastric cancer and the genes are still lacking, it was reasonable to take them as biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional validation of GWAS gene candidates for abnormal liver function during zebrafish liver development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Y. Liu

    2013-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed numerous associations between many phenotypes and gene candidates. Frequently, however, further elucidation of gene function has not been achieved. A recent GWAS identified 69 candidate genes associated with elevated liver enzyme concentrations, which are clinical markers of liver disease. To investigate the role of these genes in liver homeostasis, we narrowed down this list to 12 genes based on zebrafish orthology, zebrafish liver expression and disease correlation. To assess the function of gene candidates during liver development, we assayed hepatic progenitors at 48 hours post fertilization (hpf and hepatocytes at 72 hpf using in situ hybridization following morpholino knockdown in zebrafish embryos. Knockdown of three genes (pnpla3, pklr and mapk10 decreased expression of hepatic progenitor cells, whereas knockdown of eight genes (pnpla3, cpn1, trib1, fads2, slc2a2, pklr, mapk10 and samm50 decreased cell-specific hepatocyte expression. We then induced liver injury in zebrafish embryos using acetaminophen exposure and observed changes in liver toxicity incidence in morphants. Prioritization of GWAS candidates and morpholino knockdown expedites the study of newly identified genes impacting liver development and represents a feasible method for initial assessment of candidate genes to instruct further mechanistic analyses. Our analysis can be extended to GWAS for additional disease-associated phenotypes.

  13. p.Pro4Arg mutation in LMNA gene: a new atypical progeria phenotype without metabolism abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Na; Hao, Fei; Bai, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a typical presenile disorder, with mutation in the LMNA gene. Besides HGPS, mutations in LMNA gene have also been reported in atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). The objective of the study was to investigate the phenotype and molecular basis of APS in a Chinese family. LMNA gene mutations were also reviewed to identify the phenotypic and pathogenic differences among APS. Two siblings in a non-consanguineous Chinese family with atypical progeria were reported. The clinical features were observed, including presenile manifestations such as bird-like facial appearance, generalized lipodystrophy involving the extremities and mottled hyperpigmentation on the trunk and extremities. A heterozygous mutation c.11C>G (p.Pro4Arg) of the LMNA gene was detected in the two patients. 28 different variants of the LMNA gene have been reported in APS families, spreading over almost all the 12 exons of the LMNA gene with some hot-spot regions. This is the first detailed description of an APS family without metabolism abnormalities. APS patients share most of the clinical features, but there may be some distinct features in different ethnic groups.

  14. Deletion of the msdS/AfmsdC gene induces abnormal polarity and septation in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Depeng; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Haomiao; Ming, Jia; Jin, Cheng

    2008-07-01

    alpha-Mannosidases play an important role in the processing of mannose-containing glycans in eukaryotes. A deficiency in alpha-mannosidase is lethal in humans and cattle. In contrast to mammals, Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not require the endoplasmic reticulum alpha-mannosidase gene for growth. However, little is known of the consequence of loss of function of class I alpha-mannosidases in filamentous fungi. In this study, the msdS/AfmsdC gene was identified to encode 1,2-alpha-mannosidase MsdS in Aspergillus fumigatus. Soluble MsdS expressed in Escherichia coli was characterized as a typical class I alpha-mannosidase. The msdS gene was deleted by replacement of the msdS gene with a pyrG gene. Although the mutant showed a defect in N-glycan processing, as well as a reduction of cell wall components and a reduced ability of conidiation, it appeared that the rate of hyphal growth was not affected. Morphology analysis revealed abnormal polarity and septation at the stages of germination, hyphal growth and conidiation. Although the mechanism by which the N-glycan processing affects polarity and septation is unclear, our results show that msdS is involved in polarity and septation in A. fumigatus.

  15. Mice deficient in the ALS2 gene exhibit lymphopenia and abnormal hematopietic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Elizabeth A; Shim, Hoon; Smith, Aleah L; Lin, Xian; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Xie, Chengsong; Chen, Jichun; Cai, Huaibin

    2007-01-01

    One form of juvenile onset autosomal recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS2) has been linked to the dysfunction of the ALS2 gene. The ALS2 gene is expressed in lymphoblasts, however, whether ALS2-deficiency affects periphery blood is unclear. Here we report that ALS2 knockout (ALS2(-/-)) mice developed peripheral lymphopenia but had higher proportions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in which the stem cell factor-induced cell proliferation was up-regulated. Our findings reveal a novel function of the ALS2 gene in the lymphopoiesis and hematopoiesis, suggesting that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of ALS2.

  16. Abnormalities in alternative splicing of angiogenesis-related genes and their role in HIV-related cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mthembu NN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonkululeko N Mthembu,1 Zukile Mbita,2 Rodney Hull,1 Zodwa Dlamini1 1Research, Innovation and Engagements, Mangosuthu University of Technology, Durban, 2Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Limpopo, Sovenga, South Africa Abstract: Alternative splicing of mRNA leads to an increase in proteome biodiversity by allowing the generation of multiple mRNAs, coding for multiple protein isoforms of various structural and functional properties from a single primary pre-mRNA transcript. The protein isoforms produced are tightly regulated in normal development but are mostly deregulated in various cancers. In HIV-infected individuals with AIDS, there is an increase in aberrant alternative splicing, resulting in an increase in HIV/AIDS-related cancers, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cervical cancer. This aberrant splicing leads to abnormal production of protein and is caused by mutations in cis-acting elements or trans-acting factors in angiogenesis-related genes. Restoring the normal regulation of alternative splicing of angiogenic genes would alter the expression of protein isoforms and may confer normal cell physiology in patients with these cancers. This review highlights the abnormalities in alternative splicing of angiogenesis-related genes and their implication in HIV/AIDS-related cancers. This allows us to gain an insight into the pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS-related cancer and in turn elucidate the therapeutic potential of alternatively spliced genes in HIV/AIDS-related malignancies. Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, oncogenic viruses, hypoxia induced factor 1, Kaposi’s sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, therapies targeting alternative splicing

  17. Identification of NUP98 abnormalities in acute leukemia: JARID1A (12p13) as a new partner gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zutven, Laura J C M; Onen, Emine; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; van Drunen, Ellen; von Bergh, Anne R M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Veronese, Angelo; Mecucci, Cristina; Negrini, Massimo; de Greef, Georgine E; Beverloo, H Berna

    2006-05-01

    Chromosome rearrangements are found in many acute leukemias. As a result, genes at the breakpoints can be disrupted, forming fusion genes. One of the genes involved in several chromosome aberrations in hematological malignancies is NUP98 (11p15). As NUP98 is close to the 11p telomere, small translocations might easily be missed. Using a NUP98-specific split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe combination, we analyzed 84 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome with either normal karyotypes or 11p abnormalities to investigate whether there are unidentified 11p15 rearrangements. Neither NUP98 translocations nor deletions were identified in cases with normal karyotypes, indicating these aberrations may be very rare in this group. However, NUP98 deletions were observed in four cases with unbalanced 11p aberrations, indicating that the breakpoint is centromeric of NUP98. Rearrangements of NUP98 were identified in two patients, both showing 11p abnormalities in the diagnostic karyotype: a t(4;11)(q1?3;p15) with expression of the NUP98-RAP1GDS1 fusion product detected in a 60-year-old woman with AML-M0, and an add(11)(p15) with a der(21)t(11;21)(p15;p13) observed cytogenetically in a 1-year-old boy with AML-M7. JARID1A was identified as the fusion partner of NUP98 using 3' RACE, RT-PCR, and FISH. JARID1A, at 12p13, codes for retinoblastoma binding protein 2, a protein implicated in transcriptional regulation. This is the first report of JARID1A as a partner gene in leukemia.

  18. Abnormal expression of seven myogenesis-related genes in extraocular muscles of patients with concomitant strabismus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZHU, YUJUAN; DENG, DAMING; LONG, CHONGDE; JIN, GUORONG; ZHANG, QINGJIONG; SHEN, HUANGXUAN

    2013-01-01

    ...) and muscle creatine kinase (MCK). This study evaluated the expression of the above seven myogenesis-related genes by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in 18 resected extrocular muscles of patients with concomitant strabismus and 12...

  19. Silencing abnormal wing disc gene of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri disrupts adult wing development and increases nymph mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim El-Shesheny

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB causes considerable economic losses to citrus industries worldwide. Its management depends on controlling of the Asian citrus Psyllid (ACP, the vector of the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, the causal agent of HLB. Silencing genes by RNA interference (RNAi is a promising tool to explore gene functions as well as control pests. In the current study, abnormal wing disc (awd gene associated with wing development in insects is used to interfere with the flight of psyllids. Our study showed that transcription of awd is development-dependent and the highest level was found in the last instar (5(th of the nymphal stage. Micro-application (topical application of dsRNA to 5(th instar of nymphs caused significant nymphal mortality and adult wing-malformation. These adverse effects in ACP were positively correlated with the amounts of dsRNA used. A qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the dsRNA-mediated transcriptional down-regulation of the awd gene. Significant down-regulation was required to induce a wing-malformed phenotype. No effect was found when dsRNA-gfp was used, indicating the specific effect of dsRNA-awd. Our findings suggest a role for awd in ACP wing development and metamorphosis. awd could serve as a potential target for insect management either via direct application of dsRNA or by producing transgenic plants expressing dsRNA-awd. These strategies will help to mitigate HLB by controlling ACP.

  20. Mice deficient in the ALS2 gene exhibit lymphopenia and abnormal hematopietic function

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    One form of juvenile onset autosomal recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS2) has been linked to the dysfunction of the ALS2 gene. The ALS2 gene is expressed in lymphoblasts, however, whether ALS2-deficiency affects periphery blood is unclear. Here we report that ALS2 knockout (ALS2−/−) mice developed peripheral lymphopenia but had higher proportions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in which the stem cell factor-induced cell proliferation was up-regulated. Our findings reveal ...

  1. 基于免疫学的非常规突发事件基因研究%A Research on Abnormal Emergency Gene Based on Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘星星; 杨青

    2013-01-01

    Immunology gene theory is introduced into the abnormal emergency identification in this paper. The mapping relationship between immune gene and abnormal emergency is presented. Then, " Nine-Three" bi-layer abnormal emergency gene structure is constructed after analyzing nine kinds of specialties and three kinds of evolution mechanism of abnormal emergency. To support the structure, the concept of abnormal emergency immune gene, hypothesis and case boundary conditions are proposed. Result demonstrates that prediction and identification on abnormal emergency are enhanced by discovering the abnormal emergency gene. The integration of abnormal emergency and immune system can be strengthened.%运用免疫学基因理论研究非常规突发事件识别问题,建立了免疫基因与非常规突发事件的映射关系,剖析了非常规突发事件9种特质与3类演化机理,构建了“九三”双层非常规突发事件基因框架,并提出了非常规突发事件免疫基因概念、假设与案例界定条件.研究表明,非常规突发事件基因有利于对非常规突发事件的预测识别,将免疫系统与非常规突发事件进行更深层次的学科融合.

  2. Detection of genomic copy number changes in patients with idiopathic mental retardation by high-resolution X-array-CGH: important role for increased gene dosage of XLMR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Guy; Van Esch, Hilde; Bauters, Marijke; Hollanders, Karen; Frints, Suzanna G M; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koen; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter

    2007-10-01

    A tiling X-chromosome-specific genomic array with a theoretical resolution of 80 kb was developed to screen patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) for submicroscopic copy number differences. Four patients with aberrations previously detected at lower resolution were first analyzed. This facilitated delineation of the location and extent of the aberration at high resolution and subsequently, more precise genotype-phenotype analyses. A cohort of 108 patients was screened, 57 of which were suspected of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), 26 were probands of brother pairs, and 25 were sporadic cases. A total of 15 copy number changes in 14 patients (13%) were detected, which included two deletions and 13 duplications ranging from 0.1 to 2.7 Mb. The aberrations are associated with the phenotype in five patients (4.6%), based on the following criteria: de novo aberration; involvement of a known or candidate X-linked nonsyndromic(syndromic) MR (MRX(S)) gene; segregation with the disease in the family; absence in control individuals; and skewed X-inactivation in carrier females. These include deletions that contain the MRX(S) genes CDKL5, OPHN1, and CASK, and duplications harboring CDKL5, NXF5, MECP2, and GDI1. In addition, seven imbalances were apparent novel polymorphic regions because they do not fulfill the proposed criteria. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that not only deletions but also duplications on the X chromosome contribute to the phenotype more often than expected, supporting the increased gene dosage mechanism for deregulation of normal cognitive development.

  3. Mutations in DDR2 gene cause SMED with short limbs and abnormal calcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargal, Ruth; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Le Merrer, Martine; Sosna, Jacob; Melki, Judith; Zangen, David H; Smithson, Sarah F; Borochowitz, Zvi; Belostotsky, Ruth; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2009-01-01

    The spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia [SMED] short limb-hand type [SMED-SL] is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, first reported by Borochowitz et al. in 1993.(1) Since then, 14 affected patients have been reported.(2-5) We diagnosed 6 patients from 5 different consanguineous Arab Muslim families from the Jerusalem area with SMED-SL. Additionally, we studied two patients from Algerian and Pakistani ancestry and the parents of the first Jewish patients reported.(1) Using a homozygosity mapping strategy, we located a candidate region on chromosome 1q23 spanning 2.4 Mb. The position of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene within the candidate region and the similarity of the ddr2 knockout mouse to the SMED patients' phenotype prompted us to study this gene(6). We identified three missense mutations c.2254 C > T [R752C], c. 2177 T > G [I726R], c.2138C > T [T713I] and one splice site mutation [IVS17+1g > a] in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene. The results of this study will permit an accurate early prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for families at risk.

  4. [Dosage compensation mechanism of X chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yun; Chen, Mei; Li, Bin

    2012-08-01

    Dosage compensation mechanism is crucial for the balance expression of X chromosome genes, which ensures the protein or enzyme encoded by the X chromosome to be equal or almost equal expression amounts between males and females. However, different organisms have evolved distinct dosage compensation strategies, and so far three kinds of dosage compensation strategies among organisms have been reported. The first strategy is that the single male X chromosome expression is doubly activated; the second one is to inactivate one female X chromosome by leaving both sexes with one active allele; and the third one is to reduce the expression to half activity in both X chromosomes of the female. The study of dosage compensation will be useful to reveal the mechanism of regulation of X-linked genes as well as the evolution and the differentiation progress of the sex chromosome, and it can also contribute to illustrate mutation and distortion of sex chromosome. Therefore, this paper briefly reviewed and discussed the progresses and prospects of the important mechanism of dosage compensation.

  5. Minor abnormalities of testis development in mice lacking the gene encoding the MAPK signalling component, MAP3K1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Warr

    Full Text Available In mammals, the Y chromosome is a dominant male determinant, causing the bipotential gonad to develop as a testis. Recently, cases of familial and spontaneous 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD have been attributed to mutations in the human gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1, MAP3K1, a component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal transduction pathway. In individuals harbouring heterozygous mutations in MAP3K1, dysregulation of MAPK signalling was observed in lymphoblastoid cell lines, suggesting a causal role for these mutations in disrupting XY sexual development. Mice lacking the cognate gene, Map3k1, are viable and exhibit the eyes open at birth (EOB phenotype on a mixed genetic background, but on the C57BL/6J genetic background most mice die at around 14.5 dpc due to a failure of erythropoiesis in the fetal liver. However, no systematic examination of sexual development in Map3k1-deficient mice has been described, an omission that is especially relevant in the case of C57BL/6J, a genetic background that is sensitized to disruptions to testis determination. Here, we report that on a mixed genetic background mice lacking Map3k1 are fertile and exhibit no overt abnormalities of testis development. On C57BL/6J, significant non-viability is observed with very few animals surviving to adulthood. However, an examination of development in Map3k1-deficient XY embryos on this genetic background revealed no significant defects in testis determination, although minor abnormalities were observed, including an increase in gonadal length. Based on these observations, we conclude that MAP3K1 is not required for mouse testis determination. We discuss the significance of these data for the functional interpretation of sex-reversing MAP3K1 mutations in humans.

  6. Abnormal desmin protein in myofibrillar myopathies caused by desmin gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Dalakas, M C

    2001-04-01

    Muscle proteins were extracted in various sodium dodecyl sulfate buffers from 6 patients with myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) and previously identified with mutations in the desmin gene (desmin myopathy; DesM), 6 with MFM without mutations, and 14 disease controls to search for alterations in biochemistry and solubility of mutated desmin filaments. In the 1% posthigh-speed pellet fraction, desmin was detected with immunoblots only in DesM and not the other MFM. We conclude that mutant desmin forms insoluble aggregates that are specific for the DesM and can be detected with Western blots.

  7. γA gene repeats polymorphism for the analysis of haplotypes of abnormal hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejat Akar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to analyze γ A gene repeat polymorphism for the analysis of haplotypes of hemoglobin (Hb variants such as Hb S, Hb D-Punjab, Hb O-Arab. Sickle cell cases had mainly Benin and Arab/Indian haplotype. We found three different haplotypes among Hb S, Hb O Arab and Hb D-Punjab cases. We named these three variants as Anatolian-1 and Anatolian-2 and Asian. Our data revealed that Hb O Arab may arise twice one from Asia and the other from Europe.

  8. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  9. A cytogenetic abnormality and rare coding variants identify ABCA13 as a candidate gene in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Helen M; Pickard, Benjamin S; Maclean, Alan; Malloy, Mary P; Soares, Dinesh C; McRae, Allan F; Condie, Alison; White, Angela; Hawkins, William; McGhee, Kevin; van Beck, Margaret; MacIntyre, Donald J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Visscher, Peter M; Porteous, David J; Cannon, Ronald E; St Clair, David; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are leading causes of morbidity across all populations, with heritability estimates of approximately 80% indicating a substantial genetic component. Population genetics and genome-wide association studies suggest an overlap of genetic risk factors between these illnesses but it is unclear how this genetic component is divided between common gene polymorphisms, rare genomic copy number variants, and rare gene sequence mutations. We report evidence that the lipid transporter gene ABCA13 is a susceptibility factor for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After the initial discovery of its disruption by a chromosome abnormality in a person with schizophrenia, we resequenced ABCA13 exons in 100 cases with schizophrenia and 100 controls. Multiple rare coding variants were identified including one nonsense and nine missense mutations and compound heterozygosity/homozygosity in six cases. Variants were genotyped in additional schizophrenia, bipolar, depression (n > 1600), and control (n > 950) cohorts and the frequency of all rare variants combined was greater than controls in schizophrenia (OR = 1.93, p = 0.0057) and bipolar disorder (OR = 2.71, p = 0.00007). The population attributable risk of these mutations was 2.2% for schizophrenia and 4.0% for bipolar disorder. In a study of 21 families of mutation carriers, we genotyped affected and unaffected relatives and found significant linkage (LOD = 4.3) of rare variants with a phenotype including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. These data identify a candidate gene, highlight the genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, and suggest that rare coding variants may contribute significantly to risk of these disorders.

  10. Overexpression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon causes abnormal pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Luan, F

    2015-01-01

    Sexual diversity expressed by the Curcurbitaceae family is a primary example of developmental plasticity in plants. Most melon genotypes are andromonoecious, where an initial phase of male flowers is followed by a mixture of bisexual and male flowers. Over-expression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon plants showed an increased number of flower buds, and increased femaleness as demonstrated by a larger number bisexual buds. Transformation of CmACS-3 in melons showed earlier development of and an increased number of bisexual buds that matured to anthesis but also increased the rate of development of the bisexual buds to maturity. Field studies showed that CmACS-3-overexpressing melons had earlier mature bisexual flowers, earlier fruit set, and an increased number of fruits set on closely spaced nodes on the main stem.

  11. Abnormal neural behaviors of neonatal rat due to hyperthermia and low dosage of cigarette exposure during pregnancy%高温与低剂量香烟联合致仔鼠的神经行为异常

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任太芳; 邢智峰; 丰慧根; 李延兰; 杨保胜

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neural behavior is a sensitive parameter for predicting abnormal central nervous growth that is resulted from multiple factors. Therefore this study was designed to explore the influence of hypothermia and cigarette smoke exposure during pregnancy on neural behavioral growth of neonatal rats.OBJECTIVE: To study the influence of hypothermia and cigarette smoke exposure on neural behavioral growth of neonatal rats.DESIGN: Randomized case control study based on experimental animals. SETTING: Obstetric and Gynecological Department , Third Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical College; Cytobiological Department of Xinxiang Medical College.MATERIALS: Totally 270 healthy unpregnant SD rats were obtained, including 180 males with body mass of 190- 210 g, and 90 female rats with body mass of 225-275 g. Rats were raised with granulated feed and drinking water routinely in room of 25 ℃ with natural sunlight. Male and female rats in estrus were put in the same cage overnight in proportion of 2: 1, pregnancy was confirmed if vaginal bolt was observed the following morning. Totally 160 pregnant rats were obtained and randomly divided into 16 groups that were exposed to hyperthermia, cigarette smoke or their combination and by this way, earlier reflex, learning and memory of neonatal rats were observed after natural delivery,INTERVENTIONS: From the second day of pregnancy, rats in 37 ℃, 41 ℃,42 ℃ hyperthermia combining cigarette group received subcutaneous injection of 1 mL smoke hydrotrope every other day, while rats in 25 ℃ control group and 37 ℃, 41 ℃, 42 ℃ single hyperthemia groupwere given 2.0 mL double distilled water every day for totally 7 times. From the pregnancy of 10 days, pregnant rats were put into incubator, and rats anus temperature should be kept respectively at(37 ±0.5) ℃, (41 ±0.5)℃, (42 ±0.5)℃in the 37 ℃, 41 ℃, 42 ℃ of single hyperthemia groups and the temperature should last for 2.0 minutes; nats of 37 ℃, 41

  12. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)}Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-11-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8{+-}3.7 vs 11.0{+-}1.6 mm, p<0.001) than those without the mutation. Fractional shortening was lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than those without it (30.7{+-}7.0 vs 42.5{+-}6.6, p<0.001). MIBG uptake on the delayed MIBG image was significantly lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation (mean value of the heart to mediastinum ratio: 1.6{+-}0.2 vs 2.0{+-}0.4, p>0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)} gene. (author)

  13. Regulatory mechanisms for abnormal expression of the human breast cancer specific gene 1 in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Aiping; LI; Qing; LIU; Jingwen

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer-specific gene 1 (BCSG1), also referred as synuclein γ, was originally isolated from a human breast cancer cDNA library and the protein is mainly localized to presynaptic terminals in the nervous system. BCSG1 is not expressed in normal or benign breast lesions, but expressed at an extremely high level in the vast majority of the advanced staged breast carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas. Overexpression of BCSG1 in cancer cells led to significant increase in cell proliferation, motility and invasiveness, and metastasis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism and regulation for abnormal transcription of BCSG1, a variety of BCSG1 promoter luciferase reporters were constructed including 3' end deleted sequences, Sp1 deleted, and activator protein-1 (AP1) domains mutated. Transient transfection assay was used to detect the transcriptional activation of BCSG1 promoters. Results showed that the Sp1 sequence in 5'-flanking region was involved in the basal transcriptional activities of BCSG1 without cell-type specificity. In comparison to pGL3-1249, the reporter activities of pGL3-1553 in BCSG1-negative MCF-7 cells and pGL3-1759 in HepG2 cells were notably decreased. Mutations at AP1 sites in BCSG1 intron 1 significantly reduced the promoter activity in all cell lines. Transcription factors, c-jun, c-fos and cyclin AMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein, could markedly enhance the promoter activities. Thus, our results suggest that the abnormal expression of BCSG1 in breast cancer cells is likely regulated by multiple mechanisms. The 5' flanking region of BCSG1 provides the basal transcriptional activity without cell type specificity. A critical promoter element involved in abnormal expression of BCSG1 presents in the first exon. The cell type specificity of BCSG1 transcription is probably affected through intronic cis-regulatory sequences. AP1 domains in the first intron play an important role in control of BCSG1 transcription.

  14. Individuals With Normal GLA Gene Sequence May Present Abnormally Spliced Alpha-Galactosidase mRNA Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Deficient lysosomal α-galactosidase activity leads to intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3, which is the pathologic hallmark of Fabry disease (FD. There are over 750 pathogenic variants identified in the α-galactosidase gene (GLA. In rare patients, the cause of α-galactosidase deficiency is the overexpression of a GLA transcript with a cryptic exon in intron 4, which is physiologically present at trace levels. Objectives We aim to report abnormally spliced alpha-galactosidase mRNA transcripts found with a cDNA-based GLA genotyping protocol performed in 482 patients. Patients and Methods Genomic DNA and total RNA specimens were obtained from peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with premature stroke prospectively enrolled in the PORTYSTROKE study, or of patients with possible clinical manifestations of FD who have been referred for molecular diagnostic workup. Results Approximately 20% of the patients expressed alternatively spliced transcripts of GLA mRNA involving exon 3. We additionally report that such non-canonical transcripts are physiologically expressed at trace levels in healthy individuals, and that their expression in leukocytes markedly increased in blood samples kept at room-temperature for 48 hours before RNA extraction. Conclusions Production of alternatively spliced GLA transcripts might be involved in the regulation of GLA gene expression, and its deregulated overexpression, particularly if restricted to specific cells or tissues, might be the cause of organ-limited Gb3 pathology. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the production of the non-canonical GLA transcripts warrants further investigation, as it may contribute important new data to the understanding of the molecular pathology of FD and Gb3-related disorders.

  15. Molecular basis of antithrombin deficiency in four Japanese patients with antithrombin gene abnormalities including two novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyotani, Mayu; Okumura, Kaoru; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Yamamoto, Koji; Matsushita, Tadashi; Sugimura, Motoi; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2007-08-01

    We analyzed the antithrombin (AT) gene in four unrelated Japanese patients with an AT deficiency, and individually identified four distinct mutations in the heterozygous state. There were two novel mutations, 2417delT leading to a frameshift with a premature termination at amino acid -3 (FS-3Stop) and C2640T resulting in a missense mutation (Ala59Val). Previously reported mutations, T5342C (Ser116Pro) and T72C (Met-32Thr), were also found in the other two patients. To understand the molecular basis responsible for the AT deficiency in these patients, in vitro expression experiments were performed using HEK293 cells transfected with either wild type or respective mutant AT expression vector. We found that -3Stop-AT and -32Thr-AT were not secreted into the culture media, whereas 116Pro-AT and 59Val-AT were secreted normally. We further studied the heparin cofactor activity and the binding to heparin of each recombinant AT molecule. Ser116Pro mutation significantly impaired the binding affinity to heparin resulting in a reduced heparin cofactor activity. In contrast, we found that Ala59Val mutant AT unexpectedly showed a normal affinity to heparin, but severely impaired the heparin cofactor activity. Our findings suggested that FS-3Stop and Met-32Thr mutations are responsible for type I AT deficiency, whereas Ser116Pro and Ala59Val mutations contribute to type II AT deficiency, confirming that there were diverse molecular mechanisms of AT deficiency depend upon discrete AT gene abnormalities as reported previously.

  16. A gain-of-function mutation in the sodium channel gene Scn2a results in seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, J A; Plummer, N W; Smith, M R; Kapur, J; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G; Goldin, A L; Meisler, M H

    2001-01-01

    The GAL879-881QQQ mutation in the cytoplasmic S4-S5 linker of domain 2 of the rat brain IIA sodium channel (Na(v)1.2) results in slowed inactivation and increased persistent current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The neuron-specific enolase promoter was used to direct in vivo expression of the mutated channel in transgenic mice. Three transgenic lines exhibited seizures, and line Q54 was characterized in detail. The seizures in these mice began at two months of age and were accompanied by behavioral arrest and stereotyped repetitive behaviors. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring detected focal seizure activity in the hippocampus, which in some instances generalized to involve the cortex. Hippocampal CA1 neurons isolated from presymptomatic Q54 mice exhibited increased persistent sodium current which may underlie hyperexcitability in the hippocampus. During the progression of the disorder there was extensive cell loss and gliosis within the hippocampus in areas CA1, CA2, CA3 and the hilus. The lifespan of Q54 mice was shortened and only 25% of the mice survived beyond six months of age. Four independent transgenic lines expressing the wild-type sodium channel were examined and did not exhibit any abnormalities. The transgenic Q54 mice provide a genetic model that will be useful for testing the effect of pharmacological intervention on progression of seizures caused by sodium channel dysfunction. The human ortholog, SCN2A, is a candidate gene for seizure disorders mapped to chromosome 2q22-24.

  17. Dosage compensation is less effective in birds than in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Yuichiro

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animals with heteromorphic sex chromosomes, dosage compensation of sex-chromosome genes is thought to be critical for species survival. Diverse molecular mechanisms have evolved to effectively balance the expressed dose of X-linked genes between XX and XY animals, and to balance expression of X and autosomal genes. Dosage compensation is not understood in birds, in which females (ZW and males (ZZ differ in the number of Z chromosomes. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared the male:female ratio of expression of sets of Z-linked and autosomal genes in two bird species, zebra finch and chicken, and in two mammalian species, mouse and human. Male:female ratios of expression were significantly higher for Z genes than for autosomal genes in several finch and chicken tissues. In contrast, in mouse and human the male:female ratio of expression of X-linked genes is quite similar to that of autosomal genes, indicating effective dosage compensation even in humans, in which a significant percentage of genes escape X-inactivation. Conclusion Birds represent an unprecedented case in which genes on one sex chromosome are expressed on average at constitutively higher levels in one sex compared with the other. Sex-chromosome dosage compensation is surprisingly ineffective in birds, suggesting that some genomes can do without effective sex-specific sex-chromosome dosage compensation mechanisms.

  18. Endotoxin dosage in sepsis

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    Vincenzo Rondinelli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endotoxin, a component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of septic shock and multiple organ failure (MOF. Its entry into the bloodstream stimulates monocytes/macrophages which once activated produce and release cytokines, nitric oxide and other mediators that induce systemic inflammation, endothelial damage, organ dysfunction, hypotension (shock and MOF.The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a quantitative test for the dosage of endotoxin to determine the risk of severe Gram-negative sepsis. Materials and methods. In the period January 2009 - June 2011 we performed 897 tests for 765 patients, mostly coming from the emergency room and intensive care, of which 328 (43% women (mean age 53 and 437 (57% male (mean age 49. Fifty-nine patients, no statistically significant difference in sex, were monitored by an average of two determinations of EA.All patients had procalcitonin values significantly altered.The kit used was EAA (Endotoxin Activity Assay Estor Company, Milan, which has three ranges of endotoxin activity (EA: low risk of sepsis if <0.40 units, medium if between 0.40 and 0.59; high if 0.60. Results. 78 out of 765 patients (10% had a low risk, 447 (58% a medium risk and 240 (32% a high risk.The dosage of EA, combined with that of procalcitonin, has allowed a more targeted antibiotic therapy. Six patients in serious clinical conditions were treated by direct hemoperfusion with Toraymyxin, a device comprising a housing containing a fiber polypropylene and polystyrene with surface-bound polymyxin B, an antibiotic that removes bacterial endotoxins from the blood. Conclusions.The test is useful in risk stratification as well as Gram negative sepsis, to set and monitor targeted therapies, also based on the neutralization of endotoxin.

  19. Next-generation sequencing of 100 candidate genes in young victims of suspected sudden cardiac death with structural abnormalities of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, C L; Christiansen, S L; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In sudden, unexpected, non-traumatic death in young individuals, structural abnormalities of the heart are frequently identified at autopsy. However, the findings may be unspecific and cause of death may remain unclear. A significant proportion of these cases are most likely caused...... by inherited cardiac diseases, and the cases are categorized as sudden cardiac death (SCD). The purpose of this study was to explore the added diagnostic value of genetic testing by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a broad gene panel, as a supplement to the traditional forensic investigation in cases...... with non-diagnostic structural abnormalities of the heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: We screened 72 suspected SCD cases (

  20. DYRK1A, a Dosage-Sensitive Gene Involved in Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Is a Target for Drug Development in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchon, Arnaud; Herault, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the leading causes of intellectual disability, and patients with DS face various health issues, including learning and memory deficits, congenital heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), leukemia, and cancer, leading to huge medical and social costs. Remarkable advances on DS research have been made in improving cognitive function in mouse models for future therapeutic approaches in patients. Among the different approaches, DYRK1A inhibitors have emerged as promising therapeutics to reduce DS cognitive deficits. DYRK1A is a dual-specificity kinase that is overexpressed in DS and plays a key role in neurogenesis, outgrowth of axons and dendrites, neuronal trafficking and aging. Its pivotal role in the DS phenotype makes it a prime target for the development of therapeutics. Recently, disruption of DYRK1A has been found in Autosomal Dominant Mental Retardation 7 (MRD7), resulting in severe mental deficiency. Recent advances in the development of kinase inhibitors are expected, in the near future, to remove DS from the list of incurable diseases, providing certain conditions such as drug dosage and correct timing for the optimum long-term treatment. In addition the exact molecular and cellular mechanisms that are targeted by the inhibition of DYRK1A are still to be discovered. PMID:27375444

  1. Fibroblasts from patients with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia show abnormal expression of genes involved in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramenghi Ugo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA is a rare inherited red cell hypoplasia characterised by a defect in the maturation of erythroid progenitors and in some cases associated with malformations. Patients have an increased risk of solid tumors. Mutations have been found in several ribosomal protein (RP genes, i.e RPS19, RPS24, RPS17, RPL5, RPL11, RPL35A. Studies in haematopoietic progenitors from patients show that haplo-insufficiency of an RP impairs rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. DBA lymphocytes show reduced protein synthesis and fibroblasts display abnormal rRNA processing and impaired proliferation. Results To evaluate the involvement of non-haematopoietic tissues in DBA, we have analysed global gene expression in fibroblasts from DBA patients compared to healthy controls. Microarray expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A 2.0 Arrays revealed that 421 genes are differentially expressed in DBA patient fibroblasts. These genes include a large cluster of ribosomal proteins and factors involved in protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism, as well as genes associated to cell death, cancer and tissue development. Conclusion This analysis reports for the first time an abnormal gene expression profile in a non-haematopoietic cell type in DBA. These data support the hypothesis that DBA may be due to a defect in general or specific protein synthesis.

  2. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  3. Dosage regulation of the active X chromosome in human triploid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxian Deng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, dosage compensation is achieved by doubling expression of X-linked genes in both sexes, together with X inactivation in females. Up-regulation of the active X chromosome may be controlled by DNA sequence-based and/or epigenetic mechanisms that double the X output potentially in response to autosomal factor(s. To determine whether X expression is adjusted depending on ploidy, we used expression arrays to compare X-linked and autosomal gene expression in human triploid cells. While the average X:autosome expression ratio was about 1 in normal diploid cells, this ratio was lower (0.81-0.84 in triploid cells with one active X and higher (1.32-1.4 in triploid cells with two active X's. Thus, overall X-linked gene expression in triploid cells does not strictly respond to an autosomal factor, nor is it adjusted to achieve a perfect balance. The unbalanced X:autosome expression ratios that we observed could contribute to the abnormal phenotypes associated with triploidy. Absolute autosomal expression levels per gene copy were similar in triploid versus diploid cells, indicating no apparent global effect on autosomal expression. In triploid cells with two active X's our data support a basic doubling of X-linked gene expression. However, in triploid cells with a single active X, X-linked gene expression is adjusted upward presumably by an epigenetic mechanism that senses the ratio between the number of active X chromosomes and autosomal sets. Such a mechanism may act on a subset of genes whose expression dosage in relation to autosomal expression may be critical. Indeed, we found that there was a range of individual X-linked gene expression in relation to ploidy and that a small subset ( approximately 7% of genes had expression levels apparently proportional to the number of autosomal sets.

  4. The intellectual capacity of patients with Laron syndrome (LS) differs with various molecular defects of the growth hormone receptor gene. Correlation with CNS abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevah, O; Kornreich, L; Galatzer, A; Laron, Z

    2005-12-01

    The correlation between the molecular defects of the GH receptor (R), psychosocial development and brain abnormalities were evaluated in 10 patients with Laron syndrome (LS), in whom all data were available. The findings revealed that the intelligence quotient (IQ) and abnormalities in the brain of the patients with LS differ with various molecular defects of the GH-receptor. The most severe mental deficits and brain pathology occurred in patients with 3, 5, 6 exon deletion. Patients with point mutations in exons 2, 4 and 7 presented various degrees of medium to mild CNS abnormalities that correlated with the IQ. Notably, the patient with the E180 splice mutation in exon 6 had a normal IQ, which fits the report on normal IQ in a large Ecuadorian cohort with the same mutation. This is the first report to support a correlation between IQ, brain abnormalities and localization of the molecular defects in the GH-R gene. As all patients with LS are IGF-I-deficient, it must be assumed that other as yet unknown factors related to the molecular defects in the GH-R are the major cause of the differences in intellect and brain abnormalities.

  5. Fluorescence immunophenotyping and interphase cytogenetics (FICTION) detects BCL6 abnormalities, including gene amplification, in most cases of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhirev, Alexei G; Vasef, Mohammad A; Zhang, Qian-Yun; Reichard, Kaaren K; Czuchlewski, David R

    2014-04-01

    BCL6 translocations are a frequent finding in B-cell lymphomas of diverse subtypes, including some cases of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL). However, reliable analysis of BCL6 rearrangements using fluorescence in situ hybridization is difficult in NLPHL because of the relative paucity of neoplastic cells. Combined immunofluorescence microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization, or fluorescence immunophenotyping and interphase cytogenetics as a tool for the investigation of neoplasms (FICTION), permits targeted analysis of neoplastic cells. To better define the spectrum of BCL6 abnormalities in NLPHL using FICTION analysis. We performed an optimized FICTION analysis of 24 lymph nodes, including 11 NLPHL, 5 follicular hyperplasia with prominent progressive transformation of germinal centers, and 8 follicular hyperplasia without progressive transformation of germinal centers. BCL6 rearrangement was identified in 5 of 11 cases of NLPHL (46%). In addition, BCL6 gene amplification, with large clusters of BCL6 signals in the absence of chromosome 3 aneuploidy, was detected in 3 of 11 cases of NLPHL (27%). One NLPHL showed extra copies of BCL6 present in conjunction with multiple copies of chromosome 3. Altogether, we detected BCL6 abnormalities in 9 of 11 cases of NLPHL (82%). None of the progressive transformation of germinal centers or follicular hyperplasia cases showed BCL6 abnormalities by FICTION. To our knowledge, this is the first report of BCL6 gene amplification in NLPHL. Our optimized protocol for FICTION permits detection of cytogenetic abnormalities in most NLPHL cases and may represent a useful ancillary diagnostic technique.

  6. Association of mutations in the zona pellucida binding protein 1 (ZPBP1) gene with abnormal sperm head morphology in infertile men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, Alexander N.; O'Neil, Derek S.; Roy, Angshumoy; Arias-Mendoza, Paola A.; Chen, Ruihong; Murthy, Lata J.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 7% of men are afflicted by male infertility worldwide, and genetic factors are suspected to play a significant role in the majority of these patients. Although sperm morphology is an important parameter measured in the semen analysis, only a few genetic causes of teratozoospermia are currently known. The objective of this study was to define the association between alterations in the genes encoding the Golgi-associated PDZ- and coiled-coil motif containing protein (GOPC), the protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) and the acrosomal protein zona pellucida binding protein 1 (ZPBP1/sp38) with abnormal sperm head morphology in infertile men. Previous reports demonstrated that mice lacking Gopc, Pick1 and Zpbp1 are infertile due to abnormal head morphology. Herein, using our validated RNA-based method, we studied spermatozoal cDNA encoding the human GOPC, PICK1 and ZPBP1 genes in 381 teratozoospermic and 240 controls patients via direct sequencing. Among these genes, we identified missense and splicing mutations in the sperm cDNA encoding ZPBP1 in 3.9% (15/381) of men with abnormal sperm head morphology. These mutations were not observed in 240 matched controls and the dbSNP database (χ2 = 9.3, P = 0.002). In contrast, statistically significant and functionally relevant mutations were not discovered in the GOPC and PICK1 genes. In our study ZPBP1 mutations are associated with abnormal sperm head morphology, defined according to strict criteria, resembling the mouse Zpbp1 null phenotype. We hypothesize that missense mutations exert a dominant-negative effect due to altered ZPBP1 protein folding and protein:protein interactions in the acrosome. PMID:21911476

  7. A homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation suggests LINC00237 as a candidate gene for MOMO (macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Phi Yen; Toutain, Jérôme; Cappellen, David; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Daoud, Hussein; El Moneim, Azza Abd; Barat, Pascal; Montaubin, Orianne; Bonnet, Françoise; Dai, Zong Qi; Philippe, Christophe; Tran, Cong Toai; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoît; Saura, Robert; Briault, Sylvain; Lacombe, Didier; Taine, Laurence

    2012-11-01

    Macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities syndrome (MOMO syndrome) has been reported in only four patients to date. In these sporadic cases, no chromosomal or molecular abnormality has been identified thus far. Here, we report on the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in a child of healthy consanguineous parents suffering from MOMO syndrome. Conventional karyotyping revealed an inherited homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation (16;20)(q21;p11.2). Uniparental disomy testing showed bi-parental inheritance for both derivative chromosomes 16 and 20. The patient's oligonucleotide array-comparative genomic hybridization profile revealed no abnormality. From the homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation (16;20)(q21;p11.2), a positional cloning strategy, designed to narrow 16q21 and 20p11.2 breakpoints, revealed the disruption of a novel gene located at 20p11.23. This gene is now named LINC00237, according to the HUGO (Human Genome Organization) nomenclature. The gene apparently leads to the production of a non-coding RNA. We established that LINC00237 was expressed in lymphocytes of control individuals while normal transcripts were absent in lymphocytes of our MOMO patient. LINC00237 was not ubiquitously expressed in control tissues, but it was notably highly expressed in the brain. Our results suggested autosomal recessive inheritance of MOMO syndrome. LINC00237 could play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome and could provide new insights into hyperphagia-related obesity and intellectual disability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Antipsychotics dosage and antiparkinsonian prescriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasquet Isabelle

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the link between the dosage of several antipsychotics and the prescription of antiparkinsonians in an observational study. Methods In the context of a national naturalistic prospective observational study, a database containing all the prescriptions from 100 French psychiatrists during the year 2002 was analysed. The inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and age over 18. The mean dosage of antipsychotics with and without antiparkinsonians was compared. Since there were multiple prescriptions for a given subject, generalised mixed linear models were also used to study the link between antiparkinsonian prescription and antipsychotic dosage. Results antiparkinsonians were prescribed to 32,9% of the patients. Two groups of antipsychotics were observed relating to differences in dosage when an antiparkinsonian was co prescribed or not : a first group, where the mean dosage was higher with antiparkinsonians (risperidone, amisulpride and haloperidol and a second group (clozapine, olanzapine, in which antiparkinsonian co prescription was not related to the dosage of antipsychotics. Conclusion As a conclusion, it can be said that it is important to consider the dosage and the type of antipsychotic in the treatment of patients suffering of schizophrenia, because neurological side effects are frequent and can impair quality of life. Moreover the prescription of antiparkinsonians can lead to different side effects such anticholinergic effects.

  9. Microduplications of 3p26.3p26.2 containing CRBN gene in patients with intellectual disability and behavior abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papuc, Sorina M; Hackmann, Karl; Andrieux, Joris; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Budişteanu, Magdalena; Arghir, Aurora; Schrock, Evelin; Ţuţulan-Cuniţă, Andreea C; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2015-05-01

    We report on the clinical data and molecular cytogenetic findings in three unrelated patients presenting with intellectual disability and behavior abnormalities. An overlapping microduplication involving 3p26.2-26.3 was identified in these patients. All three aberrations were confirmed and proven to be parentally inherited. The sizes of the duplications were different, with a common minimal region of 423,754 bp containing two genes - TRNT1 and CRBN. Here, we hypothesize that the copy number gain of CRBN gene might be responsible for developmental delay/intellectual disability.

  10. Comparison of gene expression profiles and responses to zinc chloride among inter- and intraspecific hybrids with growth abnormalities in wheat and its relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Kiyofumi; Iehisa, Julio C M; Nishijima, Ryo; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid necrosis is a well-known reproductive isolation mechanism in plant species, and an autoimmune response is generally considered to trigger hybrid necrosis through epistatic interaction between disease resistance-related genes in hybrids. In common wheat, the complementary Ne1 and Ne2 genes control hybrid necrosis, defined as type I necrosis. Two other types of hybrid necrosis (type II and type III) have been observed in interspecific hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii. Another type of hybrid necrosis, defined here as type IV necrosis, has been reported in F1 hybrids between Triticum urartu and some accessions of Triticum monococcum ssp. aegilopoides. In types I, III and IV, cell death occurs gradually starting in older tissues, whereas type II necrosis symptoms occur only under low temperature. To compare comprehensive gene expression patterns of hybrids showing growth abnormalities, transcriptome analysis of type I and type IV necrosis was performed using a wheat 38k oligo-DNA microarray. Defense-related genes including many WRKY transcription factor genes were dramatically up-regulated in plants showing type I and type IV necrosis, similarly to other known hybrid abnormalities, suggesting an association with an autoimmune response. Reactive oxygen species generation and necrotic cell death were effectively inhibited by ZnCl2 treatment in types I, III and IV necrosis, suggesting a significant association of Ca(2+) influx in upstream signaling of necrotic cell death in wheat hybrid necrosis.

  11. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Conserved regulation of p53 network dosage by microRNA-125b occurs through evolving miRNA-target gene pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh T N Le

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs regulate networks of genes to orchestrate cellular functions. MiR-125b, the vertebrate homologue of the Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA lin-4, has been implicated in the regulation of neural and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis, analogous to how lin-4 regulates stem cells in C. elegans. Depending on the cell context, miR-125b has been proposed to regulate both apoptosis and proliferation. Because the p53 network is a central regulator of both apoptosis and proliferation, the dual roles of miR-125b raise the question of what genes in the p53 network might be regulated by miR-125b. By using a gain- and loss-of-function screen for miR-125b targets in humans, mice, and zebrafish and by validating these targets with the luciferase assay and a novel miRNA pull-down assay, we demonstrate that miR-125b directly represses 20 novel targets in the p53 network. These targets include both apoptosis regulators like Bak1, Igfbp3, Itch, Puma, Prkra, Tp53inp1, Tp53, Zac1, and also cell-cycle regulators like cyclin C, Cdc25c, Cdkn2c, Edn1, Ppp1ca, Sel1l, in the p53 network. We found that, although each miRNA-target pair was seldom conserved, miR-125b regulation of the p53 pathway is conserved at the network level. Our results lead us to propose that miR-125b buffers and fine-tunes p53 network activity by regulating the dose of both proliferative and apoptotic regulators, with implications for tissue stem cell homeostasis and oncogenesis.

  13. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  14. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP. Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses.

  15. Sp1 expression is disrupted in schizophrenia; a possible mechanism for the abnormal expression of mitochondrial complex I genes, NDUFV1 and NDUFV2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Ben-Shachar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevailing hypothesis regards schizophrenia as a polygenic disease, in which multiple genes combine with each other and with environmental stimuli to produce the variance of its clinical symptoms. We investigated whether the ubiquitous transcription factor Sp1 is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and consequently can affect the expression of genes implicated in this disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: mRNA of Sp1 and of mitochondrial complex I subunits (NDUFV1, NDUFV2 was analyzed in three postmortem brain regions obtained from the Stanley Foundation Brain Collection, and in lymphocytes of schizophrenic patients and controls. Sp1 role in the transcription of these genes was studied as well. Sp1 was abnormally expressed in schizophrenia in both brain and periphery. Its mRNA alteration pattern paralleled that of NDUFV1 and NDUFV2, decreasing in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, while increasing in the parieto-occipital cortex and in lymphocytes of schizophrenic patients as compared with controls. Moreover, a high and significant correlation between these genes existed in normal subjects, but was distorted in patients. Sp1 role in the regulation of complex I subunits, was demonstrated by the ability of the Sp1/DNA binding inhibitor, mithramycin, to inhibit the transcription of NDUFV1 and NDUFV2, in neuroblastoma cells. In addition, Sp1 activated NDUFV2 promoter by binding to its three GC-boxes. Both activation and binding were inhibited by mithramycin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that abnormality in Sp1, which can be the main activator/repressor or act in combination with additional transcription factors and is subjected to environmental stimuli, can contribute to the polygenic and clinically heterogeneous nature of schizophrenia.

  16. Prevalence of anal infection due to high-risk human papillomavirus and analysis of E2 gene integrity among women with cervical abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Losa, María Del Refugio; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Gómez-Carvallo, Jesús; Euán-López, Alejandra; Cisneros-Cutz, José I; Rosado-López, Ariel; Echeverría Salazar, Jesúa; Conde-Ferráez, Laura

    2017-01-06

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) infection has been associated with 90% of anal cancer cases. Women with abnormal cytology are a high-risk group to develop anal neoplasia. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence and epidemiology of HR-HPV 16, 18, 45, and 58 anal infections in women with cervical abnormalities, as well as to assess E2 gene integrity. A cross-sectional study was performed on 311 cervical and 311 anal samples from patients with abnormal cytology in two colposcopy clinics in Yucatan, Mexico. A specific PCR for oncogenes was performed in order to identify HVP 16, 18, 45 and 58. Real time PCR was used to amplify the whole HPV 16, 18, and 58 E2 gene to verify its integrity in anal samples. High risk HPV 16, 18, 58, and/or 45 were found in 41.47% (129/311) of cervical samples, and in 30.8% (96/331) of anal samples, with 18% (57/311) of the patients being positive in both samples. The same genotypes in both anatomical sites were observed in 11.25% (35/311). The E2 gene was disrupted in 82% of all tested samples. The frequency of genome disruption viral integration in anal samples by genotype was: HPV 58 (97.2%); HPV 16 (72.4%), and HPV 18 (0%). Women with cervical disease have HR-HPV anal infections, and most of them have the E2 gene disrupted, which represents a risk to develop anal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of infertile Chinese men: karyotypic abnormalities, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T T; Ran, J; Ding, X P; Li, L J; Zhang, L Y; Zhang, Y P; Nie, S S; Chen, L

    2013-07-08

    Chromosome abnormalities, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in infertile Chinese men featuring severe oligospermia and azoospermia were analyzed. Ninety-six fertile men and 189 non-obstructive infertile men, including 125 patients with azoospermia and 64 with severe oligozoospermia, were studied. Seventeen infertile men (9.0%) carried a chromosome abnormality. Twenty (10.6%) carried a Y-chromosome microdeletion. In the remainder of the patients and controls, GGN and CAG repeats were sequenced. Short GGN repeats (n repeats strongly correlated with sperm counts. No significant difference in CAG repeats was found between patients and controls, nor were CAG repeats correlated with sperm counts. However, for CAG repeats ranging between 24 and 25, there was a >2.5-fold risk (OR = 2.539, 95%CI = 1.206-5.344, P repeats in Chinese male infertility.

  18. DYRK1A (Dual-Specificity Tyrosine-Phosphorylated and -Regulated Kinase 1A: A Gene with Dosage Effect During Development and Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dierssen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available DYRKs (dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases are an emerging family of evolutionarily conserved dual-specificity kinases that play key roles in cell proliferation, survival, and development. The research in the last years suggests a relevant conserved function during neuronal development, related to proliferation and/or differentiation for DYRK1A. It is expressed in neural progenitor cells and has been proposed to participate in the signaling mechanisms that regulate dendrite differentiation. In Drosophila, disruption of the homolog minibrain gene results in flies with reduced neuroblast proliferation, decreased numbers of central brain neurons, and learning/memory deficits. Knockout DYRK1A mice are embryonic lethal, and heterozygotes show decreased viability and region-specific reductions in brain size. In humans, DYRK1A has been proposed to be involved in the neurodevelopmental alterations associated with Down syndrome. The large number of protein interaction and putative substrates described for DYRK1A suggest multiple pathways and functions to be involved in its developmental function. This review focuses on the functional role that DYRK1A plays in brain development.

  19. The roles of Dmrt (Double sex/Male-abnormal-3 Related Transcription factor) genes in sex determination and differentiation mechanisms: Ubiquity and diversity across the animal kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Marion Anne-Lise; Cosseau, Céline; Mouahid, Gabriel; Duval, David; Grunau, Christoph; Toulza, Ève; Allienne, Jean-François; Boissier, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    The Dmrt (Double sex/Male-abnormal-3 Related Transcription factor) genes have been intensively studied because they represent major transcription factors in the pathways governing sex determination and differentiation. These genes have been identified in animal groups ranging from cnidarians to mammals, and some of the genes functionally studied. Here, we propose to analyze (i) the presence/absence of various Dmrt gene groups in the different taxa across the animal kingdom; (ii) the relative expression levels of the Dmrt genes in each sex; (iii) the specific spatial (by organ) and temporal (by developmental stage) variations in gene expression. This review considers non-mammalian animals at all levels of study (i.e. no particular importance is given to animal models), and using all types of sexual strategy (hermaphroditic or gonochoric) and means of sex determination (i.e. genetic or environmental). To conclude this global comparison, we offer an analysis of the DM domains conserved among the different DMRT proteins, and propose a general sex-specific pattern for each member of the Dmrt gene family.

  20. Phytoplasma-induced floral abnormalities in Catharanthus roseus are associated with phytoplasma accumulation and transcript repression of floral organ identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Ting; Chen, Jen-Chih; Lin, Chan-Pin

    2011-12-01

    Floral symptoms caused by phytoplasma largely resemble floral reversion in other plants. Periwinkle leaf yellowing (PLY) phytoplasma and peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma caused different degrees of floral abnormalities on infected periwinkle plants. The PLY phytoplasma-infected plants exhibited floral discoloration, virescence, small flowers, and only occasionally full floral reversion. In contrast, PnWB phytoplasma frequently induced complete floral reversion and resulted in a witches'-broom symptom from the floral reversion. Although different degrees of floral symptoms were induced by these two phytoplasmas, the morphological disorders were similar to those of other plants carrying SEPALLATA mutations or gene silencing. Here, we compared expression levels of organ-identity-related genes and pigmentation genes during floral symptom development. Accumulation of phytoplasmas in malformed flowers and their closely surrounding leaves was also compared. In infected plants, transcript abundance of all examined organ identity genes and pigmentation genes was suppressed. Indeed, CrSEP3, a SEPALLALA3 ortholog, showed the greatest suppression among genes examined. Of the pigmentation genes, transcript reduction of chalcone synthase was most highly correlated with the loss in floral pigmentation. Floral symptom severities were associated with the accumulation of either phytoplasmas. Interestingly, both phytoplasmas accumulated to higher levels in malformed flowers than in their surrounding leaves. Many plant pathogens manipulate host plant development to their advantage. It is intriguing to see whether phytoplasmas alter floral development to increase their population.

  1. First applications of a targeted exome sequencing approach in fetuses with ultrasound abnormalities reveals an important fraction of cases with associated gene defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Pangalos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fetal malformations and other structural abnormalities are relatively frequent findings in the course of routine prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Due to their considerable genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the underlying genetic cause is often elusive and the resulting inability to provide a precise diagnosis precludes proper reproductive and fetal risk assessment. We report the development and first applications of an expanded exome sequencing-based test, coupled to a bioinformatics-driven prioritization algorithm, targeting gene disorders presenting with abnormal prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods. We applied the testing strategy to14 euploid fetuses, from 11 on-going pregnancies and three products of abortion, all with various abnormalities or malformations detected through prenatal ultrasound examination. Whole exome sequencing (WES was followed by variant prioritization, utilizing a custom analysis pipeline (Fetalis algorithm, targeting 758 genes associated with genetic disorders which may present with abnormal fetal ultrasound findings. Results. A definitive or highly-likely diagnosis was made in 6 of 14 cases (43%, of which 3 were abortuses (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Nemaline myopathy 2 and 3 involved on-going pregnancies (Citrullinemia, Noonan syndrome, PROKR2-related Kallmann syndrome. In the remaining eight on-going pregnancy cases (57%, a ZIC1 variant of unknown clinical significance was detected in one case, while in seven cases testing did not reveal any pathogenic variant(s. Pregnancies were followed-up to birth, resulting in one neonate harboring the PROKR2 mutation, presenting with isolated minor structural cardiac abnormalities, and in seven apparently healthy neonates. Discussion. The expanded targeted exome sequencing-based approach described herein (Fetalis, provides strong evidence suggesting a definite and beneficial increase in our diagnostic capabilities in prenatal

  2. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Jullien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2 and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA and PHERES1 (PHE1 controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  3. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Jullien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2 and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA and PHERES1 (PHE1 controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  4. Abnormal promoter methylation of multiple genes in the malignant transformed PEP2D cells induced by alpha particles exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiP; SuiJL

    2002-01-01

    The 5' promoter regions of some genes contain CpG-rich areas,known as CpG islands,Methylation of the cytosine in these dinuleotides has important regulatory effects on gene expression.The functional significance of promoter hypermethylation would play the same roles in carcinogenesis as gene mutations.The promoter methylations p14ARF,p16INK4a,MGMT,GSTP1,BUB3 and DAPK genes were analyzed with methylation specific PCR(MSP) in the transformed human bronchial epithelial cells(BEP2D) induced by α-particles.The results indicated that p14ARF gene was not methylated in BEP2D cells,but was methylated in the malignant transformed BERP35T-1 cells,and the level of its transcription was depressed remarkable in the latter.However p16INK4a gene,which shares two exons with p14ARF gene,was not methylated.MGMT gene was methylated in both BEP2D and BERP35T-1.DAPK gene was partially methylated in BEP2D cells and methylated completely in BERP35T1.GSTP1 was not methylated in BEP2D cells and was methylated partly in BERP35T-1.BUB3 gene was not methylated in BEP2D as well as BERP35T1 cells and was further proved by sequencing analysis.

  5. BESTROPHINOPATHY: A Spectrum of Ocular Abnormalities Caused by the c.614T>C Mutation in the BEST1 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toto, L.; Boon, C.J.F.; Antonio, L. Di; Parodi, M. Battaglia; Mastropasqua, R.; Antonucci, I.; Stuppia, L.; Mastropasqua, L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the variable ocular phenotype associated with a heterozygous mutation in the BEST1 gene. METHODS: Clinical and genetic assessment was performed in five members of the same family. Molecular genetic analysis of the BEST1 gene was performed by direct sequencing. Extensive

  6. Dosage effects of cohesin regulatory factor PDS5 on mammalian development: implications for cohesinopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS, a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B. Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B(-/- mice. While Pds5A(-/- and Pds5B(-/- mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A(-/- or Pds5B(-/- mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS.

  7. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  8. genes polymorphism on tacrolimus concentrations and dosage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marwa Helal

    2016-11-30

    Nov 30, 2016 ... transplant donors and recipients on blood level and dose ... netics, screening for these SNPs prior to liver transplantation might be helpful ...... heart · transplantation: systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential.

  9. A pdf Neuropeptide Gene Mutation and Ablation of PDF Neurons Each Cause Severe Abnormalities of Behavioral Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renn, Susan C.P; Park, Jae H; Rosbash, Michael; Hall, Jeffrey C; Taghert, Paul H

    1999-01-01

    .... Here, we define two critical features of that mechanism in Drosophila. We first describe animals mutant for the pdf neuropeptide gene, which is expressed by most of the candidate pacemakers (LNv neurons...

  10. Dosage sensitivity shapes the evolution of copy-number varied regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Schuster-Böckler

    Full Text Available Dosage sensitivity is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene dispensability and duplicability. The newly available data on human copy-number variation (CNV allow an analysis of the most recent and ongoing evolution. Provided that heterozygous gene deletions and duplications actually change gene dosage, we expect to observe negative selection against CNVs encompassing dosage sensitive genes. In this study, we make use of several sources of population genetic data to identify selection on structural variations of dosage sensitive genes. We show that CNVs can directly affect expression levels of contained genes. We find that genes encoding members of protein complexes exhibit limited expression variation and overlap significantly with a manually derived set of dosage sensitive genes. We show that complexes and other dosage sensitive genes are underrepresented in CNV regions, with a particular bias against frequent variations and duplications. These results suggest that dosage sensitivity is a significant force of negative selection on regions of copy-number variation.

  11. Identification of 9 uterine genes that are regulated during mouse pregnancy and exhibit abnormal levels in the cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soper Jessica

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is the leading cause of all infant mortality. In 2004, 12.5% of all births were preterm. In order to understand preterm labor, we must first understand normal labor. Since many of the myometrial changes that occur during pregnancy are similar in mice and humans and mouse gestation is short, we have studied the uterine genes that change in the mouse during pregnancy. Here, we used microarray analysis to identify uterine genes in the gravid mouse that are differentially regulated in the cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mouse model of delayed parturition. Methods Gestational d18.0 uteri (n = 4 were collected from pregnant wild-type and cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mice. Part of the uterus was used for frozen sections and RNA was isolated from the remainder. Microarray analysis was performed at the Indiana University School of Medicine Genomic Core and analyzed using the Microarray Data Portal. Northern analysis was performed to confirm microarray data and the genes localized in the gravid uterus by in situ hybridization. Results We identified 277 genes that are abnormally expressed in the gravid d18.0 cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mouse. Nine of these genes are also regulated in the normal murine uterus during the last half of gestation. Many of these genes are involved in the immune response, consistent with an important role of the immune system in parturition. Expression of 4 of these genes; arginase I, IgJ, Tnfrsf9 and troponin; was confirmed by Northern analysis to be mis-regulated during pregnancy in the knockout mouse. In situ hybridization of these genes demonstrated a similar location in the gravid wild-type and Cox-1 knockout mouse uteri. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first work to demonstrate the uterine location of these 4 genes in the mouse during late pregnancy. There are several putative transcription factor binding sites that are shared by many of the 9 genes identified here including; estrogen and

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Gajbhiye

    2016-01-01

    Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T, four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD. The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings.

  13. Conserved mechanism of PLAG1 activation in salivary gland tumors with and without chromosome 8q12 abnormalities: identification of SII as a new fusion partner gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aström, A K; Voz, M L; Kas, K; Röijer, E; Wedell, B; Mandahl, N; Van de Ven, W; Mark, J; Stenman, G

    1999-02-15

    We have previously shown (K. Kas et al, Nat. Genet., 15: 170-174, 1997) that the developmentally regulated zinc finger gene pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the target gene in 8q12 in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations. The t(3;8) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1 and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), leading to activation of PLAG1 expression and reduced expression of CTNNB1. Here we have studied the expression of PLAG1 by Northern blot analysis in 47 primary benign and malignant human tumors with or without cytogenetic abnormalities of 8q12. Overexpression of PLAG1 was found in 23 tumors (49%). Thirteen of 17 pleomorphic adenomas with a normal karyotype and 5 of 10 with 12q13-15 abnormalities overexpressed PLAG1, which demonstrates that PLAG1 activation is a frequent event in adenomas irrespective of karyotype. In contrast, PLAG1 was overexpressed in only 2 of 11 malignant salivary gland tumors analyzed, which suggests that, at least in salivary gland tumors, PLAG1 activation preferentially occurs in benign tumors. PLAG1 over-expression was also found in three of nine mesenchymal tumors, i.e., in two uterine leiomyomas and one leiomyosarcoma. RNase protection, rapid amplification of 5'-cDNA ends (5'-RACE), and reverse transcription-PCR analyses of five adenomas with a normal karyotype revealed fusion transcripts in three tumors. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these showed that they contained fusions between PLAG1 and CTNNB1 (one case) or PLAG1 and a novel fusion partner gene, i.e., the gene encoding the transcription elongation factor SII (two cases). The fusions occurred in the 5' noncoding region of PLAG1, leading to exchange of regulatory control elements and, as a consequence, activation of PLAG1 gene expression. Because all of the cases had grossly normal karyotypes, the rearrangements must result from cryptic rearrangements. The results suggest that in addition to

  14. SMC6 is an essential gene in mice, but a hypomorphic mutant in the ATPase domain has a mild phenotype with a range of subtle abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Limei; Wing, Jonathan; Taylor, Elaine; Brandt, Renata; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rácz, Ildikó; Becker, Lore; Hans, Wolfgang; Adler, Thure; Beckers, Johannes; Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Zimmer, Andreas; Klopstock, Thomas; Busch, Dirk H; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; van der Horst, Gilbertus; Lehmann, Alan R

    2013-05-01

    Smc5-6 is a highly conserved protein complex related to cohesin and condensin involved in the structural maintenance of chromosomes. In yeasts the Smc5-6 complex is essential for proliferation and is involved in DNA repair and homologous recombination. siRNA depletion of genes involved in the Smc5-6 complex in cultured mammalian cells results in sensitivity to some DNA damaging agents. In order to gain further insight into its role in mammals we have generated mice mutated in the Smc6 gene. A complete knockout resulted in early embryonic lethality, demonstrating that this gene is essential in mammals. However, mutation of the highly conserved serine-994 to alanine in the ATP hydrolysis motif in the SMC6 C-terminal domain, resulted in mice with a surprisingly mild phenotype. With the neo gene selection marker in the intron following the mutation, resulting in reduced expression of the SMC6 gene, the mice were reduced in size, but fertile and had normal lifespans. When the neo gene was removed, the mice had normal size, but detailed phenotypic analysis revealed minor abnormalities in glucose tolerance, haematopoiesis, nociception and global gene expression patterns. Embryonic fibroblasts derived from the ser994 mutant mice were not sensitive to killing by a range of DNA damaging agents, but they were sensitive to the induction of sister chromatid exchanges induced by ultraviolet light or mitomycin C. They also accumulated more oxidative damage than wild-type cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutational Landscape and Gene Expression Patterns in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemias with Monosomy 7 as a Sole Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Volinia, Stefano; Blachly, James S; Nicolet, Deedra; Oakes, Christopher; Kroll, Karl; Orwick, Shelley; Carroll, Andrew J; Stone, Richard M; Byrd, John C; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-01-01

    Monosomy of chromosome 7 is the most frequent autosomal monosomy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where it associates with poor clinical outcomes. However, molecular features associated with this sole monosomy subtype (-7 AML), which may give insights into the basis for its poor prognosis, have not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed 36 cases of -7 AML for mutations in 81 leukemia/cancer-associated genes using a customized targeted next-generation sequencing panel (Miseq). Global gene and miRNA expression profiles were also determined using paired RNA and small RNA sequencing data. Notably, gene mutations were detected in all the major AML-associated functional groups, which include activated signaling, chromatin remodeling, cohesin complex, methylation, NPM1, spliceosome, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors. Gene mutations in the chromatin remodeling groups were relatively more frequent in patients <60 years of age, who also had less mutations in the methylation and spliceosome groups compared with patients ≥60 years of age. Novel recurrent mutational events in AML were identified in the SMARCA2 gene. In patients ≥60 years of age, the presence of spliceosome mutations associated with a lower complete remission rate (P = 0.03). RNA sequencing revealed distinct gene and miRNA expression patterns between the sole -7 and non -7 AML cases, with reduced expression, as expected, of many genes and miRNAs mapped to chromosome 7, and overexpression of ID1, MECOM, and PTPRM, among others. Overall, our findings illuminate a number of molecular features of the underlying aggressive pathobiology in -7 AML patients. Cancer Res; 77(1); 207-18. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  17. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  18. Gene Expression Differences between Enriched Normal and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Quiescent Stem/Progenitor Cells and Correlations with Biological Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Affer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparing gene expression of normal and CML CD34+ quiescent (G0 cell, 292 genes were downregulated and 192 genes upregulated in the CML/G0 Cells. The differentially expressed genes were grouped according to their reported functions, and correlations were sought with biological differences previously observed between the same groups. The most relevant findings include the following. (i CML G0 cells are in a more advanced stage of development and more poised to proliferate than normal G0 cells. (ii When CML G0 cells are stimulated to proliferate, they differentiate and mature more rapidly than normal counterpart. (iii Whereas normal G0 cells form only granulocyte/monocyte colonies when stimulated by cytokines, CML G0 cells form a combination of the above and erythroid clusters and colonies. (iv Prominin-1 is the gene most downregulated in CML G0 cells, and this appears to be associated with the spontaneous formation of erythroid colonies by CML progenitors without EPO.

  19. Spectrum of Cytogenomic Abnormalities Revealed by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization on Products of Conception Culture Failure and Normal Karyotype Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Wu, Shen-Yin; Amato, Katherine; DiAdamo, Autumn; Li, Peining

    2016-03-20

    Approximately 30% of pregnancies after implantation end up in spontaneous abortions, and 50% of them are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. However, the spectrum of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in products of conception (POC) and the underlying gene-dosage-sensitive mechanisms causing spontaneous abortions remain largely unknown. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was performed as a salvage procedure for 128 POC culture failure (POC-CF) samples and as a supplemental procedure for 106 POC normal karyotype (POC-NK) samples. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 10% of POC-CF and pathogenic CNVs were detected in 3.9% of POC-CF and 5.7% of POC-NK samples. Compiled results from this study and relevant case series through a literature review demonstrated an abnormality detection rate (ADR) of 35% for chromosomal abnormalities in POC-CF samples, 3.7% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-CF samples, and 4.6% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-NK samples. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed on the genes from pathogenic CNVs found in POC samples. The denoted primary gene networks suggested that apoptosis and cell proliferation pathways are involved in miscarriage. In summary, a similar spectrum of cytogenomic abnormalities was observed in POC culture success and POC-CF samples. A threshold effect correlating the number of dosage-sensitive genes in a chromosome with the observed frequency of autosomal trisomy is proposed. A rationalized approach using firstly fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing with probes of chromosomes X/Y/18, 13/21, and 15/16/22 for common aneuploidies and polyploidies and secondly aCGH for other cytogenomic abnormalities is recommended for POC-CF samples.

  20. Gene Expression Profile Reveals Abnormalities of Multiple Signaling Pathways in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and normal controls by means of cDNA microarray, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. Our results showed there were a total of 1, 905 genes which were differentially expressed by BMMSCs derived from SLE patients, of which, 652 genes were upregulated and 1, 253 were downregulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis showed that the majority of these genes were related to cell cycle and protein binding. Pathway analysis exhibited that differentially regulated signal pathways involved actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, tight junction, and TGF-β pathway. The high protein level of BMP-5 and low expression of Id-1 indicated that there might be dysregulation in BMP/TGF-β signaling pathway. The expression of Id-1 in SLE BMMSCs was reversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. The protein level of cyclin E decreased in the cell cycling regulation pathway. Moreover, the MAPK signaling pathway was activated in BMMSCs from SLE patients via phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK. The actin distribution pattern of BMMSCs from SLE patients was also found disordered. Our results suggested that there were distinguished differences of BMMSCs between SLE patients and normal controls.

  1. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  2. Mutants of bacteriophage T4 deficient in the ability to induce nuclear disruption: shutoff of host DNA and protein synthesis gene dosage experiments, identification of a restrictive host, and possible biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snustad, D P; Bursch, C J; Parson, K A; Hefeneider, S H

    1976-04-01

    The shutoff of host DNA synthesis is delayed until about 8 to 10 min after infection when Escherichia coli B/5 cells were infected with bacteriophage T4 mutants deficient in the ability to induce nuclear disruption (ndd mutants). The host DNA synthesized after infection with ndd mutants is stable in the absence of T4 endonucleases II and IV, but is unstable in the presence of these nucleases. Host protein synthesis, as indicated by the inducibility of beta-galactosidase and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel patterns of isoptopically labeled proteins synthesize after infection, is shut off normally in ndd-infected cells, even in the absence of host DNA degradation. The Cal Tech wild-type strain of E. coli CT447 was found to restrict growth of the ndd mutants. Since T4D+ also has a very low efficiency of plating on CT447, we have isolated a nitrosoguanidine-induced derivative of CT447 which yields a high T4D+ efficiency of plating while still restricting the ndd mutants. Using this derivative, CT447 T4 plq+ (for T4 plaque+), we have shown that hos DNA degradation and shutoff of host DNA synthesis occur after infection with either ndd98 X 5 (shutoff delayed) or T4D+ (shutoff normal) with approximately the same kinetics as in E. coli strain B/5. Nuclear disruption occurs after infection of CT447 with ndd+ phage, but not after infection with ndd- phage. The rate of DNA synthesis after infection of CT447 T4 plq+ with ndd98 X 5 is about 75% of the rate observed after infection with T4D+ while the burst size of ndd98 X 5 is only 3.5% of that of T4D+. The results of gene dosage experiments using the ndd restrictive host C5447 suggest that the ndd gene product is required in stoichiometric amounts. The observation by thin-section electron microscopy of two distinct pools of DNA, one apparently phage DNA and the other host DNA, in cells infected with nuclear disruption may be a compartmentalization mechanism which separates the pathways of host DNA degradation and

  3. Abnormal expression of inflammatory genes in placentas of women with sickle cell anemia and sickle hemoglobin C disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Letícia C; Costa, Maria Laura; Ferreira, Regiane; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Lanaro, Carolina; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Surita, Fernanda G; Parpinelli, Mary A; Costa, Fernando F; Melo, Mônica Barbosa de

    2016-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a complex disease that is characterized by the polymerization of deoxyhemoglobin S, altered red blood cell membrane biology, endothelial activation, hemolysis, a procoagulant state, acute and chronic inflammation, and vaso-occlusion. Among the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy, oxygen is consumed by fetal growth, and pregnant women with SCD are more frequently exposed to low oxygen levels. This might lead to red blood cells sickling, and, consequently, to vaso-occlusion. The mechanisms by which SCD affects placental physiology are largely unknown, and chronic inflammation might be involved in this process. This study aimed to evaluate the gene expression profile of inflammatory response mediators in the placentas of pregnant women with sickle cell cell anemia (HbSS) and hemoglobinopathy SC (HbSC). Our results show differences in a number of these genes. For the HbSS group, when compared to the control group, the following genes showed differential expression: IL1RAP (2.76-fold), BCL6 (4.49-fold), CXCL10 (-2.12-fold), CXCR1 (-3.66-fold), and C3 (-2.0-fold). On the other hand, the HbSC group presented differential expressions of the following genes, when compared to the control group: IL1RAP (4.33-fold), CXCL1 (3.05-fold), BCL6 (4.13-fold), CXCL10 (-3.32-fold), C3 (-2.0-fold), and TLR3 (2.38-fold). Taken together, these data strongly suggest a differential expression of several inflammatory genes in both SCD (HbSS and HbSC), indicating that the placenta might become an environment with hypoxia, and increased inflammation, which could lead to improper placental development.

  4. Advising a cardiac disease gene positive yet phenotype negative or borderline abnormal athlete: is sporting disqualification really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Pascale; Denjoy, Isabelle; Fressart, Véronique; Wilson, Mathew G; Carré, François; Charron, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    The sudden cardiac death (SCD) of an athlete is a rare and tragic event, often caused by a number of inherited heart muscle disorders, namely the cardiomyopathies and primary arrhythmia syndromes (also known as cardiac ion channelopathies). Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics of these heritable cardiovascular diseases present new challenges for clinicians who manage athletes with these types of heart muscle conditions. Unfortunately, the clinical heterogeneity of many of these SCD diseases are also matched by the genotypic heterogeneity associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. A particularly challenging situation arises when the sports physician and attending cardiologist are presented with an athlete who demonstrates a familial context of inherited cardiac disease or presents mild cardiac abnormalities suggestive of inherited cardiac disease. Alongside the complete cardiac evaluation, genetic testing may be proposed as an additional diagnostic tool in this clinical conundrum. However, debate still remains on how extensive the screening should be, in particular the use and interpretation of genetic testing in that setting. The aim of this review is to examine the role of genetic testing within the diagnostic algorithm of preparticipation screening of athletes. This will be achieved by providing the sports medicine physician with simple current cardiac genetic knowledge for the main inherited cardiac conditions known to cause SCD. Furthermore, it will examine current knowledge for the role of genetic testing upon the prediction of SCD, concluding with its impact on the sport eligibility and disqualification conundrum using case examples from our genetic testing laboratory.

  5. [MVK gene abnormality and new approach to treatment of hyper IgD syndrome and periodic fever syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Takuya

    2007-04-01

    Hyper IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; OMIM 260920) is one of the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation.. HIDS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent fever attacks in early childhood. HIDS caused by mevalonate kinase (MK) mutations, also that is the gene of mevalonic aciduria (OMIM 251170). During febrile episodes, urinary mevalonate concentrations were found to be significantly elevated in patients. Diagnosis of HIDS was retrieving gene or measurement of the enzyme activity in peripheral blood lymphocyte in general. This of HIDS is an activity decline of MK, and a complete deficiency of MK becomes a mevalonic aciduria with a nervous symptom. The relation between the fever and inflammation of mevalonate or isoprenoid products are uncertain. The therapy attempt with statins, which is inhibited the next enzyme after HMG-CoA reductase, or inhibit the proinflammatory cytokines.

  6. Reversal of Phenotypic Abnormalities by CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Correction in Huntington Disease Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in HTT. Here we report correction of HD human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs using a CRISPR-Cas9 and piggyBac transposon-based approach. We show that both HD and corrected isogenic hiPSCs can be differentiated into excitable, synaptically active forebrain neurons. We further demonstrate that phenotypic abnormalities in HD hiPSC-derived neural cells, including impaired neural rosette formation, increased susceptibility to growth factor withdrawal, and deficits in mitochondrial respiration, are rescued in isogenic controls. Importantly, using genome-wide expression analysis, we show that a number of apparent gene expression differences detected between HD and non-related healthy control lines are absent between HD and corrected lines, suggesting that these differences are likely related to genetic background rather than HD-specific effects. Our study demonstrates correction of HD hiPSCs and associated phenotypic abnormalities, and the importance of isogenic controls for disease modeling using hiPSCs.

  7. Heterozygous deletion of a 2-Mb region including the dystroglycan gene in a patient with mild myopathy, facial hypotonia, oral-motor dyspraxia and white matter abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Amy R; Böhm, Sabrina V; Sewduth, Raj N; Josifova, Dragana; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie; Izatt, Louise; Roberts, Roland G

    2010-07-01

    Dystroglycan is a protein which binds directly to two proteins defective in muscular dystrophies (dystrophin and laminin alpha2) and whose own aberrant post-translational modification is the common aetiological route of neuromuscular diseases associated with mutations in genes encoding at least six other proteins (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, LARGE, FKTN and FKRP). It is surprising, therefore, that to our knowledge no mutations of the human dystroglycan gene itself have yet been reported. In this study, we describe a patient with a heterozygous de novo deletion of a approximately 2-Mb region of chromosome 3, which includes the dystroglycan gene (DAG1). The patient is a 16-year-old female with learning difficulties, white matter abnormalities, elevated serum creatine kinase, oral-motor dyspraxia and facial hypotonia but minimal clinically significant involvement of other muscles. As these symptoms are a subset of those observed in disorders of dystroglycan glycosylation (muscle-eye-brain disease and Warker-Warburg syndrome), we assess the likely contribution to her phenotype of her heterogosity for a null mutation of DAG1. We also show that the transcriptional compensation observed in the Dag1(+/-) mouse is not observed in the patient. Although we cannot show that haploinsufficiency of DAG1 is the sole cause of this patient's myopathy and white matter changes, this case serves to constrain our ideas of the severity of the phenotypic consequences of heterozygosity for null DAG1 mutations.

  8. Two siblings with immunodeficiency, facial abnormalities and chromosomal instability without mutation in DNMT3B gene but liability towards malignancy; a new chromatin disorder delineation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neitzel Heidemarie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ICF syndrome (standing for Immunodeficiency, Centromere instability and Facial anomalies syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive immune disorder caused by mutations of the gene de novo DNA-methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B. However, in the literature similar clinical cases without such mutations are reported, as well. Results We report on a family in which the unrelated spouses had two female siblings sharing similar phenotypic features resembling ICF-syndrome, i.e. congenital abnormalities, immunodeficiency, developmental delay and high level of chromosomal instability, including high frequency of centromeric/pericentromeric rearrangements and breaks, chromosomal fragments despiralization or pulverization. However, mutations in DNMT3B could not be detected. Conclusion The discovery of a new so-called 'chromatin disorder' is suggested. Clinical, molecular genetic and cytogenetic characteristics are reported and compared to other 'chromatin disorders'.

  9. Anaplastic ameloblastic fibrosarcoma arising from recurrent ameloblastic fibroma: restricted molecular abnormalities of certain genes to the malignant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle D; Hanna, Ehab Y; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2007-07-01

    A rare case of anaplastic ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AS) arising in an ameloblastic fibroma (AF) of the maxilla of a 48-year-old patient 10 years after the primary excision is presented. The recurrent tumor retained focal areas of AF but manifested heterogeneous malignant features ranging from low-grade spindle to highly pleomorphic sarcomas. Biomarker analysis showed alterations of the p53 and c-KIT genes restricted to the sarcomatous component. The biological implications of these findings in the future management of these tumors are discussed.

  10.  Possible gene dosage effect of glutathione-S-transferases on atopic asthma: Using real-time PCR for quantification of GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene copy numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Brasch; Christiansen, Lene; Tan, Qihua;

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation in the airways. As oxidative stress is a key component of inflammation, variations in genes involved in antioxidant defense could therefore be likely candidates for asthma. Three enzymes from the superfamily glutathione-S-...

  11. Evolution of Dosage Compensation in Anolis carolinensis, a Reptile with XX/XY Chromosomal Sex Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Shawn M.; Webster, Timothy H.; Olney, Kimberly C.; Hutchins, Elizabeth D.; Kusumi, Kenro

    2017-01-01

    In species with highly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the degradation of one of the sex chromosomes will result in unequal gene expression between the sexes (e.g. between XX females and XY males) and between the sex chromosomes and the autosomes. Dosage compensation is a process whereby genes on the sex chromosomes achieve equal gene expression. We compared genome-wide levels of transcription between males and females, and between the X chromosome and the autosomes in the green anole, Anolis carolinensis. We present evidence for dosage compensation between the sexes, and between the sex chromosomes and the autosomes. When dividing the X chromosome into regions based on linkage groups, we discovered that genes in the first reported X-linked region, anole linkage group b (LGb), exhibit complete dosage compensation, although the rest of the X-linked genes exhibit incomplete dosage compensation. Our data further suggest that the mechanism of this dosage compensation is upregulation of the X chromosome in males. We report that approximately 10% of coding genes, most of which are on the autosomes, are differentially expressed between males and females. In addition, genes on the X chromosome exhibited higher ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution than autosomal genes, consistent with the fast-X effect. Our results from the green anole add an additional observation of dosage compensation in a species with XX/XY sex determination. PMID:28206607

  12. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  13. Ablation of the PTHrP gene or the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene leads to distinct abnormalities in bone development

    OpenAIRE

    Lanske, Beate; Amling, Michael; Neff, Lynn; Guiducci, Jennifer; Baron, Roland; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    1999-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and parathyroid hormone–related peptide (PTHrP) bind to and activate the same PTH/PTHrP receptor. Deletion of either the PTHrP gene or the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene leads to acceleration of differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes. To explore further the functional relationships of PTHrP and the PTH/PTHrP receptor, bones of knockout mice were analyzed early in development, and the phenotypes of double-knockout mice were characterized.

  14. Familial Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by Abnormal and Bioinactive TSH due to Mutations in the beta-Subunit Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Neto, G; de Lacerda, L; Wondisford, F E

    1997-01-01

    Hereditary TSH deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease described in inbred Japanese families and in Greek and Brazilian kindreds. The TSH-beta-subunit gene has been shown to be the site of mutations that will give rise to truncated proteins that cannot dimerize with the alpha subunit or, alternatively, will produce a mutated TSH that is present in the circulation of the affected patients, but it is biologically inactive. Characteristically, the patients with TSH-beta-subunit-defects are born with congenital hypothyroidism, with very low levels of serum thyroid hormones and serum thyroglobulin and, paradoxically, with serum TSH levels that are consistently undetectable or at very low levels. Goiter is not present at birth, but the low radioactive thyroid uptake will increase after bovine TSH stimulation. Other pituitary hormones responses to provocative tests are normal. The subunit levels are at high concentration and are significantly increased following TRH stimulation. In two kindreds, molecular biological studies have indicated mutations in two different sites of exon 2, generating a peptide that would not dimerize with subunits to synthesize TSH molecules. In one kindred, a truncated TSH-beta protein was translated that generated a biologically inactive but detectable serum TSH molecule. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:15-20).

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals abnormal brain connectivity in EGR3 gene transfected rat model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianbin; Nie, Binbin; Ma, Ensen; Che, Jing; Sun, Shilong; Wang, Yuli; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Yawu; Luo, Senlin; Ma, Guolin; Li, Kefeng

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by the disorder of "social brain". However, the alternation of connectivity density in brain areas of schizophrenia patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully created a rat model of schizophrenia by the transfection of EGR3 gene into rat brain. We then investigated the connectivity density of schizophrenia susceptible regions in rat brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with multivariate Granger causality (GC) model. We found that the average signal strength in prefrontal lobe and hippocampus of schizophrenia model group was significantly higher than the control group. Bidirectional Granger causality connection was observed between hippocampus and thalamic in schizophrenia model group. Both connectivity density and Granger causality connection were changed in prefrontal lobe, hippocampus and thalamus after risperidone treatment. Our results indicated that fMRI in combination with GC connection analysis may be used as an important method in diagnosis of schizophrenia and evaluation the effect of antipsychotic treatment. These findings support the connectivity disorder hypothesis of schizophrenia and increase our understanding of the neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  16. IL-10 Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Post-Bronchiolitis Lung Function Abnormalities at Six Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauhkonen, Eero; Koponen, Petri; Teräsjärvi, Johanna; Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela, Kirsi; Vuononvirta, Juho; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Toikka, Jyri O; Helminen, Merja; He, Qiushui; Korppi, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been associated with wheezing and asthma in children and the genetic variation of the IL-10 cytokine production may be linked to post-bronchiolitis lung function. We used impulse oscillometry (IOS) to evaluate the associations of IL10 polymorphisms with lung function at a median age of 6.3 years in children hospitalised for bronchiolitis before six months of age. We performed baseline and post-exercise IOS on 103 former bronchiolitis patients. Data on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of IL10 rs1800896 (-1082G/A), rs1800871 (-819C/T), rs1800872 (-592C/A) were available for 99 children and of IL10 rs1800890 (-3575T/A) for 98 children. IL10 rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 combined genotype AA+CT+CA and carriage of haplotype ATA, respectively, were associated with higher resistance and lower reactance in baseline IOS in adjusted analyses. At IL10 rs1800890, the A/A-genotype and carriers of A-allele were associated with lower reactance in baseline IOS. There were no significant associations between the studied SNPs and airway hyper-reactivity to exercise. Low-IL-10-producing polymorphisms in the IL-10 encoding gene were associated with obstructive lung function parameters, suggesting an important role for IL-10 in development of lung function deficit in early bronchiolitis patients.

  17. The Enigma of Rapamycin Dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Frias, Maria A; Chatterjee, Amrita; Yellen, Paige; Foster, David A

    2016-03-01

    The mTOR pathway is a critical regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling has been observed in most cancers and, thus, the mTOR pathway has been extensively studied for therapeutic intervention. Rapamycin is a natural product that inhibits mTOR with high specificity. However, its efficacy varies by dose in several contexts. First, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress mTOR in different cell lines; second, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress the phosphorylation of different mTOR substrates; and third, there is a differential sensitivity of the two mTOR complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2 to rapamycin. Intriguingly, the enigmatic properties of rapamycin dosage can be explained in large part by the competition between rapamycin and phosphatidic acid (PA) for mTOR. Rapamycin and PA have opposite effects on mTOR whereby rapamycin destabilizes and PA stabilizes both mTOR complexes. In this review, we discuss the properties of rapamycin dosage in the context of anticancer therapeutics.

  18. Abnormal apoptosis of trophoblastic cells is related to the up-regulation of CYP11A gene in placenta of preeclampsia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin He

    Full Text Available Abnormal placenta trophoblast proliferation and apoptosis is related to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Emerging evidence has also indicated that key pregnancy-associated hormones, such as hCG, progesterone, are found in high concentration at the maternal-fetal interface. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CYP11A, a key enzyme in steroid hormone synthesis and metabolism, in normal pregnancy and severe preeclampsia placenta and to explore the underlying mechanism of the relationship between the altered CYP11A expression and onset of preeclampsia. Immunohistochemistry method was used to study the localization of CYP11A-encoded protein P450scc in the placenta; reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to examine CYP11A expression at mRNA and protein levels in patients with severe preeclampsia and normal placental tissue. CYP11A overexpression in trophoblastic cells was used to evaluate the effect on viability. TUNEL staining was used to determine whether overexpression of CYP11A could affect trophoblastic cell apoptosis. The results showed that CYP11A was selectively expressed in the cytoplasm of the placental trophoblastic cells. CYP11A expression were significantly increased in severe preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy in both mRNA and protein levels. Multiple regression analysis indicated that CYP11A gene expression was positively correlated to ALT level and Plt, while negatively correlated to INR. Overexpression of CYP11A reduced trophoblastic cell proliferation and induced HTR8/SVneo cells apoptosis through activation of activated caspase-3 expression. These results suggest that abnormally high expression of CYP11A inhibits trophoblastic proliferation and increases apoptosis and therefore could be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  19. Molecular profiling of gene copy number abnormalities in key regulatory genes in high-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: frequency and their association with clinicopathological findings in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Prerana; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2017-05-01

    Genes related to key cellular pathways are frequently altered in B cell ALL and are associated with poor survival especially in high-risk (HR) subgroups. We examined gene copy number abnormalities (CNA) in 101 Indian HR B cell ALL patients and their correlation with clinicopathological features by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, CNA were detected in 59 (59%) cases, with 26, 10 and 23% of cases harboring 1, 2 or +3 CNA. CNA were more prevalent in BCR-ABL1 (60%), pediatric (64%) and high WCC (WBC count) (63%) patients. Frequent genes deletions included CDNK2A/B (26%), IKZF1 (25%), PAX5 (14%), JAK2 (7%), BTG1 (6%), RB1 (5%), EBF1 (4%), ETV6 (4%), while PAR1 region genes were predominantly duplicated (20%). EBF1 deletions selectively associated with adults, IKZF1 deletions occurred frequently in high WCC and BCR-ABL1 cases, while PAR1 region gains significantly associated with MLL-AF4 cases. IKZF1 haploinsufficiency group was predominant, especially in adults (65%), high WCC (60%) patients and BCR-ABL1-negative (78%) patients. Most cases harbored multiple concurrent CNA, with IKZF1 concomitantly occurring with CDNK2A/B, PAX5 and BTG1, while JAK2 occurred with CDNK2A/B and PAX5. Mutually exclusive CNA included ETV6 and IKZF1/RB1, and EBF1 and JAK2. Our results corroborate with global reports, aggregating molecular markers in Indian HR B-ALL cases. Integration of CNA data from rapid methods like MLPA, onto background of existing gold-standard methods detecting significant chromosomal abnormalities, provides a comprehensive genetic profile in B-ALL.

  20. DRPLA transgenic mouse substrains carrying single copy of full-length mutant human DRPLA gene with variable sizes of expanded CAG repeats exhibit CAG repeat length- and age-dependent changes in behavioral abnormalities and gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Zhou, Jiayi; Sato, Toshiya; Takao, Keizo; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Oyake, Mutsuo; Yamada, Mitunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-05-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with intellectual deterioration and various motor deficits including ataxia, choreoathetosis, and myoclonus, caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the DRPLA gene. Longer expanded CAG repeats contribute to an earlier age of onset, faster progression, and more severe neurological symptoms in DRPLA patients. In this study, we have established DRPLA transgenic mouse lines (sublines) harboring a single copy of the full-length mutant human DRPLA gene carrying various lengths of expanded CAG repeats (Q76, Q96, Q113, and Q129), which have clearly shown motor deficits and memory disturbance whose severity increases with the length of expanded CAG repeats and age, and successfully replicated the CAG repeat length- and age-dependent features of DRPLA patients. Neuronal intranuclear accumulation of the mutant DRPLA protein has been suggested to cause transcriptional dysregulation, leading to alteration in gene expression and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in the cerebrum and cerebellum of transgenic mouse lines at 4, 8, and 12 weeks using multiple microarray platforms, and demonstrated that both the number and expression levels of the altered genes are highly dependent on CAG repeat length and age in both brain regions. Specific groups of genes and their function categories were identified by further agglomerative cluster analysis and gene functional annotation analysis. Calcium signaling and neuropeptide signaling, among others, were implicated in the pathophysiology of DRPLA. Our study provides unprecedented CAG-repeat-length-dependent mouse models of DRPLA, which are highly valuable not only for elucidating the CAG-repeat-length-dependent pathophysiology of DRPLA but also for developing therapeutic strategies for DRPLA.

  1. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle.

  2. Dosage compensation of the sex chromosomes and autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disteche, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Males are XY and females are XX in most mammalian species. Other species such as birds have a different sex chromosome make-up: ZZ in males and ZW in females. In both types of organisms one of the sex chromosomes, Y or W, has degenerated due to lack of recombination with its respective homolog X or Z. Since autosomes are present in two copies in diploid organisms the heterogametic sex has become a natural "aneuploid" with haploinsufficiency for X- or Z-linked genes. Specific mechanisms have evolved to restore a balance between critical gene products throughout the genome and between males and females. Some of these mechanisms were co-opted from and/or added to compensatory processes that alleviate autosomal aneuploidy. Surprisingly, several modes of dosage compensation have evolved. In this review we will consider the evidence for dosage compensation and the molecular mechanisms implicated.

  3. Dosage compensation, the origin and the afterlife of sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jan; Meller, Victoria H

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 100 years Drosophila has been developed into an outstanding model system for the study of evolutionary processes. A fascinating aspect of evolution is the differentiation of sex chromosomes. Organisms with highly differentiated sex chromosomes, such as the mammalian X and Y, must compensate for the imbalance in gene dosage that this creates. The need to adjust the expression of sex-linked genes is a potent force driving the rise of regulatory mechanisms that act on an entire chromosome. This review will contrast the process of dosage compensation in Drosophila with the divergent strategies adopted by other model organisms. While the machinery of sex chromosome compensation is different in each instance, all share the ability to direct chromatin modifications to an entire chromosome. This review will also explore the idea that chromosome-targeting systems are sometimes adapted for other purposes. This appears the likely source of a chromosome-wide targeting system displayed by the Drosophila fourth chromosome.

  4. Osteo-chondroprogenitor-specific deletion of the selenocysteine tRNA gene, Trsp, leads to chondronecrosis and abnormal skeletal development: a putative model for Kashin-Beck disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M Downey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck disease, a syndrome characterized by short stature, skeletal deformities, and arthropathy of multiple joints, is highly prevalent in specific regions of Asia. The disease has been postulated to result from a combination of different environmental factors, including contamination of barley by mold mycotoxins, iodine deficiency, presence of humic substances in drinking water, and, importantly, deficiency of selenium. This multifunctional trace element, in the form of selenocysteine, is essential for normal selenoprotein function, including attenuation of excessive oxidative stress, and for the control of redox-sensitive molecules involved in cell growth and differentiation. To investigate the effects of skeletal selenoprotein deficiency, a Cre recombinase transgenic mouse line was used to trigger Trsp gene deletions in osteo-chondroprogenitors. Trsp encodes selenocysteine tRNA([Ser]Sec, required for the incorporation of selenocysteine residues into selenoproteins. The mutant mice exhibited growth retardation, epiphyseal growth plate abnormalities, and delayed skeletal ossification, as well as marked chondronecrosis of articular, auricular, and tracheal cartilages. Phenotypically, the mice thus replicated a number of the pathological features of Kashin-Beck disease, supporting the notion that selenium deficiency is important to the development of this syndrome.

  5. [Pharmaceutical advice concerning different pharmaceutical dosage forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakonyi, Gergely; Zelkó, Romána

    2010-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the commonly applied types of drug uptake and the pharmacists' advice concerning a certain dosage form. The manuscript also deals with the modified release dosage forms and their abbreviations in the name of the marketing authorized products.

  6. A brief history of dosage compensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stanley M. Gartler

    2014-08-01

    In 1914, H. J. Muller postulated the origin of the Y chromosome as having resulted from restricted recombination between homologous sex chromosomes in the male and the accumulation of deleterious mutations. This evolutionary process leads to dosage compensation. This article lays out a brief history of dosage compensation in genetics.

  7. Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Heliconius Butterflies: Global yet Still Incomplete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, James R.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of heterogametic sex chromosomes is often—but not always—accompanied by the evolution of dosage compensating mechanisms that mitigate the impact of sex-specific gene dosage on levels of gene expression. One emerging view of this process is that such mechanisms may only evolve in male-heterogametic (XY) species but not in female-heterogametic (ZW) species, which will consequently exhibit “incomplete” sex chromosome dosage compensation. However, recent results suggest that at least some Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) may prove to be an exception to this prediction. Studies in bombycoid moths indicate the presence of a chromosome-wide epigenetic mechanism that effectively balances Z chromosome gene expression between the sexes by reducing Z-linked expression in males. In contrast, strong sex chromosome dosage effects without any reduction in male Z-linked expression were previously reported in a pyralid moth, suggesting a lack of any such dosage compensating mechanism. Here we report an analysis of sex chromosome dosage compensation in Heliconius butterflies, sampling multiple individuals for several different adult tissues (head, abdomen, leg, mouth, and antennae). Methodologically, we introduce a novel application of linear mixed-effects models to assess dosage compensation, offering a unified statistical framework that can estimate effects specific to chromosome, to sex, and their interactions (i.e., a dosage effect). Our results show substantially reduced Z-linked expression relative to autosomes in both sexes, as previously observed in bombycoid moths. This observation is consistent with an increasing body of evidence that some lepidopteran species possess an epigenetic dosage compensating mechanism that reduces Z chromosome expression in males to levels comparable with females. However, this mechanism appears to be imperfect in Heliconius, resulting in a modest dosage effect that produces an average 5–20% increase in male expression

  8. Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Heliconius Butterflies: Global yet Still Incomplete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, James R; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Jiggins, Chris D

    2015-09-02

    The evolution of heterogametic sex chromosomes is often-but not always-accompanied by the evolution of dosage compensating mechanisms that mitigate the impact of sex-specific gene dosage on levels of gene expression. One emerging view of this process is that such mechanisms may only evolve in male-heterogametic (XY) species but not in female-heterogametic (ZW) species, which will consequently exhibit "incomplete" sex chromosome dosage compensation. However, recent results suggest that at least some Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) may prove to be an exception to this prediction. Studies in bombycoid moths indicate the presence of a chromosome-wide epigenetic mechanism that effectively balances Z chromosome gene expression between the sexes by reducing Z-linked expression in males. In contrast, strong sex chromosome dosage effects without any reduction in male Z-linked expression were previously reported in a pyralid moth, suggesting a lack of any such dosage compensating mechanism. Here we report an analysis of sex chromosome dosage compensation in Heliconius butterflies, sampling multiple individuals for several different adult tissues (head, abdomen, leg, mouth, and antennae). Methodologically, we introduce a novel application of linear mixed-effects models to assess dosage compensation, offering a unified statistical framework that can estimate effects specific to chromosome, to sex, and their interactions (i.e., a dosage effect). Our results show substantially reduced Z-linked expression relative to autosomes in both sexes, as previously observed in bombycoid moths. This observation is consistent with an increasing body of evidence that some lepidopteran species possess an epigenetic dosage compensating mechanism that reduces Z chromosome expression in males to levels comparable with females. However, this mechanism appears to be imperfect in Heliconius, resulting in a modest dosage effect that produces an average 5-20% increase in male expression relative

  9. Post-Pacing Abnormal Repolarization in Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia Associated with a Mutation in the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Gene (RyR2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nof, Eyal; Belhassen, Bernard; Arad, Michael; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Antzelevitch, Charles; Rosso, Raphael; Fogelman, Rami; Luria, David; Eli-Ani, Dalia; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Viskin, Sami; Eldar, Michael; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Glikson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an arrhythmogenic disease for which electrophysiological studies (EPS) have shown to be of limited value. Objective We present a CPVT family in which marked post-pacing repolarization abnormalities during EPS were the only consistent phenotypic manifestation of RyR2 mutation carriers. Methods The study was prompted by the observation of transient marked QT prolongation preceding initiation of ventricular fibrillation during atrial fibrillation in a boy with a family history of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Family members underwent exercise and pharmacologic ECG testing with epinephrine, adenosine and flecainide. Non-invasive clinical tests were normal in 10 patients evaluated, except for both epinephrine and exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias in 1. EPS included bursts of ventricular pacing and programmed ventricular extrastimulation reproducing short-long sequences. Genetic screening involved direct sequencing of genes involved in LQTS as well as RyR2. Results Six patients demonstrated a marked increase in QT interval only in the first beat after cessation of ventricular pacing and/or extrastimulation. All 6 patients were found to have a heterozygous missense mutation (M4109R) in RyR2. Two of them, presenting with aborted SCD also had a second missense mutation (I406T- RyR2). Four family members without RyR2 mutations did not display prominent post-pacing QT changes. Conclusions M4109R- RyR2 is associated with a high incidence of SCD. The contribution of I406T to the clinical phenotype is unclear. In contrast to exercise testing, marked post-pacing repolarization changes in a single beat accurately predicted carriers of M4109R- RyR2 in this family. PMID:21699856

  10. Abnormal skeletal and cardiac development, cardiomyopathy, muscle atrophy and cataracts in mice with a targeted disruption of the Nov (Ccn3) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Emma; Tahri, Dalal; Andermarcher, Elisabetta; Schofield, Paul; Fleming, Stewart; Boulter, Catherine A

    2008-02-20

    Signals from the extracellular environment control many aspects of cell behaviour including proliferation, survival, differentiation, adhesion and migration. It is increasingly evident that these signals can be modulated by a group of matricellular proteins called the CCN family. CCN proteins have multiple domains through which they regulate the activities of a variety of signalling molecules including TGFbeta, BMPs and integrins, thereby influencing a wide range of processes in development and disease. Whilst the developmental roles of CCN1 and CCN2 have been elucidated, very little is known about the function of CCN3 (NOV). To investigate this, we have generated mice carrying a targeted mutation in the Nov gene (Novdel3) which reveal for the first time its diverse functions in embryos and adults. By replacing Nov exon 3 with a TKneomycin cassette, we have generated Novdel3-/- mice which produce no full length NOV protein and express at a barely detectable level a mutant NOV protein that lacks the VWC domain. In Novdel3-/- embryos, and to a lesser extent in Novdel3+/- embryos, development of the appendicular and axial skeleton was affected with enlarged vertebrae, elongated long bones and digits, delayed ossification, increased bone mineralization and severe joint malformations. Primary embryo fibroblasts from Novdel3-/- mutant embryos showed enhanced chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Cardiac development was also influenced leading to enlargement and abnormal modelling of the endocardial cushions, associated with septal defects and delayed fusion. In adults, cardiomyopathy was apparent, with hypertrophy and calcification of the septum and left ventricle dilation. Muscle atrophy was seen by 5 months of age, associated with transdifferentiation to fat. Premature tissue degeneration was also seen in the lens, with cataracts present from 6 months. We have generated the first mice with a mutation in the Nov gene (Novdel3). Our data demonstrate that NOV is a regulator of

  11. Abnormal skeletal and cardiac development, cardiomyopathy, muscle atrophy and cataracts in mice with a targeted disruption of the Nov (Ccn3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schofield Paul

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signals from the extracellular environment control many aspects of cell behaviour including proliferation, survival, differentiation, adhesion and migration. It is increasingly evident that these signals can be modulated by a group of matricellular proteins called the CCN family. CCN proteins have multiple domains through which they regulate the activities of a variety of signalling molecules including TGFβ, BMPs and integrins, thereby influencing a wide range of processes in development and disease. Whilst the developmental roles of CCN1 and CCN2 have been elucidated, very little is known about the function of CCN3 (NOV. To investigate this, we have generated mice carrying a targeted mutation in the Nov gene (Novdel3 which reveal for the first time its diverse functions in embryos and adults. Results By replacing Nov exon 3 with a TKneomycin cassette, we have generated Novdel3-/- mice which produce no full length NOV protein and express at a barely detectable level a mutant NOV protein that lacks the VWC domain. In Novdel3-/- embryos, and to a lesser extent in Novdel3+/- embryos, development of the appendicular and axial skeleton was affected with enlarged vertebrae, elongated long bones and digits, delayed ossification, increased bone mineralization and severe joint malformations. Primary embryo fibroblasts from Novdel3-/- mutant embryos showed enhanced chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Cardiac development was also influenced leading to enlargement and abnormal modelling of the endocardial cushions, associated with septal defects and delayed fusion. In adults, cardiomyopathy was apparent, with hypertrophy and calcification of the septum and left ventricle dilation. Muscle atrophy was seen by 5 months of age, associated with transdifferentiation to fat. Premature tissue degeneration was also seen in the lens, with cataracts present from 6 months. Conclusion We have generated the first mice with a mutation in the Nov gene

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ095 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is abnormal bleeding more ...

  13. Physicochemical interactions in solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Desai, Divyakant; Badawy, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Complete characterization and mechanistic understanding of physicochemical interactions in solid dosage forms are not only important for consistent manufacturability, stability, and bioavailability of the drug product, but are also expected under the quality-by-design paradigm of drug development. Lack of this understanding can impact successful and timely development, scale-up, and commercial manufacture of dosage forms. This article highlights the stability and bioavailability implications of physicochemical interactions in dosage forms citing a couple of examples where such interactions necessitated the recall of commercial drug products.

  14. ON THE SELECTION OF DRUGS DOSAGE REGIMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Bochanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A complex system of hemostasis regulation, insufficient data on drugs pharmacokinetics, multiple factors effecting treatment, including patient’s adherence to therapy, that can lead to the need for the dosage regimen specification are presented.

  15. Large-scale population study of human cell lines indicates that dosage compensation is virtually complete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette M Johnston

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation in female mammals results in dosage compensation of X-linked gene products between the sexes. In humans there is evidence that a substantial proportion of genes escape from silencing. We have carried out a large-scale analysis of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from four human populations to determine the extent to which escape from X chromosome inactivation disrupts dosage compensation. We conclude that dosage compensation is virtually complete. Overall expression from the X chromosome is only slightly higher in females and can largely be accounted for by elevated female expression of approximately 5% of X-linked genes. We suggest that the potential contribution of escape from X chromosome inactivation to phenotypic differences between the sexes is more limited than previously believed.

  16. Pentamidine Dosage: A Base/Salt Confusion

    OpenAIRE

    Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Kager, Piet A.

    2008-01-01

    Pentamidine has a long history in the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and leishmaniasis. Early guidelines on the dosage of pentamidine were based on the base-moiety of the two different formulations available. Confusion on the dosage of pentamidine arose from a different labelling of the two available products, either based on the salt or base moiety available in the preparation. We provide an overview of the various guidelines concerning HAT and leishmaniasis over the past d...

  17. Mechanisms and evolutionary patterns of mammalian and avian dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Julien

    Full Text Available As a result of sex chromosome differentiation from ancestral autosomes, male mammalian cells only contain one X chromosome. It has long been hypothesized that X-linked gene expression levels have become doubled in males to restore the original transcriptional output, and that the resulting X overexpression in females then drove the evolution of X inactivation (XCI. However, this model has never been directly tested and patterns and mechanisms of dosage compensation across different mammals and birds generally remain little understood. Here we trace the evolution of dosage compensation using extensive transcriptome data from males and females representing all major mammalian lineages and birds. Our analyses suggest that the X has become globally upregulated in marsupials, whereas we do not detect a global upregulation of this chromosome in placental mammals. However, we find that a subset of autosomal genes interacting with X-linked genes have become downregulated in placentals upon the emergence of sex chromosomes. Thus, different driving forces may underlie the evolution of XCI and the highly efficient equilibration of X expression levels between the sexes observed for both of these lineages. In the egg-laying monotremes and birds, which have partially homologous sex chromosome systems, partial upregulation of the X (Z in birds evolved but is largely restricted to the heterogametic sex, which provides an explanation for the partially sex-biased X (Z expression and lack of global inactivation mechanisms in these lineages. Our findings suggest that dosage reductions imposed by sex chromosome differentiation events in amniotes were resolved in strikingly different ways.

  18. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  19. Pentamidine dosage: a base/salt confusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorlo, Thomas P C; Kager, Piet A

    2008-05-28

    Pentamidine has a long history in the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and leishmaniasis. Early guidelines on the dosage of pentamidine were based on the base-moiety of the two different formulations available. Confusion on the dosage of pentamidine arose from a different labelling of the two available products, either based on the salt or base moiety available in the preparation. We provide an overview of the various guidelines concerning HAT and leishmaniasis over the past decades and show the confusion in the calculation of the dosage of pentamidine in these guidelines and the subsequent published reports on clinical trials and reviews. At present, only pentamidine isethionate is available, but the advised dosage for HAT and leishmaniasis is (historically) based on the amount of pentamidine base. In the treatment of leishmaniasis this is probably resulting in a subtherapeutic treatment. There is thus a need for a new, more transparent and concise guideline concerning the dosage of pentamidine, at least in the treatment of HAT and leishmaniasis.

  20. Pentamidine dosage: a base/salt confusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P C Dorlo

    Full Text Available Pentamidine has a long history in the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT and leishmaniasis. Early guidelines on the dosage of pentamidine were based on the base-moiety of the two different formulations available. Confusion on the dosage of pentamidine arose from a different labelling of the two available products, either based on the salt or base moiety available in the preparation. We provide an overview of the various guidelines concerning HAT and leishmaniasis over the past decades and show the confusion in the calculation of the dosage of pentamidine in these guidelines and the subsequent published reports on clinical trials and reviews. At present, only pentamidine isethionate is available, but the advised dosage for HAT and leishmaniasis is (historically based on the amount of pentamidine base. In the treatment of leishmaniasis this is probably resulting in a subtherapeutic treatment. There is thus a need for a new, more transparent and concise guideline concerning the dosage of pentamidine, at least in the treatment of HAT and leishmaniasis.

  1. Coat protein mutations in an attenuated Cucumber mosaic virus encoding mutant 2b protein that lacks RNA silencing suppressor activity induces chlorosis with photosynthesis gene repression and chloroplast abnormalities in infected tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Ryota; Wada, Tomoya; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2014-05-01

    In tobacco plants, the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) pepo strain induces mosaic symptoms, including pale green chlorosis and malformed tissues. Here, we characterized the involvement of 2b protein and coat protein (CP) in the development of mosaic symptoms. A 2b mutant (R46C) that lacks viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity showed an asymptomatic phenotype with low levels of virus accumulation. Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein did not complement the virulence of the R46C, although it did restore high-level virus accumulation. However, R46C mutants expressing mutated CP in which the amino acid P129 was mutated to A, E, C, Q, or S induced chlorosis that was associated with reduced expression of chloroplast and photosynthesis related genes (CPRGs) and abnormal chloroplasts with fewer thylakoid membranes. These results suggest that the CP of the CMV pepo strain acquires virulence by amino acid mutations, which causes CPRG repression and chloroplast abnormalities.

  2. Active compounds release from semisolid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Anna; Goscianska, Joanna; Nowak, Izabela

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to review all the aspects of the in vitro release testing (IVRT) from semisolid dosage forms. Although none of the official dissolution methods has been specified for use with semisolid dosage forms, their utility for assessing release rates of drugs from semisolid dosage forms has become a topic of considerable interest. One can expect to overcome such complexity in the future, when the official "Topical and Transdermal Drug Products-Product Performance Tests" will be published in an issue of the Pharmacopeial Forum. Many factors such as type of the dissolution medium, membrane, temperature, and speed have an influence on the mechanism and kinetics of the release testing from gels, creams, and ointments; therefore, those parameters have been widely discussed.

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device (IUD) can also cause ... this type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell ...

  4. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  5. Housing under abnormal light-dark cycles attenuates day/night expression rhythms of the clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the amygdala and hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Shunpei; Tahara, Yu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ishigooka, Jun; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-10-01

    Although the results of previous studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms are involved in the pathogenesis of depression, no studies have examined the interaction of clock gene expression deficit and depression state. In this study, we examined clock gene expression levels and depressive-like behavior in mice housed under 3.5h light, 3.5h dark (T = 7) conditions to investigate the association between clock gene expression and depressive state. C57BL/6J mice were housed under a T = 24 cycle (12h light, 12h dark) or a T = 7 cycle and clock gene expression levels in the hippocampus and the amygdala were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Depressive state was evaluated by the forced swim test (FST). Although circadian rhythms of Per1 and Per2 clock gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala were still detected under T = 7 conditions, rhythmicity and expression levels of both significantly decreased. Mice housed with a T = 7 cycle showed increased immobile time in the FST than those with a T = 24 cycle. The present results suggest that the presence of a depressive state around the early active phase of activity may be related to impairment of rhythmicity and expression levels of Per1 and Per2 genes under abnormal light-dark conditions.

  6. [Evaluation of voriconazole oral dosage in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yukihiro; Kawasumi, Noriyo; Hirai, Jun; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2014-10-01

    Voriconazole (VRCZ), a broad-spectrum triazole, is served in two dosage forms-injection and oral. VRCZ is difference dosage of oral and intravenous administration writing a medical package insert in Japan. 6 mg/kg intravenous injection (IV) twice daily for first day as initial loading dose, followed by 3-4 mg/kg IV twice daily between meals is recommended. 300 mg orally twice daily for first day as initial loading dose, followed by 150-200 mg orally twice daily between meals is recommended. Patients weighing over 40 kg, 200 mg orally twice daily between meals is recommended. Patients weighing under 40 kg, 100 mg orally twice daily between meals is recommended, increase to 150 mg twice daily if inadequate response. This study evaluated VRCZ trough concentration and oral dosage in the 23 cases which administered VRCZ to analysis for TDM in Aichi University Hospital. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was calculated to examine relationships among variables. The level of statistical significance was set at p=0.05. All data were analyzed and processed on JMP 8 (SAS Institute Japan). There was a significant positive correlation between VRCZ trough concentration and dose/weight (r=0.47 p<0.05). In this result, VRCZ oral dosage is appropriate to administer dose/weight (mg/kg) twice a day as same as IV.

  7. Impact of gene dosage and methanol concentration on Rhizopus chinensis recombinant lipase production in Pichia pastoris%基因拷贝数和甲醇浓度对重组毕赤酵母产华根霉脂肪酶的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞; 喻晓蔚; 沙冲; 徐岩

    2011-01-01

    将华根霉脂肪酶基因克隆到甲基营养型毕赤酵母中表达,以甲醇利用快型菌株为宿主,在7L发酵罐水平对脂肪酶基因拷贝数分别为3、5、6的3株基因重组菌-XY RCL-3、XY RCL-5、XY RCL-6进行高密度发酵调控,同时研究了甲醇浓度对表达华根霉脂肪酶的影响.结果表明,XY RCL-5在相同条件下发酵产酶能力高于XY RCL-6和XY RCL-3,最适甲醇诱导浓度控制在0.1%±0.02%时,酶活可达到12 500 U/mL,菌体干重达到204 g/L,蛋白浓度也能达到8.02 g/L.%The Rhizopus chinensis lipase genes was cloned and expressed in Mut+ methylotrophic Pichia pastoris with different gene dosage. The high-density fermentation of the recombinant Pichia pastoris with gene dosage of three (XY RCL-3), five (XY RCL-5) and six (XY RCL-6) was investigated on 7-liter fermenter. The impact of methanol concentration on Rhizopus chinensis lipase expression was also explored. Our results indicated that more Rhizopus chinensis lipase was produced in XY RCL-5produced than that of XY RCL-6 and XY RCL-3 under the same conditions. When methanol concentration was controlled at 0.10%±0.02%, the enzyme activity of Rhizopus chinensis lipase produced by XY RCL-5 could achieve 12 500 U/mL, and the dry weight of XY RCL-5 and protein concentration could reach 204 g/L and 8.02 g/L, respectively.

  8. Mutations in the T (brachyury) gene cause a novel syndrome consisting of sacral agenesis, abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies and a persistent notochordal canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, A. V.; Alders, M.; Sylva, M.; Bilardo, C. M.; Pajkrt, E.; van Rijn, R. R.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Bulk, S.; Stefanovic, S.; Ilgun, A.; Barnett, P.; Mannens, M. M. A. M.; Moorman, A. F. M.; Oostra, R. J.; van Maarle, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The T gene (brachyury gene) is the founding member of the T-box family of transcription factors and is vital for the formation and differentiation of the mesoderm and the axial development of all vertebrates. Results We report here on four patients from three consanguineous families exhib

  9. Mutations in the T (brachyury) gene cause a novel syndrome consisting of sacral agenesis, abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies and a persistent notochordal canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, A V; Alders, M; Sylva, M; Bilardo, C M; Pajkrt, E; van Rijn, R R; Schulte-Merker, S; Bulk, S; Stefanovic, S; Ilgun, A; Barnett, P; Mannens, M M A M; Moorman, A F M; Oostra, R J; van Maarle, M C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The T gene (brachyury gene) is the founding member of the T-box family of transcription factors and is vital for the formation and differentiation of the mesoderm and the axial development of all vertebrates. RESULTS: We report here on four patients from three consanguineous families exh

  10. Analysis of homeobox gene action may reveal novel angiogenic pathways in normal placental vasculature and in clinical pregnancy disorders associated with abnormal placental angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma eMurthi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes are essential for both the development of the blood and lymphatic vascular systems, as well as for their maintenance in the adult. Homeobox genes comprise an important family of transcription factors, which are characterised by a well conserved DNA binding motif; the homeodomain. The specificity of the homeodomain allows the transcription factor to bind to the promoter regions of batteries of target genes and thereby regulates their expression. Target genes identified for homeodomain proteins have been shown to control fundamental cell processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We and others have reported that homeobox genes are expressed in the placental vasculature, but our knowledge of their downstream target genes is limited. This review highlights the importance of studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which homeobox genes and their downstream targets may regulate important vascular cellular processes such as proliferation, migration, and endothelial tube formation, which are essential for placental vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. A better understanding of the molecular targets of homeobox genes may lead to new therapies for aberrant angiogenesis associated with clinically important pregnancy pathologies, including fetal growth restriction and preeclampsia.

  11. Murine double nullizygotes of the angiotensin type 1A and 1B receptor genes duplicate severe abnormal phenotypes of angiotensinogen nullizygotes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchida, S.; Matsusaka, T; Chen, X; Okubo, S.; Niimura, F; Nishimura, H.; Fogo, A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Inagami, T; Ichikawa, I

    1998-01-01

    Rodents are the unique species carrying duplicated angiotensin (Ang) type 1 (AT1) receptor genes, Agtr1a and Agtr1b. After separately generating Agtr1a and Agtr1b null mutant mice by gene targeting, we produced double mutant mice homozygous for both Agtr1a and Agtr1b null mutation (Agtr1a-/-; Agtr1b-/-) by mating the single gene mutants. Agtr1a-/-, Agtr1b-/- mice are characterized by normal in utero survival but decreased ex utero survival rate. After birth they are characterized by low body ...

  12. Basics of compounding foam dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Loyd V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information on the use of foam dosage forms and pharmacists' ability to extemporaneously compound them. The article provides: (1) a discussion on the rationale and advantages of using foams, (2) a differentiation between the various types and structures of foams, (3) a list of the various types of ingredients and examples of each, and (4) a description of the preparation of pharmaceutical foams.

  13. Abnormal dosage of ultraconserved elements is highly disfavored in healthy cells but not cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B McCole

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultraconserved elements (UCEs are strongly depleted from segmental duplications and copy number variations (CNVs in the human genome, suggesting that deletion or duplication of a UCE can be deleterious to the mammalian cell. Here we address the process by which CNVs become depleted of UCEs. We begin by showing that depletion for UCEs characterizes the most recent large-scale human CNV datasets and then find that even newly formed de novo CNVs, which have passed through meiosis at most once, are significantly depleted for UCEs. In striking contrast, CNVs arising specifically in cancer cells are, as a rule, not depleted for UCEs and can even become significantly enriched. This observation raises the possibility that CNVs that arise somatically and are relatively newly formed are less likely to have established a CNV profile that is depleted for UCEs. Alternatively, lack of depletion for UCEs from cancer CNVs may reflect the diseased state. In support of this latter explanation, somatic CNVs that are not associated with disease are depleted for UCEs. Finally, we show that it is possible to observe the CNVs of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells become depleted of UCEs over time, suggesting that depletion may be established through selection against UCE-disrupting CNVs without the requirement for meiotic divisions.

  14. Artificial Intelligence Based Alum Dosage Control in Water Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Poongodi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Supplying good quality of drinking water is a challenging task during the rainy season and floods. During this period water becomes highly polluted with suspended solids which increase the water turbidity. Alum is used to reduce the turbidity of the water. Typically in water treatment plants alum dosage is decided by the Jar test and the desired alum dosage is added manually. This research proposes an automatic alum dosage mixing process. The alum dosage is controlled by an intelligent controller which consists of a dosage predictor, an inverse model of the dosage pump and a Pulse Width Modulation (PWM controller. The optimal alum dosage is predicted by the dosage predictor. The PWM controller controls the flow rate of the alum dosing pump. This proposed method has been implemented in a laboratory based water treatment plant and it ensures the automation in water treatment plant to supply good quality drinking water.

  15. CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES IN INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smogavec

    2009-08-01

    Conclusions Chromosomal analysis is an important method in diagnostic procedures of infertility, because chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions. Sex chromosome aneuploidies are highly correlated to infertility of females and males.

  16. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  17. Incomplete Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia interpunctella, Based on De Novo Transcriptome Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter W.; Mank, Judith E.; Wedell, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Males and females experience differences in gene dose for loci in the nonrecombining region of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. If not compensated, this leads to expression imbalances, with the homogametic sex on average exhibiting greater expression due to the doubled gene dose. Many organisms with heteromorphic sex chromosomes display global dosage compensation mechanisms, which equalize gene expression levels between the sexes. However, birds and Schistosoma have been previously shown to lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation mechanisms, and the status in other female heterogametic taxa including Lepidoptera remains unresolved. To further our understanding of dosage compensation in female heterogametic taxa and to resolve its status in the lepidopterans, we assessed the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. As P. interpunctella lacks a complete reference genome, we conducted de novo transcriptome assembly combined with orthologous genomic location prediction from the related silkworm genome, Bombyx mori, to compare Z-linked and autosomal gene expression levels for each sex. We demonstrate that P. interpunctella lacks complete Z chromosome dosage compensation, female Z-linked genes having just over half the expression level of males and autosomal genes. This finding suggests that the Lepidoptera and possibly all female heterogametic taxa lack global dosage compensation, although more species will need to be sampled to confirm this assertion. PMID:23034217

  18. Modeling abnormal early development with induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Xianming; Fan, Wenxia; Zhao, Ping; Chan, Yau-Chi; Chen, Shen; Zhang, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Ya; Li, Yanhua; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Li, Xingyan; Yang, Jiayin; Peng, Tianran; Zychlinski, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dirk; Zhang, Ruosi; Deng, Kang; Ng, Kwong-Man; Menten, Bjorn; Zhong, Mei; Wu, Jiayan; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yonglong; Schambach, Axel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Many human diseases share a developmental origin that manifests during childhood or maturity. Aneuploid syndromes are caused by supernumerary or reduced number of chromosomes and represent an extreme example of developmental disease, as they have devastating consequences before and after birth. Investigating how alterations in gene dosage drive these conditions is relevant because it might help treat some clinical aspects. It may also provide explanations as to how quantitative differences in gene expression determine phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility among natural populations. Here, we aimed to produce induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that can be used to improve our understanding of aneuploid syndromes. We have generated iPSCs from monosomy X [Turner syndrome (TS)], trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and partial trisomy 11;22 (Emanuel syndrome), using either skin fibroblasts from affected individuals or amniocytes from antenatal diagnostic tests. These cell lines stably maintain the karyotype of the donors and behave like embryonic stem cells in all tested assays. TS iPSCs were used for further studies including global gene expression analysis and tissue-specific directed differentiation. Multiple clones displayed lower levels of the pseudoautosomal genes ASMTL and PPP2R3B than the controls. Moreover, they could be transformed into neural-like, hepatocyte-like and heart-like cells, but displayed insufficient up-regulation of the pseudoautosomal placental gene CSF2RA during embryoid body formation. These data support that abnormal organogenesis and early lethality in TS are not caused by a tissue-specific differentiation blockade, but rather involves other abnormalities including impaired placentation.

  19. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242 Section 520.1242 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage...

  20. Amylin Treatment Reduces Neuroinflammation and Ameliorates Abnormal Patterns of Gene Expression in the Cerebral Cortex of an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Erming; Zhu, Haihao; Wang, Xiaofan; Gower, Adam C.; Wallack, Max; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Kowall, Neil; Qiu, Wei Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Our recent study has demonstrated that peripheral amylin treatment reduces the amyloid pathology in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mouse models, and improves their learning and memory. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of amylin for AD was beyond reducing the amyloids in the brain, and have now directly tested the actions of amylin on other aspects of AD pathogenesis, especially neuroinflammation. A 10-week course of peripheral amylin treatment significantly reduced levels of cerebral inflammation markers, Cd68 and Iba1, in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. Mechanistic studies indicated the protective effect of amylin required interaction with its cognate receptor because silencing the amylin receptor expression blocked the amylin effect on Cd68 in microglia. Using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we discovered that amylin treatment influenced two gene modules linked with amyloid pathology: 1) a module related to proinflammation and transport/vesicle process that included a hub gene of Cd68, and 2) a module related to mitochondria function that included a hub gene of Atp5b. Amylin treatment restored the expression of most genes in the APP cortex toward levels observed in the wild-type (WT) cortex in these two modules including Cd68 and Atp5b. Using a human dataset, we found that the expression levels of Cd68 and Atp5b were significantly correlated with the neurofibrillary tangle burden in the AD brain and with their cognition. These data suggest that amylin acts on the pathological cascade in animal models of AD, and further supports the therapeutic potential of amylin-type peptides for AD. PMID:27911303

  1. Silencing of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-associated gene GDAP1 induces abnormal mitochondrial distribution and affects Ca2+ homeostasis by reducing store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Martín, David; Rueda, Carlos B; Estela, Anna; Sánchez-Piris, Maribel; González-Sánchez, Paloma; Traba, Javier; de la Fuente, Sergio; Scorrano, Luca; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Alvarez, Javier; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Palau, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    GDAP1 is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that acts as a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics. Mutations of the GDAP1 gene cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. We show that GDAP1 interacts with the vesicle-organelle trafficking proteins RAB6B and caytaxin, which suggests that GDAP1 may participate in the mitochondrial movement within the cell. GDAP1 silencing in the SH-SY5Y cell line induces abnormal distribution of the mitochondrial network, reduces the contact between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and alters the mobilization of mitochondria towards plasma membrane upon depletion of ER-Ca(2+) stores. GDAP1 silencing does not affect mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, ER-Ca(2+), or Ca(2+) flow from ER to mitochondria, but reduces Ca(2+) inflow through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) following mobilization of ER-Ca(2+) and SOCE-driven Ca(2+) entry in mitochondria. Our studies suggest that the pathophysiology of GDAP1-related CMT neuropathies may be associated with abnormal distribution and movement of mitochondria throughout cytoskeleton towards the ER and subplasmalemmal microdomains, resulting in a decrease in SOCE activity and impaired SOCE-driven Ca(2+) uptake in mitochondria.

  2. Research progress of the abnormal expression of Sox genes in breast cancer%Sox基因的异常表达与乳腺癌研究的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石静; 章佳新

    2014-01-01

    Sox基因家族是一类SRY相关基因构成的基因家族,编码一系列Sox家族的转录因子.Sox基因在个体发育过程中参与了性别决定和分化、神经发育、软骨形成等多种发育过程.近年研究者发现,Sox基因的异常表达与乳腺癌的发生、发展有一定关系,如Sox2、Sox4的过表达与乳腺癌的发生相关;Sox7和Sox17在乳腺癌中可作为抑癌基因,其表达下调可激活Wnt/β-catenin信号通路,与乳腺癌的发生发展有一定关系.%Sox gene family is composed of a class of SRY gene,encoding a series of transcription factors.In the ontogeny,sox genes involved in a variety of development,such as sex determination and differentiation,neural development,cartilage formation.In recent years,researchers found that the abnormal expression of sox gene was related with the development of breast cancer,such as,the overexpression of Sox2 and Sox4 was related with breast cancer; Sox7 and Sox17 in breast cancer could act as tumor suppressor gene,the downregulation of which could activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Dosage-sensitive function of retinoblastoma related and convergent epigenetic control are required during the Arabidopsis life cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal J Johnston

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant life cycle alternates between two distinct multi-cellular generations, the reduced gametophytes and the dominant sporophyte. Little is known about how generation-specific cell fate, differentiation, and development are controlled by the core regulators of the cell cycle. In Arabidopsis, RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED (RBR, an evolutionarily ancient cell cycle regulator, controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and regulation of a subset of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 genes and METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1 in the male and female gametophytes, as well as cell fate establishment in the male gametophyte. Here we demonstrate that RBR is also essential for cell fate determination in the female gametophyte, as revealed by loss of cell-specific marker expression in all the gametophytic cells that lack RBR. Maintenance of genome integrity also requires RBR, because diploid plants heterozygous for rbr (rbr/RBR produce an abnormal portion of triploid offspring, likely due to gametic genome duplication. While the sporophyte of the diploid mutant plants phenocopied wild type due to the haplosufficiency of RBR, genetic analysis of tetraploid plants triplex for rbr (rbr/rbr/rbr/RBR revealed that RBR has a dosage-dependent pleiotropic effect on sporophytic development, trichome differentiation, and regulation of PRC2 subunit genes CURLY LEAF (CLF and VERNALIZATION 2 (VRN2, and MET1 in leaves. There were, however, no obvious cell cycle and cell proliferation defects in these plant tissues, suggesting that a single functional RBR copy in tetraploids is capable of maintaining normal cell division but is not sufficient for distinct differentiation and developmental processes. Conversely, in leaves of mutants in sporophytic PRC2 subunits, trichome differentiation was also affected and expression of RBR and MET1 was reduced, providing evidence for a RBR-PRC2-MET1 regulatory feedback loop involved in sporophyte development. Together, dosage-sensitive RBR

  4. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS.

  5. Impairment of the tRNA-splicing endonuclease subunit 54 (tsen54) gene causes neurological abnormalities and larval death in zebrafish models of pontocerebellar hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasher, Paul R; Namavar, Yasmin; van Tijn, Paula; Fluiter, Kees; Sizarov, Aleksander; Kamermans, Maarten; Grierson, Andrew J; Zivkovic, Danica; Baas, Frank

    2011-04-15

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) represents a group (PCH1-6) of neurodegenerative autosomal recessive disorders characterized by hypoplasia and/or atrophy of the cerebellum, hypoplasia of the ventral pons, progressive microcephaly and variable neocortical atrophy. The majority of PCH2 and PCH4 cases are caused by mutations in the TSEN54 gene; one of the four subunits comprising the tRNA-splicing endonuclease (TSEN) complex. We hypothesized that TSEN54 mutations act through a loss of function mechanism. At 8 weeks of gestation, human TSEN54 is expressed ubiquitously in the brain, yet strong expression is seen within the telencephalon and metencephalon. Comparable expression patterns for tsen54 are observed in zebrafish embryos. Morpholino (MO) knockdown of tsen54 in zebrafish embryos results in loss of structural definition in the brain. This phenotype was partially rescued by co-injecting the MO with human TSEN54 mRNA. A developmental patterning defect was not associated with tsen54 knockdown; however, an increase in cell death within the brain was observed, thus bearing resemblance to PCH pathophysiology. Additionally, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea mutant zebrafish homozygous for a tsen54 premature stop-codon mutation die within 9 days post-fertilization. To determine whether a common disease pathway exists between TSEN54 and other PCH-related genes, we also monitored the effects of mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetase (rars2; PCH1 and PCH6) knockdown in zebrafish. Comparable brain phenotypes were observed following the inhibition of both genes. These data strongly support the hypothesis that TSEN54 mutations cause PCH through a loss of function mechanism. Also we suggest that a common disease pathway may exist between TSEN54- and RARS2-related PCH, which may involve a tRNA processing-related mechanism.

  6. Abnormal menstrual periods (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have a variety of causes, such as endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, and abnormal thyroid or ... the endometrium becomes unusually thick it is called endometrial ... Hyperplasia may cause profuse or extended menstrual bleeding.

  7. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  8. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  10. Abnormalities in structure and expression of the retinoblastoma gene in small cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Sorenson, G D; Pettengill, O S

    1990-01-01

    the Rb protein, we investigated the expression of the Mr 110,000-116,000 Rb protein in SCLC tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice and/or as cell lines. Rb messenger RNA expression was determined by Northern blotting, and gross structural gene alterations were investigated by Southern blotting. Tumors...... small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Absence of the 4.7 kilobase mRNA has been found to be frequent in SCLC, and it has been reported that the Rb Mr 110,000-116,000 protein product is always absent, even in tumors expressing Rb mRNA. Using Western blotting technique with a monoclonal antibody directed against...

  11. Abnormal protein aggregationand neurodegenerativediseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal protein aggregation or amyloid is the major cause ofmany neurodegenerative disorders. The present review focuses on the correlation between sequence and structure features of proteins related to the diseases and abnormal protein aggregation. Recent progress has improved our knowledge on understand-ing the mechanism of amyloid formation. We suggest a nucleation model for ordered protein aggregation, which can also explain pathogenesis mechanisms of these neurodegenerative diseases in vivo.

  12. Normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene and abnormal incorporation of fibrillin into the extracellular matrix in Lujan Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhaw, G.A.; Stone, C.; Milewicz, D. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Lujan syndrome is an X-linked condition that includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, poor social integration, normal secondary sexual development with normal testicular size, generalized hypotonia, hypernasal voice and dolichostenomelia. Major cardiac complications and lens dislocation have not been reported although severe myopia may occur. All reported cases have had negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome but establishing this constellation of findings as a distinctive entity has been difficult. We report 4 males in two sibships with clinical findings consistent with Lujan syndrome, normal karyotypes, negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome and a normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene. Dermal fibroblasts explanted from one of the affected males were used to study fibrillin synthesis secretion and extracellular matrix incorporation into microfibrils. Cells from the affected individual showed normal synthesis and secretion of fibrillin when compared to control cells, but the fibrillin was not incorporated into the extracellular matrix. These results suggest the presence of a gene on the X chromosome which may play a role in microfibril assembly and when deficient may disrupt the incorporation of fibrillin into microfibrils. This may be important not only in normal body morphogenesis but also in the development/function of the brain. More affected individuals are needed to investigate these findings further.

  13. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: Part 2—Morphomechanical Abnormalities, Gene Reexpression, and Gender Effects on Ventricular Hypertrophy and Its Reversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In part 1, we considered cytomolecular mechanisms underlying calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD), hemodynamics, and adaptive feedbacks controlling pathological left ventricular hypertrophy provoked by ensuing aortic valvular stenosis (AVS). In part 2, we survey diverse signal transduction pathways that precede cellular/molecular mechanisms controlling hypertrophic gene expression by activation of specific transcription factors that induce sarcomere replication in-parallel. Such signaling pathways represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention and prevention of decompensation/failure. Hypertrophy provoking signals, in the form of dynamic stresses and ligand/effector molecules that bind to specific receptors to initiate the hypertrophy, are transcribed across the sarcolemma by several second messengers. They comprise intricate feedback mechanisms involving gene network cascades, specific signaling molecules encompassing G protein-coupled receptors and mechanotransducers, and myocardial stresses. Future multidisciplinary studies will characterize the adaptive/maladaptive nature of the AVS-induced hypertrophy, its gender- and individual patient-dependent peculiarities, and its response to surgical/medical interventions. They will herald more effective, precision medicine treatments. PMID:27184804

  14. The characteristics of novel dosage forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić-Aškrabić Jela

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of pharmaceutical-technological development is to find a procedure of transforming an active substance (a drug into a drug dosage form which is not only acceptable for application, but also enables the active substance to be released following administration, pursuant to therapy objectives. The aim is that the concentration of the active substance in the action location rapidly reaches a therapeutic level and maintains an approximately constant level in the course of a particular time, according to the established therapeutic goal. The primary objective is to present the active ingredient (drug in the form and concentration/quantity that enables the corresponding therapeutic response, i.e. to control the site and rate of medicinal substance release from the drug, as well as the rate at which it reaches the membranes and surfaces to which it is absorbed, while applying a common method of administration. The procedures used to achieve this goal are becoming highly complex and demanding and are aiming at sophisticated drug delivery systems and functional packaging material. Development from the existing drug molecule, through the conventional drug dosage form, to a new system of drug "delivery" (novel delivery system, can improve the drug (active substance characteristics significantly in view of compliance (acceptability by the patient, safety and efficiency. The paper presents an overview of the most important examples of pharmaceutical forms with controlled release and advanced drug "carriers".

  15. Evaluation of new indomethacin dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, E S

    1983-01-01

    Indomethacin, an indole derivative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been available since the early 1960s in gelatin capsules. In 1982, a sustained release product, Indocin SR, was marketed. Awaiting marketing approval is a unique controlled release form of indomethacin, Indos. The disposition of indomethacin includes enterohepatic cycling and extensive metabolism to inactive metabolites. Enterohepatic cycling makes interpretation of bioavailability estimates of indomethacin dosage forms difficult. The relationship of indomethacin plasma concentration to therapeutic effects and side effects is inconclusive. It appears in vivo prostaglandin inhibition occurs at very low plasma concentrations that are achievable with all available dosage forms. Indocin SR is a sustained release capsule of indomethacin designed to deliver 25 mg of drug immediately and 50 mg gradually. Absolute bioavailability of the product is 80%. The plasma concentration-time curves do not show good sustained release characteristics; after four hours plasma concentrations resemble those seen with a single dose of regular capsule. The cost compared with Indocin is competitive. Indos is a zero-order release form of indomethacin. It is a unique drug delivery system that shows good controlled release characteristics. Bioavailability is 85%. Both Indocin SR and Indos are apparently therapeutically equivalent to indomethacin capsules. In elderly patients, Indos has been shown to be associated with fewer side effects than Indocin. Both Indocin SR and Indos have the advantage of once or twice daily dosing.

  16. Drug dosage protocol for calcium oxalate stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Salim, Abiya

    2009-12-01

    In earlier studies, we have confirmed that in most patients with calcium oxalate stone formation, a combination of allopurinol and pyridoxine is best suited for treatment and prevention of the stone forming process. The objective of this study is to identify the most effective directed medical treatment of urinary stones. The drug dose adjustment was based on clinical, radiological, biochemical, and microscopic parameters. 444 patients with proved calcium oxalate stone disease who were getting a combination of allopurinol and pyridoxine for a minimum period of 36 months were enrolled in this prospective study. The dosage schedule of these patients was recorded. Dosage adjustment was made depending upon the various clinical, biochemical, microscopic, and radiological changes during the study period. The dosage schedules were in six categories, namely very high dose chemotherapy (VHDC), i.e. allopurinol 600 mg/day and pyridoxine 240 mg/day, high-dose chemotherapy (HDC), i.e. allopurinol 300 mg/day and pyridoxine 120 mg/day, moderate dose prophylaxis (MDP), i.e. allopurinol 200 mg/day and pyridoxine 80 mg/day, low-dose prophylaxis (LDP), i.e. allopurinol 100 mg/day and pyridoxine 40 mg/day, and very low-dose prophylaxis (VLDP), i.e. allopurinol 50 mg/day and pyridoxine 20 mg/day and intermittent VLDP, wherein the VLDP was given on alternate months and still later at longer intervals. The temporary risk was assessed at each visit and dosage adjustment was made. The effect of the intervention was assessed during the next visit. All the patients involved in the study needed dose adjustment. The following schedules were initiated: VHDC (12) 3.5%, HDC (103) 23.2%, MDP (78) 17.57%, or LDP (251) 56.53%. Patients who defaulted for more than a month were excluded from the study. During each visit for follow up, all patients were advised change over of dose depending upon the clinical situation at the time of review. Patients on VHDC were advised reduction to lower doses

  17. Abnormal Segregation of Alleles and Haplotypes at the Polymorphic Site of the PRNP Gene Within Promoter and Intron 1 Regions in Polish Holstein–Friesian Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    STRYCHALSKI, Janusz; Czarnik, Urszula; Zabolewicz, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Allele and haplotype segregation at the polymorphic sites within the promoter (23indel) and intron 1 (12indel) regions of the PRNP gene was analyzed in Polish Holstein–Friesian cattle. More 23del/del homozygotes and fewer 23ins/ins homozygotes than expected were observed in the offspring of ♂ 23ins/del × ♀ 23ins/del parents. In the offspring of ♂ 23ins/del × ♀ 23del/del parents and ♂ 23del/del × ♀ 23ins/del parents, a trend toward more 23del/del animals and fewer 23ins/del animals than expect...

  18. Systematic Cellular Disease Models Reveal Synergistic Interaction of Trisomy 21 and GATA1 Mutations in Hematopoietic Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiko Banno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal aneuploidy and specific gene mutations are recognized early hallmarks of many oncogenic processes. However, the net effect of these abnormalities has generally not been explored. We focused on transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD in Down syndrome, which is characteristically associated with somatic mutations in GATA1. To better understand functional interplay between trisomy 21 and GATA1 mutations in hematopoiesis, we constructed cellular disease models using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and genome-editing technologies. Comparative analysis of these engineered iPSCs demonstrated that trisomy 21 perturbed hematopoietic development through the enhanced production of early hematopoietic progenitors and the upregulation of mutated GATA1, resulting in the accelerated production of aberrantly differentiated cells. These effects were mediated by dosage alterations of RUNX1, ETS2, and ERG, which are located in a critical 4-Mb region of chromosome 21. Our study provides insight into the genetic synergy that contributes to multi-step leukemogenesis.

  19. Meta-analysis of heterogeneous Down Syndrome data reveals consistent genome-wide dosage effects related to neurological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Jurado Luis A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21 is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in the human population and key molecular networks dysregulated in DS are still unknown. Many different experimental techniques have been applied to analyse the effects of dosage imbalance at the molecular and phenotypical level, however, currently no integrative approach exists that attempts to extract the common information. Results We have performed a statistical meta-analysis from 45 heterogeneous publicly available DS data sets in order to identify consistent dosage effects from these studies. We identified 324 genes with significant genome-wide dosage effects, including well investigated genes like SOD1, APP, RUNX1 and DYRK1A as well as a large proportion of novel genes (N = 62. Furthermore, we characterized these genes using gene ontology, molecular interactions and promoter sequence analysis. In order to judge relevance of the 324 genes for more general cerebral pathologies we used independent publicly available microarry data from brain studies not related with DS and identified a subset of 79 genes with potential impact for neurocognitive processes. All results have been made available through a web server under http://ds-geneminer.molgen.mpg.de/. Conclusions Our study represents a comprehensive integrative analysis of heterogeneous data including genome-wide transcript levels in the domain of trisomy 21. The detected dosage effects build a resource for further studies of DS pathology and the development of new therapies.

  20. SOLID DOSAGE FORMS IN UNANI SYSTEM OF MEDICINE: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid S. Chaudhary

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Drugs obtained from natural sources are rarely administered or dispensed to patients in their native forms but are formulated into dosage forms. In Unani system of medicine dosage forms are broadly classified into four categories according to their state these are solid dosage forms, semisolid, liquid and gaseous dosage forms. Among them solid dosage forms e.g. Sufoof (powder, Kohal (coryllium, Kushta (calx, Qurs (tablet etc have several advantages over other dosage forms such as higher stability, easy to carry, better patient compliance. The rate of absorption of a formulation depends on the dosage form, route of administration and particle size. Some solid dosage forms like shiyaf (suppository, zarur (dusting powder, noorah (depilatory are used locally to produce their respective actions. But unfortunately some effective and potent dosage forms are neither used nor manufactured and they are near to extinct. Therefore in the present review an effort has been made to summarize the detailed Unani classical literature of solid dosage forms.

  1. Mucin phenotypic expression and p53 gene abnormality of gastric super-minute well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: Re-evaluation with relationship between histogenesis of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and intestinal metaplasia in distal stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Toshikazu

    2005-01-01

    lesions in the distal stomach, which had both gastric and intestinal phenotypic mucin, are considered to develop from the tubular proliferative zone with the incomplete type of the intestinal metaplasia and p53 gene abnormality, while a part of them, which had only gastric phenotypic mucin, may derive from the gastric native tubules (non-metaplastic epithelium with p53 gene abnormality.

  2. [Dosage problems of sodium nitroprusside (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, B

    1976-12-01

    Sodium nitroprusside has proved a useful completion of anaesthesiologist's armament. Nevertheless there still exist some doubts concerning correct dosage. This uncertainity is aggravated by communications in literature about fatal outcomes of hypotensions induced with this drug. For the patient's safety, we recommend not to exceed an infusion rate of 15mcg/kg/minute or a total of 1.5-3mg/kg irrespective of the time of administration. In any case the development of metabolic acidosis or the occurence of tachyphylaxis or resistance should be a strong argument for discontinuing nitroprusside and changing to an other method of hypotensive anaesthesia. A useful aid is the control of infusion rate by the IVAC-531-machine.

  3. Overcoming qEEG abnormalities and reward gene deficits during protracted abstinence in male psychostimulant and polydrug abusers utilizing putative dopamine D₂ agonist therapy: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas J H; Morse, Siobhan; Giordano, John; Chen, Amanda Lih Chaun; Thompson, James; Allen, Cameron; Smolen, Andrew; Lubar, Joel; Stice, Eric; Downs, B William; Waite, Roger L; Madigan, Margaret A; Kerner, Mallory; Fornari, Frank; Braverman, Eric R

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that in both food- and drug-addicted individuals there is "dopamine resistance" associated with the DRD2 gene A1 allele. Based on earlier studies, evidence is emerging wherein the potential of utilizing a natural, nonaddicting, safe, putative D2 agonist may play a significant role in the recovery of individuals with reward deficiency syndrome, including those addicted to psychoactive chemicals. Positive outcomes demonstrated by quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) imaging in a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study involving oral Synaptose Complex KB220Z™ showed an increase of alpha waves and low beta wave activity in the parietal brain region. Using t statistics, significant differences observed between placebo and Synaptose Complex KB220Z™ consistently occurred in the frontal regions after week 1 and then again after week 2 of analyses (P = 0.03). This is the first report to demonstrate involvement of the prefrontal cortex in the qEEG response to a natural putative D2 agonist (Synaptose Complex KB220Z™), especially evident in dopamine D2 A1 allele subjects. Independently, we have further supported this finding with an additional study of 3 serious polydrug abusers undergoing protracted abstinence who carried the DRD2 A1 allele. Significant qEEG differences were found between those who received 1 dose of placebo compared with those who were administered Synaptose Complex KB220Z™. Synaptose Complex KB220Z™ induced positive regulation of the dysregulated electrical activity of the brain in these addicts. The results are indicative of a phase change from low amplitude or low power in the brain to a more regulated state by increasing an average of 6.169 mV(2) across the prefrontal cortical region. In the first experiment we found that while 50% of the subjects carried the DRD2 A1 allele, 100% carried ≥ 1 risk allele. Specifically, based on the proposed addiction risk score for these 14 subjects, 72% had

  4. Boron deficiency results in early repression of a cytokinin receptor gene and abnormal cell differentiation in the apical root meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Isidro; Poza, Laura; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Bolaños, Luis

    2014-04-01

    The development of Arabidopsis thaliana was dramatically altered within few hours following boron (B) deprivation. This effect was particularly evident in the apical root meristem. The essentiality of boron in plants has been clearly linked to its structural role in the cell wall, however the diversity and rapidity alterations of plant organogenesis when the micronutrient is absent suggest that B deficiency could also affect gene regulation during plant development. Therefore, the effect of B deficiency on cell elongation, apical root meristem cell division, and early differentiation of root tissues was investigated in A. thaliana seedlings. Dark-growth experiments indicated that hypocotyl elongation was inhibited 2 days after removing B, but apical root growth ceased almost immediately following B deprivation. Detection of cycline B1 by GUS staining of a promoter-reporter construct revealed that low B led to a reduced zone of cell division. The expression of CRE1/WOL/AHK4, encoding an integral membrane protein with histidine kinase domain that mediates cytokinin signaling and root xylem differentiation, was inhibited under B deficiency resulting in arrested xylem development at the protoxylem stage. Because the transition from cell division to cell differentiation in apical root meristems is controlled by cytokinins, this result support the hypothesis that signaling mechanisms during cell differentiation and organogenesis are highly sensitive to B deficiency, and together with previous reports that link the micronutrient with auxin or ethylene control of root architecture, suggests that B could play a role in regulation of hormone mediated early plant development signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Influence of biological activated carbon dosage on landfill leachate treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan-Rui; Guo, Yan; Wu, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC) dosage on COD removal in landfill leachate treatment were compared. The COD removal efficiency of reactors with 0, 100 and 300 g activated carbon dosage per litre activated sludge was 12.9%, 19.6% and 27.7%, respectively. The results indicated that BAC improved the refractory organic matter removal efficiency and there was a positive correlation between COD removal efficiency and BAC dosage. The output of carbon dioxide after 8h of aeration in reactors was 109, 193 and 306 mg corresponding to the activated carbon dosages mentioned above, which indicated the amount of biodegradation and BAC dosage also had a positive correlation. The combination of adsorption and bioregeneration of BAC resulted in the positive correlation betweem organic matter removal efficiency and BAC dosage, and bioregeneration was the root cause for the microbial decomposition of refractory organics.

  6. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  7. Dosage-sensitive X-linked locus influences the development of amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, and fear recognition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Catriona D; Lawrence, Kate; Thomas, N Simon; Price, Cathy J; Ashburner, John; Friston, Karl J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Oreland, Lars; Skuse, David H

    2003-11-01

    The amygdala, which plays a critical role in emotional learning and social cognition, is structurally and functionally sexually dimorphic in humans. We used magnetic neuroimaging and molecular genetic analyses with healthy subjects and patients possessing X-chromosome anomalies to find dosage-sensitive genes that might influence amygdala development. If such X-linked genes lacked a homologue on the Y-chromosome they would be expressed in one copy in normal 46,XY males and two copies in normal 46,XX females. We showed by means of magnetic neuroimaging that 46,XY males possess significantly increased amygdala volumes relative to normal 46,XX females. However, females with Turner syndrome (45,X) have even larger amygdalae than 46,XY males. This finding implies that haploinsufficiency for one or more X-linked genes influences amygdala development irrespective of a direct or indirect (endocrinological) mechanism involving the Y-chromosome. 45,X females also have increased grey matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, close to a region implicated in emotional learning. They are as poor as patients with bilateral amygdalectomies in the recognition of fear from facial expressions. We attempted to localize the gene(s) responsible for these deficits in X-monosomy by means of a deletion mapping strategy. We studied female patients possessing structural X-anomalies of the short arm. A genetic locus (no greater than 4.96 Mb in size) at Xp11.3 appears to play a key role in amygdala and orbitofrontal structural and (by implication) functional development. Females with partial X-chromosome deletions, in whom this critical locus is deleted, have normal intelligence. Their fear recognition is as poor as that of 45,X females and their amygdalae are correspondingly enlarged. This 4.96 Mb region contains, among others, the genes for monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and B (MAOB), which are involved in the oxidative deamination of several neurotransmitters, including dopamine and

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... Received 19 April 2015; accepted 11 May 2015 ... Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Child Psychiatry Clinic, ... Males are affected more than females, only one case had ... communication, repetitive behavior, abnormal movement ... course, age, sex and consanguinity of the patients.

  9. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  10. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...

  11. Lacrimal system abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B D

    1994-03-01

    This report outlines several of the more important abnormalities of the lacrimal system in infants and young children. Although rare, alacrima can be a very difficult clinical problem to treat. The most common cause of alacrima is the Riley-Day syndrome. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a very common anomaly in children. The clinical appearance and treatment of this disorder are discussed.

  12. Dosage compensation and sex-specific epigenetic landscape of the X chromosome in the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gautier; Legeai, Fabrice; Prunier-Leterme, Nathalie; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Tagu, Denis; Jaquiéry, Julie; Le Trionnaire, Gaël

    2017-01-01

    Heterogametic species display a differential number of sex chromosomes resulting in imbalanced transcription levels for these chromosomes between males and females. To correct this disequilibrium, dosage compensation mechanisms involving gene expression and chromatin accessibility regulations have emerged throughout evolution. In insects, these mechanisms have been extensively characterized only in Drosophila but not in insects of agronomical importance. Aphids are indeed major pests of a wide range of crops. Their remarkable ability to switch from asexual to sexual reproduction during their life cycle largely explains the economic losses they can cause. As heterogametic insects, male aphids are X0, while females (asexual and sexual) are XX. Here, we analyzed transcriptomic and open chromatin data obtained from whole male and female individuals to evaluate the putative existence of a dosage compensation mechanism involving differential chromatin accessibility of the pea aphid's X chromosome. Transcriptomic analyses first showed X/AA and XX/AA expression ratios for expressed genes close to 1 in males and females, respectively, suggesting dosage compensation in the pea aphid. Analyses of open chromatin data obtained by Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE-seq) revealed a X chromosome chromatin accessibility globally and significantly higher in males than in females, while autosomes' chromatin accessibility is similar between sexes. Moreover, chromatin environment of X-linked genes displaying similar expression levels in males and females-and thus likely to be compensated-is significantly more accessible in males. Our results suggest the existence of an underlying epigenetic mechanism enhancing the X chromosome chromatin accessibility in males to allow X-linked gene dose correction between sexes in the pea aphid, similar to Drosophila. Our study gives new evidence into the comprehension of dosage compensation in link with chromatin biology in

  13. The X factor: X chromosome dosage compensation in the evolutionarily divergent monotremes and marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Pask, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Marsupials and monotremes represent evolutionarily divergent lineages from the majority of extant mammals which are eutherian, or placental, mammals. Monotremes possess multiple X and Y chromosomes that appear to have arisen independently of eutherian and marsupial sex chromosomes. Dosage compensation of X-linked genes occurs in monotremes on a gene-by-gene basis, rather than through chromosome-wide silencing, as is the case in eutherians and marsupials. Specifically, studies in the platypus have shown that for any given X-linked gene, a specific proportion of nuclei within a cell population will silence one locus, with the percentage of cells undergoing inactivation at that locus being highly gene-specific. Hence, it is perhaps not surprising that the expression level of X-linked genes in female platypus is almost double that in males. This is in contrast to the situation in marsupials where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in females by the long non-coding RNA RSX, a functional analogue of the eutherian XIST. However, marsupial X chromosome inactivation differs from that seen in eutherians in that it is exclusively the paternal X chromosome that is silenced. In addition, marsupials appear to have globally upregulated X-linked gene expression in both sexes, thus balancing their expression levels with those of the autosomes, a process initially proposed by Ohno in 1967 as being a fundamental component of the X chromosome dosage compensation mechanism but which may not have evolved in eutherians.

  14. Increased STAG2 dosage defines a novel cohesinopathy with intellectual disability and behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman; Corbett, Mark A; Van Bon, Bregje W M; Gardner, Alison; Woenig, Joshua A; Jolly, Lachlan A; Douglas, Evelyn; Friend, Kathryn; Tan, Chuan; Van Esch, Hilde; Holvoet, Maureen; Raynaud, Martine; Field, Michael; Leffler, Melanie; Budny, Bartłomiej; Wisniewska, Marzena; Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Batanian, Jacqueline; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Jensen, Corinna; Bienek, Melanie; Froyen, Guy; Ullmann, Reinhard; Hu, Hao; Love, Michael I; Haas, Stefan A; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Baxendale, Anne; Nicholl, Jillian; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Haan, Eric; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Gecz, Jozef

    2015-12-20

    Next generation genomic technologies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the genetic architecture of human neurodevelopmental disorders. Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in the genetics of intellectual disability (ID). For many CNVs, and copy number gains in particular, the responsible dosage-sensitive gene(s) have been hard to identify. We have collected 18 different interstitial microduplications and 1 microtriplication of Xq25. There were 15 affected individuals from 6 different families and 13 singleton cases, 28 affected males in total. The critical overlapping region involved the STAG2 gene, which codes for a subunit of the cohesin complex that regulates cohesion of sister chromatids and gene transcription. We demonstrate that STAG2 is the dosage-sensitive gene within these CNVs, as gains of STAG2 mRNA and protein dysregulate disease-relevant neuronal gene networks in cells derived from affected individuals. We also show that STAG2 gains result in increased expression of OPHN1, a known X-chromosome ID gene. Overall, we define a novel cohesinopathy due to copy number gain of Xq25 and STAG2 in particular.

  15. DUF1220 dosage is linearly associated with increasing severity of the three primary symptoms of autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Davis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the three most frequently documented copy number variations associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a 1q21.1 duplication that encompasses sequences encoding DUF1220 protein domains, the dosage of which we previously implicated in increased human brain size. Further, individuals with ASD frequently display accelerated brain growth and a larger brain size that is also associated with increased symptom severity. Given these findings, we investigated the relationship between DUF1220 copy number and ASD severity, and here show that in individuals with ASD (n = 170, the copy number (dosage of DUF1220 subtype CON1 is highly variable, ranging from 56 to 88 copies following a Gaussian distribution. More remarkably, in individuals with ASD CON1 copy number is also linearly associated, in a dose-response manner, with increased severity of each of the three primary symptoms of ASD: social deficits (p = 0.021, communicative impairments (p = 0.030, and repetitive behaviors (p = 0.047. These data indicate that DUF1220 protein domain (CON1 dosage has an ASD-wide effect and, as such, is likely to be a key component of a major pathway underlying ASD severity. Finally, these findings, by implicating the dosage of a previously unexamined, copy number polymorphic and brain evolution-related gene coding sequence in ASD severity, provide an important new direction for further research into the genetic factors underlying ASD.

  16. Abnormal lung development in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameis, Dustin; Khoshgoo, Naghmeh; Keijzer, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The outcomes of patients diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) have recently improved. However, mortality and morbidity remain high, and this is primarily caused by the abnormal lung development resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of CDH is poorly understood, despite the identification of certain candidate genes disrupting normal diaphragm and lung morphogenesis in animal models of CDH. Defects within the lung mesenchyme and interstitium contribute to disturbed distal lung development. Frequently, a disturbance in the development of the pleuroperitoneal folds (PPFs) leads to the incomplete formation of the diaphragm and subsequent herniation. Most candidate genes identified in animal models have so far revealed relatively few strong associations in human CDH cases. CDH is likely a highly polygenic disease, and future studies will need to reconcile how disturbances in the expression of multiple genes cause the disease. Herein, we summarize the available literature on abnormal lung development associated with CDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stability of dry coated solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kablitz, Caroline Désirée; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2009-01-01

    The dry coating process was evaluated in terms of storage stability investigating drug release and agglomeration tendency of the different coated oral dosage forms; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) was used with triethylcitrate (TEC) as plasticizer and acetylated monoglyceride (Myvacet) as wetting agent. Talc or colloidal silicon dioxide (Aerosil) was used as anti-tacking agents. In contrast to coating formulations consisting of HPMCAS and Myvacet all formulations containing TEC showed enteric resistance and no agglomeration tendency after preparation. After storage at 10% RH +/- 5% enteric resistance is increased slightly. This increase is more pronounced at 60% RH +/- 5%. The formulations without anti-tacking agents showed higher drug releases after 12 and 24 months due to the damage of the film's integrity during sample preparation caused by the high tackiness of the film. Tackiness is not affected by storing if samples are stored at low relative humidity. At high relative humidity tackiness increases upon storage especially for formulations without anti-tacking agents. The sieving results of the agglomeration measurements after storage can be confirmed by ring shear measurements performed immediately after preparation and approved to be a tool, which is able to predict the agglomeration during storage.

  18. Lubricants in Pharmaceutical Solid Dosage Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjiang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lubrication plays a key role in successful manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms; lubricants are essential ingredients in robust formulations to achieve this. Although many failures in pharmaceutical manufacturing operations are caused by issues related to lubrication, in general, lubricants do not gain adequate attention in the development of pharmaceutical formulations. In this paper, the fundamental background on lubrication is introduced, in which the relationships between lubrication and friction/adhesion forces are discussed. Then, the application of lubrication in the development of pharmaceutical products and manufacturing processes is discussed with an emphasis on magnesium stearate. In particular, the effect of its hydration state (anhydrate, monohydrate, dihydrate, and trihydrate and its powder characteristics on lubrication efficiency, as well as product and process performance is summarized. In addition, the impact of lubrication on the dynamics of compaction/compression processes and on the mechanical properties of compacts/tablets is presented. Furthermore, the online monitoring of magnesium stearate in a blending process is briefly mentioned. Finally, the chemical compatibility of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API with magnesium stearate and its reactive impurities is reviewed with examples from the literature illustrating the various reaction mechanisms involved.

  19. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section 520.905 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Fenbendazole oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970 Section 520.970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin...

  1. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. ...

  3. Microbial quality of some herbal solid dosage forms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... This is due to raw materials contamination and unhygienic production conditions. ... Key words: Microbial quality, herbal, contamination, solid dosage form ... The type of dosage form, packaging, manufacturing and expiration dates of subject solid herbal drugs. ..... Microbial spoilage and preservation of.

  4. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  6. Hyper-Variability in Circulating Insulin, High Fat Feeding Outcomes, and Effects of Reducing Ins2 Dosage in Male Ins1-Null Mice in a Specific Pathogen-Free Facility

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is an essential hormone with key roles in energy homeostasis and body composition. Mice and rats, unlike other mammals, have two insulin genes: the rodent-specific Ins1 gene and the ancestral Ins2 gene. The relationships between insulin gene dosage and obesity has previously been explored in male and female Ins2 -/- mice with full or reduced Ins1 dosage, as well as in female Ins1 -/- mice with full or partial Ins2 dosage. We report herein unexpected hyper-variability in Ins1-null male...

  7. Prevalence and patterns of morphological abnormalities in patients with childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merks, Johannes H. M.; Ozgen, Heval M.; Koster, Jan; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Caron, Huib N.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Context Constitutional gene defects predispose to cancer in children. Such tumor predisposition syndromes can be recognized by specific patterns of morphological abnormalities. Objectives To assess the prevalence of morphological abnormalities in a large cohort of patients with childhood cancer and

  8. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  9. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  10. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  11. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  12. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption.

  13. Renal abnormalities in patients with Kallmann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, J C; Méndez, J P; Maya-Núñez, G; Ulloa-Aguirre, A; Kofman-Alfaro, S

    1999-03-01

    To report experience in patients with Kallmann syndrome (KS) in whom urography was used to establish the type and frequency of renal anomalies associated with the disorder. Of 19 patients with KS, 15 had the X-linked recessive form of the disease, whereas the remaining four were sporadic. Each patient underwent intravenous pyelography (IVP) using a non-ionic, low osmolarity contrast medium. Of the 19 patients with KS, 10 had kidney abnormalities; four presented with unilateral renal agenesis and six had less severe forms of renal abnormality (renal malrotation in four and bilateral dilatation of the calyces and pelves in two). One of the patients with unilateral renal agenesis carried a deletion in KAL, the gene responsible for the X-linked type of KS. Three of the four patients with renal malrotation had a confirmed X-linked recessive form and one carried a point mutation in KAL. These results suggest that kidney abnormalities are more frequent and diverse in patients with KS than previously reported. They also indicate that defects in the KAL gene may contribute to abnormal renal development. However, a review of the literature revealed no close correlation between KAL mutations and kidney anomalies in the X-linked type of disease. Taken together, these data suggest that KAL mutations are not invariably associated with failure of renal development and that additional factors (epigenetic or local) may compensate for defects in the KAL protein.

  14. Russia: An Abnormal Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Rosefielde

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman recently rendered a summary verdict on the post Soviet Russian transition experience finding that the Federation had become a normal country with the west's assistance, and predicting that it would liberalize and develop further like other successful nations of its type. This essay demonstrates that they are mistaken on the first count, and are likely to be wrong on the second too. It shows factually, and on the norms elaborated by Pareto, Arrow and Bergson that Russia is an abnormal political economy unlikely to democratize, westernize or embrace free enterprise any time soon

  15. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  16. Structural basis for MOF and MSL3 recruitment into the dosage compensation complex by MSL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Jan; Hallacli, Erinc; Lipp, Michael; Holz, Herbert; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan; Cusack, Stephen; Akhtar, Asifa

    2011-02-01

    The male-specific lethal (MSL) complex is required for dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, and analogous complexes exist in mammals. We report structures of binary complexes of mammalian MSL3 and the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) MOF with consecutive segments of MSL1. MSL1 interacts with MSL3 as an extended chain forming an extensive hydrophobic interface, whereas the MSL1-MOF interface involves electrostatic interactions between the HAT domain and a long helix of MSL1. This structure provides insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOF and enables us to show analogous interactions of MOF with NSL1. In Drosophila, selective disruption of Msl1 interactions with Msl3 or Mof severely affects Msl1 targeting to the body of dosage-compensated genes and several high-affinity sites, without affecting promoter binding. We propose that Msl1 acts as a scaffold for MSL complex assembly to achieve specific targeting to the X chromosome.

  17. Automatic identification and normalization of dosage forms in drug monographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each day, millions of health consumers seek drug-related information on the Web. Despite some efforts in linking related resources, drug information is largely scattered in a wide variety of websites of different quality and credibility. Methods As a step toward providing users with integrated access to multiple trustworthy drug resources, we aim to develop a method capable of identifying drug's dosage form information in addition to drug name recognition. We developed rules and patterns for identifying dosage forms from different sections of full-text drug monographs, and subsequently normalized them to standardized RxNorm dosage forms. Results Our method represents a significant improvement compared with a baseline lookup approach, achieving overall macro-averaged Precision of 80%, Recall of 98%, and F-Measure of 85%. Conclusions We successfully developed an automatic approach for drug dosage form identification, which is critical for building links between different drug-related resources.

  18. Dopaminergic system abnormalities Etiopathogenesis of dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhui Wu; Huifang Shang; Xiaoyi Zou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much research has focused on the close relationship between etiopathogenesis of dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Nevertheless, details of the mechanism are still not clear.OBJECTIVE: To review studies from the past few years about pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system.RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the key words "dystonia" and "dopamine", PubMed database and SCI databases were searched from January 1990 to December 2005 for relevant English publications. A total of 73 articles were searched and, initially, all articles were selected. Inclusive criteria: studies based on pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Exclusive criteria: duplicated studies. A total of 19 articles were extracted after preliminary screening.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The data sources were the PubMed and SCI databases. The types of articles chosen were reviews and original articles.DATA SYNTHESIS: Metabolism and function of dopamine in the central nervous system: the chemical constitution of dopamine is a single benzene ring. The encephalic regions of dopamine synthesis and their fiber projections comprise four nervous system pathways. One of these pathways is the substantia nigra-striatum dopamine pathway, which is a side-loop of the basal ganglia circuitry that participates in movement control and plays a main role in the adjustment of extracorticospinal tract movement. Dopamine can lead to the facilitation of movement. Dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system: different modes of dopamine abnormality exist in various forms of dystonia. Abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in several primary dystonias: at present, fifteen gene loci of primary dystonia have been reported (DYT1-DYT15). The relationship between abnormalities of the dopaminergic system and the

  19. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  20. Expansion of GA Dinucleotide Repeats Increases the Density of CLAMP Binding Sites on the X-Chromosome to Promote Drosophila Dosage Compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guray Kuzu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dosage compensation is an essential process that equalizes transcript levels of X-linked genes between sexes by forming a domain of coordinated gene expression. Throughout the evolution of Diptera, many different X-chromosomes acquired the ability to be dosage compensated. Once each newly evolved X-chromosome is targeted for dosage compensation in XY males, its active genes are upregulated two-fold to equalize gene expression with XX females. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CLAMP zinc finger protein links the dosage compensation complex to the X-chromosome. However, the mechanism for X-chromosome identification has remained unknown. Here, we combine biochemical, genomic and evolutionary approaches to reveal that expansion of GA-dinucleotide repeats likely accumulated on the X-chromosome over evolutionary time to increase the density of CLAMP binding sites, thereby driving the evolution of dosage compensation. Overall, we present new insight into how subtle changes in genomic architecture, such as expansions of a simple sequence repeat, promote the evolution of coordinated gene expression.

  1. General lack of global dosage compensation in ZZ/ZW systems? Broadening the perspective with RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Jochen BW

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species with heteromorphic sex chromosomes face the challenge of large-scale imbalance in gene dose. Microarray-based studies in several independent male heterogametic XX/XY systems suggest that dosage compensation mechanisms are in place to mitigate the detrimental effects of gene dose differences. However, recent genomic research on female heterogametic ZZ/ZW systems has generated surprising results. In two bird species and one lepidopteran no evidence for a global dosage compensating mechanism has been found. The recent advent of massively parallel RNA sequencing now opens up the possibility to gauge the generality of this observation with a broader phylogenetic sampling. It further allows assessing the validity of microarray-based inference on dosage compensation with a novel technology. Results We here expemplify this approach using massively parallel sequencing on barcoded individuals of a bird species, the European crow (Corvus corone, where previously no genetic resources were available. Testing for Z-linkage with quantitative PCR (qPCR, we first establish that orthology with distantly related species (chicken, zebra finch can be used as a good predictor for chromosomal affiliation of a gene. We then use a digital measure of gene expression (RNA-seq on brain transcriptome and confirm a global lack of dosage compensation on the Z chromosome. RNA-seq estimates of male-to-female (m:f expression difference on the Z compare well to previous microarray-based estimates in birds and lepidopterans. The data further lends support that an up-regulation of female Z-linked genes conveys partial compensation and suggest a relationship between sex-bias and absolute expression level of a gene. Correlation of sex-biased gene expression on the Z chromosome across all three bird species further suggests that the degree of compensation has been partly conserved across 100 million years of avian evolution. Conclusions This work

  2. A benefit/risk approach towards selecting appropriate pharmaceutical dosage forms - an application for paediatric dosage form selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Tom; Ernest, Terry B; Walsh, Jennifer; Williams, Julie L

    2012-10-05

    The design and selection of new pharmaceutical dosage forms involves the careful consideration and balancing of a quality target product profile against technical challenges and development feasibility. Paediatric dosage forms present particular complexity due to the diverse patient population, patient compliance challenges and safety considerations of this vulnerable population. This paper presents a structured framework for assessing the comparative benefits and risks of different pharmaceutical design options against pre-determined criteria relating to (1) efficacy, (2) safety and (3) patient access. This benefit/risk framework has then been applied to three hypothetical, but realistic, scenarios for paediatric dosage forms in order to explore its utility in guiding dosage form design and formulation selection. The approach allows a rigorous, systematic and qualitative assessment of the merits and disadvantages of each dosage form option and helps identify mitigating strategies to modify risk. The application of a weighting and scoring system to the criteria depending on the specific case could further refine the analysis and aid decision-making. In this paper, one case study is scored for illustrative purposes. However, it is acknowledged that in real development scenarios, the generation of actual data considering the very specific situation for the patient/product/developer would come into play to drive decisions on the most appropriate dosage form strategy.

  3. High-dosage pyridoxine-induced auditory neuropathy and protection with coffee in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin Na; Yi, Tae Hoo; Kim, Sun Yeou; Kang, Tong Ho

    2009-04-01

    Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a hearing disorder characterized by an abnormal auditory brainstem response (ABR). This study examined experimental AN model induced in mice following increased dosages of pyridoxine. Induced AN was examined for pyridoxine treatment. To assess AN, we evaluated the ABR, auditory middle latency response (AMLR), otoacoustic emission (OAE), and histochemical morphology of the auditory nerve. Pyridoxine-treated mice exhibited an increase in the hearing threshold shift and delayed latency of both ABR and AMLR in proportion to pyridoxine dosage. Additionally, the extent of auditory nerve fiber loss increased in a dose-dependent manner following pyridoxine intoxication. Coffee or trigonelline treatment ameliorated the hearing threshold shift, delayed latency of the auditory evoked potential, and improved sensory fiber loss induced by pyridoxine intoxication. The present findings demonstrate that high-dose pyridoxine administration can be used to produce a new mouse model for AN, and coffee or trigonelline as a main active compound of coffee extract can potentially facilitate recovery from pyridoxine-induced auditory neuropathy.

  4. [Y chromosome structural abnormalities and Turner's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-06-01

    Although specifically male, the human Y chromosome may be observed in female karyotypes, mostly in women with Turner syndrome stigmata. In women with isolated gonadal dysgenesis but otherwise normal stature, the testis determining factor or SRY gene may have been removed from the Y chromosome or may be mutated. In other women with Turner syndrome, the karyotype is usually abnormal and shows a frequent 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. In these cases, the phenotype depends on the ratio between Y positive and 45,X cell lines in the body. When in mosaicism, Y chromosomes are likely to carry structural abnormalities which explain mitotic instability, such as the existence of two centromeres. Dicentric Y isochromosomes for the short arm (idic[Yp]) or ring Y chromosomes (r[Y]) are the most frequent abnormal Y chromosomes found in infertile patients and in Turner syndrome in mosaic with 45,X cells. Although monocentric, deleted Y chromosomes for the long arm and those carrying microdeletions in the AZF region are also instable and are frequently associated with a 45,X cell line. Management of infertile patients carrying such abnormal Y chromosomes must take into account the risk and the consequences of a mosaicism in the offspring.

  5. A duplicated PLP gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease detected by comparative multiplex PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Kawanishi, C. [Yokohama City Univ., Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked dysmyelinating disorder caused by abnormalities in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is essential for oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelin formation. Although linkage analysis has shown the homogeneity at the PLP locus in patients with PMD, exonic mutations in the PLP gene have been identified in only 10% - 25% of all cases, which suggests the presence of other genetic aberrations, including gene duplication. In this study, we examined five families with PMD not carrying exonic mutations in PLP gene, using comparative multiplex PCR (CM-PCR) as a semiquantitative assay of gene dosage. PLP gene duplications were identified in four families by CM-PCR and confirmed in three families by densitometric RFLP analysis. Because a homologous myelin protein gene, PMP22, is duplicated in the majority of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, PLP gene overdosage may be an important genetic abnormality in PMD and affect myelin formation. 38 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  7. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  8. Abnormal X : autosome ratio, but normal X chromosome inactivation in human triploid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwood Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation (XCI is that aspect of mammalian dosage compensation that brings about equivalence of X-linked gene expression between females and males by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes (Xi in normal female cells, leaving them with a single active X (Xa as in male cells. In cells with more than two X's, but a diploid autosomal complement, all X's but one, Xa, are inactivated. This phenomenon is commonly thought to suggest 1 that normal development requires a ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set, and 2 that an early event in XCI is the marking of one X to be active, with remaining X's becoming inactivated by default. Results Triploids provide a test of these ideas because the ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set cannot be achieved, yet this abnormal ratio should not necessarily affect the one-Xa choice mechanism for XCI. Previous studies of XCI patterns in murine triploids support the single-Xa model, but human triploids mostly have two-Xa cells, whether they are XXX or XXY. The XCI patterns we observe in fibroblast cultures from different XXX human triploids suggest that the two-Xa pattern of XCI is selected for, and may have resulted from rare segregation errors or Xi reactivation. Conclusion The initial X inactivation pattern in human triploids, therefore, is likely to resemble the pattern that predominates in murine triploids, i.e., a single Xa, with the remaining X's inactive. Furthermore, our studies of XIST RNA accumulation and promoter methylation suggest that the basic features of XCI are normal in triploids despite the abnormal X:autosome ratio.

  9. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  10. The Abnormal Methylation of Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor Receptor-2(KDR) Gene in Infancy Hemangioma.%血管瘤血管内皮生长因子受体KDR基因异常甲基化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恩; 刘铭; 彭强

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the methylation status of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor ( VEGFR, KDR) gene in hemangioma, vascular malformation and normal skin tissues by establishing methylation sensitivity high resolution dissolve curve method ( MS-HRM). The role of genetic methylation in proliferating and regressing hemangiomas also will be discussed. Methods 48 different period hemangioma samples, 15 vascular abnormality samples, and 8 normal skin tissue samples were tested respectively. The DNA of samples were extracted, modificated with sulphite methylation. Then, the DNA of samples was purificated and recycled and prepared for test. The methylation levels of KDR in all samples were tested by the methylation sensitivity high resolution dissolve curve method ( MS-HRM) . Results KDR gene methylation were detected positively in 32 hemangioma specimens(66. 67% ) , including 21 proliferate hemangiomas samples (87. 50% ) and 11 involuting hemangiomas(45. 83%). There was significant difference between proliferate hemangiomas and involuting hemangiomas in KDR methylation(X 2= 9. 375 ,P < 0. 05 ) . The methylation positive rate of vascular malformation samples was 13. 33% ( ranged from 0% to 25% ). The methylation positive rate of normal wrapping skin tissues was 12.50 % ( ranged from 0% to 5% ). The methylation positive rate in hemangioma was significant higher than that in vascular malformation or normal wrapping skin tissue ( P < 0. 05 ) . Conclutions Abnormal methylation of KDR expressed in hemangioma which may be associated with hemangioma formation, hyperplasia and degradation.%目的 通过建立甲基化敏感性高分辨率溶解曲线法(MS-HRM),检测血管内皮生长因子VEGF受体KDR基因启动子区域在不同时期血管瘤、血管畸形及正常皮肤组织中的甲基化状态,初步探讨基因甲基化在血管瘤形成、增生、退化过程中的作用.方法选取不同时期血管瘤石蜡标本48例、血管畸形石蜡标本15例

  11. Mitochondrial abnormalities in the myofibrillar myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, S; Schaefer, J; Meinhardt, M; Reichmann, H

    2015-11-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies are a genetically diverse group of skeletal muscle disorders, with distinctive muscle histopathology. Causative mutations have been identified in the genes MYOT, LDB3, DES, CRYAB, FLNC, BAG3, DNAJB6, FHL1, PLEC and TTN, which encode proteins which either reside in the Z-disc or associate with the Z-disc. Mitochondrial abnormalities have been described in muscle from patients with a myofibrillar myopathy. We reviewed the literature to determine the extent of mitochondrial dysfunction in each of the myofibrillar myopathy subtypes. Abnormal mitochondrial distribution is a frequent finding in each of the subtypes, but a high frequency of COX-negative or ragged red fibres, a characteristic finding in some of the conventional mitochondrial myopathies, is a rare finding. Few in vitro studies of mitochondrial function have been performed in affected patients.

  12. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  13. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami Minemura; Kazuto Tajiri; Yukihiro Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  14. Curve Fitting And Interpolation Model Applied In Nonel Dosage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuling Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Curve Fitting and Interpolation Model are applied in Nonel dosage detection in this paper firstly, and the gray of continuous explosive in the Nonel has been forecasted. Although the traditional infrared equipment establishes the relationship of explosive dosage and light intensity, but the forecast accuracy is very low. Therefore, gray prediction models based on curve fitting and interpolation are framed separately, and the deviations from the different models are compared. Simultaneously, combining on the sample library features, the cubic polynomial fitting curve of the higher precision is used to predict grays, and 5mg-28mg Nonel gray values are calculated by MATLAB. Through the predictive values, the dosage detection operations are simplified, and the defect missing rate of the Nonel are reduced. Finally, the quality of Nonel is improved.

  15. Atypical refsum disease with pipecolic acidemia and abnormal catalase distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, M R; Jansen, G A; Verhoeven, N M; Mooyer, P A; Jakobs, C; Roels, F; Espeel, M; Fourmaintraux, A; Bellet, H; Wanders, R J; Saudubray, J M

    2000-01-01

    We describe an 18-year-old patient with psychomotor retardation and abnormally short metatarsi and metacarpals but no other signs of classic Refsum disease. Molecular analysis of the phytanoyl-coenzyme A hydroxylase gene revealed a homozygous deletion causing a frameshift. Surprisingly, L-pipecolic acid was elevated in plasma, and microscopy of the liver showed a reduced number of peroxisomes per cell and a larger average peroxisome size. These abnormal peroxisomes lacked catalase as did peroxisomes in fibroblasts of this patient. Such generalized peroxisomal abnormalities are not present in classic Refsum disease.

  16. 应用SNPs技术确定C.elegans形成异常习惯化的基因位置%A study of ascertaining the exact gene location where C. elegans form abnormal habituation using SNPs methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许锡振; 张桂芳; 赵彦; 濮瀑; 乐卫东

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the enact gene location hab-1 ( en308) which effects C elagans abnormal habituation using SNPs methods. Methods (1) To retrieve the SNP markers of Y71A12B which chained at the first autosome the CB4856 (22. 330MU) and SNP markers of C37A5 (22. 330MU) in C. elegans gene bank,its genotype was set to YC/YC,the genotypes of hab-1 (cn308) was set to h/h. (2) By means of Synchronized processing, the size of worms was unified. (3) Wild-type CB4856 male was three-factor hybridized with her-maphroditism cn308. F1 generation were tested by Tap test, recording the distance of response of the worms, statistical processing, screening habituation and retaining the Normal Heterozygote (YC/h) , suboulturing to F2. (4) Then F2 generation were tested by Tap test,C. elegans with slow habitualion were selected, processed by PCR, digested by restriction enzyme , separated target fragment with 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. Results After the first Tap test, the formation of habituation of the wild-type was significantly faster than the cn308. (the average of habituation for Tap stimulation( Moving distance, unit;mm) ,the wild-type' s was (0.414 ±0. 049)mm,cn308 was (0.777 ±0.062)mm, ( = 10.08, P<0.001) ,in the habituation retention test 1 hour later,the habituation of wild-type was found that it retained significantly longer than cn308 (the average of habituation retention, wild-type was (0.307 ±0.041)mm,cn308 was (0. 815 ±0. 054) mm, : = 11.54, P< 0.001). (2) SNP fragments were analyzed, the genetic recombination number between SNP marker of Y71A12B and hab-1 and the genetic recombination number between SNP marker of C37A5 and hab-1 were gathered, observing the phenotype of H non C-type, namely, Ch/h:20, Yh/h:6 ,by reckoning the restructuring proportion it was determined that the distance between hab-1 and SNP marker of Y71A12B was 0. 831MU. The distance between hab-1 and SNP marker of C37A5 was 0. 249MU. So it could be ascertained that hab-1 located between

  17. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: prednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M; Derendorf, H; Krämer, J; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2007-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing prednisolone are reviewed. Data on its solubility, oral absorption, and permeability are not totally conclusive, but strongly suggest a BCS Class 1 classification. Prednisolone's therapeutic indications and therapeutic index, pharmacokinetics, and the possibility of excipient interactions were also taken into consideration. Available evidence indicates that a biowaiver for IR solid oral dosage forms formulated with the excipients tabulated in this article would be unlikely to expose patients to undue risks.

  18. CYP1B1 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to breast cancer with abnormal Hilit%CYP1B1基因多态性与异常体液型乳腺癌易感性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吐尔逊·买买提; 哈木拉提·吾甫尔; 伊力哈木·乃扎木; 彭晓梅; 多力坤·买买提玉素甫; 卡依尔·玉素甫

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between gene polymorphism of cytochrome P4501 Bl in exon 3 codon 432 Leu-Val and breast cancer( BC) and its clinical subgroups( breast cancer with abnormal Hilit[ BCAH]. Methods The BC patients were divided into four groups with different body fluid type according to Uighur medicine theory. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism( PCR-RFLP) technique was used to detect the polymorphism in exon 3 Leu432Val of CYP1B1 in 84 BC patients and 131 normal control subjects. Results The frequency of genotype and allele of CYP1B1 of BC,BCAH and the control group was not significantly different(P>0.05). Compared with wild type(Leu/Leu) ,the susceptibility to BC for subjects with the Leu/Val + Val/Val was increased by 2.137(odds ratio [OR] =2. 137,95% confidence interval [CY] :0.969 -4.717,P =0.056),and by 3.636( OR =3.636,95% C7:0.996 -13.157;/>=0.062) in BCAH patients. Conclusion Mutation of genotype (Leu/Val + Val/Val) of CYP1B1 may be correlated to the susceptibility to BC and BCABH in Chinese Han population of Xinjiang.%目的 探讨细胞色素氧化酶p450(cytochrome,CYP)1B1基因外显子3密码子432亮氨酸(Leu)-缬氨酸(Val)位点多态性与乳腺癌(BC)及其异常体液型乳腺癌(BCAH)的相关性.方法 按维吾尔医学将乳腺癌病例组分为4种体液型,应用聚合酶链反应-限制性片断长度多态性(PCR-RFLP)技术检测84例BC患者和131例对照组的CYP1B1基因Leu432Val位点多态性的分布频率.结果 CYP1 B1各基因型及等位基因分布频率在BC、BCAH与对照组之间差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);在BC病例组中Leu/Val和Val/Val合并后其发生BC的风险是野生型Leu/Leu个体的2.137倍(95%CI=0.969 ~4.717,P=0.056),在BCABH病例组中其发生BC的风险是野生型Leu/Leu个体的3.636倍(95% CI =0.996~13.157,P=0.062).结论 CYP1B1突变基因型(Leu/Val+ Val/Val)可能与新疆汉族人群BC和BCABH易感性有关.

  19. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Gimenez, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Alegret, X. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Rivas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  20. Dnmt3b is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Lepore, Janet B; Zegarek, Matthew H; Kocherginsky, Masha; Singh, Mahi; Davis, Elizabeth M; Link, Petra A; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M; Karpf, Adam R; Godley, Lucy A

    2013-03-14

    The drivers of abnormal DNA methylation in human cancers include widespread aberrant splicing of the DNMT3B gene, producing abnormal transcripts that encode truncated proteins that may act as dominant negative isoforms. To test whether reduced Dnmt3b dosage can alter tumorigenesis, we bred Dnmt3b(+/-) mice to Eµ-Myc mice, a mouse model susceptible to B-cell lymphomas. Eµ-Myc/Dnmt3b(+/-) mice showed a dramatic acceleration of lymphomagenesis, greater even than that observed in Eµ-Myc mice that express a truncated DNMT3B isoform found in human tumors, DNMT3B7. This finding indicates that Dnmt3b can act as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Although reduction in both Dnmt3b dosage and expression of DNMT3B7 within the Eµ-Myc system had similar effects on tumorigenesis and DNA hypermethylation, different molecular mechanisms appear to underlie these changes. This study offers insight into how de novo DNA methyltransferases function as tumor suppressors and the sensitivity of Myc-induced lymphomas to DNA methylation.

  1. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, Marcelle O; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Eduardo F; Storpirtis, Silvia; Junginger, Hans E; Kopp, Sabine; Midha, Kamal K; Shah, Vinod P; Stavchansky, Salomon; Dressman, Jennifer B; Barends, Dirk M

    2011-05-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing levofloxacin as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. According to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System, levofloxacin can be assigned to Class I. No problems with BE of IR levofloxacin formulations containing different excipients and produced by different manufacturing methods have been reported and hence the risk of bioinequivalence caused by these factors appears to be low. In addition, levofloxacin has a wide therapeutic index. On the basis of this evidence, a biowaiver is recommended for IR solid oral dosage forms containing levofloxacin as the single API provided that (a) the test product contains only excipients present in IR levofloxacin drug products that have been approved in International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) or associated countries and which have the same dosage form; (b) both the test and comparator dosage form are "very rapidly dissolving" or "rapidly dissolving" with similarity of the dissolution profiles demonstrated at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8; and (c) if the test product contains polysorbates, it should be both qualitatively and quantitatively identical to its comparator in terms of polysorbate content.

  2. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: prednisolone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, M; Derendorf, H; Krämer, J; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2007-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing prednisolone are reviewed. Data on its solubility, oral absorption, and permeability are not totally conclusive, but strongl

  3. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: cimetidine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jantratid, E; Prakongpan, S; Dressman, J B; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Barends, D M

    2006-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing cimetidine are reviewed. According to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), cimetidine would be assigned

  4. 76 FR 59023 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tylosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tylosin... drug application (ANADA) filed by Cross Vetpharm Group, Ltd. The ANADA provides for use of tylosin..., Dublin 24, Ireland, filed ANADA 200-455 for use of TYLOMED-WS (tylosin tartrate), a water soluble powder...

  5. Narrative Language Intervention Intensity and Dosage: Telling the Whole Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, LaVae M.

    2009-01-01

    This article expands on the work of S. F. Warren, M. E. Fey, and P. J. Yoder (2007) by applying their suggested intervention-intensity parameters to narrative language intervention with school-aged children. These pharmacologically based dosage concepts are examined from two perspectives: oral narrative skills as the target of language therapy and…

  6. Selective laser trabeculoplasty: Does energy dosage predict response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Habib

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Within the range of total energy examined, there is a positive correlation between total energy used and amount of pressure reduction achieved at up to 3 years of follow-up. This may be useful in determining the optimal energy dosage for maximum effect for patients receiving SLT.

  7. Whole-body vibration dosage alters leg blood flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgo, N.; Eser, P.; Groot, P.C.E. de; Galea, M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of whole-body vibration dosage on leg blood flow was investigated. Nine healthy young adult males completed a set of 14 random vibration and non-vibration exercise bouts whilst squatting on a Galileo 900 plate. Six vibration frequencies ranging from 5 to 30 Hz (5 Hz increments) were used

  8. Whole-body vibration dosage alters leg blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgo, Noel; Eser, Prisca; de Groot, Patricia; Galea, Mary

    The effect of whole-body vibration dosage on leg blood flow was investigated. Nine healthy young adult males completed a set of 14 random vibration and non-vibration exercise bouts whilst squatting on a Galileo 900 plate. Six vibration frequencies ranging from 5 to 30 Hz (5 Hz increments) were used

  9. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448 Section 520.1448 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... starting line). The loss on drying is not more than 10 percent when dried in vacuum at 60 °C for 2 hours....

  10. Imprinting of the polycomb group gene MEDEA serves as a ploidy sensor in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erilova, Aleksandra; Brownfield, Lynette; Exner, Vivien; Rosa, Marisa; Twell, David; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia

    2009-09-01

    Balanced maternal and paternal genome contributions are a requirement for successful seed development. Unbalanced contributions often cause seed abortion, a phenomenon that has been termed "triploid block." Misregulation of imprinted regulatory genes has been proposed to be the underlying cause for abnormalities in growth and structure of the endosperm in seeds with deviating parental contributions. We identified a mutant forming unreduced pollen that enabled us to investigate direct effects of unbalanced parental genome contributions on seed development and to reveal the underlying molecular mechanism of dosage sensitivity. We provide evidence that parent-of-origin-specific expression of the Polycomb group (PcG) gene MEDEA is causally responsible for seed developmental aberrations in Arabidopsis seeds with increased paternal genome contributions. We propose that imprinted expression of PcG genes is an evolutionary conserved mechanism to balance parental genome contributions in embryo nourishing tissues.

  11. Maths anxiety and medication dosage calculation errors: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Davis, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    A student's accuracy on drug calculation tests may be influenced by maths anxiety, which can impede one's ability to understand and complete mathematic problems. It is important for healthcare students to overcome this barrier when calculating drug dosages in order to avoid administering the incorrect dose to a patient when in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of maths anxiety on healthcare students' ability to accurately calculate drug dosages by performing a scoping review of the existing literature. This review utilised a six-stage methodology using the following databases; CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Scopus, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Trip database (http://www.tripdatabase.com/) and Grey Literature report (http://www.greylit.org/). After an initial title/abstract review of relevant papers, and then full text review of the remaining papers, six articles were selected for inclusion in this study. Of the six articles included, there were three experimental studies, two quantitative studies and one mixed method study. All studies addressed nursing students and the presence of maths anxiety. No relevant studies from other disciplines were identified in the existing literature. Three studies took place in the U.S, the remainder in Canada, Australia and United Kingdom. Upon analysis of these studies, four factors including maths anxiety were identified as having an influence on a student's drug dosage calculation abilities. Ultimately, the results from this review suggest more research is required in nursing and other relevant healthcare disciplines regarding the effects of maths anxiety on drug dosage calculations. This additional knowledge will be important to further inform development of strategies to decrease the potentially serious effects of errors in drug dosage calculation to patient safety.

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. These tests may include a detailed ultrasound, amniocentesis (to check for chromosomal abnormalities) and in some ... the provider may recommend additional tests, such as amniocentesis and a detailed ultrasound, to diagnose or rule ...

  13. 3D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell transfection with high uniformity and dosage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Bertani, Paul; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Chen, Feng; Chiang, Chiling; Malkoc, Veysi; Kuang, Tairong; Gao, Keliang; Lee, L. James; Lu, Wu

    2015-12-01

    Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a ``3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip'' on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40 000 cells per cm2 on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk electroporation (BEP), the NEP chip shows a 20 fold improvement in dosage control and uniformity, while still maintaining high cell viability (>90%) even in cells such as cardiac cells which are characteristically difficult to transfect. This high-throughput 3D NEP system provides an innovative and medically valuable platform with uniform and reliable cellular transfection, allowing for a steady supply of healthy, engineered cells.Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a ``3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip'' on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40 000 cells per cm2 on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk

  14. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Serum RASSF1A Gene Abnormal Methyla-tion Detection and Clinical Evaluation%上皮性卵巢肿瘤血清中RASSF1A基因异常甲基化检测及临床评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金钰; 杨雪; 李艳艳; 高春英

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the RASSF1A gene in epithelial ovarian cancer serum abnormal methylation detection and clinical significance. Methods From February 2014 to February 2016 in our hospital treated 88 cases of patients with ovarian tumors, including epithelial ovarian cancer in 44 cases of observation group, and 44 patients with benign tumor as the control group, to detect abnormal compared two groups of RASSF1A gene methylation. Results Observa-tion group serum abnormal methylation rate of RASSF1A gene is 56.8% higher than that of control group, with statisti-cal difference, P< 0.05; WHO pathological class II, III grade patients serum abnormal methylation rate of RASSF1A gene is 60.0%, 81.8% were significantly higher than that of patients with grade I, statistically difference,P< 0.05; FI-GO class III ~ IV in serum in patients with abnormal methylation rate of RASSF1A gene is 80.0% higher than that of grade I ~ II patients, statistically difference,P < 0.05. Conclusion In clinical diagnosis of epithelial ovarian tumor of RASSF1A gene abnormal methylation detection, can provide new ideas for clinical treatment and prognosis, has the im-portant clinical reference value.%目的:探究上皮性卵巢肿瘤血清中RASSF1A基因异常甲基化检测与临床意义。方法选择2014年2月—2016年2月于该院接受治疗的88例卵巢肿瘤患者,其中上皮性卵巢癌44例为观察组,良性肿瘤患者44例为对照组,再检测对比两组RASSF1A基因异常甲基化。结果观察组血清RASSF1A基因异常甲基化比率为56.8%显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义,P<0.05;WHO病理II级、III级患者血清中RASSF1A基因异常甲基化比率为60.0%、81.8%均显著高于I级患者,差异有统计学意义,P<0.05;FIGO分级III~IV级患者血清中RASSF1A基因异常甲基化比率为80.0%显著高于I~II级患者,差异有统计学意义,P<0.05。结论在临床上诊断上皮性卵巢肿瘤可对RASSF1A基因异常甲基化进行检测,

  15. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  16. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  17. Abnormal expression of PACAP gene in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome%骨髓增生异常综合征患者骨髓细胞中PACAP基因的异常表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stella Aprilia Ika; Zixing Chen; Xiaofei Qi; Hongjie Shen; Jiannong Cen; Yuanyuan Wang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression pattern of PACAP gene in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods: The expression pattem of PACAP gene in CD34+ cells from MDS patients was determined by microarray, con-firmed in expanding samples by quantitative real-time PCR in bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results: The transcription of PACAP gene was found significantly down-regulated in patients with MDS in comparison with that in control samples, with a means of 220.1 in MDS-RA and 116.8 in MDS-RAEB (P < 0.05 ). Conclusion: PACAP gene is expressed significantly lower in patients with MDS.

  18. Hair Shaft Abnormality in Children: a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Rahmatpour Rokni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Hair is an ectodermal structure, and its formation is regulated by master genes important in embryology. Hair shaft consists of three major regions: the medulla, cortex and cuticle. Hair shaft abnormality will divide structural hair abnormalities into two broad categories - those associated with increased hair fragility and those not associated with increased hair fragility. We conducted a review study to assess hair shaft abnormality in children. Materials and Methods We conducted a review of all papers published on hair shaft abnormalities. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar on papers publish from 1990 to 2016. The search terms were: hair shaft abnormality, Hair loss, Hair fragility. All abstracts and full text English-language articles were studied. Results While common developmental and structural features are shared in hair follicles and hair shafts. Anomalies of the hair shaft are separated into those with and those without increased hair fragility. Conclusion Although hair has no vital function, it may serve as an indicator for human health. Clinical and morphological hair abnormalities can be clues to specific complex disorders. Hair shaft abnormalities can be inherited or acquired, can reflect a local problem or a systemic disease.

  19. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  20. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  1. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  2. Epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach for fetal trisomy 21 detection using an autosomal genetic reference marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu K Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The putative promoter of the holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS gene on chromosome 21 is hypermethylated in placental tissues and could be detected as a fetal-specific DNA marker in maternal plasma. Detection of fetal trisomy 21 (T21 has been demonstrated by an epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach where the amount of hypermethylated HLCS in maternal plasma is normalized using a fetal genetic marker on the Y chromosome as a chromosome dosage reference marker. We explore if this method can be applied on both male and female fetuses with the use of a paternally-inherited fetal single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP allele on a reference chromosome for chromosome dosage normalization. METHODOLOGY: We quantified hypermethylated HLCS molecules using methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease digestion followed by real-time or digital PCR analyses. For chromosome dosage analysis, we compared the amount of digestion-resistant HLCS to that of a SNP allele (rs6636, a C/G SNP that the fetus has inherited from the father but absent in the pregnant mother. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a fetal-specific SNP allele on a reference chromosome, we analyzed 20 euploid and nine T21 placental tissue samples. All samples with the fetal-specific C allele were correctly classified. One sample from each of the euploid and T21 groups were misclassified when the fetal-specific G allele was used as the reference marker. We then analyzed 33 euploid and 14 T21 maternal plasma samples. All but one sample from each of the euploid and T21 groups were correctly classified using the fetal-specific C allele, while correct classification was achieved for all samples using the fetal-specific G allele as the reference marker. CONCLUSIONS: As a proof-of-concept study, we have demonstrated that the epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach can be applied to the prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21 for both male and female fetuses.

  3. Weird mammals provide insights into the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes and dosage compensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jennifer A. Marshall Graves

    2015-12-01

    The deep divergence of mammalian groups 166 and 190 million years ago (MYA) provide genetic variation to explore the evolution of DNA sequence, gene arrangement and regulation of gene expression in mammals. With encouragement from the founder of the field, Mary Lyon, techniques in cytogenetics and molecular biology were progressively adapted to characterize the sex chromosomes of kangaroos and other marsupials, platypus and echidna—and weird rodent species. Comparative gene mapping reveals the process of sex chromosome evolution from their inception 190 MYA (they are autosomal in platypus) to their inevitable end (the Y has disappeared in two rodent lineages). Our X and Y are relatively young, getting their start with the evolution of the sex-determining gene, which triggered progressive degradation of the Y chromosome. Even more recently, sex chromosomes of placental mammals fused with an autosomal region which now makes up most of the Y. Exploration of gene activity patterns over four decades showed that dosage compensation via X-chromosome inactivation is unique to therian mammals, and that this whole chromosome control process is different in marsupials and absent in monotremes and reptiles, and birds. These differences can be exploited to deduce how mammalian sex chromosomes and epigenetic silencing evolved.

  4. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi K Mishra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer and gene dosage drives adaptation to wood colonization in a tree pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhillon, Braham; Feau, Nicolas; Aerts, Andrea L; Beauseigle, Stéphanie; Bernier, Louis; Copeland, Alex; Foster, Adam; Gill, Navdeep; Henrissat, Bernard; Herath, Padmini; LaButti, Kurt M; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A; Majoor, Eline; Ohm, Robin A; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L; Pribowo, Amadeus; Saddler, John N; Sakalidis, Monique L; de Vries, Ronald P; Grigoriev, Igor V; Goodwin, Stephen B; Tanguay, Philippe; Hamelin, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most damaging tree pathogens can attack woody stems, causing lesions (cankers) that may be lethal. To identify the genomic determinants of wood colonization leading to canker formation, we sequenced the genomes of the poplar canker pathogen, Mycosphaerella populorum, and the closely rela

  6. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: prednisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M; Derendorf, H; Krämer, J; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2007-06-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing prednisone are reviewed. Due to insufficient data prednisone cannot be definitively classified according to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) criteria as both the solubility and the permeability of prednisone are on the borderline of the present criteria of BCS Class I. Prednisone's therapeutic indications and therapeutic index, pharmacokinetics and the possibility of excipient interactions were also taken into consideration. Available evidence indicates that a biowaiver for IR solid oral dosage forms formulated with the excipients tabulated in this article would be unlikely to expose patients to undue risks.

  7. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS VALIDATION OF TABLET DOSAGE FORM: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Surbhi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In pharmaceutical organizations, validation is a fundamental segment that supports a company commitment to quality assurance. Validation is a tool of quality assurance which provides confirmation of the quality in equipment systems, manufacturing processes, software and testing methods. Validation assures that products with pre-determined quality characteristics and attributes can be reproduced consistently/reproducibly within the established limits of the manufacturing process operation at the manufacturing site. Validation of the individual steps of the manufacturing processes is called the process validation. Different dosage forms have different validation protocols. Here this article concentrates on the process validation of tablet dosage form, protocol preparation and regulatory basis for process validation in industry. It gives in detail the validation of each step of the manufacturing process of tablets through wet granulation.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of nateglinide in bulk and tablet dosage forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Suresh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nateglinide (NTG is available as tablet dosage form in 60 mg and 120 mg strength. In the present study, two simple, reproducible and efficient UV spectrophotometric methods for the estimation of this drug in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage forms have been developed. In method I, methanol-AR was used as solvent, while in method II, Methanol-AR + 10% V/V 3N NaOH was used as reference solvent. In method I, nateglinide shows λmax at 216 nm, which is then shifted to 225.4 nm on increasing the basicity of the reference solvent in method II. The linearity for nateglinide was observed to be statistically in the range of 10-100 μg/ml in method I and 100-1000 μg/ml in method II. Both the methods were validated using ANOVA. The recovery studies confirmed the accuracy of the proposed methods.

  9. Determination of Azithromycin in pharmaceutical dosage forms by Spectrophotometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhagia B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for determination of azithromycin in its pharmaceutical dosage forms. In the proposed method, azithromycin is oxidized with potassium permanganate to liberate formaldehyde, which is determined in situ using acetyl acetone, in the presence of ammonium acetate. A yellow coloured chromogen was obtained, having an absorption maxima at 412 nm. The method is found to be linear in the concentration range of 10-75 µg/ml, with regression coefficient of 0.9978. Various reaction parameters such as concentration of potassium permanganate and reagent, time required for oxidation, and maximum colour intensity were optimized. The method was validated, and can be used successfully to assay azithromycin in its pharmaceutical dosage forms viz. tablets, capsules, and injections.

  10. Gelatin and Non-Gelatin Capsule Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullapalli, Rampurna P; Mazzitelli, Carolyn L

    2017-06-01

    Capsules offer an alternate to tablets for oral delivery of therapeutic compounds. One advantage of capsules over tablets is their amenability to deliver not only solids but also nonaqueous liquids and semisolids as a unit dose solid dosage form. Shell component is an essential part of capsule dosage forms. Capsule shells, available as hard or soft shells, are formulated from gelatin or a non-gelatin polymeric material such as hypromellose and starch, water, and with or without a nonvolatile plasticizer. The capsule shells may also be formulated to modify the release of their fill contents in a site-specific manner in the gastrointestinal tract. The goal of the current review is to provide an in-depth discussion on polymeric film-forming materials and manufacturing technologies used in the production of capsule shells. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4-2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 [Formula: see text] for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-[Formula: see text] sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring.

  12. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: prednisolone.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, M.; Derendorf, H; Krämer, J.; Junginger, H E; Midha, K.K.; Shah, V. P.; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2007-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing prednisolone are reviewed. Data on its solubility, oral absorption, and permeability are not totally conclusive, but strongly suggest a BCS Class 1 classification. Prednisolone's therapeutic indications and therapeutic index, pharmacokinetics, and the possibility of excipient interactions were also taken into considerat...

  13. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: cimetidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Jantratid, E; Prakongpan, S.; Dressman, J B; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Midha, K.K.; Barends, D M

    2006-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing cimetidine are reviewed. According to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), cimetidine would be assigned to Class III. Cimetidine's therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions, and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) pr...

  14. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Meiklejohn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  15. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Landeen, Emily L; Cook, Jodi M; Kingan, Sarah B; Presgraves, Daven C

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females) has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female) germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  16. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: rifampicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C; Dressman, J B; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Barends, D M

    2009-07-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of new multisource and reformulated immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing rifampicin as the only Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) are reviewed. Rifampicin's solubility and permeability, its therapeutic use and index, pharmacokinetics, excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems were taken into consideration. Solubility and absolute BA data indicate that rifampicin is a BCS Class II drug. Of special concern for biowaiving is that many reports of failure of IR solid oral dosage forms of rifampicin to meet BE have been published and the reasons for these failures are yet insufficiently understood. Moreover, no reports were identified in which in vitro dissolution was shown to be predictive of nonequivalence among products. Therefore, a biowaiver based approval of rifampicin containing IR solid oral dosage forms cannot be recommended for either new multisource drug products or for major scale-up and postapproval changes (variations) to existing drug products.

  17. Biowaiver Monographs for Immediate Release Solid Oral Dosage Forms: Levetiracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruševska, Marija; Berglez, Sandra; Krisch, Igor; Legen, Igor; Megušar, Klara; Peternel, Luka; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Groot, D W; Kopp, Sabine; Langguth, Peter; Mehta, Mehul; Polli, James E; Shah, Vinod P; Dressman, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    Literature and experimental data relevant for the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing levetiracetam are reviewed. Data on solubility and permeability suggest that levetiracetam belongs to class I of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). Levetiracetam's therapeutic use, its wide therapeutic index, and its favorable pharmacokinetic properties make levetiracetam a valid candidate for the BCS-based biowaiver approach. Further, no BE studies with levetiracetam IR formulations in which the test formulation failed to show BE with the comparator have been reported in the open literature. On the basis of the overall evidence, it appears unlikely that a BCS-based biowaiver approach for levetiracetam IR solid oral dosage forms formulated with established excipients would expose patients to undue risks. Thus, the BCS-based biowaiver approach procedure is recommended for IR solid oral dosage form containing levetiracetam, provided the excipients in the formulation are also present in products that have been approved in countries belonging to or associated with the International Committee on Harmonization and are used in their usual quantities, and provided the dissolution profiles of the test and reference product comply with the current requirements for BCS-based biowaivers.

  18. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: pyrazinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C; Dressman, J B; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Barends, D M

    2008-09-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing pyrazinamide as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. Pyrazinamide is BCS Class III, with linear absorption over a wide dosing range. The risk of bioinequivalence is estimated to be low. Depending on the definition used, pyrazinamide can be classified as a narrow therapeutic index (NTI) drug, which is usually a caveat to biowaiving but may be deemed acceptable if the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPCs) of the test product stipulates the need for regular monitoring of liver function. It is concluded that a biowaiver can be recommended for IR solid oral dosage only when the test product (a) contains only excipients present in pyrazinamide IR solid oral drug products approved in ICH or associated countries, (b) these excipients are present in amounts normally used in IR solid oral dosage forms, (c) the test product is very rapidly dissolving, (d) the SmPC of the test product indicates the need for monitoring of the patient's liver function.

  19. Prevalence and trends of cellulosics in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, David J; Omidian, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Many studies have shown that cellulose derivatives (cellulosics) can provide various benefits when used in virtually all types of dosage forms. Nevertheless, the popularity of their use in approved drug products is rather unknown. This research reports the current prevalence and trends of use for 15 common cellulosics in prescription drug products. The cellulosics were powdered and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), ethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), hypromellose (HPMC), HPMC phthalate, HPMC acetate succinate, cellulose acetate (CA), CA phthalate, sodium (Na) and calcium (Ca) carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), croscarmellose sodium (XCMCNa), methyl cellulose, and low substituted HPC. The number of brand drug products utilizing each cellulosics was determined using the online drug index Rxlist. A total of 607 brand products were identified having one or more of the cellulosics as an active or inactive ingredient. An array of various dosage forms was identified and revealed HPMC and MCC to be the most utilized cellulosics in all products followed by XCMCNa and HPC. Many products contained two or more cellulosics in the formulation (42% containing two, 23% containing three, and 4% containing 4-5). The largest combination occurrence was HPMC with MCC. The use of certain cellulosics within different dosage form types was found to contain specific trends. All injectables utilized only CMCNa, and the same with all ophthalmic solutions utilizing HPMC, and otic suspensions utilizing HEC. Popularity and trends regarding cellulosics use may occur based on many factors including functionality, safety, availability, stability, and ease of manufacturing.

  20. Relationship between folic acid metabolism-related enzyme gene polymorphism and susceptibility of abnormal pregnancy%叶酸代谢相关酶基因多态性与不良孕产发生易感性的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茜西; 伍萍芝; 何琳琳; 吕德欣; 傅锦坚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)C677T,A1298C and methionine synthase reductase(MTRR)gene polymorphism with abnormal pregnancy history.Methods 549 normal women (control group)and 300 women with the abnormal pregnancy history(observation group)were taken as the subjects by adopting the case control research method.The oral mucosa epithelial cells were collected for extracting genomic DNA.The MTHFR and MTRR gene polymorphisms were detected by the gene sequencing method.Results The distribution frequency of MTHFR 677TT genotype in the abnormal pregnancy group was significantly increased compared with the control group (10.00% vs.3.46%,χ2 =15.25,P <0.01);the distribution frequency of MTHFR-1298CC genotype in the abnormal pregnancy group was significantly in-creased compared with the control group (11.00 vs.4.01%,χ2 =15.66,P <0.01);the distribution frequency of MTRR A66G gen-otype had no statistical difference between the two groups(χ2 =3.02,P =0.082).The interactive analysis of 2 genes indicated that simultaneous carrying the MTHFR A1298C mutation site and MTRR A66G mutation site increased the possibility of abnormal pregnancy occurrence (OR=1.52,P =0.011).Conclusion MTHFR C677T and A1298C have a certain correlation with female ab-normal pregnancy occurrence.%目的:分析妇女亚甲基四氢叶酸还原酶(MTHFR)C677T、A1298C 及甲硫氨酸合成酶还原酶(MTRR)A66G 基因多态性与不良孕产史的关联性。方法采用病例对照研究的方法,以549例正常妇女(对照组)及300例有不良孕产史(观察组)妇女为对象,采集口腔黏膜上皮细胞,提取基因组 DNA,采用基因测序技术,进行 MTHFR 及 MTRR 基因多态性检测。结果MTHFR 677TT 基因型在观察组的分布频率(10.00%)较对照组(3.46%)明显升高(χ2=15.25,P <0.01);MTHFR-1298CC基因型在观察组的分布频率(11.00%)较对照组(4

  1. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  2. Chromosome abnormalities in Indonesian patients with short stature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramayuda Chrysantine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short stature is associated with several disorders including wide variations of chromosomal disorders and single gene disorders. The objective of this report is to present the cytogenetic findings in Indonesian patients with short stature. Methods G-banding and interphase/metaphase FISH were performed on short stature patients with and without other clinical features who were referred by clinicians all over Indonesia to our laboratory during the year 2003–2009. Results The results of chromosomal analysis of ninety seven patients (mean age: 10.7 years old were collected. The group of patients with other clinical features showed sex chromosome abnormalities in 45% (18/40 and autosomal abnormalities in 10% (4/40, whereas those with short stature only, 42.1% (24/57 had sex chromosome abnormalities and 1.75% (1/57 had autosomal abnormalities. The autosomal chromosomal abnormalities involved mostly subtelomeric regions. Results discrepancies between karyotype and FISH were found in 10 patients, including detection of low-level monosomy X mosaicism in 6 patients with normal karyotype, and detection of mosaic aneuploidy chromosome 18 in 1 patient with 45,XX,rob(13;14(q10;q10. Statistical analysis showed no significant association between the groups and the type of chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusion Chromosome abnormalities account for about 50% of the short stature patients. Wide variations of both sex and autosomal chromosomes abnormalities were detected in the study. Since three out of five patients had autosomal structural abnormalities involving the subtelomeric regions, thus in the future, subtelomeric FISH or even a more sensitive method such as genomic/SNP microarray is needed to confirm deletions of subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9, 11 and 18. Low-level mosaicism in normal karyotype patients indicates interphase FISH need to be routinely carried out in short stature patients as an adjunct to karyotyping.

  3. 3D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell transfection with high uniformity and dosage control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Bertani, Paul; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Chen, Feng; Chiang, Chiling; Malkoc, Veysi; Kuang, Tairong; Gao, Keliang; Lee, L James; Lu, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a "3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip" on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40,000 cells per cm(2) on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk electroporation (BEP), the NEP chip shows a 20 fold improvement in dosage control and uniformity, while still maintaining high cell viability (>90%) even in cells such as cardiac cells which are characteristically difficult to transfect. This high-throughput 3D NEP system provides an innovative and medically valuable platform with uniform and reliable cellular transfection, allowing for a steady supply of healthy, engineered cells.

  4. Tissue- and stage-dependent dosage compensation on the Neo-X chromosome in drosophila pseudoobscura

    KAUST Repository

    Nozawa, Masafumi

    2013-12-03

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation (DC) is widely accepted in various organisms. This concept is mostly supported by comparisons of gene expression between chromosomes and between sexes. However, genes on the X chromosome and autosomes are mostly not homologous, and the average gene expression level on these chromosomes may not be the same even under DC, which complicates comparisons between chromosomes. Many genes with sex-biased expression also make comparisons between sexes difficult. To overcome these issues, we investigated DC by comparing the expression of neo-X-linked genes in Drosophila pseudoobscura with those of their autosomal orthologs in other Drosophila species. The ratio of the former to the latter in males would be 1 under DC, whereas it becomes 0.5 without DC. We found that the ratio was ∼0.85 for adult whole bodies, indicating that the DC is incomplete on the neo-X chromosome in adults as a whole. The ratio (∼0.90) was also significantly less than 1 for adult bodies without gonads, whereas it was ∼1.0 for adult heads. These results indicate that DC varies among tissues. Our sliding-window analysis of the ratio also revealed that the upregulation of neo-X-linked genes in males occurred chromosome wide in all tissues analyzed, indicating global upregulation mechanisms. However, we found that gene functions also affected the levels of DC. Furthermore, most of the genes recently moved to the X were already under DC at the larval stage but not at the adult stage. These results suggest that DC in Drosophila species operates in a tissue/stage-dependent manner. © 2013 The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral abnormalities in the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaji, Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder, mainly affecting the ectodermal components such as, enamel, nail, and hair. The gene for EvC syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16. Patients with EvC syndrome characteristically presents with congenitally missing teeth, abnormal frenal attachment, microdontia, and hexadactyly.

  6. Oral abnormalities in the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babaji Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder, mainly affecting the ectodermal components such as, enamel, nail, and hair. The gene for EvC syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16. Patients with EvC syndrome characteristically presents with congenitally missing teeth, abnormal frenal attachment, microdontia, and hexadactyly.

  7. Association of MTHFR Polymorphisms and Chromosomal Abnormalities in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thivaratana Sinthuwiwat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in MTHFR gene might explain the interindividual differences in the reduction of DNA repaired and the increase of chromosome breakage and damage. Nowadays, chromosomal rearrangement is recognized as a major cause of lymphoid malignancies. In addition, the association of MTHFR polymorphisms with aneuploidy was found in several studies, making the MTHFR gene as a good candidate for leukemia etiology. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the common sequence variation, 677C>T and 1298A>C in the MTHFR gene of 350 fixed cell specimens archived after chromosome analysis. The distribution of the MTHFR polymorphisms frequency was compared in leukemic patients with structural chromosome abnormality and chromosome aneuploidy, as well as in those with no evidence of chromosome abnormalities. We observed a significant decrease in the distribution of T allele in 677C>T polymorphisms among patients with chromosomal abnormalities including both structural aberration and aneuploidy. The same significance result also found in patients with structural aberration when compare with the normal karyotype patients. Suggesting that polymorphism in the MTHFR gene was involved in chromosome abnormalities of leukemia. However, further investigation on the correlation with the specific types of chromosomal aberrations is needed.

  8. Biopharmaceutical considerations and characterizations in development of colon targeted dosage forms for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malayandi, Rajkumar; Kondamudi, Phani Krishna; Ruby, P K; Aggarwal, Deepika

    2014-04-01

    Colon targeted dosage forms have been extensively studied for the localized treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. These dosage forms not only improve the therapeutic efficacy but also reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions and hence improve the patient compliance. However, complex and highly variable gastro intestinal physiology limits the clinical success of these dosage forms. Biopharmaceutical characteristics of these dosage forms play a key role in rapid formulation development and ensure the clinical success. The complexity in product development and clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms are based on the biopharmaceutical characteristics such as physicochemical properties of drug substances, pharmaceutical characteristics of dosage form, physiological conditions and pharmacokinetic properties of drug substances as well as drug products. Various in vitro and in vivo techniques have been employed in past to characterize the biopharmaceutical properties of colon targeted dosage forms. This review focuses on the factors influencing the biopharmaceutical performances of the dosage forms, in vitro characterization techniques and in vivo studies.

  9. Effect of Injection Minimal Dosages of Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA to Body Weight and Blood Chemistry Male Rat Strain Sprague-Dawley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nukman Moeloek

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Many family planning program focus more on men. Until now, vasectomy has been the commonly used method for male contraception. However, this method creates inconvenience such as irreversibility and psychological problems. One of the alternatives contraception is the combination of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA and androgen. The minimum dosage of DMPA could suppress testosterone level that leads to reduced spermatogenesis and sperm viability. Nevertheless, until now it is not known whether minimum dosages of DMPA have an effect to body weight and blood chemistry. Therefore, this research aimed at determinate the effect of minimal dosages of DMPA to body mass and blood chemistry using male rats (Rattus norvegicus L. strain Sprague-Dawley as model. This research using completely randomized design, unequal size sample, castration treatments and several doses DMPA (1.25, 0.625, and 0.313 milligram. Injecting of DMPA conducted intramuscularly on week 0 and week 12. Normality/homogeneity Data normality were analyzed before ANOVA test. Then, abnormal data were tested using Kruskal-Wallis test. The result shows that injection of DMPA in various doses do not have an effect on body weight and blood chemistry such as erytrocytes, haemoglobin, hematocrite, HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, SGOT, SGPT and triglyseride (p>0,05. Furthermore, it is concluded that that no effect of minimal dosages of DMPA to body mass and blood chemistry of rat.

  10. Systematic Cellular Disease Models Reveal Synergistic Interaction of Trisomy 21 and GATA1 Mutations in Hematopoietic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kimihiko; Omori, Sayaka; Hirata, Katsuya; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Nakagawa, Natsuki; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Wada, Kazuko; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-05-10

    Chromosomal aneuploidy and specific gene mutations are recognized early hallmarks of many oncogenic processes. However, the net effect of these abnormalities has generally not been explored. We focused on transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) in Down syndrome, which is characteristically associated with somatic mutations in GATA1. To better understand functional interplay between trisomy 21 and GATA1 mutations in hematopoiesis, we constructed cellular disease models using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and genome-editing technologies. Comparative analysis of these engineered iPSCs demonstrated that trisomy 21 perturbed hematopoietic development through the enhanced production of early hematopoietic progenitors and the upregulation of mutated GATA1, resulting in the accelerated production of aberrantly differentiated cells. These effects were mediated by dosage alterations of RUNX1, ETS2, and ERG, which are located in a critical 4-Mb region of chromosome 21. Our study provides insight into the genetic synergy that contributes to multi-step leukemogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form drug...

  12. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syn

  13. Congenital abnormalities in methylmercury poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, S.H.

    1975-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the teratogenic potential of methylmercury on chick embryogenesis. Methylmercuric chloride was dissolved in sodium bicarbonate (0.2%) and administered to the chick embryos at doses ranging from 0.0009 to 0.010 mg per egg. The injections were made at days 2 and 3 on incubation (Groups A and B). All the embryos including controls were examined on the 7th day of incubation. Methylmercury poisoning was observed to be both embryolethal and teratogenic. Within the two groups, embryolethality was higher in Group A. The following congenital abnormalities were observed: exencephaly, shortened and twisted limbs, microphthalmia, shortened and twisted neck, beak abnormalities, everted viscera, reduced body size and hemorrhage all over the body. Exencephaly and limb abnormalities were very common. No differences in the incidence and types of gross abnormalities within both the groups (A and B) were noted. The incidence of malformations among the controls was low. The results of present investigation show that methylmercury poisoning is both embryolethal and teratogenic to early chick embryogenesis. (auth)

  14. Application of whole genome exon sequencing technology in identifying clone of hereditary fibrinogen abnormality family pathogenic gene%全基因组外显子测序技术在遗传性纤维蛋白原异常家系致病基因的克隆鉴定中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓娣; 张新友; 宋通微; 洪澄英

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究采用全基因组外显子测序技术在遗传性纤维蛋白原异常家系致病基因鉴定中的应用价值。方法采集12例遗传性纤维蛋白原异常患者及其核心家庭成员外周血检测凝血指标,并提取其基因组DNA进行全基因组外显子测序,分析测序结果,探讨遗传性纤维蛋白原异常的分子机制。结果全基因组外显子测序结果显示:先证者A1、A4以及B2均为FGA基因g.1233G>A突变,A1的妹妹、A4的父亲以及B2的母亲均携带有相同的突变;A2、A7、B4和B5均为FGG基因g.10819G>A突变,家系成员中A2的母亲和外婆、A7的姐姐和女儿、B4的母亲和B5的母亲均携带有相同的突变;A3、A5、A6、B1和B3及其相关亲属共10例携带有FGB基因g.9692A>G突变。先证者及家系主要成员中发生Fg基因突变的成员APTT、PT和TT均明显延长,但Fg活性显著降低。结论遗传性纤维蛋白原异常可由多种Fg基因外显子突变导致,FGB和FGG外显子突变较为常见。%Objective To research the applicative value of whole genome exon sequencing technology in identifying clone of hereditary fibrinogen abnormality family pathogenic gene. Methods Peripheral blood of 12 patients with hereditary fibrinogen abnormality and core family members was collected to detect coagulation index. And genomic DNA was received whole genome exon sequencing. Test results were analyzed to explore molecular mechanism of hereditary fibrinogen abnormality. Results Results of whole genome exon sequencing technology showed probandA1, A4, and B2 all had FGA gene g. 1233G>A mutation. A1’s sister, A4’s father, and B2’s mother carried the same mutation. A2, A7, B4 and B5 all had FGA gene, g.10819G>A mutation. A2’s mother and grandmother, A7’s sister and daughter, B4’s mother and B5’s mother carried the same mutation. A3, A5, A6, B1 and B3 and 10 people in their related family had FGA gene g.9692A>G mutation. In proband and

  15. Correlation between Abnormal Expressions of CD44 Protein and Gene and Lymph Node Metastasis for Human Lung Carcinoma%人肺癌CD44蛋白和基因的异常表达与淋巴结转移的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连斌; 孙玉鹗

    2001-01-01

    目的:研究 CD44蛋白和基因在人肺癌组织中的异常表达,以及这种异常表达与淋巴结转移的相关性。方法:应用 SP免疫组织化学染色方法和 RT PCR/Southern方法,研究人肺癌组织中 CD44蛋白和基因的表达,并应用 QTM970计算机图像分析仪,对免疫组织化学染色结果进行定量分析。结果: SP免疫组织化学染色和计算机图像定量分析结果显示,非小细胞肺癌( non small cell lung carcinomas, NSCLCs)组织比癌旁肺组织,有淋巴结转移比无淋巴结转移的非小细胞肺癌组织染色强度深,差异有极显著意义( F=16.67, P< 0.01); RT PCR/Southern杂交结果显示,有淋巴结转移较无淋巴结转移的非小细胞肺癌表达更多的 CD44 mRNA异常转录子(χ 2=12.13, P< 0.01)。结论: CD44蛋白和基因在人非小细胞肺癌中出现异常表达,这种异常表达在人非小细胞肺癌的发展和淋巴结转移中起重要作用。检测 CD44蛋白和基因的表达,可能对判断非小细胞肺癌病人的预后、预测淋巴结的转移趋势 ,具有重要的临床意义。%Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the abnormal expressions of CD44 protein and gene, relationship between the abnormal expressions of CD44 protein and gene and lymph node metastasis of human lung carcinomas. Methods: SP immunohistochemistry and RT PCR/Southern methods were used to investigate the expressions of CD44 protein and gene of human lung carcinomas. The immunohistochemistry results were quantitatively analyzed with QTM970 computed image analyzer. Results: SP immunohistochemistry results and quantitative analysis revealed that stronger expression of CD44 protein was observed in non small cell lung carcinomas than in para carcinomatous pulmonary tissues, in non small cell lung carcinomas with lymph node metastasis than in non small cell lung carcinomas without lymph node metastasis

  16. Dissection of Genetic Mechanism of Abnormal Heading in Hybrid Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-jun; QU Li-jun; XIANG Chao; WANG Hui; XIA Jia-fa; LI Ze-fu; GAO Yong-ming; SHI Ying-yao

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal heading in hybrid rice production has caused great economic loss in recent years, but the genetic basis of this phenomenon remains elusive. In this study, we developed four testcross populations using 38 introgression lines (ILs) from Shuhui 527 (SH527)/Fuhui 838 (FH838)//SH527 population as male parents and four male sterile lines (MSLs; namely II-32A, Xieqingzao A, Gang 46A and Jin 23A) as female parents. Progeny testing allowed us to identify 55 abnormal heading combinations in Hefei, but had late heading date in Hangzhou and Guangzhou of China. By one-and two-way analysis of variance, a total of 21 QTLs and 31 pairs of epistatic QTLs associated with photosensitivity were identified in the four populations, respectively. Genotypic analysis showed that the IL parent of most abnormal heading combinations showed some introgressions at markers RM331 and RM3395 on chromosome 8 (strongly associated with the known genes OsHAP3H/DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1) of donor FH838 alleles, and these two markers were also identified as affecting photosensitivity. The observation that the recipient parent (SH527), donor parent (FH838), their testcross combinations with four MSLs, and the IL parents of abnormal heading combinations had normal heading date in Hefei suggested that OsHAP3H/DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1 showed no independent regulation on abnormal heading in the abnormal heading combinations. It is noteworthy that complex epistasis among RM331 or RM3395 with other loci, including dominant × additive, additive × dominant, and dominant × dominant epistases, were identified only in the four testcross populations of the current study, but not in the SH527/FH838//SH527 population, suggesting the cause of abnormal heading in abnormal heading combinations in Hefei and delayed heading in Hangzhou and Guangzhou.

  17. Drug dosage recommendations in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periáñez-Párraga, Leonor; Martínez-López, Iciar; Ventayol-Bosch, Pere; Puigventós-Latorre, Francesc; Delgado-Sánchez, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Chronic liver diseases (CLD) alter the kinetics of drugs. Despite dosage adjustment is based on Child-Pugh scores, there are no available recommendations and/or algorithms of reference to facilitate dosage regimens. A literature review about dose adjustment of the drugs from the hospital guide -which are included in the list of the WHO recommended drugs to be avoided or used with caution in patients with liver disease- was carried out. The therapeutic novelties from the last few years were also included. In order to do so, the summary of product characteristics (SPC), the database DrugDex-Micromedex, the WHO recommendations and the review articles from the last 10 years in Medline were reviewed. Moreover, the kinetic parameters of each drug were calculated with the aim of establishing a theoretical recommendation based on the proposal of Delcò and Huet. Recommendations for 186 drugs are presented according to the SPC (49.5%), DrugDex-Micromedex (26.3%) and WHO (18.8%) indications; six recommendations were based on specific publications; the theoretical recommendation based on pharmacokinetic parameters was proposed in four drugs. The final recommendations for clinical management were: dosage modification (26.9%), hepatic/analytical monitoring of the patient (8.6%), contraindication (18.8%), use with caution (19.3%) and no adjustment required (26.3%). In this review, specific recommendations for the practical management of patients with chronic liver disease are presented. It has been elaborated through a synthesis of the published bibliography and completed by following a theoretical methodology.

  18. Placental Abnormalities and Preeclampsia in Trisomy 13 Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Women who are carrying a trisomy 13 fetus are prone to have an abnormal placenta as well as to develop preeclampsia in the second and third trimesters. This article provides a comprehensive review of placental abnormalities, such as small placental volume, reduced placental vascularization, a partial molar appearance of the placenta and placental mesenchymal dysplasia, and preeclampsia associated with trisomy 13 pregnancies. The candidate preeclampsia-causing genes on chromosome 13, such as sFlt1, COL4A2 and periostin, are discussed.

  19. The impact of neuroleptic dosage and extrapyramidal side effects on schizophrenic basic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Andresen, B

    2000-01-01

    The impact of neuroleptic medication and extrapyramidal symptoms on abnormal subjective experiences in schizophrenia, also termed basic symptoms, as assessed with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) was investigated in 40 schizophrenic patients medicated with conventional neuroleptics. Basic symptoms are thought to reflect the subjective side of schizophrenic vulnerability and to underlie schizophrenic symptomatology. It was expected that basic symptoms would inversely correlate with chlorpromazine equivalents, since neuroleptics not only improve acute schizophrenic symptoms but also have prophylactic properties. However, a significant positive correlation with neuroleptic dosage and extrapyramidal symptoms emerged, suggesting that basic symptoms as operationalized in the FCQ partly reflect neuroleptic-induced deficits. The results remained unchanged when global psychopathology was controlled for. In line with previous research, basic symptoms correlated with thought disorder but not with positive symptoms. However, when the effects of neuroleptic-induced disturbances were controlled for, thought disorder also insignificantly correlated with basic symptoms. Our findings confirm previous results that question the construct validity of the FCQ. Moreover, the need to control for confounding variables (such as medication) is emphasized by comparing different psychiatric groups.

  20. On p53 revival using system oriented drug dosage design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Azam, Shumaila; Bhatti, A I; Azam, Rizwan; Ullah, Mukhtar; Fazal, Sahar

    2017-02-21

    We propose a new paradigm in the drug design for the revival of the p53 pathway in cancer cells. It is shown that the current strategy of using small molecule based Mdm2 inhibitors is not enough to adequately revive p53 in cancerous cells, especially when it comes to the extracting pulsating behavior of p53. This fact has come to notice when a novel method for the drug dosage design is introduced using system oriented concepts. As a test case, small molecule drug Mdm2 repressor Nutlin 3a is considered. The proposed method determines the dose of Nutlin to revive p53 pathway functionality. For this purpose, PBK dynamics of Nutlin have also been integrated with p53 pathway model. The p53 pathway is the focus of researchers for the last thirty years for its pivotal role as a frontline cancer suppressant protein due to its effect on cell cycle checkpoints and cell apoptosis in response to a DNA strand break. That is the reason for finding p53 being absent in more than 50% of tumor cancers. Various drugs have been proposed to revive p53 in cancer cells. Small molecule based drugs are at the foremost and are the subject of advanced clinical trials. The dosage design of these drugs is an important issue. We use control systems concepts to develop the drug dosage so that the cancer cells can be treated in appropriate time. We investigate by using a computational model how p53 protein responds to drug Nutlin 3a, an agent that interferes with the MDM2-mediated p53 regulation. The proposed integrated model describes in some detail the regulation network of p53 including the negative feedback loop mediated by MDM2 and the positive feedback loop mediated by Mdm2 mRNA as well as the reversible represses of MDM2 caused by Nutlin. The reported PBK dynamics of Nutlin 3a are also incorporated to see the full effect. It has been reported that p53 response to stresses in two ways. Either it has a sustained (constant) p53 response, or there are oscillations in p53 concentration. The

  1. 3种微生物诱导的家蚕attacin基因异常表达形式的研究%Abnormal Expression of Silkworm Attacin Gene Induced by 3 Kinds of Microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔卫青; 杨金宏

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this research was to study the expression of silkworm attacin gene induced by some different microorganisms. [Method] Three kinds of microorganism, BmNPV, JM109 and Agrobacterium LBA4404, were ingested to silkworm and the expression profile of attacin gene in hemocyte and fat body was detected by semi-quantitative PCR. And subsequently, the PCR products were cloned and sequenced for further analysis. [Result] A specific band, about 800 bp, appeared in fat body of all induced silkworms. As indicated by the results of cloning and sequencing (GenBank accession number: FJ373019), the band was produced because the 2 introns existing in normal expression form were not spliced. Furthermore, when the extended expression sequence was translated into amino acids, the translation stopped earlier by the stop codon TGA at the 5' end of the first intron of the original sequence, leading the loss of attacin C terminus. [Conclusion] There were two splicesomes of attacin gene, which had reference value to study the role of the attacin gene in silkworm immunity.

  2. ABNORMAL TYPE-III COLLAGEN PRODUCED BY AN EXON-17-SKIPPING MUTATION OF THE COL3A1 GENE IN EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME TYPE-IV IS NOT INCORPORATED INTO THE EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHIODO, AA; SILLENCE, DO; COLE, WG; BATEMAN, JF

    1995-01-01

    A novel heterozygous mutation of the COL3Al gene that encodes the alpha 1(III) chains of type III collagen was identified in a family with the: acrogeric form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Cultured dermal fibroblasts produced normal and shortened alpha 1(III) chains. The triple helix o

  3. Research of abnormal changes of APC and DCC gene in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer%大肠癌发生发展过程中APC和DCC基因异常改变的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李圆圆; 杨玉秀

    2008-01-01

    Objective To approach the effect of APC gene and DCC gene in the pathogenetie process of eoloreetal cancer,and to offer theoretical evidence to clinical diagnosis and therapy by detecting the expression of APC gene and DCC gene in nor-real cases ,eoloreetal adenoma and colorectal cancer. Methods Tissue samples were collected from 37 cases of eoloreetal canc-er,22 cases of eolorectal adenoma and 12 cases normal controls. Tissue DNA was extracted and APC and DCC gene mutation were detected with PCR -SSCP. Results The mutation rate of APC gene and DCC gene in coloreetal cancer were 37.8% (14/37)and 51.3% (19/37) ,respectively,and the mutation rate of APC gene and DCC gene in colorectal adenoma were 27.3% (6/22)and 22.7% (5/22). None mutation was detected in 12 normal controls. There was some relation between DCC gene mutation and the histological differentiated degree, the lower the histological differentiated degree, the higher mutation rate (P < 0.05). Con-dusion The mutation of APC and DCC hare occurred in the early stage of colorectal cancer and might be the early diagnostic criteria of clinical application.%目的 探讨APC、DCC基因在正常大肠组织、腺瘤及癌组织中的表达情况,分析其相互作用关系,探讨其发病机制,为临床早期诊断和治疗提供实验依据.方法 从37例大肠癌、22例大肠腺瘤以及12例正常对照者的大肠组织中分别提取DNA,应用PCR-SSCP法检测组织中APC、DCC基因突变情况.结果 37例大肠癌组织中APC基因突变率为37.8%(14/37),DCC基因突变率为51.3%(19/37);22例大肠腺瘤组织中APC基因突变率为27.3%(6/22),DCC基因突变率为22.7%(5/22);12例正常组织中APC、DCC基因突变率为0.DCC基因突变与组织分化程度有关,分化程度越低,突变率越高(P<0.05).结论 APC及DCC基因突变发生在大肠癌的早期阶段,有可能作为早期诊断指标应用于临床.

  4. Avian sex, sex chromosomes, and dosage compensation in the age of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2014-04-01

    Comparisons of the sex chromosome systems in birds and mammals are widening our view and deepening our understanding of vertebrate sex chromosome organization, function, and evolution. Birds have a very conserved ZW system of sex determination in which males have two copies of a large, gene-rich Z chromosome, and females have a single Z and a female-specific W chromosome. The avian ZW system is quite the reverse of the well-studied mammalian XY chromosome system, and evolved independently from different autosomal blocs. Despite the different gene content of mammal and bird sex chromosomes, there are many parallels. Genes on the bird Z and the mammal X have both undergone selection for male-advantage functions, and there has been amplification of male-advantage genes and accumulation of LINEs. The bird W and mammal Y have both undergone extensive degradation, but some birds retain early stages and some mammals terminal stages of the process, suggesting that the process is more advanced in mammals. Different sex-determining genes, DMRT1 and SRY, define the ZW and XY systems, but DMRT1 is involved in downstream events in mammals. Birds show strong cell autonomous specification of somatic sex differences in ZZ and ZW tissue, but there is growing evidence for direct X chromosome effects on sexual phenotype in mammals. Dosage compensation in birds appears to be phenotypically and molecularly quite different from X inactivation, being partial and gene-specific, but both systems use tools from the same molecular toolbox and there are some signs that galliform birds represent an early stage in the evolution of a coordinated system.

  5. Nail abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C; Cribier, B; Sibilia, J; Kuntz, J L; Grosshans, E

    1997-12-01

    Many nail abnormalities have traditionally been described in association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their specificity has never been assessed in a controlled study. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency and the specificity of nail changes associated with RA in a case-controlled study including 50 patients suffering from RA and 50 controls. For each patient, a general skin examination was performed and the 20 nails were examined. The nail features were noted and classified. A chi 2 test or a Fisher test was used to compare the two groups. The only nail abnormalities significantly associated with RA were longitudinal ridging on nine or 10 finger nails (29 patients in the RA group vs. three in the controls, chi 2: P nail (24 patients vs. 10, chi 2: P nail changes were noticed but were not frequent enough to be significant. The presence of longitudinal ridging on the finger nails was significantly associated with RA.

  6. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  7. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  8. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  9. Increased Maternal Genome Dosage Bypasses the Requirement of the FIS Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Seed Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kradolfer, David; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Seed development in flowering plants is initiated after a double fertilization event with two sperm cells fertilizing two female gametes, the egg cell and the central cell, leading to the formation of embryo and endosperm, respectively. In most species the endosperm is a polyploid tissue inheriting two maternal genomes and one paternal genome. As a consequence of this particular genomic configuration the endosperm is a dosage sensitive tissue, and changes in the ratio of maternal to paternal contributions strongly impact on endosperm development. The FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED (FIS) Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is essential for endosperm development; however, the underlying forces that led to the evolution of the FIS-PRC2 remained unknown. Here, we show that the functional requirement of the FIS-PRC2 can be bypassed by increasing the ratio of maternal to paternal genomes in the endosperm, suggesting that the main functional requirement of the FIS-PRC2 is to balance parental genome contributions and to reduce genetic conflict. We furthermore reveal that the AGAMOUS LIKE (AGL) gene AGL62 acts as a dosage-sensitive seed size regulator and that reduced expression of AGL62 might be responsible for reduced size of seeds with increased maternal genome dosage. PMID:23326241

  10. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  11. Research progress of mitotic arrest deficient gene abnormalities in tumor%有丝分裂阻滞缺陷基因异常在肿瘤中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙倩(综述); 张显玉(综述); 庞达(审校)

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint ( SAC) is an important monitoring mechanism to monitor the connection between centromeres and microtubules and to ensure proper chromosome separation in human .Mitotic arrest defective protein(Mad)family,as an important part of SAC,plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis. Mutations or altered expressions of Mad may lead to abnormal separations of chromosomes and play a partial role in tumorigenesis ,poor prognosis and chemotherapy drug resistance .%纺锤体组装检验点( Spindle assembly checkpoint ,SAC)是机体有丝分裂的重要监控机制,能够监控着丝点与微管之间的连接,确保染色体正确分离。有丝分裂阻滞缺陷家族蛋白( Mitotic arrest defi-cient protein,Mad)作为SAC的重要组成部分,其主要在正常有丝分裂过程中发挥作用。 Mad家族基因突变或蛋白表达异常可能导致染色体异常分离,在促使肿瘤发生、预示肿瘤预后不良、化疗药物耐药等方面都起到一定作用。

  12. Mutations in the BLOC-1 Subunits Dysbindin and Muted Generate Divergent and Dosage-dependent Phenotypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Jennifer; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Gokhale, Avanti; Tornieri, Karine; Singleton, Kaela S.; Mullin, Ariana P.; Tang, Junxia; Talbot, Konrad; Faundez, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Post-mortem analysis has revealed reduced levels of the protein dysbindin in the brains of those suffering from the neurodevelopmental disorder schizophrenia. Consequently, mechanisms controlling the cellular levels of dysbindin and its interacting partners may participate in neurodevelopmental processes impaired in that disorder. To address this question, we studied loss of function mutations in the genes encoding dysbindin and its interacting BLOC-1 subunits. We focused on BLOC-1 mutants affecting synapse composition and function in addition to their established systemic pigmentation, hematological, and lung phenotypes. We tested phenotypic homogeneity and gene dosage effects in the mouse null alleles muted (Bloc1s5mu/mu) and dysbindin (Bloc1s8sdy/sdy). Transcripts of NMDA receptor subunits and GABAergic interneuron markers, as well as expression of BLOC-1 subunit gene products, were affected differently in the brains of Bloc1s5mu/mu and Bloc1s8sdy/sdy mice. Unlike Bloc1s8sdy/sdy, elimination of one or two copies of Bloc1s5 generated indistinguishable pallidin transcript phenotypes. We conclude that monogenic mutations abrogating the expression of a protein complex subunit differentially affect the expression of other complex transcripts and polypeptides as well as their downstream effectors. We propose that the genetic disruption of different subunits of protein complexes and combinations thereof diversifies phenotypic presentation of pathway deficiencies, contributing to the wide phenotypic spectrum and complexity of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24713699

  13. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Nair, Anita; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Groot, D W; Kopp, Sabine; Langguth, Peter; Polli, James E; Shah, Vinod P; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2013-02-01

    Literature data pertaining to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence testing for the approval of immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing efavirenz as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. Because of lack of conclusive data about efavirenz's permeability and its failure to comply with the "high solubility" criteria according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), the API can be classified as BCS Class II/IV. In line with the solubility characteristics, the innovator product does not meet the dissolution criteria for a "rapidly dissolving product." Furthermore, product variations containing commonly used excipients or in the manufacturing process have been reported to impact the rate and extent of efavirenz absorption. Despite its wide therapeutic index, subtherapeutic levels of efavirenz can lead to treatment failure and also facilitate the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants. For all these reasons, a biowaiver for IR solid oral dosage forms containing efavirenz as the sole API is not scientifically justified for reformulated or multisource drug products.

  14. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: metronidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediguieri, Camila F; Porta, Valentina; G Nunes, Diana S; Nunes, Taina M; Junginger, Hans E; Kopp, Sabine; Midha, Kamal K; Shah, Vinod P; Stavchansky, Salomon; Dressman, Jennifer B; Barends, Dirk M

    2011-05-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing metronidazole are reviewed. Metronidazole can be assigned to Biopharmaceutics Classification System Class I. Most BE studies that were identified reported the investigated formulations to be bioequivalent, indicating the risk of bioinequivalence to be low. Formulations showing differences in bioavailability showed dissimilarities in in vitro dissolution profiles. Furthermore, metronidazole has a wide therapeutic index. It is concluded that a biowaiver for solid IR formulations is justified, provided: (a) the test product and its comparator are both rapidly dissolving; (b) meet similarity of the dissolution profiles at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8; (c) the test product contains only excipients present in IR drug products approved in International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) or associated countries in the same dosage form; and (d) if the test product contains sorbitol, sodium laurilsulfate, or propylene glycol, the test product needs to be qualitatively and quantitatively identical to its comparator with respect to these excipients [corrected]..

  15. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry.

  16. Stability of pharmaceutical salts in solid oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Haichen; Byrn, Stephen R; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2017-03-09

    Using pharmaceutical salts in solid dosage forms can raise stability concerns, especially salt dissociation which can adversely affect the product performance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the salt instability encountered in solid state formulations is imperative to ensure the product quality. The present article uses the fundamental theory of acid base, ionic equilibrium, relationship of pH and solubility as a starting point to illustrate and interpret the salt formation and salt disproportionation in pharmaceutical systems. The criteria of selecting the optimal salt form and the underlying theory of salt formation and disproportionation are reviewed in detail. Factors influencing salt stability in solid dosage forms are scrutinized and discussed with the case studies. In addition, both commonly used and innovative strategies for preventing salt dissociations in formulation, on storage, and during manufacturing will be suggested herein. This article will provide formulation scientists and manufacturing engineers an insight into the mechanisms of salt disproportionation and salt formation, which can help them avoid and solve the instability issues of pharmaceutical salts in the product design.

  17. Blue light dosage affects carotenoids and tocopherols in microgreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuolienė, Giedrė; Viršilė, Akvilė; Brazaitytė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Julė; Sakalauskienė, Sandra; Vaštakaitė, Viktorija; Novičkovas, Algirdas; Viškelienė, Alina; Sasnauskas, Audrius; Duchovskis, Pavelas

    2017-08-01

    Mustard, beet and parsley were grown to harvest time under selected LEDs: 638+660+731+0% 445nm; 638+660+731+8% 445nm; 638+660+731+16% 445nm; 638+660+731+25% 445nm; 638+660+731+33% 445nm. From 1.2 to 4.3 times higher concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids, α- and β-carotenes, lutein, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin was found under blue 33% treatment in comparison to lower blue light dosages. Meanwhile, the accumulation of metabolites, which were not directly connected with light reactions, such as tocopherols, was more influenced by lower (16%) blue light dosage, increasing about 1.3 times. Thus, microgreen enrichment of carotenoid and xanthophyll pigments may be achieved using higher (16-33%) blue light intensities. Changes in metabolite quantities were not the result of changes of other carotenoid concentration, but were more influenced by light treatment and depended on the species. Significant quantitative changes in response to blue light percentage were obtained for both directly and not directly light-dependent metabolite groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4–2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mu~{\\rm l}/{\\rm MHz}$\\end{document} for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mu~{\\rm l}/{\\rm MHz}$\\end{document} sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring. PMID:27170865

  19. Aceclofenac topical dosage forms: in vitro and in vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Kamal; Pabreja, Kavita; Ramana, Malipeddi Venkata

    2010-12-01

    Aceclofenac is a new generation non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug showing effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. It is available in the form of tablets of 100 mg. Importance of aceclofenac as a NSAID has inspired development of topical dosage forms. This mode of administration may help avoid typical side effects associated with oral administration of NSAIDs, which have led to its withdrawal. Furthermore, aceclofenac topical dosage forms can be used as a supplement to oral therapy for better treatment of conditions such as arthritis. Ointments, creams, and gels containing 1% (m/m) aceclofenac have been prepared. They were tested for physical appearance, pH, spreadability, extrudability, drug content uniformity, in vitro diffusion and in vitro permeation. Gels prepared using Carbopol 940 (AF2, AF3) and macrogol bases (AF7) were selected after the analysis of the results. They were evaluated for acute skin irritancy, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects using the carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema method. AF2 was shown to be significantly (p < 0.05) more effective in inhibiting hyperalgesia associated with inflammation, compared to AF3 and AF7. Hence, AF2 may be suggested as an alternative to oral preparations.

  20. The VviMYB80 Gene is Abnormally Expressed in Vitis vinifera L. cv. 'Zhong Shan Hong' and its Expression in Tobacco Driven by the 35S Promoter Causes Male Sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huan; Yu, Xiaojuan; Yuan, Yue; Zhang, Yaguang; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Jiyu; Zhang, Meng; Ji, Chenfei; Liu, Qian; Tao, Jianmin

    2016-03-01

    Anther development is a very precise and complicated process. In Arabidopsis, the AtMYB80 transcription factor regulates genes involved in pollen development and controls the timing of tapetal programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, we isolated and characterized cDNA for VviMYB80 expressed in flower buds of male-sterile Vitis vinifera L. cv. 'Zhong Shan Hong', a late-maturing cultivar derived from self-progeny of cv. 'Wink'. VviMYB80 belongs to the MYB80 subfamily and clusters with AtMYB35/TDF1 in a distinct clade. We found that in flower buds, expression of the VviMYB80 gene in cv. 'Zhong Shan Hong' sharply increased at the tetrad stage, resulting in a higher and earlier transcript level than that found in cv. 'Wink'. Expression of the VviMYB80 gene, driven by the 35S promoter, caused pleiotropic effects on the stamens, including smaller and shriveled anthers, delayed dehiscence, fewer seeds, shorter anther filaments, distorted pollen shape and a lack of cytoplasm, with the tapetum exhibiting hypertrophy in transformed tobacco. These results suggest that VviMYB80 may play an important role in stamen development and that expression of VviMYB80 driven by the 35S promoter in tobacco induces male sterility. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Principles of gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  2. Divergent actions of long noncoding RNAs on X-chromosome remodelling in mammals and Drosophila achieve the same end result: dosage compensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhash C. Lakhotia

    2015-12-01

    Organisms with heterochromatic sex chromosomes need to compensate for differences in dosages of the sex chromosome-linked genes that have somatic functions. In-depth cytological and subsequent biochemical and molecular studies on dosage compensation started with Mary F. Lyon’s proposal in early 1960s that the Barr body in female mammalian somatic cells represented one of the randomly inactivated and heterochromatinized X chromosomes. In contrast, Drosophila was soon shown to achieve dosage compensation through hypertranscription of single X in male whose chromatin remains more open. Identification of proteins that remodel chromatin either to cause one of the two X chromosomes in somatic cells of very early female mammalian embryos to become condensed and inactive or to remodel the single X in male Drosophila embryos to a more open state for hypertranscription provided important insights into the underlying cellular epigenetic processes. However, the most striking and unexpected discoveries were the identification of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), X- inactive specific transcript (Xist) in mammals and roX1/2 in Drosophila, which were essential for achieving the contrasting chromatin organizations but leading to similar end result in terms of dosage compensation of X-linked genes in females and males. An overview of the processes of X inactivation or hyperactivation in mammals and Drosophila, respectively, and the roles played by Xist, roX1/2 and other lncRNAs in these events is presented.

  3. [Increasing dosage: a momentous proposition to improve therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao-He; Yan, Dan; Jin, Cheng; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2008-02-01

    To explore a key approach for improving therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine by means of increasing its dosage. The rationality, necessity and feasibility of this proposition were explained and verified by the retrospective and prospective analysis about the current situation of therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine, the relationship between dosage and therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine, the rationality of conventional dosage specification. The unremarkable therapeutic efficacy was the main reason of traditional Chinese medicine to be denounced frequently, which was heavily due to its low dosage. However, many cases showed excellent therapeutic efficacy if a big dosage was used. Compared with the clinical dosage of western medicine and curative dose of active substance from traditional Chinese medicine or crude drugs, the specification of the conventional dosage of traditional Chinese medicine failed to be rigorous and objective. The viewpoint of "Cooking pot size limitation" and "Human stomach size limitation" may be the bottleneck which restricted the increase of traditional dosage. In conclusion, to increase the dosage of traditional Chinese medicine and elucidate the relationship between dosage and therapeutic efficacy would be a momentous and essential method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine.

  4. Condensin-mediated chromosome organization and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Christine Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms sexual fate is determined by a chromosome-based method which entails a difference in sex chromosome-linked gene dosage. Consequently, a gene regulatory mechanism called dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Dosage compensation initiates as cells transition from pluripotency to differentiation. In C. elegans, dosage compensation is achieved by the dosage compensation complex (DCC binding to both X chromosomes in hermaphrodites to downregulate gene expression by two fold. The DCC contains a subcomplex (condensin IDC similar to the evolutionarily conserved condensin complexes which play a fundamental role in chromosome dynamics during mitosis. Therefore, mechanisms related to mitotic chromosome condensation are hypothesized to mediate dosage compensation. Consistent with this hypothesis, monomethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20 is increased, whereas acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 is decreased, both on mitotic chromosomes and on interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes in worms. These observations suggest that interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes maintain some characteristics associated with condensed mitotic chromosome. This chromosome state is stably propagated from one cell generation to the next. In this review we will speculate on how the biochemical activities of condensin can achieve both mitotic chromosome compaction and gene repression.

  5. Fibrillin abnormalities and prognosis in Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, T.; Furthmayr, H.; Francke, U.; Gasner, C. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)

    1995-08-28

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem autosomal-dominant disorder, is characterized by mutations of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene and by abnormal patterns of synthesis, secretion, and matrix deposition of the fibrillin protein. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of fibrillin protein abnormalities in the diagnosis of MFS, we studied dermal fibroblasts from 57 patients with classical MFS, 15 with equivocal MFS, 8 with single-organ manifestations, and 16 with other connective tissue disorders including homocystinuria and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism was identified in 70 samples that were classified into four different groups based on quantitation of fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition. Significant correlations were found for phenotypic features including arachnodactyly, striae distensae, cardiovascular manifestations, and fibrillin groups II and IV, which included 70% of the MFS patients. In addition, these two groups were associated with shortened {open_quotes}event-free{close_quotes} survival and more severe cardiovascular complications than groups I and III. The latter included most of the equivocal MFS/single manifestation patients with fibrillin abnormalities. Our results indicate that fibrillin defects at the protein level per se are not specific for MFS, but that the drastically reduced fibrillin deposition, caused by a dominant-negative effect of abnormal fibrillin molecules in individuals defined as groups II and IV, is of prognostic and possibly diagnostic significance. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... conditions: Abnormal folds or location of the pinna Low-set ears No opening to the ear canal ...

  7. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy individuals with background of diabetic sibling. ... As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of ... Article Metrics.

  8. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • ...

  9. [Phenomenology of abnormal body perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M L

    1983-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problematic nature of the phenomenological grasping of the consciousness of the body and its pathological modifications. The reasoning is oriented by the doctrine of Husserl of the so-called sentiments as the fundamentals of the experience of the own body. This basic approach does not only seem to be basically for a psychology of the consciousness of the body, but also to give the theoretical-conceptual structure for a great number of psychopathological modifications. Subsequent to a criticism of the conventional use of the term 'hallucination of the body' we attempt to chart elements of a scheme of the abnormal consciousness of the body.

  10. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  11. Microarray-based analysis for hepatocellular carcinoma: From gene expression profiling to new challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka Midorikawa; Masatoshi Makuuchi; Wei Tang; Hiroyuki Aburatani

    2007-01-01

    Accumulation of mutations and alterations in the expression of various genes result in carcinogenesis, and the development of microarray technology has enabled us to identify the comprehensive gene expression alterations in oncogenesis. Many studies have applied this technology for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and identified a number of candidate genes useful as biomarkers in cancer staging, prediction of recurrence and prognosis, and treatment selection. Some of these target molecules have been used to develop new serum diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets against HCC to benefit patients. Previously, we compared gene expression profiling data with classification based on clinicopathological features, such as hepatitis viral infection or liver cancer progression. The next era of gene expression analysis will require systematic integration of expression profiles with other types of biological information, such as genomic locus, gene function, and sequence information. We have reported integration between expression profiles and locus information, which is effective in detecting structural genomic abnormalities, such as chromosomal gains and losses, in which we showed that gene expression profiles are subject to chromosomal bias. Furthermore, array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis and allelic dosage analysis using genotyping arrays for HCC were also reviewed, with comparison of conventional methods.

  12. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: cimetidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantratid, E; Prakongpan, S; Dressman, J B; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Barends, D M

    2006-05-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing cimetidine are reviewed. According to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), cimetidine would be assigned to Class III. Cimetidine's therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions, and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems were also taken into consideration. On the basis of the overall evidence, a biowaiver can be recommended for cimetidine IR products, provided that the test product contains only those excipients reported in this paper in their usual amounts, and that the test and the comparator drug products both are "rapidly dissolving" as per BCS.

  13. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: furosemide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, G E; Longhi, M R; Mora, M J; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2010-06-01

    Literature and new experimental data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing furosemide are reviewed. The available data on solubility, oral absorption, and permeability are sufficiently conclusive to classify furosemide into Class IV of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Furosemide's therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems are also taken into consideration. In view of the data available, it is concluded that the biowaiver procedure cannot be justified for either the registration of new multisource drug products or major postapproval changes (variations) to existing drug products.

  14. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthast, H; Dressman, J B; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Oeser, H; Shah, V P; Vogelpoel, H; Barends, D M

    2005-10-01

    Literature data are reviewed on the properties of ibuprofen related to the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Ibuprofen was assessed to be a BCS class II drug. Differences in composition and/or manufacturing procedures were reported to have an effect on the rate, but not the extent of absorption; such differences are likely to be detectable by comparative in vitro dissolution tests. Also in view of its therapeutic use, its wide therapeutic index and uncomplicated pharmacokinetic properties, a biowaiver for immediate release (IR) ibuprofen solid oral drug products is scientifically justified, provided that the test product contains only those excipients reported in this paper in their usual amounts, the dosage form is rapidly dissolving (85% in 30 min or less) in buffer pH 6.8 and the test product also exhibits similar dissolution profiles to the reference product in buffer pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8.

  15. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: acetazolamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, G E; Longhi, M R; Becker, C; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2008-09-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing acetazolamide are reviewed. Acetazolamide's solubility and permeability characteristics according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), as well as its therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems are taken into consideration. The available data on solubility, on oral absorption and permeability are not sufficiently conclusive to classify acetazolamide with certainty. Taking a conservative approach, no biowaiver is considered justified for the registration of new multisource drug products. However, SUPAC level 1 and level 2 postapproval changes and most EU Type I variations can be approved waiving in vivo BE studies.

  16. SILYMARIN FOOD SUPPLEMENTS – ORAL SOLID DOSAGE FORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELICIA G. GLIGOR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several tablet formulations containing silymarin were developed, in order to meet the requirements of different markets. Milk thistle - Silybum marianum (L. Gaertn – standardized extracts have proven their positive effect on liver functionality plus other health benefits. Lactose is a widely used excipient for the production of oral solid dosage forms. One important inconvenient of lactose is related to the lactose intolerant potential customers. Cellulose, isomalt and dicalcium phosphate have been selected as alternative possible tablet binders and diluents. Laboratory and pilot batches were studied for each excipient. The pharmacotechnical properties and silybin content of the tablets were measured and recorded in accordance to the European Pharmacopoeia. All pilot batches had results in the desired range of values in order to permit large scale compacting and blistering of the tablets. Currently the formulations containing isomalt and dicalcium phosphate that made the subject of this study are being produced on industrial scale.

  17. Nanofibrous solid dosage form of living bacteria prepared by electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Wagner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the suitability of electrospinning for biodrug delivery and to develop an electrospinning-based method to produce vaginal drug delivery systems. Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria were encapsulated into nanofibers of three different polymers (polyvinyl alcohol and polyvinylpyrrolidone with two different molar masses. Shelf life of the bacteria could be enhanced by the exclusion of water and by preparing a solid dosage form, which is an advantageous and patient-friendly way of administration. The formulations were stored at –20, 7 and 25°C, respectively. Viability testing showed that the nanofibers can provide long term stability for huge amounts of living bacteria if they are kept at (or below 7°C. Furthermore, all kinds of nanowebs prepared in this work dissolved instantly when they got in contact with water, thus the developed biohybrid nanowebs can provide new potential ways for curing bacterial vaginosis.

  18. Genetic variants associated with warfarin dosage in Kuwaiti population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Sumi Elsa; Antony, Dinu; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Hebbar, Prashantha; Alkayal, Fadi; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Alsmadi, Osama; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2017-06-01

    Assessing the distinct prevalence or absence of genetic variants associated with differential response to the anticoagulant medication of warfarin in different population groups is actively pursued by pharmacogenomics community. Populations from Arabian Peninsula are underrepresented in such studies. By way of examining exome- and genome-wide genotype data from 1395 Arab individuals in Kuwait, we report distinct occurrence of warfarin response-related variants rs12460590_A/CYP2A7, rs2108622_T/CYP4F2, rs2884737_C/VKORC1 and distinct absence of rs11150606_C/PRSS53 in Kuwaiti population. The presented results in conjunction with similar literature reports on Qatari population enhance the worldwide understanding on population-specific distributions of genetic variants associated with warfarin drug dosage.

  19. Spectrophotometric estimation of pioglitazone hydrochloride in tablet dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basniwal Pawan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, rapid, and precise methods - linear regression equation (LRE and standard absorptivity - were developed and validated for the estimation of pioglitazone hydrochloride in tablet dosage form. The maximum absorbance (lmax of pioglitazone hydrochloride was found to be 269.8 nm in methanol:water:hydrochloric acid (250:250:1. Beer-Lambert law was obeyed in the concentration range of 10-50 µg/ml, and the standard absorptivity was found to be 253.97 dl/g/cm. Both the methods were validated for linearity, accuracy, precision (days, analysts, and instrument variation, and robustness (solvent composition. The numerical values for all parameters lie within the acceptable limits. Pioglitazone hydrochloride was estimated in the range of 99.58-99.97% by LRE method and 100.25-100.75% by standard absorptivity method. At 99% confidence limit, the F-test value for the methods was found to be 1.8767.

  20. Drug release characteristics of dosage forms:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satinder Kakar; Ramandeep Singh; Alok Semwal

    2014-01-01

    Area of drug delivery is vast, and various advances have been made in the medical field. Besides the versatility in the dosage forms, various orders for the drug release are known, which includes zero order, first order, Higuchi model, Hixon Crowell model and Korsmeyer Peppas model. In vitro dissolution is recognized as an important element in the development of drug. The nature of the drug such as its shape, crystallinity, particle size and solubility reflects the kinetics of the drug. Various models are used to study the dissolution profiles of the new drug substances. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the drug alters the drug release and performance that is action of drug in the body, which is in vivo performance. Various model dependent methods and model independent methods have been taken into consideration for studying the drug release kinetics.

  1. Drug dosage in continuous venoveno hemofiltration in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, Farahnak; Shahrbaf, Fatemeh Ghane

    2016-01-01

    The dosage of drugs in patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy need to be adjusted based on a number of variables that that affect pharmacokinetics (PK) including patient weight, CRRT modality (convention, vs. diffusion), blood and/or effluent flow, hemofilter characteristics, physiochemical drug properties, volume of distribution, protein binding and half-life as well as residual renal function. There is a paucity of data on PK studies in children with acute kidney injury requiring CRRT. When possible, therapeutic drug monitoring should be utilized for those medications where serum drug concentrations can be obtained in a clinically relevant time frame. Also, a patient-centered team approach that includes an intensive care unit pharmacist is recommended to prevent medication-related errors and enhance safe and effective medication use is highly recommended. The aim of this article is to review the current guidelines for drug dosing in critically ill children who require continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

  2. On Regularity of Abnormal Subriemannian Geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Kanghai

    2012-01-01

    We prove the smoothness of abnormal minimizers of subriemannian manifolds of step 3 with a nilpotent basis. We prove that rank 2 Carnot groups of step 4 admit no strictly abnormal minimizers. For any subriemannian manifolds of step less than 7, we show all abnormal minimizers have no corner type singularities, which partly generalize the main result of Leonardi-Monti.

  3. Effects of maternal psychotropic drug dosage on birth outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michielsen LA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura A Michielsen,1 Frank MMA van der Heijden,1 Paddy KC Janssen,2 Harold JH Kuijpers11Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venlo, the Netherlands; 2Department of Pharmacy, VieCuri Medical Centre, Venlo, the NetherlandsBackground: The aim of this retrospective study was to explore the relationship between psychotropic medication dosage and birth outcomes.Methods: A total of 136 women were enrolled, who had an active mental disorder, were taking medication to prevent a relapse, or had a history of postpartum depression or psychosis. Medication use was evaluated for the three trimesters and during labor. Based on the defined daily dose, medication use was classified into three groups. Primary outcome variables included the infant gestational age at birth, birth weight, and Apgar scores at one and 5 minutes.Results: Our study showed a significantly higher incidence of Apgar score ≤7 at 5 minutes in women taking psychotropic drugs as compared with the group taking no medication, respectively (16.3% versus 0.0%, P=0.01. There was no significant difference between the two groups in Apgar score at one minute or in gestational age and birth weight. The results showed no significant differences in gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores for a low–intermediate or high dose of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and for a low or intermediate dose of an antipsychotic.Conclusion: This study does not indicate a relationship between doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antipsychotics and adverse neonatal outcomes.Keywords: pregnancy, psychotropic medication, dosage, birth outcomes

  4. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohin, Igor E; Kulinich, Julia I; Ramenskaya, Galina V; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Kopp, Sabine; Langguth, Peter; Polli, James E; Shah, Vinod P; Groot, D W; Barends, Dirk M; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-02-01

    Literature and experimental data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing piroxicam in the free acid form are reviewed. Piroxicam solubility and permeability, its therapeutic use and therapeutic index, pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA), and corresponding dissolution data are taken into consideration. The available data suggest that according to the current biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and all current guidances, piroxicam would be assigned to BCS Class II. The extent of piroxicam absorption seems not to depend on manufacturing conditions or excipients, so the risk of bioinequivalence in terms of area under the curve (AUC) is very low, but the rate of absorption (i.e., BE in terms of Cmax ) can be affected by the formulation. Current in vitro dissolution methods may not always reflect differences in terms of Cmax for BCS Class II weak acids; however, minor differences in absorption rate of piroxicam would not subject the patient to unacceptable risks: as piroxicam products may be taken before or after meals, the rate of absorption cannot be considered crucial to drug action. Therefore, a biowaiver for IR piroxicam solid oral dosage form is considered feasible, provided that (a) the test product contains only excipients, which are also present in IR solid oral drug products containing piroxicam, which have been approved in ICH or associated countries, for instance, those presented in Table 3 of this paper; (b) both the test and comparator drug products dissolve 85% in 30 min or less at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8; and (c) the test product and comparator show dissolution profile similarity in pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8. When not all of these conditions can be fulfilled, BE of the products should be established in vivo.

  5. Struvite precipitation from urine with electrochemical magnesium dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Alexandra; Udert, Kai M

    2013-01-01

    When magnesium is added to source-separated urine, struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) precipitates and phosphorus can be recovered. Up to now, magnesium salts have been used as the main source of magnesium. Struvite precipitation with these salts works well but is challenging in decentralized reactors, where high automation of the dosage and small reactor sizes are required. In this study, we investigated a novel approach for magnesium dosage: magnesium was electrochemically dissolved from a sacrificial magnesium electrode. We demonstrated that this process is technically simple and economically feasible and thus interesting for decentralized reactors. Linear voltammetry and batch experiments at different anode potentials revealed that the anode potential must be higher than -0.9 V vs. NHE (normal hydrogen electrode) to overcome the strong passivation of the anode. An anode potential of -0.6 V vs. NHE seemed to be suitable for active magnesium dissolution. For 13 subsequent cycles at this potential, we achieved an average phosphate removal rate of 3.7 mg P cm(-2) h(-1), a current density of 5.5 mA cm(-2) and a current efficiency of 118%. Some magnesium carbonate (nesquehonite) accumulated on the anode surface; as a consequence, the current density decreased slightly, but the current efficiency was not affected. The energy consumption for these experiments was 1.7 W h g P(-1). A cost comparison showed that sacrificial magnesium electrodes are competitive with easily soluble magnesium salts such as MgCl(2) and MgSO(4), but are more expensive than dosing with MgO. Energy costs for the electrochemical process were insignificant. Dosing magnesium electrochemically could thus be a worthwhile alternative to dosing magnesium salts. Due to the simple reactor and handling of magnesium, this may well be a particularly interesting approach for decentralized urine treatment.

  6. Abnormal visuomotor processing in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân E. Robson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtle disturbances of visual and motor function are known features of schizophrenia and can greatly impact quality of life; however, few studies investigate these abnormalities using simple visuomotor stimuli. In healthy people, electrophysiological data show that beta band oscillations in sensorimotor cortex decrease during movement execution (event-related beta desynchronisation (ERBD, then increase above baseline for a short time after the movement (post-movement beta rebound (PMBR; whilst in visual cortex, gamma oscillations are increased throughout stimulus presentation. In this study, we used a self-paced visuomotor paradigm and magnetoencephalography (MEG to contrast these responses in patients with schizophrenia and control volunteers. We found significant reductions in the peak-to-peak change in amplitude from ERBD to PMBR in schizophrenia compared with controls. This effect was strongest in patients who made fewer movements, whereas beta was not modulated by movement in controls. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of visual gamma between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that clear abnormalities in basic sensorimotor processing in schizophrenia can be observed using a very simple MEG paradigm.

  7. Up-regulation of a HOXA-PBX3 homeobox-gene signature following down-regulation of miR-181 is associated with adverse prognosis in patients with cytogenetically abnormal AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zejuan; Huang, Hao; Li, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Ping; Arnovitz, Stephen; Radmacher, Michael D; Maharry, Kati; Elkahloun, Abdel; Yang, Xinan; He, Chunjiang; He, Miao; Zhang, Zhiyu; Dohner, Konstanze; Neilly, Mary Beth; Price, Colles; Lussier, Yves A; Zhang, Yanming; Larson, Richard A; Le Beau, Michelle M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Bullinger, Lars; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Lowenberg, Bob; Liu, Paul P; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Rowley, Janet D; Chen, Jianjun

    2012-03-08

    Increased expression levels of miR-181 family members have been shown to be associated with favorable outcome in patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Here we show that increased expression of miR-181a and miR-181b is also significantly (P miR-181b significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited viability/proliferation of leukemic cells and delayed leukemogenesis; such effects could be reversed by forced expression of PBX3. Thus, the up-regulation of the 4 homeobox genes resulting from the down-regulation of miR-181 family members probably contribute to the poor prognosis of patients with nonfavorable CA-AML. Restoring expression of miR-181b and/or targeting the HOXA/PBX3 pathways may provide new strategies to improve survival substantially.

  8. Biliary excretion of diazepam in rats: influence of the route of administration and dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R; Plaa, G L

    1981-01-01

    The biliary excretion of diazepam metabolites was found in rats. Equivalent dosages of diazepam were administered orally and intraperitoneally. The biliary excretion was dose-dependent and was greater following intraperitoneal administration. After intravenous administration, a greater percentage of the diazepam dosage administered was excreted into the bile. Repetitive intravenous administrations yielded results which approached those observed after intraperitoneally administered dosages given as a bolus.

  9. TaS2 nanosheet-based room-temperature dosage meter for nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiyuan He

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A miniature dosage meter for toxic gas is developed based on TaS2 nanosheets, which is capable of indicating the toxic dosage of trace level NO at room temperature. The TaS2 film-based chemiresistor shows an irreversible current response against the exposure of NO. The unique non-recovery characteristic makes the TaS2 film-based device an ideal indicator of total dosage of chronicle exposure.

  10. Evaluation of insecticides in different dosages to control cicadas in parica plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odineila Martins Monteiro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the more efficient and economically viable dosage of chemical insecticide to control Quesada gigas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae nymphs in parica plantations. Three dosages of three products (carbofuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam were tested based on the maximum recommended dosage for the control of cicadas in coffee plants and applied in total area. The dosage of one kilogram of a commercial product based in thiamethoxam per hectare was more efficient economically and environmentally to control nymphs of Q. gigas in parica plantations.

  11. Effect of UV/EB radiation dosages on the properties of nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nik Salleh, Nik Ghazali, E-mail: Nik_Ghazali@nuclearmalaysia.gov.m [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Block 42, Radiation Curing and Synthesis Group, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Firdaus Yhaya, Mohd; Hassan, Azman; Abu Bakar, Aznizam; Mokhtar, Munirah [Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) radiation on the properties of cured nanocomposite coatings. Surface hardness increased with increase in radiation dosages (number of passes) for all samples. This was due to the increase in crosslinking with increase in radiation dosage. Pendulum hardness, gel content, and thumb twist results were analyzed to choose appropriate curing dosage for both curing techniques. The selected dosages were then used to cure coatings for scratch and abrasion resistance tests. It was found that the UV curing produced coatings with better abrasion resistance, whereas EB curing was a more suitable approach for producing scratch resistance coatings.

  12. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  13. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  14. [Natural biopolymers as excipients in medicinal product dosage form. Part I. Soft gelatin capsules as a modern and elegant pharmaceutical dosage form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyński, Łukasz Jerzy; Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj

    2010-01-01

    Soft gelatin capsules (Softgels) are modern and effective pharmaceutical dosage form for the administration of many medicinal products and food supplements formulations. In this short article major advantages and disadvantages of soft gelatin capsules are reviewed. Each step of manufacturing focused on fundamental techniques and requirements for developing and manufacturing technology for soft gelatin capsules is provided. Main role, characteristics, raw material, manufacturing techniques and applications in dosage form of gelatin is discussed. The review of recent advances in softgels are also included.

  15. Abnormal secretion and function of recombinant human factor VII as the result of modification to a calcium binding site caused by a 15-base pair insertion in the F7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, F; Carew, J A; Perry, D J; Hunault, M; Khanduri, U; Perkins, S J; Mannucci, P M; Bauer, K A

    2001-02-15

    A case of a novel mutation in the F7 gene that results in factor VII coagulant activity (VII:c) of less than 1% and VII antigen (VII:Ag) levels of 10% is presented. DNA analysis revealed a homozygous 15-base pair (bp) in-frame insertion-type mutation at nucleotide 10554. This insertion consisted of a duplication of residues leucine (L)213 to aspartic acid (D)217 (leucine, serine, glutamic acid, histidine, and aspartic acid), probably arising by slipped mispairing between 2 copies of a direct repeat (GCGAGCACGAC) separated by 4 bp. Molecular graphic analyses showed that the insertion is located at the surface of the catalytic domain in an exposed loop stabilized by extensive salt-bridge and hydrogen bond formation at which the calcium binding site is located. The mutation probably interferes with protein folding during VII biosynthesis and/or diminishes functional activity through the loss of calcium binding. In vitro expression studies demonstrated that the levels of VII:Ag in lysates of cells transfected with wild type VII (VIIWT) were equivalent to those with mutant type VII (VIIMT), but the level of secreted VIIMT was 5% to 10% that of VIIWT. Pulse chase studies demonstrated that VIIMT did not accumulate intracellularly, and studies with inhibitors of protein degradation showed that recombinant VIIMT was partially degraded in the pre-Golgi compartment. Accordingly, only small amounts of VIIMT with undetectable procoagulant activity were secreted into conditioned media. These results demonstrate that a combination of secretion and functional defects is the mechanism whereby this insertion causes VII deficiency.

  16. Single chromosomal abnormalities in Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panani, Anna D

    2007-01-01

    In Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD), increased proliferation with effective maturation of the myeloid lineage is present, while peripheral leukocytosis, thrombocytosis or elevated red blood cell mass are found. This group of disorders includes polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF). Furthermore, cases that cannot be clearly defined are regarded as unclassified CMPD. In Philadelphia-negative CMPD, recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities occur, but no specific abnormality has been defined to date. Chromosomal abnormalities detected in a neoplastic disease as a sole anomaly are of major importance, possibly constituting primary changes implicated in the initiation or progression of the neoplastic process. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and the type of single chromosomal changes in Philadelphia-negative CMPD patients. By conventional cytogenetics, 245 Philadelphia-negative CMPD cases at diagnosis were investigated for the frequency and the type of single chromosomal aberrations. Seventeen patients presented single chromosomal changes. These aberrations were, according to frequency, +8 (in 3 PV cases, 2 IMF and 2 unclassified myeloproliferative diseases), +13 in 3 cases (IMF, ET and unclassified myeloproliferative disease), monosomy 10 in 2 PV cases, monosomy 14 in one ET patient, +3, -4 and del(11)(q13) in 1 unclassified myeloproliferative disease each and monosomy 7 in 1 IMF case. It is unclear whether these abnormalities found at the time of diagnosis play a role in CMPD. However, since an isolated chromosomal abnormality may be implicated in the initiation of the neoplastic process, the documentation of more cases of CMPD with single abnormalities at the time of diagnosis would facilitate the identification of candidate genes involved in the neoplastic process.

  17. Transcription factor SP4 is a susceptibility gene for bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjin Zhou

    Full Text Available The Sp4 transcription factor plays a critical role for both development and function of mouse hippocampus. Reduced expression of the mouse Sp4 gene results in a variety of behavioral abnormalities relevant to human psychiatric disorders. The human SP4 gene is therefore examined for its association with both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in European Caucasian and Chinese populations respectively. Out of ten SNPs selected from human SP4 genomic locus, four displayed significant association with bipolar disorder in European Caucasian families (rs12668354, p = 0.022; rs12673091, p = 0.0005; rs3735440, p = 0.019; rs11974306, p = 0.018. To replicate the genetic association, the same set of SNPs was examined in a Chinese bipolar case control sample. Four SNPs displayed significant association (rs40245, p = 0.009; rs12673091, p = 0.002; rs1018954, p = 0.001; rs3735440, p = 0.029, and two of them (rs12673091, rs3735440 were shared with positive SNPs from European Caucasian families. Considering the genetic overlap between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we extended our studies in Chinese trios families for schizophrenia. The SNP7 (rs12673091, p = 0.012 also displayed a significant association. The SNP7 (rs12673091 was therefore significantly associated in all three samples, and shared the same susceptibility allele (A across all three samples. On the other hand, we found a gene dosage effect for mouse Sp4 gene in the modulation of sensorimotor gating, a putative endophenotype for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The deficient sensorimotor gating in Sp4 hypomorphic mice was partially reversed by the administration of dopamine D2 antagonist or mood stabilizers. Both human genetic and mouse pharmacogenetic studies support Sp4 gene as a susceptibility gene for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The studies on the role of Sp4 gene in hippocampal development may provide novel insights for the contribution of hippocampal abnormalities in these

  18. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Apa I Gene Polymorphism and Immunological Abnormality in Patients with Vitiligo%白癜风患者维生素D受体Apa I基因多态性及免疫异常的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙越; 韩菁; 吴瑞勤; 谢匡成; 朱光斗; 施伟民

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) Apa Ⅰ gene polymorphism and immunological abnormality on vitiligo patients. Methods VDR genotypes of 46 vitiligo patients and 50 healthy controls were tested by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR- RFLP). We also measured the levels of immunoglobulin IgG, IgM, IgA and complements C3, C4 and T lymphocyte subpopulations CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ of peripheral blood. Results ①There was significant difference in genotype distribution of VDR-Apa Ⅰ polymorphisms between vitiligo patients, whose frequency of aa is higher(P<0.05), and normal controls. ② Vitiligo patients with Aa, aa had higher level of IgA than control cases, and the C3 measured in aa genotype showed the same trend (P<0.01). ③ Compared with normal controls,the percentage of CD3+ was significantly lower in vitiligo patients with aa genotype (P<0.05). Conclusion It suggests that VDR is a susceptible gene for involving in vitiligo, and aa is the susceptible genotype·for vitiligo patients. Immunological abnormality may exist in vitiligo patients with aa genotype. Our study also indicates that the pathogenesis of vitiligo might have some connection with VDR gene and immunological abnormality.%目的 探讨白癜风维生素D(VDR)受体Apa I基因多态性及其与免疫异常的关系.方法 采用聚合酶链反应和限制性片段长度多态性方法,对46例白癜风患者和50例健康人的VDR Apa I基因多态性进行分析,以及各基因型与外周血免疫球蛋白IgA、IgM、IgG,补体C3、C4以及T细胞亚群CD3+、CD4+、CD8+之间的关系.结果 ①VDR-Apa I位点的aa基因型在白癜风患者中出现的频率高于正常对照组(P<.05).②Aa、aa基因型组白癜风患者血清免疫球蛋白IgA水平显著低于正常对照组(P<0.05与P<0.01),aa基因型患者补体C3水平显著低于正常对照组(P<0.01).③aa基因型组白癜风患者的CD3+T淋巴细

  19. Effects of maternal psychotropic drug dosage on birth outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Laura A; van der Heijden, Frank MMA; Janssen, Paddy KC; Kuijpers, Harold JH

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this retrospective study was to explore the relationship between psychotropic medication dosage and birth outcomes. Methods A total of 136 women were enrolled, who had an active mental disorder, were taking medication to prevent a relapse, or had a history of postpartum depression or psychosis. Medication use was evaluated for the three trimesters and during labor. Based on the defined daily dose, medication use was classified into three groups. Primary outcome variables included the infant gestational age at birth, birth weight, and Apgar scores at one and 5 minutes. Results Our study showed a significantly higher incidence of Apgar score ≤7 at 5 minutes in women taking psychotropic drugs as compared with the group taking no medication, respectively (16.3% versus 0.0%, P=0.01). There was no significant difference between the two groups in Apgar score at one minute or in gestational age and birth weight. The results showed no significant differences in gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores for a low–intermediate or high dose of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and for a low or intermediate dose of an antipsychotic. Conclusion This study does not indicate a relationship between doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antipsychotics and adverse neonatal outcomes. PMID:24376355

  20. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: isoniazid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C; Dressman, J B; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Barends, D M

    2007-03-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing isoniazid as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. Isoniazid's solubility and permeability characteristics according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), as well as its therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems were taken into consideration. Isoniazid is "highly soluble" but data on its oral absorption and permeability are inconclusive, suggesting this API to be on the borderline of BCS Class I and III. For a number of excipients, an interaction with the permeability is extreme unlikely, but lactose and other deoxidizing saccharides can form condensation products with isoniazid, which may be less permeable than the free API. A biowaiver is recommended for IR solid oral drug products containing isoniazid as the sole API, provided that the test product meets the WHO requirements for "very rapidly dissolving" and contains only the excipients commonly used in isoniazid products, as listed in this article. Lactose and/or other deoxidizing saccharides containing formulations should be subjected to an in vivo BE study.

  1. Biowaiver Monographs for Immediate Release Solid Oral Dosage Forms: Ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Navid; Barazesh Morgani, Ahmadreza; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Groot, D W; Langguth, Peter; Mehta, Mehul U; Polli, James E; Shah, Vinod P; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-04-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release solid oral dosage forms containing ribavirin are reviewed. Ribavirin is highly soluble, but its permeability characteristics are not well defined. Therefore according to the Biopharmaceutical Classification System, and taking a "worst case" approach, ribavirin should be assigned to class III. As ribavirin is transported across the brush border membrane of the human jejunum by hCNT2, it shows saturable uptake in the intestine. However, no common excipients have been shown to compete for ribavirin absorption, nor have problems with BE of immediate release ribavirin formulations containing different excipients and produced by different manufacturing methods been reported in the open literature. So the risk of bioinequivalence caused by these factors appears to be low. Ribavirin is considered a narrow therapeutic index drug, as judged by comparing the minimum effective concentration and minimum toxic concentrations in blood. Although ribavirin would not be eligible for approval via a Biopharmaceutical Classification System-based biowaiver procedure according to today's guidances due to its narrow therapeutic index, the risks of biowaiving should be weighed against the considerable risks associated with studying BE of ribavirin products in healthy subjects.

  2. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: aciclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, J; Gonzalez-Alvarez, I; Bermejo, M; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2008-12-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing (biowaiver) for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing aciclovir are reviewed. Aciclovir therapeutic use and therapeutic index, pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) studies were also taken into consideration in order to ascertain whether a biowaiver can be recommended. According to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and considering tablet strengths up to 400 mg, aciclovir would be BCS Class III. However, in some countries also 800 mg tablets are available which fall just within BCS Class IV. Aciclovir seems not to be critical with respect to a risk for bioinequivalence, as no examples of bioinequivalence have been identified. It has a wide therapeutic index and is not used for critical indications. Hence, if: (a) the test product contains only excipients present in aciclovir solid oral IR drug products approved in ICH or associated countries, for instance as presented in this article; and (b) the comparator and the test product both are very rapidly dissolving, a biowaiver for IR aciclovir solid oral drug products is considered justified for all tablet strengths.

  3. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: lamivudine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, S; Jantratid, E; Dressman, J B; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Barends, D M

    2011-06-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing lamivudine as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient were reviewed. The solubility and permeability data of lamivudine as well as its therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data indicating excipient interactions, and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) studies were taken into consideration. Lamivudine is highly soluble, but its permeability characteristics are not well-defined. Reported BA values in adults ranged from 82% to 88%. Therefore, lamivudine is assigned to the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class III, noting that its permeability characteristics are near the border of BCS class I. Lamivudine is not a narrow therapeutic index drug. Provided that (a) the test product contains only excipients present in lamivudine IR solid oral drug products approved in the International Conference on Harmonization or associated countries in usual amounts and (b) the test product as well as the comparator product fulfills the BCS dissolution criteria for very rapidly dissolving; a biowaiver can be recommended for new lamivudine multisource IR products and major post-approval changes of marketed drug products.

  4. Studies of phase transitions in the aripiprazole solid dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łaszcz, Marta; Witkowska, Anna

    2016-01-05

    Studies of the phase transitions in an active substance contained in a solid dosage form are very complicated but essential, especially if an active substance is classified as a BCS Class IV drug. The purpose of this work was the development of sensitive methods for the detection of the phase transitions in the aripiprazole tablets containing initially its form III. Aripiprazole exhibits polymorphism and pseudopolymorphism. Powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry methods were developed for the detection of the polymorphic transition between forms III and I as well as the phase transition of form III into aripiprazole monohydrate in tablets. The study involved the initial 10 mg and 30 mg tablets, as well as those stored in Al/Al blisters, a triplex blister pack and HDPE bottles (with and without desiccant) under accelerated and long term conditions. The polymorphic transition was not observed in the initial and stored tablets but it was visible on the DSC curve of the Abilify(®) 10 mg reference tablets. The formation of the monohydrate was observed in the diffractograms and Raman spectra in the tablets stored under accelerated conditions. The monohydrate phase was not detected in the tablets stored in the Al/Al blisters under long term conditions. The results showed that the Al/Al blisters can be recommended as the packaging of the aripiprazole tablets containing form III.

  5. RP-HPLC estimation of risperidone in tablet dosage forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bladania S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, specific, accurate, and precise reverse phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the estimation of risperidone in tablet dosage forms. A Phenomenex Gemini C-18, 5 µm column having 250x4.6 mm i.d. in isocratic mode, with mobile phase containing methanol: acetonitrile: 50 mM potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (80:10:10 v/v was used. The flow rate was 1.3 ml/min and effluents were monitored at 234 nm. Clozapine was used as an internal standard. The retention time of risperidone and clozapine were 2.5 min and 3.3 min, respectively. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity, limit of quantification, limit of detection, robustness and stability. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for estimation of risperidone was found to be 500 ng/ml and 990 ng/ml, respectively. Recovery of risperidone was found to be in the range of 99.02-101.68%. Proposed method was successfully applied for the quantitative determination of risperidone in tablet formulations.

  6. Self-compacting concretes (SCC: comparison of methods of dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. F. Tutikian

    Full Text Available The composition of a self-compacting concrete (SCC should be defined to fulfills a number of requirements, such as self-compactibility, strength and durability. This study aims to compare three methods of dosage for SCC with local materials, so as to determine which one is the most economical and rational, thus assisting the executor in making a decision and enabling economic and technical feasibility for its application. The methods used in the experimental program were: Nan Su et al., which was developed in 2001 [1]; Repette-Melo, which was proposed in 2005 [2]; and Tutikian & Dal Molin, which was developed in 2007 [3]. From the results obtained in the experimental program, it was observed that the method which presented the lowest cost and highest compressive strength at the ages of 7, 28 and 91 days was Tutikian & Dal Molin, while the one which reached the lowest chloride ion penetration, best compactness and highest elasticity modulus was Repette-Melo. In tests carried out in the fresh state, all tested methods yielded mixtures which comply with the self-compactibility levels required by ABNT NBR 15823:2010 [4].

  7. Solid lipid extrusion of sustained release dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Claudia; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-09-01

    The applicability of the solid lipid extrusion process as preparations method for sustained release dosage forms was investigated in this study. Two lipids with similar melting ranges but of different composition, glyceryl palmitostearate (Precirol ATO 5) and glyceryl trimyristate (Dynasan 114), and mixtures of each lipid with 50% or 75% theophylline were extruded at temperatures below their melting ranges. Extrudates were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, porosity measurements and in vitro drug dissolution studies. The possibility of processing lipids by softening instead of complete melting and without subsequent formation of low-melting, metastable polymorphs could be demonstrated. Extrudates based on formulations of glyceryl palmitostearate/theophylline (50:50) and glyceryl trimyristate/theophylline (50:50) showed sustained release properties. An influence of extrusion conditions on the matrix structure was shown for extrudates based on a mixture of glyceryl trimyristate and theophylline (50:50). Glyceryl trimyristate tended to solidify in porous structures after melting. Exceeding a material temperature of 50.5 degrees C led to porous extrudate matrices with a faster drug release. The production of novel, non porous sustained release matrices was possible at a material temperature of 49.5 degrees C. Extrudates based on glyceryl trimyristate/theophylline (50:50) only slight changes in melting enthalpy and stable drug release profiles.

  8. Formulation and evaluation of gastroretentive dosage forms of Clarithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, Muralidhar; Gonugunta, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Reddy Veerareddy, Prabhakar

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop the hydrodynamically balanced delivery system of Clarithromycin (CLA) which, after oral administration should have the ability to prolong gastric residence time with the desired in vitro release profile for the localized action in the stomach, in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) mediated peptic ulcer. By applying wet granulation technique floating tablets of Clarithromycin were prepared. The proportion of sodium bicarbonate was varied to get the least possible lag time, also the polymer part varied to get the desired release. In vivo radiographic studies were performed with Barium sulphate loaded formulation to justify the increased gastric residence time of the dosage form in the stomach, based on the floating principle. The formulation developed using 66.2% Clarithromycin, 12% HPMC K4M polymer, 8% sodium bicarbonate gave floating lag time less than 3 min with a floating time of 12 h, and an in vitro release profile very near to the desired release. X-ray studies showed the enhanced gastric residence time of the tablet to 220 +/- 30 min. The mechanism of release of Clarithromycin from the floating tablets is anomalous diffusion transport and follows zero order kinetics. In vivo radiographic studies suggest that the tablet has increased gastric residence time for the effective localized action of the antibiotic (Clarithromycin) in the treatment of H.pylori mediated peptic ulcer.

  9. Dissolution methodology for taste masked oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittings, Sally; Turnbull, Neil; Roberts, Clive J; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2014-01-10

    Conventional adult dosage forms are often not suitable for the paediatric and geriatric populations due to either swallowing difficulties or patient repulsion and a requirement for tailored dosing to individual compliance or physiological needs. Alternative formulations are available; however these often require the incorporation of more complex taste masking techniques. One approach to taste masking is to reduce contact between the bitter Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) and oral cavity taste bud regions. This is achieved by hindering release in the oral cavity, or including competitive inhibition of bitter sensation for example by using flavours or sweeteners. There may also be other sensational complications from the API such as residual burning, reflux or metallic taste sensations to deal with. In vitro dissolution testing is employed to elucidate taste masking capability by quantifying release of the drug in simulated oral cavity conditions. Dissolution testing approaches may also be used to potentially predict or quantify the effect of the taste masking technique on the resultant pharmacokinetic profile. The present review investigates the anatomy and physiology of the oral cavity and current approaches to taste masking. In vitro dissolution methodologies adopted in the evaluation of taste masked formulations are discussed for their relative merits and drawbacks. A vast array of methodologies has been employed, with little agreement between approaches, and a lack of biorelevance. Future directions in dissolution methodology such as TNO Intestinal Model (TIM) and the Artificial Stomach and Duodenum model (ASD) are also discussed.

  10. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17β-HSD type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wise Petra M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2 is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4, an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ and females (ZW because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Results Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  11. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17beta-HSD type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Sarah E; Itoh, Yuichiro; Lance, Valentin A; Wise, Petra M; Ekanayake, Preethika S; Oyama, Randi K; Arnold, Arthur P; Schlinger, Barney A

    2010-04-01

    Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2) is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4), an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ) and females (ZW) because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  12. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17β-HSD type 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2) is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4), an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ) and females (ZW) because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Results Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:20359329

  13. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms....

  14. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men from Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, Jaganathan; Kujur, Smita B; Selvaraj, Kamala; Suruli, Muthiah S; Haripriya, Geetha; Samuel, Chandra R

    2015-07-01

    Male infertility has been associated with aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletions and specific gene mutations and/or polymorphisms. Besides genetic factors, any block in sperm delivery, endocrine disorders, testicular tumours, infectious diseases, medications, lifestyle factors and environmental toxins can also play a causative role. This study aimed to determine the constitutional karyotype in infertile males having normal female partners in a south Indian population. A total of 180 men with a complaint of primary infertility ranging from 1 to 25 years were screened for chromosomal abnormalities through conventional analysis of GTG-banded metaphases from cultured lymphocytes. Four individuals were diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome. Two cases exhibited reciprocal translocations and one showed a maternally inherited insertion. Polymorphisms were seen in sixty-seven patients (37.2%). The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 4.6% and variants involving the heterochromatic regions of Y, chromosome 9 and the acrocentric chromosomes in 38.2% of the infertile men with an abnormal seminogram strongly reiterates the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing and counselling in the diagnostic work-up prior to the use of assisted reproduction technologies.

  15. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  16. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems.

  17. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  18. The abnormal genes of learning and memory in C. elegans and their functions%C.elegans的学习记忆异常基因及其功能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许锡振; 吴利标; 罗信国; 赵彦; 濮瀑; 朱旭新

    2009-01-01

    目的 探索学习记忆异常基因hab-1(cn308)的功能.方法 1. 在hab-1领域有Y63D3A.6、Y63D3A.7和Y63D3A.8等三个YAC克隆.在基因库里检索Y63D3A.6、Y63D3A.7和Y63D3A.8的cDNA序列,用DNASIS-Mac v3.6软件处理并设计引物,进行PCR.把PCR产物插入pMD~(TM)18-TVector载体,并培养提取Y63D3A.6、Y63D3A.7和Y63D3A.8的目的 DNA,纯化DNA.2.进行rescue实验:把三种YAC克隆(clone)Y63D3A.6、Y63D3A.7和Y63D3A.8的DNA分别与GFP蛋白连接配制融合蛋白.应用OLYMPUSAxiovert S100共聚焦倒置显微镜操作系统,在L4大小的C.elegans生殖腺(gonad)内分别把三种GFP融合蛋白溶液显微注射,发育传代至F1.在F1代选择带有GFP荧光的C.elegans,观察基冈的表达部位,并进行Tap测试,通过观察在哪个YAC克隆把hab-1(cn308)的表现型恢复为野生型来确定hab-1的等位基因.3. DNA测序和同源性检索:hab-1的等位基冈确定以后对cn308进行DNA测序.根据cn308的测序结果与已知的等位基因DNA序列进行Homology search,分析cn308的基因结构,并进行BLSTP homologic search,和其他物种比较目的 基因的功能来阐明hab-1的基因功能.结果 对Y63D3A.6、Y63D3A.7和Y63D3A.8等三种基因表达率进行χ~2检验结果表示差异有显著性(χ~2=26.84,P0.05, P<0.05, there was a significant difference. It showed that although Y63D3A.6, Y63D3A.7 and Y63D3A.8 have linkage with the adjacent location of the first autosomal, expressing rate on the head of C. elegans had no relatedness and had significant differences. It revealed that Y63D3A.7 was expressed strongly on the head of C. elegans, and Tap test proved that Y63D3A.7 rescued hab-1 to wild-type phenotype. The result of DNA sequencing was that hab-1 (cn308) was a missense mutation (GAG→GGG, namely, Glu→Gly ). The result of BLST homologic search showed that Y63D3A.7 was the activity which adjusts mitochondrion complex Ⅰ, it illustrated that hab-1 gene had relations with the function of mitochondrion

  19. Neuronal migration abnormalities and its possible implications for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTanigaki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder that displays behavioral deficits such as decreased sensory gating, reduced social interaction and working memory deficits. The neurodevelopmental model is one of the widely accepted hypotheses of the etiology of schizophrenia. Subtle developmental abnormalities of the brain which stated long before the onset of clinical symptoms are thought to lead to the emergence of illness. Schizophrenia has strong genetic components but its underlying molecular pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Genetic linkage and association studies have identified several genes involved in neuronal migrations as candidate susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, although their effect size is small. Recent progress in copy number variation studies also has identified much higher risk loci such as 22q11. Based on these genetic findings, we are now able to utilize genetically-defined animal models. Here we summarize the results of neurodevelopmental and behavioral analysis of genetically-defined animal models. Furthermore, animal model experiments have demonstrated that embryonic and perinatal neurodevelopmental insults in neurogenesis and neuronal migrations cause neuronal functional and behavioral deficits in affected adult animals, which are similar to those of schizophrenic patients. However, these findings do not establish causative relationship. Genetically-defined animal models are a critical approach to explore the relationship between neuronal migration abnormalities and behavioral abnormalities relevant to Schizophrenia.

  20. Genetic disorders with both hearing loss and cardiovascular abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, John W; Craigen, William; Martinez, Hugo; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2011-01-01

    There has been a growing appreciation for conditions that affect hearing and which are accompanied by significant cardiovascular disorders. In this chapter we consider several broad classes of conditions including deafness due to abnormal structural development of the inner ear, those with physiological abnormalities in the inner ear sensory apparatus, and conditions with progressive loss of function of sensory cells or middle ear functions. Because of shared developmental controls, inner ear malformations are often associated with congenital heart defects and can be part of complex syndromes that affect other organs and neurodevelopmental outcome. Physiological disorders of the hair cells can lead to hearing loss and can be associated with cardiac arrhythmias, especially long QT syndrome. In addition, cellular energy defects such as mitochondrial disorders can affect maintenance of hair cells and are often associated with cardiomyopathy. Lysosomal storage diseases and other disorders affecting connective tissue can lead to chronic middle ear disease, with conductive hearing loss and also cause cardiac valve disease and/or cardiomyopathy. The genetic basis for these conditions is heterogeneous and includes chromosomal/genomic disorders, de novo dominant mutations, and familial dominant, autosomal-recessive, and mitochondrial (matrilineal) inheritance. Taken together, there are more than 100 individual genes implicated in genetic hearing impairment that are also associated with congenital and/or progressive cardiac abnormalities. These genes encode transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors, components of signal transduction pathways, ion channels, mitochondrial proteins and assembly factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and enzymes involved in lysosomal functions.

  1. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of fetal growth abnormalities in

  2. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10⁶ ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10⁶ ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10²-10³ ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants.

  3. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  5. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W. Heyne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect.

  6. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Galen W.; Everson, Joshua L.; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J.; Melberg, Cal G.; Fink, Dustin M.; Parins, Kia F.; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Ulschmid, Caden M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect. PMID:27585885

  7. Cerebral abnormalities in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D D M; Barker, P B; Lederman, H M; Crawford, T O

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defect of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene, is characterized by progressive neurologic impairment with cerebellar atrophy, ocular and cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation and susceptibility to developing lymphoreticular malignancy. Supratentorial brain abnormalities have been reported only rarely. In this study, brain MRI was performed in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia having stable neurologic impairment. Intracerebral telangiectasia with multiple punctate hemosiderin deposits were identified in 60% of subjects. These lesions were apparently asymptomatic. They are similar in appearance to radiation-induced telangiectasia and to cryptogenic vascular malformations. Also noted, in the 2 oldest subjects, was extensive white matter T2 hyperintensity, and in 1 of these a space-occupying fluid collection consistent with transudative capillary leak and edema as evidenced by reduced levels of metabolites on MR spectroscopic imaging. Asymptomatic supratentorial vascular abnormalities appear to be common in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia.

  8. Circulatory abnormalities in cirrhosis with focus on neurohumoral aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis exhibit characteristic hemodynamic changes with a hyperkinetic circulation and an abnormal distribution of the blood volume and neurohumoral regulation. Their plasma and noncentral blood volumes are increased, and the central and arterial blood volume and systemic vascular...... and hyperkinetic circulation in cirrhosis. Various vasodilators such as atrial natriurectic peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and nitric oxide are among potential candidates in the arterial vasodilatation in cirrhosis. Besides enhanced sympathetic nervous activity, activation of the renin......-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and elevated circulating vasopressin, endothelin-1 may also be implicated in the hemodynamic counter-regulation in cirrhosis. Recent research has focused on the assertion that the hemodynamic and neurohumoral abnormalities in cirrhosis are part of a general circulatory dysfunction influencing...

  9. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  10. An Abnormal Vibrational Mode of Torsion Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 涂英; 顾邦明; 胡忠坤; 罗俊

    2003-01-01

    In the experiment for the determination of the gravitational constant G, we found an abnormal vibrational mode of the torsion pendulum. The abnormal mode disappeared as a magnetic damper was introduced to the torsion pendulum system. Our experimental results also show that the magnetic damper can be used to suppress the high frequency vibrational noises to torsion pendulums effectively.

  11. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  12. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  13. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients.

  14. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  15. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  16. Application of DBNPA dosage for biofouling control in spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Amber Siddiqui Shahnawaz

    2017-05-30

    Biocides may be used to control biofouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biocide 2,2-dibromo-3-ni-trilopropionamide (DBNPA) dosage on biofouling control. Preventive biofouling control was studied applying a continuous dosage of substrate (0.5 mg/L) and DBNPA (1 mg/L). Curative biofouling control was studied on pre-grown biofilms, once again applying a continuous dosage of substrate (0.5 mg acetate C/L) and DBNPA (1 and 20 mg/L). Biofouling studies were performed in membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) supplied with biodegradable substrate and DBNPA. The pressure drop was monitored in time and at the end of the study, the accumulated biomass in MFS was quantified by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Continuous dosage of DBNPA (1 mg/L) prevented pressure drop increase and biofilm accumulation in the MFSs during a run time of 7 d, showing that biofouling can be managed by preventive DBNPA dosage. For biofouled systems, continuous dosage of DBNPA (1 and 20 mg/L) inactivated the accumulated biomass but did not restore the original pressure drop and did not remove the accumulated inactive cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), indicating DBNPA dosage is not suitable for curative biofouling control.

  17. Softgels: consumer perceptions and market impact relative to other oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W J; Francis, J J

    2000-01-01

    Softgels, which contain a liquid formulation of a drug, often provide clinical benefit over other solid oral dosage forms and may represent an attractive alternative to them. A consumer preference survey of softgels versus other solid forms investigated four areas: (1) identification of various dosage forms; (2) perception of therapeutic benefit (easiest to swallow, faster-acting, work longer); (3) impact of individual product characteristics on overall product selection; and (4) market impact in terms of premiums consumers would pay on the basis of dosage form. The 300 survey participants strongly preferred clear softgels over other dosage forms in virtually every area. Softgels were perceived as easy to swallow and fast-acting, with a duration of action second only to that of a two-piece capsule. Overall preference was driven by ease of swallowing, and softgels were rated first by the majority of respondents. Consumers would be interested in various products if these were available as softgels rather than in their current oral dosage forms and may be willing to pay a premium for softgel products. This survey confirms consumer preferences for particular dosage forms and for softgels over other solid forms. Pharmaceutical scientists and marketers should consider softgels as alternative dosage forms when developing new compounds or considering life-cycle management of existing products.

  18. Mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation: Necessary clinical skills for the nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasakis Efstratios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When nurses perform their tasks, they manage situations where maths knowledge is required. Such a situation is the calculation of medication dosage. Aim: The literature review of papers relevant with the mathematical knowledge and drug calculation skills of nurses and nursing students. Material-Method: A search of published research and review articles from January 1989 until March 2012, has been conducted in Pubmed database. The search terms used were: nurses, mathematics skills, numeracy skills and medication dosology calculation skills. Results: Literature review showed that many studies focus in the mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation competency of nursing students. Results from these studies revealed that nursing students had poor mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation skills. In contrast with students, professional nurses are more likely to have sufficient skills in drug calculations. Apart from the papers analyzing calculation skills' assessment, several studies examined educational interventions in the context of calculation skills enhancement. Accuracy and proficiency in the dosage calculation of medications is a preventive factor of errors made at medication preparation and administration. Conclusion: Mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation abilities are interrelated concepts and essential clinical skills for the nurse. The fact that nursing students do not have adequate skills for calculating medications' dosage, might be an issue that schools of nursing education should focus in. Further research of the drug dosage calculation skills is considered essential.

  19. Does a history of suicide attempt predict higher antipsychotic dosage in schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettige, Nuwan C; Kennedy, James L; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Antipsychotic dosage is generally adjusted by physicians depending on the stability of the patient and the response to that particular drug. Our hypothesis is that patients with previous suicide attempt are prescribed higher doses of antipsychotics. We examined the dosage and patterns of antipsychotic use in regard to past suicidal behaviour. For this study, 304 subjects with schizophrenia spectrum disorders between the ages of 18 and 75 were recruited. A cross-sectional assessment was used for this study, in which data were collected from each patient through an interview and self-report questionnaires. The percentages of the Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS) maximum recommended daily dose were applied to standardize antipsychotic dosages across different treatments. We compared the standardized dosage of antipsychotics in schizophrenics with previous suicide attempts and those who have never attempted suicide. Applying the ANCOVA, our preliminary results show no significant difference (P = 0.467) in antipsychotic dosage in the attempters and non-attempters. The prescribed clozapine dosage fails to show a significant relationship with suicidal history (P >0.05). In summary, our analysis does not show antipsychotic dosage adjustment based on past suicide attempt, after controlling for the current suicidal ideation and hopelessness.

  20. Boxing and mixed martial arts: preliminary traumatic neuromechanical injury risk analyses from laboratory impact dosage data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam J; Benzel, Edward C; Miele, Vincent J; Morr, Douglas R; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-05-01

    In spite of ample literature pointing to rotational and combined impact dosage being key contributors to head and neck injury, boxing and mixed martial arts (MMA) padding is still designed to primarily reduce cranium linear acceleration. The objects of this study were to quantify preliminary linear and rotational head impact dosage for selected boxing and MMA padding in response to hook punches; compute theoretical skull, brain, and neck injury risk metrics; and statistically compare the protective effect of various glove and head padding conditions. An instrumented Hybrid III 50th percentile anthropomorphic test device (ATD) was struck in 54 pendulum impacts replicating hook punches at low (27-29 J) and high (54-58 J) energy. Five padding combinations were examined: unpadded (control), MMA glove-unpadded head, boxing glove-unpadded head, unpadded pendulum-boxing headgear, and boxing glove-boxing headgear. A total of 17 injury risk parameters were measured or calculated. All padding conditions reduced linear impact dosage. Other parameters significantly decreased, significantly increased, or were unaffected depending on padding condition. Of real-world conditions (MMA glove-bare head, boxing glove-bare head, and boxing glove-headgear), the boxing glove-headgear condition showed the most meaningful reduction in most of the parameters. In equivalent impacts, the MMA glove-bare head condition induced higher rotational dosage than the boxing glove-bare head condition. Finite element analysis indicated a risk of brain strain injury in spite of significant reduction of linear impact dosage. In the replicated hook punch impacts, all padding conditions reduced linear but not rotational impact dosage. Head and neck dosage theoretically accumulates fastest in MMA and boxing bouts without use of protective headgear. The boxing glove-headgear condition provided the best overall reduction in impact dosage. More work is needed to develop improved protective padding to minimize

  1. Endocrine abnormalities in dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Ankit Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Progress has been made in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of hormone action and its effects on the cardiac tissue. There is evidence from observational studies that patients with postpartum cardiomyopathy improve after inhibition of release of prolactin from the pituitary by bromocriptine. This has renewed interest in the role of hormones in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, especially in women. We intended to assess the hormonal changes in female patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Methods: Twenty female patients aged 20-40 years old (mean age 29 ΁ 5.6 years with a diagnosis of idiopathic DCMP with left ventricular ejection fraction [EF] <35% and a stable clinical course in the last 3 months were included in the study. All the patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II or III. All the patients underwent clinical evaluation followed by blood sampling for hormonal analysis. Blood was taken after overnight fasting and analyzed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, T3, T4, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, prolactin, insulin, parathyroid hormone (PTH, and 25 (OH Vitamin D. The results were compared with twenty age and sex matched controls. Results: The mean EF of the twenty patients was 24.4 ΁ 5.3% and duration of symptoms was 29.1 ΁ 24 months. Insulin growth factor 1 levels were significantly lower than normal. Fifty percent of the patients had levels lower than normal, but there was no correlation of IGF-I with NYHA class and EF. Testing of the thyroid hormones revealed that TSH levels were similar between patient and controls though 40% of the patients had elevated TSH levels. Of these patients, 5% (1 had hypothyroid. In addition to this, 10% (2 had isolated low T3, suggestive of the low T3 syndrome. None of the thyroid abnormalities showed a correlation with NYHA class or EF. All other hormone concentrations were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: In this cohort of female

  2. Liver abnormalities and endocrine diseases.

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    Burra, Patrizia

    2013-08-01

    The liver and its pleotropic functions play a fundamental role in regulating metabolism, and is also an inevitable target of multiple metabolic disorders. The numerous and constant relationships and feedback mechanisms between the liver and all endocrine organs is reflected by the fact that an alteration of one oftentimes results in the malfunction of the other. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism are frequently associated with hepatic alterations, and thyroid diseases must be excluded in transaminase elevation of unknown cause. Drugs such as propylthiouracil, used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism, may induce liver damage, and other drugs such as amiodarone, carbamazepine, and several chemotherapeutic agents can lead to both thyroid and liver abnormalities. Liver diseases such as hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cirrhosis may cause altered levels of thyroid hormones, and alcoholic liver disease, both due to the noxious substance ethanol as well as to the hepatic damage it causes, may be responsible for altered thyroid function. Both excess and insufficiency of adrenal function may result in altered liver function, and adrenocortical dysfunction may be present in patients with cirrhosis, especially during episodes of decompensation. Again an important player which affects both the endocrine system and the liver, alcohol may be associated with pseudo-Cushing syndrome. Sex hormones, both intrinsic as well as extrinsically administered, have an important impact on liver function. While oestrogens are related to cholestatic liver damage, androgens are the culprit of adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others. Chronic liver disease, on the other hand, has profound repercussions on sex hormone metabolism, inducing feminization in men and infertility and amenorrhoea in women. Lastly, metabolic syndrome, the pandemia of the present and future centuries, links the spectrum of liver damage ranging from steatosis to cirrhosis, to the array of endocrine alterations

  3. Relative bioavailability of carbocysteine from three dosage forms, investigated in healthy volunteers.

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    Bron, J

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bioavailability of a new tablet formulation of carbocysteine relative against two other oral carbocysteine containing dosage forms, viz. a syrup and capsules. Plasma levels and urine concentrations of carbocysteine were monitored, following oral administration of all three dosage forms to healthy human volunteers, by direct derivatization of carbocysteine using dabsylchloride and subsequent high performance liquid chromatography. There was no difference in bioavailability of carbocysteine from these dosage forms as expressed by the respective areas under the plasma concentration-time curves and total amounts of unchanged carbocysteine excreted in urine.

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

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    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  5. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees for... applications in the backlog as of October 1, 2012, on finished dosage form (FDF) and active pharmaceutical... Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...