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Sample records for abnormal eeg background

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Background:Autism is currently viewed as a genetically determined neurode- velopmental disorder although its definite underlying etiology remains to be established. Aim of the Study: Our purpose was to assess autism related morphological neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the.

  2. EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities in relevance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Autism is currently viewed as a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder although its defi nite underlying etiology remains to be established. Aim of the Study: Our purpose was to assess autism related morphological neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the ...

  3. A comparative study of EEG abnormalities among subjects with inter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Electrophysiological investigation is an integral part in the management of neuropsychiatric disorders; but this is rare in developing countries including Nigeria. Objectives: The study aims to determine EEG abnormalities among subjects with inter-ictal psychosis in comparison to those with schizophrenia.

  4. Frequency of EEG abnormalities in age-matched siblings of autistic children with abnormal sleep EEG patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chez, Michael G; Buchanan, Thomas; Aimonovitch, Mary; Mrazek, Susan; Krasne, Valerie; Langburt, Wayne; Memon, Shoaib

    2004-04-01

    Epileptiform activity in sleep has been described even in the absence of clinical seizures in 43-68% of patients with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Genetic factors may play a significant role in the frequency of epilepsy, yet the frequency in normal age-matched controls is unknown. We studied overnight ambulatory electroencephalograms (EEGs) in 12 nonepileptic, nonautistic children with a sibling with both ASDs and an abnormal EEG. EEG studies were read and described independently by two pediatric epileptologists; 10 were normal studies and 2 were abnormal. The occurrence of abnormal EEGs in our sample (16.6%) was lower than the reported occurrence in children with ASDs. Further, the two abnormal EEGs were of types typically found in childhood and were different from those found in the ASD-affected siblings. The lack of similarity between sibling EEGs suggests that genetic factors alone do not explain the higher frequency of EEG abnormalities reported in ASDs.

  5. Interictal EEG abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Bauer, J.; Singh, D.D.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine interictal EEG abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). METHODS: (a) Retrospective study of EEG reports of 187 consecutive patients with PNES seen at the Department of Epileptology, Bonn, Germany; (b) Blinded, multirater comparison of EEGs of all

  6. Holistic approach for automated background EEG assessment in asphyxiated full-term infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Vladimir; Cherian, Perumpillichira J.; Koolen, Ninah; Naulaers, Gunnar; Swarte, Renate M.; Govaert, Paul; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To develop an automated algorithm to quantify background EEG abnormalities in full-term neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Approach. The algorithm classifies 1 h of continuous neonatal EEG (cEEG) into a mild, moderate or severe background abnormality grade. These classes are well established in the literature and a clinical neurophysiologist labeled 272 1 h cEEG epochs selected from 34 neonates. The algorithm is based on adaptive EEG segmentation and mapping of the segments into the so-called segments’ feature space. Three features are suggested and further processing is obtained using a discretized three-dimensional distribution of the segments’ features represented as a 3-way data tensor. Further classification has been achieved using recently developed tensor decomposition/classification methods that reduce the size of the model and extract a significant and discriminative set of features. Main results. Effective parameterization of cEEG data has been achieved resulting in high classification accuracy (89%) to grade background EEG abnormalities. Significance. For the first time, the algorithm for the background EEG assessment has been validated on an extensive dataset which contained major artifacts and epileptic seizures. The demonstrated high robustness, while processing real-case EEGs, suggests that the algorithm can be used as an assistive tool to monitor the severity of hypoxic insults in newborns.

  7. The Association between EEG Abnormality and Behavioral Disorder: Developmental Delay in Phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Alaee, Mohammad Reza; Zarafshan, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background. Brain defect leading to developmental delay is one of the clinical manifestations of phenylketonuria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between EEG abnormality and developmental delay/behavioral disorders in phenylketonuria. Patients and Methods. 105 phenylketonuria patients, who were diagnosed through newborn screening tests or during follow-up evaluation, were enrolled. Patients who were seizure-free for at least six months before the study were included. The developmental score were evaluated by the ASQ questionnaire (age-stage questionnaire) and the test of child symptom inventory-4 (CSI-4), respectively. Results. 55 patients had a history of seizure more than 6 months before the study. Seventy had abnormal EEG (cases) and 35 had normal EEG (controls). There was no significant difference between mean phenylalanine levels in the abnormal and normal EEG groups at the time of diagnosis, after six months and at our evaluation. Distribution of DQ level in the abnormal and normal EEG groups revealed a significant difference. An abnormal EEG was associated with a higher percentage of low DQ levels. Conclusion. Paroxysmal epileptic discharges in PKU patients are important. Treatment of these EEG abnormalities may affect developmental scores or may lead to correction of some behavioral disorders in patients.

  8. The colorful brain: Visualization of EEG background patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a method to transform routine clinical EEG recordings to an alternative visual domain. The method is intended to support the classic visual interpretation of the EEG background pattern and to facilitate communication about relevant EEG characteristics. In addition, it provides

  9. Correlation between intra- and extracranial background EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels W.; Madsen, Rasmus E.

    2012-01-01

    Scalp EEG is the most widely used modality to record the electrical signals of the brain. It is well known that the volume conduction of these brain waves through the brain, cerebrospinal fluid, skull and scalp reduces the spatial resolution and the signal amplitude. So far the volume conduction...

  10. Selective mutism and abnormal electroencephalography (EEG) tracings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Keren; Kivity, Sara; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Halevi, Ayelet; Shuper, Avinoam

    2011-11-01

    Epileptic discharges are not considered a part of the clinical picture of selective mutism, and electroencephalography is generally not recommended in its work-up. This report describes 6 children with selective mutism who were found to have a history of epilepsy and abnormal interictal or subclinical electroencephalography recordings. Two of them had benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes. The mutism was not related in time to the presence of active seizures. While seizures could be controlled in all children by medications, the mutism resolved only in 1. Although the discharges could be coincidental, they might represent a co-morbidity of selective mutism or even play a role in its pathogenesis. Selective mutism should be listed among the psychiatric disorders that may be associated with electroencephalographic abnormalities. It can probably be regarded as a symptom of a more complicated organic brain disorder.

  11. Clinical and EEG features of ischemic stroke patients with abnormal discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-lei YANG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical and EEG features of ischemic stroke patients with abnormal discharges.  Methods Clinical data and 24-hour EEG monitoring of 162 ischemic stroke patients were analyzed retrospectively. One-year follow-up was carried out and post-ischemic epilepsy was diagnosed.  Results Among 162 ischemic stroke patients, 24-hour EEG was abnormal in 87 cases (53.70%. According to the correspondence of site of infarcts and abnormal discharges, these 87 cases were classified into 2 groups: matched group (N = 24, 27.59% and unmatched group (N = 63, 72.41%. There was no significant difference between 2 groups in terms of Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP and TOAST classification (P = 0.792, 0.111, while there was significant difference between 2 groups on the site of infarcts (P = 0.000. In matched group, the infarcts were mainly located in cortex (N = 23, 95.83%. However, in unmatched group, the infarcts were mainly located in cortex and basal ganglia (N = 27, 42.86%, or in basal ganglia only (N = 24, 38.10%. In matched group, 24-hour EEG showed slowing of background activities, and sharp waves and sharp and slow wave complex which were corresponding to the infarct sites. The abnormal discharges could only be recorded around the infarct unilaterally. In unmatched group, the epileptiform discharges were recorded in both contralateral and ipsilateral ischemic hemispheres, usually with widespread slow waves and asymmetric background. The infarcts were limited, but abnormal discharges were widespread. For example, the infarct was located in deep brain, while scalp abnormal discharges were recorded. Although there was no significant difference in terms of epilepsy incidence between 2 groups (P = 0.908, the types of epilepsy were statistically different between 2 groups (P = 0.000. In matched group, the main type was partial seizure. But in unmatched group, the main types of epilepsy were secondary generalized seizure and

  12. Relation of EEG alpha background to cognitive fuction, brain atrophy, and cerebral metabolism in Down's syndrome. Age-specific changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devinsky, O.; Sato, S.; Conwit, R.A.; Schapiro, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    We studied 19 young adults (19 to 37 years old) and 9 older patients (42 to 66 years old) with Down's syndrome (DS) and a control group of 13 healthy adults (22 to 38 years old) to investigate the relation of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha background to cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Four of the older patients with DS had a history of mental deterioration, disorientation, and memory loss and were demented. Patients and control subjects had EEGs, psychometric testing, quantitative computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18. A blinded reader classified the EEGs into two groups--those with normal alpha background or those with abnormal background. All the control subjects, the 13 young adult patients with DS, and the 5 older patients with DS had normal EEG backgrounds. In comparison with the age-matched patients with DS with normal alpha background, older patients with DS with decreased alpha background had dementia, fewer visuospatial skills, decreased attention span, larger third ventricles, and a global decrease in cerebral glucose utilization with parietal hypometabolism. In the young patients with DS, the EEG background did not correlate with psychometric or positron emission tomographic findings, but the third ventricles were significantly larger in those with abnormal EEG background. The young patients with DS, with or without normal EEG background, had positron emission tomographic findings similar to those of the control subjects. The mechanism underlying the abnormal EEG background may be the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in older patients with DS and may be cerebral immaturity in younger patients with DS

  13. Not EEG abnormalities but epilepsy is associated with autistic regression and mental functioning in childhood autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdlicka, Michal; Komarek, Vladimir; Propper, Lukas; Kulisek, Robert; Zumrova, Alena; Faladova, Ludvika; Havlovicova, Marketa; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Blatny, Marek; Urbanek, Tomas

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential association of epilepsy and EEG abnormalities with autistic regression and mental retardation. We examined a group of 77 autistic children (61 boys, 16 girls) with an average age of 9.1 +/- 5.3 years. Clinical interview, neurological examination focused on the evaluation of epilepsy, IQ testing, and 21-channel EEG (including night sleep EEG recording) were performed. Normal EEGs were observed in 44.4% of the patients, non-epileptiform abnormal EEGs in 17.5%, and abnormal EEGs with epileptiform discharges in 38.1% of the patients. Epilepsy was found in 22.1% of the subjects. A history of regression was reported in 25.8% of the patients, 54.8% of the sample had abnormal development during the first year of life, and 79.7% of the patients were mentally retarded. Autistic regression was significantly more frequent in patients with epilepsy than in non-epileptic patients (p = 0.003). Abnormal development during the first year of life was significantly associated with epileptiform EEG abnormalities (p = 0.014). Epilepsy correlated significantly with mental retardation (p = 0.001). Although the biological basis and possible causal relationships of these associations remain to be explained, they may point to different subgroups of patients with autistic spectrum disorders.

  14. Slowed EEG rhythmicity in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evidence of abnormal cerebral pain processing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Hansen, Tine Maria; Gravesen, Carina

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  15. Relation of EEG alpha background to cognitive fuction, brain atrophy, and cerebral metabolism in Down's syndrome. Age-specific changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devinsky, O.; Sato, S.; Conwit, R.A.; Schapiro, M.B. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We studied 19 young adults (19 to 37 years old) and 9 older patients (42 to 66 years old) with Down's syndrome (DS) and a control group of 13 healthy adults (22 to 38 years old) to investigate the relation of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha background to cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Four of the older patients with DS had a history of mental deterioration, disorientation, and memory loss and were demented. Patients and control subjects had EEGs, psychometric testing, quantitative computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18. A blinded reader classified the EEGs into two groups--those with normal alpha background or those with abnormal background. All the control subjects, the 13 young adult patients with DS, and the 5 older patients with DS had normal EEG backgrounds. In comparison with the age-matched patients with DS with normal alpha background, older patients with DS with decreased alpha background had dementia, fewer visuospatial skills, decreased attention span, larger third ventricles, and a global decrease in cerebral glucose utilization with parietal hypometabolism. In the young patients with DS, the EEG background did not correlate with psychometric or positron emission tomographic findings, but the third ventricles were significantly larger in those with abnormal EEG background. The young patients with DS, with or without normal EEG background, had positron emission tomographic findings similar to those of the control subjects. The mechanism underlying the abnormal EEG background may be the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in older patients with DS and may be cerebral immaturity in younger patients with DS.

  16. Epilepsy and EEG abnormalities in children with autism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Urbánek, Tomáš; Komárek, V.; Hrdlička, M.; Faladová, L.; Zumrová, A.; Neuschlová, L.; Kulísek, R.

    Supplement 8, č. 43 (2002), s. 176-177 ISSN 0013-9580. [European Congress on Epileptology /5./. 06.10.2002-10.10.2002, Madrid] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : Epilepsy * EEG * autism Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  17. Correlation between perceived stigma and EEG paroxysmal abnormality in childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Sano, Fumikazu; Ohyama, Tetsuo; Sugita, Kanji; Aihara, Masao

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) findings such as localized EEG paroxysmal abnormality (PA) and the perception of stigma to determine EEG factors associated with perceived stigma in childhood epilepsy. Participants comprised 40 patients (21 boys, 19 girls; mean age, 14.6 years) with epilepsy at enrollment. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: 1) age of 12-18 years, inclusive; 2) ≥6 months after epilepsy onset; 3) the ability to read and speak Japanese; and 4) the presence of EEG PA. Fifteen healthy seizure-free children were included as a control group. Participants were asked to rate how often they felt or acted in the ways described in the items of the Child Stigma Scale using a 5-point scale. Electroencephalogram paroxysms were classified based on the presence of spikes, sharp waves, or spike-wave complexes, whether focal or generalized. Participants showed significantly higher stigma scores than healthy subjects (pstigma. The average total scores of patients presenting with EEG PA at generalized, frontal, RD, midtemporal, and occipital regions were 2.3, 4.0, 2.4, 3.2, and 2.2, respectively. The scores of all questions were higher in the frontal group than those in other regions (pstigma than children presenting with nonfrontal EEG PA (pstigma. Further studies are needed to confirm whether frontal EEG PA may function as a mediator of emotional responses such as perceived stigma in childhood epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Background: Madelung's deformity is a congenital abnormality of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Madelung's deformity is a congenital abnormality of the wrist caused by a disturbance of growth that retards the development of the ulnar and volar aspect of the distal radial physis, usually idiopathic, but can be associated with bone dysplas.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative EEG abnormalities in violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Ana Calzada; Amador, Alfredo Alvarez

    2009-02-01

    Resting eyes closed electroencephalogram was studied in a group of violent offenders evaluated at Psychiatric Department of the Legal Medicine Institute in Cuba (18 with antisocial personality disorder, ASPD, and 10 without psychiatric diagnosis). Characteristics of the EEG visual inspection and the use of frequency domain quantitative analysis techniques (narrow band spectral parameters) are described. Both groups were compared to Cuban normative database. High incidences of electroencephalographic abnormalities were found in both groups of violent offenders. The most frequent were: electrogenesis alterations, attenuated alpha rhythm and theta and delta activities increase in the frontal lobe. In the quantitative analysis theta and delta frequencies were increased and alpha activity was decreased in both groups. Differences appear for the topographical patterns present in subjects of both groups. EEG abnormalities were more severe in ASPD than in control group. Results suggest that EEG abnormalities in violent offenders should reflect aspects of brain dysfunction related to antisocial behaviour.

  20. Zonisamide eradicated paroxysmal headache with EEG abnormalities triggered by hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yuki; Hayashi, Masaharu; Ohya, Tatsuo

    2006-10-01

    Generally, prognosis of hypertensive encephalopathy in childhood is favorable. We reported a 5-year-old girl who presented with a headache attack and EEG abnormalities after hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritis. The patient had suffered from hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritis, which soon ameliorated. Five months later, she developed attacks of headache, vomiting and disturbed consciousness with left side-predominant EEG abnormalities. Although carbamazepine and sodium valproate failed to improve her condition, zonisamide eradicated both the symptoms and EEG abnormalities, and an attack has not reoccurred for 5 years since completion of her treatment. It is noteworthy that delayed-onset complications can occur in child hypertensive encephalopathy, cases of which should be followed up prudently. Zonisamide should be considered for treatment of attacks of headaches with an epileptic character.

  1. Daytime sleepiness and EEG abnormalities in patients treated with second generation antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okruszek, Lukasz; Jernajczyk, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Waliniowska, Elżbieta; Jakubczyk, Tomasz; Jarema, Marek; Wichniak, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether or not an increased prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or EEG abnormalities is observed in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), and to compare the effects of second generation antipsychotics (SGA) on patients' daytime sleepiness level and EEG recordings. EEG recordings and self-reports of EDS, assessed with Epworth (ESS) and Stanford (SSS) Sleepiness Scales, were compared between 244 patients with SSD and 82 patients with anxiety, personality or behavioral disorders (non-psychotic disorders, NPD). To examine the effects of various SGA, patients treated in monotherapy with aripiprazole, olanzapine, clozapine, risperidone and sertindole were compared. A higher prevalence of abnormal EEG recordings was observed in SSD patients. No significant differences in average daytime sleepiness were found between patients with SSD and NPD; however, patients with SSD had longer sleep duration. Aripiprazole treatment was associated with significantly smaller and less frequent EEG abnormalities than treatment with any other SGA, while treatment with clozapine and olanzapine was related to an increased prevalence of severe EEG abnormalities. Patients with SSD treated with SGA in monotherapy were less sleepy than unmedicated patients with NPD. Although antipsychotics may have profound effects on EEG patients with schizophrenia do not have higher daytime sleepiness than patients with anxiety/personality disorders. Patients with schizophrenia may compensate sedative effects of antipsychotic treatment with sleep duration prolongation and report even less sleepiness than non-psychotic patients. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation between EEG abnormalities and symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Akihiro

    2010-11-01

    Children with ASD often suffer from epilepsy and paroxysmal EEG abnormality. Purposes of this study are the confirmation of incidence of epileptic seizures and EEG abnormalities in children with autism using a high performance digital EEG, to examine the nature of EEG abnormalities such as locus or modality, and to determine if the development of children with ASD, who have experienced developmental delay, improves when their epilepsy has been treated and maintained under control. A total of 1014 autistic children that have been treated and followed-up for more than 3 years at Yasuhara Children's Clinic in Osaka, Japan, were included in this study. Each participant's EEG had been recorded approximately every 6 months under sleep conditions. Epilepsy was diagnosed in 37% (375/1014) of the study participants. Almost all patients diagnosed with epilepsy presented with symptomatic epilepsy. The data showed that the participants with lower IQ had a higher incidence of epileptic seizures. Epileptic EEG discharges occurred in 85.8% (870/1014) of the patients. There was also a very high incidence of spike discharges in participants whose intellectual quotient was very low or low. Epileptic seizure waves most frequently developed from the frontal lobe (65.6%), including the front pole (Fp1 and Fp2), frontal part (F3, F4, F7 and F8) and central part (C3, Cz and C4). The occurrence rate of spike discharges in other locations, including temporal lobe (T3, T4, T5, T6), parietal lobe (P3, Pz, P4), occipital lobe (O1, O2) and multifocal spikes was less than 10%. These results support the notion that there is a relationship between ASD and dysfunction of the mirror neuron system. The management of seizure waves in children diagnosed with ASD may result in improves function and reduction of autistic symptoms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic classification of background EEG activity in healthy and sick neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfhede, Johan; Thordstein, Magnus; Löfgren, Nils; Flisberg, Anders; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Kjellmer, Ingemar; Lindecrantz, Kaj

    2010-02-01

    The overall aim of our research is to develop methods for a monitoring system to be used at neonatal intensive care units. When monitoring a baby, a range of different types of background activity needs to be considered. In this work, we have developed a scheme for automatic classification of background EEG activity in newborn babies. EEG from six full-term babies who were displaying a burst suppression pattern while suffering from the after-effects of asphyxia during birth was included along with EEG from 20 full-term healthy newborn babies. The signals from the healthy babies were divided into four behavioural states: active awake, quiet awake, active sleep and quiet sleep. By using a number of features extracted from the EEG together with Fisher's linear discriminant classifier we have managed to achieve 100% correct classification when separating burst suppression EEG from all four healthy EEG types and 93% true positive classification when separating quiet sleep from the other types. The other three sleep stages could not be classified. When the pathological burst suppression pattern was detected, the analysis was taken one step further and the signal was segmented into burst and suppression, allowing clinically relevant parameters such as suppression length and burst suppression ratio to be calculated. The segmentation of the burst suppression EEG works well, with a probability of error around 4%.

  4. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Correlation between aberrant behaviors, EEG abnormalities and seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Elena Hartley-McAndrew

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between epilepsy, epileptiform discharges, cognitive, language and behavioral symptoms is not clearly understood. Since difficulties with socialization and maladaptive behaviors are found in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, we inquired whether epileptiform activity and seizures are associated with adverse behavioral manifestations in this population. We reviewed our EEG database between 1999-2006, and identified 123 children with ASD. EEG abnormalities were found in 39 children (31%. A control group of age and gender matched ASD children with normal EEG’s was obtained. Packets of questionnaires including the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale II (VABS, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS were sent by mail. Out of 21 packets received, 11 had normal and 10 had abnormal EEG’s. There were no statistically significant differences in behavior between the two groups. Statistical analysis of discharge location and frequency did not reveal a significant trend. However, children with ASD and seizures had statistically significant lower scores in VABS daily living (P=0.009 and socialization (P=0.007 as compared to those without seizures. ASD children with seizures had higher ABC levels of hyperactivity and irritability. Differences in irritability scores nearly reached statistical significance (P=0.058. There was no significant difference in the degree of CARS autism rating between the groups. Our study did not reveal statistically significant differences in behaviors between ASD children with and without EEG abnormalities. However, ASD children with seizures revealed significantly worse behaviors as compared to counterparts without seizures.

  5. EEG abnormalities and epilepsy in autistic spectrum disorders: clinical and familial correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Arman, Ayşe Rodopman; Işik, Uğur; Bez, Yasin; Berkem, Meral

    2010-02-01

    Our aim was to examine the characteristics of EEG findings and epilepsy in autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and the associated clinical and familial risk factors. Fifty-seven children (86% male) with ASD, mean age 82+/-36.2 months, were included in the study. Thirty-nine (68.4%) children had the diagnosis of autism, 15 (26.3%) had Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and 3 (5.3%) had high-functioning autism. One hour of sleep and/or awake EEG recordings was obtained for each child. All patients were evaluated with respect to clinical and familial characteristics and with the Childhood Autism Rating Scale, the Autism Behavior Checklist, and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. The frequency of interictal epileptiform EEG abnormalities (IIEAs) was 24.6% (n=14), and the frequency of epilepsy was 14.2% (n=8). IIEAs were associated with a diagnosis of epilepsy (P=0.0001), Childhood Autism Rating Scale Activity scores (P=0.047), and a history of asthma and allergy (P=0.044). Epilepsy was associated with a family history of epilepsy (P=0.049) and psychiatric problems in the mother during pregnancy (P=0.0026). Future studies with larger samples will help to clarify the possible associations of epilepsy/IIEAs with asthma/allergy, hyperactivity, and familial factors in ASD. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. EEG

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... In clinical psychiatry, EEG is also used in evaluating pres- ence of seizure especially the ones that produce complex behaviors (temporal lobe, frontal lobe and petit mal sei- zures). EEG can also be used during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to monitor whether or not the stimulus produces seizure activity.

  7. EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also used to: Evaluate problems with sleep ( sleep disorders ) Monitor the brain during brain surgery An EEG may be done ... in some cases) Seizure disorder (such as epilepsy) Sleep disorder (such as narcolepsy ) Swelling of the brain (edema) Risks An EEG test is very safe. ...

  8. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System for Classification of Background EEG Signals from ESES Patients and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixian; Wang, Yinghua; Ouyang, Gaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Background electroencephalography (EEG), recorded with scalp electrodes, in children with electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES) syndrome and control subjects has been analyzed. We considered 10 ESES patients, all right-handed and aged 3–9 years. The 10 control individuals had the same characteristics of the ESES ones but presented a normal EEG. Recordings were undertaken in the awake and relaxed states with their eyes open. The complexity of background EEG was evaluated using the permutation entropy (PE) and sample entropy (SampEn) in combination with the ANOVA test. It can be seen that the entropy measures of EEG are significantly different between the ESES patients and normal control subjects. Then, a classification framework based on entropy measures and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) classifier is proposed to distinguish ESES and normal EEG signals. The results are promising and a classification accuracy of about 89% is achieved. PMID:24790547

  9. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System for Classification of Background EEG Signals from ESES Patients and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixian Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background electroencephalography (EEG, recorded with scalp electrodes, in children with electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES syndrome and control subjects has been analyzed. We considered 10 ESES patients, all right-handed and aged 3–9 years. The 10 control individuals had the same characteristics of the ESES ones but presented a normal EEG. Recordings were undertaken in the awake and relaxed states with their eyes open. The complexity of background EEG was evaluated using the permutation entropy (PE and sample entropy (SampEn in combination with the ANOVA test. It can be seen that the entropy measures of EEG are significantly different between the ESES patients and normal control subjects. Then, a classification framework based on entropy measures and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS classifier is proposed to distinguish ESES and normal EEG signals. The results are promising and a classification accuracy of about 89% is achieved.

  10. Correlation between temporal pole MRI abnormalities and surface ictal EEG patterns in patients with unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Garzon, Eliana; Oliveira, Pedro A L; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo S; Bianchin, Marino M; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study is to analyze ictal patterns observed during continuous Video-EEG monitoring in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS), and to correlate these EEG patterns to temporal pole abnormalities observed on magnetic resonance imaging exams. We analyzed 147 seizures from 35 patients with TLE and unilateral HS. Ictal patterns were classified and correlated to signal abnormalities and volumetric measures of the temporal poles. Volume differences over 10% were considered abnormal. The most frequent type of ictal pattern was rhythmic theta activity (RTA), encountered in 65.5% of the seizures. Rhythmic beta activity (RBA) was observed in 11% of the seizures, localized attenuation in 8%, interruption of epileptiform discharges in 6%, repetitive discharges in 5.5%, and rhythmic delta activity (RDA) in 4%. Sixty-six percent of the patients presented signal abnormalities in the temporal pole that were always ipsilateral to the HS. Sixty percent presented significant asymmetry of the temporal poles consisting of reduced volume that was also always ipsilateral to HS. Although patients with RTA as the predominant ictal pattern tended to present asymmetry of temporal poles (p=0.305), the ictal EEG pattern did not correlate with temporal pole asymmetry or signal abnormalities. RTA is the most frequent initial ictal pattern in patients with TLE due to unilateral HS. Temporal pole signal changes and volumetric reduction were commonly found in this group of patients, both abnormalities appearing always ipsilateral to the HS. However, neither temporal pole volume reduction nor signal abnormalities correlated with the predominant ictal pattern, suggesting that the temporal poles are not crucially involved in the process of epileptogenesis.

  11. Acute behavioral symptomatology at disappearance of epileptiform EEG abnormality. Paradoxical or "forced" normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, P

    1991-01-01

    Paradoxical or "forced" normalization of the EEG of patients with epilepsy was first described by Landolt in 1953. It refers to conditions where disappearance of epileptiform discharge from the routine scalp EEG is accompanied by some kind of behavioral disorder. The best known of these is a paranoid psychotic state in clear consciousness, which is also known as "alternative" psychosis. Thus, the issue is related to much older observations which indicated a "biological antagonism" between productive psychotic symptomatology and epileptic seizures, which led to the therapy of psychoses with artificially induced convulsions. Apart from psychotic episodes, the clinical manifestations of PN comprise dysphoric states, hysterical and hypochondriacal syndromes, affective disorders, and miscellanea. PN can be observed in both generalized and localization-related epilepsies as a rare complication. A subset where it is more frequently seen are in adults with persistent absence seizures when the latter become finally controlled by succinimide therapy. These seem to be the drugs with the highest hazard of precipitation of PN, but all other AEDs have also been suspected. Sleep disturbance by succinimide treatment may play a crucial role, but a variety of other factors are also involved, including psychosocial factors. The pathogenesis of this condition has given rise to some debate but remains still unresolved. Eleven of the most important hypotheses have been discussed and seem to converge into a more comprehensive hypothesis which basically assumes that, during PN, the epilepsy is still active subcortically, perhaps with spread of discharge along unusual pathways. This activity is supposed to provide energy and, possibly, some of the symptoms included in the psychotic syndrome. A critical clinical condition results, usually with a dysphoric symptomatology, where a development towards psychosis is impending but still depends on the presence or absence of a variety of risk

  12. Not EEG abnormalities but epilepsy is associated with autistic regression and mental functioning in childhood autism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdlička, M.; Komárek, V.; Propper, L.; Kulísek, R.; Zumrová, A.; Faladová, L.; Havlovicová, M.; Sedláček, Z.; Blatný, Marek; Urbánek, Tomáš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2004), s. 209-213 ISSN 1018-8827 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : childhood autism * epilepsy * EEG Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2004

  13. [Neurological and neuropsychological comparison between subjects with learning disorder and those suffering from learning difficulties when eeg abnormalities are detected at pediatric age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsetti, L; Viberti, B; Ariano, C; Isocrono, A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study is to compare data and investigate the points of overlap between the two clinical conditions. The hypothesis is to observe a similar cognitive and neuropsychological profile in LD children and subjects with electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities. The present study consists of a descriptive analysis of 35 children who have been tested for suspected learning disorder (LD). The diagnostic protocol includes a detailed cognitive and neuropsychological evaluation, as well as logopedic and neuropsychomotor assessment. Children carried neurological visit, EEG in waking and encephalic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In this study, anamnestic data and the results of some of the neuropsychological tests were administrated to children and subsequently were analyzed. Depending on EEG report (positive or negative), subjects were split in two subsample: subjects with "pure" LD and subjects who showed significant paroxysmal abnormalities at the EEG. This comparison shows that the profile of the two subsamples matches for many aspects. The only statistically significant differences are the increased impairment of meta-phonological skills and reading speed in children with EEG abnormalities. On the other hand, children with "pure" LD are inclined to manifest more frequently difficulties in highly-modularized processes, such as counting. In conclusion, the substantial overlap of the two profiles causes a reflection about the difficulty in making differential diagnosis in children who show a suspected LD, in absence of an accurate neurophysiological and neuroradiological investigation. The study did not find out useful markers to select subjects who should carry EEG and encephalic NMR. Our team established to keep EEG in waking in the diagnostic protocol, for all children with LD diagnosis. Only in case of abnormalities at the track, we prescribed EEG in sleeping and encephalic NMR.

  14. Abnormal response to photic stimulation in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: an EEG-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Emanuele; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Fabbri, Serena; Cecchi, Paolo; Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco

    2014-07-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a young-onset electroclinical syndrome, characterized by myoclonic, generalized tonic-clonic, and possibly typical absence seizures. Interictal electroencephalography (EEG) displays 3-6 Hz spike/polyspike and wave pattern. Photosensitivity is common. Our aim was to explore the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response evoked by a highly provocative photic stimulus in a cohort of people with JME compared to a group of nonphotosensitive healthy controls, and to investigate the hemodynamic phenomena seen in patients with photosensitive JME. We studied 13 JME patients and 18 healthy controls using EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) performed during low luminance intermittent photic stimulation (IPS). The BOLD response to IPS was investigated both in JME and control groups. In photosensitive JME subjects, we also performed a dynamic evaluation of BOLD signal changes evoked by the photoparoxysmal response (PPR) in a time frame ranging from 10 s before the onset of the EEG paroxysm up until 10 s afterward. The IPS evoked a positive BOLD response in striate and extrastriate visual areas, which was less in JME patients than in controls. Moreover, people with JME had a reduced positive BOLD response in the frontoparietal areas and putamen but a stronger negative BOLD response in the primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1) and in cortical regions belonging to the default mode network (DMN). In JME, the dynamic evaluation of BOLD signal changes related to PPR revealed an early positive response in the putamen and SM1, followed by BOLD signal decrements in the putamen, caudate nuclei, thalami, and SM1. Our results confirm the hypothesis that people with JME might have an altered interaction between the motor circuit and other neuronal networks, with prominent involvement of basal ganglia circuitry. The PPR could be a final expression of pathogenic phenomena occurring in the striato-thalamocortical system, possibly a core feature

  15. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. GABAergic neuron-specific loss of Ube3a causes Angelman syndrome-like EEG abnormalities and enhances seizure susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C.; Wallace, Michael L.; Sidorov, Michael S.; Burette, Alain C.; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M.; King, Ian F.; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J.; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) – all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. PMID:27021170

  17. Electroencephalogram (EEG) duration needed to detect abnormalities in angelman syndrome: is 1 hour of overnight recording sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Althea A; Goldman, Suzanne; Barnes, Gregory; Goodpaster, Luke; Malow, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    Approximately, 90% of patients with Angelman syndrome present with epileptic seizures. Obtaining an electroencephalogram (EEG) with sleep improves the chances of detecting ictal, interictal, and benign abnormal rhythms in Angelman syndrome. However, electroencephalograms, even when obtained during sleep, can be challenging in this population because of tactile sensitivities as well as anxiety related to a novel environment. We tested the hypothesis that 1 hour of sleep on an electroencephalogram would provide as much information as an entire night of electroencephalogram recording, yet more than a routine electroencephalogram conducted during the day. Overnight polysomnograms were collected in 14 children with Angelman syndrome seen at Vanderbilt University. All patients who obtained sleep within the first hour of the overnight electroencephalogram had interictal discharges recorded. Our results show that when sleep is obtained, a 1-hour electroencephalogram yields just as much information as recording an entire night. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Down's syndrome and related abnormalities in an area of high background radiation in coastal Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochupillai, N.; Verma, I.C.; Grewal, M.S.; Ramalingaswami, V.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that in a coastal area of Kerala, Southern India, the background radiation is between 1500 and 3000 mR/yr, this being due to the presence of Th-containing monazite mineral in the soil. During an epidemiological study of modular lesions of the thyroid in this area an apparently high prevalence of Down's syndrome and other forms of severe mental retardation was observed. A house-to-house survey of relevant abnormalities in this area was made, and also in a comparable control area without high background radiation. The frequency of chromosome aberrations in a sample of the population in the study and control areas was also investigated. The observations support the view that radiation induces genetic anomalies occur with above average frequency in the population living in the area with high background radiation. Only gross abnormalities evident in clinical examination were recorded. The study and control populations were similar in age and sex structure and general sociologic conditions. Severe mental retardation was the commonest abnormality encountered, and 85% of the abnormalities detected in the study population were genetic in origin, compared with 56% in the control population. Prevalence of Down's syndrome was 0.93 per 1000 in the study population. (U.K.)

  19. Spectral EEG abnormalities during vibrotactile encoding and quantitative working memory processing in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is associated with a number of cognitive impairments such as deficient sensory encoding or working memory processing. However, it is largely unclear how dysfunctions on these various levels of cortical processing contribute to alterations of stimulus-specific information representation. To test this, we used a well-established sequential frequency comparison paradigm, in which sensory encoding of vibrotactile stimuli can be assessed via frequency-specific steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs over primary somatosensory cortex (S1. Further, we investigated the maintenance of frequency information in working memory (WM in terms of parametric power modulations of induced beta-band EEG oscillations. In the present study schizophrenic patients showed significantly less pronounced SSEPs during vibrotactile stimulation than healthy controls. In particular, inter-trial phase coherence was reduced. While maintaining vibrotactile frequencies in WM, patients showed a significantly weaker prefrontal beta-power modulation compared to healthy controls. Crucially, patients exhibited no general disturbances in attention, as inferred from a behavioral test and from alpha-band event-related synchronization. Together, our results provide novel evidence that patients with schizophrenia show altered neural correlates of stimulus-specific sensory encoding and WM maintenance, suggesting an early somatosensory impairment as well as alterations in the formation of abstract representations of task-relevant stimulus information.

  20. The role of the standard EEG in clinical psychiatry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The EEG is a commonly requested test on patients attending psychiatric services, predominantly to investigate for a possible organic brain syndrome causing behavioural changes. AIMS: To assess referrals for EEG from psychiatric services in comparison with those from other sources. We determine which clinical factors were associated with an abnormal EEG in patients referred from psychiatric sources. METHODS: A retrospective review of EEG requests in a 1-year period was performed. Analysis of referral reasons for psychiatric patients was undertaken, and outcome of patients referred from psychiatric services post-EEG was reviewed. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred and seventy EEGs were reviewed, of which 91 (6.2%) were referred from psychiatry. Neurology service referrals had detection rates of abnormal EEGs of 27%, with psychiatric referrals having the lowest abnormality detection rate of 17.6% (p < 0.1). In psychiatric-referred patients the only significant predictors found of an abnormal EEG were a known history of epilepsy (p < 0.001), being on clozapine (p < 0.05), and a possible convulsive seizure (RR = 6.51). Follow-up data of 53 patients did not reveal a significant clinical impact of EEG results on patient management. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients are referred for EEG from psychiatric sources despite a relatively low index of suspicion of an organic brain disorders, based on reasons for referral documented, with an unsurprising low clinical yield.

  1. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Annette M. B.; Hofman, Winni F.; Hillen, Marij A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is—partly due to a lack of theory-driven research—no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck’s theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared to silence, whereas individuals with a low level of cortical arousal should be unaffected by background music or benefit from it. Participants were tested in a paired-associate learning paradigm consisting of three immediate word recall tasks, as well as a delayed recall task one week later. Baseline cortical arousal assessed with spontaneous EEG measurement in silence prior to the learning rounds was used for the analyses. Results revealed no interaction between cortical arousal and the learning condition (background music vs. silence). Instead, we found an unexpected main effect of cortical arousal in the beta band on recall, indicating that individuals with high beta power learned more vocabulary than those with low beta power. To substantiate this finding we conducted an exact replication of the experiment. Whereas the main effect of cortical arousal was only present in a subsample of participants, a beneficial main effect of background music appeared. A combined analysis of both experiments suggests that beta power predicts the performance in the word recall task, but that there is no effect of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. In light of these findings, we discuss whether searching for effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning, independent of factors such as inter-individual differences and task complexity, might be a red herring. Importantly, our findings emphasize the need for sufficiently powered research designs and exact

  2. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats B Küssner

    Full Text Available As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared to silence, whereas individuals with a low level of cortical arousal should be unaffected by background music or benefit from it. Participants were tested in a paired-associate learning paradigm consisting of three immediate word recall tasks, as well as a delayed recall task one week later. Baseline cortical arousal assessed with spontaneous EEG measurement in silence prior to the learning rounds was used for the analyses. Results revealed no interaction between cortical arousal and the learning condition (background music vs. silence. Instead, we found an unexpected main effect of cortical arousal in the beta band on recall, indicating that individuals with high beta power learned more vocabulary than those with low beta power. To substantiate this finding we conducted an exact replication of the experiment. Whereas the main effect of cortical arousal was only present in a subsample of participants, a beneficial main effect of background music appeared. A combined analysis of both experiments suggests that beta power predicts the performance in the word recall task, but that there is no effect of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. In light of these findings, we discuss whether searching for effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning, independent of factors such as inter-individual differences and task complexity, might be a red herring. Importantly, our findings emphasize the need for sufficiently powered research designs and

  3. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küssner, Mats B; de Groot, Annette M B; Hofman, Winni F; Hillen, Marij A

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared to silence, whereas individuals with a low level of cortical arousal should be unaffected by background music or benefit from it. Participants were tested in a paired-associate learning paradigm consisting of three immediate word recall tasks, as well as a delayed recall task one week later. Baseline cortical arousal assessed with spontaneous EEG measurement in silence prior to the learning rounds was used for the analyses. Results revealed no interaction between cortical arousal and the learning condition (background music vs. silence). Instead, we found an unexpected main effect of cortical arousal in the beta band on recall, indicating that individuals with high beta power learned more vocabulary than those with low beta power. To substantiate this finding we conducted an exact replication of the experiment. Whereas the main effect of cortical arousal was only present in a subsample of participants, a beneficial main effect of background music appeared. A combined analysis of both experiments suggests that beta power predicts the performance in the word recall task, but that there is no effect of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. In light of these findings, we discuss whether searching for effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning, independent of factors such as inter-individual differences and task complexity, might be a red herring. Importantly, our findings emphasize the need for sufficiently powered research designs and exact replications

  4. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  5. Abnormal pain processing in chronic tension-type headache: a high-density EEG brain mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, L.; Egsgaard, L.L.; Jensen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Central sensitization caused by prolonged nociceptive input from muscles is considered to play an important role for chronification of tension-type headache. In the present study we used a new high-density EEG brain mapping technique to investigate spatiotemporal aspects of brain activity...

  6. A statistically robust EEG re-referencing procedure to mitigate reference effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage, Kyle Q.; Kramer, Mark A.; Chu, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The electroencephalogram (EEG) remains the primary tool for diagnosis of abnormal brain activity in clinical neurology and for in vivo recordings of human neurophysiology in neuroscience research. In EEG data acquisition, voltage is measured at positions on the scalp with respect to a reference electrode. When this reference electrode responds to electrical activity or artifact all electrodes are affected. Successful analysis of EEG data often involves re-referencing procedures th...

  7. Seizure classification in EEG signals utilizing Hilbert-Huang transform

    OpenAIRE

    Oweis, Rami J; Abdulhay, Enas W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Classification method capable of recognizing abnormal activities of the brain functionality are either brain imaging or brain signal analysis. The abnormal activity of interest in this study is characterized by a disturbance caused by changes in neuronal electrochemical activity that results in abnormal synchronous discharges. The method aims at helping physicians discriminate between healthy and seizure electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. Method Discrimination in this ...

  8. The Correlation between Electroencephalography Amplitude and Interictal Abnormalities: Audit study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami F. Al-Rawas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between background amplitude and interictal abnormalities in routine electroencephalography (EEG. Methods: This retrospective audit was conducted between July 2006 and December 2009 at the Department of Clinical Physiology at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A total of 1,718 electroencephalograms (EEGs were reviewed. All EEGs were from patients who had been referred due to epilepsy, syncope or headaches. EEGs were divided into four groups based on their amplitude: group one ≤20 μV; group two 21–35 μV; group three 36–50 μV, and group four >50 μV. Interictal abnormalities were defined as epileptiform discharges with or without associated slow waves. Abnormalities were identified during periods of resting, hyperventilation and photic stimulation in each group. Results: The mean age ± standard deviation of the patients was 27 ± 12.5 years. Of the 1,718 EEGs, 542 (31.5% were abnormal. Interictal abnormalities increased with amplitude in all four categories and demonstrated a significant association (P <0.05. A total of 56 EEGs (3.3% had amplitudes that were ≤20 μV and none of these showed interictal epileptiform abnormalities. Conclusion: EEG amplitude is an important factor in determining the presence of interictal epileptiform abnormalities in routine EEGs. This should be taken into account when investigating patients for epilepsy. A strong argument is made for considering long-term EEG monitoring in order to identify unexplained seizures which may be secondary to epilepsy. It is recommended that all tertiary institutions provide EEG telemetry services.

  9. Characteristics of late-onset epilepsy and EEG findings in children with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneul Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics of late-onset epilepsy combined with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and the relationship between certain types of electroencephalography (EEG abnormalities in ASD and associated neuropsychological problems. Methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with ASD in early childhood and later developed clinical seizures were reviewed retrospectively. First, the clinical characteristics, language and behavioral regression, and EEG findings of these late-onset epilepsy patients with ASD were investigated. The patients were then classified into 2 groups according to the severity of the EEG abnormalities in the background rhythm and paroxysmal discharges. In the severe group, EEG showed persistent asymmetry, slow and disorganized background rhythms, and continuous sharp and slow waves during slow sleep (CSWS. Results: Between the two groups, there was no statistically significant difference in mean age (P=0.259, age of epilepsy diagnosis (P=0.237, associated family history (P=0.074, and positive abnormal magnetic resonance image (MRI findings (P=0.084. The severe EEG group tended to have more neuropsychological problems (P=0.074. The severe group statistically showed more electrographic seizures in EEG (P =0.000. Rett syndrome was correlated with more severe EEG abnormalities (P=0.002. Although formal cognitive function tests were not performed, the parents reported an improvement in neuropsychological function on the follow up checkup according to a parent’s questionnaire. Conclusion: Although some ASD patients with late-onset epilepsy showed severe EEG abnormalities, including CSWS, they generally showed an improvement in EEG and clinical symptoms in the longterm follow up. In addition, severe EEG abnormalities tended to be related to the neuropsychological function.

  10. Sleep EEG of Microcephaly in Zika Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Paulo Afonso Medeiros; Aguiar, Aline de Almeida Xavier; Miranda, Jose Lucivan; Falcao, Alexandre Loverde; Andrade, Claudia Suenia; Reis, Luigi Neves Dos Santos; Almeida, Ellen White R Bacelar; Bello, Yanes Brum; Monfredinho, Arthur; Kanda, Rafael Guimaraes

    2018-01-01

    Microcephaly (MC), previously considered rare, is now a health emergency of international concern because of the devastating Zika virus pandemic outbreak of 2015. The authors describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) findings in sleep EEG of epileptic children who were born with microcephaly in areas of Brazil with active Zika virus transmission between 2014 and 2017. The authors reviewed EEGs from 23 children. Nine were females (39.2%), and the age distribution varied from 4 to 48 months. MC was associated with mother positive serology to toxoplasmosis (toxo), rubella (rub), herpes, and dengue (1 case); toxo (1 case); chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (1 case); syphilis (1 case); and Zika virus (ZIKV) (10 cases). In addition, 1 case was associated with perinatal hypoxia and causes of 9 cases remain unknown. The main background EEG abnormality was diffuse slowing (10 cases), followed by classic (3 cases) and modified (5 cases) hypsarrhythmia. A distinct EEG pattern was seen in ZIKV (5 cases), toxo (2 cases), and undetermined cause (1 case). It was characterized by runs of frontocentrotemporal 4.5-13 Hz activity (7 cases) or diffuse and bilateral runs of 18-24 Hz (1 case). In ZIKV, this rhythmic activity was associated with hypsarrhythmia or slow background. Further studies are necessary to determine if this association is suggestive of ZIKV infection. The authors believe that EEG should be included in the investigation of all newly diagnosed congenital MC, especially those occurring in areas of autochthonous transmission of ZIKV.

  11. Quantitative EEG evaluation in patients with acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Souza Marques da Silva Braga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the use of quantitative EEG (qEEG in patients with acute encephalopathies (AEs and EEG background abnormalities. Method Patients were divided into favorable outcome (group A, 43 patients and an unfavorable outcome (group B, 5 patients. EEGLAB software was used for the qEEG analysis. A graphic of the spectral power from all channels was generated for each participant. Statistical comparisons between the groups were performed. Results In group A, spectral analysis revealed spectral peaks (theta and alpha frequency bands in 84% (38/45 of the patients. In group B, a spectral peak in the delta frequency range was detected in one patient. The remainder of the patients in both groups did not present spectral peaks. Statistical analysis showed lower frequencies recorded from the posterior electrodes in group B patients. Conclusion qEEG may be useful in the evaluations of patients with AEs by assisting with the prognostic determination.

  12. Resting-state EEG oscillatory dynamics in fragile X syndrome: abnormal functional connectivity and brain network organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melle J W van der Molen

    Full Text Available Disruptions in functional connectivity and dysfunctional brain networks are considered to be a neurological hallmark of neurodevelopmental disorders. Despite the vast literature on functional brain connectivity in typical brain development, surprisingly few attempts have been made to characterize brain network integrity in neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we used resting-state EEG to characterize functional brain connectivity and brain network organization in eight males with fragile X syndrome (FXS and 12 healthy male controls. Functional connectivity was calculated based on the phase lag index (PLI, a non-linear synchronization index that is less sensitive to the effects of volume conduction. Brain network organization was assessed with graph theoretical analysis. A decrease in global functional connectivity was observed in FXS males for upper alpha and beta frequency bands. For theta oscillations, we found increased connectivity in long-range (fronto-posterior and short-range (frontal-frontal and posterior-posterior clusters. Graph theoretical analysis yielded evidence of increased path length in the theta band, suggesting that information transfer between brain regions is particularly impaired for theta oscillations in FXS. These findings are discussed in terms of aberrant maturation of neuronal oscillatory dynamics, resulting in an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory neuronal circuit activity.

  13. Anormalidades focais no pequeno mal epiléptico EEG focal abnormalities in P.M. epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Camargo Lima

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados 31 pacientes com crises clínicas tipo P.M. cujos eletrencefalogramas revelaram disritmia centrencefálica secundária a atividade irritativa focal. A sua freqüência entre as disritmias centrencefálicas foi de 27% (19% secundárias a foco de localização profunda e 8% secundárias a foco de localização cortical. O tipo clínico das crises foi analizado, sendo ressaltado o fato de que 8 pacientes não apresentaram crise tipo P.M. puro (ausência: 4 apresentaram P.M. mioclônico e 4 P.M. acinético. A alta incidência de antecedentes pessoais de valor (33% foi enfatizada.Thirty one patients with P.M. epileptic crisis whose EEG showed centrencephalic disrythmia secondary to focal irritating activity where thoroughly observed. 19% of the cases showed centroencephalic disrythmia secondary to deeply situated focus and 8% to focus of cortical situation; in these cases the temporal projection was predominant. The clinical type of the crisis was analysed with emphasis on the fact that 8 patients did not show a "sheer" P.M. type crisis (absence: 4 showed mioclonic P.M. and 4 akynetic P.M. The high incidency of personal antecedents (33% is emphasized.

  14. Brain perfusion SPECT and EEG findings in Rett syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappalainen, R.; Liewendahl, K.; Nikkinen, P.; Sainio, K.; Riikonen, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients (mean age 8.4 + 5.3 years) with Rett syndrome (RS) were studied with EEG and 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT. Eleven patients had background abnormalities and 10 patients paroxysmal activity in EEG. Hypoperfusion of varying severity was detected in 11 patients, 7 patients having multiple lesions. Bifrontal hypoperfusion, observed in 6 patients, was the most distinctive finding. Hypoperfusion was observed also in other cortical regions, except for the occipital lobes. There was no correlation between severity of the background abnormality or presence of paroxysmal activity in EEG and grade of hypoperfusion. There was, however, an association between the severity of hypoperfusion and early manifestation of symptoms in patients with RS. Whether this early-onset group of patients represents a different disease entity or only reflects disease variability the basic pathology being the same, is a possibility that deserves further clarification. (au) 37 refs

  15. Brain perfusion SPECT and EEG findings in Rett syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, R. [Children`s Castle Hospital, Dept. of Child Neurology, Helsinki (Finland); Liewendahl, K.; Nikkinen, P. [Univ. Central Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Laboratory Dept., Helsinki (Finland); Sainio, K.; Riikonen, R.S. [Univ. Central Hospital, Child Neurology, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients (mean age 8.4 + 5.3 years) with Rett syndrome (RS) were studied with EEG and {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT. Eleven patients had background abnormalities and 10 patients paroxysmal activity in EEG. Hypoperfusion of varying severity was detected in 11 patients, 7 patients having multiple lesions. Bifrontal hypoperfusion, observed in 6 patients, was the most distinctive finding. Hypoperfusion was observed also in other cortical regions, except for the occipital lobes. There was no correlation between severity of the background abnormality or presence of paroxysmal activity in EEG and grade of hypoperfusion. There was, however, an association between the severity of hypoperfusion and early manifestation of symptoms in patients with RS. Whether this early-onset group of patients represents a different disease entity or only reflects disease variability the basic pathology being the same, is a possibility that deserves further clarification. (au) 37 refs.

  16. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task

    OpenAIRE

    K?ssner, Mats B.; de Groot, Annette M. B.; Hofman, Winni F.; Hillen, Marij A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared...

  17. EEG Beta power but not background music predicts the recall scores in an foreign-vocobulary learning tast

    OpenAIRE

    Küssner, M.B.; de Groot, A.M.B.; Hofman, W.F.; Hillen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared...

  18. EEG Beta power but not background music predicts the recall scores in an foreign-vocobulary learning tast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küssner, M.B.; de Groot, A.M.B.; Hofman, W.F.; Hillen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on

  19. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küssner, Mats B.; de Groot, Annette M. B.; Hofman, Winni F.; Hillen, Marij A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on

  20. Comparison of background EEG activity of different groups of patients with idiopathic epilepsy using Shannon spectral entropy and cluster-based permutation statistical testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Urigüen

    Full Text Available Idiopathic epilepsy is characterized by generalized seizures with no apparent cause. One of its main problems is the lack of biomarkers to monitor the evolution of patients. The only tools they can use are limited to inspecting the amount of seizures during previous periods of time and assessing the existence of interictal discharges. As a result, there is a need for improving the tools to assist the diagnosis and follow up of these patients. The goal of the present study is to compare and find a way to differentiate between two groups of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy, one group that could be followed-up by means of specific electroencephalographic (EEG signatures (intercritical activity present, and another one that could not due to the absence of these markers. To do that, we analyzed the background EEG activity of each in the absence of seizures and epileptic intercritical activity. We used the Shannon spectral entropy (SSE as a metric to discriminate between the two groups and performed permutation-based statistical tests to detect the set of frequencies that show significant differences. By constraining the spectral entropy estimation to the [6.25-12.89 Hz range, we detect statistical differences (at below 0.05 alpha-level between both types of epileptic patients at all available recording channels. Interestingly, entropy values follow a trend that is inversely related to the elapsed time from the last seizure. Indeed, this trend shows asymptotical convergence to the SSE values measured in a group of healthy subjects, which present SSE values lower than any of the two groups of patients. All these results suggest that the SSE, measured in a specific range of frequencies, could serve to follow up the evolution of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy. Future studies remain to be conducted in order to assess the predictive value of this approach for the anticipation of seizures.

  1. Interhemispheric synchrony in the neonatal EEG revisited: Activation Synchrony Index as a promising classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninah eKoolen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A key feature of normal neonatal EEG at term age is interhemispheric synchrony (IHS, which refers to the temporal co-incidence of bursting across hemispheres during trace alternant EEG activity. The assessment of IHS in both clinical and scientific work relies on visual, qualitative EEG assessment without clearly quantifiable definitions. A quantitative measure, activation synchrony index (ASI, was recently shown to perform well as compared to visual assessments. The present study set out to test whether IHS is stable enough for clinical use, and whether it could be an objective feature of EEG normality.We analyzed 31 neonatal EEG recordings that had been clinically classified as normal (n=14 or abnormal (n=17 using holistic, conventional visual criteria including amplitude, focal differences, qualitative synchrony, and focal abnormalities. We selected 20-minute epochs of discontinuous background pattern. ASI values were computed separately for different channel pair combinations and window lengths to define the optimal ASI intraindividual stability. Finally, ROC curves were computed to find trade-offs related to compromised data lengths, a common challenge in neonatal EEG studies.Using the average of four consecutive 2.5-minute epochs in the centro-occipital bipolar derivations gave ASI estimates that very accurately distinguished babies clinically classified as normal vs. abnormal. It was even possible to draw a cut-off limit (ASI~3.6 which correctly classified the EEGs in 97% of all cases. Finally, we showed that compromising the length of EEG segments from 20 minutes to 5 minutes leads to increased variability in ASI-based classification.Our findings support the prior literature that IHS is an important feature of normal neonatal brain function. We show that ASI may provide diagnostic value even at individual level, which strongly supports its use in prospective clinical studies on neonatal EEG as well as in the feature set of upcoming EEG

  2. Application of a novel measure of EEG non-stationarity as 'Shannon- entropy of the peak frequency shifting' for detecting residual abnormalities in concussed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cheng; Slobounov, Semyon

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this report was to propose a novel measure of non-stationarity of EEG signals, named Shannon- entropy of the peak frequency shifting (SEPFS). The feasibility of this method was documented comparing this measure with traditional time domain assessment of non-stationarity and its application to EEG data sets obtained from student-athletes before and after suffering a single episode of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with age-matched normal controls. Instead of assessing the power density distribution on the time-frequency plane, like previously proposed measures of signal non-stationarity, this new measure is based on the shift of the dominant frequency of the EEG signal over time. We applied SEPFS measure to assess the properties of EEG non-stationarity in subjects before and shortly after they suffered mTBI. Student-athletes at high risk for mTBI (n=265) were tested prior to concussive episodes as a baseline. From this subject pool, 30 athletes who suffered from mTBI were retested on day 30 post-injury. Additional subjects pool (student-athletes without history of concussion, n=30) were recruited and test-re-tested within the same 30 day interval. Thirty-two channels EEG signals were acquired in sitting eyes closed condition. The results showed that the SEPFS values significantly decreased in subjects suffering from mTBI. Specifically, reduced EEG non-stationarity was observed in occipital, temporal and central brain areas, indicating the possibility of residual brain dysfunctions in concussed individuals. A similar but less statistically significant trend was observed using traditional time domain analysis of EEG non-stationarity. The proposed measure has at least two merits of interest: (1) it is less affected by the limited resolution of time-frequency representation of the EEG signal; (2) it takes into account the neural characteristics of the EEG signal that have not been considered in previously proposed measures of non-stationarity. This new

  3. The best time for EEG recording in febrile seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Rezayi, Alireza; Togha, Mansoureh; Ahmadabadi, Farzad; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Azargashb, Eznollah; Khodaei, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that detection of epileptic discharge is unusual during the first postictal week of febrile seizure and others believe that EEGs carried out on the day of the seizure are abnormal in as many as 88% of the patients. In this study, we intend to compare early and late EEG abnormalities in febrile seizure. EEG was recorded during daytime sleep, 24-48 hours (early EEG) and 2 weeks (late EEG) after the seizure in 36 children with febrile seizure (FS), aged between 3 months and 6 years. EEGs that showed generalized or focal spikes, sharp, spike wave complex, and slowing were considered as abnormal EEG. Abnormalities of the first EEG were compared with those of second EEG. The most common abnormal epileptiform discharges recorded in the early EEG were slow waves (27.6%) and sharp waves in late EEG (36%). Distribution of abnormalities in early and late EEG showed no significant statistical difference. The early and late EEG recording had the same results in patient with febrile seizure.

  4. EEG use in a tertiary referral centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively audit all electroencephalograms (EEGs) done over a 2-month period in 2009 by the Neurophysiology Department at Cork University Hospital. There were 316 EEGs performed in total, of which 176\\/316 (56%) were done within 24 hours of request. Out of 316 EEGs, 208 (66%) were considered \\'appropriate\\' by SIGN and NICE guidelines; 79\\/208 (38%) had abnormal EEGs and 28 of these abnormal EEGs had epileptiform features. There were 108\\/316 (34%) \\'inappropriate\\' requests for EEG; of these 15\\/108 (14%) were abnormal. Of the 67\\/316 (21%) patients who had EEGs requested based on a history of syncope\\/funny turns: none of these patients had epileptiform abnormalities on their EEGs. Our audit demonstrates that EEGs are inappropriately over-requested in our institution in particular for cases with reported \\'funny turns\\' and syncope. The yield from EEGs in this cohort of patients was low as would be expected.

  5. Electroencephalogram abnormalities in full term infants with history of severe asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanti Halim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background An electroencephalogram (EEG is an electroimaging tool used to determine developmental and electrical problems in the brain. A history of severe asphyxia is a risk factor for these brain problems in infants. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of abnormal EEGs in full term neonates and to assess for an association with severe asphyxia, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, and spontaneous delivery. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Pediatric Outpatient Department of Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, from November 2013 to January 2014. Subjects were fullterm infants aged 1 month who were delivered and/or hospitalized at Sanglah Hospital. All subjects underwent EEG. The EEGs were interpreted by a pediatric neurology consultant, twice, with a week interval between readings. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Association between abnormal ECG and severe asphyxia were analyzed by Chi-square and multivariable logistic analyses. Results Of 55 subjects, 27 had a history of severe asphyxia and 28 were vigorous babies. Forty percent (22/55 of subjects had abnormal EEG findings, 19/22 of these subjects having history of severe asphyxia, 15/22 had history of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, and 20/22 were delievered vaginally. There were strong correlations between the prevalence of abnormal EEG and history of severe asphyxia, HIE, and spontaneous delivery. Conclusion Prevalence of abnormal EEG among full-term neonates referred to neurology/growth development clinic is around 40%, with most of them having a history of severe asphyxia. Abnormal EEG is significantly associated to severe asphyxia, HIE, and spontaneous delivery.

  6. Hemizygous Le-Cre Transgenic Mice Have Severe Eye Abnormalities on Some Genetic Backgrounds in the Absence of LoxP Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorà, Natalie J.; Collinson, J. Martin; Hill, Robert E.; West, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Eye phenotypes were investigated in Le-CreTg/−; Pax6fl/+ mice, which were expected to show tissue-specific reduction of Pax6 in surface ectoderm derivatives. To provide a better comparison with our previous studies of Pax6+/− eye phenotypes, hemizygous Le-CreTg/− and heterozygous Pax6fl/+mice were crossed onto the CBA/Ca genetic background. After the Le-Cre transgene had been backcrossed to CBA/Ca for seven generations, significant eye abnormalities occurred in some hemizygous Le-CreTg/−; Pax6+/+ controls (without a floxed Pax6fl allele) as well as experimental Le-CreTg/−; Pax6fl/+ mice. However, no abnormalities were seen in Le-Cre−/−; Pax6fl/+ or Le-Cre−/−; Pax6+/+ controls (without the Le-Cre transgene). The severity and frequency of the eye abnormalities in Le-CreTg/−; Pax6+/+ control mice diminished after backcrossing Le-CreTg/− mice to the original FVB/N strain for two generations, showing that the effect was reversible. This genetic background effect suggests that the eye abnormalities are a consequence of an interaction between the Le-Cre transgene and alleles of unknown modifier genes present in certain genetic backgrounds. The abnormalities were also ameliorated by introducing additional Pax6 gene copies on a CBA/Ca background, suggesting involvement of Pax6 depletion in Le-CreTg/−; Pax6+/+ mice rather than direct action of Cre recombinase on cryptic pseudo-loxP sites. One possibility is that expression of Cre recombinase from the Pax6-Le regulatory sequences in the Le-Cre transgene depletes cofactors required for endogenous Pax6 gene expression. Our observation that eye abnormalities can occur in hemizygous Le-CreTg/−; Pax6+/+ mice, in the absence of a floxed allele, demonstrates the importance of including all the relevant genetic controls in Cre-loxP experiments. PMID:25272013

  7. EEG changes in children born to epileptic parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Morozov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptiform EEG changes are much more common in children whose parents are epileptic than in the population. There is evidence that subclinical epileptiform activity affects children’s intellect and behavior. These changes need timely detection and therapy. Objective: to determine the specific features and rates of EEG abnormalities in children born to parents with epilepsy. Patients and methods. The brain bioelectrical activity of 47 children born to epileptic fathers, 53 children born to epileptic mothers, and 46 children born to healthy parents (a control group was evaluated via video EEG monitoring method on an Encephalan 9 apparatus (Medicom MTD, Taganrog, Russia. Results and discussion. Epileptiform EEG activity was significantly more frequently recorded in the children born to epileptic patients than in the control children. There was no significant difference in the detection rate of epileptiform activity in the groups of children, whose parents had epilepsy. EEG changes were significantly more common in children whose parents had idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The children born to epileptic mothers were more often recorded to have impaired bioelectrical activity of organic nature as a regional continued deceleration of basic activity and its deceleration in the background recording. Epileptiform activity was subclinical in the majority of cases. At the same time, it was unaccompanied by clinical manifestations in all the control children. Regional epileptiform activity was predominant in the study and control groups. 

  8. Quantitative EEG and medial temporal lobe atrophy in Alzheimer′s dementia: Preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Ji Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: The electroencephalogram (EEG abnormalities in Alzheimer′s disease (AD have been widely reported, and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA is one of the hallmarks in early stage of AD. We aimed to assess the relationship between EEG abnormalities and MTLA and its clinical validity. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 patients with AD were recruited (the mean age: 77.83 years. Baseline EEGs were analyzed with quantitative spectral analysis. MTLA was assessed by a T1-axial visual rating scale (VRS. Results: In relative power spectrum analysis according to the right MTLA severity, the power of theta waves in C4, T4, F4, F8, and T5 increased significantly and the power of beta waves in T6, C4, T4, F8, T5, P3, T3, and F7 decreased significantly in severe atrophy group. In relative power spectrum analysis according to the left MTLA severity, the power of theta waves in T3 increased significantly and that of beta waves in P4, T6, C4, F4, F8, T5, P3, C3, T3, F3, and F7 decreased significantly in severe atrophy group. Conclusion: The severe MTLA group, regardless of laterality, showed more severe quantitative EEG alterations. These results suggest that quantitative EEG abnormalities are correlated with the MTLA, which may play an important role in AD process.

  9. Overcoming qEEG abnormalities and reward gene deficits during protracted abstinence in male psychostimulant and polydrug abusers utilizing putative dopamine D₂ agonist therapy: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas J H; Morse, Siobhan; Giordano, John; Chen, Amanda Lih Chaun; Thompson, James; Allen, Cameron; Smolen, Andrew; Lubar, Joel; Stice, Eric; Downs, B William; Waite, Roger L; Madigan, Margaret A; Kerner, Mallory; Fornari, Frank; Braverman, Eric R

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that in both food- and drug-addicted individuals there is "dopamine resistance" associated with the DRD2 gene A1 allele. Based on earlier studies, evidence is emerging wherein the potential of utilizing a natural, nonaddicting, safe, putative D2 agonist may play a significant role in the recovery of individuals with reward deficiency syndrome, including those addicted to psychoactive chemicals. Positive outcomes demonstrated by quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) imaging in a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study involving oral Synaptose Complex KB220Z™ showed an increase of alpha waves and low beta wave activity in the parietal brain region. Using t statistics, significant differences observed between placebo and Synaptose Complex KB220Z™ consistently occurred in the frontal regions after week 1 and then again after week 2 of analyses (P = 0.03). This is the first report to demonstrate involvement of the prefrontal cortex in the qEEG response to a natural putative D2 agonist (Synaptose Complex KB220Z™), especially evident in dopamine D2 A1 allele subjects. Independently, we have further supported this finding with an additional study of 3 serious polydrug abusers undergoing protracted abstinence who carried the DRD2 A1 allele. Significant qEEG differences were found between those who received 1 dose of placebo compared with those who were administered Synaptose Complex KB220Z™. Synaptose Complex KB220Z™ induced positive regulation of the dysregulated electrical activity of the brain in these addicts. The results are indicative of a phase change from low amplitude or low power in the brain to a more regulated state by increasing an average of 6.169 mV(2) across the prefrontal cortical region. In the first experiment we found that while 50% of the subjects carried the DRD2 A1 allele, 100% carried ≥ 1 risk allele. Specifically, based on the proposed addiction risk score for these 14 subjects, 72% had

  10. Predictive Values of Electroencephalography (EEG) in Epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictive Values of Electroencephalography (EEG) in Epilepsy Patients with Abnormal Behavioural Symptoms. OR Obiako, SO Adeyemi, TL Sheikh, LF Owolabi, MA Majebi, MO Gomina, F Adebayo, EU Iwuozo ...

  11. Seizure classification in EEG signals utilizing Hilbert-Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhay Enas W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification method capable of recognizing abnormal activities of the brain functionality are either brain imaging or brain signal analysis. The abnormal activity of interest in this study is characterized by a disturbance caused by changes in neuronal electrochemical activity that results in abnormal synchronous discharges. The method aims at helping physicians discriminate between healthy and seizure electroencephalographic (EEG signals. Method Discrimination in this work is achieved by analyzing EEG signals obtained from freely accessible databases. MATLAB has been used to implement and test the proposed classification algorithm. The analysis in question presents a classification of normal and ictal activities using a feature relied on Hilbert-Huang Transform. Through this method, information related to the intrinsic functions contained in the EEG signal has been extracted to track the local amplitude and the frequency of the signal. Based on this local information, weighted frequencies are calculated and a comparison between ictal and seizure-free determinant intrinsic functions is then performed. Methods of comparison used are the t-test and the Euclidean clustering. Results The t-test results in a P-value Conclusion An original tool for EEG signal processing giving physicians the possibility to diagnose brain functionality abnormalities is presented in this paper. The proposed system bears the potential of providing several credible benefits such as fast diagnosis, high accuracy, good sensitivity and specificity, time saving and user friendly. Furthermore, the classification of mode mixing can be achieved using the extracted instantaneous information of every IMF, but it would be most likely a hard task if only the average value is used. Extra benefits of this proposed system include low cost, and ease of interface. All of that indicate the usefulness of the tool and its use as an efficient diagnostic tool.

  12. Subclinical white matter lesions and medial temporal lobe atrophy are associated with EEG slowing in a memory clinic cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramberger, Milica G; Giske, Katarina; Cavallin, Lena; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Andersson, Thomas; Winblad, Bengt; Jelic, Vesna

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the relationship between electroencephalographic (EEG) findings obtained by standardized visual analysis, subclinical white matter lesions (WML) and brain atrophy in a large memory clinic population. Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=58), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=141), subjective cognitive impairment (SCI, n=194) had clinical, MRI based WML severity and regional atrophy assessments, and routine resting EEG recording. Background activity (BA) and episodic and continuous abnormalities were assessed visually in EEG. WML (p=0.006) and atrophy in medial temporal regions (MTA) (p=atrophy in a memory clinic population. Even the standard visually assessed EEG can complement a memory clinic diagnostic workup. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in cerebral hemodynamics and amplitude integrated EEG in an asphyxiated newborn during and after cool cap treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancora, Gina; Maranella, Eugenia; Locatelli, Chiara; Pierantoni, Luca; Faldella, Giacomo

    2009-06-01

    Amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) were applied in a newborn with a moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy before, during and after brain cooling. At 2h of life a selective head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia was started and maintained for 72h. aEEG background pattern improved from severely abnormal to normal during the first 17h of life. NIRS revealed a reduction in cerebral blood volume (CBV) during hypothermia that recovered during the rewarming period, whereas brain oxygenation remained stable. As brain cooling is supposed to reduce delayed hyperemia and help to maintain neuronal metabolism following cerebral insults, aEEG and NIRS monitoring may be useful during hypothermic treatment in order to document changes in CBV and brain oxygenation possibly reflecting the efficacy of hypothermia.

  14. Effect of carbamazepine (Tegretol) on seizure and EEG patterns in monkeys with alumina-induced focal motor and hippocampal foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, J; Grewal, R S

    1976-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of chronic carbamazepine (Tegretol) medication on focal seizures and associated interictal EEG abnormalities in Rhesus monkeys with alumina-induced foci in either the sensorimotor cortex or the hipocampus was investigated. In both groups of animals, carbamazepine produced qualitative control of visible seizures and reduced intracortical spike propagation, but did not cause complete normalization of the background EEG; quantitative indices, such as spike density and amount of paroxysmal discharge representative of abnormal EEG activity, were significantly reduced with respect to predrug values during medication and after cessation as well. Threshold to pentylenetetrazol was elevated by carbamazepine in both groups of epileptic monkeys. Aggressivity and other clinical manifestations in monekys with hippocampal foci were markedly reduced by carbamazepine.

  15. Early-onset acquired epileptic aphasia (Landau-Kleffner syndrome, LKS) and regressive autistic disorders with epileptic EEG abnormalities: the continuing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonna, Thierry; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2010-10-01

    Early-onset acquired epileptic aphasia (Landau-Kleffner syndrome) may present as a developmental language disturbance and the affected child may also exhibit autistic features. Landau-Kleffner is now seen as the rare and severe end of a spectrum of cognitive-behavioural symptoms that can be seen in idiopathic (genetic) focal epilepsies of childhood, the benign end being the more frequent typical rolandic epilepsy. Several recent studies show that many children with rolandic epilepsy have minor developmental cognitive and behavioural problems and that some undergo a deterioration (usually temporary) in these domains, the so-called "atypical" forms of the syndrome. The severity and type of deterioration correlate with the site and spread of the epileptic spikes recorded on the electroencephalogram within the perisylvian region, and continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) frequently occur during this period of the epileptic disorder. Some of these children have more severe preexisting communicative and language developmental disorders. If early stagnation or regression occurs in these domains, it presumably reflects epileptic activity in networks outside the perisylvian area, i.e. those involved in social cognition and emotions. Longitudinal studies will be necessary to find out if and how much the bioelectrical abnormalities play a causal role in these subgroup of children with both various degrees of language and autistic regression and features of idiopathic focal epilepsy. One has to remember that it took nearly 40 years to fully acknowledge the epileptic origin of aphasia in Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the milder acquired cognitive problems in rolandic epilepsies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Seizures, electroencephalographic abnormalities, and outcome of ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Peralta, Ana Rita; Martins, Hugo; Casimiro, Carlos; Morgado, Carlos; Franco, Ana Catarina; Viana, Pedro; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia; Pinho E Melo, Teresa; Paiva, Teresa; Ferro, José M

    2017-12-01

    Seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities have been associated with unfavorable stroke functional outcome. However, this association may depend on clinical and imaging stroke severity. We set out to analyze whether epileptic seizures and early EEG abnormalities are predictors of stroke outcome after adjustment for age and clinical/imaging infarct severity. A prospective study was made on consecutive and previously independent acute stroke patients with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score ≥ 4 on admission and an acute anterior circulation ischemic lesion on brain imaging. All patients underwent standardized clinical and diagnostic assessment during admission and after discharge, and were followed for 12 months. Video-EEG (<60 min) was performed in the first 72 h. The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score quantified middle cerebral artery infarct size. The outcomes in this study were an unfavorable functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] ≥ 3) and death (mRS = 6) at discharge and 12 months after stroke. Unfavorable outcome at discharge was independently associated with NIHSS score (p = 0.001), EEG background activity slowing (p < 0.001), and asymmetry (p < 0.001). Unfavorable outcome 1 year after stroke was independently associated with age (p = 0.001), NIHSS score (p < 0.001), remote symptomatic seizures (p = 0.046), EEG background activity slowing (p < 0.001), and asymmetry (p < 0.001). Death in the first year after stroke was independently associated with age (p = 0.028), NIHSS score (p = 0.001), acute symptomatic seizures (p = 0.015), and EEG suppression (p = 0.019). Acute symptomatic seizures were independent predictors of vital outcome and remote symptomatic seizures of functional outcome in the first year after stroke. Therefore, their recognition and prevention strategies may be clinically relevant. Early EEG abnormalities were independent predictors and comparable to age and early

  17. Diagnostic Role of ECG Recording Simultaneously With EEG Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirli, Mustafa Tansel; Aparci, Mustafa; Kendirli, Nurten; Tekeli, Hakan; Karaoglan, Mustafa; Senol, Mehmet Guney; Togrol, Erdem

    2015-07-01

    Arrhythmia is not uncommon in the etiology of syncope which mimics epilepsy. Data about the epilepsy induced vagal tonus abnormalities have being increasingly reported. So we aimed to evaluate what a neurologist may gain by a simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in the patients who underwent EEG testing due to prediagnosis of epilepsy. We retrospectively evaluated and detected ECG abnormalities in 68 (18%) of 376 patients who underwent EEG testing. A minimum of 20 of minutes artifact-free recording were required for each patient. Standard 1-channel ECG was simultaneously recorded in conjunction with the EEG. In all, 28% of females and 14% of males had ECG abnormalities. Females (mean age 49 years, range 18-88 years) were older compared with the male group (mean age 28 years, range 16-83 years). Atrial fibrillation was more frequent in female group whereas bradycardia and respiratory sinus arrhythmia was higher in male group. One case had been detected a critical asystole indicating sick sinus syndrome in the female group and treated with a pacemaker implantation in the following period. Simultaneous ECG recording in conjunction with EEG testing is a clinical prerequisite to detect and to clarify the coexisting ECG and EEG abnormalities and their clinical relevance. Potentially rare lethal causes of syncope that mimic seizure or those that could cause resistance to antiepileptic therapy could effectively be distinguished by detecting ECG abnormalities coinciding with the signs and abnormalities during EEG recording. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  18. Multichannel EEG Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caat, Michael ten

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) measures electrical brain activity by electrodes attached to the scalp. Multichannel EEG refers to a measurement with a large number of electrodes. EEG has clinical as well as scientific applications, including neurology, psychology, pharmacy, linguistics, and biology.

  19. Continuous EEG Monitoring in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian Kærsmose; Wellwood, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous EEG (cEEG) may allow monitoring of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and seizures, including non-convulsive seizures (NCSz), and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). We aimed to evaluate: (a) the diagnostic...

  20. A comparison of EEG spectral entropy with conventional quantitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of EEG spectral entropy with conventional quantitative EEG at varying depths of sevoflurane anaesthesia. PR Bartel, FJ Smith, PJ Becker. Abstract. Background and Aim: Recently an electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral entropy module (M-ENTROPY) for an anaesthetic monitor has become commercially ...

  1. Acute EEG findings in HIV-infected Zambian adults with new-onset seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elafros, Melissa A.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Kalungwana, Lisa; Potchen, Michael J.; Bositis, Christopher M.; Koralnik, Igor J.; Theodore, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe acute EEG findings in HIV-infected adults with new-onset seizure, assess baseline clinical characteristics associated with EEG abnormalities, and evaluate the relationship between EEG abnormalities and recurrent seizure. Methods: Eighty-one HIV-infected adults with new-onset seizure had EEG recordings during their index admission. Baseline characteristics assessed included HIV stage, seizure semiology, serum and CSF studies, neuroimaging, cognitive function based on the Zambian Mini-Mental State Examination and International HIV Dementia Scale, and psychiatric symptoms using the Shona Symptom Questionnaire. We evaluated the relationship between baseline characteristics and EEG abnormalities. Patients were followed for seizure recurrence, and the association between acute EEG abnormalities and seizure recurrence was assessed. Death was a secondary outcome. Results: Fifty-five patients had abnormal EEGs (68%): 18 (22%) had interictal spikes (12) or a recorded seizure (6). Among baseline clinical characteristics, more advanced HIV disease (p = 0.039) and any imaging abnormality (p = 0.027) were associated with abnormal EEGs. Cortical (p = 0.008) and white matter (p = 0.004) abnormalities were associated with slow posterior dominant rhythm. Patients were followed for a median of 303 days (interquartile range 103–560). Twenty-four (30%) died and 23 (28%) had recurrent seizures. EEG abnormalities were not associated with recurrent seizure. There was a nonsignificant association between seizures recorded during EEG and death (67% vs 26%, p = 0.051). Conclusions: EEG abnormalities are common in this population, particularly in patients with imaging abnormalities and advanced HIV. Acute EEG abnormalities were not associated with recurrent seizure, but high mortality rates during follow-up limited this analysis. PMID:25740861

  2. Sleepwalking and night terrors in adulthood clinical EEG findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, C R; Vela-Bueno, A; Bixler, E O; Schweitzer, P K; Kales, A

    1980-07-01

    This is the first controlled study to show a lack of relation between a positive history of sleepwalking or night terrors in adults and daytime EEG abnormalities. We recorded a standard clinical EEG on 35 adult sleepwalkers (SW), 35 adult night terror patients (NT), and 35 control subjects (CS). Three subjects in the SW group showed abnormalities: one during both the resting record (RR) and hyperventilation (HV), and two only during HV. None in the NT group showed any EEG abnormality. Two control subjects showed abnormalities of both RR and HV, and a third only during HV. The number of abnormal EEGs within each group was limited, and the three groups did not significantly differ from one another. Our results suggest that the daytime clinical EEG is of limited value in evaluating adults with the primary complaint of sleepwalking or night terrors. However, further all-night sleep EEG studies utilizing clinical montage are needed to investigate the temporal relationship of sleepwalking and night terror events to possible EEG abnormalities.

  3. The relationship between intra-operative entropy of the EEG and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Background. Entropy is based on the extent of order in both the cortical EEG and facial EMG (FEMG) signals, measured from the patient's forehead. Order equals regularity of the EEG signal. In an awake patient, the. EEG is very irregular and the entropy high. As the level of anesthesia deepens, the EEG becomes more ...

  4. Evidence of brain abnormality in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Bauer, J.; Singh, D.D.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    Markers of brain abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) were studied to explore whether physical brain disorder is associated with an increased risk of PNES. Evidence of epileptiform EEG changes, MRI abnormalities, and neuropsychological (NPS)

  5. Clapping-surpressed focal spikes in EEG may be unique for the patients with rett syndrome : a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yudan; Liu, Chang; Shi, Mingchao; Cui, Li

    2016-06-13

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects females. Typical features include a loss of purposeful hand skills, development of hand stereotypies, loss of spoken language, gait abnormalities, and acquired microcephaly. However, Rett syndrome hasn't been recognized by clinical doctors at the early stage. So we need to find some special characters. We reported a Chinese case of Rett syndrome, exhibiting continuous centrotemporal spikes in EEG with paroxysmal suppression by hand stereotypies (hand clapping). The child, female, 4 years old, presented with a significant regression in her spoken language skills, hand stereotypies (hand clapping and hand wringing), a wider based gait with difficulties in balance, repeated abnormal behaviors (bruxism and head banging). With her clinical-history, Rett syndrome was suspected and genetic testing with mutation in MECP2 confirmed the diagnosis. Her EEG showed slow acticity in background and revealed a specific feature that continuous centrotemporal spikes can be suppressed by the repeated hand clapping. And when the hand stopped, the spikes reoccured again. This unique EEG signature has rarely been reported, which will expand the spectrum of EEG abnormalities in Rett syndrome.

  6. EEG indices in patients with high risk of ischemic stroke as predictors of initial disturbed cerebral circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal changes were detected in EEG in patients with high risk of ischemic stroke (higher level than in the population. These changes show the disturbances in forming mechanisms of functional condition of cerebrum during the calm wakeful period. Changes were represented by: the registration of EEG IV- type (the E.A. Zhirmunsky type which was characterized by disorganization of alpha activity and of slow waves; the instability of pattern during the record of background activity; the paroxysmal activity in form of flashes of the bilateral synchronized waves; the strengthening of low-frequency and high-amplitude β-activity. Revealed changes in EEG show the presence of initial disturbed cerebral circulation and can be recommended as predictors of these disturbances.

  7. Epileptiform abnormalities and quantitative EEG in children with attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder Atividade epileptiforme e eletrencefalograma quantitativo em crianças com transtorno de déficit de atenção/hiperatividade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu Corrêa Fonseca

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There is much controversy about the importance of the electroencephalogram (EEG in assessing the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. The objective of this study was to assess the use of EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG in ADHD children. Thirty ADHD children and 30 sex- and age-matched controls with no neurological or psychiatric problems were studied. The EEG was recorded from 15 electrode sites during an eyes-closed resting condition. Epileptiform activity was assessed, as were the absolute and relative powers in the classical bands after application of the Fast Fourier transform. Epileptiform activity was found in 3 (10% ADHD children. As compared to the controls, the ADHD group showed significantly greater absolute delta and theta powers in a diffuse way, and also greater absolute beta power and smaller relative alpha 1 and beta powers at some electrodes. A logistic multiple regression model, allowed for 83.3% sensibility and specificity in diagnosing ADHD.Há controvérsias sobre a importância do eletrencefalogama (EEG na avaliação do transtorno de déficit de atenção/hiperatividade (TDAH. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, em crianças com TDAH, o EEG digital e quantitativo. Foram estudadas 30 crianças com TDAH e 30 sadias, sem evidências de problemas neurológicos ou psiquiátricos e pareadas por idade e gênero. Foi registrado o EEG em 15 posições de eletrodos, durante repouso e olhos fechados. Foi realizada pesquisa de atividade epileptiforme e feita análise de freqüências nas faixas clássicas, após aplicação da transformada rápida de Fourier. Foi encontrada atividade epileptiforme em 3 (10% crianças com TDAH. O grupo TDAH teve, em relação ao grupo controle, significativamente, maior potência absoluta delta e teta, de modo difuso, assim como maior potência absoluta beta e menor potência relativa alfa 1 e beta, em alguns eletrodos. Um modelo de regressão múltipla logística possibilitou sensibilidade e

  8. Correlation between the neonatal EEG and the neurological examination in the first year of life in infants with bacterial meningitis Correlación entre el EEG neonatal y el examen neurológico en el primer año de vida en recién nacidos con meningitis bacteriana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Poblano

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the contribution of neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG and its correlation with the neurological examination at age of 9 months in newborns with bacterial neonatal meningitis. METHOD: Twenty seven infants were studied with positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture for bacteria. We used the worse EEG result during acute phase of meningitis, and performed neurologic follow-up after discharge from hospital. Background cerebral activity was classified as normal or mildly, moderately, or markedly abnormal. Neurologic examination outcomes was classified normal, mild abnormalities, moderate abnormalities and severe abnormalities. RESULTS: EEG performed in the neonatal period during acute bacterial meningitis predicts adverse outcome early at age of 9 months, and had a significant correlation with cephalic perimeter and active tone alterations. CONCLUSION: Neonatal EEG is useful for predicting abnormal outcomes, especially cephalic perimeter and active tone abnormalities at 9 months of age in infants with bacterial neonatal meningitis.OBJETIVO: Medir la contribución del electroencefalograma (EEG neonatal y su correlación con el examen neurológico a la edad de 9 meses en recién nacidos con meningitis neonatal bacteriana. MÉTODO: Se estudió a 27 neonatos con cultivos positivos de líquido cefalorraquídeo a bacterias. Se uso el peor resultado del EEG obtenido durante el periodo agudo de la meningitis. El seguimiento neurológico se efectuó tras el egreso hospitalario. La actividad de fondo del EEG se clasificó en normal y anormal leve, moderada y severa. El examen neurológico se clasificó en normal, y anormal leve moderado y severo. RESULTADOS: El EEG realizado durante el periodo neonatal durante la fase aguda de la meningitis bacteriana predice bien un resultado adverso a la edad de 9 meses, con correlaciones significativas con el perímetro cefálico y con las alteraciones del tono activo. CONCLUSION: El EEG neonatal es

  9. Persistent lactic acidosis in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy correlates with EEG grade and electrographic seizure burden.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, D M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Predicting at birth which infants with perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury will progress to significant encephalopathy remains a challenge. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether lactic acidosis at birth in asphyxiated neonates could predict the grade of EEG encephalopathy by examining the relationship between time taken for the normalisation of lactate, severity of encephalopathy and seizure burden. METHODS: Continuous early video-EEG monitoring was performed in babies at risk for hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Encephalopathy was graded from the EEG data. Total seizure burden (seconds) was calculated for each baby. Initial blood gas measurements of pH, base deficit and lactate were taken within 30 minutes of delivery. Time to normal serum lactate was determined in hours from birth for each infant. RESULTS: All 50 term infants had raised initial serum lactate (median (lower, upper quartiles) 11.7 (10.2, 14.9)). There were no significant differences between the initial serum lactate, pH and base deficit in infants with normal\\/mildly abnormal (n = 24), moderately abnormal (n = 14), severely abnormal (n = 5) and inactive EEGs (n = 7). Time to normal lactate varied significantly with EEG grade (median (lower, upper quartile) 6.0 (4.1, 9.5) for mild\\/normal EEG, 13.5 (6.8, 23.5) moderate EEG, 41.5 (30.0, 55.5) severe group, 12.0 (8.1, 21.5) inactive group; p<0.001). Time to normal lactate correlated significantly with EEG seizure burden (seconds; R = 0.446, p = 0.002). Mean (SD) time to normal lactate was 10.0 (7.2) hours in infants who did not have seizures and 27.3 (19.0) hours in the 13 infants with electrographic seizures (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Serum lactate levels in the first 30 minutes of life do not predict the severity of the ensuing encephalopathy. In contrast, sustained lactic acidosis is associated with severe encephalopathy on EEG and correlates with seizure burden.

  10. Improving the inter-rater agreement of hypsarrhythmia using a simplified EEG grading scale for children with infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytinger, John R; Hussain, Shaun A; Islam, Monica P; Millichap, John J; Patel, Anup D; Ryan, Nicole R; Twanow, Jaime-Dawn E; Heyer, Geoffrey L

    2015-10-01

    There is poor inter-rater agreement in determining the presence or absence of hypsarrhythmia among patients with infantile spasms. Yet, remission of hypsarrhythmia has been used as a clinical and research outcome measure. Two important features of hypsarrhythmia are the burden of epileptiform discharges and the amplitudes of background slow waves. We hypothesized that an electroencephalogram (EEG) grading scale emphasizing epileptiform discharge burden and the amplitudes of background slow waves would improve inter-rater agreement in interpreting hypsarrhythmia. Our aim was to assess inter-rater agreement of hypsarrhythmia using a novel and simplified EEG grading scale called the 'BASED' (Burden of Amplitudes and Epileptiform Discharges) score and compare this to the traditional method of EEG analysis. Twenty patients with infantile spasms were prospectively evaluated and electroclinical outcomes were determined. Forty EEG clips (20 pre-treatment and 20 post-treatment), representing the most severely abnormal five minute sleep epoch of each study, were assessed by three reviewers blinded to treatment and clinical outcome. Fleiss' kappa (К) was used to assess the inter-rater agreement in the interpretation of hypsarrhythmia when using the BASED score compared to the traditional method of EEG analysis. Reviewers had favorable inter-rater agreement using the BASED score in interpreting hypsarrhythmia (К: 0.87) compared to when using the traditional method of EEG analysis to interpret hypsarrhythmia (К: 0.09). The three reviewers all agreed on the presence or absence of hypsarrhythmia in 37/40 (93%) epochs using the BASED score but in only 15/40 (38%) epochs using the traditional method of EEG analysis, p=infantile spasms clinical trials must better define criteria for hypsarrhythmia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical neuropsychiatric correlates and EEG findings among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean age was 4.8 (±3.9) years, with most subjects falling in the age group of 0-5 years(69.4%). Mixed specific developmental ... proportion had EEG abnormalities of the epileptiform types possibly reinforcing the previously known fact of prevalent subtle brain damage among African children. The need for preventive ...

  12. [EEG in Parkinson's disease and cerebral hypoxia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, W; Löwe, H P; Xenakis, C

    1978-03-01

    EEG-findings of a group of 95 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease were related to accompanying diseases inducing cerebral hypoxic hypoxidosis. The EEG in 59 to 74 per cent of our patients was abnormal but the changes were not specific. There was a correlation between age and EEG-abnormalities. On the other hand no association could be seen between EEG-changes and duration of the Parkinson's disease. At least 74 per cent of the patients suffered from concomitant cardiovascular complications and 36 of them had a severe pathologic EEG as well as a pathologic ECG. The results lead to the conclusion that in treatment of parkinsonian patients attention is to be paid to accompanying diseases as heart failure, angiopathy or anemia.

  13. Meditation and the EEG

    OpenAIRE

    West, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Previous research on meditation and the EEG is described, and findings relating to EEG patterns during meditation are discussed. Comparisons of meditation with other altered states are reviewed and it is concluded that, on the basis of existing EEG evidence, there is some reason for differentiating between meditation and drowsing. Research on alpha-blocking and habituation of the blocking response during meditation is reviewed, and the effects of meditation on EEG patterns outside of meditati...

  14. A physiology-based seizure detection system for multichannel EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ping Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG signals play a critical role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Multichannel EEGs contain more information than do single-channel EEGs. Automatic detection algorithms for spikes or seizures have traditionally been implemented on single-channel EEG, and algorithms for multichannel EEG are unavailable. METHODOLOGY: This study proposes a physiology-based detection system for epileptic seizures that uses multichannel EEG signals. The proposed technique was tested on two EEG data sets acquired from 18 patients. Both unipolar and bipolar EEG signals were analyzed. We employed sample entropy (SampEn, statistical values, and concepts used in clinical neurophysiology (e.g., phase reversals and potential fields of a bipolar EEG to extract the features. We further tested the performance of a genetic algorithm cascaded with a support vector machine and post-classification spike matching. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained 86.69% spike detection and 99.77% seizure detection for Data Set I. The detection system was further validated using the model trained by Data Set I on Data Set II. The system again showed high performance, with 91.18% detection of spikes and 99.22% seizure detection. CONCLUSION: We report a de novo EEG classification system for seizure and spike detection on multichannel EEG that includes physiology-based knowledge to enhance the performance of this type of system.

  15. Inflammatory and vascular placental lesions are associated with neonatal amplitude integrated EEG recording in early premature neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Paz-Levy

    Full Text Available Placental histologic examination can assist in revealing the mechanism leading to preterm birth. Accumulating evidence suggests an association between intrauterine pathological processes, morbidity and mortality of premature infants, and their long term outcome. Neonatal brain activity is increasingly monitored in neonatal intensive care units by amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG and indices of background activity and sleep cycling patterns were correlated with long term outcome. We hypothesized an association between types of placental lesions and abnormal neonatal aEEG patterns.To determine the association between the placental lesions observed in extreme preterm deliveries, and their neonatal aEEG patterns and survival.This prospective cohort study included extreme premature infants, who were born ≤ 28 weeks of gestation, their placentas were available for histologic examination, and had a continues aEEG, soon after birthn = 34. Infants and maternal clinical data were collected. aEEG data was assessed for percentage of depressed daily activity in the first 3 days of life and for sleep cycling. Associations of placental histology with clinical findings and aEEG activity were explored using parametric and non-parametric statistics.Twenty two out of the 34 newborns survived to discharge. Preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM or chorioamnionitis were associated with placental lesions consistent with fetal amniotic fluid infection (AFI or maternal under perfusion (MUP (P < 0.05. Lesions consistent with fetal response to AFI were associated with absence of SWC pattern during the 1st day of life. Fetal-vascular-thrombo-occlusive lesions of inflammatory type were negatively associated with depressed cerebral activity during the 1st day of life, and with aEEG cycling during the 2nd day of life (P<0.05. Placental lesions associated with MUP were associated with depressed neonatal cerebral activity during the first 3 days of life (P = 0

  16. Screening EEG in Aircrew Selection: Clinical Aerospace Neurology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jonathan B.; Riley, Terrence

    2001-01-01

    .0139% (4/28627). After review of the value of the EEG as a screening tool, the US Navy now uses EEG only for certain clinical indications (head injury, unexplained loss of consciousness, family history of epilepsy, and abnormal neurological exam). Currently the US Navy does not use EEG for screening for any flight applicant without a neurologic indication. In the US Navy, an electroencephalographic pattern is determined to be epileptiform by a neurologist.

  17. Added clinical value of the inferior temporal EEG electrode chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Justesen, Anders; Eskelund Johansen, Ann Berit; Martinussen, Noomi Ida; Wasserman, Danielle; Terney, Daniella; Meritam, Pirgit; Gardella, Elena; Beniczky, Sándor

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic added value of supplementing the 10-20 EEG array with six electrodes in the inferior temporal chain. EEGs were recorded with 25 electrodes: 19 positions of the 10-20 system, and six additional electrodes in the inferior temporal chain (F9/10, T9/10, P9/10). Five-hundred consecutive standard and sleep EEG recordings were reviewed using the 10-20 array and the extended array. We identified the recordings with EEG abnormalities that had peak negativities at the inferior temporal electrodes, and those that only were visible at the inferior temporal electrodes. From the 286 abnormal recordings, the peak negativity was at the inferior temporal electrodes in 81 cases (28.3%) and only visible at the inferior temporal electrodes in eight cases (2.8%). In the sub-group of patients with temporal abnormalities (n = 134), these represented 59% (peak in the inferior chain) and 6% (only seen at the inferior chain). Adding six electrodes in the inferior temporal electrode chain to the 10-20 array improves the localization and identification of EEG abnormalities, especially those located in the temporal region. Our results suggest that inferior temporal electrodes should be added to the EEG array, to increase the diagnostic yield of the recordings. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Syndrome of transient headache and neurological deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) in a patient with confusional symptoms, diffuse EEG abnormalities, and bilateral vasospasm in transcranial Doppler ultrasound: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo de la Cruz, M; Domínguez Rubio, R; Luque Buzo, E; Díaz Otero, F; Vázquez Alén, P; Orcajo Rincón, J; Prieto Montalvo, J; Contreras Chicote, A; Grandas Pérez, F

    2017-04-17

    HaNDL syndrome (transient headache and neurological deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis) is characterised by one or more episodes of headache and transient neurological deficits associated with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. To date, few cases of HaNDL manifesting with confusional symptoms have been described. Likewise, very few patients with HaNDL and confusional symptoms have been evaluated with transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). TCD data from patients with focal involvement reveal changes consistent with vasomotor alterations. We present the case of a 42-year-old man who experienced headache and confusional symptoms and displayed pleocytosis, diffuse slow activity on EEG, increased blood flow velocity in both middle cerebral arteries on TCD, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings suggestive of diffuse involvement, especially in the left hemisphere. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a patient with HaNDL, confusional symptoms, diffuse slow activity on EEG, and increased blood flow velocity in TCD. Our findings suggest a relationship between cerebral vasomotor changes and the pathophysiology of HaNDL. TCD may be a useful tool for early diagnosis of HaNDL. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Workers on transformation of the shelter object of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant into an ecologically-safe system show qEEG abnormalities and cognitive dysfunctions: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, Konstantyn; Perchuk, Iryna; Marazziti, Donatella

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed at assessing bioelectric activity and cognitive functions in the workers on the conversion project of the "Shelter" object (SO) of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant into an environmentally safe system. A total of 196 men were included and examined before (t0) and after (t1) working on the SO in the period 2004-2008. They underwent a qEEG and a battery of neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments. At t1, the organized type of qEEG shifted towards the disorganized one. An increase of spectral δ-power in the left frontotemporal area, of θ- and α-power in the left temporal area, with redistribution of α-activity to the front and reduction of dominant frequency in the left temporal area, were registered. Further, neurocognitive tests revealed the presence of mild cognitive disorders at t1. Interestingly, those subjects previously exposed to radiation with no consequences, were more resistant to these detrimental effects. Taken together, the disturbances observed may be considered as cognitive symptoms of a chronic fatigue syndrome resulting from the exposure to ionizing radiation. Simple and non-invasive assessments, such as those performed by us, may be helpful to detect early brain changes caused by the presence of radiological risk factors.

  20. The clinical use of quantitative EEG in cognitive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso de Medeiros Kanda

    Full Text Available Abstract The primary diagnosis of most cognitive disorders is clinically based, but the EEG plays a role in evaluating, classifying and following some of these disorders. There is an ongoing debate over routine use of qEEG. Although many findings regarding the clinical use of quantitative EEG are awaiting validation by independent investigators while confirmatory clinical follow-up studies are also needed, qEEG can be cautiously used by a skilled neurophysiologist in cognitive dysfunctions to improve the analysis of background activity, slow/fast focal activity, subtle asymmetries, spikes and waves, as well as in longitudinal follow-ups.

  1. SVM detection of epileptiform activity in routine EEG.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Routine electroencephalogram (EEG) is an important test in aiding the diagnosis of patients with suspected epilepsy. These recordings typically last 20-40 minutes, during which signs of abnormal activity (spikes, sharp waves) are looked for in the EEG trace. It is essential that events of short duration are detected during the routine EEG test. The work presented in this paper examines the effect of changing a range of input values to the detection system on its ability to distinguish between normal and abnormal EEG activity. It is shown that the length of analysis window in the range of 0.5s to 1s are well suited to the task. Additionally, it is reported that patient specific systems should be used where possible due to their better performance.

  2. Recording EEG In Young Children Without Sedation | Curuneaux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Although it has been considered that sedation in children undergoing EEG tests is effective and safe and complications are infrequent, occasionally adverse sedation-related events are presented. Objective The aim of this work was to determine if it is possible to carry out EEG in children up to 4 years old ...

  3. Quantitative EEG Applying the Statistical Recognition Pattern Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engedal, Knut; Snaedal, Jon; Hoegh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the discriminatory power of quantitative EEG (qEEG) applying the statistical pattern recognition (SPR) method to separate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients from elderly individuals without dementia and from other dementia patients. METHODS...

  4. EEG does not predict response to valproate treatment of aggression in patients with borderline and antisocial personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Roy R; Struve, Frederick A; Patrick, Gloria

    2003-04-01

    Previous investigations of the role of EEG in predicting response of aggressive patients to valproate therapy have yielded mixed results. In this study of borderline and antisocial personality disorder patients hospitalized with aggressive behavior, EEGs were obtained prior to treatment with valproate. Eight of 22 (36.4%) patients subsequently responsive to valproate had nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities, while 5 of 20 (25%) patients not responsive to valproate had nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities. Although more of the valproate responders than nonresponders had EEG abnormalities, the presence of nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities was not a statistically significant (X2 = 0.213, df = 1, p = 0.64) predictor of valproate response in personality disorder patients with aggression.

  5. Added clinical value of the inferior temporal EEG electrode chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach Justesen, Anders; Eskelund Johansen, Ann Berit; Martinussen, Noomi Ida

    2018-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic added value of supplementing the 10–20 EEG array with six electrodes in the inferior temporal chain. Methods EEGs were recorded with 25 electrodes: 19 positions of the 10–20 system, and six additional electrodes in the inferior temporal chain (F9/10, T9/10, P...... in the inferior chain) and 6% (only seen at the inferior chain). Conclusions Adding six electrodes in the inferior temporal electrode chain to the 10–20 array improves the localization and identification of EEG abnormalities, especially those located in the temporal region. Significance Our results suggest...

  6. EEG: Origin and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.; Mulert, C.; Lemieux, L.

    2010-01-01

    The existence of the electrical activity of the brain (i.e. the electroencephalogram or EEG) was discovered more than a century ago by Caton. After the demonstration that the EEG could be recorded from the human scalp by Berger in the 1920s, it made a slow start before it became accepted as a method

  7. Resting state in Alzheimer's disease: a concurrent analysis of Flash-Visual Evoked Potentials and quantitative EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartaglione Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate to what extent Alzheimer's Disease (AD affects Resting State activity, the possible impairment of independent electrophysiological parameters was determined in Eye-open and Eye-closed Conditions. Specifically, Flash-Visual Evoked Potential (F-VEP and quantitative EEG (q-EEG were examined to establish whether abnormalities of the former were systematically associated with changes of the latter. Methods Concurrently recorded F-VEP and q-EEG were comparatively analysed under Eye-open and Eye-closed Conditions in 11 Controls and 19 AD patients presenting a normal Pattern-Visual Evoked Potential (P-VEP. Between Condition differences in latencies of P2 component were matched to variations in spectral components of q-EEG. Results P2 latency increased in 10 AD patients with Abnormal Latency (AD-AL under Eye-closed Condition. In these patients reduction of alpha activity joined an increased delta power so that their spectral profile equated that recorded under Eye-open Condition. On the opposite, in Controls as well as in AD patients with Normal P2 Latency (AD-NL spectral profiles recorded under Eye-open and Eye-closed Conditions significantly differed from each other. At the baseline, under Eye-open Condition, the spectra overlapped each other in the three Groups. Conclusion Under Eye-closed Condition AD patients may present a significant change in both F-VEP latency and EEG rhythm modulation. The presence of concurrent changes of independent parameters suggests that the neurodegenerative process can impair a control system active in Eye-closed Condition which the electrophysiological parameters depend upon. F-VEP can be viewed as a reliable marker of such impairment.

  8. Topographic time-frequency decomposition of the EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T; Marti-Lopez, F; Valdes-Sosa, P

    2001-08-01

    Frequency-transformed EEG resting data has been widely used to describe normal and abnormal brain functional states as function of the spectral power in different frequency bands. This has yielded a series of clinically relevant findings. However, by transforming the EEG into the frequency domain, the initially excellent time resolution of time-domain EEG is lost. The topographic time-frequency decomposition is a novel computerized EEG analysis method that combines previously available techniques from time-domain spatial EEG analysis and time-frequency decomposition of single-channel time series. It yields a new, physiologically and statistically plausible topographic time-frequency representation of human multichannel EEG. The original EEG is accounted by the coefficients of a large set of user defined EEG like time-series, which are optimized for maximal spatial smoothness and minimal norm. These coefficients are then reduced to a small number of model scalp field configurations, which vary in intensity as a function of time and frequency. The result is thus a small number of EEG field configurations, each with a corresponding time-frequency (Wigner) plot. The method has several advantages: It does not assume that the data is composed of orthogonal elements, it does not assume stationarity, it produces topographical maps and it allows to include user-defined, specific EEG elements, such as spike and wave patterns. After a formal introduction of the method, several examples are given, which include artificial data and multichannel EEG during different physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Automatic Artifact Removal in EEG of Normal and Demented Individuals Using ICA–WT during Working Memory Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qazzaz, Noor Kamal; Hamid Bin Mohd Ali, Sawal; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Islam, Mohd Shabiul; Escudero, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing dementia is a global challenge in supporting personalized health care. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is a promising tool to support the diagnosis and evaluation of abnormalities in the human brain. The EEG sensors record the brain activity directly with excellent time resolution. In this study, EEG sensor with 19 electrodes were used to test the background activities of the brains of five vascular dementia (VaD), 15 stroke-related patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 15 healthy subjects during a working memory (WM) task. The objective of this study is twofold. First, it aims to enhance the recorded EEG signals using a novel technique that combines automatic independent component analysis (AICA) and wavelet transform (WT), that is, the AICA–WT technique; second, it aims to extract and investigate the spectral features that characterize the post-stroke dementia patients compared to the control subjects. The proposed AICA–WT technique is a four-stage approach. In the first stage, the independent components (ICs) were estimated. In the second stage, three-step artifact identification metrics were applied to detect the artifactual components. The components identified as artifacts were marked as critical and denoised through DWT in the third stage. In the fourth stage, the corrected ICs were reconstructed to obtain artifact-free EEG signals. The performance of the proposed AICA–WT technique was compared with those of two other techniques based on AICA and WT denoising methods using cross-correlation XCorr and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) (ANOVA, p ˂ 0.05). The AICA–WT technique exhibited the best artifact removal performance. The assumption that there would be a deceleration of EEG dominant frequencies in VaD and MCI patients compared with control subjects was assessed with AICA–WT (ANOVA, p ˂ 0.05). Therefore, this study may provide information on post-stroke dementia particularly VaD and stroke-related MCI patients

  10. Automatic Artifact Removal in EEG of Normal and Demented Individuals Using ICA-WT during Working Memory Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qazzaz, Noor Kamal; Hamid Bin Mohd Ali, Sawal; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Islam, Mohd Shabiul; Escudero, Javier

    2017-06-08

    Characterizing dementia is a global challenge in supporting personalized health care. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is a promising tool to support the diagnosis and evaluation of abnormalities in the human brain. The EEG sensors record the brain activity directly with excellent time resolution. In this study, EEG sensor with 19 electrodes were used to test the background activities of the brains of five vascular dementia (VaD), 15 stroke-related patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 15 healthy subjects during a working memory (WM) task. The objective of this study is twofold. First, it aims to enhance the recorded EEG signals using a novel technique that combines automatic independent component analysis (AICA) and wavelet transform (WT), that is, the AICA-WT technique; second, it aims to extract and investigate the spectral features that characterize the post-stroke dementia patients compared to the control subjects. The proposed AICA-WT technique is a four-stage approach. In the first stage, the independent components (ICs) were estimated. In the second stage, three-step artifact identification metrics were applied to detect the artifactual components. The components identified as artifacts were marked as critical and denoised through DWT in the third stage. In the fourth stage, the corrected ICs were reconstructed to obtain artifact-free EEG signals. The performance of the proposed AICA-WT technique was compared with those of two other techniques based on AICA and WT denoising methods using cross-correlation X C o r r and peak signal to noise ratio ( P S N R ) (ANOVA, p ˂ 0.05). The AICA-WT technique exhibited the best artifact removal performance. The assumption that there would be a deceleration of EEG dominant frequencies in VaD and MCI patients compared with control subjects was assessed with AICA-WT (ANOVA, p ˂ 0.05). Therefore, this study may provide information on post-stroke dementia particularly VaD and stroke-related MCI patients through

  11. Automatic Artifact Removal in EEG of Normal and Demented Individuals Using ICA–WT during Working Memory Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Kamal Al-Qazzaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing dementia is a global challenge in supporting personalized health care. The electroencephalogram (EEG is a promising tool to support the diagnosis and evaluation of abnormalities in the human brain. The EEG sensors record the brain activity directly with excellent time resolution. In this study, EEG sensor with 19 electrodes were used to test the background activities of the brains of five vascular dementia (VaD, 15 stroke-related patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and 15 healthy subjects during a working memory (WM task. The objective of this study is twofold. First, it aims to enhance the recorded EEG signals using a novel technique that combines automatic independent component analysis (AICA and wavelet transform (WT, that is, the AICA–WT technique; second, it aims to extract and investigate the spectral features that characterize the post-stroke dementia patients compared to the control subjects. The proposed AICA–WT technique is a four-stage approach. In the first stage, the independent components (ICs were estimated. In the second stage, three-step artifact identification metrics were applied to detect the artifactual components. The components identified as artifacts were marked as critical and denoised through DWT in the third stage. In the fourth stage, the corrected ICs were reconstructed to obtain artifact-free EEG signals. The performance of the proposed AICA–WT technique was compared with those of two other techniques based on AICA and WT denoising methods using cross-correlation X C o r r and peak signal to noise ratio ( P S N R (ANOVA, p ˂ 0.05. The AICA–WT technique exhibited the best artifact removal performance. The assumption that there would be a deceleration of EEG dominant frequencies in VaD and MCI patients compared with control subjects was assessed with AICA–WT (ANOVA, p ˂ 0.05. Therefore, this study may provide information on post-stroke dementia particularly VaD and stroke

  12. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Ages and Stages Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School ... Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic material inherited from one generation ...

  13. Validation of a smartphone-based EEG among people with epilepsy: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mckenzie, Erica D.; Lim, Andrew S P; Leung, Edward C W

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the ability of a smartphone-based electroencephalography (EEG) application, the Smartphone Brain Scanner-2 (SBS2), to detect epileptiform abnormalities compared to standard clinical EEG. The SBS2 system consists of an Android tablet wirelessly connected to a 14-electrode...

  14. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-09-04

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (Pretinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands.

  15. Resting state EEG oscillatory power differences in ADHD college students and their peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woltering Steven

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the most robust neural abnormalities differentiating individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD from typically developing controls are elevated levels of slow oscillatory activity (e.g., theta and reduced fast oscillatory activity (e.g., alpha and beta during resting-state electroencephalography (EEG. However, studies of resting state EEG in adults with ADHD are scarce and yield inconsistent findings. Methods EEG profiles, recorded during a resting-state with eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions, were compared for college students with ADHD (n = 18 and a nonclinical comparison group (n = 17. Results The ADHD group showed decreased power for fast frequencies, especially alpha. This group also showed increased power in the slow frequency bands, however, these effects were strongest using relative power computations. Furthermore, the theta/beta ratio measure was reliably higher for the ADHD group. All effects were more pronounced for the eyes-closed compared to the eyes-open condition. Measures of intra-individual variability suggested that brains of the ADHD group were less variable than those of controls. Conclusions The findings of this pilot study reveal that college students with ADHD show a distinct neural pattern during resting state, suggesting that oscillatory power, especially alpha, is a useful index for reflecting differences in neural communication of ADHD in early adulthood.

  16. Mindfulness based cognitive therapy improves frontal control in bipolar disorder: a pilot EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howells Fleur M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive processing in Bipolar Disorder is characterized by a number of attentional abnormalities. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy combines mindfulness meditation, a form of attentional training, along with aspects of cognitive therapy, and may improve attentional dysfunction in bipolar disorder patients. Methods 12 euthymic BD patients and 9 control participants underwent record of electroencephalography (EEG, band frequency analysis during resting states (eyes open, eyes closed and during the completion of a continuous performance task (A-X version, EEG event-related potential (ERP wave component analysis. The individuals with BD completed an 8-week MBCT intervention and record of EEG was repeated. Results (1 Brain activity, individuals with BD showed significantly decreased theta band power, increased beta band power, and decreased theta/beta ratios during the resting state, eyes closed, for frontal and cingulate cortices. Post MBCT intervention improvement over the right frontal cortex was seen in the individuals with BD, as beta band power decreased. (2 Brain activation, individuals with BD showed a significant P300-like wave form over the frontal cortex during the cue. Post MBCT intervention the P300-like waveform was significantly attenuated over the frontal cortex. Conclusions Individuals with BD show decreased attentional readiness and activation of non-relevant information processing during attentional processes. These data are the first that show, MBCT in BD improved attentional readiness, and attenuated activation of non-relevant information processing during attentional processes.

  17. Comparative EEG mapping studies in Huntington's disease patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painold, Annamaria; Anderer, Peter; Holl, Anna K; Letmaier, Martin; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Saletu, Bernd; Bonelli, Raphael M

    2010-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with prominent motor and cognitive decline. Previous studies with small sample sizes and methodological limitations have described abnormal electroencephalograms (EEG) in this cohort. The aim of the present study was to investigate objectively and quantitatively the neurophysiological basis of the disease in HD patients as compared to normal controls, utilizing EEG mapping. In 55 HD patients and 55 healthy controls, a 3-min vigilance-controlled EEG (V-EEG) was recorded during midmorning hours. Evaluation of 36 EEG variables was carried out by spectral analysis and visualized by EEG mapping techniques. To elucidate drug interference, the analysis was performed for the total group, unmedicated patients only and between treated and untreated patients. Statistical overall analysis by the omnibus significance test demonstrated significant (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) EEG differences between HD patients and controls. Subsequent univariate analysis revealed a general decrease in total power and absolute alpha and beta power, an increase in delta/theta power, and a slowing of the centroids of delta/theta, beta and total power. The slowing of the EEG in HD reflects a disturbed brain function in the sense of a vigilance decrement, electrophysiologically characterized by inhibited cortical areas (increased delta/theta power) and a lack of normal routine and excitatory activity (decreased alpha and beta power). The results are similar to those found in other dementing disorders. Medication did not affect the overall interpretation of the quantitative EEG analysis, but certain differences might be due to drug interaction, predominantly with antipsychotics. Spearman rank correlations revealed significant correlations between EEG mapping and cognitive and motor impairment in HD patients.

  18. EEG and Spelling Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1991-01-01

    The EEGs in 23 13-year-old Finnish-speaking boys with spelling disabilities and in 21 matched controls were studied in the Departments of Child Neurology, Paediatrics, Clinical Neurophysiology and Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland.

  19. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EEG Controlled Wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Sim Kok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a brainwave controlled wheelchair. The main objective of this project is to construct a wheelchair which can be directly controlled by the brain without requires any physical feedback as controlling input from the user. The method employed in this project is the Brain-computer Interface (BCI, which enables direct communication between the brain and the electrical wheelchair. The best method for recording the brain’s activity is electroencephalogram (EEG. EEG signal is also known as brainwaves signal. The device that used for capturing the EEG signal is the Emotiv EPOC headset. This headset is able to transmit the EEG signal wirelessly via Bluetooth to the PC (personal computer. By using the PC software, the EEG signals are processed and converted into mental command. According to the mental command (e.g. forward, left... obtained, the output electrical signal is sent out to the electrical wheelchair to perform the desired movement. Thus, in this project, a computer software is developed for translating the EEG signal into mental commands and transmitting out the controlling signal wirelessly to the electrical wheelchair.

  1. Discovering EEG resting state alterations of semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, Matthias; Koenig, Thomas; Kinoshita, Toshihiko; Utsunomiya, Keita; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Dierks, Thomas; Nishida, Keiichiro

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of semantic dementia relies on cost-intensive MRI or PET, although resting EEG markers of other dementias have been reported. Yet the view still holds that resting EEG in patients with semantic dementia is normal. However, studies using increasingly sophisticated EEG analysis methods have demonstrated that slightest alterations of functional brain states can be detected. We analyzed the common four resting EEG microstates (A, B, C, and D) of 8 patients with semantic dementia in comparison with 8 healthy controls and 8 patients with Alzheimer's disease. Topographical differences between the groups were found in microstate classes B and C, while microstate classes A and D were comparable. The data showed that the semantic dementia group had a peculiar microstate E, but the commonly found microstate C was lacking. Furthermore, the presence of microstate E was significantly correlated with lower MMSE and language scores. Alterations in resting EEG can be found in semantic dementia. Topographical shifts in microstate C might be related to semantic memory deficits. This is the first study that discovered resting state EEG abnormality in semantic dementia. The notion that resting EEG in this dementia subtype is normal has to be revised. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EEG. Renewables Act. Comment. 4. new rev. and enl. ed.; EEG. Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz. Kommentar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, Walter [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Berg-, Umwelt- und Europarecht; Mueggenborg, Hans-Juergen [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Kassel Univ. (Germany); Cosack, Tilman [Hochschule Trier, Umwelt-Campus Birkenfeld (Germany). IREK - Inst. fuer das Recht der Erneuerbaren Energien, Energieeffizienzrecht und Klimaschutzrecht; Ekardt, Felix (ed.) [Forschungsstelle Nachhaltigkeit und Klimapolitik, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Unlike any other Act, the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) changes continuously. Recently it has been fundamentally transformed with the amendment 2014. Comprehensive, readable and practice-oriented. The proven Berliner comment EEG is your reliable companion through the new regulatory regime. All provisions of the EEG 2014 thorough and easy to understand commented by experts of the matter. 2. The EEG Amending Act of 29.6.2015 has already been considered. A detailed introduction and contributions to the relevant European law and the antitrust aspects of the renewable energy sources to guarantee you a broad understanding of the rules. Valuable background information you provide, the digressions of the most important renewable energy technologies, will explain the pictures thanks to numerous the scientific and technical foundations. Moreover you the construction law aspects in the construction of photovoltaic and wind turbines are explained clearly. [German] Wie kaum ein anderes Gesetz veraendert sich das Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG) laufend. Zuletzt wurde es mit der Novelle 2014 grundlegend umgestaltet. Umfassend, verstaendlich und praxisgerecht Der bewaehrte Berliner Kommentar EEG ist Ihr verlaesslicher Begleiter durch das neue Regelungsregime. Alle Vorschriften des EEG 2014 werden gruendlich und leicht verstaendlich von Kennern der Materie kommentiert. Das 2. EEG-Aenderungsgesetz vom 29.06.2015 ist bereits beruecksichtigt. Eine ausfuehrliche Einleitung sowie Beitraege zum einschlaegigen europaeischen Recht und zu den kartellrechtlichen Aspekten der erneuerbaren Energien verhelfen Ihnen zu einem breiten Verstaendnis der Vorschriften. Wertvolles Hintergrundwissen liefern Ihnen auch die Exkurse zu den wichtigsten Erneuerbare-Energien-Technologien, die Ihnen dank zahlreicher Abbildungen die naturwissenschaftlich-technischen Grundlagen erlaeutern. Zudem werden Ihnen die baurechtlichen Aspekte bei der Errichtung von Photovoltaik- und Windenergieanlagen

  3. Generalized periodic EEG activity in two cases of neurosyphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghinah Renato

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosyphilis is a recognized cause of epileptic seizures and cognitive impairment, but is not usually associated with the finding of generalized periodic activity in the EEG. We report two similar cases characterized by progressive cognitive impairment followed by partial complex seizures, in whom the EEG showed generalized periodic activity. Both cerebrospinal fluid and the response to penicillin therapy confirmed the diagnoses of neurosyphilis in the two cases. The finding of EEG generalized periodic activity in patients with cognitive or behavioral disorders is usually associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although there are other conditions, some of them potentially reversible, which may also present this EEG abnormality. Neurosyphilis has tended not to be included among them, and our present findings support the importance of first ruling out neurosyphilis in those patients with cognitive or behavioral disorders associated with generalized periodic epileptiform discharges.

  4. The prevalence of electroencephalographic abnormalities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... South African studies. There is little South African data examining either prevalence or usefulness of EEG abnormalities among adult psychiatric patients. Some work has been done in adolescents. Szabo1 reviewed all admissions to the adolescent inpatient unit at Tara. Hospital between 1990 and 1995.

  5. Measurement and modification of the EEG and related behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterman, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes in the sensorimotor pathways were found to accompany the effect of rhythmic EEG patterns in the sensorimotor cortex. Additionally, several striking behavioral changes were seen, including in particular an enhancement of sleep and an elevation of seizure threshold to epileptogenic agents. This raised the possibility that human seizure disorders might be influenced therapeutically by similar training. Our objective in human EEG feedback training became not only the facilitation of normal rhythmic patterns, but also the suppression of abnormal activity, thus requiring complex contingencies directed to the normalization of the sensorimotor EEG. To achieve this, a multicomponent frequency analysis was developed to extract and separate normal and abnormal elements of the EEG signal. Each of these elements was transduced to a specific component of a visual display system, and these were combined through logic circuits to present the subject with a symbolic display. Variable criteria provided for the gradual shaping of EEG elements towards the desired normal pattern. Some 50-70% of patients with poorly controlled seizure disorders experienced therapeutic benefits from this approach in our laboratory, and subsequently in many others. A more recent application of this approach to the modification of human brain function in our lab has been directed to the dichotomous problems of task overload and underload in the contemporary aviation environment. At least 70% of all aviation accidents have been attributed to the impact of these kinds of problems on crew performance. The use of EEG in this context has required many technical innovations and the application of the latest advances in EEG signal analysis. Our first goal has been the identification of relevant EEG characteristics. Additionally, we have developed a portable recording and analysis system for application in this context. Findings from laboratory and in-flight studies suggest that we

  6. Seizure semiology and EEG findings in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Justyna A; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2014-05-01

    Seizures constitute a frequent yet under-described manifestation of mitochondrial disorders (MDs). The aim of this study was to describe electroencephalography (EEG) findings and clinical seizure types in a population of children and adults with mitochondrial disease. Retrospective chart review of 165 records of children and adults with mitochondrial disease seen in the University of Texas Houston Mitochondrial Center between 2007 and 2012 was performed; all subjects were diagnosed with confirmed mitochondrial disease. EEG findings and clinical data, including seizure semiology and response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), were analyzed and categorized. Sixty-six percent (109/165) of subjects had a routine EEG performed. Sixty-one percent (67/109) of EEG studies were abnormal and 85% (56/67) had epileptiform discharges. The most common EEG finding was generalized slowing (40/67, 60%). The most frequent category of epileptiform activity seen was multifocal discharges (41%), followed by focal (39%) and generalized (39%) discharges. Clinical seizures were seen in 55% of subjects and the most common types of seizures observed were complex partial (37%) and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC; 37%). The most common seizure type in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was GTC (33%), with generalized or focal discharges seen on EEG. In Leigh syndrome GTC (11%) and complex partial (11%) seizures were the most frequent types. Of 60 subjects with clinical seizures, 28% were intractable to medical treatment. Mitochondrial disorder should be included in the list of differential diagnosis in any child that presents with encephalopathy, seizures, and a fluctuating clinical course. Given the relatively high prevalence of EEG abnormalities in patients with MD, EEG should be performed during initial evaluation in all patients with MD, not only upon clinical suspicion of epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International

  7. Panayiotopoulos syndrome: a clinical, EEG, and neuropsychological study of 93 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specchio, Nicola; Trivisano, Marina; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo; Cappelletti, Simona; Masciarelli, Giovanni; Volkov, Josiv; Fusco, Lucia; Vigevano, Federico

    2010-10-01

    To explore the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), neuropsychological features, and prognosis of Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS). Of 1,794 children aged between 1 and 14 years referred for the first afebrile focal seizure, between January 1992 and December 2004, 93 (5.2%) had PS according to clinical criteria. Age at onset ranged from 1.1 to 8.6 years, and was earlier in children with more than one seizure. Autonomic seizures followed a stereotypical onset and progression. Emesis, pallor, or flushing was almost always among the first symptoms that usually culminated in vomiting (77.4% of patients). More than half (55%) of seizures were longer than 30 min but these did not appear to affect remission and number of seizures. Interictal EEG showed great variability, with 79.5% of patients showing spikes of variable localizations and evolution over time; 16.1% had background abnormalities only, and 5.4% had consistently normal EEG studies. Onsets in five ictal EEGs were posterior or anterior-left or right. On neuropsychological testing, IQ and subtests of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) were within normal limits, although some minor statistically significant differences were found in arithmetic, comprehension, and picture arrangement in comparison with controls. Cumulative probability of recurrence was 57.6%, 45.6%, 35.1%, and 11.7% at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively, after the first seizure. Thirty-four (58.6%) of 59 patients treated with antiepileptic drugs continued having seizures before ultimate remission. PS is a uniform childhood susceptibility to autonomic seizures that is related to early age of development and with excellent prognosis with regard to seizure remission and neuropsychological development. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Task-related functional connectivity in autism spectrum conditions: an EEG study using wavelet transform coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarino Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC are a set of pervasive neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by a wide range of lifelong signs and symptoms. Recent explanatory models of autism propose abnormal neural connectivity and are supported by studies showing decreased interhemispheric coherence in individuals with ASC. The first aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of reduced interhemispheric coherence in ASC, and secondly to investigate specific effects of task performance on interhemispheric coherence in ASC. Methods We analyzed electroencephalography (EEG data from 15 participants with ASC and 15 typical controls, using Wavelet Transform Coherence (WTC to calculate interhemispheric coherence during face and chair matching tasks, for EEG frequencies from 5 to 40 Hz and during the first 400 ms post-stimulus onset. Results Results demonstrate a reduction of interhemispheric coherence in the ASC group, relative to the control group, in both tasks and for all electrode pairs studied. For both tasks, group differences were generally observed after around 150 ms and at frequencies lower than 13 Hz. Regarding within-group task comparisons, while the control group presented differences in interhemispheric coherence between faces and chairs tasks at various electrode pairs (FT7-FT8, TP7-TP8, P7-P8, such differences were only seen for one electrode pair in the ASC group (T7-T8. No significant differences in EEG power spectra were observed between groups. Conclusions Interhemispheric coherence is reduced in people with ASC, in a time and frequency specific manner, during visual perception and categorization of both social and inanimate stimuli and this reduction in coherence is widely dispersed across the brain. Results of within-group task comparisons may reflect an impairment in task differentiation in people with ASC relative to typically developing individuals. Overall, the results of this research support the value of WTC

  9. A decision support framework for the discrimination of children with controlled epilepsy based on EEG analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabri Simon G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this work we consider hidden signs (biomarkers in ongoing EEG activity expressing epileptic tendency, for otherwise normal brain operation. More specifically, this study considers children with controlled epilepsy where only a few seizures without complications were noted before starting medication and who showed no clinical or electrophysiological signs of brain dysfunction. We compare EEG recordings from controlled epileptic children with age-matched control children under two different operations, an eyes closed rest condition and a mathematical task. The aim of this study is to develop reliable techniques for the extraction of biomarkers from EEG that indicate the presence of minor neurophysiological signs in cases where no clinical or significant EEG abnormalities are observed. Methods We compare two different approaches for localizing activity differences and retrieving relevant information for classifying the two groups. The first approach focuses on power spectrum analysis whereas the second approach analyzes the functional coupling of cortical assemblies using linear synchronization techniques. Results Differences could be detected during the control (rest task, but not on the more demanding mathematical task. The spectral markers provide better diagnostic ability than their synchronization counterparts, even though a combination (or fusion of both is needed for efficient classification of subjects. Conclusions Based on these differences, the study proposes concrete biomarkers that can be used in a decision support system for clinical validation. Fusion of selected biomarkers in the Theta and Alpha bands resulted in an increase of the classification score up to 80% during the rest condition. No significant discrimination was achieved during the performance of a mathematical subtraction task.

  10. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  11. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Concordance of MRI and EEG Focal Slowing in Nonsyndromic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Kangwon National University, Korea, and The Epilepsy Center, Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, USA studied the correlation and significance of EEG focal slowing and focal MRI abnormalities in 253 children with nonsyndromic epilepsy.

  13. Higher-Order Spectrum in Understanding Nonlinearity in EEG Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauchy Pradhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental nature of the brain's electrical activities recorded as electroencephalogram (EEG remains unknown. Linear stochastic models and spectral estimates are the most common methods for the analysis of EEG because of their robustness, simplicity of interpretation, and apparent association with rhythmic behavioral patterns in nature. In this paper, we extend the use of higher-order spectrum in order to indicate the hidden characteristics of EEG signals that simply do not arise from random processes. The higher-order spectrum is an extension Fourier spectrum that uses higher moments for spectral estimates. This essentially nullifies all Gaussian random effects, therefore, can reveal non-Gaussian and nonlinear characteristics in the complex patterns of EEG time series. The paper demonstrates the distinguishing features of bispectral analysis for chaotic systems, filtered noises, and normal background EEG activity. The bispectrum analysis detects nonlinear interactions; however, it does not quantify the coupling strength. The squared bicoherence in the nonredundant region has been estimated to demonstrate nonlinear coupling. The bicoherence values are minimal for white Gaussian noises (WGNs and filtered noises. Higher bicoherence values in chaotic time series and normal background EEG activities are indicative of nonlinear coupling in these systems. The paper shows utility of bispectral methods as an analytical tool in understanding neural process underlying human EEG patterns.

  14. Safety and EEG data quality of concurrent high-density EEG and high-speed fMRI at 3 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Thrane Foged

    Full Text Available Concurrent EEG and fMRI is increasingly used to characterize the spatial-temporal dynamics of brain activity. However, most studies to date have been limited to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI. There is considerable interest in integrating recently developed high-speed fMRI methods with high-density EEG to increase temporal resolution and sensitivity for task-based and resting state fMRI, and for detecting interictal spikes in epilepsy. In the present study using concurrent high-density EEG and recently developed high-speed fMRI methods, we investigate safety of radiofrequency (RF related heating, the effect of EEG on cortical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in fMRI, and assess EEG data quality.The study compared EPI, multi-echo EPI, multi-band EPI and multi-slab echo-volumar imaging pulse sequences, using clinical 3 Tesla MR scanners from two different vendors that were equipped with 64- and 256-channel MR-compatible EEG systems, respectively, and receive only array head coils. Data were collected in 11 healthy controls (3 males, age range 18-70 years and 13 patients with epilepsy (8 males, age range 21-67 years. Three of the healthy controls were scanned with the 256-channel EEG system, the other subjects were scanned with the 64-channel EEG system. Scalp surface temperature, SNR in occipital cortex and head movement were measured with and without the EEG cap. The degree of artifacts and the ability to identify background activity was assessed by visual analysis by a trained expert in the 64 channel EEG data (7 healthy controls, 13 patients.RF induced heating at the surface of the EEG electrodes during a 30-minute scan period with stable temperature prior to scanning did not exceed 1.0° C with either EEG system and any of the pulse sequences used in this study. There was no significant decrease in cortical SNR due to the presence of the EEG cap (p > 0.05. No significant differences in the visually analyzed EEG data quality were found between

  15. Nonlinear analysis of EEG signals at different mental states

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Kannathal; Acharya U, Rajendra; Alias, Fadhilah; Tiboleng, Thelma; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan K

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The EEG (Electroencephalogram) is a representative signal containing information about the condition of the brain. The shape of the wave may contain useful information about the state of the brain. However, the human observer can not directly monitor these subtle details. Besides, since bio-signals are highly subjective, the symptoms may appear at random in the time scale. Therefore, the EEG signal parameters, extracted and analyzed using computers, are highly useful in di...

  16. EEG biofeedback improves attentional bias in high trait anxiety individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Sijuan; Lin, Guiping; Sun, Peng; Wang, Tinghuai

    2013-01-01

    Background Emotion-related attentional bias is implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback can obviously improve the anxiety disorders and reduce stress level, and can also enhance attention performance in healthy subjects. The present study examined the effects and mechanisms of EEG biofeedback training on the attentional bias of high trait anxiety (HTA) individuals toward negative stimuli. Results Event-related potentials were rec...

  17. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a mental disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  18. The EEG in psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... chiatric disorders have a neurobiological basis. Nevertheless, the typically marked focal or generalised slowing found in the. EEG in patients with acute or chronic encephalopathies due to metabolic changes, infections, toxins, trauma and tumours is useful to the clinician in the differentiation of these disor-.

  19. CT scan findings and EEG in systemic lupus erythematodes patients with neuro-psychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Rumiko; Hagiwara, Mariko; Katayose, Keiko; Yashima, Yuko; Kumashiro, Hisashi

    1988-01-01

    In 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematodes presenting with neuro-psychiatric disorders, CT scans were compared with encephalographic (EEG) findings. CT findings were markedly abnormal in 6, slight with a sulcal enlargement in 3, and normal in 5. In the group of markedly abnormal CT findings, focal abnormal low density areas were detected in 2, severe generalized cerebral atrophy in one, and severe atrophy of the right hemisphere in one. EEG findings included focal paroxysmal abnormality of high voltage slow burst at the left frontal dominance and positive spike on the right hemisphere. Epileptic seizure and depressed sensorium seemed to be related to CT abnormality. In 3 patients with epileptic seizures, their symptoms were closely related to CT abnormality. Parkinsonisms and depressed sensorium were also related to CT abnormality. (Namekawa, K)

  20. Utility of Independent Component Analysis for Interpretation of Intracranial EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane eWhitmer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrode arrays are sometimes implanted in the brains of patients with intractable epilepsy to better localize seizure foci before epilepsy surgery. Analysis of intracranial EEG (iEEG recordings is typically performed in the electrode channel domain without explicit separation of the sources that generate the signals. However, intracranial EEG signals, like scalp EEG signals, could be linear mixtures of local activity and volume conducted activity arising in multiple source areas. Independent component analysis (ICA has recently been applied to scalp EEG data, and shown to separate the signal mixtures into independently generated brain and non-brain source signals. Here, we applied ICA to un-mix source signals from intracranial EEG recordings from four epilepsy patients during a visually cued finger movement task in the presence of background pathological brain activity. This ICA decomposition demonstrated that the iEEG recordings were not maximally independent, but rather are linear mixtures of activity from multiple sources. Many of the independent component (IC projections to the iEEG recording grid were consistent with sources from single brain regions, including components exhibiting classic movement-related dynamics. Notably, the largest IC projection to each channel accounted for no more than 20%-80% of the channel signal variance, implying that in general intracranial recordings cannot be accurately interpreted as recordings of independent brain sources. These results suggest that ICA can be used to identify and monitor major field sources of local and distributed functional networks generating iEEG data. ICA decomposition methods are useful for improving the fidelity of source signals of interest, likely including distinguishing the sources of pathological brain activity.

  1. EEG. Renewables Act. Comment. 4. new rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenz, Walter; Cosack, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Unlike any other Act, the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) changes continuously. Recently it has been fundamentally transformed with the amendment 2014. Comprehensive, readable and practice-oriented. The proven Berliner comment EEG is your reliable companion through the new regulatory regime. All provisions of the EEG 2014 thorough and easy to understand commented by experts of the matter. 2. The EEG Amending Act of 29.6.2015 has already been considered. A detailed introduction and contributions to the relevant European law and the antitrust aspects of the renewable energy sources to guarantee you a broad understanding of the rules. Valuable background information you provide, the digressions of the most important renewable energy technologies, will explain the pictures thanks to numerous the scientific and technical foundations. Moreover you the construction law aspects in the construction of photovoltaic and wind turbines are explained clearly. [de

  2. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  3. Comparison of Amplitude-Integrated EEG and Conventional EEG in a Cohort of Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledin, Irina; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Gilat, Shlomo; Yogev, Hagai; Golan, Agneta; Novack, Victor; Shany, Eilon

    2017-03-01

    To compare amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) and conventional EEG (EEG) activity in premature neonates. Biweekly aEEG and EEG were simultaneously recorded in a cohort of infants born less than 34 weeks gestation. aEEG recordings were visually assessed for lower and upper border amplitude and bandwidth. EEG recordings were compressed for visual evaluation of continuity and assessed using a signal processing software for interburst intervals (IBI) and frequencies' amplitude. Ten-minute segments of aEEG and EEG indices were compared using regression analysis. A total of 189 recordings from 67 infants were made, from which 1697 aEEG/EEG pairs of 10-minute segments were assessed. Good concordance was found for visual assessment of continuity between the 2 methods. EEG IBI, alpha and theta frequencies' amplitudes were negatively correlated to the aEEG lower border while conceptional age (CA) was positively correlated to aEEG lower border ( P continuity and amplitude.

  4. Can EEG Differentiate Among Syndromes in Genetic Generalized Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Udaya; Hepworth, Graham; Cook, Mark; DʼSouza, Wendyl

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate EEG differences among syndromes in genetic generalized epilepsy based on quantified data. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory EEGs were recorded in consecutive patients diagnosed with genetic generalized epilepsy. All epileptiform EEG abnormalities were quantified into density scores (total duration of epileptiform discharges per hour). One-way analysis of variance was conducted to find out differences in EEG density scores among the syndromes. Generalized linear mixed models were also fitted to explore the association between the proportion of "pure" generalized spike-wave paroxysms and fragments (without intervening polyspikes/polyspike-waves) and the syndromes. In total, 6,923 epileptiform discharges were analyzed from 105 abnormal EEGs. In the analysis of variance, six EEG variables were significantly different among syndromes: total spike density (P = 0.001), total polyspike and polyspike-wave density (P = 0.049), generalized spike-wave-only density (P paroxysm density (P paroxysm duration mean (P = 0.018), and generalized paroxysm duration maximum (P = 0.009). The density of epileptiform discharges and the paroxysm durations were the highest in juvenile absence epilepsy followed by juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and generalized epilepsy with tonic-clonic seizures only. Generalized linear mixed models revealed that "pure" generalized spike-wave discharges (without intervening polyspikes/polyspike waves) tended to be more frequent in absence epilepsies, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.21). The findings of this study suggest that the density and duration of epileptiform discharges can help differentiate among genetic generalized epilepsy syndromes.

  5. MRI in temporal lobe epilepsy. Correlation between EEG, SPECT and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesugi, Hideji; Onuma, Teiichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ishida, Shiro

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between MRI, SPECT, EEG and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated. Subjects were 162 patients (84 males, 78 females) whose average age was 38.1±12.1 years. SPECT was carried out in 45 patients. The results were as follows: abnormal MR images were obtained in 36% of the group without epileptic discharge, and in 42% of the group with temporal spikes. There was no correlation between epileptic discharge in EEG and MRI abnormality. The lateralities of epileptic discharge and MRI were in disagreement in 9 of 39 patients (23%), indicating that determining the epileptic focus from scalp EEG was difficult. There was no correlation between the basic activity in EEG and abnormality in MRI. The rate of abnormal SPECT (89%) was higher than that of abnormal MRI (40%). The rate of the group with ictal automatism (52%) was higher than that of the group without ictal automatism (35%). The rate of abnormal MR images was high in the group with encephalitis (73%). The rate was higher in the group with febrile convulsion (62%) than in the group without it (28%). The rate of the abnormal MR images was higher in the group with a seizure frequency of at least several mal/month (48%) than in the group with a seizure frequency of less than several mal/year (29%). (author)

  6. Hypoglycemia-Associated EEG Changes in Prepubertal Children With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Grith Lærkholm; Foli-Andersen, Pia; Fredheim, Siri

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to explore the possible difference in the electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern between euglycemia and hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) during daytime and during sleep. The aim is to develop a hypoglycemia alarm based on continuous EEG...... measurement and real-time signal processing. METHOD: Eight T1D patients aged 6-12 years were included. A hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp was performed to induce hypoglycemia both during daytime and during sleep. Continuous EEG monitoring was performed. For each patient, quantitative EEG (qEEG) measures...... in specific bands comparing hypoglycemia to euglycemia both during daytime and during sleep. In daytime the EEG-based algorithm identified hypoglycemia in all children on average at a blood glucose (BG) level of 2.5 ± 0.5 mmol/l and 18.4 (ranging from 0 to 55) minutes prior to blood glucose nadir. During...

  7. Research on the Characteristics of Alzheimer's Disease Using EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Taishi; Musha, Toshimitsu; Yagi, Tohru

    In this paper, we proposed a new method for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) on the basis of electroencephalograms (EEG). The method, which is termed Power Variance Function (PVF) method, indicates the variance of the power at each frequency. By using the proposed method, the power of EEG at each frequency was calculated using Wavelet transform, and the corresponding variances were defined as PVF. After the PVF histogram of 55 healthy people was approximated as a Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution, we evaluated the PVF of 22 patients with AD and 25 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). As a result, the values for all AD and MCI subjects were abnormal. In particular, the PVF in the θ band for MCI patients was abnormally high, and the PVF in the α band for AD patients was low.

  8. Seizure classification in EEG signals utilizing Hilbert-Huang transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweis, Rami J; Abdulhay, Enas W

    2011-05-24

    Classification method capable of recognizing abnormal activities of the brain functionality are either brain imaging or brain signal analysis. The abnormal activity of interest in this study is characterized by a disturbance caused by changes in neuronal electrochemical activity that results in abnormal synchronous discharges. The method aims at helping physicians discriminate between healthy and seizure electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. Discrimination in this work is achieved by analyzing EEG signals obtained from freely accessible databases. MATLAB has been used to implement and test the proposed classification algorithm. The analysis in question presents a classification of normal and ictal activities using a feature relied on Hilbert-Huang Transform. Through this method, information related to the intrinsic functions contained in the EEG signal has been extracted to track the local amplitude and the frequency of the signal. Based on this local information, weighted frequencies are calculated and a comparison between ictal and seizure-free determinant intrinsic functions is then performed. Methods of comparison used are the t-test and the Euclidean clustering. The t-test results in a P-value method is also contrasted against the Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition that reaches 80% accuracy. Comparison results strengthen the contribution of this paper not only from the accuracy point of view but also with respect to its fast response and ease to use. An original tool for EEG signal processing giving physicians the possibility to diagnose brain functionality abnormalities is presented in this paper. The proposed system bears the potential of providing several credible benefits such as fast diagnosis, high accuracy, good sensitivity and specificity, time saving and user friendly. Furthermore, the classification of mode mixing can be achieved using the extracted instantaneous information of every IMF, but it would be most likely a hard task if only the

  9. A Case of Habitual Neck Compression Induced Electroencephalogram Abnormalities: Differentiating from Epileptic Seizures Using a Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hoyoung; Kim, Youngsoo; Yun, Changho; Kim, Sangeun; Park, Sungho

    2014-01-01

    Self-induced hypoxia has been reported particularly in adolescents, and it can result in neurological injury. Here, we present a case of electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities induced by habitual neck compression differentiated from epileptic seizures by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. A 19-year-old male was admitted for evaluation of recurrent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. No interictal EEG abnormality was detected; however, abnormal slow delta waves were found immediately after habitual right neck compression. To differentiate EEG abnormalities due to a hemodynamic deficit induced by habitual neck compression from an epileptic seizure, Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed immediately after right carotid artery compression. Abnormal delta waves were triggered, and cerebral hypoperfusion in the right internal carotid artery territory was detected on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. The slow delta wave detected on the EEG resulted from the cerebral hypoperfusion because of the habitual neck compression

  10. Correlation of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT with surface EEG, MR, and CT for noninvasive localization of seizure foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelstad, B.L.; Laxer, K.D.; Dickson, H.S.; Cooper, K.E.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Some patients with refractory seizure disorders are candidates for surgical management. Correct preoperative lateralization is essential. Of 19 patients with seizure disorders who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, 14 were considered to have ultimately had definitive localization by other means: consistently abnormal surface electroencephalogram (EEG), subdural or deep electrode EEG, EEG response to resection, abnormal histopatholgy, or grossly abnormal MR image. Lateralization with SPECT was (1) focal or regional hypoperfusion (11 patients) or (2) discrete focal hyperperfusion (one patient). Correct lateralization was obtained in ten of 14 with SPECT, nine of 14 with surface EEG, seven of 12 with MR, and one of eight with CT. Preoperative evaluation of patients with medically refractory seizures can be aided by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

  11. Dry EEG Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lopez-Gordo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications.

  12. INTELLIGENT EEG ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murugesan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain is the wonderful organ of human body. It is the agent of information collection and transformation. The neural activity of the human brain starts between the 17th and 23rd week of prenatal development. It is believed that from this early stage and throughout life electrical signals are generated by the brain function but also the status of the whole body. Understanding of neuronal functions and neurophysiologic properties of the brain function together with the mechanisms underlying the generation of signals and their recording is, however, vital for those who deal with these signals for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of brain disorders and the related diseases. This research paper concentrated only on brain tumor detection. Using minimum electrode location the brain tumor possibility is detected. This paper is separated into two parts: the First part deals with electrode location on the scalp and the second part deals with how the fuzzy logic rule based algorithm is applied for estimation of brain tumor from EEG. Basically 8 locations are identified. After acquiring the pure EEG signal Fuzzy Logic Rule is applied to predict the possibility of brain tumor.

  13. Recording EEG in immature rats with a novel miniature telemetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayachkivsky, A.; Lehmkuhle, M. J.; Fisher, J. H.; Ekstrand, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Serial EEG recordings from immature rat pups are extremely difficult to obtain but important for analyzing animal models of neonatal seizures and other pediatric neurological conditions as well as normal physiology. In this report, we describe the features and applications of a novel miniature telemetry system designed to record EEG in rat pups as young as postnatal day 6 (P6). First, we have recorded electrographic seizure activity in two animal models of neonatal seizures, hypoxia- and kainate-induced seizures at P7. Second, we describe a viable approach for long-term continuous EEG monitoring of naturally reared rat pups implanted with EEG at P6. Third, we have used serial EEG recordings to record age-dependent changes in the background EEG signal as the animals matured from P7 to P11. The important advantages of using miniature wireless EEG technology are: 1) minimally invasive surgical implantation; 2) a device form-factor that is compatible with housing of rat pups with the dam and littermates; 3) serial recordings of EEG activity; and 4) low power consumption of the unit, theoretically allowing continuous monitoring for up to 2 yr without surgical reimplantation. The miniature EEG telemetry system provides a technical advance that allows researchers to record continuous and serial EEG recordings in neonatal rodent models of human neurological disorders, study the progression of the disease, and then assess possible therapies using quantitative EEG as an outcome measure. This new technical approach should improve animal models of human conditions that rely on EEG monitoring for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23114207

  14. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B A M; Aarts, Ronald M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. A single-channel EEG signal can be mapped into visibility graphs (VGS), including basic visibility graph (VG), horizontal VG (HVG), and difference VG (DVG). These graphs were used to characterize different EEG seizure patterns. To demonstrate its effectiveness in identifying EEG seizure patterns and detecting generalized seizures, EEG recordings of 615h on one EEG channel from 29 epileptic patients with ID were analyzed. A novel feature set with discriminative power for seizure detection was obtained by using the VGS method. The degree distributions (DDs) of DVG can clearly distinguish EEG of each seizure pattern. The degree entropy and power-law degree power in DVG were proposed here for the first time, and they show significant difference between seizure and non-seizure EEG. The connecting structure measured by HVG can better distinguish seizure EEG from background than those by VG and DVG. A traditional EEG feature set based on frequency analysis was used here as a benchmark feature set. With a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, the seizure detection performance of the benchmark feature set (sensitivity of 24%, FD t /h of 1.8s) can be improved by combining our proposed VGS features extracted from one EEG channel (sensitivity of 38%, FD t /h of 1.4s). The proposed VGS-based features can help improve seizure detection for ID patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral perfusion abnormalities in therapy-resistant epilepsy in mentally retarded pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Nawaz, K.; Hassoon, M.; Rahman, M.; Olofsson, O.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies sites of cerebral perfusion abnormalities in therapy-resistant epilepsy in mentally retarded pediatric patients (TREMRPP) using Tc-99m HMPAO and to compare it with the results of electroencephalography (EEG) and fluorographic CT. Thirteen children underwent Tc-99m HMPAO single photon emission CT (SPECT) studies; 11 had fluorographic CT, and 12 had EEG (four had EEG twice). All studies for same patients were within 2 weeks of each other. SPECT studies were reviewed twice by two nuclear medicine physicians without any knowledge of the results of other tests. Fluorographic CT results showed cerebral atrophy in only three and were normal in eight. EEG results were abnormal in all 12 patients examined. Epileptogenic spikes (EPS) were seen in eight patients only. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT studies were abnormal in all patients; they showed 21 foci of decreased perfusion on nine patients and nine foci of increased perfusion in seven patients (three patients had mixed lesions)

  16. [EEG and brain-stem evoked potentials in 125 recent concussions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geets, W; Louette, N

    1983-12-01

    EEG and ipsi/contralateral BEPs have been recorded in 125 cases of concussion at most 48 h after the cerebral trauma. In 100 cases of minor concussion the temporary loss of consciousness lasted not more than 2 min. In 25 cases of mild concussion, the loss of consciousness lasted until their arrival at the hospital. In minor concussions an abnormal EEG was found in 17% of the cases and in mild concussions, in 56%. The abnormalities of the BEP, more often seen in mild concussions (60%) than in minor concussions (8%), are an increase of interpeak latencies or distorted responses with average to bad reproducibility. The results are discussed.

  17. Electroencephalographic abnormalities in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-Reyes, Ana; Alvarez-Amador, Alfredo; Galán-García, Lídice; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    The presence of brain dysfunction in violent offenders has been frequently examined with inconsistent results. The aim of the study was to assess the EEG of 84 violent offenders by visual inspection and frequency-domain quantitative analysis in 84 violent prisoners. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was also employed for theta band of the EEG spectra. Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) was present in 50 of the offenders and it was absent in the remaining 34. The prevalence of EEG abnormalities, by visual inspection, was similar for both the ASPD group (82%) and non-ASPD group (79%). The brain topography of these anomalies also did not differ between groups, in contrast to results of the EEG quantitative analysis (QEEG) and LORETA that showed remarkable regional differences between both groups. QEEG analysis showed a pattern of excess of theta-delta activities and decrease of alpha band on the right fronto-temporal and left temporo-parietal regions in the ASPD group. LORETA signified an increase of theta activity (5.08 Hz) in ASPD group relative to non-ASPD group within left temporal and parietal regions. Findings indicate that QEEG analysis and techniques of source localization may reveal differences in brain electrical activity among offenders with ASPD, which was not obvious to visual inspection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC EEG system for research quality auditory event-related potentials in children

    OpenAIRE

    Badcock, Nicholas A.; Preece, Kathryn A.; de Wit, Bianca; Glenn, Katharine; Fieder, Nora; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous work has demonstrated that a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system, Emotiv EPOC, can be adjusted to provide valid auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in adults that are comparable to ERPs recorded by a research-grade EEG system, Neuroscan. The aim of the current study was to determine if the same was true for children. Method. An adapted Emotiv EPOC system and Neuroscan system were used to make simultaneous EEG recordings in nineteen 6- to 12-year-old...

  19. Quantitative change of EEG and respiration signals during mindfulness meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigates measures of mindfulness meditation (MM) as a mental practice, in which a resting but alert state of mind is maintained. A population of older people with high stress level participated in this study, while electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiration signals were recorded during a MM intervention. The physiological signals during meditation and control conditions were analyzed with signal processing. Methods EEG and respiration data were collected and analyzed on 34 novice meditators after a 6-week meditation intervention. Collected data were analyzed with spectral analysis, phase analysis and classification to evaluate an objective marker for meditation. Results Different frequency bands showed differences in meditation and control conditions. Furthermore, we established a classifier using EEG and respiration signals with a higher accuracy (85%) at discriminating between meditation and control conditions than a classifier using the EEG signal only (78%). Conclusion Support vector machine (SVM) classifier with EEG and respiration feature vector is a viable objective marker for meditation ability. This classifier should be able to quantify different levels of meditation depth and meditation experience in future studies. PMID:24939519

  20. Nonlinear analysis of EEG signals at different mental states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiboleng Thelma

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The EEG (Electroencephalogram is a representative signal containing information about the condition of the brain. The shape of the wave may contain useful information about the state of the brain. However, the human observer can not directly monitor these subtle details. Besides, since bio-signals are highly subjective, the symptoms may appear at random in the time scale. Therefore, the EEG signal parameters, extracted and analyzed using computers, are highly useful in diagnostics. This work discusses the effect on the EEG signal due to music and reflexological stimulation. Methods In this work, nonlinear parameters like Correlation Dimension (CD, Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE, Hurst Exponent (H and Approximate Entropy (ApEn are evaluated from the EEG signals under different mental states. Results The results obtained show that EEG to become less complex relative to the normal state with a confidence level of more than 85% due to stimulation. Conclusions It is found that the measures are significantly lower when the subjects are under sound or reflexologic stimulation as compared to the normal state. The dimension increases with the degree of the cognitive activity. This suggests that when the subjects are under sound or reflexologic stimuli, the number of parallel functional processes active in the brain is less and the brain goes to a more relaxed state

  1. Neurophysiology of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: EEG-based network and graph analysis of the interictal and immediate preictal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, B; Puskás, S; Besenyei, M; Spisák, T; Opposits, G; Hollódy, K; Fogarasi, A; Fekete, I; Emri, M

    2013-10-01

    The neuronal mechanisms of enduring seizure propensity and seizure precipitation in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are not known. We investigated these issues, within the framework of the "network concept" of epilepsy. Design1: 19, unmedicated JME patients were compared with nineteen, age-, and sex-matched normal control persons (NC). A total of 120s, artifact-free, paroxysm-free, eyes-closed, resting state EEG background activity was analyzed for each person. Design2: interictal and immediate preictal periods of the JME patients were compared in order to explore interictal-preictal network differences. For both comparison designs, statistically significant differences of EEG functional connectivity (EEGfC), nodal and global graph parameters were evaluated. Design1: maximum abnormalities were: increased delta, theta, alpha1 EEGfC and decreased alpha2 and beta EEGfC in the JME group as compared to the NC group, mainly among cortical areas that are involved in sensory-motor integration. Nodal degree and efficiency of three, medial, basal frontal nodes were greater in JME than in NC, in the alpha1 band. Design2: preictal delta EEGfC showed further increase in the above-mentioned areas, as compared to the interictal state. Increased EEGfC indicates a hypercoupled state among the specified cortical areas. This interictal abnormality further increases in the preictal state. Nodal graph statistics indicates abnormal neuronal dynamics in the cortical area that is the ictal onset zone in JME. Interictal and preictal neuronal dysfunction has been described in terms of network dynamics and topography in JME patients. Forthcoming investigations of seizure precipitation and therapeutic drug effects are encouraged on this basis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of sleep-EEG in preterm and term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereymaeker, Anneleen; Pillay, Kirubin; Vervisch, Jan; De Vos, Maarten; Van Huffel, Sabine; Jansen, Katrien; Naulaers, Gunnar

    2017-10-01

    Neonatal sleep is a crucial state that involves endogenous driven brain activity, important for neuronal survival and guidance of brain networks. Sequential EEG-sleep analysis in preterm infants provides insights into functional brain integrity and can document deviations of the biologically pre-programmed process of sleep ontogenesis during the neonatal period. Visual assessment of neonatal sleep-EEG, with integration of both cerebral and non-cerebral measures to better define neonatal state, is still considered the gold standard. Electrographic patterns evolve over time and are gradually time locked with behavioural characteristics which allow classification of quiet sleep and active sleep periods during the last 10weeks of gestation. Near term age, the neonate expresses a short ultradian sleep cycle, with two distinct active and quiet sleep, as well as brief periods of transitional or indeterminate sleep. Qualitative assessment of neonatal sleep is however challenged by biological and environmental variables that influence the expression of EEG-sleep patterns and sleep organization. Developing normative EEG-sleep data with the aid of automated analytic methods, can further improve our understanding of extra-uterine brain development and state organization under stressful or pathological conditions. Based on those developmental biomarkers of normal and abnormal brain function, research can be conducted to support and optimise sleep in the NICU, with the ultimate goal to improve therapeutic interventions and neurodevelopmental outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep-wake variables and EEG power spectra in Mongolian gerbils and Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, M V; Gambelunghe, C; Mariucci, G; Bruschelli, G; Adami, M; Giuditta, A

    1994-11-01

    Using electroencephalographic methods (EEG), we have analyzed the basal sleep structure and the EEG power spectra of gerbils and rats during periods of wakefulness (W), synchronized sleep (SS) and paradoxical sleep (PS). During the 6 hr light period examined, duration of sleep was similar for rats and gerbils, but gerbils showed fewer PS episodes and a longer amount of SS episodes followed by wakefulness. In addition, SS episodes preceding PS were of longer duration in gerbils than in rats. EEG power spectral analysis indicated a higher relative output in the 1-4 Hz range in gerbils in comparison with rats. On the whole, the data indicate the existence of significant differences in the basal sleep structure and EEG power spectra of gerbils and rats. This background information might be useful in the comparison of the effects of a given experimental treatment, such as cerebral ischemia, on the EEG activity of these two animal species.

  4. Epileptogenic developmental venous anomaly: insights from simultaneous EEG/fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, Olivier; Wiest, Roland; Jann, Kay; König, Thomas; Meyer, Klaus; Hauf, Martinus

    2013-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are associated with epileptic seizures; however, the role of DVA in the epileptogenesis is still not established. Simultaneous interictal electroencephalogram/functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI) recordings provide supplementary information to electroclinical data about the epileptic generators, and thus aid in the differentiation of clinically equivocal epilepsy syndromes. The main objective of our study was to characterize the epileptic network in a patient with DVA and epilepsy by simultaneous EEG/fMRI recordings. A 17-year-old woman with recently emerging generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and atypical generalized discharges, was investigated using simultaneous EEG/fMRI at the university hospital. Previous high-resolution MRI showed no structural abnormalities, except a DVA in the right frontal operculum. Interictal EEG recordings showed atypical generalized discharges, corresponding to positive focal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates in the right frontal operculum, a region drained by the DVA. Additionally, widespread cortical bilateral negative BOLD correlates in the frontal and parietal lobes were delineated, resembling a generalized epileptic network. The EEG/fMRI recordings support a right frontal lobe epilepsy, originating in the vicinity of the DVA, propagating rapidly to both frontal and parietal lobes, as expressed on the scalp EEG by secondary bilateral synchrony. The DVA may be causative of focal epilepsies in cases where no concomitant epileptogenic lesions can be detected. Advanced imaging techniques, such as simultaneous EEG/fMRI, may thus aid in the differentiation of clinically equivocal epilepsy syndromes.

  5. Safety and EEG data quality of concurrent high-density EEG and high-speed fMRI at 3 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Mette Thrane; Lindberg, Ulrich; Vakamudi, Kishore; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Pinborg, Lars H.; Kjær, Troels W.; Fabricius, Martin; Svarer, Claus; Ozenne, Brice; Thomsen, Carsten; Beniczky, Sándor; Posse, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent EEG and fMRI is increasingly used to characterize the spatial-temporal dynamics of brain activity. However, most studies to date have been limited to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). There is considerable interest in integrating recently developed high-speed fMRI methods with high-density EEG to increase temporal resolution and sensitivity for task-based and resting state fMRI, and for detecting interictal spikes in epilepsy. In the present study using concurrent high-density EEG and recently developed high-speed fMRI methods, we investigate safety of radiofrequency (RF) related heating, the effect of EEG on cortical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in fMRI, and assess EEG data quality. Materials and methods The study compared EPI, multi-echo EPI, multi-band EPI and multi-slab echo-volumar imaging pulse sequences, using clinical 3 Tesla MR scanners from two different vendors that were equipped with 64- and 256-channel MR-compatible EEG systems, respectively, and receive only array head coils. Data were collected in 11 healthy controls (3 males, age range 18–70 years) and 13 patients with epilepsy (8 males, age range 21–67 years). Three of the healthy controls were scanned with the 256-channel EEG system, the other subjects were scanned with the 64-channel EEG system. Scalp surface temperature, SNR in occipital cortex and head movement were measured with and without the EEG cap. The degree of artifacts and the ability to identify background activity was assessed by visual analysis by a trained expert in the 64 channel EEG data (7 healthy controls, 13 patients). Results RF induced heating at the surface of the EEG electrodes during a 30-minute scan period with stable temperature prior to scanning did not exceed 1.0° C with either EEG system and any of the pulse sequences used in this study. There was no significant decrease in cortical SNR due to the presence of the EEG cap (p > 0.05). No significant differences in the visually analyzed EEG

  6. EEG frequency PCA in EEG-ERP dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M

    2018-05-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) has long been used to decompose the ERP into components, and these mathematical entities are increasingly accepted as meaningful and useful representatives of the electrophysiological components constituting the ERP. A similar expansion appears to be beginning in regard to decomposition of the EEG amplitude spectrum into frequency components via frequency PCA. However, to date, there has been no exploration of the brain's dynamic EEG-ERP linkages using PCA decomposition to assess components in each measure. Here, we recorded intrinsic EEG in both eyes-closed and eyes-open resting conditions, followed by an equiprobable go/no-go task. Frequency PCA of the EEG, including the nontask resting and within-task prestimulus periods, found seven frequency components within the delta to beta range. These differentially predicted PCA-derived go and no-go N1 and P3 ERP components. This demonstration suggests that it may be beneficial in future brain dynamics studies to implement PCA for the derivation of data-driven components from both the ERP and EEG. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  7. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and EEG pattern in celiac patients on prolonged gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Authors investigate the relationship between serum anti-tTG antibodies and EEG pattern in 12 celiac patients of various age on gluten-free diet for 1-10 years. In a group of 6 patients with good compliance with the diet, anti-tTG antibodies were normal in all and EEG in 5; in another group of 6 patients with poor compliance with the diet, serum anti-tTG antibodies were raised in all; EEG abnormalities of various gravity were reported in 5 patients. The concomitance of raised anti-tTG antibodies and EEG abnormalities is stressed, as possible expression of an immune-inflammatory reaction persistent in Central Nervous System.

  8. "COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF EEGs WITH AND WITHOUT SLEEP DEPRIVATION IN DIAGNOSIS OF CHILDHOOD EPILEPSY "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Keihani

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Seizure is the most common neurologic disorder in the pediatric age. Obtaining thorough history and performing complete examination as well as electroencephalography (EEG are very important in confirming the diagnosis and finding the cause. Epileptiform activity may be enhanced by activating procedures including sleep deprivation. In this study we performed short duration (up to 8 hours sleep deprivation in 139 children with history of seizure but with normal or non specific awake EEG. We obtained 70% abnormality, 54% of which was of classic pattern of absence (3 Hz spike and slow wave. Most abnormal EEGs belonged to children in the age range of 5-10 yrs. It seems that short duration sleep deprivation is as useful as long duration sleep deprivation.

  9. Improved Diagnosis in Children with Partial Epilepsy Using a Multivariable Prediction Model Based on EEG Network Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diessen, E.; Otte, W.M.; Braun, K.P.J.; Stam, C.J.; Jansen, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition is routinely performed to support an epileptic origin of paroxysmal events in patients referred with a possible diagnosis of epilepsy. However, in children with partial epilepsies the interictal EEGs are often normal. We aimed to develop a

  10. Boxers--computed tomography, EEG, and neurological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, R.J.; Cole, M.; Thompson, J.S.; Kim, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    During the last three years, 40 ex-boxers were examined to determine the effects of boxing in regard to their neurological status and the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the brain. Thirty-eight of these patients had a CT scan of the brain, and 24 had a complete neurological examination including an EEG. The results demonstrate a significant relationship between the number of bouts fought and CT changes indicating cerebral atrophy. Positive neurological findings were not significantly correlated with the number of bouts. Electroencephalographic abnormalities were significantly correlated with the number of bouts fought. Computed tomography and EEG of the brain should be considered as part of a regular neurological examination for active boxers and, if possible, before and after each match, to detect not only the effects of acute life-threatening brain trauma such as subdural hematomas and brain hemorrhages, but the more subtle and debilitating long-term changes of cerebral atrophy

  11. Relationships between automated EEG and cranial CT in patients with senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Katsumi; Miyasaka, Mutue; Nakano, Takashi; Ohtaka, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    The degree of dementia was examined in relation to findings of automated EEG and cranial CT in 50 demented old patients aged 51 - 86. Slow waves on EEC, and dilated ventricle and atrophied cortex on cranial CT were frequently associated with poor psychological scores. As the degree of dilated ventricle increased, the frequency and amplitude of slow waves increased and the frequency and continuity of α waves decreased. Dilated ventricle was more strongly correlated with abnormal EEG findings than atrophied cortex. This was more marked in cases of severer patients. Abnormal EEC findings associated with poor psychological scores were more frequently observed in the group of patients with vascular dementia (VD, n = 30) than the group of patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, n = 20). Abnormal EEG findings were correlated with poor scores on Hasegawa test in the VD group and with those on Bender Gestalt test in the SDAT group. The degree of dilated ventricle was more correlated with abnormal EEG findings in the SDAT group than the VD group. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  13. 32-Channel banana-avg montage is better than 16-channel double banana montage to detect epileptiform discharges in routine EEGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Juan; Gonzalez, Walter; Bautista, Ramon; DeCerce, John

    2008-10-01

    We designed a study, comparing the yield of standard 16-channel longitudinal bipolar montage (double banana) versus a combined 32-channel longitudinal bipolar plus average referential montage (banana-plus), to detect epileptic abnormalities. We selected 25 consecutive routine EEG samples with a diagnosis of spike or sharp waves in the temporal regions and 25 consecutive focal slowing and 50 normal EEGs. A total of 100 samples were printed in both montages and randomized for reading. Thirty independent EEG readers blinded from the EEG diagnosis were invited to participate. Twenty-two readers successfully completed the test for a total of 4400 answers collected for analysis. The average sensitivity to detect epileptiform discharges for 16 and 32-channel montages was 36.5% and 61%, respectively (Pdouble banana montage. Residents and EEG fellows could improve EEG-reading accuracy if taught on a combined 32-channel montage.

  14. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  15. Optimizing microsurgical skills with EEG neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Larry

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By enabling individuals to self-regulate their brainwave activity in the field of optimal performance in healthy individuals, neurofeedback has been found to improve cognitive and artistic performance. Here we assessed whether two distinct EEG neurofeedback protocols could develop surgical skill, given the important role this skill plays in medicine. Results National Health Service trainee ophthalmic microsurgeons (N = 20 were randomly assigned to either Sensory Motor Rhythm-Theta (SMR or Alpha-Theta (AT groups, a randomized subset of which were also part of a wait-list 'no-treatment' control group (N = 8. Neurofeedback groups received eight 30-minute sessions of EEG training. Pre-post assessment included a skills lab surgical procedure with timed measures and expert ratings from video-recordings by consultant surgeons, together with state/trait anxiety self-reports. SMR training demonstrated advantages absent in the control group, with improvements in surgical skill according to 1 the expert ratings: overall technique (d = 0.6, p Conclusion SMR-Theta neurofeedback training provided significant improvement in surgical technique whilst considerably reducing time on task by 26%. There was also evidence that AT training marginally reduced total surgery time, despite suboptimal training efficacies. Overall, the data set provides encouraging evidence of optimised learning of a complex medical specialty via neurofeedback training.

  16. Objective Audiometry using Ear-EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Kidmose, Preben

    Recently, a novel electroencephalographic (EEG) method called ear-EEG [1], that enable recording of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) from a personalized earpiece was introduced. Initial investigations show that well established AEPs, such as ASSR and P1-N1-P2 complex can be observed from ear-EEG...

  17. Frontal EEG asymmetry in borderline personality disorder is associated with alexithymia

    OpenAIRE

    Flasbeck, Vera; Popkirov, Stoyan; Brüne, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Frontal EEG asymmetry is a widely studied correlate of emotion processing and psychopathology. Recent research suggests that frontal EEG asymmetry during resting state is related to approach/withdrawal motivation and is also found in affective disorders such as major depressive disorder. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show aberrant behavior in relation to both approach and withdrawal motivation, which may arguably be associated with their difficulties in emotio...

  18. Background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of background radiation, whether natural or caused by man's activities, are discussed. The known biological effects of radiation in causing cancers or genetic mutations are explained. The statement that there is a threshold below which there is no risk is examined critically. (U.K.)

  19. EEG monitoring in postanoxic coma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloostermans, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) contains information that is useful for the prediction of both poor and good neurological outcome in patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest treated with mild hypothermia. The combined group of iso-electric, low voltage or burst-suppression

  20. A stochastic model for EEG microstate sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Matthias; Brodbeck, Verena; Laufs, Helmut; Schneider, Gaby

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of spontaneous resting state neuronal activity is assumed to give insight into the brain function. One noninvasive technique to study resting state activity is electroencephalography (EEG) with a subsequent microstate analysis. This technique reduces the recorded EEG signal to a sequence of prototypical topographical maps, which is hypothesized to capture important spatio-temporal properties of the signal. In a statistical EEG microstate analysis of healthy subjects in wakefulness and three stages of sleep, we observed a simple structure in the microstate transition matrix. It can be described with a first order Markov chain in which the transition probability from the current state (i.e., map) to a different map does not depend on the current map. The resulting transition matrix shows a high agreement with the observed transition matrix, requiring only about 2% of mass transport (1/2 L1-distance). In the second part, we introduce an extended framework in which the simple Markov chain is used to make inferences on a potential underlying time continuous process. This process cannot be directly observed and is therefore usually estimated from discrete sampling points of the EEG signal given by the local maxima of the global field power. Therefore, we propose a simple stochastic model called sampled marked intervals (SMI) model that relates the observed sequence of microstates to an assumed underlying process of background intervals and thus, complements approaches that focus on the analysis of observable microstate sequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute Radiological Abnormalities after Bronchial Thermoplasty: A Prospective Cohort Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    d'Hooghe, Julia N. S.; van den Berk, Inge A. H.; Annema, Jouke T.; Bonta, Peter I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a novel treatment for severe asthma based on radiofrequency energy delivery to the larger airways. Although impressive radiological abnormalities have been reported, the incidence, pattern, and behavior over time of acute radiological abnormalities

  2. PyEEG: an open source Python module for EEG/MEG feature extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Forrest Sheng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG) is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  3. The additional lateralizing and localizing value of the postictal EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kimberley; Gollwitzer, Stephanie; Millward, Helen; Wehner, Tim; Scott, Catherine; Diehl, Beate

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the additional lateralizing and localizing value of the postictal EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). The ictal EEG in FLE is frequently challenging to localize. We identified patients investigated for epilepsy surgery with unilateral FLE based on consistent semiology, a clear lesion and/or with frontal onset on intracranial EEG. A one hour section of postictal EEG was analyzed by two raters for new or activated EEG features and it was assessed whether these features offered additional information when compared to the ictal EEG. Postictal features assessed included asymmetrical return of the posterior dominant rhythm and potentiated lateralized or regional frontal slowing, spikes or sharp waves. Thirty-eight patients were included who had a combined total of ninety-six seizures. 47/96 (49%) postictal periods contained correctly lateralizing or localizing information. The sensitivity for asymmetrical return of the posterior dominant rhythm was 24%. The sensitivity for regional frontal slow and frontal spikes was 23% and 20% respectively. Further analysis showed that in 14/38 (39%) patients, at least one seizure with an unhelpful ictal EEG was followed by postictal EEG features that added new localizing or lateralizing information. A subgroup of 11 patients who were ⩾1 year seizure-free (ILAE class 1) and thus classified as having a 'gold-standard' FLE diagnosis were analyzed separately and it was found that 14/30 of their seizures (47%) had extra postictal information. The new postictal information was always concordant with the ultimate diagnosis, except for asymmetric postictal return of background activity ipsilateral to the epileptogenic zone in three patients. This study shows that a close examination of the postictal EEG can offer additional information which can contribute to the identification of a potentially resectable epileptogenic zone. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology

  4. EEG criteria predictive of complicated evolution in idiopathic rolandic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, R; de Saint-Martin, A; Carcangiu, R; Rudolf, G; Seegmuller, C; Kleitz, C; Metz-Lutz, M N; Hirsch, E; Marescaux, C

    2001-09-25

    Although so-called "benign" epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) always has an excellent prognosis with regard to seizure remission, behavioral problems and cognitive dysfunctions may sometimes develop in its course. To search for clinical or EEG markers allowing early detection of patients prone to such complications, the authors conducted a prospective study in a cohort of unselected patients with BECTS. In 35 children with BECTS, academic, familial, neurologic, neuropsychological, and wake and sleep EEG evaluations were repeated every 6 to 12 months from the beginning of the seizure disorder up to complete recovery. In 25 of 35 patients (72%), behavioral and intellectual functioning remained unimpaired. In 10 of 35 patients (28%), educational performance and familial maladjustment occurred. These sociofamilial problems were correlated with impulsivity, learning difficulties, attention disorders, and minor (7/35 cases, 20%) or serious (3/35 cases, 8%) auditory-verbal or visual-spatial deficits. Worsening phases started 2 to 36 months after onset and persisted for 9 to 39 months. Occurrence of atypical evolutions was significantly correlated with five qualitative and one quantitative interictal EEG pattern: intermittent slow-wave focus, multiple asynchronous spike-wave foci, long spike-wave clusters, generalized 3-c/s "absence-like" spike-wave discharges, conjunction of interictal paroxysms with negative or positive myoclonia, and abundance of interictal abnormalities during wakefulness and sleep. Clinical deterioration was not linked with seizure characteristics or treatment. Different combinations of at least three of six distinctive interictal EEG patterns and their long-lasting (> or =6-month) persistence seem to be the hallmarks of patients with BECTS at risk for neuropsychological impairments.

  5. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina A. Reis Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  6. Independent EEG sources are dipolar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Delorme

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA and blind source separation (BSS methods are increasingly used to separate individual brain and non-brain source signals mixed by volume conduction in electroencephalographic (EEG and other electrophysiological recordings. We compared results of decomposing thirteen 71-channel human scalp EEG datasets by 22 ICA and BSS algorithms, assessing the pairwise mutual information (PMI in scalp channel pairs, the remaining PMI in component pairs, the overall mutual information reduction (MIR effected by each decomposition, and decomposition 'dipolarity' defined as the number of component scalp maps matching the projection of a single equivalent dipole with less than a given residual variance. The least well-performing algorithm was principal component analysis (PCA; best performing were AMICA and other likelihood/mutual information based ICA methods. Though these and other commonly-used decomposition methods returned many similar components, across 18 ICA/BSS algorithms mean dipolarity varied linearly with both MIR and with PMI remaining between the resulting component time courses, a result compatible with an interpretation of many maximally independent EEG components as being volume-conducted projections of partially-synchronous local cortical field activity within single compact cortical domains. To encourage further method comparisons, the data and software used to prepare the results have been made available (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/BSSComparison.

  7. EEG correlates of virtual reality hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David; Ciorciari, Joseph; Carbis, Colin; Liley, David

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated hypnosis-related electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence and power spectra changes in high and low hypnotizables (Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale) induced by a virtual reality hypnosis (VRH) induction system. In this study, the EEG from 17 participants (Mean age = 21.35, SD = 1.58) were compared based on their hypnotizability score. The EEG recording associated with a 2-minute, eyes-closed baseline state was compared to the EEG during a hypnosis-related state. This novel induction system was able to produce EEG findings consistent with previous hypnosis literature. Interactions of significance were found with EEG beta coherence. The high susceptibility group (n = 7) showed decreased coherence, while the low susceptibility group (n = 10) demonstrated an increase in coherence between medial frontal and lateral left prefrontal sites. Methodological and efficacy issues are discussed.

  8. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  9. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  10. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. ACOG. ...

  11. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re-evaluated...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave....

  12. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 1 Ball Aerospace – 2875 Presidential Drive , Fairborn, Ohio 45324 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science...electroencephalogram (EEG) is a positive indicator of mental workload. However, EEG signals are easily affected by artifacts . An artifact mediation

  13. EEG differences between the opioid and adrenergic psyhoneuroendocrine rat types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristea, A; Moldovan, M; Munteanu, A M

    2000-01-01

    (BEA) of the "O" and "A" rat types during restrained wakefulness and anesthesia with Ether and chloral hydrate (CHL). The differentiation of the psyhoneuroendocrine rat types was made using the level of painful sensitivity. 13 hypersensitive "A" and 14 hyposensitive "O" rats were selected from a 91......Our work is based on the hypothesis of the existence of an opioid psychoneuroendocrine type named "O" type (Cristea, 1993), opposed to the well known adrenergic "A" type described by Roseman and Friedman in 1980. In the present study we tested the differences between the background EEG activity...... adult (140 g) male Wistar population using the distribution of the tail retraction time (TRT) during a tail-flick test. The epidural EEG activity, was quantified within the 1-30 Hz band by six numerical parameters: root mean square (RMS), mean spectral frequency (MSF), spectral edge frequency at 95...

  14. EEG and Sonic Platforms to Enhance Mindfulness Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitilin de Berigny

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores interactive applications that encourage mindfulness through sensors and novel input technology. Research in psychology and neuroscience demonstrating the benefits of mindfulness is initiating a new movement in interactive design. As cutting edge technologies become more accessible they are being employed to research and explore the practice of mindfulness. We examine three interactive installation artworks that promote mindfulness. In order to contextualize the interactive artworks discussed we first examine the historical background of the Electroencephalogram (EEG. We then discuss the physiological processes of meditation and the history behind the clinical practice of mindfulness. We show how artists and designers employ EEG sensors, to record the electrical activity of the brain to visualize mindfulness meditation practices. Lastly, we conclude the paper by discussing the future of the three artworks.

  15. EEG low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painold, Annamaria; Anderer, Peter; Holl, Anna K; Letmaier, Martin; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Saletu, Bernd; Bonelli, Raphael M

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal electroencephalography (EEG) in Huntington's disease (HD). The aim of the present investigation was to compare quantitatively analyzed EEGs of HD patients and controls by means of low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Further aims were to delineate the sensitivity and utility of EEG LORETA in the progression of HD, and to correlate parameters of cognitive and motor impairment with neurophysiological variables. In 55 HD patients and 55 controls a 3-min vigilance-controlled EEG (V-EEG) was recorded during midmorning hours. Power spectra and intracortical tomography were computed by LORETA in seven frequency bands and compared between groups. Spearman rank correlations were based on V-EEG and psychometric data. Statistical overall analysis by means of the omnibus significance test demonstrated significant (p < 0.01) differences between HD patients and controls. LORETA theta, alpha and beta power were decreased from early to late stages of the disease. Only advanced disease stages showed a significant increase in delta power, mainly in the right orbitofrontal cortex. Correlation analyses revealed that a decrease of alpha and theta power correlated significantly with increasing cognitive and motor decline. LORETA proved to be a sensitive instrument for detecting progressive electrophysiological changes in HD. Reduced alpha power seems to be a trait marker of HD, whereas increased prefrontal delta power seems to reflect worsening of the disease. Motor function and cognitive function deteriorate together with a decrease in alpha and theta power. This data set, so far the largest in HD research, helps to elucidate remaining uncertainties about electrophysiological abnormalities in HD.

  16. Coherence in children with AD/HD and excess alpha power in their EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbie, Joel C; Clarke, Adam R; Barry, Robert J; Dupuy, Franca E; McCarthy, Rory; Selikowitz, Mark

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated differences in EEG coherence measures between two groups of children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) - one with the more common EEG profile (increased theta), and a group with excess alpha activity as the dominant EEG abnormality. 26 children (aged 9-13years) with AD/HD were included in each of the excess-theta and excess-alpha groups, and were age- and sex-matched with 26 control subjects. EEG was recorded from 19 electrode sites during an eyes-closed resting condition. Wave-shape coherence was calculated for eight intrahemispheric and eight interhemispheric electrode pairs, for the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. In comparison with the controls, the excess-theta AD/HD group had increased theta intrahemispheric coherences at short-medium inter-electrode distances. Frontally, the excess-theta AD/HD group had increased interhemispheric theta and reduced beta coherences. The excess-alpha group primarily showed increased slow wave (delta and theta) intrahemispheric coherence at short-medium inter-electrode distances, and reduced alpha coherence at longer inter-electrode distances, compared with controls. An increase in frontal interhemispheric theta coherence was also found. These results suggest that AD/HD children with excess alpha power have an underlying connectivity dysfunction in the frontal lobes, which is found in common with other subjects with the excess-theta EEG profile. However, a number of qualitative differences exist that could be associated with other aspects of the AD/HD diagnosis. The excess-alpha group appeared to have fewer frontal-lobe abnormalities than the excess-theta AD/HD group. This is the first study to investigate coherence in AD/HD children who have the atypical profile of increased alpha power in their EEG. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tele-transmission of EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, M; Kubis, N; Sauleau, P; N'Guyen The Tich, S; Touzery-de Villepin, A

    2015-03-01

    EEG recordings can be sent for remote interpretation. This article aims to define the tele-EEG procedures and technical guidelines. Tele-EEG is a complete medical act that needs to be carried out with the same quality requirements as a local one in terms of indications, formulation of the medical request and medical interpretation. It adheres to the same quality requirements for its human resources and materials. It must be part of a medical organization (technical and medical network) and follow all rules and guidelines of good medical practices. The financial model of this organization must include costs related to performing the EEG recording, operating and maintenance of the tele-EEG network and medical fees of the physician interpreting the EEG recording. Implementing this organization must be detailed in a convention between all parties involved: physicians, management of the healthcare structure, and the company providing the tele-EEG service. This convention will set rules for network operation and finance, and also the continuous training of all staff members. The tele-EEG system must respect all rules for safety and confidentiality, and ensure the traceability and storing of all requests and reports. Under these conditions, tele-EEG can optimize the use of human resources and competencies in its zone of utilization and enhance the organization of care management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. Test-retest reliability of cognitive EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, L. K.; Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Task-related EEG is sensitive to changes in cognitive state produced by increased task difficulty and by transient impairment. If task-related EEG has high test-retest reliability, it could be used as part of a clinical test to assess changes in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the EEG recorded during the performance of a working memory (WM) task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). METHODS: EEG was recorded while subjects rested quietly and while they performed the tasks. Within session (test-retest interval of approximately 1 h) and between session (test-retest interval of approximately 7 days) reliability was calculated for four EEG components: frontal midline theta at Fz, posterior theta at Pz, and slow and fast alpha at Pz. RESULTS: Task-related EEG was highly reliable within and between sessions (r0.9 for all components in WM task, and r0.8 for all components in the PVT). Resting EEG also showed high reliability, although the magnitude of the correlation was somewhat smaller than that of the task-related EEG (r0.7 for all 4 components). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that under appropriate conditions, task-related EEG has sufficient retest reliability for use in assessing clinical changes in cognitive status.

  19. Does EEG-Neurofeedback Improve Neurocognitive Functioning in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder? A Systematic Review and a Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollebregt, Madelon A.; van Dongen-Boomsma, Martine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of placebo-controlled randomized studies relating to EEG-neurofeedback and its effect on neurocognition in attention-deficient/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is limited. For this reason, a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was designed to assess the effects of EEG-neurofeedback on neurocognitive functioning…

  20. Resting-state connectivity in the prodromal phase of schizophrenia: insights from EEG microstates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Christina; Faber, Pascal L; Leicht, Gregor; Schoettle, Daniel; Polomac, Nenad; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L; Lehmann, Dietrich; Mulert, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Resting-state EEG microstates are thought to reflect the momentary local states and interactions of distributed neural networks in the brain. Several changes in resting-state EEG microstates have been described in acutely ill patients with schizophrenia, but it is not known whether these represent trait or state abnormalities. The present study aimed to investigate this issue by assessing EEG microstate characteristics in high-risk individuals (HR) and clinically stable first-episode patients with schizophrenia (SZ) with low symptom levels, compared to each other and healthy controls (HC). Participants were 18 HR, 18 SZ, and 22 HC subjects. 64-channel resting-state EEG recordings were used for microstate analyses. Microstates were clustered into four classes (A-D) according to their topography. Temporal parameters and topographies of microstates were compared among groups. Microstate class A displayed higher coverage and occurrence in HR than SZ and HC, while microstate class B covered significantly more time in SZ compared to both HR and HC. Microstate class B displayed an aberrant spatial configuration in SZ, and to a lesser extent also in HR, compared to HC, with patients exhibiting significantly higher activity in the vicinity of the left posterior cingulate. Microstate abnormalities observed in HR were similar to those previously reported in acutely ill patients with schizophrenia. Moreover, there was evidence that HR and SZ might share specific disturbances in brain functional connectivity. These findings raise the possibility that certain abnormalities in resting-state EEG microstates might be associated with an increased risk for psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Epilepsy surgery in pediatric epileptic encephalopathy: when interictal EEG counts the most.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahwan, Amre; O'Halloran, Philip J; Madigan, Cathy; King, Mary D; O'Brien, Donncha

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, seizure onset localization in ictal electro-encephalography (EEG) is the main factor guiding resective epilepsy surgery. The situation is often different in infantile epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate the importance of the underrated interictal (rather than ictal) surface EEG in informing decision-making in epilepsy surgery for children with epileptic encephalopathy caused by subtle focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We present a small case series of three children who had an epileptic encephalopathy with either epileptic spasms or tonic seizures. All three were thought initially to have normal neuroimaging. Ictal EEG localizing features were seen in none and lateralizing features were seen only clinically in one of the three. However, the interictal EEG showed persistent and consistent focal irregular slowing in all, particularly after medically resolving the diffuse encephalopathy. Subtle FCDs were uncovered in all. Surgery was performed in all with excellent outcome. In infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by subtle FCD, the often underrated interictal surface EEG (particularly persistent foal irregular slowing) informs the most; not only to the target area for surgical resection but also to its extent. This may negate the need for unnecessary and sometimes non-informative invasive monitoring in these cases. A matter of "zooming out" to define the extent of a resectable abnormality rather than "zooming in" to define a seemingly localized epileptic focus that may change with time.

  2. Increased Prevalence of Intermittent Rhythmic Delta or Theta Activity (IRDA/IRTA) in the Electroencephalograms (EEGs) of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Fleck, Max; Bartels, Susanne; Altenm?ller, Dirk-Matthias; Riedel, Andreas; Bubl, Emanuel; Matthies, Swantje; Feige, Bernd; Perlov, Evgeniy; Endres, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: An increased prevalence of pathological electroencephalography (EEG) signals has been reported in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). In an elaborative case description of such a patient with intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity (IRDA/IRTA), the BPD symptoms where linked to the frequency of the IRDAs/IRTAs and vanished with the IRDAs/IRTAs following anticonvulsive therapy. This observation raised a question regarding the prevalence of such EEG abnormal...

  3. Increased Prevalence of Intermittent Rhythmic Delta or Theta Activity (IRDA/IRTA) in the Electroencephalograms (EEGs) of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Fleck, Max; Bartels, Susanne; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias; Riedel, Andreas; Bubl, Emanuel; Matthies, Swantje; Feige, Bernd; Perlov, Evgeniy; Endres, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    An increased prevalence of pathological electroencephalography (EEG) signals has been reported in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). In an elaborative case description of such a patient with intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity (IRDA/IRTA), the BPD symptoms where linked to the frequency of the IRDAs/IRTAs and vanished with the IRDAs/IRTAs following anticonvulsive therapy. This observation raised a question regarding the prevalence of such EEG abnormalities in BPD patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the frequency of EEG abnormalities in a carefully analyzed psychiatric collective. Following earlier reports, we hypothesized an increased prevalence of EEG abnormalities in BPD patients. We recruited 96 consecutive patients with BPD from the archive of a university clinic for psychiatry and psychotherapy, and compared the prevalence of EEG abnormalities to those of 76 healthy controls subjects. The EEGs were rated by three different blinded clinicians, including a consultant specializing in epilepsy from the local epilepsy center. We found a significant increase in the prevalence of IRDAs and IRTAs in BPD patients (14.6%) compared to the control subjects (3.9%; p = 0.020). In this blinded retrospective case-control study, we were able to confirm an increased prevalence of pathological EEG findings (IRDAs/IRTAs only) in BPD patients. The major limitation of this study is that the control group was not matched on age and gender. Therefore, the results should be regarded as preliminary findings of an open uncontrolled, retrospective study. Future research performing prospective, controlled studies is needed to verify our findings and answer the question of whether such EEG findings might predict a positive response to anticonvulsive pharmacological treatment.

  4. Increased prevalence of intermittent rhythmic delta or theta activity (IRDA/IRTA in the electroencephalograms (EEGs of patients with borderline personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger eTebartz Van Elst

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increased prevalence of pathological electroencephalography (EEG signals has been reported in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD. In an elaborative case description of such a patient with intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity (IRDA/IRTA, the BPD symptoms where linked to the frequency of the IRDAs/IRTAs and vanished with the IRDAs/IRTAs following anticonvulsive therapy. This observation raised a question regarding the prevalence of such EEG abnormalities in BPD patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the frequency of EEG abnormalities in a carefully analyzed psychiatric collective. Following earlier reports, we hypothesized an increased prevalence of EEG abnormalities in BPD patients.Participants and Methods: We recruited 96 consecutive patients with BPD from the archive of a university clinic for psychiatry and psychotherapy, and compared the prevalence of EEG abnormalities to those of 76 healthy controls subjects. The EEGs were rated by three different blinded clinicians, including a consultant specializing in epilepsy from the local epilepsy center.Results: We found a significant increase in the prevalence of IRDAs and IRTAs in BPD patients (14.6% compared to the control subjects (3.9%; p=0.020. Discussion: In this blinded retrospective case-control study, we were able to confirm an increased prevalence of pathological EEG findings (IRDAs/IRTAs only in BPD patients. The major limitation of this study is that the control group was not matched on age and gender. Therefore, the results should be regarded as preliminary findings of an open uncontrolled, retrospective study. Future research performing prospective, controlled studies is needed to verify our findings and answer the question of whether such EEG findings might predict a positive response to anticonvulsive pharmacological treatment.

  5. Added diagnostic value of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in patients suspected for epilepsy, where previous, extensive EEG workup was unrevealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duez, Lene; Beniczky, Sándor; Tankisi, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the possible additional diagnostic yield of MEG in the workup of patients with suspected epilepsy, where repeated EEGs, including sleep-recordings failed to identify abnormalities. METHODS: Fifty-two consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of epilepsy and at least thr...

  6. High density scalp EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Britton, Jeffrey W; Van Gompel, Jamie; Lagerlund, Terrance L; So, Elson; Wong-Kisiel, Lilly C; Cascino, Gregory C; Brinkman, Benjamin H; Nelson, Cindy L; Watson, Robert; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Localization of seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy using the 10-20 system scalp EEG is often challenging because neocortical seizure can spread rapidly, significant muscle artifact, and the suboptimal spatial resolution for seizure generators involving mesial frontal lobe cortex. Our aim in this study was to determine the value of visual interpretation of 76 channel high density EEG (hdEEG) monitoring (10-10 system) in patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy, and to evaluate concordance with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional EEG, and intracranial EEG (iEEG). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14 consecutive patients who underwent hdEEG monitoring for suspected frontal lobe seizures. The gold standard for localization was considered to be iEEG. Concordance of hdEEG findings with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional 10-20 EEG, and iEEG as well as correlation of hdEEG localization with surgical outcome were examined. hdEEG localization was concordant with iEEG in 12/14 and was superior to conventional EEG 3/14 (pfrontal epilepsy requiring localization of epileptogenic brain. hdEEG may assist in developing a hypothesis for iEEG monitoring and could potentially augment EEG source localization. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Resting state cortical rhythms in athletes: a high-resolution EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Iacoboni, Marco; Infarinato, Francesco; Aschieri, Pierluigi; Buffo, Paola; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Soricelli, Andrea; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Del Percio, Claudio

    2010-01-15

    The present electroencephalographic (EEG) study tested the working hypothesis that the amplitude of resting state cortical EEG rhythms (especially alpha, 8-12 Hz) was higher in elite athletes compared with amateur athletes and non-athletes, as a reflection of the efficiency of underlying back-ground neural synchronization mechanisms. Eyes closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 16 elite karate athletes, 20 amateur karate athletes, and 25 non-athletes. The EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), and beta 2 (20-30 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Statistical results showed that the amplitude of parietal and occipital alpha 1 sources was significantly higher in the elite karate athletes than in the non-athletes and karate amateur athletes. Similar results were observed in parietal and occipital delta sources as well as in occipital theta sources. Finally, a control confirmatory experiment showed that the amplitude of parietal and occipital delta and alpha 1 sources was stronger in 8 elite rhythmic gymnasts compared with 14 non-athletes. These results supported the hypothesis that cortical neural synchronization at the basis of eyes-closed resting state EEG rhythms is enhanced in elite athletes than in control subjects.

  8. Resting-state EEG in schizophrenia: auditory verbal hallucinations are related to shortening of specific microstates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, J; Hubl, D; Strik, W K; Dierks, T; Koenig, T

    2011-06-01

    Abnormal perceptions and cognitions in schizophrenia might be related to abnormal resting states of the brain. Previous research found that a specific class (class D) of sub-second electroencephalography (EEG) microstates was shortened in schizophrenia. This shortening correlated with positive symptoms. We questioned if this reflected positive psychotic traits or present psychopathology. Resting-state EEGs of frequently hallucinating patients, indicating on- and offset of hallucinations by button press, were analyzed. Microstate class D duration was related to spontaneous within-subject fluctuations of auditory hallucinations. Microstate D was significantly shorter in periods with hallucinations. Microstates of class D resemble topographies associated with error monitoring. Its premature termination may facilitate the misattribution of self-generated inner speech to external sources during hallucinations. These results suggest that microstate D represents a biological state marker for hallucinatory experiences. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  10. EEG applications for sport and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Trevor; Steffert, Tony; Ros, Tomas; Leach, Joseph; Gruzelier, John

    2008-08-01

    One approach to understanding processes that underlie skilled performing has been to study electrical brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG). A notorious problem with EEG is that genuine cerebral data is often contaminated by artifacts of non-cerebral origin. Unfortunately, such artifacts tend to be exacerbated when the subject is in motion, meaning that obtaining reliable data during exercise is inherently problematic. These problems may explain the limited number of studies using EEG as a methodological tool in the sports sciences. This paper discusses how empirical studies have generally tackled the problem of movement artifact by adopting alternative paradigms which avoid recording during actual physical exertion. Moreover, the specific challenges that motion presents to obtaining reliable EEG data are discussed along with practical and computational techniques to confront these challenges. Finally, as EEG recording in sports is often underpinned by a desire to optimise performance, a brief review of EEG-biofeedback and peak performance studies is also presented. A knowledge of practical aspects of EEG recording along with the advent of new technology and increasingly sophisticated processing models offer a promising approach to minimising, if perhaps not entirely circumventing, the problem of obtaining reliable EEG data during motion.

  11. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC® EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousikou, Petroula; Mahajan, Yatin; de Lissa, Peter; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants – particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system has been developed that is portable, inexpensive, and easy to set up. In this study we tested if auditory ERPs measured using a gaming EEG system (Emotiv EPOC®, www.emotiv.com) were equivalent to those measured by a widely-used, laboratory-based, research EEG system (Neuroscan). Methods. We simultaneously recorded EEGs with the research and gaming EEG systems, whilst presenting 21 adults with 566 standard (1000 Hz) and 100 deviant (1200 Hz) tones under passive (non-attended) and active (attended) conditions. The onset of each tone was marked in the EEGs using a parallel port pulse (Neuroscan) or a stimulus-generated electrical pulse injected into the O1 and O2 channels (Emotiv EPOC®). These markers were used to calculate research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 peaks) and the mismatch negativity (MMN) in active and passive listening conditions for each participant. Results. Analyses were restricted to frontal sites as these are most commonly reported in auditory ERP research. Intra-class correlations (ICCs) indicated that the morphology of the research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERP waveforms were similar across all participants, but that the research and gaming EEG system MMN waveforms were only similar for participants with non-noisy MMN waveforms (N = 11 out of 21). Peak amplitude and latency measures revealed no significant differences between the size or the timing of the auditory P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and MMN peaks. Conclusions

  12. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC(®) EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Nicholas A; Mousikou, Petroula; Mahajan, Yatin; de Lissa, Peter; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants - particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system has been developed that is portable, inexpensive, and easy to set up. In this study we tested if auditory ERPs measured using a gaming EEG system (Emotiv EPOC(®), www.emotiv.com) were equivalent to those measured by a widely-used, laboratory-based, research EEG system (Neuroscan). Methods. We simultaneously recorded EEGs with the research and gaming EEG systems, whilst presenting 21 adults with 566 standard (1000 Hz) and 100 deviant (1200 Hz) tones under passive (non-attended) and active (attended) conditions. The onset of each tone was marked in the EEGs using a parallel port pulse (Neuroscan) or a stimulus-generated electrical pulse injected into the O1 and O2 channels (Emotiv EPOC(®)). These markers were used to calculate research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 peaks) and the mismatch negativity (MMN) in active and passive listening conditions for each participant. Results. Analyses were restricted to frontal sites as these are most commonly reported in auditory ERP research. Intra-class correlations (ICCs) indicated that the morphology of the research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERP waveforms were similar across all participants, but that the research and gaming EEG system MMN waveforms were only similar for participants with non-noisy MMN waveforms (N = 11 out of 21). Peak amplitude and latency measures revealed no significant differences between the size or the timing of the auditory P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and MMN peaks

  13. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC® EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Badcock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants – particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG system has been developed that is portable, inexpensive, and easy to set up. In this study we tested if auditory ERPs measured using a gaming EEG system (Emotiv EPOC®, www.emotiv.com were equivalent to those measured by a widely-used, laboratory-based, research EEG system (Neuroscan.Methods. We simultaneously recorded EEGs with the research and gaming EEG systems, whilst presenting 21 adults with 566 standard (1000 Hz and 100 deviant (1200 Hz tones under passive (non-attended and active (attended conditions. The onset of each tone was marked in the EEGs using a parallel port pulse (Neuroscan or a stimulus-generated electrical pulse injected into the O1 and O2 channels (Emotiv EPOC®. These markers were used to calculate research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 peaks and the mismatch negativity (MMN in active and passive listening conditions for each participant.Results. Analyses were restricted to frontal sites as these are most commonly reported in auditory ERP research. Intra-class correlations (ICCs indicated that the morphology of the research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERP waveforms were similar across all participants, but that the research and gaming EEG system MMN waveforms were only similar for participants with non-noisy MMN waveforms (N = 11 out of 21. Peak amplitude and latency measures revealed no significant differences between the size or the timing of the auditory P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and MMN peaks

  14. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re-evaluated...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave.......We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re...

  15. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengfan; Niu, Linwei; Xian, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Genshe

    2017-01-01

    The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI) technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based Brain Computer Interface (BCI), to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques. PMID:28484488

  16. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG- based Brain Computer Interface (BCI, to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques.

  17. EEG, transmission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose 18F. Their use in adults with gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmark, M.E.; Theodore, W.H.; Sato, S.; De La Paz, R.; Patronas, N.; Brooks, R.; Jabbari, B.; Di Chiro, G.

    1983-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between findings from EEG, transmission computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography in 23 adults with gliomas. The cortical metabolic rate was suppressed in patients with and without focal slowing. Focal delta activity was not related to involvement of gray or white matter. Rhythmic delta activity and focal attenuation of background amplitude on EEG, however, were correlated with involvement of the thalamus

  18. EFFICACY OF ACTIVATION PROCEDURES TO ILLUSTRATE EEG CHANGES IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimpy Bhuyan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND EEG or Electroencephalogram, which is the most important diagnostic procedure to evaluate Epilepsy patients, may sometimes fall short of accurate sensitivity and may require few Activation Procedures such as ‘Hyperventilation’ and ‘Sleep’ to bring out the active changes of an Epileptic brain. The present study was done with the aim of knowing the efficacy of such Activation Procedures like ‘Hyperventilation’ and ‘Sleep’ in illustrating the EEG wave pattern changes of an Epileptic brain during the interictal period. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was done in the Department of Physiology in association with the Department of Neurology, Assam Medical College & Hospital, Dibrugarh, Assam from June 2014 to May 2015. ‘113’ clinically diagnosed cases of Epilepsy were studied and analysed through Electroencephalogram using the internationally accepted 10-20 electrode placement method. Hyperventilation was used in 28 Epilepsy cases and Sleep was used in 14 Epilepsy cases. History & Physical examination findings were recorded in a Proforma. Chi-square analysis was done through GraphPad Prism 6 software to assess the significance of the activation procedures used. RESULTS Our study found that EEG of 42 cases out of the total 113 cases required Activation Procedures to elicit the wave pattern changes of the Epileptic brain. Hyperventilation was helpful in adult age group and sleep was useful in children age group. Hyperventilation had overall 53.57% sensitivity in detecting Epilepsy, and Sleep had 64.29% sensitivity in detecting Epilepsy. Hyperventilation was specifically helpful to elicit absence seizures where it had 75% sensitivity. CONCLUSION The sensitivity of EEG in detecting Epilepsy can thus be increased by using activation procedures like sleep & Hyperventilation to ensure that no epilepsy cases are missed out in diagnosis & treatment.

  19. Sleep in the human hippocampus: a stereo-EEG study.

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    Fabio Moroni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is compelling evidence indicating that sleep plays a crucial role in the consolidation of new declarative, hippocampus-dependent memories. Given the increasing interest in the spatiotemporal relationships between cortical and hippocampal activity during sleep, this study aimed to shed more light on the basic features of human sleep in the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded intracerebral stereo-EEG directly from the hippocampus and neocortical sites in five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The time course of classical EEG frequency bands during the first three NREM-REM sleep cycles of the night was evaluated. We found that delta power shows, also in the hippocampus, the progressive decrease across sleep cycles, indicating that a form of homeostatic regulation of delta activity is present also in this subcortical structure. Hippocampal sleep was also characterized by: i a lower relative power in the slow oscillation range during NREM sleep compared to the scalp EEG; ii a flattening of the time course of the very low frequencies (up to 1 Hz across sleep cycles, with relatively high levels of power even during REM sleep; iii a decrease of power in the beta band during REM sleep, at odds with the typical increase of power in the cortical recordings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data imply that cortical slow oscillation is attenuated in the hippocampal structures during NREM sleep. The most peculiar feature of hippocampal sleep is the increased synchronization of the EEG rhythms during REM periods. This state of resonance may have a supportive role for the processing/consolidation of memory.

  20. Neurobiological correlates of EMDR monitoring - an EEG study.

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    Marco Pagani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. METHODS: Electroencephalography (EEG was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0 and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1. Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. RESULTS: During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. CONCLUSIONS: The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful

  1. Neurobiological Correlates of EMDR Monitoring – An EEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Methods Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. Results During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. Conclusions The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus

  2. Trends in EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koles, Z J

    1998-02-01

    The concepts underlying the quantitative localization of the sources of the EEG inside the brain are reviewed along with the current and emerging approaches to the problem. The concepts mentioned include monopolar and dipolar source models and head models ranging from the spherical to the more realistic based on boundary and finite elements. The forward and inverse problems in electroencephalography are discussed, including the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. The approaches to the solution of the inverse problem described include single and multiple time-slice localization, equivalent dipole localization and the weighted minimum norm. The multiple time-slice localization approach is highlighted as probably the best available at this time and is discussed in terms of the spatiotemporal model of the EEG. The effect of noise corruption, artifacts and the number of recording electrodes on the accuracy of source localization is also mentioned. It is suggested that the main appeal of the minimum norm is that it does not assume a model for the sources and provides an estimate of the current density everywhere in the three dimensional volume of the head.

  3. Declining functional connectivity and changing hub locations in Alzheimer's disease: an EEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, M.M.A.; Stam, C.J.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; de Waal, H.; van Straaten, E.C.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: EEG studies have shown that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have weaker functional connectivity than controls, especially in higher frequency bands. Furthermore, active regions seem more prone to AD pathology. How functional connectivity is affected in AD subgroups of disease

  4. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC? EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs

    OpenAIRE

    Badcock, Nicholas A.; Mousikou, Petroula; Mahajan, Yatin; de?Lissa, Peter; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants ? particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system ha...

  5. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Epileptiform EEG Discharges in a Large Memory Clinic Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liedorp, M.; Stam, C.J.; van der Flier, W.M.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Scheltens, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although EEG is not considered as standard in memory clinics, evidence indicates that epileptiform discharges are of value in diagnosing cognitive complaints as epilepsy. Objective: To determine prevalence and significance of epileptiform discharges in a memory clinic. Methods: 1,674

  6. A randomized controlled trial into the effects of neurofeedback, methylphenidate, and physical activity on EEG power spectra in children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.P.; Bink, M.; Gelade, K.; van Mourik, R.; Maras, A.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical and neurophysiological effects of neurofeedback (NF) as treatment for children with ADHD are still unclear. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra before and after NF compared to methylphenidate (MPH) treatment and physical

  7. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  8. Graph theoretical analysis of EEG functional connectivity during music perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjie; Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Chu; Liu, Dongwei; Ding, Xiaojun; Zhou, Changle

    2012-11-05

    The present study evaluated the effect of music on large-scale structure of functional brain networks using graph theoretical concepts. While most studies on music perception used Western music as an acoustic stimulus, Guqin music, representative of Eastern music, was selected for this experiment to increase our knowledge of music perception. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from non-musician volunteers in three conditions: Guqin music, noise and silence backgrounds. Phase coherence was calculated in the alpha band and between all pairs of EEG channels to construct correlation matrices. Each resulting matrix was converted into a weighted graph using a threshold, and two network measures: the clustering coefficient and characteristic path length were calculated. Music perception was found to display a higher level mean phase coherence. Over the whole range of thresholds, the clustering coefficient was larger while listening to music, whereas the path length was smaller. Networks in music background still had a shorter characteristic path length even after the correction for differences in mean synchronization level among background conditions. This topological change indicated a more optimal structure under music perception. Thus, prominent small-world properties are confirmed in functional brain networks. Furthermore, music perception shows an increase of functional connectivity and an enhancement of small-world network organizations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Does sleep deprivation alter functional EEG networks in children with focal epilepsy?

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    Eric evan Diessen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG recordings after sleep deprivation increase the diagnostic yield in patients suspected of epilepsy if the routine EEG remains inconclusive. Sleep deprivation is associated with increased interictal EEG abnormalities in patients with epilepsy, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In this feasibility study, we used a network analytical approach to provide novel insights into this clinical observation. The aim was to characterize the effect of sleep deprivation on interictal functional network organization using a unique dataset of paired routine and sleep deprivation recordings in patients and controls. We included twenty-one children referred to the first seizure clinic of our center with suspected new onset focal epilepsy in whom a routine interictal and a sleep deprivation EEG (SD-EEG were performed. Seventeen children, in whom the diagnosis of epilepsy was excluded, served as controls. For both time points weighted functional networks were constructed based on interictal artifact free time-series. Routine and sleep deprivation networks were characterized at different frequency bands using minimum spanning tree (MST measures (leaf number and diameter and classical measures of integration (path length and segregation (clustering coefficient. A significant interaction was found for leaf number and diameter between patients and controls after sleep deprivation: patients showed a shift towards a more path-like MST network whereas controls showed a shift towards a more star-like MST network. This shift in network organization after sleep deprivation in patients is in accordance with previous studies showing a more regular network organization in the ictal state and might relate to the increased epileptiform abnormalities found in patients after sleep deprivation. Larger studies are needed to verify these results. Finally, MST measures were more sensitive in detecting network changes as compared to the classical measures of

  10. Emergence EEG pattern classification in sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Huang, Cheng; Li, Yongwang; Hight, Darren F; Voss, Logan J; Sleigh, Jamie W; Li, Xiaoli; Bai, Yang

    2018-03-07

    Objective. Significant spectral characteristics of electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns exist in individual patients during re-establishing consciousness after general anesthesia. However, these EEG patterns cannot be quantitatively identified using commercially available depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitors. This study proposed an effective classification method and indices to classify these patterns among patients. Approach. Four types of emergence EEG patterns were identified based on EEG data set from 52patients undergoing sevoflurane general anesthesia from two hospitals. Then, the relative power spectrum density (RPSD) of five frequency sub-bands of clinical interest (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma) were selected for emergence state analysis. Finally, the genetic algorithm support vector machine (GA-SVM) was used to identify the emergence EEG patterns. Performance was reported in terms of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and accuracy (AC). Main results. The combination of the mean and mode of RPSD in delta and alpha band (P (delta)/P (alpha) performed the best with the GA-SVM classification. AC indices obtained by GA-SVM across the four patterns were 90.64±7.61, 81.79±5.84, 82.14±7.99, and 72.86±11.11 respectively. Furthermore, the emergence time of the patients with EEG emergence pattern I and III increased with the increasing of patients' age. While for the patients with EEG emergence pattern IV, the emergence time positively correlates with the patients' age which less than 50, and negatively correlates with the patients' age which more than 50. Significance. The mean and mode of P (delta)/P (alpha) is a useful index to classify the different emergence EEG patterns. In addition, the EEG emergence patterns may correlate with underlying neural substrate which related with patients' age. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  11. Distribution entropy analysis of epileptic EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yan, Chang; Karmakar, Chandan; Liu, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    It is an open-ended challenge to accurately detect the epileptic seizures through electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Recently published studies have made elaborate attempts to distinguish between the normal and epileptic EEG signals by advanced nonlinear entropy methods, such as the approximate entropy, sample entropy, fuzzy entropy, and permutation entropy, etc. Most recently, a novel distribution entropy (DistEn) has been reported to have superior performance compared with the conventional entropy methods for especially short length data. We thus aimed, in the present study, to show the potential of DistEn in the analysis of epileptic EEG signals. The publicly-accessible Bonn database which consisted of normal, interictal, and ictal EEG signals was used in this study. Three different measurement protocols were set for better understanding the performance of DistEn, which are: i) calculate the DistEn of a specific EEG signal using the full recording; ii) calculate the DistEn by averaging the results for all its possible non-overlapped 5 second segments; and iii) calculate it by averaging the DistEn values for all the possible non-overlapped segments of 1 second length, respectively. Results for all three protocols indicated a statistically significantly increased DistEn for the ictal class compared with both the normal and interictal classes. Besides, the results obtained under the third protocol, which only used very short segments (1 s) of EEG recordings showed a significantly (p entropy algorithm. The capability of discriminating between the normal and interictal EEG signals is of great clinical relevance since it may provide helpful tools for the detection of a seizure onset. Therefore, our study suggests that the DistEn analysis of EEG signals is very promising for clinical and even portable EEG monitoring.

  12. Signal Quality Evaluation of Emerging EEG Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Radüntz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG registration as a direct measure of brain activity has unique potentials. It is one of the most reliable and predicative indicators when studying human cognition, evaluating a subject's health condition, or monitoring their mental state. Unfortunately, standard signal acquisition procedures limit the usability of EEG devices and narrow their application outside the lab. Emerging sensor technology allows gel-free EEG registration and wireless signal transmission. Thus, it enables quick and easy application of EEG devices by users themselves. Although a main requirement for the interpretation of an EEG is good signal quality, there is a lack of research on this topic in relation to new devices. In our work, we compared the signal quality of six very different EEG devices. On six consecutive days, 24 subjects wore each device for 60 min and completed tasks and games on the computer. The registered signals were evaluated in the time and frequency domains. In the time domain, we examined the percentage of artifact-contaminated EEG segments and the signal-to-noise ratios. In the frequency domain, we focused on the band power variation in relation to task demands. The results indicated that the signal quality of a mobile, gel-based EEG system could not be surpassed by that of a gel-free system. However, some of the mobile dry-electrode devices offered signals that were almost comparable and were very promising. This study provided a differentiated view of the signal quality of emerging mobile and gel-free EEG recording technology and allowed an assessment of the functionality of the new devices. Hence, it provided a crucial prerequisite for their general application, while simultaneously supporting their further development.

  13. EEG and CT findings of infant partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Kumanomido, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Makoto; Ueoka, Kiyotaka

    1981-01-01

    Examination of EEG and cranial CT were performed in 19 cases of partial seizures with elementary symptomatology (PSES), 6 cases of partial seizures with complex symptomatology (PSCS), and 17 cases of benign focal pilepsy of childhood with Rolandic spikes (BFECRS). The results were as follows. 1) In 16 of 19 cases of PSES (84%), various abnormal CT findings such as localized cerebral atrophy (7 cases), localized cerebral atrophy complicated with porencephaly (4 cases), porencephaly alone (2 cases), and diffuse cerebral atrophy (3 cases) were found. 2) Of 6 cases of PSCS localized cerebral atrophy was found in 3 cases, porencephaly in one case, and localized calcification in one case. Normal CT findings were obtained in one case. 3) In comparison of EEG findings with CT findings in 25 cases of partial seizures CT findings correlated with the basic waves rather than the paroxysmal ones. 4) The fact that CT findings in patients with BFECRS were mostly normal suggests the functional origin of the seizures. 5) CT was valuable in partial seizures for detecting underlying disorders and predicting the prognosis. (Ueda, J.)

  14. PyEEG: An Open Source Python Module for EEG/MEG Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forrest Sheng Bao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  15. Analyzing Electroencephalogram Signal Using EEG Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh BHARDWAJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The EEG is composed of electrical potentials arising from several sources. Each source (including separate neural clusters, blink artifact or pulse artifact forms a unique topography onto the scalp – ‘scalp map‘. Scalp map may be 2-D or 3-D.These maps are mixed according to the principle of linear superposition. Independent component analysis (ICA attempts to reverse the superposition by separating the EEG into mutually independent scalp maps, or components. MATLAB toolbox and graphic user interface, EEGLAB is used for processing EEG data of any number of channels. Wavelet toolbox has been used for 2-D signal analysis.

  16. Improving Cross-Day EEG-Based Emotion Classification Using Robust Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Pin Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Constructing a robust emotion-aware analytical framework using non-invasively recorded electroencephalogram (EEG signals has gained intensive attentions nowadays. However, as deploying a laboratory-oriented proof-of-concept study toward real-world applications, researchers are now facing an ecological challenge that the EEG patterns recorded in real life substantially change across days (i.e., day-to-day variability, arguably making the pre-defined predictive model vulnerable to the given EEG signals of a separate day. The present work addressed how to mitigate the inter-day EEG variability of emotional responses with an attempt to facilitate cross-day emotion classification, which was less concerned in the literature. This study proposed a robust principal component analysis (RPCA-based signal filtering strategy and validated its neurophysiological validity and machine-learning practicability on a binary emotion classification task (happiness vs. sadness using a five-day EEG dataset of 12 subjects when participated in a music-listening task. The empirical results showed that the RPCA-decomposed sparse signals (RPCA-S enabled filtering off the background EEG activity that contributed more to the inter-day variability, and predominately captured the EEG oscillations of emotional responses that behaved relatively consistent along days. Through applying a realistic add-day-in classification validation scheme, the RPCA-S progressively exploited more informative features (from 12.67 ± 5.99 to 20.83 ± 7.18 and improved the cross-day binary emotion-classification accuracy (from 58.31 ± 12.33% to 64.03 ± 8.40% as trained the EEG signals from one to four recording days and tested against one unseen subsequent day. The original EEG features (prior to RPCA processing neither achieved the cross-day classification (the accuracy was around chance level nor replicated the encouraging improvement due to the inter-day EEG variability. This result

  17. Valor do EEG na caracterização e prognóstico de patologias neurológicas em recém-nascidos prematuros Relationship of EEG, neurological diseases and follow-up in preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magoa Lahorgue Nunes

    1995-09-01

    neurological and electroencephalogram (EEG or polysomnography (PS evaluation. EEG/PS alterations, pathologies and prognosis were reported. The EEG were classified according to basal activity alterations, presence of paroxysmal activity and sleep stages organization and maturity. The most frequent pathology was perinatal asphyxia (40% followed by intraventricular hemorrhage (HIV, 16%. The most frequent complaint for exam indication was apnea (71% followed by convulsion (19%. Fifty-five percent of the exams exclusively required because apnea complaint were considered normal and out of all exams required because seizures only 31 % were normal. The EEG alteration most frequently related to perinatal asphyxia, HIV and intrauterine growth delay was immaturity and in the NB with seizures immature EEG and abnormal paroxysms. Many different alterations were registered in the NB with nervous system infection. The EEG findings more correlated with unfavorable prognosis were isoelectricity and abnormal paroxysmal activity including positive sharp waves (100%.

  18. Plant abnormality diagnosis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Akira.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention diagnose an abnormal event occurred in a large-scaled plant, such as a nuclear power plant. The device comprises the following four functions. (1) Abnormality candidates are estimated based on an intelligence base storing characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and physical amounts of the plant components, and detected abnormality and measured values. Among the candidates, one which coincidents with the measured value such as an actual process amount is judged as a first cause. (2) In addition, a real time plant behavior is estimated based on parameters determining a plant operation mode. The candidate for the abnormality cause is estimated by the comparison between the result of the estimation and the measured value such as a process amount. (3) Characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and the physical amount of the plant components are structured stepwise thereby identifying the first abnormality cause. (4) Inactuated or failed portions of the components for restoring the abnormality to normal state are identified based on the intelligence base simultaneously with the estimation for the first abnormality cause. (I.S.)

  19. Predictive value of EEG findings at control of epileptic spasms for seizure relapse in patients with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keitaro; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Kimizu, Tomokazu; Kimura, Sadami; Ikeda, Tae; Mogami, Yukiko; Yanagihara, Keiko; Mano, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the prognostic importance of electroencephalography (EEG) findings at cessation of epileptic spasms for seizure outcome. We reviewed 71 children with West syndrome (cryptogenic 14) who had obtained control of epileptic spasms with initial treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) 37, high-dose vitamin B6 2, and antiepileptic drugs 32). According to the EEG findings at control of epileptic spasms, the subjects were divided into three groups: normal group (no epileptic activity, n=12), abnormal group (residual epileptic activity without hypsarrhythmia, n=53), and hypsarrhythmic group (persisting hypsarrhythmia, n=6). Overall, 47 (66%) of the 71 patients (cryptogenic 4) had experienced relapses of seizures (epileptic spasms 23 and focal seizure 24) after initial control of epileptic spasms. Within symptomatic cases, seizure relapse rate varied widely from 0% (Down syndrome) to 100% (tuberous sclerosis), depending on underlying causes. Seizure relapse depended on the EEG findings at control of epileptic spasms. The normal group had a significantly lower seizure relapse rate (17%) in comparison with the abnormal group (75%), the hypsarrhythmic group (83%), and the epileptiform (abnormal plus hypsarrhythmic, 76%) group. No significant difference in seizure relapse rate was observed between non-hypsarrhythmic (normal plus abnormal, 65%) and hypsarrhythmic groups. At the last follow-up, normal group children also showed a favorable seizure prognosis (seizure control 100%). A favorable seizure prognosis is associated with the disappearance of epileptic activity, but not the resolution of hypsarrhythmic pattern on EEG at control of epileptic spasms. We suggest that effective treatment for West syndrome should produce both cessation of epileptic spasms and disappearance of epileptic activity on EEG. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Paulina A; González, Alvaro J; Pérez, María E; Kattan, Javier; Fabres, Jorge G; Tapia, José L; González, Hernán S

    2014-01-01

    to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR) were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. ten of the 21 monitored infants (48%) presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25%) encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%), all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43%) evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. Toso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. METHODS: this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. RESULTS: ten of the 21 monitored infants (48% presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25% encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%, all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43% evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. CONCLUSIONS: in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn.

  2. Exploration of lower frequency EEG dynamics and cortical alpha asymmetry in long-term rajyoga meditators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanishka Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rajyoga meditation is taught by Prajapita Brahmakumaris World Spiritual University (Brahmakumaris and has been followed by more than one million followers across the globe. However, rare studies were conducted on physiological aspects of rajyoga meditation using electroencephalography (EEG. Band power and cortical asymmetry were not studied with Rajyoga meditators. Aims: This study aims to investigate the effect of regular meditation practice on EEG brain dynamics in low-frequency bands of long-term Rajyoga meditators. Settings and Design: Subjects were matched for age in both groups. Lower frequency EEG bands were analyzed in resting and during meditation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one male long-term meditators (LTMs and same number of controls were selected to participate in study as par inclusion criteria. Semi high-density EEG was recorded before and during meditation in LTM group and resting in control group. The main outcome of the study was spectral power of alpha and theta bands and cortical (hemispherical asymmetry calculated using band power. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA was performed to find the significant difference between EEG spectral properties of groups. Pearson's Chi-square test was used to find difference among demographics data. Results: Results reveal high-band power in alpha and theta spectra in meditators. Cortical asymmetry calculated through EEG power was also found to be high in frontal as well as parietal channels. However, no correlation was seen between the experience of meditation (years, hours practice and EEG indices. Conclusion: Overall findings indicate contribution of smaller frequencies (alpha and theta while maintaining meditative experience. This suggests a positive impact of meditation on frontal and parietal areas of brain, involved in the processes of regulation of selective and sustained attention as well as provide evidence about their involvement in emotion and cognitive

  3. Adolescence & Parental History of Alcoholism: Insights from the Sleep EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Reen, Eliza; Acebo, Christine; LeBourgeois, Monique; Seifer, Ronald; Fallone, Gahan; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Disrupted sleep is a common complaint of individuals with alcohol use disorder and in abstinent alcoholics. Furthermore, among recovering alcoholics, poor sleep predicts relapse to drinking. Whether disrupted sleep in these populations results from prolonged alcohol use or precedes the onset of drinking is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the sleep EEG in alcohol naïve, parental history positive (PH+) and negative (PH−) boys and girls. Methods All-night sleep EEG recordings in two longitudinal cohorts (child and teen) followed at 1.5 – 3 year intervals were analyzed. The child and teen participants were 9/10 and 15/16 years old at the initial assessment, respectively. Parental history status was classified by DSM-IV criteria applied to structured interviews (CDIS-IV) resulting in 14 PH− and 10 PH+ children and 14 PH− and 10 PH+ teens. Sleep data were visually scored in 30-second epochs using standard criteria. Power spectra were calculated for EEG derivations C3/A2, C4/A1, O2/A1, O1/A2 for NREM and REM sleep. Results We found no difference between PH+ and PH− individuals in either cohort for any visually scored sleep stage variable. Spectral power declined in both cohorts across assessments for NREM and REM sleep in all derivations and across frequencies independent of parental history status. With regard to parental history, NREM sleep EEG power was lower for the delta band in PH+ teens at both assessments for the central derivations. Furthermore, power in the sigma band for the right occipital derivation in both NREM and REM sleep was lower in PH+ children only at the initial assessment. Conclusions We found no gross signs of sleep disruption as a function of parental history. Modest differences in spectral EEG power between PH+ and PH− children and teens indicate that a marker of parental alcohol history may detectable in teens at risk for problem drinking. PMID:22486223

  4. Review on solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergult Anneleen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of electroencephalogram (EEG source localization is to find the brain areas responsible for EEG waves of interest. It consists of solving forward and inverse problems. The forward problem is solved by starting from a given electrical source and calculating the potentials at the electrodes. These evaluations are necessary to solve the inverse problem which is defined as finding brain sources which are responsible for the measured potentials at the EEG electrodes. Methods While other reviews give an extensive summary of the both forward and inverse problem, this review article focuses on different aspects of solving the forward problem and it is intended for newcomers in this research field. Results It starts with focusing on the generators of the EEG: the post-synaptic potentials in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These cells generate an extracellular current which can be modeled by Poisson's differential equation, and Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. The compartments in which these currents flow can be anisotropic (e.g. skull and white matter. In a three-shell spherical head model an analytical expression exists to solve the forward problem. During the last two decades researchers have tried to solve Poisson's equation in a realistically shaped head model obtained from 3D medical images, which requires numerical methods. The following methods are compared with each other: the boundary element method (BEM, the finite element method (FEM and the finite difference method (FDM. In the last two methods anisotropic conducting compartments can conveniently be introduced. Then the focus will be set on the use of reciprocity in EEG source localization. It is introduced to speed up the forward calculations which are here performed for each electrode position rather than for each dipole position. Solving Poisson's equation utilizing FEM and FDM corresponds to solving a large sparse linear system. Iterative

  5. Intracranial EEG Connectivity Analysis and Result Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 275-279 ISSN 2010-3638 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Connectivity * Correlation * Intracranial EEG * Signal Processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  6. Two channel EEG thought pattern classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D A; Nguyen, H T; Burchey, H A

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time electro-encephalogram (EEG) identification system with the goal of achieving hands free control. With two EEG electrodes placed on the scalp of the user, EEG signals are amplified and digitised directly using a ProComp+ encoder and transferred to the host computer through the RS232 interface. Using a real-time multilayer neural network, the actual classification for the control of a powered wheelchair has a very fast response. It can detect changes in the user's thought pattern in 1 second. Using only two EEG electrodes at positions O(1) and C(4) the system can classify three mental commands (forward, left and right) with an accuracy of more than 79 %

  7. Computerized EEG: predictor of outcome in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Marasa, J; Saletu, B; Davis, S; Mucciardi, A N

    1975-03-01

    Based on a double blind cross-over study, it was determined that schizophrenic patient who have more high frequency fast activity and a lesser degree of alpha and slow waves in computerized EEG before the treatment have a better therapeutic outcome to the major tranquilizer (neuroleptic) treatment. The correlation between pretreatment high frequency computer EEG measurements and better therapeutic outcome reached the level of statistical significance. "Therapy resistant" schizophrenic patients were characterized by a lesser degree of very fast beta activity, more alpha waves and slow waves, higher amplitudes in computer EEG, and a lesser degree of acute (florid) psychotic symptomatology but more "negative" symptoms such as motor retardation and blunted affect. One of the most striking results of the study is the finding that schizophrenic patients with certain psychopathological profiles also have similar computer EEG profiles.

  8. Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Broyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The default-mode network (DMN is characterised by coherent very low frequency (VLF brain oscillations. The cognitive significance of this VLF profile remains unclear, partly because of the temporally constrained nature of the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal. Previously we have identified a VLF EEG network of scalp locations that shares many features of the DMN. Here we explore the intracranial sources of VLF EEG and examine their overlap with the DMN in adults with high and low ADHD ratings. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DC-EEG was recorded using an equidistant 66 channel electrode montage in 25 adult participants with high- and 25 participants with low-ratings of ADHD symptoms during a rest condition and an attention demanding Eriksen task. VLF EEG power was calculated in the VLF band (0.02 to 0.2 Hz for the rest and task condition and compared for high and low ADHD participants. sLORETA was used to identify brain sources associated with the attention-induced deactivation of VLF EEG power, and to examine these sources in relation to ADHD symptoms. There was significant deactivation of VLF EEG power between the rest and task condition for the whole sample. Using s-LORETA the sources of this deactivation were localised to medial prefrontal regions, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and temporal regions. However, deactivation sources were different for high and low ADHD groups: In the low ADHD group attention-induced VLF EEG deactivation was most significant in medial prefrontal regions while for the high ADHD group this deactivation was predominantly localised to the temporal lobes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Attention-induced VLF EEG deactivations have intracranial sources that appear to overlap with those of the DMN. Furthermore, these seem to be related to ADHD symptom status, with high ADHD adults failing to significantly deactivate medial prefrontal regions while at the same time showing significant attenuation of

  9. Reproducible localization of interictal epileptiform discharges using EEG-triggered fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symms, M.R.; Allen, P.J.; Fish, D.R.; Barker, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    We report preliminary experiences using fMRI triggered by EEG to localize the site of interictal epileptiform activity. EEG was recorded in the scanner and monitored on-line; the recording quality was good enough to allow the clear identification of spikes in the EEG. Snap-shot EPI was performed 2-4 s after an epileptiform discharge ('spike') or after at least 10 s of background activity ('rest') was observed. A pixel-by-pixel t-test was performed between the 'rest' and the 'spike' images to determine areas of significant activation. Significant activation was obtained in a patient with epilepsy. To assess the reliability and reproducibility of the technique, the patient was scanned on four separate occasions with similar areas being activated in all the studies, confirming the validity of the result. (author)

  10. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for th...

  11. QUANTITATIVE EEG COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER (ASD AND ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plamen D. Dimitrov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism is a mental developmental disorder, manifested in the early childhood. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is another psychiatric condition of the neurodevelopmental type. Both disorders affect information processing in the nervous system, altering the mechanisms which control how neurons and their synapses are connected and organized. Purpose: To examine if quantitative EEG assessment is sensitive and simple enough to differentiate autism from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and neurologically typical children. Material and methods: Quantitative EEG is a type of electrophysiological assessment that uses computerized mathematical analysis to convert the raw waveform data into different frequency ranges. Each frequency range is averaged across a sample of data and quantified into mean amplitude (voltage in microvolts mV. We performed quantitative EEG analysis and compared 4 cohorts of children (aged from 3 to 7 years: with autism (high [n=27] and low [n=52] functioning, with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [n=34], and with typical behavior [n75]. Results: Our preliminary results show that there are significant qEEG differences between the groups of patients and the control cohort. The changes affect the potential levels of delta-, theta-, alpha-, and beta- frequency spectrums. Conclusion: The present study shows some significant quantitative EEG findings in autistic patients. This is a step forward in our efforts, aimed at defining specific neurophysiologic changes, in order to develop and refine strategies for early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders, differentiation from other development conditions in childhood, detection of specific biomarkers and early initiation of treatment.

  12. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  13. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  15. Video-EEG recordings in full-term neonates of diabetic mothers: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Conde, José Ramón; González González, Nieves Luisa; González Barrios, Desiré; González Campo, Candelaria; Suárez Hernández, Yaiza; Sosa Comino, Elena

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether full-term newborn infants of diabetic mothers (IDM) present immature/disorganised EEG patterns in the immediate neonatal period, and whether there was any relationship with maternal glycaemic control. Cohort study with an incidental sample performed in a tertiary hospital neonatal unit. 23 IDM and 22 healthy newborns born between 2010 and 2013. All underwent video-EEG recording lasting >90 min at 48-72 h of life. We analysed the percentage of indeterminate sleep, transient sharp waves per hour and mature-for-gestational age EEG patterns (discontinuity, maximum duration of interburst interval (IBI), asynchrony, asymmetry, δ brushes, encoches frontales and α/θ rolandic activity). The group of IDM was divided into two subgroups according to maternal HbA1c: (1) HbA1c≥6% and (2) HbA1cIDM presented significantly higher percentage of indeterminate sleep (57% vs 25%; pIDM with maternal HbA1c≥6% showed greater percentage of δ brushes in the burst (14% vs 4%; p=0.007). Full-term IDM newborns showed video-EEG features of abnormal development of brain function. Maternal HbA1c levels<6% during pregnancy could minimise the risk of cerebral dysmaturity.

  16. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemiński, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. PMID:26553287

  17. Cognitive neuroscience of creativity: EEG based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2007-05-01

    Cognitive neuroscience of creativity has been extensively studied using non-invasive electrical recordings from the scalp called electroencephalograms (EEGs) and event related potentials (ERPs). The paper discusses major aspects of performing research using EEG/ERP based experiments including the recording of the signals, removing noise, estimating ERP signals, and signal analysis for better understanding of the neural correlates of processes involved in creativity. Important factors to be kept in mind to record clean EEG signal in creativity research are discussed. The recorded EEG signal can be corrupted by various sources of noise and methodologies to handle the presence of unwanted artifacts and filtering noise are presented followed by methods to estimate ERPs from the EEG signals from multiple trials. The EEG and ERP signals are further analyzed using various techniques including spectral analysis, coherence analysis, and non-linear signal analysis. These analysis techniques provide a way to understand the spatial activations and temporal development of large scale electrical activity in the brain during creative tasks. The use of this methodology will further enhance our understanding the processes neural and cognitive processes involved in creativity.

  18. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  19. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. McGill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE.

  20. Hippocampal EEG and behaviour in dog. II. Hippocampal EEG correlates with elementary motor acts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolds, D.E.A.T.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Aitink, J.W.; Kamp, A.

    A positive correlation has been shown between the speed of forced stepping on a conveyor belt and the amplitude and frequency of the concomitant hippocampal EEG. Significant modulation in the spectral properties of the dog's hippocampal EEG has been found in relation to 3 elementary motor acts:

  1. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The association between deafness and ocular problems is well established; however the nature and prevalence of these problems are diverse across the globe. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the nature and prevalence of ophthalmologic abnormalities in deaf students and offer treatment to ...

  2. Integration of differences in EEG analysis reveals changes in human EEG caused by microwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Maie; Lass, Jaanus; Kalda, Jaan; Säkki, Maksim; Tomson, Ruth; Tuulik, Viiu; Hinrikus, Hiie

    2006-01-01

    Three different methods in combination with integration of differences in signals were applied for EEG analysis to distinguish changes in EEG caused by microwave: S-parameter, power spectral density and length distribution of low variability periods. The experiments on the effect of modulated low-level microwaves on human EEG were carried out on four different groups of healthy volunteers exposed to 450 MHz microwave radiation modulated with 7 Hz, 14 Hz, 21 Hz, 40 Hz, 70 Hz, 217 or 1000 Hz frequencies. The field power density at the scalp was 0.16 mW/cm2. The EEG analysis performed for individuals with three different methods showed that statistically significant changes occur in the EEG rhythms energy and dynamics between 12% and 30% of subjects.

  3. The prevalence of electroencephalographic abnormalities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invasive, low cost, neurodiagnostic technique widely available in general and psychiatric hospitals in South Africa. Psychiatric patients are regularly referred for EEG's. The major indication for EEG in psychiatric practice is to rule out an organic cause of mental illness. Organic ...

  4. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for the correlation coefficients between the subjective ratings on the ten positive emotions per film clip and the corresponding EEG spectral powers in different frequency bands. Based on the similarities of the participants' ratings on the ten positive emotions, these emotions were further clustered into three representative clusters, as 'encouragement' for awe, gratitude, hope, inspiration, pride, 'playfulness' for amusement, joy, interest, and 'harmony' for love, serenity. Using the EEG spectral powers as features, both the binary classification on the higher and lower ratings on these positive emotions and the binary classification between the three positive emotion clusters, achieved accuracies of approximately 80% and above. To our knowledge, our study provides the first piece of evidence on the EEG correlates of different positive emotions.

  5. Nucleated red blood cells and early EEG: predicting Sarnat stage and two year outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B H

    2012-01-31

    AIMS: Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy (HIE) causes characteristic changes of the electroencephalogram (EEG), and a raised Nucleated Red Blood Cell (NRBC) count compared to controls. We wished to examine whether combining these markers could improve their ability to predict HIE severity in the first 24h. METHODS: Term infants with HIE were recruited. NRBC count and continuous multi-channel EEG were recorded within the first 24h. Neurological assessment was carried out at 24 months. A control population with NRBC counts in the first 24h was recruited. RESULTS: 44 infants with HIE and 43 control infants were recruited. Of the HIE population 39 completed a 2 year follow-up. The median NRBC count differed significantly between the controls and those with HIE (3\\/100 WBC [range of 0-11] vs 12.3\\/100 WBC [0-240]) (p<0.001). Within the HIE population the median NRBC count was significantly greater in infants with moderate\\/severe HIE than mild (16\\/100 WBC [range of 0-240] vs 8\\/100 WBC [1-23]) (p=0.016), and among infants with abnormal outcome compared to normal (21.3\\/100 WBC [1-239.8] vs 8.3\\/100 WBC [0-50])(p=0.03). The predictive ability of EEG changed with time post-delivery, therefore results are given at both 12 and 24h of age. At both time points the combined marker had a stronger correlation than EEG alone; with HIE severity (12h: r=0.661 vs r=0.622), (24h: r=0.645 vs r=0.598), and with outcome at 2 years (12h: r=0.756 vs r=0.652), (24h: r=0.802 vs r=0.746). CONCLUSION: Combining early EEG and NRBC count to predict HIE severity and neurological outcome, improved the predictive ability of either in isolation.

  6. Automatic epileptic seizure detection in EEGs using MF-DFA, SVM based on cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongnan; Wen, Tingxi; Huang, Wei; Wang, Meihong; Li, Chunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with transient brain dysfunction that results from the sudden abnormal discharge of neurons in the brain. Since electroencephalogram (EEG) is a harmless and noninvasive detection method, it plays an important role in the detection of neurological diseases. However, the process of analyzing EEG to detect neurological diseases is often difficult because the brain electrical signals are random, non-stationary and nonlinear. In order to overcome such difficulty, this study aims to develop a new computer-aided scheme for automatic epileptic seizure detection in EEGs based on multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and support vector machine (SVM). New scheme first extracts features from EEG by MF-DFA during the first stage. Then, the scheme applies a genetic algorithm (GA) to calculate parameters used in SVM and classify the training data according to the selected features using SVM. Finally, the trained SVM classifier is exploited to detect neurological diseases. The algorithm utilizes MLlib from library of SPARK and runs on cloud platform. Applying to a public dataset for experiment, the study results show that the new feature extraction method and scheme can detect signals with less features and the accuracy of the classification reached up to 99%. MF-DFA is a promising approach to extract features for analyzing EEG, because of its simple algorithm procedure and less parameters. The features obtained by MF-DFA can represent samples as well as traditional wavelet transform and Lyapunov exponents. GA can always find useful parameters for SVM with enough execution time. The results illustrate that the classification model can achieve comparable accuracy, which means that it is effective in epileptic seizure detection.

  7. Interictal functional connectivity of human epileptic networks assessed by intracerebral EEG and BOLD signal fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Bettus

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to demonstrate whether spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal derived from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI reflect spontaneous neuronal activity in pathological brain regions as well as in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. This is a crucial issue as coherent fluctuations of fMRI signals between remote brain areas are now widely used to define functional connectivity in physiology and in pathophysiology. We quantified functional connectivity using non-linear measures of cross-correlation between signals obtained from intracerebral EEG (iEEG and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI in 5 patients suffering from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Functional connectivity was quantified with both modalities in areas exhibiting different electrophysiological states (epileptic and non affected regions during the interictal period. Functional connectivity as measured from the iEEG signal was higher in regions affected by electrical epileptiform abnormalities relative to non-affected areas, whereas an opposite pattern was found for functional connectivity measured from the BOLD signal. Significant negative correlations were found between the functional connectivities of iEEG and BOLD signal when considering all pairs of signals (theta, alpha, beta and broadband and when considering pairs of signals in regions spared by epileptiform discharges (in broadband signal. This suggests differential effects of epileptic phenomena on electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals and/or an alteration of the neurovascular coupling secondary to pathological plasticity in TLE even in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. In addition, indices of directionality calculated from both modalities were consistent showing that the epileptogenic regions exert a significant influence onto the non epileptic areas during the interictal period. This study shows that functional

  8. Investigating reading comprehension through EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Baretta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2012n63p69   Experimental studies point that different factors can influence reading comprehension, such as the topic, text type, reading task, and others. The advances in technologies for the past decades have provided researchers with several possibilities to investigate what goes on in one’s brain since their eyes meet the page until comprehension is achieved. Since the mid-80’s, numerous studies have been conducted with the use of the electroencephalogram (EEG to investigate the process of reading, through the analysis of different components – n400, n100 or n1, P2, among others. These components reveal, for example, how the brain integrates the meaning of a specific word in the semantic context of a given sentence.  based on previous studies, which demonstrate that different types of words affect cognitive load, this paper aims at investigating how the brain processes function and content words inserted in expository and narrative texts with suitable / unsuitable conclusions. results showed that the type of text and word influence the cognitive load in different scalp areas (midline, right and left hemispheres. The  n1s were more pronounced to the content words inserted in narrative texts and to the function words inserted in the expository type of texts, corroborating former studies.

  9. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...

  10. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism. Farida El-Baz a. , Mohamed Saad Zaghloul a. , Ezzat El Sobky a. ,. Reham M Elhossiny a,. *, Heba Salah a. , Neveen Ezy Abdelaziz b a Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt b Children with Special ...

  12. Insights from intermittent binocular rivalry and EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Pitts

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Novel stimulation and analytical approaches employed in EEG studies of ambiguous figures have recently been applied to binocular rivalry. The combination of intermittent stimulus presentation and EEG source imaging has begun to shed new light on the neural underpinnings of binocular rivalry. Here, we review the basics of the intermittent paradigm and highlight methodological issues important for interpreting previous results and designing future experiments. We then outline current analytical approaches, including EEG microstates, event-related potentials, and statistically-based source estimation, and propose a spatio-temporal model that integrates findings from several studies. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of using binocular rivalry as a tool to investigate the neural basis of perceptual awareness.

  13. EEG-guided meditation: A personalized approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A; Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Kallio-Tamminen, Tarja

    2015-12-01

    The therapeutic potential of meditation for physical and mental well-being is well documented, however the possibility of adverse effects warrants further discussion of the suitability of any particular meditation practice for every given participant. This concern highlights the need for a personalized approach in the meditation practice adjusted for a concrete individual. This can be done by using an objective screening procedure that detects the weak and strong cognitive skills in brain function, thus helping design a tailored meditation training protocol. Quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) is a suitable tool that allows identification of individual neurophysiological types. Using qEEG screening can aid developing a meditation training program that maximizes results and minimizes risk of potential negative effects. This brief theoretical-conceptual review provides a discussion of the problem and presents some illustrative results on the usage of qEEG screening for the guidance of mediation personalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modular, bluetooth enabled, wireless electroencephalograph (EEG) platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Joseph A; Witt, Tyler S; Beyette, Fred R

    2013-01-01

    A design for a modular, compact, and accurate wireless electroencephalograph (EEG) system is proposed. EEG is the only non-invasive measure for neuronal function of the brain. Using a number of digital signal processing (DSP) techniques, this neuronal function can be acquired and processed into meaningful representations of brain activity. The system described here utilizes Bluetooth to wirelessly transmit the digitized brain signal for an end application use. In this way, the system is portable, and modular in terms of the device to which it can interface. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) has become a popular extension of EEG systems in modern research. This design serves as a platform for applications using BCI capability.

  15. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hematological abnormalities such as anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia occur in children infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These abnormalities are due to myelosuppression caused by the HIV and contribute to the morbidity and mortality of HIV.infected children. Malnutrition is ...

  16. Abnormal Spatial Asymmetry of Selective Attention in ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edgar; Mattingley, Jason B.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia; English, Therese; Hester, Robert; Vance, Alasdair; Bellgrove, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Evidence for a selective attention abnormality in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been hard to identify using conventional methods from cognitive science. This study tested whether the presence of selective attention abnormalities in ADHD may vary as a function of perceptual load and target…

  17. The prevalence and risk factors of abnormal glucose tolerance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy amongst women in the reproductive age worldwide. Abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) is common amongst women with PCOS. The prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance amongst Nigerian women with PCOS has not been investigated.

  18. Fetal alcohol exposure leads to abnormal olfactory bulb development and impaired odor discrimination in adult mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Akers (Katherine); S.A. Kushner (Steven); A.T. Leslie (Ana); L. Clarke (Laura); D. van der Kooy (Derek); J.P. Lerch (Jason); P.W. Frankland (Paul)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Children whose mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy exhibit widespread brain abnormalities and a complex array of behavioral disturbances. Here, we used a mouse model of fetal alcohol exposure to investigate relationships between brain abnormalities and specific

  19. Structural Brain Abnormalities of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder With Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, S.D.; Luman, M.; Greven, C.U.; Veroude, K.; Faraone, S.V.; Hartman, C.A.; Hoekstra, P.J.; Franke, B.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Heslenfeld, D.J.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with structural abnormalities in total gray matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. Findings of structural abnormalities in frontal and temporal lobes, amygdala, and insula are less consistent. Remarkably, the impact of

  20. EEG. Renewables Act. Comment. 3. new rev. and enl. ed.; EEG. Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz. Kommentar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, Walter [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany). Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Berg-, Umwelt- und Europarecht; Mueggenborg, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [Kassel Univ. (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    Like hardly any other law, the Renewable Energy Sources Law (EEG) is a subject to continuing modifications. This makes the application of the already complicated regulations even for experts to a special challenge. With the proven Berliner comment EEG, now a reliable companion through the bureaucratic jungle is available. All regulations of the EEG are commented precisely and easily to understand by profound experts. An extensive selection of terminology enables a rapid orientation within this book. In addition to the excursions to renewable energy technologies, this book also describes the structural aspects in the establishment of a photovoltaic system.

  1. Analysis of routine EEG usage in a general adult ICU.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, J C

    2009-09-01

    Non-convulsive seizures and status epilepticus are common in brain-injured patients in intensive care units. Continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) monitoring is the most sensitive means of their detection. In centres where cEEG is unavailable, routine EEG is often utilized for diagnosis although its sensitivity is lower.

  2. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... signals by means of radio or telephone transmission systems. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system...

  3. Fractal Dimension in Epileptic EEG Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, R.

    Fractal Analysis is the well developed theory in the data analysis of non-linear time series. Especially Fractal Dimension is a powerful mathematical tool for modeling many physical and biological time signals with high complexity and irregularity. Fractal dimension is a suitable tool for analyzing the nonlinear behaviour and state of the many chaotic systems. Particularly in analysis of chaotic time series such as electroencephalograms (EEG), this feature has been used to identify and distinguish specific states of physiological function.Epilepsy is the main fatal neurological disorder in our brain, which is analyzed by the biomedical signal called Electroencephalogram (EEG). The detection of Epileptic seizures in the EEG Signals is an important tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. So we made an attempt to analyze the EEG in depth for knowing the mystery of human consciousness. EEG has more fluctuations recorded from the human brain due to the spontaneous electrical activity. Hence EEG Signals are represented as Fractal Time Series.The algorithms of fractal dimension methods have weak ability to the estimation of complexity in the irregular graphs. Divider method is widely used to obtain the fractal dimension of curves embedded into a 2-dimensional space. The major problem is choosing initial and final step length of dividers. We propose a new algorithm based on the size measure relationship (SMR) method, quantifying the dimensional behaviour of irregular rectifiable graphs with minimum time complexity. The evidence for the suitability (equality with the nature of dimension) of the algorithm is illustrated graphically.We would like to demonstrate the criterion for the selection of dividers (minimum and maximum value) in the calculation of fractal dimension of the irregular curves with minimum time complexity. For that we design a new method of computing fractal dimension (FD) of biomedical waveforms. Compared to Higuchi's algorithm, advantages of this method include

  4. Electromagnetic source imaging using simultaneous scalp EEG and intracranial EEG: An emerging tool for interacting with pathological brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Amir Hossein; Sohrabpour, Abbas; He, Bin

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the performance, merits and limitations of source imaging using intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings and to compare its accuracy to the results of EEG source imaging. Accuracy in this study, is measured both by determining the location and inter-nodal connectivity of underlying brain networks. Systematic computer simulation studies are conducted to evaluate iEEG-based source imaging vs. EEG-based source imaging, and source imaging using both EEG and iEEG. To test the source imaging models, networks of inter-connected nodes (in terms of activity) are simulated. The location of the network nodes is randomly selected within a realistic geometry head model and a connectivity link is created among these nodes based on a multi-variate auto-regressive (MVAR) model. Then the forward problem is solved to calculate the potentials at the electrodes and noise (white and correlated) is added to these simulated potentials to simulate realistic measurements. Subsequently, the inverse problem is solved and an algorithm based on principle component analysis is performed on the estimated source activities to determine the location of the simulated network nodes. The activity of these nodes (over time), is then extracted, and used to estimate the connectivity links among the mentioned nodes using Granger causality analysis. Source imaging based on iEEG recordings may or may not improve the accuracy in localization, depending on the number and location of active nodes relative to iEEG electrodes and to other nodes within the network. However, our simulation results suggest that combining EEG and iEEG modalities (simultaneous scalp and intracranial recordings) can improve the imaging accuracy significantly. While iEEG source imaging is useful in estimating the exact location of sources near the iEEG electrodes, combining EEG and iEEG recordings can achieve a more accurate imaging due to the high spatial coverage of the scalp electrodes and the

  5. Prevalence and Characterization of ECG Abnormalities After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, Maurits D. R.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van der Bilt, Ivo A. C.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; de Gans, Koen; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are well known in ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, these changes have only rarely been investigated systematically in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence and

  6. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doubal, F.N.; Hokke, P.E.; Wardlaw, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Lacunar strokes account for 25% of ischaemic strokes, but their precise aetiology is unknown. Similarities between the retinal and cerebral small vessels mean that clarification of the exact relationship between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, and particularly with stroke

  7. Abnormal distracter processing in adults with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Marzinzik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subjects with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD are overdistractible by stimuli out of the intended focus of attention. This control deficit could be due to primarily reduced attentional capacities or, e. g., to overshooting orienting to unexpected events. Here, we aimed at identifying disease-related abnormalities of novelty processing and, therefore, studied event-related potentials (ERP to respective stimuli in adult ADHD patients compared to healthy subjects. METHODS: Fifteen unmedicated subjects with ADHD and fifteen matched controls engaged in a visual oddball task (OT under simultaneous EEG recordings. A target stimulus, upon which a motor response was required, and non-target stimuli, which did not demand a specific reaction, were presented in random order. Target and most non-target stimuli were presented repeatedly, but some non-target stimuli occurred only once ('novels'. These unique stimuli were either 'relative novels' with which a meaning could be associated, or 'complete novels', if no association was available. RESULTS: In frontal recordings, a positive component with a peak latency of some 400 ms became maximal after novels. In healthy subjects, this novelty-P3 (or 'orienting response' was of higher magnitude after complete than after relative novels, in contrast to the patients with an undifferentially high frontal responsivity. Instead, ADHD patients tended to smaller centro-parietal P3 responses after target signals and, on a behavioural level, responded slower than controls. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate abnormal novelty processing in adult subjects with ADHD. In controls, the ERP pattern indicates that allocation of meaning modulates the processing of new stimuli. However, in ADHD such a modulation was not prevalent. Instead, also familiar, only context-wise new stimuli were treated as complete novels. We propose that disturbed semantic processing of new stimuli resembles a mechanism for

  8. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  9. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise

    2007-01-01

    and define management pathways for fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Methods: Our FMU databases were searched to ascertain all fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Sonographic findings, diagnosis and outcome were reviewed. Results: Of the 370 cases identified, 31.6% were associated with spinabifida......Background: Abnormal head shape is an uncommon finding on prenatal ultrasound, often associated with breech presentation, spinabifida, aneuploidy or secondary to oligohydramnios or fetal position. Other aetiologies are rarer and may be more difficult to define. Objective: To determine the aetiology...... incidence of genetic syndromes, in the absence of a clear diagnosis, referral to a tertiary centre and genetic input is advised as detection of subtle sonographic features may aid diagnosis, allowing for targeted molecular analysis. An algorithm for management will be proposed....

  10. Analysis of brain activity and response to colour stimuli during learning tasks: an EEG study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgieri, Raffaella; Lucchiari, Claudio; Marini, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    The research project intends to demonstrate how EEG detection through BCI device can improve the analysis and the interpretation of colours-driven cognitive processes through the combined approach of cognitive science and information technology methods. To this end, firstly it was decided to design an experiment based on comparing the results of the traditional (qualitative and quantitative) cognitive analysis approach with the EEG signal analysis of the evoked potentials. In our case, the sensorial stimulus is represented by the colours, while the cognitive task consists in remembering the words appearing on the screen, with different combination of foreground (words) and background colours. In this work we analysed data collected from a sample of students involved in a learning process during which they received visual stimuli based on colour variation. The stimuli concerned both the background of the text to learn and the colour of the characters. The experiment indicated some interesting results concerning the use of primary (RGB) and complementary (CMY) colours.

  11. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  12. Standardized computer-based organized reporting of EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Aurlien, Harald; Brøgger, Jan C.

    2017-01-01

    . In the end, the diagnostic significance is scored, using a standardized list of terms. SCORE has specific modules for scoring seizures (including seizure semiology and ictal EEG patterns), neonatal recordings (including features specific for this age group), and for Critical Care EEG Terminology. SCORE...... in the second, revised version of SCORE (Standardized Computer-based Organized Reporting of EEG), which is presented in this paper. The revised terminology was implemented in a software package (SCORE EEG), which was tested in clinical practice on 12,160 EEG recordings. Standardized terms implemented in SCORE...... is a useful clinical tool, with potential impact on clinical care, quality assurance, data-sharing, research and education....

  13. Interrater variability of EEG interpretation in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: EEG is widely used to predict outcome in comatose cardiac arrest patients, but its value has been limited by lack of a uniform classification. We used the EEG terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) to assess interrater variability in a cohort.......42) for malignant patterns. Substantial agreement was found for malignant periodic or rhythmic patterns (κ 0.72) while agreement for identifying an unreactive EEG was fair (κ 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: The ACNS EEG terminology can be used to identify highly malignant EEG-patterns in post cardiac arrest patients...

  14. Artifact removal from EEG data with empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Efremova, Tatyana Yu.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper we propose the novel method for dealing with the physiological artifacts caused by intensive activity of facial and neck muscles and other movements in experimental human EEG recordings. The method is based on analysis of EEG signals with empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). We introduce the mathematical algorithm of the method with following steps: empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing empirical modes with artifacts, reconstruction of the initial EEG signal. We test the method on filtration of experimental human EEG signals from movement artifacts and show high efficiency of the method.

  15. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...... megakaryocytopoesis, wide, pericyte-coated and morphologically aberrant vessels were detected. MVD was significantly greater in bone marrow and spleen samples from animals with myelofibrosis than in wild-type mice. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that angiogenesis is similarly abnormal in human and murine...... myelofibrosis with intense pericyte coating, presumably related to abnormal megakaryocytopoiesis....

  16. The spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalographic abnormalities due to SHANK3 loss-of-function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J Lloyd; Quach, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    The coincidence of autism with epilepsy is 27% in those individuals with intellectual disability. 1 Individuals with loss-of-function mutations in SHANK3 have intellectual disability, autism, and variably, epilepsy. 2-5 The spectrum of seizure semiologies and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities has never been investigated in detail. With the recent report that SHANK3 mutations are present in approximately 2% of individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities and 1% of individuals with autism, determining the spectrum of seizure semiologies and electrographic abnormalities will be critical for medical practitioners to appropriately counsel the families of patients with SHANK3 mutations. A retrospective chart review was performed of all individuals treated at the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Child Neurology who have been identified as having either a chromosome 22q13 microdeletion encompassing SHANK3 or a loss-of-function mutation in SHANK3 identified through whole-exome sequencing. For each subject, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure semiology, frequency, age of onset, and efficacy of therapy were determined. Electroencephalography studies were reviewed by a board certified neurophysiologist. Neuroimaging was reviewed by both a board certified pediatric neuroradiologist and child neurologist. There is a wide spectrum of seizure semiologies, frequencies, and severity in individuals with SHANK3 mutations. There are no specific EEG abnormalities found in our cohort, and EEG abnormalities were present in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy and those without history of a clinical seizure. All individuals with a mutation in SHANK3 should be evaluated for epilepsy due to the high prevalence of seizures in this population. The most common semiology is atypical absence seizure, which can be challenging to identify due to comorbid intellectual disability in individuals with SHANK3 mutations; however, no consistent seizure semiology, neuroimaging

  17. EEG source imaging during two Qigong meditations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Pascal L; Lehmann, Dietrich; Tei, Shisei; Tsujiuchi, Takuya; Kumano, Hiroaki; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-08-01

    Experienced Qigong meditators who regularly perform the exercises "Thinking of Nothing" and "Qigong" were studied with multichannel EEG source imaging during their meditations. The intracerebral localization of brain electric activity during the two meditation conditions was compared using sLORETA functional EEG tomography. Differences between conditions were assessed using t statistics (corrected for multiple testing) on the normalized and log-transformed current density values of the sLORETA images. In the EEG alpha-2 frequency, 125 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Qigong" than "Thinking of Nothing," forming a single cluster in parietal Brodmann areas 5, 7, 31, and 40, all in the right hemisphere. In the EEG beta-1 frequency, 37 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Thinking of Nothing" than "Qigong," forming a single cluster in prefrontal Brodmann areas 6, 8, and 9, all in the left hemisphere. Compared to combined initial-final no-task resting, "Qigong" showed activation in posterior areas whereas "Thinking of Nothing" showed activation in anterior areas. The stronger activity of posterior (right) parietal areas during "Qigong" and anterior (left) prefrontal areas during "Thinking of Nothing" may reflect a predominance of self-reference, attention and input-centered processing in the "Qigong" meditation, and of control-centered processing in the "Thinking of Nothing" meditation.

  18. Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

    2013-09-05

    Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Source localization of rhythmic ictal EEG activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Lantz, Göran; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Although precise identification of the seizure-onset zone is an essential element of presurgical evaluation, source localization of ictal electroencephalography (EEG) signals has received little attention. The aim of our study was to estimate the accuracy of source localization of rhythmic ictal ...

  20. Microneedle array electrode for human EEG recording.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüttge, Regina; van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Microneedle array electrodes for EEG significantly reduce the mounting time, particularly by circumvention of the need for skin preparation by scrubbing. We designed a new replication process for numerous types of microneedle arrays. Here, polymer microneedle array electrodes with 64 microneedles,

  1. EEG-based characterization of flicker perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazo, M.; Tsoneva, T.; Garcia Molina, G.

    2013-01-01

    Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP) is an oscillatory electrical response appearing in the electroencephalogram (EEG) in response to flicker stimulation. The SSVEP manifests more prominently in electrodes located near the visual cortex and has oscillatory components at the stimulation

  2. Random matrix analysis of human EEG data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeba, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 91, - (2003), s. 198104-1 - 198104-4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : random matrix theory * EEG signal Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 7.035, year: 2003

  3. Clinical neuropsychiatric correlates and EEG findings among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental retardation.4. This present study focuses on psychomotor developmental delays or disorders; which are divided into specific disorders in which only a ... Nigeria: Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) and Psychiatric Hospital, Yaba, Lagos. ..... brain imaging could not be done to complement the EEG findings.

  4. Evolutionary optimization of classifiers and features for single-trial EEG Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessberg Johan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background State-of-the-art signal processing methods are known to detect information in single-trial event-related EEG data, a crucial aspect in development of real-time applications such as brain computer interfaces. This paper investigates one such novel approach, evaluating how individual classifier and feature subset tailoring affects classification of single-trial EEG finger movements. The discrete wavelet transform was used to extract signal features that were classified using linear regression and non-linear neural network models, which were trained and architecturally optimized with evolutionary algorithms. The input feature subsets were also allowed to evolve, thus performing feature selection in a wrapper fashion. Filter approaches were implemented as well by limiting the degree of optimization. Results Using only 10 features and 100 patterns, the non-linear wrapper approach achieved the highest validation classification accuracy (subject mean 75%, closely followed by the linear wrapper method (73.5%. The optimal features differed much between subjects, yet some physiologically plausible patterns were observed. Conclusion High degrees of classifier parameter, structure and feature subset tailoring on individual levels substantially increase single-trial EEG classification rates, an important consideration in areas where highly accurate detection rates are essential. Also, the presented method provides insight into the spatial characteristics of finger movement EEG patterns.

  5. Educational problems related to quantitative EEG changes in benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedrus, Glória M A S; Fonseca, Lineu C; Melo, Elisa M V; Ximenes, Valeria L

    2009-08-01

    The relationship between educational problems and clinical/electroencephalographic aspects was assessed in 38 children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). Children were assessed using the School Performance Test; questionnaires on learning difficulties administered to parents and teachers; the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition; and EEGs. Absolute and relative amplitudes in the classic bands (quantitative EEG) and characteristics of epileptiform activity on the EEG were examined. Educational problems were observed in 7 (18.4%) children with BECTS. In this subgroup, relative alpha amplitudes at the central and parietal electrodes were lower as compared with those of the BECTS subgroup with normal educational performance and a control group matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status. The data indicated a possible relationship between alterations in background brain electrical activity and the tendency toward inferior educational performance in children with BECTS. This study suggested that quantitative EEGs are a possible physiological tool in the assessment of cognitive aspects in children with BECTS.

  6. Reduction in time-to-sleep through EEG based brain state detection and audio stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo Zhang; Cuntai Guan; Ti Eu Chan; Juanhong Yu; Aung Aung Phyo Wai; Chuanchu Wang; Haihong Zhang

    2015-08-01

    We developed an EEG- and audio-based sleep sensing and enhancing system, called iSleep (interactive Sleep enhancement apparatus). The system adopts a closed-loop approach which optimizes the audio recording selection based on user's sleep status detected through our online EEG computing algorithm. The iSleep prototype comprises two major parts: 1) a sleeping mask integrated with a single channel EEG electrode and amplifier, a pair of stereo earphones and a microcontroller with wireless circuit for control and data streaming; 2) a mobile app to receive EEG signals for online sleep monitoring and audio playback control. In this study we attempt to validate our hypothesis that appropriate audio stimulation in relation to brain state can induce faster onset of sleep and improve the quality of a nap. We conduct experiments on 28 healthy subjects, each undergoing two nap sessions - one with a quiet background and one with our audio-stimulation. We compare the time-to-sleep in both sessions between two groups of subjects, e.g., fast and slow sleep onset groups. The p-value obtained from Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test is 1.22e-04 for slow onset group, which demonstrates that iSleep can significantly reduce the time-to-sleep for people with difficulty in falling sleep.

  7. Spatial and temporal EEG dynamics of dual-task driving performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shi-An

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driver distraction is a significant cause of traffic accidents. The aim of this study is to investigate Electroencephalography (EEG dynamics in relation to distraction during driving. To study human cognition under a specific driving task, simulated real driving using virtual reality (VR-based simulation and designed dual-task events are built, which include unexpected car deviations and mathematics questions. Methods We designed five cases with different stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA to investigate the distraction effects between the deviations and equations. The EEG channel signals are first converted into separated brain sources by independent component analysis (ICA. Then, event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP changes of the EEG power spectrum are used to evaluate brain dynamics in time-frequency domains. Results Power increases in the theta and beta bands are observed in relation with distraction effects in the frontal cortex. In the motor area, alpha and beta power suppressions are also observed. All of the above results are consistently observed across 15 subjects. Additionally, further analysis demonstrates that response time and multiple cortical EEG power both changed significantly with different SOA. Conclusions This study suggests that theta power increases in the frontal area is related to driver distraction and represents the strength of distraction in real-life situations.

  8. EEG and dementia indicators in AIDS patients' Rorschach test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fernandes do Prado

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the EEG and Rorschach test (RT of nineteen AIDS patients and eight normal people in the same age group. Eight patients presented slow alpha rhythms (8 to 9 Hz; three, not-slow alpha rhythms (>9 to 13Hz; and eight, beta rhythms in background activity. Paroxystic activity, characterized by diffuse theta or delta waves, was present in eleven patients. We observed Oberholzer syndrome (organic dementia diagnosed by RT in ten patients and Piotrowski syndrome (organic dementia diagnosed by RT in eleven patients; six presented both. When considering only the group of AIDS patients, we did not observe a significant relation among slow alpha rhythm, not-slow alpha rhythm and the presence of paroxystic activity with the above-mentioned syndromes. AIDS patients with slow alpha rhythms showed a significantly greater number of Piotrowski syndrome dementia indicators when compared to normal individuals or those with slow alpha rhythms. We did not observe the same with Oberholzer syndrome.

  9. EEG Power During Waking and NREM Sleep in Primary Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Meme; Pietrone, Regina; Cashmere, J. David; Begley, Amy; Miewald, Jean M.; Germain, Anne; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pathophysiological models of insomnia invoke the concept of 24-hour hyperarousal, which could lead to symptoms and physiological findings during waking and sleep. We hypothesized that this arousal could be seen in the waking electroencephalogram (EEG) of individuals with primary insomnia (PI), and that waking EEG power would correlate with non-REM (NREM) EEG. Methods: Subjects included 50 PI and 32 good sleeper controls (GSC). Five minutes of eyes closed waking EEG were collected at subjects' usual bedtimes, followed by polysomnography (PSG) at habitual sleep times. An automated algorithm and visual editing were used to remove artifacts from waking and sleep EEGs, followed by power spectral analysis to estimate power from 0.5–32 Hz. Results: We did not find significant differences in waking or NREM EEG spectral power of PI and GSC. Significant correlations between waking and NREM sleep power were observed across all frequency bands in the PI group and in most frequency bands in the GSC group. Conclusions: The absence of significant differences between groups in waking or NREM EEG power suggests that our sample was not characterized by a high degree of cortical arousal. The consistent correlations between waking and NREM EEG power suggest that, in samples with elevated NREM EEG beta activity, waking EEG power may show a similar pattern. Citation: Wu YM; Pietrone R; Cashmere JD; Begley A; Miewald JM; Germain A; Buysse DJ. EEG power during waking and NREM sleep in primary insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):1031-1037. PMID:24127147

  10. Relation of EEG and computerized tomography in transient ischaemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladurner, G.; Enge, S.; Sager, W.D.; Logar, C.; Lechner, H.; Landeskrankenhaus Graz; Graz Univ.

    1981-01-01

    80 patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were examined via computer tomogram (CT) and electronencephalogram (EEG). 53 patients were found to have a normal CT and 32 a normal EEG. In the patients with pathological CT findings (27) a significantly lower number of normal EEG's (22) was seen. Further subdivision of the 27 pathological CT findings revealed 12 patients with hypodense areas (infarctions) and 15 patients with an atrophy only. A normal EEG was significantly rarer in patients with a hypodense lesion (2) and in those with atrophy (3), focal EEG changes being significantly more frequent. Hence EEG findings facilitate the aetiological linking of an atrophy to an ischaemic stroke, especially when EEG follow-up examinations are included in the diagnostic procedure. (orig.) [de

  11. EEG Based Inference of Spatio-Temporal Brain Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese

    Electroencephalography (EEG) provides a measure of brain activity and has improved our understanding of the brain immensely. However, there is still much to be learned and the full potential of EEG is yet to be realized. In this thesis we suggest to improve the information gain of EEG using three....... The main topic of this thesis is the localization of the EEG generators. This entails solving both a forward and an inverse problem. The inverse problem maps the EEG signal recorded on the scalp to its origin in the brain. It is a highly ill-posed problem which we tackle by employing a sparsity promoting...... recovery ability. The forward problem describes the propagation of neuronal activity in the brain to the EEG electrodes on the scalp. The geometry and conductivity of the head layers are normally required to model this path. We propose a framework for inferring forward models which is based on the EEG...

  12. EEG microstates of wakefulness and NREM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Verena; Kuhn, Alena; von Wegner, Frederic; Morzelewski, Astrid; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Borisov, Sergey; Michel, Christoph M; Laufs, Helmut

    2012-09-01

    EEG-microstates exploit spatio-temporal EEG features to characterize the spontaneous EEG as a sequence of a finite number of quasi-stable scalp potential field maps. So far, EEG-microstates have been studied mainly in wakeful rest and are thought to correspond to functionally relevant brain-states. Four typical microstate maps have been identified and labeled arbitrarily with the letters A, B, C and D. We addressed the question whether EEG-microstate features are altered in different stages of NREM sleep compared to wakefulness. 32-channel EEG of 32 subjects in relaxed wakefulness and NREM sleep was analyzed using a clustering algorithm, identifying the most dominant amplitude topography maps typical of each vigilance state. Fitting back these maps into the sleep-scored EEG resulted in a temporal sequence of maps for each sleep stage. All 32 subjects reached sleep stage N2, 19 also N3, for at least 1 min and 45 s. As in wakeful rest we found four microstate maps to be optimal in all NREM sleep stages. The wake maps were highly similar to those described in the literature for wakefulness. The sleep stage specific map topographies of N1 and N3 sleep showed a variable but overall relatively high degree of spatial correlation to the wake maps (Mean: N1 92%; N3 87%). The N2 maps were the least similar to wake (mean: 83%). Mean duration, total time covered, global explained variance and transition probabilities per subject, map and sleep stage were very similar in wake and N1. In wake, N1 and N3, microstate map C was most dominant w.r.t. global explained variance and temporal presence (ratio total time), whereas in N2 microstate map B was most prominent. In N3, the mean duration of all microstate maps increased significantly, expressed also as an increase in transition probabilities of all maps to themselves in N3. This duration increase was partly--but not entirely--explained by the occurrence of slow waves in the EEG. The persistence of exactly four main microstate

  13. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  14. Abnormal glucose tolerance and lipid abnormalities in Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discussion. Regardless of varying diagnostic classification, abnormal glucose tolerance is a well-documented risk factor. 16 Abnormalities in. Because ofthe small number offemale MI survivors, the effect of obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance on lipid levels was studied in the male patients only. There was no significant.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamic Complexity and Sources of Resting-state EEG in Abstinent Heroin Addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinglin; Jiang, Hua; Hu, Bin; Li, Yonghui; Zhong, Ning; Li, Mi; Lin, Wenhua; Liu, Quanying

    2017-07-01

    It has been reported that chronic heroin intake induces both structural and functional changes in human brain; however, few studies have investigated the carry-over adverse effects on brain after heroin withdrawal. In this paper, we examined the neurophysiological differences between the abstinent heroin addicts (AHAs) and healthy controls (HCs) using nonlinear dynamic analysis and source localization analysis in resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) data; 5 min resting EEG data from 20 AHAs and twenty age-, education-, and gender-matched HCs were recorded using 64 electrodes. The results of nonlinear characteristics (e.g., the correlation dimension, Kolmogorov entropy, and Lempel-Ziv complexity) showed that the EEG signals in alpha band from AHAs were significantly more irregular. Moreover, the source localization results confirmed the neuronal activities in alpha band in AHAs were significantly weaker in parietal lobe (BA3 and BA7), frontal lobe (BA4 and BA6), and limbic lobe (BA24). Together, our analysis at both the sensor level and source level suggested the functional abnormalities in the brain during heroin abstinence, in particular for the neuronal oscillations in alpha band.

  16. Cardiac arrest associated with epileptic seizures: A case report with simultaneous EEG and ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehvari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ictal asystole is a rare, probably underestimated manifestation of epileptic seizures whose pathophysiology is still debated. This report describes two patients who had cardiac asystole at the end of their seizure. The first patient was a 13-year-old boy with complex partial seizures.. His MRI showed symmetrical signal abnormality in the bilateral parietooccipital lobe accompanied by mild gliosis and volume loss. During a 3-day long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had cardiac arrest at the end of one of his seizures that was secondarily generalized. The second one was a 42-year-old veteran with penetrating head trauma in the left frontal lobe due to shell injury. During long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had one generalized tonic–clonic seizure accompanied by bradycardia and cardiac asystole. Asystoles could have a role in the incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP, meaning that the presence of ictal bradycardia is a risk factor for SUDEP. In cases of epileptic cardiac dysrhythmia, prolonged simultaneous EEG/ECG monitoring may be required. Cardiological investigation should be included in epilepsy management.

  17. Investigation of phase synchronization of interictal EEG in right temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Cai, Lihui; Wu, Xinyu; Song, Zhenxi; Wang, Jiang; Xia, Zijie; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yibin

    2018-02-01

    Epilepsy is commonly associated with abnormally synchronous activity of neurons located in epileptogenic zones. In this study, we investigated the synchronization characteristic of right temporal lobe epilepsy (RTLE). Multichannel electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded from the RTLE patients during interictal period and normal controls. Power spectral density was first used to analyze the EEG power for two groups of subjects. It was found that the power of epileptics is increased in the whole brain compared with that of the control. We calculated phase lag index (PLI) to measure the phase synchronization between each pair of EEG signals. A higher degree of synchronization was observed in the epileptics especially between distant channels. In particular, the regional synchronization degree was negatively correlated with power spectral density and the correlation was weaker for epileptics. Moreover, the synchronization degree decayed with the increase of relative distance of channels for both the epilepsy and control, but the dependence was weakened in the former. The obtained results may provide new insights into the generation mechanism of epilepsy.

  18. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  19. Outcomes of patients with altered level of consciousness and abnormal electroencephalogram: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Paula Rodrigues; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Naves, Pedro Vicente Ferreira; Ladeia-Frota, Carol; Caboclo, Luís Otávio

    2017-01-01

    , respectively, p = 0.049]. Hospital LOS, in-hospital mortality and frequency of unfavorable outcomes did not differ between Ictal patients treated exclusively with AEDs or IVADs. In patients with acute altered consciousness and abnormal routine EEG, antiepileptic treatment did not improve outcomes regardless of the presence of periodic, rhythmic or ictal EEG patterns.

  20. Movement-related cortical potentials in paraplegic patients: abnormal patterns and considerations for BCI-rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren eXu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI can be promising for the motor neuro-rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. However, this shall require detailed knowledge of the abnormalities in the EEG signatures of paraplegic patients. The association of abnormalities in different subgroups of patients and their relation to the sensorimotor integration are relevant for the design, implementation and use of BCI systems in patient populations. This study explores the patterns of abnormalities of movement related cortical potentials (MRCP during motor imagery tasks of feet and right hand in patients with paraplegia (including the subgroups with/without central neuropathic pain and complete/incomplete injury patients and the level of distinctiveness of abnormalities in these groups using pattern classification. The most notable observed abnormalities were the amplified execution negativity and its slower rebound in the patient group. The potential underlying mechanisms behind these changes and other minor dissimilarities in patients’ subgroups, as well as the relevance to BCI applications, are discussed. The findings are of interest from a neurological perspective as well as for BCI-assisted neuro-rehabilitation and therapy.

  1. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Causality within the epileptic network: an EEG-fMRI study validated by intracranial EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisabetta eVaudano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate localization of the Seizure Onset Zone (SOZ is crucial in patients with drug-resistance focal epilepsy. EEG with fMRI recording (EEG-fMRI has been proposed as a complementary non-invasive tool, which can give useful additional information in the pre-surgical workup. However, fMRI maps related to interictal epileptiform activities (IED often show multiple regions of signal change, or networks, rather than highly focal ones. Effective connectivity approaches like Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM applied to fMRI data potentially offers a framework to address which brain regions drives the generation of seizures and IED within an epileptic network. Here we present a first attempt to validate DCM on EEG-fMRI data in one patient affected by frontal lobe epilepsy. Pre-surgical EEG-fMRI demonstrated two distinct clusters of BOLD signal increases linked to IED, one located in the left frontal pole and the other in the ipsilateral dorso-lateral frontal cortex. DCM of the IED-related BOLD signal favoured a model corresponding to the left dorsolateral frontal cortex as driver of changes in the fronto-polar region. The validity of DCM was supported by: (a the results of two different non-invasive analysis obtained on the same dataset: EEG source imaging (ESI, and psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI; (b the failure of a first surgical intervention limited to the fronto-polar region; (c the results of the intracranial EEG monitoring performed after the first surgical intervention confirming a SOZ located over the dorso-lateral frontal cortex. These results add evidence that EEG-fMRI together with advanced methods of BOLD signal analysis is a promising tool that can give relevant information within the epilepsy surgery diagnostic work-up.

  3. Prognostic value of non-reactive burst suppression EEG pattern associated to early neonatal seizures Valor prognóstico do EEG com padrão de surto-supressão não reativo associado a convulsões neonatais precoces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Lahorgue Nunes

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seizures are the most frequent neurological event in newborns and clinical data suggest that etiology is the dominant factor in long term outcome. However, there are consistent background EEG abnormalities associated to neonatal seizures that are usually related to unfavorable outcome as the burst - suppression pattern. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to correlate clinical and EEG features associated to long - term outcome of newborns with non - reactive burst - suppression (BS EEG. METHOD: Newborns included in the study were selected from our database and had conceptional age (at the time of first EEG >37 weeks, EEG recordings with non - reactive BS available for review and clinical follow up. RESULTS: 12 newborns met inclusion criteria, 50% had seizures in the first day of life. Seizures became refractory to treatment in all of them. In 50% the etiology of seizures was considered cryptogenic, 33% had inborn errors of metabolism and 17% had clinical history and neuroimage suggestive of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The follow-up showed that 7/12 infants deceased, 3 during the first year of life, and one in the neonatal period. All the survivors had severe developmental delay and multifocal neurological impairment. 92% developed refractory epilepsy, 58% were latter diagnosed with West syndrome. CONCLUSION: The non-reactive BS pattern may appear related to many neonatal neurological disorders and is associated with early and refractory neonatal seizures. It is clearly associated with elevated morbidity and mortality and to the development of post-neonatal epilepsy.RESUMO Convulsões representam o evento neurológico mais freqüente no período neonatal e a etiologia das crises parece ser o aspecto clínico mais associado ao prognóstico a longo prazo. Entretanto, existem padrões anormais de EEG, que de forma consistente relacionam-se a prognóstico, entre eles o padrão de surto - supressão. OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve

  4. Human-machine interfaces based on EMG and EEG applied to robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarcinelli-Filho Mario

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two different Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs were developed, both based on electro-biological signals. One is based on the EMG signal and the other is based on the EEG signal. Two major features of such interfaces are their relatively simple data acquisition and processing systems, which need just a few hardware and software resources, so that they are, computationally and financially speaking, low cost solutions. Both interfaces were applied to robotic systems, and their performances are analyzed here. The EMG-based HMI was tested in a mobile robot, while the EEG-based HMI was tested in a mobile robot and a robotic manipulator as well. Results Experiments using the EMG-based HMI were carried out by eight individuals, who were asked to accomplish ten eye blinks with each eye, in order to test the eye blink detection algorithm. An average rightness rate of about 95% reached by individuals with the ability to blink both eyes allowed to conclude that the system could be used to command devices. Experiments with EEG consisted of inviting 25 people (some of them had suffered cases of meningitis and epilepsy to test the system. All of them managed to deal with the HMI in only one training session. Most of them learnt how to use such HMI in less than 15 minutes. The minimum and maximum training times observed were 3 and 50 minutes, respectively. Conclusion Such works are the initial parts of a system to help people with neuromotor diseases, including those with severe dysfunctions. The next steps are to convert a commercial wheelchair in an autonomous mobile vehicle; to implement the HMI onboard the autonomous wheelchair thus obtained to assist people with motor diseases, and to explore the potentiality of EEG signals, making the EEG-based HMI more robust and faster, aiming at using it to help individuals with severe motor dysfunctions.

  5. The use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B H

    2011-07-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy continues to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among neonates around the globe. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, the need to accurately classify the severity of injury in the early neonatal period is of great importance. As clinical measures cannot always accurately estimate the severity early enough for treatment to be initiated, clinicians have become more dependent on conventional and amplitude integrated EEG. Despite this, there is currently no single agreed classification scheme for the neonatal EEG in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. In this review we discuss classification schemes of neonatal background EEG, published over the past 35 years, highlighting the urgent need for a universal visual analysis scheme.

  6. The use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B H

    2012-01-31

    Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy continues to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among neonates around the globe. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, the need to accurately classify the severity of injury in the early neonatal period is of great importance. As clinical measures cannot always accurately estimate the severity early enough for treatment to be initiated, clinicians have become more dependent on conventional and amplitude integrated EEG. Despite this, there is currently no single agreed classification scheme for the neonatal EEG in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. In this review we discuss classification schemes of neonatal background EEG, published over the past 35 years, highlighting the urgent need for a universal visual analysis scheme.

  7. Time-frequency analysis of band-limited EEG with BMFLC and Kalman filter for BCI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Time-Frequency analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) during different mental tasks received significant attention. As EEG is non-stationary, time-frequency analysis is essential to analyze brain states during different mental tasks. Further, the time-frequency information of EEG signal can be used as a feature for classification in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Methods To accurately model the EEG, band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC), a linear combination of truncated multiple Fourier series models is employed. A state-space model for BMFLC in combination with Kalman filter/smoother is developed to obtain accurate adaptive estimation. By virtue of construction, BMFLC with Kalman filter/smoother provides accurate time-frequency decomposition of the bandlimited signal. Results The proposed method is computationally fast and is suitable for real-time BCI applications. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, a comparison with short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for both synthesized and real EEG data is performed in this paper. The proposed method is applied to BCI Competition data IV for ERD detection in comparison with existing methods. Conclusions Results show that the proposed algorithm can provide optimal time-frequency resolution as compared to STFT and CWT. For ERD detection, BMFLC-KF outperforms STFT and BMFLC-KS in real-time applicability with low computational requirement. PMID:24274109

  8. Donepezil Impairs Memory in Healthy Older Subjects: Behavioural, EEG and Simultaneous EEG/fMRI Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsters, Joshua H.; O'Connell, Redmond G.; Martin, Mary P.; Galli, Alessandra; Cassidy, Sarah M.; Kilcullen, Sophia M.; Delmonte, Sonja; Brennan, Sabina; Meaney, Jim F.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Upton, Neil; Lai, Robert; Laruelle, Marc; Lawlor, Brian; Robertson, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    Rising life expectancies coupled with an increasing awareness of age-related cognitive decline have led to the unwarranted use of psychopharmaceuticals, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), by significant numbers of healthy older individuals. This trend has developed despite very limited data regarding the effectiveness of such drugs on non-clinical groups and recent work indicates that AChEIs can have negative cognitive effects in healthy populations. For the first time, we use a combination of EEG and simultaneous EEG/fMRI to examine the effects of a commonly prescribed AChEI (donepezil) on cognition in healthy older participants. The short- and long-term impact of donepezil was assessed using two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. In both cases, we utilised cognitive (paired associates learning (CPAL)) and electrophysiological measures (resting EEG power) that have demonstrated high-sensitivity to age-related cognitive decline. Experiment 1 tested the effects of 5 mg/per day dosage on cognitive and EEG markers at 6-hour, 2-week and 4-week follow-ups. In experiment 2, the same markers were further scrutinised using simultaneous EEG/fMRI after a single 5 mg dose. Experiment 1 found significant negative effects of donepezil on CPAL and resting Alpha and Beta band power. Experiment 2 replicated these results and found additional drug-related increases in the Delta band. EEG/fMRI analyses revealed that these oscillatory differences were associated with activity differences in the left hippocampus (Delta), right frontal-parietal network (Alpha), and default-mode network (Beta). We demonstrate the utility of simple cognitive and EEG measures in evaluating drug responses after acute and chronic donepezil administration. The presentation of previously established markers of age-related cognitive decline indicates that AChEIs can impair cognitive function in healthy older individuals. To our knowledge this is the first study to identify the precise

  9. Emotional responses as independent components in EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    Combine wireless neuroheadsets with smartphones that enable mobile brain imaging can potentially allow us to design cognitive interfaces which adapt to our affective responses. Neuroimaging experiments using electroencephalography (EEG) initially identified two components elicited by pleasant...... or unpleasant images; early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP). Recent studies suggest that several time course components may be modulated by emotional content in images or text. However these neural signatures are characterized by small voltage changes that would be highly...... susceptible to noise if captured in a mobile context. Hypothesizing that retrieval of emotional responses in mobile usage scenarios could be enhanced through spatial filtering, we compare a standard EEG electrode based analysis against an approach based on independent component analysis (ICA). By clustering...

  10. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  11. Analysis of alcoholic EEG signals based on horizontal visibility graph entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guohun; Li, Yan; Wen, Peng Paul; Wang, Shuaifang

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel horizontal visibility graph entropy (HVGE) approach to evaluate EEG signals from alcoholic subjects and controlled drinkers and compare with a sample entropy (SaE) method. Firstly, HVGEs and SaEs are extracted from 1,200 recordings of biomedical signals, respectively. A statistical analysis method is employed to choose the optimal channels to identify the abnormalities in alcoholics. Five group channels are selected and forwarded to a K-Nearest Neighbour (K-NN) and a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct classification, respectively. The experimental results show that the HVGEs associated with left hemisphere, [Formula: see text]1, [Formula: see text]3 and FC5 electrodes, of alcoholics are significantly abnormal. The accuracy of classification with 10-fold cross-validation is 87.5 [Formula: see text] with about three HVGE features. By using just optimal 13-dimension HVGE features, the accuracy is 95.8 [Formula: see text]. In contrast, SaE features associated cannot identify the left hemisphere disorder for alcoholism and the maximum classification ratio based on SaE is just 95.2 [Formula: see text] even using all channel signals. These results demonstrate that the HVGE method is a promising approach for alcoholism identification by EEG signals.

  12. Functional Mapping with Simultaneous MEG and EEG

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hesheng; Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven; Ahlfors, Seppo; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) to locate and determine the temporal evolution in brain areas involved in the processing of simple sensory stimuli. We will use somatosensory stimuli to locate the hand somatosensory areas, auditory stimuli to locate the auditory cortices, visual stimuli in four quadrants of the visual field to locate the early visual areas. These type of experiments are used for functional mapping in epileptic and brain tumor patients to lo...

  13. EEG microstates during resting represent personality differences

    OpenAIRE

    Schlegel, Felix; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L.; Milz, Patricia; Gianotti, Lorena R. R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the spontaneous brain electric activity of 13 skeptics and 16 believers in paranormal phenomena; they were university students assessed with a self-report scale about paranormal beliefs. 33-channel EEG recordings during no-task resting were processed as sequences of momentary potential distribution maps. Based on the maps at peak times of Global Field Power, the sequences were parsed into segments of quasi-stable potential distribution, the 'microstates'. The microstates were ...

  14. Infraslow EEG changes in infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Bello-Espinosa, Luis E; Wei, Xing-Chang; Scantlebury, Morris H

    2014-12-01

    Infantile spasms (IS) are a devastating epileptic encephalopathy syndrome of infancy. Analysis of infraslow EEG activity (ISA) has shown potential in the presurgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy and in differentiating between focal and generalized epilepsy syndromes. Infraslow EEG activity analysis may provide insights into the pathophysiology of some difficult-to-treat epilepsy syndromes, such as IS. To our knowledge, there are no published reports describing ISA in patients with IS. The purpose of this study was to describe ictal patterns of ISA in patients with IS and to correlate with clinical data. EEG recordings of all cases of IS in the past 10 years at the Alberta Children's Hospital were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were a technically adequate video EEG recording that captured at least one spasm. For each patient, the first 10 confirmed spasms were examined. Spasms were evaluated for changes in ISA, which were either generalized, lateralized, or absent ISA (g-ISA, l-ISA, or n-ISA, respectively). Results were correlated with treatments, clinical course, and information pertinent to likely etiology of the IS. A total of 77% of spasms were associated with ISA; 57% with g-ISA, 20% l-ISA, and 21% n-ISA. All patients with exclusively g-ISA showed at least a partial response to initial therapy, while this was the case in 66.7% of those with at least some l-ISA and 50% of those with exclusively n-ISA. Other seizure types occurred in 60% of patients with exclusively g-ISA versus 83% with some l-ISA and all patients with exclusively n-ISA. Ictal ISA was observed in the majority of IS. Trends were observed suggesting that the presence of exclusive g-ISA changes may be a positive prognostic factor in IS.

  15. Background sources at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, γ-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Statistical maps for EEG dipolar source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénar, Christian G; Gunn, Roger N; Grova, Christophe; Champagne, Benoît; Gotman, Jean

    2005-03-01

    We present a method that estimates three-dimensional statistical maps for electroencephalogram (EEG) source localization. The maps assess the likelihood that a point in the brain contains a dipolar source, under the hypothesis of one, two or three activated sources. This is achieved by examining all combinations of one to three dipoles on a coarse grid and attributing to each combination a score based on an F statistic. The probability density function of the statistic under the null hypothesis is estimated nonparametrically, using bootstrap resampling. A theoretical F distribution is then fitted to the empirical distribution in order to allow correction for multiple comparisons. The maps allow for the systematic exploration of the solution space for dipolar sources. They permit to test whether the data support a given solution. They do not rely on the assumption of uncorrelated source time courses. They can be compared to other statistical parametric maps such as those used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results are presented for both simulated and real data. The maps were compared with LORETA and MUSIC results. For the real data consisting of an average of epileptic spikes, we observed good agreement between the EEG statistical maps, intracranial EEG recordings, and fMRI activations.

  17. Evaluation of postoperative sharp waveforms through EEG and magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Tanaka, Naoaki; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Milligan, Tracey A; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Khoshbin, Shahram; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Bromfield, Edward B

    2010-02-01

    EEGs obtained after craniotomy are difficult to read because of a breach rhythm consisting of unfiltered sharply contoured physiologic waveforms that can mimic interictal epileptiform discharges. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is less affected by the skull breach. The postcraniotomy EEG and MEG scans of 20 patients were reviewed by two experienced electroencephalographers. Larger interrater variability was found for EEG as compared with MEG. Review of patients who had postoperative seizures suggested that EEG was more sensitive but less specific than MEG in detecting interictal epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, several instances of sharp waveforms that were difficult to evaluate on EEG were found to be more easily interpretable on MEG. MEG may also help determine whether asymmetries in physiologic rhythms on EEG result from the skull defect or are pathologic. MEG should be considered as an adjunctive study in patients with a breach rhythm for evaluation of interictal epileptiform discharges and cerebral dysfunction.

  18. Memories of attachment hamper EEG cortical connectivity in dissociative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Speranza, Anna Maria; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Trentini, Cristina; Vergano, Carola Maggiora; Liotti, Giovanni; Brunetti, Riccardo; Testani, Elisa; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated cortical connectivity modifications by electroencephalography (EEG) lagged coherence analysis, in subjects with dissociative disorders and in controls, after retrieval of attachment memories. We asked thirteen patients with dissociative disorders and thirteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls to retrieve personal attachment-related autobiographical memories through adult attachment interviews (AAI). EEG was recorded in the closed eyes resting state before and after the AAI. EEG lagged coherence before and after AAI was compared in all subjects. In the control group, memories of attachment promoted a widespread increase in EEG connectivity, in particular in the high-frequency EEG bands. Compared to controls, dissociative patients did not show an increase in EEG connectivity after the AAI. Conclusions: These results shed light on the neurophysiology of the disintegrative effect of retrieval of traumatic attachment memories in dissociative patients.

  19. Exploring EEG signals in a Brain-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrycki, Paweł; Mulawka, Jan

    2014-11-01

    This article shows the basic methods of electroencephalography EEG signal exploration. It contains information about data acquisition and different methods in which brain-computer interfaces can be made. The main focus of the paper is to find a way to determine the best set of parameters to detect movement of a hand in EEG signal. In the introduction there is also short introduction to EEG as well as fundamentals of support vector machine.

  20. Burst suppression in sleep in a routine outpatient EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Kheder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS is an electroencephalogram (EEG pattern that is characterized by brief bursts of spikes, sharp waves, or slow waves of relatively high amplitude alternating with periods of relatively flat EEG or isoelectric periods. The pattern is usually associated with coma, severe encephalopathy of various etiologies, or general anesthesia. We describe an unusual case of anoxic brain injury in which a BS pattern was seen during behaviorally defined sleep during a routine outpatient EEG study.

  1. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG)

    OpenAIRE

    Zachery Ryan Hernandez; Zachery Ryan Hernandez; Jesus Gabriel Cruz-Garza; Jesus Gabriel Cruz-Garza; Sargoon eNepaul; Karen Kohn Bradley; Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal; Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Although efforts to characterize human movement through EEG have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) dancers. Each dancer performed whole body functional movements of t...

  2. [Interaction of diazepam and levodropropizine evaluated with quantitative EEG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, A; Bejor, M; Beungarbe, D; Cosentina, R

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the presence of possible interactions between Levodropropizine and benzodiazepines (BZ). Experience was performed recording bioccipital quantified EEG in 5 healthy volunteers in normal conditions, after BZ administration and after BZ plus Levodropropizine administration. The slight shifting towards lower frequences in quantified EEG, due to BZ, was not modified by Levodropropizine administration. As results from this experience Levodropropizine seems not to have sinergic action on BZ effect in quantified EEG.

  3. Age-related effects in the EEG during propofol anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A; Grouven, U; Zander, I; Beger, F A; Siedenberg, M; Schultz, B

    2004-01-01

    Age-related differences in the spectral composition of the EEG in induction and emergence times, and in drug consumption during propofol anaesthesia were investigated. The EEGs of 60 female patients between 22 and 85 years of age were monitored continuously during standardized induction of anaesthesia with 2 mg of propofol kg(-1)60 s(-1). The EEGs were visually assessed in 20-s epochs according to a scale from A (awake) to F (very deep hypnosis). Visual EEG classifications, spectral parameters, and induction times were compared between different age groups. Additionally, data of 546 patients included in a multicentre study with 4630 patients (EEG monitor Narcotrend, MT MonitorTechnik, Bad Bramstedt, Germany) were analyzed with regard to age-dependent changes of propofol consumption using target-controlled infusion (TCI). During induction, patients older than 70 years reached significantly deeper EEG stages than younger patients, needed a longer time to reach the deepest EEG stage, and needed more time until a light EEG stage was regained. In patients aged 70 years and older, the total power, mainly in deep EEG stages, was significantly smaller due to a distinctly smaller absolute power of the delta frequency band. No single spectral parameter was able to reliably distinguish all EEG stages. During the steady state of anaesthesia, older patients needed less propofol for the maintenance of a defined stage of hypnosis than younger patients. Older patients differ from younger ones regarding the hypnotic effect of propofol and the spectral patterns in the EEG. For an efficient automatic assessment of the EEG during anaesthesia a multivariable approach accounting for age-effects is indispensable.

  4. Differential diagnosis by EEG of dissociative status versus nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo, Carlos; Elices, Nélida; Huertas, David

    2012-01-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) has different clinical presentations, from minimal confusion to bizarre behavioral manifestations, psychosis or coma. As a result, patients can sometimes be misdiagnosed and labeled as psychiatric cases. The patient was alert and disoriented in time, with disconnection episodes, generalized slowness, slow mental response, faltering language and slow answers. A differential diagnosis between dissociative status and NCSE was proposed. The physical and neurological examinations were normal. The cranial CT scan findings were normal. Only the EEG provided the definitive diagnostic data, consisting of generalized spike and wave discharges of 2-3 Hz against a desynchronized background. Diagnosis of NCSE requires the availability of an EEG. Often patients are on the border between medical conditions and mental disorders. Observation of the disease evolution and an open-minded attitude of physicians are necessary for the correct diagnosis and treatment.

  5. How Can We Identify Ictal and Interictal Abnormal Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert S.; Scharfman, Helen E.; deCurtis, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) defined a seizure as “a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain.” This definition has been used since the era of Hughlings Jackson, and does not take into account subsequent advances made in epilepsy and neuroscience research. The clinical diagnosis of a seizure is empirical, based upon constellations of certain signs and symptoms, while simultaneously ruling out a list of potential imitators of seizures. Seizures should be delimited in time, but the borders of ictal (during a seizure), interictal (between seizures) and postictal (after a seizure) often are indistinct. EEG recording is potentially very helpful for confirmation, classification and localization. About a half-dozen common EEG patterns are encountered during seizures. Clinicians rely on researchers to answer such questions as why seizures start, spread and stop, whether seizures involve increased synchrony, the extent to which extra-cortical structures are involved, and how to identify the seizure network and at what points interventions are likely to be helpful. Basic scientists have different challenges in use of the word ‘seizure,’ such as distinguishing seizures from normal behavior, which would seem easy but can be very difficult because some rodents have EEG activity during normal behavior that resembles spike-wave discharge or bursts of rhythmic spiking. It is also important to define when a seizure begins and stops so that seizures can be quantified accurately for pre-clinical studies. When asking what causes seizures, the transition to a seizure and differentiating the pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal state is also important because what occurs before a seizure could be causal and may warrant further investigation for that reason. These and other issues are discussed by three epilepsy researchers with clinical and basic science expertise. PMID:25012363

  6. Deep Neural Architectures for Mapping Scalp to Intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Andreas; Spyrou, Loukianos; Martin-Lopez, David; Valentin, Antonio; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Sanei, Saeid; Took, Clive Cheong

    2018-03-19

    Data is often plagued by noise which encumbers machine learning of clinically useful biomarkers and electroencephalogram (EEG) data is no exemption. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) data enhances the training of deep learning models of the human brain, yet is often prohibitive due to the invasive recording process. A more convenient alternative is to record brain activity using scalp electrodes. However, the inherent noise associated with scalp EEG data often impedes the learning process of neural models, achieving substandard performance. Here, an ensemble deep learning architecture for nonlinearly mapping scalp to iEEG data is proposed. The proposed architecture exploits the information from a limited number of joint scalp-intracranial recording to establish a novel methodology for detecting the epileptic discharges from the sEEG of a general population of subjects. Statistical tests and qualitative analysis have revealed that the generated pseudo-intracranial data are highly correlated with the true intracranial data. This facilitated the detection of IEDs from the scalp recordings where such waveforms are not often visible. As a real-world clinical application, these pseudo-iEEGs are then used by a convolutional neural network for the automated classification of intracranial epileptic discharges (IEDs) and non-IED of trials in the context of epilepsy analysis. Although the aim of this work was to circumvent the unavailability of iEEG and the limitations of sEEG, we have achieved a classification accuracy of 68% an increase of 6% over the previously proposed linear regression mapping.

  7. Adaptive frequency decomposition of EEG with subsequent expert system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, C S; Arnold, T; Visbeck, A; Hundemer, H P; Hopf, H C

    2001-11-01

    We present a hybrid system for automatic analysis of clinical routine EEG, comprising a spectral analysis and an expert system. EEG raw data are transformed into the time-frequency domain by the so-called adaptive frequency decomposition. The resulting frequency components are converted into pseudo-linguistic facts via fuzzification. Finally, an expert system applies symbolic rules formulated by the neurologist to evaluate the extracted EEG features. The system detects artefacts, describes alpha rhythm by frequency, amplitude, and stability and after artefact rejection detects pathologic slow activity. All results are displayed as linguistic terms, numerical values and maps of temporal extent, giving an overview about the clinical routine EEG.

  8. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panischev, O Yu; Demin, S A; Muhametshin, I G; Yu Demina, N

    2015-01-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome. (paper)

  9. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  10. Standardized computer-based organized reporting of EEG:SCORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sandor; H, Aurlien,; JC, Brøgger,

    2013-01-01

    in free-text format. The purpose of our endeavor was to create a computer-based system for EEG assessment and reporting, where the physicians would construct the reports by choosing from predefined elements for each relevant EEG feature, as well as the clinical phenomena (for video-EEG recordings....... SCORE can potentially improve the quality of EEG assessment and reporting; it will help incorporate the results of computer-assisted analysis into the report, it will make possible the build-up of a multinational database, and it will help in training young neurophysiologists....

  11. Association of patients with parkinsonism and epilepsy with EEG changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Igor

    2006-07-01

    EEG is an important diagnostic method for epilepsies. EEG changes in patients with Parkinson's disease and epilepsy are not unknown or unexpected events. We investigated 250 Parkinson's disease patients. Epileptic seizures were recorded in 10 patients. Four patients had generalized tonic clonic seizures; 3 partial complex seizures, 2 of which with secondary generalization; while 3 patients had right-handed simple motor partial seizure. Clinical and neurophysiological investigations, neuroimagining techniques electroencephalographic investigations (EEG, EEG in sleep) were conducted. Our patients were well controlled with antiepileptic therapy.

  12. Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; Broeke, E.N. van den; Arns, M.W.; Goor, H. van; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in

  13. A different view on the checkerboard? Alterations in early and late visually evoked EEG potentials in Asperger observers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Kornmeier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asperger Autism is a lifelong psychiatric condition with highly circumscribed interests and routines, problems in social cognition, verbal and nonverbal communication, and also perceptual abnormalities with sensory hypersensitivity. To objectify both lower-level visual and cognitive alterations we looked for differences in visual event-related potentials (EEG between Asperger observers and matched controls while they observed simple checkerboard stimuli. METHODS: In a balanced oddball paradigm checkerboards of two checksizes (0.6° and 1.2° were presented with different frequencies. Participants counted the occurrence times of the rare fine or rare coarse checkerboards in different experimental conditions. We focused on early visual ERP differences as a function of checkerboard size and the classical P3b ERP component as an indicator of cognitive processing. RESULTS: We found an early (100-200 ms after stimulus onset occipital ERP effect of checkerboard size (dominant spatial frequency. This effect was weaker in the Asperger than in the control observers. Further a typical parietal/central oddball-P3b occurred at 500 ms with the rare checkerboards. The P3b showed a right-hemispheric lateralization, which was more prominent in Asperger than in control observers. DISCUSSION: The difference in the early occipital ERP effect between the two groups may be a physiological marker of differences in the processing of small visual details in Asperger observers compared to normal controls. The stronger lateralization of the P3b in Asperger observers may indicate a stronger involvement of the right-hemispheric network of bottom-up attention. The lateralization of the P3b signal might be a compensatory consequence of the compromised early checksize effect. Higher-level analytical information processing units may need to compensate for difficulties in low-level signal analysis.

  14. Online Reduction of Artifacts in EEG of Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Using Reference Layer Adaptive Filtering (RLAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyrl, David; Krausz, Gunther; Koschutnig, Karl; Edlinger, Günter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allow us to study the active human brain from two perspectives concurrently. Signal processing based artifact reduction techniques are mandatory for this, however, to obtain reasonable EEG quality in simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Current artifact reduction techniques like average artifact subtraction (AAS), typically become less effective when artifact reduction has to be performed on-the-fly. We thus present and evaluate a new technique to improve EEG quality online. This technique adds up with online AAS and combines a prototype EEG-cap for reference recordings of artifacts, with online adaptive filtering and is named reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF). We found online AAS + RLAF to be highly effective in improving EEG quality. Online AAS + RLAF outperformed online AAS and did so in particular online in terms of the chosen performance metrics, these being specifically alpha rhythm amplitude ratio between closed and opened eyes (3-45% improvement), signal-to-noise-ratio of visual evoked potentials (VEP) (25-63% improvement), and VEPs variability (16-44% improvement). Further, we found that EEG quality after online AAS + RLAF is occasionally even comparable with the offline variant of AAS at a 3T MRI scanner. In conclusion RLAF is a very effective add-on tool to enable high quality EEG in simultaneous EEG-fMRI experiments, even when online artifact reduction is necessary.

  15. Microneedle physical contact as a therapeutic for abnormal scars

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, David C.; Balmayor, Elizabeth R.; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Xu, Chenjie

    2017-01-01

    Background Abnormal (keloid and hypertrophic) scars are a significant affliction with no satisfactory single modality therapy to-date. Available options are often ineffective, painful, potentially hazardous, and require healthcare personnel involvement. Herein a self-administered microneedle device based on drug-free physical contact for inhibiting abnormal scars is reported. Its therapeutic activity through microneedle contact eliminates hazards associated with toxic anti-scarring drugs whil...

  16. Hemostatic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogia, Aarti; Sikka, Meera; Sharma, Satender; Rusia, Usha

    2018-01-27

    Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Diverse hemostatic abnormalities have been reported in patients with myeloma which predispose to bleeding and also thrombosis. Methods: Complete blood count, biochemical parameters and parameters of hemostasis i.e. platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), factor VIII assay results, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer and lupus anticoagulant, were assessed in 29 MM patients and 30 age matched controls. Results: The most frequent abnormal screening parameter was APTT. Of the six indicative of a bleeding tendency i.e. thrombocytopenia, prolonged PT, APTT, TT, reduced plasma fibrinogen and factor VIII, at least one was abnormal in 8 (27.6%) patients. Of the four prothrombotic markers, lupus anticoagulant, D-dimer, elevated factor VIII and plasma fibrinogen, one or more marker was present in 24 (82.7%). D-dimer was the most common prothrombotic marker, being elevated in 22 (75.9%) patients. One or more laboratory parameter of hemostasis was abnormal in all 29 (100%) patients. Though thrombotic complications are reported to be less frequent as compared to hemorrhagic manifestations, one or more marker of thrombosis was present in 24 (82.7%) patients. Conclusion: This study provided laboratory evidence of hemostatic dysfunction which may be associated with thrombotic or bleeding complications at diagnosis in all MM patients. Hence, screening for these abnormalities at the time of diagnosis should help improved prognosis in such cases. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms in preschool and school-aged children with epilepsy: Focus on clinical and EEG features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Canto, Giulia; Pellacani, Simona; Valvo, Giulia; Masi, Gabriele; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Sicca, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral problems are frequent comorbidities of epilepsy, although their clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) correlates remain uncertain. In this study, we have assessed the frequency of psychopathological problems in a cohort of children with epilepsy, and established their main clinical and EEG-associated features. One hundred fifty-nine young patients with epilepsy were recruited and assessed through the Child Behavior Checklist for preschool-aged children (CBCL 1 1/2-5) or for school-aged children (CBCL 6-18). Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) results were then correlated to the main clinical and EEG data. We found emotional and behavioral problems in about half of the children in our sample. Internalizing, social, and attention problems were more common than externalizing features. Moderate intellectual disability, a nonidiopathic etiology of epilepsy, a poor control of seizures, and antiepileptic polytherapies, as well as an early age at seizure-onset and a longer duration of the disorder, were all associated with specific behavioral and emotional problems. A temporal site of interictal EEG abnormalities also enhanced the risk for psychiatric comorbidities, especially in the externalizing domain. Several clinical and EEG features are associated with an increased risk for emotional and behavioral comorbidities in children with epilepsy. Their identification may foster an early diagnosis and appropriate care, limiting the worsening of psychiatric symptoms and their impact on quality of life and health status. A better understanding of the underlying clinical and molecular mechanisms is needed to further improve prevention and treatment interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Classification of single normal and Alzheimer’s disease individuals from cortical sources of resting state EEG rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eBabiloni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG rhythms in groups of Alzheimer’s disease (AD compared to healthy elderly (Nold subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2-4 Hz, theta (4-8 Hz, alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz, alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz, beta 1 (13-20 Hz, beta 2 (20-30 Hz, and gamma (30-40 Hz were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e. 70%. Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%. These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%.

  19. Hippocampal EEG and behaviour in dog. I. Hippocampal EEG correlates of gross motor behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolds, D.E.A.T.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Aitink, J.W.; Kamp, A.

    It was shown that rewarding spectral shifts (i.e. increase in amplitude or peak frequency of the hippocampal EEG) causes a solitary dog to show increased motor behaviour. Rewarded spectral shifts concurred with a variety of behavioural transitions. It was found that statistically significant

  20. Emergency EEG: study of survival EEG de urgência: taxa de sobrevivência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir Alves Borges

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the survival rate according to the main findings of emergency electroencephalography (EEGs of patients treated in a tertiary hospital. METHOD: In this prospective study, the findings of consecutive emergency EEGs performed on inpatients in Hospital de Base in São José do Rio Preto, Brazil were correlated with survival utilizing Kaplan-Meyer survival curves. RESULTS: A total of 681 patients with an average age of 42 years old (1 day to 96 years were evaluated, of which 406 were male. The main reasons for EEGs were epileptic seizures (221 cases, hepatic encephalopathy [116 cases of which 85 (73.3% were men, p-value=0.001], status epilepticus (104 cases and impaired consciousness (78 cases. The underlying disease was confirmed in 578 (84.3% cases with 119 (17.5% having liver disease [91 (76.0% were men, p-value=0.001], 105 (15.4% suffering strokes, 67 (9.9% having metabolic disorders, 51 (7.5% central nervous system infections and 49 (7.2% epilepsy. In the three months following EEG, a survival rate of 75% was found in patients with normal, discreet slow activity or intermittent rhythmic delta activity EEGs, of 50% for those with continuous delta activity and generalized epileptiform discharges, and of 25% for those with burst-suppression, diffuse depression, and in alpha/theta-pattern coma. Death was pronounced immediately in patients with isoelectric EEGs. CONCLUSION: The main findings of EEGs, differentiated different survival rates and are thus a good prognostic tool for patients examined in emergencies.OBJETIVO: Determinar a taxa de sobrevivência (TS, segundo os principais achados de eletrencefalograma de urgência (E-EEG, dos pacientes atendidos nas emergências de hospital de alta complexidade. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo, por ordem de chegada, da correlação entre os achados de E-EEG, feitos nos pacientes à beira do leito, com TS, utilizando-se as curvas de sobrevidas de Kaplan Meyer no Hospital de Base de S

  1. The effectiveness of EEG-feedback on attention, impulsivity and EEG : A sham feedback controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H. N. Alexander; Lansbergen, Marieke M.; Van Os, Titus W. D. P.; Bocker, Koen B. E.; Kenemans, J. Leon

    2010-01-01

    EEG-feedback, also called neurofeedback, is a training procedure aimed at altering brain activity, and is used as a treatment for disorders like Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Studies have reported positive effects of neurofeedback on attention and other dependent variables.

  2. Detecting interictal discharges in first seizure patients: ambulatory EEG or EEG after sleep deprivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geut, I.; Weenink, S.; Knottnerus, I.L.H.; van Putten, Michel J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Uncertainty about recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure is a significant psychological burden for patients, and motivates the need for diagnostic tools with high sensitivity and specificity to assess recurrence risk. As the sensitivity of a routine EEG after a first unprovoked seizure

  3. Incidence of epileptiform EEG activity in children during mask induction of anaesthesia with brief administration of 8% sevoflurane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Schultz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A high incidence of epileptiform activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG was reported in children undergoing mask induction of anaesthesia with administration of high doses of sevoflurane for 5 minutes and longer. This study was performed to investigate whether reducing the time of exposure to a high inhaled sevoflurane concentration would affect the incidence of epileptiform EEG activity. It was hypothesized that no epileptiform activity would occur, when the inhaled sevoflurane concentration would be reduced from 8% to 4% immediately after the loss of consciousness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 70 children (age 7-96 months, ASA I-II, premedication with midazolam were anaesthetized with 8% sevoflurane in 100% oxygen via face mask. Immediately after loss of consciousness, the sevoflurane concentration was reduced to 4%. EEGs were recorded continuously and were later analyzed visually with regard to epileptiform EEG patterns. Sevoflurane at a concentration of 8% was given for 1.2 ± 0.4 min (mean ± SD. In 14 children (20% epileptiform EEG patterns without motor manifestations were observed (delta with spikes (DSP, rhythmic polyspikes (PSR, epileptiform discharges (PED in 10, 10, 4 children (14%, 14%, 6%. 38 children (54% had slow, rhythmic delta waves with high amplitudes (DS appearing on average before DSP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The hypothesis that no epileptiform potentials would occur during induction of anaesthesia with a reduction of the inspired sevoflurane concentration from 8% to 4% directly after LOC was not proved. Even if 8% sevoflurane is administered only briefly for induction of anaesthesia, epileptiform EEG activity may be observed in children despite premedication with midazolam.

  4. Consensus on the use of neurophysiological tests in the intensive care unit (ICU): electroencephalogram (EEG), evoked potentials (EP), and electroneuromyography (ENMG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guørit, J.M.; Amantini, A.; Amodio, P.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY AIM: To provide a consensus of European leading authorities about the optimal use of clinical neurophysiological (CN) tests (electroencephalogram [EEG]; evoked potentials [EP]; electroneuromyography [ENMG]) in the intensive care unit (ICU) and, particularly, about the way to make these tests...... contribution to all other experts. A complete consensus has been reached when submitting the manuscript. RESULTS: What the group considered as the best classification systems for EEG and EP abnormalities in the ICU is first presented. CN tests are useful for diagnosis (epilepsy, brain death, and neuromuscular...... disorders), prognosis (anoxic ischemic encephalopathy, head trauma, and neurologic disturbances of metabolic and toxic origin), and follow-up, in the adult, paediatric, and neonatal ICU. Regarding prognosis, a clear distinction is made between these tests whose abnormalities are indicative of an ominous...

  5. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  6. Peak and averaged bicoherence for different EEG patterns during general anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles Paul

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in nonlinear neuronal mechanisms of EEG generation in the course of general anaesthesia have been extensively investigated in research literature. A number of EEG signal properties capable of tracking these changes have been reported and employed in anaesthetic depth monitors. The degree of phase coupling between different spectral components is a marker of nonlinear EEG generators and is claimed to be an important aspect of BIS. While bicoherence is the most direct measure of phase coupling, according to published research it is not directly used in the calculation of BIS, and only limited studies of its association with anaesthetic depth and level of consciousness have been published. This paper investigates bicoherence parameters across equal band and unequal band bifrequency regions, during different states of anaesthetic depth relating to routine clinical anaesthesia, as determined by visual inspection of EEG. Methods 41 subjects scheduled for day surgery under general anaesthesia were recruited into this study. EEG bicoherence was analysed using average and smoothed-peak estimates calculated over different regions on the bifrequency plane. Statistical analysis of associations between anaesthetic depth/state of consciousness and bicoherence estimates included linear regression using generalised linear mixed effects models (GLMs, ROC curves and prediction probability (Pk. Results Bicoherence estimates for the δ_θ region on the bifrequency plane were more sensitive to anaesthetic depth changes compared to other bifrequency regions. Smoothed-peak bicoherence displayed stronger associations than average bicoherence. Excluding burst suppression and large transients, the δ_θ peak bicoherence was significantly associated with level of anaesthetic depth (z = 25.74, p 2 = 0.191. Estimates of Pk for this parameter were 0.889(0.867-0.911 and 0.709(0.689-0.729 respectively for conscious states and anaesthetic depth

  7. The default mode network and EEG regional spectral power: a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Neuner

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG frequencies have been linked to specific functions as an "electrophysiological signature" of a function. A combination of oscillatory rhythms has also been described for specific functions, with or without predominance of one specific frequency-band. In a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study at 3 T we studied the relationship between the default mode network (DMN and the power of EEG frequency bands. As a methodological approach, we applied Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components (MELODIC and dual regression analysis for fMRI resting state data. EEG power for the alpha, beta, delta and theta-bands were extracted from the structures forming the DMN in a region-of-interest approach by applying Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA. A strong link between the spontaneous BOLD response of the left parahippocampal gyrus and the delta-band extracted from the anterior cingulate cortex was found. A positive correlation between the beta-1 frequency power extracted from the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and the spontaneous BOLD response of the right supplementary motor cortex was also established. The beta-2 frequency power extracted from the PCC and the precuneus showed a positive correlation with the BOLD response of the right frontal cortex. Our results support the notion of beta-band activity governing the "status quo" in cognitive and motor setup. The highly significant correlation found between the delta power within the DMN and the parahippocampal gyrus is in line with the association of delta frequencies with memory processes. We assumed "ongoing activity" during "resting state" in bringing events from the past to the mind, in which the parahippocampal gyrus is a relevant structure. Our data demonstrate that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations within the DMN are associated with different EEG-bands and strengthen the conclusion that this network is characterized by a specific

  8. EEG Signal Classification With Super-Dirichlet Mixture Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zhanyu; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Prasad, Swati

    2012-01-01

    Classification of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal is a challengeable task in the brain-computer interface systems. The marginalized discrete wavelet transform (mDWT) coefficients extracted from the EEG signals have been frequently used in researches since they reveal features related to the...

  9. Dynamics of convulsive seizure termination and postictal generalized EEG suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, P.R.; Thijs, R.D.; Lamberts, R.J.; Velis, D.N.; Visser, G.H.; Tolner, E.A.; Sander, J.W.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Kalitzin, S.N.

    It is not fully understood how seizures terminate and why some seizures are followed by a period of complete brain activity suppression, postictal generalized EEG suppression. This is clinically relevant as there is a potential association between postictal generalized EEG suppression,

  10. A computerised EEG-analyzing system for small laboratory animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropveld, D.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Popken, R. J.; Smith, J.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental setup, including instrumentation and software packaging, is described for the use of a minicomputer as an on-line analyzing system of the EEG in rats. Complete fast Fourier transformation of the EEG sampled in 15 episodes of 10 s each is plotted out within 7 min after the start of

  11. Reduced GABAA receptor density contralateral to a potentially epileptogenic MRI abnormality in a patient with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwert, T.; Stodieck, S.R.G.; Puskas, C.; Diehl, B.; Puskas, Z.; Schuierer, G.; Vollet, B.; Schober, O.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging cerebral GABA A receptor density (GRD) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 iomazenil is highly accurate in lateralizing epileptogenic foci in patients with complex partial seizures of temporal origin. Limited knowledge exists on how iomazenil SPET compares with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this regard. We present a patient with complex partial seizures in whom MRI had identified an arachnoid cyst anterior to the tip of the left temporal lobe. Contralaterally to this structural abnormality, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) performed after sleep deprivation disclosed an intermittent frontotemporal dysrhythmic focus with slow and sharp waves. On iomazenil SPET images GRD was significantly reduced in the right temporal lobe and thus contralaterally to the MRI abnormality, but ipsilaterally to the pathological EEG findings. These data suggest that iomazenil SPET may significantly contribute to the presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients even when MRI identifies potentialy epileptogenic structural lesions. (orig.)

  12. Standardized computer-based organized reporting of EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Aurlien, Harald; Brøgger, Jan C.

    2017-01-01

    are used to report the features of clinical relevance, extracted while assessing the EEGs. Selection of the terms is context sensitive: initial choices determine the subsequently presented sets of additional choices. This process automatically generates a report and feeds these features into a database......Standardized terminology for computer-based assessment and reporting of EEG has been previously developed in Europe. The International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology established a taskforce in 2013 to develop this further, and to reach international consensus. This work resulted...... in the second, revised version of SCORE (Standardized Computer-based Organized Reporting of EEG), which is presented in this paper. The revised terminology was implemented in a software package (SCORE EEG), which was tested in clinical practice on 12,160 EEG recordings. Standardized terms implemented in SCORE...

  13. [Qualitative and quantitative EEG-findings in schizophrenia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M

    1978-03-01

    The results of the qualitative but particularly the quantitative EEG-studies indicate that 1. The EEG of adult schizophrenics is characterized by an appearance of excessive fast activity along with some slow waves and the lack of alpha-activity. 2. Excessive fast activity and lack of alpha-waves have also been found in the EEGs of psychotic children and most interestingly in children whose parents (particularly the mother) are schizophrenic (high risk children). 3. Based on the studies during sleep and investigations with neuroleptics, it was established that the origin of the excess fast activity in schizophrenia cannot be the muscle potential. Particularly the excess fast activity in high risk children for schizophrenia goes against the muscle potential hypothesis. 4. The quantitative EEG changes seen in schizophrenia show similarity to those seen after hallucinogenic compounds particularly after anticholinergic hallucinogenics. 5. All neuroleptics (major tranquilizers) produce quantitative EEG alterations which are almost diametrically opposite to those seen in schizoprenia.

  14. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    . Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging......Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain...... imaging device. The quality of the source reconstruction depends on the forward model which details head geometry and conductivities of different head compartments. These person-specific factors are complex to determine, requiring detailed knowledge of the subject’s anatomy and physiology. In this proof...

  15. EEG Suppression Associated with Apneic Episodes in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evonne Low

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the EEG findings from an ex-preterm neonate at term equivalent age who presented with intermittent but prolonged apneic episodes which were presumed to be seizures. A total of 8 apneic episodes were captured (duration 23–376 seconds during EEG monitoring. The baseline EEG activity was appropriate for corrected gestational age and no electrographic seizure activity was recorded. The average baseline heart rate was 168 beats per minute (bpm and the baseline oxygen saturation level was in the mid-nineties. Periods of complete EEG suppression lasting 68 and 179 seconds, respectively, were recorded during 2 of these 8 apneic episodes. Both episodes were accompanied by bradycardia less than 70 bpm and oxygen saturation levels of less than 20%. Short but severe episodes of apnea can cause complete EEG suppression in the neonate.

  16. Correlation of Visuospatial Ability and EEG Slowing in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Dominique; Calabrese, Pasquale; Meyer, Antonia; Chaturvedi, Menorca; Hatz, Florian; Fuhr, Peter; Gschwandtner, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Background. Visuospatial dysfunction is among the first cognitive symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is often predictive for PD-dementia. Furthermore, cognitive status in PD-patients correlates with quantitative EEG. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the correlation between EEG slowing and visuospatial ability in nondemented PD-patients. Methods. Fifty-seven nondemented PD-patients (17 females/40 males) were evaluated with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and a high-resolution 256-channel EEG was recorded. A median split was performed for each cognitive test dividing the patients sample into either a normal or lower performance group. The electrodes were split into five areas: frontal, central, temporal, parietal, and occipital. A linear mixed effects model (LME) was used for correlational analyses and to control for confounding factors. Results. Subsequently, for the lower performance, LME analysis showed a significant positive correlation between ROCF score and parietal alpha/theta ratio ( b = .59, p = .012) and occipital alpha/theta ratio ( b = 0.50, p = .030). No correlations were found in the group of patients with normal visuospatial abilities. Conclusion. We conclude that a reduction of the parietal alpha/theta ratio is related to visuospatial impairments in PD-patients. These findings indicate that visuospatial impairment in PD-patients could be influenced by parietal dysfunction.

  17. Abnormal auditory mismatch response in tinnitus sufferers with high-frequency hearing loss is associated with subjective distress level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Patrick

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus is an auditory sensation frequently following hearing loss. After cochlear injury, deafferented neurons become sensitive to neighbouring intact edge-frequencies, guiding an enhanced central representation of these frequencies. As psychoacoustical data 123 indicate enhanced frequency discrimination ability for edge-frequencies that may be related to a reorganization within the auditory cortex, the aim of the present study was twofold: 1 to search for abnormal auditory mismatch responses in tinnitus sufferers and 2 relate these to subjective indicators of tinnitus. Results Using EEG-mismatch negativity, we demonstrate abnormalities (N = 15 in tinnitus sufferers that are specific to frequencies located at the audiometrically normal lesion-edge as compared to normal hearing controls (N = 15. Groups also differed with respect to the cortical locations of mismatch responsiveness. Sources in the 90–135 ms latency window were generated in more anterior brain regions in the tinnitus group. Both measures of abnormality correlated with emotional-cognitive distress related to tinnitus (r ~ .76. While these two physiological variables were uncorrelated in the control group, they were correlated in the tinnitus group (r = .72. Concerning relationships with parameters of hearing loss (depth and slope, slope turned out to be an important variable. Generally, the steeper the hearing loss is the less distress related to tinnitus was reported. The associations between slope and the relevant neurophysiological variables are in agreement with this finding. Conclusions The present study is the first to show near-to-complete separation of tinnitus sufferers from a normal hearing control group based on neurophysiological variables. The finding of lesion-edge specific effects and associations with slope of hearing loss corroborates the assumption that hearing loss is the basis for tinnitus development. It is likely that some central

  18. Effective brain network analysis with resting-state EEG data: a comparison between heroin abstinent and non-addicted subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Dong, Qunxi; Hao, Yanrong; Zhao, Qinglin; Shen, Jian; Zheng, Fang

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Neuro-electrophysiological tools have been widely used in heroin addiction studies. Previous studies indicated that chronic heroin abuse would result in abnormal functional organization of the brain, while few heroin addiction studies have applied the effective connectivity tool to analyze the brain functional system (BFS) alterations induced by heroin abuse. The present study aims to identify the abnormality of resting-state heroin abstinent BFS using source decomposition and effective connectivity tools. Approach. The resting-state electroencephalograph (EEG) signals were acquired from 15 male heroin abstinent (HA) subjects and 14 male non-addicted (NA) controls. Multivariate autoregressive models combined independent component analysis (MVARICA) was applied for blind source decomposition. Generalized partial directed coherence (GPDC) was applied for effective brain connectivity analysis. Effective brain networks of both HA and NA groups were constructed. The two groups of effective cortical networks were compared by the bootstrap method. Abnormal causal interactions between decomposed source regions were estimated in the 1-45 Hz frequency domain. Main results. This work suggested: (a) there were clear effective network alterations in heroin abstinent subject groups; (b) the parietal region was a dominant hub of the abnormally weaker causal pathways, and the left occipital region was a dominant hub of the abnormally stronger causal pathways. Significance. These findings provide direct evidence that chronic heroin abuse induces brain functional abnormalities. The potential value of combining effective connectivity analysis and brain source decomposition methods in exploring brain alterations of heroin addicts is also implied.

  19. Combined analysis of cortical (EEG) and nerve stump signals improves robotic hand control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombini, Mario; Rigosa, Jacopo; Zappasodi, Filippo; Porcaro, Camillo; Citi, Luca; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Micera, Silvestro

    2012-01-01

    Interfacing an amputee's upper-extremity stump nerves to control a robotic hand requires training of the individual and algorithms to process interactions between cortical and peripheral signals. To evaluate for the first time whether EEG-driven analysis of peripheral neural signals as an amputee practices could improve the classification of motor commands. Four thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes (tf-LIFEs-4) were implanted in the median and ulnar nerves of the stump in the distal upper arm for 4 weeks. Artificial intelligence classifiers were implemented to analyze LIFE signals recorded while the participant tried to perform 3 different hand and finger movements as pictures representing these tasks were randomly presented on a screen. In the final week, the participant was trained to perform the same movements with a robotic hand prosthesis through modulation of tf-LIFE-4 signals. To improve the classification performance, an event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) procedure was applied to EEG data to identify the exact timing of each motor command. Real-time control of neural (motor) output was achieved by the participant. By focusing electroneurographic (ENG) signal analysis in an EEG-driven time window, movement classification performance improved. After training, the participant regained normal modulation of background rhythms for movement preparation (α/β band desynchronization) in the sensorimotor area contralateral to the missing limb. Moreover, coherence analysis found a restored α band synchronization of Rolandic area with frontal and parietal ipsilateral regions, similar to that observed in the opposite hemisphere for movement of the intact hand. Of note, phantom limb pain (PLP) resolved for several months. Combining information from both cortical (EEG) and stump nerve (ENG) signals improved the classification performance compared with tf-LIFE signals processing alone; training led to cortical reorganization and

  20. Three-Dimensional EEG Signal Tracking for Reproducible Monitoring of Self-Contemplating Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglei Meng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG can globally monitor neural activity in millisecond scale, which is critical for identifying causality of human brain functions and mechanisms. However, to obtain accurate EEG stimulation-response relationship one usually needs to repeat multiple-ten times of stimulation-response recording to average out background signals of other irreverent brain activities, making real-time monitoring difficult to be accomplished. In this study, we explored new approaches which don’t require repeats. EEG signals were recorded from subjects doing mind tasks including image formation of motor functions or emotional subjects and mathematical calculations in mind. Time stamps in EEG recording were used to mark task completion time. Signals within 300ms or 1,000ms before task completions were analyzed. Using sLoreta 3-D tracking we found that delta-wave activities were mostly located at frontal lobe or visual cortex, isolated with each other. Theta-wave activity tended to rotate around cortex with low spatial correlation. Beta-wave behaved like inquiry types of oscillations between any two regions across cortex and was consistently correlated with each other over different areas. Alpha-wave activity looked like mixture of theta and beta activities. Together with sliding window dynamic connectivity method we confirmed beta waves play key roles in linking different brain areas together for information inquiry. Theta and low Alpha are more likely playing the role of information control, integration, and image formation. With the proposed new method we demonstrated reproducible linkages of subject behaviors with 3-D tracing characteristics along the 3 categories: emotion, math calculation, and motor functions without using event repeats.

  1. Functional Mapping with Simultaneous MEG and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven; Ahlfors, Seppo; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2010-06-14

    We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) to locate and determine the temporal evolution in brain areas involved in the processing of simple sensory stimuli. We will use somatosensory stimuli to locate the hand somatosensory areas, auditory stimuli to locate the auditory cortices, visual stimuli in four quadrants of the visual field to locate the early visual areas. These type of experiments are used for functional mapping in epileptic and brain tumor patients to locate eloquent cortices. In basic neuroscience similar experimental protocols are used to study the orchestration of cortical activity. The acquisition protocol includes quality assurance procedures, subject preparation for the combined MEG/EEG study, and acquisition of evoked-response data with somatosensory, auditory, and visual stimuli. We also demonstrate analysis of the data using the equivalent current dipole model and cortically-constrained minimum-norm estimates. Anatomical MRI data are employed in the analysis for visualization and for deriving boundaries of tissue boundaries for forward modeling and cortical location and orientation constraints for the minimum-norm estimates.

  2. EEG microstates during resting represent personality differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Felix; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Milz, Patricia; Gianotti, Lorena R R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the spontaneous brain electric activity of 13 skeptics and 16 believers in paranormal phenomena; they were university students assessed with a self-report scale about paranormal beliefs. 33-channel EEG recordings during no-task resting were processed as sequences of momentary potential distribution maps. Based on the maps at peak times of Global Field Power, the sequences were parsed into segments of quasi-stable potential distribution, the 'microstates'. The microstates were clustered into four classes of map topographies (A-D). Analysis of the microstate parameters time coverage, occurrence frequency and duration as well as the temporal sequence (syntax) of the microstate classes revealed significant differences: Believers had a higher coverage and occurrence of class B, tended to decreased coverage and occurrence of class C, and showed a predominant sequence of microstate concatenations from A to C to B to A that was reversed in skeptics (A to B to C to A). Microstates of different topographies, putative "atoms of thought", are hypothesized to represent different types of information processing.The study demonstrates that personality differences can be detected in resting EEG microstate parameters and microstate syntax. Microstate analysis yielded no conclusive evidence for the hypothesized relation between paranormal belief and schizophrenia.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  4. Zambia Country Background Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampwaye, Godfrey; Jeppesen, Søren; Kragelund, Peter

    This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change).......This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change)....

  5. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1 sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2 still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes or MEG (275-gradiometers and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG (167-contacts and low-density EEG (ldEEG (21-electrodes. To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset, i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  6. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Küpper, Philipp; Kugel, Harald; Heers, Marcel; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Haueisen, Jens; Rampp, Stefan; Stefan, Hermann; Wolters, Carsten H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1) sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2) still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes) or MEG (275-gradiometers) and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG) (167-contacts) and low-density EEG (ldEEG) (21-electrodes). To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset), i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  7. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  8. Behavioral measures and EEG monitoring using the Brain Symmetry Index during the Wada test in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.M.; Tomas-Fernandez, Meritxell; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    EEG monitoring is used routinely during the Wada test in children. We quantified EEG asymmetry using the Brain Symmetry Index (BSI) to reduce subjectivity of EEG interpretation. Clinical and procedural variables were obtained and EEG data were retrieved from 46 patients with a total of 89

  9. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC EEG system for research quality auditory event-related potentials in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Nicholas A; Preece, Kathryn A; de Wit, Bianca; Glenn, Katharine; Fieder, Nora; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous work has demonstrated that a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system, Emotiv EPOC, can be adjusted to provide valid auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in adults that are comparable to ERPs recorded by a research-grade EEG system, Neuroscan. The aim of the current study was to determine if the same was true for children. Method. An adapted Emotiv EPOC system and Neuroscan system were used to make simultaneous EEG recordings in nineteen 6- to 12-year-old children under "passive" and "active" listening conditions. In the passive condition, children were instructed to watch a silent DVD and ignore 566 standard (1,000 Hz) and 100 deviant (1,200 Hz) tones. In the active condition, they listened to the same stimuli, and were asked to count the number of 'high' (i.e., deviant) tones. Results. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) indicated that the ERP morphology recorded with the two systems was very similar for the P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 ERP peaks (r = .82 to .95) in both passive and active conditions, and less so, though still strong, for mismatch negativity ERP component (MMN; r = .67 to .74). There were few differences between peak amplitude and latency estimates for the two systems. Conclusions. An adapted EPOC EEG system can be used to index children's late auditory ERP peaks (i.e., P1, N1, P2, N2, P3) and their MMN ERP component.

  10. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHS...

  11. Análisis de reducción de ruido en señales EEG orientado al reconocimiento de patrones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Guarnizo-Lemus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A study on background noise reduction (denoising on EEG signals using wavelet transform is presented, assuming that extracted features are susceptible to common noise within classes; besides, the feature space separability is compared using a linear Bayesian classifier. An increment of 1% in the average recognition rate is reached performing noise reduction in the identification of two functional states.

  12. Subcortical vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia : EEG global power independently predicts vascular impairment and brain symmetry index reflects severity of cognitive decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V.A.; Mariën, Peter; Nagels, Guy; Weeren, Arie J.T.M.; Saerens, Jos; Van Putten, Michel J.A.M.; de Deyn, Peter P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presentation of the small-vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious, and differential difficulties can arise with mild cognitive impairment. We investigated EEG

  13. Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment, No Dementia : EEG Global Power Independently Predicts Vascular Impairment and Brain Symmetry Index Reflects Severity of Cognitive Decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V. A.; Marien, Peter; Nagels, Guy; Weeren, Arie J. T. M.; Saerens, Jos; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose:Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presentation of the small-vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious, and differential difficulties can arise with mild cognitive impairment. We investigated EEG

  14. Pattern classification of EEG signals reveals perceptual and attentional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Monica D; Sherman, Aleksandra; Esterman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Pattern classification techniques have been widely used to differentiate neural activity associated with different perceptual, attentional, or other cognitive states, often using fMRI, but more recently with EEG as well. Although these methods have identified EEG patterns (i.e., scalp topographies of EEG signals occurring at certain latencies) that decode perceptual and attentional states on a trial-by-trial basis, they have yet to be applied to the spatial scope of attention toward global or local features of the display. Here, we initially used pattern classification to replicate and extend the findings that perceptual states could be reliably decoded from EEG. We found that visual perceptual states, including stimulus location and object category, could be decoded with high accuracy peaking between 125-250 ms, and that the discriminative spatiotemporal patterns mirrored and extended our (and other well-established) ERP results. Next, we used pattern classification to investigate whether spatiotemporal EEG signals could reliably predict attentional states, and particularly, the scope of attention. The EEG data were reliably differentiated for local versus global attention on a trial-by-trial basis, emerging as a specific spatiotemporal activation pattern over posterior electrode sites during the 250-750 ms interval after stimulus onset. In sum, we demonstrate that multivariate pattern analysis of EEG, which reveals unique spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity distinguishing between behavioral states, is a sensitive tool for characterizing the neural correlates of perception and attention.

  15. Usability of four commercially-oriented EEG systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, W. David; Whitaker, Keith W.; Ries, Anthony J.; Vettel, Jean M.; Cortney Bradford, J.; Kerick, Scott E.; McDowell, Kaleb

    2014-08-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) holds promise as a neuroimaging technology that can be used to understand how the human brain functions in real-world, operational settings while individuals move freely in perceptually-rich environments. In recent years, several EEG systems have been developed that aim to increase the usability of the neuroimaging technology in real-world settings. Here, the usability of three wireless EEG systems from different companies are compared to a conventional wired EEG system, BioSemi’s ActiveTwo, which serves as an established laboratory-grade ‘gold standard’ baseline. The wireless systems compared include Advanced Brain Monitoring’s B-Alert X10, Emotiv Systems’ EPOC and the 2009 version of QUASAR’s Dry Sensor Interface 10-20. The design of each wireless system is discussed in relation to its impact on the system’s usability as a potential real-world neuroimaging system. Evaluations are based on having participants complete a series of cognitive tasks while wearing each of the EEG acquisition systems. This report focuses on the system design, usability factors and participant comfort issues that arise during the experimental sessions. In particular, the EEG systems are assessed on five design elements: adaptability of the system for differing head sizes, subject comfort and preference, variance in scalp locations for the recording electrodes, stability of the electrical connection between the scalp and electrode, and timing integration between the EEG system, the stimulus presentation computer and other external events.

  16. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  17. Study on non-linear bistable dynamics model based EEG signal discrimination analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Lin, Han; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp. EEG measures voltage fluctuations generating from ionic current flows within the neurons of the brain. EEG signal is looked as one of the most important factors that will be focused in the next 20 years. In this paper, EEG signal discrimination based on non-linear bistable dynamical model was proposed. EEG signals were processed by non-linear bistable dynamical model, and features of EEG signals were characterized by coherence index. Experimental results showed that the proposed method could properly extract the features of different EEG signals.

  18. Whitening of Background Brain Activity via Parametric Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal Kamel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signal subspace techniques have been recently suggested for the extraction of the visual evoked potential signals from brain background colored noise. The majority of these techniques assume the background noise as white, and for colored noise, it is suggested to be whitened, without further elaboration on how this might be done. In this paper, we investigate the whitening capabilities of two parametric techniques: a direct one based on Levinson solution of Yule-Walker equations, called AR Yule-Walker, and an indirect one based on the least-squares solution of forward-backward linear prediction (FBLP equations, called AR-FBLP. The whitening effect of the two algorithms is investigated with real background electroencephalogram (EEG colored noise and compared in time and frequency domains.

  19. Automated approach to detecting behavioral states using EEG-DABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Loris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrocorticographic (ECoG signals represent cortical electrical dipoles generated by synchronous local field potentials that result from simultaneous firing of neurons at distinct frequencies (brain waves. Since different brain waves correlate to different behavioral states, ECoG signals presents a novel strategy to detect complex behaviors. We developed a program, EEG Detection Analysis for Behavioral States (EEG-DABS that advances Fast Fourier Transforms through ECoG signals time series, separating it into (user defined frequency bands and normalizes them to reduce variability. EEG-DABS determines events if segments of an experimental ECoG record have significantly different power bands than a selected control pattern of EEG. Events are identified at every epoch and frequency band and then are displayed as output graphs by the program. Certain patterns of events correspond to specific behaviors. Once a predetermined pattern was selected for a behavioral state, EEG-DABS correctly identified the desired behavioral event. The selection of frequency band combinations for detection of the behavior affects accuracy of the method. All instances of certain behaviors, such as freezing, were correctly identified from the event patterns generated with EEG-DABS. Detecting behaviors is typically achieved by visually discerning unique animal phenotypes, a process that is time consuming, unreliable, and subjective. EEG-DABS removes variability by using defined parameters of EEG/ECoG for a desired behavior over chronic recordings. EEG-DABS presents a simple and automated approach to quantify different behavioral states from ECoG signals.

  20. Polysomnography with quantitative EEG in patients with and without fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Victor W; Rutledge, Dana N; Stern, John M

    2015-04-01

    Characterize the polysomnographic (PSG) and quantitative EEG (qEEG) features of fibromyalgia and determine whether fibromyalgia patients differ in these measures when compared with a control sleep disorder population. All undergoing all-night PSG for evaluation of a sleep disorder were evaluated for fibromyalgia. The PSGs were interpreted for routine sleep measures, and qEEG was performed to measure the delta and alpha frequency power during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Measures and qEEG were analyzed according to fibromyalgia diagnosis. Community-based sleep medicine center. All patients undergoing PSG over a 2-year period. None. Of the 385 patients in the study population, 133 had fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology criteria. The population's average Epworth Sleepiness Score was 10.5, the average sleep efficiency was 78%, and the Periodic Limb Movement disorder prevalence was 15%. None of these sleep measures differed significantly between the fibromyalgia and non-fibromyalgia groups. Obstructive sleep apnea was present in 45% of the fibromyalgia group. Significant differences were present in the qEEG ratio of delta to alpha frequency power, which was 95% specific for fibromyalgia when ≤1. A qEEG ratio ≤10.5 was 85% sensitive for fibromyalgia, and a qEEG ratio >10.5 had an 89% negative predictive value for fibromyalgia. Among patients with fibromyalgia who were not taking a benzodiazepine or benzodiazepine agonist, a qEEG ratio ≤10.5 was 84% specific and had a 78% positive predictive value. Sleep disorders identified by routine PSG, including obstructive sleep apnea, are common in fibromyalgia, but periodic leg movement disorder and poor sleep efficiency are not. A qEEG low delta/alpha ratio during non-rapid eye movement sleep can differentiate patients with fibromyalgia from others who are referred for PSG. Consideration of benzodiazepine and benzodiazepine agonist use is important when interpreting the delta/alpha ratio.

  1. 4h versus 1h-nap-video-EEG monitoring in an Epileptology Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Michel, Vi-Huong; Dinkelacker, Vera; Solano, Ovidio; Levy, Pierre-P; Lambrecq, Virginie; Adam, Claude; Dupont, Sophie; Naccache, Lionel; Fournier, Emmanuel; Baulac, Michel; Navarro, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    To compare the performance of 4h-video EEG monitoring (VEEG) and 1h-nap-VEEG in an Epileptology Unit. We examined short-term VEEG data from 196 patients admitted to characterize their: (i) clinical events; (ii) epileptic syndromes or (iii) state after status epilepticus or surgery. We compared the 4h-VEEG and 1h-nap-VEEG performances using three measures: (i) the capability to detect epileptic seizures (ES), psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), interictal epileptiform abnormalities (IEA) and sleep-related IEA; (ii) the usefulness to answer questions on referral; (iii) the sensitivity for the final diagnosis. The 4h-VEEG test recorded clinical events in 53.6% of 196 patients, IEA in 41.3%, sleep-related IEA in 34.7%, and was judged as useful in 66.8%. The 4h-VEEG was compared to the 1h-nap-VEEG in 129 patients. 4h-VEEG had a better capability to record clinical events (50.3% vs. 6.2%, pnap-EEG. This work found 4h-VEEG records were superior to the 1h-nap-VEEG test on the basis of three complementary measures, capability, usefulness and sensitivity. 4h-VEEG is a useful alternative investigation tool in an Epileptology Unit. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep EEG findings in ICD-10 borderline personality disorder in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Tarek; Okasha, Tarek; Okasha, Ahmed

    2002-09-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that patients with borderline personality disorder show some similarities to patients with major depression, especially regarding their sleep profile. This study aimed at investigating such a hypothesis in an Egyptian sample, considering the possible influence of cultural differences. All night polysomnographic assessments were made for 20 ICD-10 diagnosed borderline patients (without co-morbid depression), in addition to 20 patients with major depression and 20 healthy matched controls. The two patient groups differed significantly from controls in their sleep profile, especially regarding sleep continuity measures, decreased SWS and REM sleep abnormalities. High similarity was found in EEG sleep profile of the two patient groups, though the changes were more robust in patients with depression. The small number of subjects precluded finer analyses of sleep microstructure by depressive symptoms. The great similarity in EEG sleep profile between borderline personality disorder patients and patients with major depression suggests a common biological origin for both conditions, with the difference being 'quantitative' rather than 'qualitative'. Our data are all the more compelling in that the presumed personality disturbance in the Egyptian culture manifests neurophysiologically as in the Western world.

  3. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  4. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  5. The natural radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggleby, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The components of the natural background radiation and their variations are described. Cosmic radiation is a major contributor to the external dose to the human body whilst naturally-occurring radionuclides of primordial and cosmogenic origin contribute to both the external and internal doses, with the primordial radionuclides being the major contributor in both cases. Man has continually modified the radiation dose to which he has been subjected. The two traditional methods of measuring background radiation, ionisation chamber measurements and scintillation counting, are looked at and the prospect of using thermoluminescent dosimetry is considered

  6. Cosmic Tachyon Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium statistical mechanics of a background radiation of superluminal particles is investigated, based on a vectorial wave equation for tachyons of the Proca type. The partition function, the spectral energy density, and the various thermodynamic variables of an ideal Bose gas of tachyons in an open Robertson-Walker cosmology are derived. The negative mass square in the wave equation changes the frequency scaling in the Rayleigh-Jeans law, and there are also significant changes in the low temperature regime as compared to the microwave background, in particular in the caloric and thermal equations of state.

  7. Prospective motion correction for MRI using EEG-equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hanson, Lars G.

    2016-01-01

    A new prospective motion correction technique is presented that is based on signals from gradient switching, in an EEG-cap with interconnected electrodes the subject wears during scanning. The method has no line-of-sight limitations as optical methods, requires no interleaved navigator modules or...... or additional hardware for sites already doing EEG-fMRI. Instead a training scan is performed were signals recorded with the EEG-system are correlated with motion parameters estimated by image realignment. Initial results from application of the method in a phantom are promising....

  8. Implantation of an EEG telemetric transmitter in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugno, M; Mandile, P; D'Angiolillo, D; Montagnese, P; Giuditta, A

    1996-04-01

    We describe a method of implanting a telemetric transmitter of EEG signals in the laboratory rat. The transmitter is available commercially and may be implanted in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the hindermost dorsal region of the animal. The two stainless steel electrodes connected to the transmitter are led to the cranium through a subcutaneous tunnel, and are fixed to the cranium bones. EEG signals are collected by a receiver placed under the cage; reception of the signals is improved by suitably placed antennae. The method allows recording of EEG data from a free-moving rat during the expression of behavioral tasks in a limited space.

  9. EEG Artifact Removal Using a Wavelet Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Anh T.; Musson, John; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederick; Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Richey, Carl; Schnell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    !n this paper we developed a wavelet neural network. (WNN) algorithm for Electroencephalogram (EEG) artifact removal without electrooculographic (EOG) recordings. The algorithm combines the universal approximation characteristics of neural network and the time/frequency property of wavelet. We. compared the WNN algorithm with .the ICA technique ,and a wavelet thresholding method, which was realized by using the Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE) with an adaptive gradient-based optimal threshold. Experimental results on a driving test data set show that WNN can remove EEG artifacts effectively without diminishing useful EEG information even for very noisy data.

  10. Efficiency analysis of voluntary control of human's EEG spectral characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiroy, Valery N; Aslanyan, Elena V; Lazurenko, Dmitry M; Minyaeva, Nadezhda R; Bakhtin, Oleg M

    2016-03-01

    Spectral power (SP) of EEG alpha and beta-2 frequencies in different cortical areas has been used for neurofeedback training to control a graphic interface in different scenarios. The results show that frequency range and brain cortical areas are associated with high or low efficiency of voluntary control. Overall, EEG phenomena observed in the course of training are largely general changes involving extensive brain areas and frequency bands. Finally, we have demonstrated EEG patterns that dynamically switch with a specific feature in different tasks within one training, after a relatively short period of training.

  11. Functional brain networks in Alzheimer's disease: EEG analysis based on limited penetrable visibility graph and phase space method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Yang, Chen; Wang, Ruofan; Yu, Haitao; Cao, Yibin; Liu, Jing

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, EEG series are applied to construct functional connections with the correlation between different regions in order to investigate the nonlinear characteristic and the cognitive function of the brain with Alzheimer's disease (AD). First, limited penetrable visibility graph (LPVG) and phase space method map single EEG series into networks, and investigate the underlying chaotic system dynamics of AD brain. Topological properties of the networks are extracted, such as average path length and clustering coefficient. It is found that the network topology of AD in several local brain regions are different from that of the control group with no statistically significant difference existing all over the brain. Furthermore, in order to detect the abnormality of AD brain as a whole, functional connections among different brain regions are reconstructed based on similarity of clustering coefficient sequence (CCSS) of EEG series in the four frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, and beta), which exhibit obvious small-world properties. Graph analysis demonstrates that for both methodologies, the functional connections between regions of AD brain decrease, particularly in the alpha frequency band. AD causes the graph index complexity of the functional network decreased, the small-world properties weakened, and the vulnerability increased. The obtained results show that the brain functional network constructed by LPVG and phase space method might be more effective to distinguish AD from the normal control than the analysis of single series, which is helpful for revealing the underlying pathological mechanism of the disease.

  12. A FDM anisotropic formulation for EEG simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, P; Hyttinen, J; Inchingolo, P; Magrofuoco, A; Mininel, S; Vatta, F

    2006-01-01

    Accurate head modeling is required to properly simulate bioelectric phenomena in 3-D as well as to estimate the 3-D bioelectric activity starting from superficial bioelectric measurements and 3-D imaging. Aiming to build an accurate and realistic representation of the volume conductor of the head, also the anisotropy of head tissues should be taken into account. In this paper we describe a new finite-difference method (FDM) formulation which accounts for anisotropy of the various head tissues. Our proposal, being based on FDM, derives the head model directly from patient's specific clinical images. We present here the details of the numerical formulation and the method validation by comparing our numerical proposal and known analytical results using a multi-shell anisotropic head model with skull anisotropy. Furthermore, we analyzed also different numerical grid refinement and EEG source characteristics. The comparison with previously developed FDM methods shows a good performance of the proposed method.

  13. Identifying auditory cortex encoding abnormalities in schizophrenia: The utility of low-frequency versus 40 Hz steady-state measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J C; Fisk, Charles L; Chen, Yu-Han; Stone-Howell, Breannan; Liu, Song; Hunter, Michael A; Huang, Mingxiong; Bustillo, Juan; Cañive, José M; Miller, Gregory A

    2018-03-23

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and EEG have identified poststimulus low frequency and 40 Hz steady-state auditory encoding abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ). Negative findings have also appeared. To identify factors contributing to these inconsistencies, healthy control (HC) and SZ group differences were examined in MEG and EEG source space and EEG sensor space, with better group differentiation hypothesized for source than sensor measures given greater predictive utility for source measures. Fifty-five HC and 41 chronic SZ were presented 500 Hz sinusoidal stimuli modulated at 40 Hz during simultaneous whole-head MEG and EEG. MEG and EEG source models using left and right superior temporal gyrus (STG) dipoles estimated trial-to-trial phase similarity and percent change from prestimulus baseline. Group differences in poststimulus low-frequency activity and 40 Hz steady-state response were evaluated. Several EEG sensor analysis strategies were also examined. Poststimulus low-frequency group differences were observed across all methods. Given an age-related decrease in left STG 40 Hz steady-state activity in HC (HC > SZ), 40 Hz steady-state group differences were evident only in younger participants' source measures. Findings thus indicated that optimal data collection and analysis methods depend on the auditory encoding measure of interest. In addition, whereas results indicated that HC and SZ auditory encoding low-frequency group differences are generally comparable across modality and analysis strategy (and thus not dependent on obtaining construct-valid measures of left and right auditory cortex activity), 40 Hz steady-state group-difference findings are much more dependent on analysis strategy, with 40 Hz steady-state source-space findings providing the best group differentiation. © 2018 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  15. Delta rhythmicity is a reliable EEG biomarker in Angelman syndrome: a parallel mouse and human analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Michael S; Deck, Gina M; Dolatshahi, Marjan; Thibert, Ronald L; Bird, Lynne M; Chu, Catherine J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2017-01-01

    Clinicians have qualitatively described rhythmic delta activity as a prominent EEG abnormality in individuals with Angelman syndrome, but this phenotype has yet to be rigorously quantified in the clinical population or validated in a preclinical model. Here, we sought to quantitatively measure delta rhythmicity and evaluate its fidelity as a biomarker. We quantified delta oscillations in mouse and human using parallel spectral analysis methods and measured regional, state-specific, and developmental changes in delta rhythms in a patient population. Delta power was broadly increased and more dynamic in both the Angelman syndrome mouse model, relative to wild-type littermates, and in children with Angelman syndrome, relative to age-matched neurotypical controls. Enhanced delta oscillations in children with Angelman syndrome were present during wakefulness and sleep, were generalized across the neocortex, and were more pronounced at earlier ages. Delta rhythmicity phenotypes can serve as reliable biomarkers for Angelman syndrome in both preclinical and clinical settings.

  16. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Petrovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS. The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8, and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6 electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG, the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure, the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs. Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann–Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman’s correlation. Results We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency (αAVG in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered “alpha flow”, indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions

  17. Abnormal haemoglobin variants, ABO and Rh blood groups among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Abnormal haemoglobin variants ( HbSS,AS,AC,SC,etc) have been known to be common among blacks. Patients with sickle cell disease are often faced with the risk of alloimmunization from allogeneic blood transfusion. Objectives: The study was designed to sample students population of African descents for ...

  18. Attitude of Nigerian women to abnormal menstrual bleeding from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and Norethisterone Enanthate (Net-En) are frequently used progestogen-only injectable contraceptives in many developing countries including Nigeria. Their use is often complicated by abnormal and unpredictable menstrual bleeding patterns. This has often been ...

  19. Serum amino acid abnormalities in pediatric patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Plasma amino acid concentrations have been reported to be abnormal in patients with chronic renal failure. L-Arginine has been used to improve endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The present study aim at investigating the status of plasma amino acids in pediatric patients with ...

  20. Pattern of abnormalities detected on scout films at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hysterosalpingography (HSG) assesses tubal status during infertility investigation. The scout film standardizes the film qualities and detects calcified areas in the pelvis. Unfortunately the film is often skipped during HSG. This study determined the pattern of abnormalities detected in scout films and assessed ...

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism | El-Baz | Egyptian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by clinical, etiologic and genetic heterogeneity. Many surveys revealed cytogenetically visible chromosomal abnormalities in 7.4% of autistic patients documented as well as several submicroscopic variants. This study had been conducted to identify some ...

  2. Risk factors for abnormal tubal hysterosalpingographic findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acquired structural abnormalities of the female reproductive tract contributes to the aetiology of female infertility. So many presumed risk factors for female tubal infertility are seen among Nigerian women. However, reports on the relationship between these factors and tubal pathology as seen on ...

  3. Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre including abnormal dental development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, M; Lauesen, S R; Daugaard-Jensen, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre (SCS) is a rare skin condition, where dense collagen is deposited in a localised groove of the head and neck area resembling the stroke of a sabre. The SCS may involve the oral cavity, but the severity and relation to this skin abnormality is unknown...

  4. Roles of adrenergic α1 and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the mediation of the desynchronization effects of modafinil in a mouse EEG synchronization model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Rui Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synchronized electroencephalogram (EEG activity is observed in pathological stages of cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Modafinil, known to increase the release of catecholamines, is a potent wake-promoting agent, and has shown some abilities to desynchronize EEG,but its receptor mechanisms by which modafinil induces desynchoronization remain to be elucidated. Here we used a pharmacological EEG synchronization model to investigate the involvement of adrenergic α1 receptors (R, α1R and dopamine (DA D1 and D2 receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs on modafinil-induced desynchronization in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were treated with cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine and monoamine depletor reserpine to produce experimental EEG synchronization characterized by continuous large-amplitude synchronized activity, with prominent increased delta and decreased theta, alpha, and beta power density. The results showed that modafinil produced an EEG desynchronization in the model. This was characterized by a general decrease in amplitude of all the frequency bands between 0 and 20 Hz, a prominent reduction in delta power density, and an increase in theta power density. Adrenergic α1R antagonist terazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p. completely antagonized the EEG desynchronization effects of modafinil at 90 mg/kg. However, DA D1R and D2R blockers partially attenuated the effects of modafinil. The modafinil-induced decrease in the amplitudes of the delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves and in delta power density were completely abolished by pretreatment with a combination of the D1R antagonist SCH 23390 (30 µg/kg and the D2R antagonist raclopride (2 mg/kg, i.p.. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that modafinil-mediated desynchronization may be attributed to the activation of adrenergic α1R, and dopaminergic D1R and D2R in a model of EEG synchronization.

  5. Roles of Adrenergic α1 and Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptors in the Mediation of the Desynchronization Effects of Modafinil in a Mouse EEG Synchronization Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Rui; Yang, Su-Rong; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Qu, Wei-Min; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    Background Synchronized electroencephalogram (EEG) activity is observed in pathological stages of cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Modafinil, known to increase the release of catecholamines, is a potent wake-promoting agent, and has shown some abilities to desynchronize EEG,but its receptor mechanisms by which modafinil induces desynchoronization remain to be elucidated. Here we used a pharmacological EEG synchronization model to investigate the involvement of adrenergic α1 receptors (R, α1R) and dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs) on modafinil-induced desynchronization in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were treated with cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine and monoamine depletor reserpine to produce experimental EEG synchronization characterized by continuous large-amplitude synchronized activity, with prominent increased delta and decreased theta, alpha, and beta power density. The results showed that modafinil produced an EEG desynchronization in the model. This was characterized by a general decrease in amplitude of all the frequency bands between 0 and 20 Hz, a prominent reduction in delta power density, and an increase in theta power density. Adrenergic α1R antagonist terazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely antagonized the EEG desynchronization effects of modafinil at 90 mg/kg. However, DA D1R and D2R blockers partially attenuated the effects of modafinil. The modafinil-induced decrease in the amplitudes of the delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves and in delta power density were completely abolished by pretreatment with a combination of the D1R antagonist SCH 23390 (30 µg/kg) and the D2R antagonist raclopride (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that modafinil-mediated desynchronization may be attributed to the activation of adrenergic α1R, and dopaminergic D1R and D2R in a model of EEG synchronization. PMID:24116090

  6. Performance evaluation of a motor-imagery-based EEG-Brain computer interface using a combined cue with heterogeneous training data in BCI-Naive subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Youngbum

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subjects in EEG-Brain computer interface (BCI system experience difficulties when attempting to obtain the consistent performance of the actual movement by motor imagery alone. It is necessary to find the optimal conditions and stimuli combinations that affect the performance factors of the EEG-BCI system to guarantee equipment safety and trust through the performance evaluation of using motor imagery characteristics that can be utilized in the EEG-BCI testing environment. Methods The experiment was carried out with 10 experienced subjects and 32 naive subjects on an EEG-BCI system. There were 3 experiments: The experienced homogeneous experiment, the naive homogeneous experiment and the naive heterogeneous experiment. Each experiment was compared in terms of the six audio-visual cue combinations and consisted of 50 trials. The EEG data was classified using the least square linear classifier in case of the naive subjects through the common spatial pattern filter. The accuracy was calculated using the training and test data set. The p-value of the accuracy was obtained through the statistical significance test. Results In the case in which a naive subject was trained by a heterogeneous combined cue and tested by a visual cue, the result was not only the highest accuracy (p Conclusions We propose the use of this measuring methodology of a heterogeneous combined cue for training data and a visual cue for test data by the typical EEG-BCI algorithm on the EEG-BCI system to achieve effectiveness in terms of consistence, stability, cost, time, and resources management without the need for a trial and error process.

  7. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  8. Improving EEG signal peak detection using feature weight learning ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asrul Adam

    Neural network with random weights (NNRW); feature weight learning (FWL); electroencephalogram (EEG); peak detection algorithm; pattern recognition; particle swarm optimization (PSO). 1. Introduction. The utilization of peak detection algorithms has emerged as a useful tool in several physiological signal applications,.

  9. ECG contamination of EEG signals: effect on entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Dhritiman; Bansal, Sonia

    2016-02-01

    Entropy™ is a proprietary algorithm which uses spectral entropy analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals to produce indices which are used as a measure of depth of hypnosis. We describe a report of electrocardiographic (ECG) contamination of EEG signals leading to fluctuating erroneous Entropy values. An explanation is provided for mechanism behind this observation by describing the spread of ECG signals in head and neck and its influence on EEG/Entropy by correlating the observation with the published Entropy algorithm. While the Entropy algorithm has been well conceived, there are still instances in which it can produce erroneous values. Such erroneous values and their cause may be identified by close scrutiny of the EEG waveform if Entropy values seem out of sync with that expected at given anaesthetic levels.

  10. EEG feature selection method based on decision tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lijuan; Ge, Hui; Ma, Wei; Miao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to solve automated feature selection problem in brain computer interface (BCI). In order to automate feature selection process, we proposed a novel EEG feature selection method based on decision tree (DT). During the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal processing, a feature extraction method based on principle component analysis (PCA) was used, and the selection process based on decision tree was performed by searching the feature space and automatically selecting optimal features. Considering that EEG signals are a series of non-linear signals, a generalized linear classifier named support vector machine (SVM) was chosen. In order to test the validity of the proposed method, we applied the EEG feature selection method based on decision tree to BCI Competition II datasets Ia, and the experiment showed encouraging results.

  11. An unsupervised subject identification technique using EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-08-01

    In this work, EEG spectral features of different subjects are uniquely mapped into a 2D feature space. Such distinctive 2D features pave the way to identify subjects from their EEG spectral characteristics in an unsupervised manner without any prior knowledge. First, we extract power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands. Next, we use t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding to map data points from high dimensional space in a visible 2D space. Such non-linear data embedding method visualizes different subjects' data points as well-separated islands in two dimensions. We use a fuzzy c-means clustering technique to identify different subjects without any prior knowledge. The experimental results show that our proposed method efficiently (precision greater than 90%) discriminates 10 subjects using only the spectral information within their EEG signals.

  12. Interhemispheric asynchrony of the sleep EEG in northern fur seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhametov, L M; Lyamin, O I; Polyakova, I G

    1985-08-15

    In northern fur seals the two brain hemispheres can generate the EEG slow waves during sleep not only simultaneously, as in all the terrestrial mammals investigated, but also independently as in dolphins.

  13. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  14. Prognostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in successfully resuscitated patients used in daily clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    electroencephalography (EEG) patterns and mortality in a clinical cohort of OHCA-patients. METHODS: From 2002 to 2011 consecutive patients were admitted to an intensive-care-unit after resuscitation from OHCA. Utstein-criteria for pre-hospital data and review of individual patients' charts for post-resuscitation care......-suppression in 17 (8%) patients. A favourable EEG pattern (reactivity, favourable background frequency and RDA) was independently associated with reduced mortality with hazard ratio (HR) 0.43 (95%CI: 0.24-0.76), p=0.004 (false positive rate: 31%) and a non-favourable EEG pattern (no reactivity, unfavourable...... such as Rhythmic Delta Activity (RDA) seem to be associated with a better prognosis, whereas suppressed voltage and burst-suppression patterns were associated with poor prognosis....

  15. Sri Lanka; Background Papers

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1995-01-01

    This Background Paper on Sri Lanka provides information on the economic developments during 1992–95. Developments in the domestic and external sectors are discussed. The deficiencies of the official consumer price index that resulted in a substantial understatement of inflation performance in 1994 and alternative estimates of underlying inflation are described. The structural rigidities in the labor market that perpetuate high unemployment and limit job growth are also described. The paper al...

  16. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarper, Nazan; Akansel, Guer; Aydogan, Metin; Gedikbasi, Demet; Babaoglu, Kadir; Goekalp, Ayse Sevim

    2002-01-01

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  17. Classification of independent components of EEG into multiple artifact classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Laura; Andersen, Tobias; Mørup, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to automatically identify multiple artifact types in EEG. We used multinomial regression to classify independent components of EEG data, selecting from 65 spatial, spectral, and temporal features of independent components using forward selection. The classifier identified...... neural and five nonneural types of components. Between subjects within studies, high classification performances were obtained. Between studies, however, classification was more difficult. For neural versus nonneural classifications, performance was on par with previous results obtained by others. We...

  18. Scalable EEG interpretation using Deep Learning and Schema Descriptors

    OpenAIRE

    Picone, Joseph; Obeid, Iyad; Harabagiu, Sanda

    2016-01-01

    •Focus on addressing a critical market gap in EEG technology – real-time seizure detection for intensive care unit (ICU) and epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) applications. •The ability to auto-scan EEGs and predict seizures in advance will be a transformational clinical technology. Existing products that seek to increase accuracy and productivity via automatic analysis are limited by high rates of false positives, overwhelming healthcare providers with misleading ...

  19. Bayesian Correlated Component Analysis for inference of joint EEG activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Kamronn, Simon Due; Parra, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic generative multi-view model to test the representational universality of human information processing. The model is tested in simulated data and in a well-established benchmark EEG dataset.......We propose a probabilistic generative multi-view model to test the representational universality of human information processing. The model is tested in simulated data and in a well-established benchmark EEG dataset....

  20. Emotion classification using single-channel scalp-EEG recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilifard, Amir; Brigante Pizzolato, Ednaldo; Kafiul Islam, Md

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have found evidence for corticolimbic Theta electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillation in the neural processing of visual stimuli perceived as fear or threatening scene. Recent studies showed that neural oscillations' patterns in Theta, Alpha, Beta and Gamma sub-bands play a main role in brain's emotional processing. The main goal of this study is to classify two different emotional states by means of EEG data recorded through a single-electrode EEG headset. Nineteen young subjects participated in an EEG experiment while watching a video clip that evoked three emotional states: neutral, relaxation and scary. Following each video clip, participants were asked to report on their subjective affect by giving a score between 0 to 10. First, recorded EEG data were preprocessed by stationary wavelet transform (SWT) based denoising to remove artifacts. Afterward, the distribution of power in time-frequency space was obtained using short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and then, the mean value of energy was calculated for each EEG sub-band. Finally, 46 features, as the mean energy of frequency bands between 4 and 50 Hz, containing 689 instances - for each subject -were collected in order to classify the emotional states. Our experimental results show that EEG dynamics induced by horror and relaxing movies can be classified with average classification rate of 92% using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We also compared the performance of SVM to K-nearest neighbors (K-NN). The results show that K-NN achieves a better classification rate by 94% accuracy. The findings of this work are expected to pave the way to a new horizon in neuroscience by proving the point that only single-channel EEG data carry enough information for emotion classification.

  1. Behavioral and EEG Correlates of Reduced Executive Functioning in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Espano, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to orphanage care or other deprived conditions represent a contributing risk factor in the development of ADHD behaviors. Upon leaving these contexts, the resting EEG patterns found in post-institutionalized (PI) children resemble the EEG profile of children with behavior problems, such as inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Specifically, this atypical pattern consists of increased theta power relative to other power spectra and decreased alpha power. This study examined if ...

  2. Clinical significance of dynamic measurements of seric TNF-α, HMGBl, and NSE levels and aEEG monitoring in neonatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-H; Zhang, B-L; Guo, S-M; Wang, P; Yang, J-W

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the clinical value of monitoring blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), high mobility group protein Bl (HMGBl), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and examining an amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram (aEEG) for the diagnosis and short-term prognosis of brain damage caused by neonatal asphyxia. Sixty full-term neonates born in Yidu Central Hospital from January to December 2015 were enrolled in the study. The neonates were classified into one of 3 groups: 23 neonates in the mild asphyxia group, 7 in a severe asphyxia group and 30 in a control group admitted to the NICU but without asphyxia. The neonates presenting asphyxia received standard neonatal resuscitation before they were transferred to the NICU. The dynamic changes of the umbilical artery/peripheral blood TNF-α, HMGBl, and NSE levels and aEEG results were monitored and compared among the groups. The umbilical artery and serum TNF-α, HMGBl, and NSE levels at day 1 were significantly higher in the two asphyxia groups than in the control group; and the values were higher in the severe asphyxia group (p neonates with abnormal aEEG results at 6 hours postpartum had higher serum TNF-α, HMGBl and NSE levels than those with normal aEEG results (p neonatal asphyxia.

  3. Linear dynamic models for classification of single-trial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samdin, S Balqis; Ting, Chee-Ming; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Ariff, A K; Mohd Noor, A B

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of linear dynamic models (LDMs) to improve classification of single-trial EEG signals. Existing dynamic classification of EEG uses discrete-state hidden Markov models (HMMs) based on piecewise-stationary assumption, which is inadequate for modeling the highly non-stationary dynamics underlying EEG. The continuous hidden states of LDMs could better describe this continuously changing characteristic of EEG, and thus improve the classification performance. We consider two examples of LDM: a simple local level model (LLM) and a time-varying autoregressive (TVAR) state-space model. AR parameters and band power are used as features. Parameter estimation of the LDMs is performed by using expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. We also investigate different covariance modeling of Gaussian noises in LDMs for EEG classification. The experimental results on two-class motor-imagery classification show that both types of LDMs outperform the HMM baseline, with the best relative accuracy improvement of 14.8% by LLM with full covariance for Gaussian noises. It may due to that LDMs offer more flexibility in fitting the underlying dynamics of EEG.

  4. Headache in the paediatrics patients, clinical-EEG Correlation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Lizano Rabelo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive study was made, with the objective to describe to a clinical group of variables epidemiologists and of laboratory of 108 patients to whom it was made to them and EEG and whose fundamental symptom was the headache; in the period January to December of 2009. The data was taken from the registry of patients of the neurophysiology department of Paediatric Hospital. The variables of the study were: age, sex, type of headache, results of the EEG, and characteristics of pathological EEG activity. The results were expressed in graphical and analyzed tables and of percentage form. The patients of 14 to 16 years predominated (40,7%, female patient (53,7%, clinically the observed recurrent acute migraine in 60 cases was the one that prevailed, as well as normality in the EEG (81,5%, the pathological cases we observed focal paroxysms in 15 patients (75% and focal alterations in 80% of the pathological EEG. Conclusions: In our environment the migraine in the paediatric patient is a frequent pathology that motivates the accomplishment of diverse studies among them the EEG, being this normal one in most of the cases and the non-specific alterations, the recurrent acute migraine and female patients prevailed.

  5. Categorisation of Mobile EEG: A Researcher’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Bateson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are increasingly attempting to undertake electroencephalography (EEG recordings in novel environments and contexts outside of the traditional static laboratory setting. The term “mobile EEG,” although commonly used to describe many of these undertakings, is ambiguous, since it attempts to encompass a wide range of EEG device mobility, participant mobility, and system specifications used across investigations. To provide quantitative parameters for “mobile EEG,” we developed a Categorisation of Mobile EEG (CoME scheme based upon scoring of device mobility (D, from 0, off-body, to 5, head-mounted with no additional equipment, participant mobility (P, from 0, static, to 5, unconstrained running, system specification (S, from 4, lowest, to 20, highest, and number of channels (C used. The CoME scheme was applied to twenty-nine published mobile EEG studies. Device mobility scores ranged from 0D to 4D, participant mobility scores from 0P to 4P, and system specification scores from 6S to 17S. The format of the scores for the four parameters is given, for example, as (2D, 4P, 17S, 32C and readily enables comparisons across studies. Our CoME scheme enables researchers to quantify the degree of device mobility, participant mobility, and system specification used in their “mobile EEG” investigations in a standardised way.

  6. A three domain covariance framework for EEG/MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roś, Beata P; Bijma, Fetsje; de Gunst, Mathisca C M; de Munck, Jan C

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a covariance framework for the analysis of single subject EEG and MEG data that takes into account observed temporal stationarity on small time scales and trial-to-trial variations. We formulate a model for the covariance matrix, which is a Kronecker product of three components that correspond to space, time and epochs/trials, and consider maximum likelihood estimation of the unknown parameter values. An iterative algorithm that finds approximations of the maximum likelihood estimates is proposed. Our covariance model is applicable in a variety of cases where spontaneous EEG or MEG acts as source of noise and realistic noise covariance estimates are needed, such as in evoked activity studies, or where the properties of spontaneous EEG or MEG are themselves the topic of interest, like in combined EEG-fMRI experiments in which the correlation between EEG and fMRI signals is investigated. We use a simulation study to assess the performance of the estimator and investigate the influence of different assumptions about the covariance factors on the estimated covariance matrix and on its components. We apply our method to real EEG and MEG data sets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces Correa, A; Laciar, E; Patino, H D; Valentinuzzi, M E

    2007-01-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records

  8. Predicting EEG complexity from sleep macro and microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouvarda, I; Maglaveras, N; Mendez, M O; Rosso, V; Parrino, L; Grassi, A; Terzano, M; Bianchi, A M; Cerutti, S

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the relation between the complexity of electroencephalography (EEG) signal, as measured by fractal dimension (FD), and normal sleep structure in terms of its macrostructure and microstructure. Sleep features are defined, encoding sleep stage and cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) related information, both in short and long term. The relevance of each sleep feature to the EEG FD is investigated, and the most informative ones are depicted. In order to quantitatively assess the relation between sleep characteristics and EEG dynamics, a modeling approach is proposed which employs subsets of the sleep macrostructure and microstructure features as input variables and predicts EEG FD based on these features of sleep micro/macrostructure. Different sleep feature sets are investigated along with linear and nonlinear models. Findings suggest that the EEG FD time series is best predicted by a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) model, employing both sleep stage/transitions and CAP features at different time scales depending on the EEG activation subtype. This combination of features suggests that short-term and long-term history of macro and micro sleep events interact in a complex manner toward generating the dynamics of sleep

  9. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  10. Corrected Four-Sphere Head Model for EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Næss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The EEG signal is generated by electrical brain cell activity, often described in terms of current dipoles. By applying EEG forward models we can compute the contribution from such dipoles to the electrical potential recorded by EEG electrodes. Forward models are key both for generating understanding and intuition about the neural origin of EEG signals as well as inverse modeling, i.e., the estimation of the underlying dipole sources from recorded EEG signals. Different models of varying complexity and biological detail are used in the field. One such analytical model is the four-sphere model which assumes a four-layered spherical head where the layers represent brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, skull, and scalp, respectively. While conceptually clear, the mathematical expression for the electric potentials in the four-sphere model is cumbersome, and we observed that the formulas presented in the literature contain errors. Here, we derive and present the correct analytical formulas with a detailed derivation. A useful application of the analytical four-sphere model is that it can serve as ground truth to test the accuracy of numerical schemes such as the Finite Element Method (FEM. We performed FEM simulations of the four-sphere head model and showed that they were consistent with the corrected analytical formulas. For future reference we provide scripts for computing EEG potentials with the four-sphere model, both by means of the correct analytical formulas and numerical FEM simulations.

  11. Methodological aspects of EEG and Body dynamics measurements during motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro eReis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available EEG involves recording, analysis, and interpretation of voltages recorded on the human scalp originating from brain grey matter. EEG is one of the favorite methods to study and understand processes that underlie behavior. This is so, because EEG is relatively cheap, easy to wear, light weight and has high temporal resolution. In terms of behavior, this encompasses actions, such as movements, that are performed in response to the environment. However, there are methodological difficulties when recording EEG during movement such as movement artifacts. Thus, most studies about the human brain have examined activations during static conditions. This article attempts to compile and describe relevant methodological solutions that emerged in order to measure body and brain dynamics during motion. These descriptions cover suggestions of how to avoid and reduce motion artifacts, hardware, software and techniques for synchronously recording EEG, EMG, kinematics, kinetics and eye movements during motion. Additionally, we present various recording systems, EEG electrodes, caps and methods for determination of real/custom electrode positions. In the end we will conclude that it is possible to record and analyze synchronized brain and body dynamics related to movement or exercise tasks.

  12. Synchronizing MIDI and wireless EEG measurements during natural piano performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamm, Anna; Palmer, Caroline; Bauer, Anna-Katharina R; Bleichner, Martin G; Demos, Alexander P; Debener, Stefan

    2017-07-08

    Although music performance has been widely studied in the behavioural sciences, less work has addressed the underlying neural mechanisms, perhaps due to technical difficulties in acquiring high-quality neural data during tasks requiring natural motion. The advent of wireless electroencephalography (EEG) presents a solution to this problem by allowing for neural measurement with minimal motion artefacts. In the current study, we provide the first validation of a mobile wireless EEG system for capturing the neural dynamics associated with piano performance. First, we propose a novel method for synchronously recording music performance and wireless mobile EEG. Second, we provide results of several timing tests that characterize the timing accuracy of our system. Finally, we report EEG time domain and frequency domain results from N=40 pianists demonstrating that wireless EEG data capture the unique temporal signatures of musicians' performances with fine-grained precision and accuracy. Taken together, we demonstrate that mobile wireless EEG can be used to measure the neural dynamics of piano performance with minimal motion constraints. This opens many new possibilities for investigating the brain mechanisms underlying music performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Generalized Information Equilibrium Approaches to EEG Sleep Stage Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Zorick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroscience have raised the hypothesis that the underlying pattern of neuronal activation which results in electroencephalography (EEG signals is via power-law distributed neuronal avalanches, while EEG signals are nonstationary. Therefore, spectral analysis of EEG may miss many properties inherent in such signals. A complete understanding of such dynamical systems requires knowledge of the underlying nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In recent work by Fielitz and Borchardt (2011, 2014, the concept of information equilibrium (IE in information transfer processes has successfully characterized many different systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium. We utilized a publicly available database of polysomnogram EEG data from fourteen subjects with eight different one-minute tracings of sleep stage 2 and waking and an overlapping set of eleven subjects with eight different one-minute tracings of sleep stage 3. We applied principles of IE to model EEG as a system that transfers (equilibrates information from the time domain to scalp-recorded voltages. We find that waking consciousness is readily distinguished from sleep stages 2 and 3 by several differences in mean information transfer constants. Principles of IE applied to EEG may therefore prove to be useful in the study of changes in brain function more generally.

  14. First seizure: EEG and neuroimaging following an epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd; Newton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An early EEG (within 48 h) and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hr_MRI) are the methods of choice for an accurate diagnosis after a first seizure presentation. Together with a careful history and examination, they will allow definition of the epilepsy syndrome in two-thirds of patients and help assess the individual risk for seizure recurrence, which is determined by the specific syndrome and is highest with focal epileptiform activity on EEG. Despite the heterogeneity of first seizure studies, EEG and etiology are consistently found to be the best predictors for seizure recurrence and prognosis. The additional yield of sleep-deprived EEG and sleep EEG is uncertain; yet MRI is essential for detecting brain tumors and other structural bases for new epilepsy. The rate occurrence of remote symptomatic seizures increases significantly with age and the most common etiology in the elderly with a first seizure is stroke; however, its exact relevance to epileptogenicity is yet to be defined. There is a striking lack of systematic studies using early EEG and hr_MRI in order to better characterize epileptogenic areas and elucidate the mechanisms of seizure provocation.

  15. Bluetooth Communication Interface for EEG Signal Recording in Hyperbaric Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastena, Lucio; Formaggio, Emanuela; Faralli, Fabio; Melucci, Massimo; Rossi, Marco; Gagliardi, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Lucio; Storti, Silvia F

    2015-07-01

    Recording biological signals inside a hyperbaric chamber poses technical challenges (the steel walls enclosing it greatly attenuate or completely block the signals as in a Faraday cage), practical (lengthy cables creating eddy currents), and safety (sparks hazard from power supply to the electronic apparatus inside the chamber) which can be overcome with new wireless technologies. In this technical report we present the design and implementation of a Bluetooth system for electroencephalographic (EEG) recording inside a hyperbaric chamber and describe the feasibility of EEG signal transmission outside the chamber. Differently from older systems, this technology allows the online recording of amplified signals, without interference from eddy currents. In an application of this technology, we measured EEG activity in professional divers under three experimental conditions in a hyperbaric chamber to determine how oxygen, assumed at a constant hyperbaric pressure of 2.8 ATA , affects the bioelectrical activity. The EEG spectral power estimated by fast Fourier transform and the cortical sources of the EEG rhythms estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic analysis were analyzed in three different EEG acquisitions: breathing air at sea level; breathing oxygen at a simulated depth of 18 msw, and breathing air at sea level after decompression.

  16. Do sleep-deprived EEG recordings reflect spike index as found in full-night EEG recordings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Pål G; Evsiukova, Tatiana; Brockmeier, Frans; Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar

    2010-11-01

    The sleep EEGs of many children with neurodevelopmental disorders reveal epileptiform activity. The aim of this study was to compare spike index (SI) in full-night recordings with SI in sleep-deprived EEGs in the morning; EEGs were obtained over 24 hours using ambulatory equipment. Sixteen children between the ages of 7 and 12 years were included in the study. They had to wake up at 3:00 AM and go to sleep again at 7:30 AM. Epileptiform activity was quantified, and SIs of full-night and morning recordings were compared. Two patients did not fall asleep. In one recording there was a technical problem that made calculations impossible. SIs calculated from EEGs obtained during a short nap in the morning were comparable to those calculated from full-night recordings. There seems to be a higher failure rate during morning recordings because of patients not falling asleep. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The risk of menstrual abnormalities after tubal sterilization: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    shobeiri, Mehri Jafari; AtashKhoii, Simin

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Tubal sterilization is the method of family planning most commonly used. The existence of the post-tubal-ligation syndrome of menstrual abnormalities has been the subject of debate for decades. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 112 women with the history of Pomeroy type of tubal ligation achieved by minilaparatomy as the case group and 288 women with no previous tubal ligation as the control group were assessed for menstrual abnormalities. Results Menstrual abnormalities...

  18. Family Background and Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Matthew J.; Sol, Joeri; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Vast amounts of money are currently being spent on policies aimed at promoting entrepreneurship. The success of such policies, however, rests in part on the assumption that individuals are not ‘born entrepreneurs’. In this paper, we assess the importance of family background and neighborhood...... effects as determinants of entrepreneurship. We start by estimating sibling correlations in entrepreneurship. We find that between 20 and 50 percent of the variance in different entrepreneurial outcomes is explained by factors that siblings share. The average is 28 percent. Allowing for differential...... entrepreneurship does play a large role, as do shared genes....

  19. Background and introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; van der Voordt, Theo; Coenen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    in scope between FM and CREM is that CREM has its focus on real estate as physical and economical assets utilized by an organisation, while FM has a wider service focus. The difference in scope between FM and CREM on one side and B2B marketing on the other is that FM and CREM are related to organisations...... background information to understand the following chapters in this book. Research limitations: The chapter is mainly based on the experience and knowledge of the editors. It does not include original research but provides an introductory overview of the book. Originality/value: This chapter takes a look...

  20. Malaysia; Background Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This Background Paper on Malaysia examines developments and trends in the labor market since the mid-1980s. The paper describes the changes in the employment structure and the labor force. It reviews wages and productivity trends and their effects on unit labor cost. The paper highlights that Malaysia’s rapid growth, sustained since 1987, has had a major impact on the labor market. The paper outlines the major policy measures to address the labor constraints. It also analyzes Malaysia’s recen...

  1. The influence of amplifier, interface and biological noise on signal quality in high-resolution EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Hans J; Sander, Tilmann; Trahms, Lutz

    2006-02-01

    First, the intrinsic random noise sources of a biopotential measurement in general are reviewed. For the special case of an electroencephalographic (EEG) measurement we have extended the commonly used amplifier noise model by biological generated background noise. As the strongest of all noise sources involved will dominate the resulting signal to noise ratio (S/N), we have investigated under which conditions this will be the case. We illustrate experimentally that up to 100 Hz S/N practically depends only on cortical generated background noise, while at a few hundred Hz or more amplifier and thermal noise of interelectrode resistance are the major sources.

  2. [Acoustic evoked driving reactions in the EEG and their conditioning related to the personality factor extraversion-introversion (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidmayer, I; Schulter, G

    1980-12-01

    Clicks were delivered in trains of 2,5 s duration at click repetition rates of 5 or 8/s to provoke rhythmical activity in the vertex-EEG ('driving response') and to condition the driving response to neutral stimuli in a discrimination paradigm. The Eysenck Personality Inventory was administered to define an independent personality variable, i.e. extraversion-introversion; the interaction of background activity, driving and conditioned driving response with the personality dimension was analyzed. In the background EEG there was a significant difference in the absolute power of the fast alpha-band between introverts and extraverts. Driving was only observed in the fundamental frequency of acoustic stimulation, not in the first harmonic. There was no interaction between driving response and extraversion-introversion or resting EEG activity. Classical conditioning of the driving response was successful with introverts only. Results were interpreted within the framework of Eysenck's personality theory. The possibility to study neurophysiological correlates of memory processes in humans by means of conditioned driving responses is discussed.

  3. Triorchidism: A Rare Genitourinary Abnormality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During early adulthood it will be carried out by palpation, ultrasonography, semen analysis, serum testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone levels and during late adulthood follow up will be done by ultrasonography for malignancy every 2 years. CONCLUSION. Polyorchidism is a rare genitourinary abnormality and its.

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2007-03-01

    Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup (3q), dup (11p), inv (11), dup (1q), del (1q), dup (4q), dup (5p), dup (6q), del (9p), dup (15q), dup(17q), Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD) such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  5. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  6. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  7. Decreased coherence in higher frequency ranges (beta and gamma) between central and frontal EEG in patients with schizophrenia: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeragani, Vikram Kumar; Cashmere, David; Miewald, Jean; Tancer, Manuel; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2006-01-30

    Schizophrenia is associated with a dysfunction of cognitive integration that may be due to abnormalities in inhibitory neural circuitry. A previous study found a failure of gamma band (25-45 Hz) synchronization in patients with schizophrenia compared to controls. Another recent study also stressed the importance of investigating high frequencies in the scalp-recorded sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). In this study, we compared coherence between first episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (n=8) and age- and sex-matched normal controls (n=8) using two 32-s epochs of C4 and F4 EEG. The coherence was obtained using 4096 data points (128 Hz signal) using cross-spectral analysis with Blackman-Tukey window in beta (15.25-24.75 Hz) and gamma (25-44.75 Hz) frequency bands. We used wake, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep periods for the analyses. Our results show a significant decrease in coherence in both beta and gamma frequency bands in patients. Post-hoc 't' tests revealed a significantly lower coherence only during the wake stage in patients with schizophrenia in beta as well as gamma frequency bands. These results further support the importance of the analyses of high-frequency bands in the EEG and support previous findings of abnormal neural synchrony in patients with schizophrenia. These results have been discussed further in relation to wake and sleep stages.

  8. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Benjamin; Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven R

    2015-01-01

    and characteristics of persistent pain after abdominoplasty, which is one of the most frequent cosmetic surgical procedures. METHODS: In September 2014, a link to a web-based questionnaire was mailed to 217 patients who had undergone abdominoplasty between 2006 and 2014 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg......BACKGROUND: Persistent postsurgical pain is a well-recognized problem after a number of common surgical procedures, such as amputation, thoracotomy, and inguinal hernia repair. Less is known about persistent pain after cosmetic surgical procedures. We, therefore, decided to study the incidence...... University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. RESULTS: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire...

  9. Holy Psychopathology Batman: The Pedagogical Use of Comic Books in the Teaching of Abnormal Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Reece O.; Zeglin, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Many undergraduate psychology students eventually choose a career providing clinical mental health services. A background in abnormal psychology (psychopathology) is helpful and requisite in these graduate academic and future professional venues. The creativity needed to adequately teach the complex material covered in most abnormal psychology…

  10. Prevalence of abnormal general movements in three-month-old infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, Hylco; Dijk-Stigter, Geerteke R.; Grooten, Hedwig M. J.; Janssen-Plas, Femke E. M.; Koopmans, Alice J.; Mulder, Christien D.; van Belle, Ans; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background: The quality of general movements (GMs) is a sensitive tool to measure neurodevelopmental condition in early infancy. No information is available on prevalence rates of abnormal GMs in the general population. Objective: To assess the prevalence of abnormal GMs in the general population of

  11. Abnormal glucose metabolism in acute myocardial infarction: influence on left ventricular function and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høfsten, Dan E; Løgstrup, Brian B; Møller, Jacob E

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the influence of abnormal glucose metabolism on left ventricular (LV) function and prognosis in 203 patients with acute myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: Abnormal glucose metabolism is associated with increased mortality after acute myocardial infarction. This appears to b...... alone did not explain the excess mortality in patients with newly detected or known diabetes....

  12. Is screening for abnormal ECG patterns justified in long-term follow-up of childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracyclines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourier, M.S.; Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A.M.C.; Loonen, J.J.; Bokkerink, J.P.M.; Roeleveld, N.; Beer, G.; Bellersen, L.; Kapusta, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ECG and echocardiography are noninvasive screening tools to detect subclinical cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs). Our aims were as follows: (1) assess the prevalence of abnormal ECG patterns, (2) determine the agreement between abnormal ECG patterns and

  13. Dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings: empirical mode methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Khramova, Marina V.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-04-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for removing noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings based on empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). As physiological artifacts we consider specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the proposed method with steps including empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing these empirical modes and reconstructing of initial EEG signal. We show the efficiency of the method on the example of filtration of human EEG signal from eye-moving artifacts.

  14. Multimodal EEG Recordings, Psychometrics and Behavioural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeijinga, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of neuronal activity are preferably combined. In an overview on how this approach can take shape, multimodal electroencephalography (EEG) is treated in 2 main parts: by experiments without a task and in the experimentally cued working brain. It concentrates first on the alpha rhythm properties and next on data-driven search for patterns such as the default mode network. The high-resolution volumic distributions of neuronal metabolic indices result in distributed cortical regions and possibly relate to numerous nuclei, observable in a non-invasive manner in the central nervous system of humans. The second part deals with paradigms in which nowadays assessment of target-related networks can align level-dependent blood oxygenation, electrical responses and behaviour, taking the temporal resolution advantages of event-related potentials. Evidence-based electrical propagation in serial tasks during performance is now to a large extent attributed to interconnected pathways, particularly chronometry-dependent ones, throughout a chain including a dorsal stream, next ventral cortical areas taking the flow of information towards inferior temporal domains. The influence of aging is documented, and results of the first multimodal studies in neuropharmacology are consistent. Finally a scope on implementation of advanced clinical applications and personalized marker strategies in neuropsychiatry is indicated. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Dipole localization using simulated intracerebral EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nathalie; Gulrajani, Ramesh; Gotman, Jean

    2005-11-01

    In the clinical interpretation of intracerebral EEGs, epileptic foci are commonly identified by visually analyzing the amplitude of the potentials. This is potentially misleading since electrodes record activity from several sources, but the nearest ones generate large amplitudes that can overpower distant sources. Our objective was to improve foci detection in intracerebral recordings by applying source localization methods. Data were simulated by placing 3 sources in a semi-infinite medium near 3 intracerebral electrodes. Potentials were generated and contaminated with white and correlated noise. Two inverse problem algorithms, beamforming and RAP-MUSIC, were used to calculate equivalent dipoles. Simulations for each noise types showed that the two methods detected the source locations accurately, with RAP-MUSIC reporting lower orientation errors. With correlated noise, beamforming reconstructed original source waveforms poorly. A spatial resolution analysis was performed, in which beamforming adequately distinguished sources separated by 1.2 cm, whereas RAP-MUSIC separated sources as close as 0.4-0.6 cm. Both source localization methods proved useful in detecting the location of dipolar sources based on simulated intracerebral potentials. For all simulations, RAP-MUSIC was more accurate than beamforming. It is possible to use source localization methods traditionally applied to scalp recordings for improving source detection from intracerebral recordings.

  16. Pump cavitation background noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.

    1976-01-01

    Cavitation is defined as the growth and collapse of cavities associated with the change in pressure in contrast to the case of boiling where change in temperature is the dominating factor. It is commonly accepted that cavitation inception occurs when the minimum pressure in a system reaches the vapor pressure corresponding to the local temperatures of the liquid. The foregoing statement is, in fact, another way of defining incipient boiling which is usually defined as the condition where the temperature reaches the saturation temperature corresponding to the system pressure. Therefore, there is no difference between cavitation and boiling since both are associated with the growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. Cavitation noise may not be avoidable for an LMFBR primary pump under normal operating conditions, and will be present as background during boiling detection by acoustic methods

  17. Structural Brain Abnormalities in Successfully Treated HIV Infection: Associations With Disease and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoest, Rosan A.; Underwood, Jonathan; de Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Cole, James H.; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Zetterberg, Henrik; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Portegies, Peter; Winston, Alan; Sharp, David J.; Gisslén, Magnus; Reiss, Peter; Winston, A.; Prins, M.; Schim van der Loeff, M. F.; Schouten, J.; Schmand, B.; Geurtsen, G. J.; Sharp, D. J.; Villaudy, J.; Berkhout, B.; Gisslén, M.; Pasternak, A.; Sabin, C. A.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Libert, C.; Franceschi, C.; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, E.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; van der Valk, M.; Bisschop, P. H.; Zaheri, S.; Burger, D.; Cole, J. H.; Zikkenheiner, W.; Janssen, F. R.; Underwood, J.; Kooij, K. W.; Doyle, N.; Verheij, E.; Verboeket, S. O.; Elsenga, B. C.; Hillebregt, M. M. J.; Ruijs, Y. M. C.; Benschop, D. P.; Tembo, L.; McDonald, L.; Stott, M.; Legg, K.; Lovell, A.; Erlwein, O.; Kingsley, C.; Norsworthy, P.; Mullaney, S.; Kruijer, T.; del Grande, L.; Olthof, V.; Visser, G. R.; May, L.; Verbraak, F.; Demirkaya, N.; Visser, I.; Su, T.; Leech, R.; Huguet, J.; Frankin, E.; van der Kuyl, A.; Weijer, K.; Siteur-van Rijnstra, E.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Maurer, I.; Mangas Ruiz, M. M.; Girigorie, A. F.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; de Graaff-Teulen, M.; Dewaele, S.; Garagnani, P.; Pirazzini, C.; Capri, M.; Dall'Olio, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Salvioli, S.; Fuchs, D.; Zetterberg, H.; Weber, D.; Grune, T.; Jansen, E. H. J. M.; de Francesco, D.; Sindlinger, T.; Oehlke, S.

    2018-01-01

    Background. Brain structural abnormalities have been reported in persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PLWH) who are receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Methods. We investigated factors associated with brain

  18. Monitoring alert and drowsy states by modeling EEG source nonstationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2017-10-01

    Objective. As a human brain performs various cognitive functions within ever-changing environments, states of the brain characterized by recorded brain activities such as electroencephalogram (EEG) are inevitably nonstationary. The challenges of analyzing the nonstationary EEG signals include finding neurocognitive sources that underlie different brain states and using EEG data to quantitatively assess the state changes. Approach. This study hypothesizes that brain activities under different states, e.g. levels of alertness, can be modeled as distinct compositions of statistically independent sources using independent component analysis (ICA). This study presents a framework to quantitatively assess the EEG source nonstationarity and estimate levels of alertness. The framework was tested against EEG data collected from 10 subjects performing a sustained-attention task in a driving simulator. Main results. Empirical results illustrate that EEG signals under alert versus drowsy states, indexed by reaction speeds to driving challenges, can be characterized by distinct ICA models. By quantifying the goodness-of-fit of each ICA model to the EEG data using the model deviation index (MDI), we found that MDIs were significantly correlated with the reaction speeds (r  =  ‑0.390 with alertness models and r  =  0.449 with drowsiness models) and the opposite correlations indicated that the two models accounted for sources in the alert and drowsy states, respectively. Based on the observed source nonstationarity, this study also proposes an online framework using a subject-specific ICA model trained with an initial (alert) state to track the level of alertness. For classification of alert against drowsy states, the proposed online framework achieved an averaged area-under-curve of 0.745 and compared favorably with a classic power-based approach. Significance. This ICA-based framework provides a new way to study changes of brain states and can be applied to

  19. EEG responses to visual landmarks in flying pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Alexei L; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Dell'Ariccia, Gaia; Abramchuk, Andrei N; Serkov, Andrei N; Latanov, Alexander V; Loizzo, Alberto; Wolfer, David P; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2009-07-28

    GPS analysis of flight trajectories of pigeons can reveal that topographic features influence their flight paths. Recording electrical brain activity that reflects attentional processing could indicate objects of interest that do not cause changes in the flight path. Therefore, we investigated whether crossing particular visual landmarks when homing from a familiar release site is associated with changes in EEG. Birds carried both data-loggers for recording GPS position and EEG during flight. First, we classified characteristic EEG frequencies of caged birds and found five main bands: A: 0-3, B: 3-12, C: 12-60, D: 60-130, and E: 130-200 Hz. We analyzed changes in these activity bands when pigeons were released over sea (a featureless environment) and over land. Passing over the coastline and other prominent landmarks produced a pattern of EEG alterations consisting of two phases: activation of EEG in the high-frequency bands (D and/or E), followed by activation of C. Overlaying the EEG activity with GPS tracks allowed us to identify topographical features of interest for the pigeons that were not recognizable by distinct changes of their flight path. We provide evidence that EEG analysis can identify landmarks and objects of interest during homing. Middle-frequency activity (C) reflects visual perception of prominent landmarks, whereas activation of higher frequencies (D and E) is linked with information processing at a higher level. Activation of E bands is likely to reflect an initial process of orientation and is not necessarily linked with processing of visual information.

  20. The electroclinical-imagiological spectrum and long-term outcome of transient periictal MRI abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Nuno; Breia, Paula; Soares, Pedro; Saraiva, Paulo; Calado, Sofia; Jordão, Constança; Vale, José

    2010-10-01

    The electroclinical-imagiological spectrum and long-term outcome of transient periictal MRI abnormalities (TPMA) remains largely unclear. This prompted us to perform a prospective observational cohort study, including electroencephalography (EEG) and multi-sequence MRI, in 19 consecutive patients (8 female, mean age 51.7 years) with TPMA induced by convulsive and non-convulsive status epilepticus (n=14) or isolated seizures. TPMA were associated with focal, lateralized or diffuse EEG abnormalities, and were mostly focal unilateral and cortico-subcortical (n=11), less frequently cortically restricted, bilateral, hemispheric and with remote lesions (pulvinar, cerebellum); 66.7% had cortico-pial contrast enhancement and 93.7% restriction on diffusion-weighted imaging, with cortical cytotoxic edema on apparent-diffusion coefficient, only tumor-like TPMA (n=5) presenting noticeable subcortical vasogenic edema. The heterogeneity of clinical, EEG and MRI findings contributed to a 38.6% strict focal topographic concordance between them, with the more widespread findings also attributable to the time lag between studies, seizure dynamics/etiologies and cerebral reserve. At follow-up (mean duration 29.6 months, 3-120), the brain damage induced by TPMA was responsible for a high incidence of clinical and MRI sequelae (63.2%), only tumor-like/small TPMA induced by acute symptomatic seizures presenting good clinical outcomes. Our findings may contribute to a better definition and comprehension of the TPMA electroclinical-imagiological spectrum, pathophysiology and long-term outcome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidental sinus abnormalities in 256 patients referred for brain MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanaati H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imaging abnormalities in the paranasal sinuses are regularly noted as incidental findings on MRI, however, little is known about their prevalence in the Iranian population. The purpose of this study was to classify these findings in the paranasal sinuses as seen on MRI and to investigate the prevalence, according to site and type of paranasal abnormality. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the T2-weighted axial MRI of 256 patients with diseases unrelated to their paranasal sinuses were reviewed between May 2002 and June 2003. The findings were categorized according to the anatomic location and the imaging characteristics of the abnormality. The abnormalities recorded included total sinus opacification, mucoperiosteal thickening >5mm, air fluid levels and retention cysts or polyps. Unilateral or bilateral involvement and septal deviation were also noted. A sinus was considered normal if it was fully aerated and no soft-tissue density was apparent within the cavity. Results: Among our cases, 111 (43.5% were male and 145 (56.5% were female. Of these patients, abnormalities in one or more of the sinus groups were found in 110 subjects (42.9%, 55.5% of which were male and 44.5% were female (P=0.001. Maxillary sinus abnormalities were observed in 66.4% of the patients, while ethmoid sinus abnormalities were found in 63.6%. Of the ethmoid abnormalities, 21% were found in the anterior section, 9% in the middle ethmoid, and 8% in the posterior ethmoid. The most common abnormality found was mucosal thickening. Among our cases, 23.4% had septal deviation, which was significantly higher among those with sinusitis (29% versus 19.1%; P<0.01. Of those patients with sinus involvement, 16% were involved in the sphenoid sinus and 5% in the frontal sinus. The results obtained from the patients with sinus abnormality revealed that 85% suffered from cough, nasal obstruction, runny nose, facial pain and post nasal discharge and 24% had been diagnosed

  2. A Novel Approach Based on Data Redundancy for Feature Extraction of EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hafeez Ullah; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Kamel, Nidal; Hussain, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Feature extraction and classification for electroencephalogram (EEG) in medical applications is a challenging task. The EEG signals produce a huge amount of redundant data or repeating information. This redundancy causes potential hurdles in EEG analysis. Hence, we propose to use this redundant information of EEG as a feature to discriminate and classify different EEG datasets. In this study, we have proposed a JPEG2000 based approach for computing data redundancy from multi-channels EEG signals and have used the redundancy as a feature for classification of EEG signals by applying support vector machine, multi-layer perceptron and k-nearest neighbors classifiers. The approach is validated on three EEG datasets and achieved high accuracy rate (95-99 %) in the classification. Dataset-1 includes the EEG signals recorded during fluid intelligence test, dataset-2 consists of EEG signals recorded during memory recall test, and dataset-3 has epileptic seizure and non-seizure EEG. The findings demonstrate that the approach has the ability to extract robust feature and classify the EEG signals in various applications including clinical as well as normal EEG patterns.

  3. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodulfo Garcia, Maikel; Tornes Perez, Victor Manuel; Castellanos Tardo, Juan Ramon

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  4. Glial abnormalities in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this article we review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders, and we discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. The goal is not to carry out a comprehensive review but to selectively discuss existing evidence in support of an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders.

  5. Abnormal Metabolite in Alcoholic Subjects,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    0.01 0.12 81 A.A. 51 M 0 ɘ.01 0.09 Schizophrenia 85a W.G. 67 M 0 ɘ.01 0.21 Proteins & Ketones in Urine b 0 ɘ.01 0.11 86a W.H. 67 M 0 ɘ.01 0.15 b 0...AD-AS 90 TOTTS GAP MEDICAL RESEARCH LABS INC BANGOR PA F/G 6/5 ABNORMAL METABOLITE IN ALCOHOLIC SUBJECTS, U) 1982 R L BEECH, M E FELVER, M R...LAKSCHMANAN NOOBIN 70 C 0233 UNJCLASSIFIED NL I ,I/ ABNORMAL METABOLITE IN ALCOHOLIC SUBJECTS Richard L . Veech, Michael E. Felver, M.R. Lakschmanan, Stewart

  6. Reduced GABA{sub A} receptor density contralateral to a potentially epileptogenic MRI abnormality in a patient with complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwert, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Stodieck, S.R.G. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Puskas, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Diehl, B. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Puskas, Z. [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schuierer, G. [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Vollet, B. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schober, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    Imaging cerebral GABA{sub A} receptor density (GRD) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 iomazenil is highly accurate in lateralizing epileptogenic foci in patients with complex partial seizures of temporal origin. Limited knowledge exists on how iomazenil SPET compares with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this regard. We present a patient with complex partial seizures in whom MRI had identified an arachnoid cyst anterior to the tip of the left temporal lobe. Contralaterally to this structural abnormality, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) performed after sleep deprivation disclosed an intermittent frontotemporal dysrhythmic focus with slow and sharp waves. On iomazenil SPET images GRD was significantly reduced in the right temporal lobe and thus contralaterally to the MRI abnormality, but ipsilaterally to the pathological EEG findings. These data suggest that iomazenil SPET may significantly contribute to the presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients even when MRI identifies potentialy epileptogenic structural lesions. (orig.)

  7. Symptomatic splenic hamartoma with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassarjian, A.; Patenaude, Y.G.; Bernard, C.; Bell, L.

    2001-01-01

    Background. There is a rare association between splenic hamartomas and hematological abnormalities with, to our knowledge, only 24 reported cases in the English literature. Patients and methods. We report a case of a splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old boy associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, multiple lobular capillary hemangiomas of the skin, hypertension, and anemia. Following imaging with ultrasonography, MRI, and nuclear scans, a hamartoma was suspected, but malignancy could not be excluded. The lesion was removed by partial splenectomy, and pathological examination confirmed the presence of a red pulp splenic hamartoma. Results. The renal, hematological, and dermatological abnormalities resolved following removal of the splenic hamartoma. This is the first reported case of a splenic hamartoma associated with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities and only the second reported case of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma treated by partial splenectomy. (orig.)

  8. Symptomatic splenic hamartoma with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassarjian, A.; Patenaude, Y.G. [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada); Bernard, C. [Dept. of Pathology, Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada); Bell, L. [Dept. of Nephrology, Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada)

    2001-02-01

    Background. There is a rare association between splenic hamartomas and hematological abnormalities with, to our knowledge, only 24 reported cases in the English literature. Patients and methods. We report a case of a splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old boy associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, multiple lobular capillary hemangiomas of the skin, hypertension, and anemia. Following imaging with ultrasonography, MRI, and nuclear scans, a hamartoma was suspected, but malignancy could not be excluded. The lesion was removed by partial splenectomy, and pathological examination confirmed the presence of a red pulp splenic hamartoma. Results. The renal, hematological, and dermatological abnormalities resolved following removal of the splenic hamartoma. This is the first reported case of a splenic hamartoma associated with renal, cutaneous, and hematological abnormalities and only the second reported case of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma treated by partial splenectomy. (orig.)

  9. Computed tomography abnormalities in hanging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, F.; Floris, R.

    1987-01-01

    The CT pattern of bilateral and symmetrical round low density areas in the globi pallidi has been observed in a young man who attempted suicide by hanging. These CT abnormalities are similar to those described in other conditions such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, cyanide and methanol poisoning, hypoglycaemia, drowning and acute global central nervous system hypoperfusion.The findings appear to be correlated with acute cerebral hypoxia. (orig.)

  10. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glia...

  11. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  12. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  13. Low background infrared (LBIR) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Low background infrared (LBIR) facility was originally designed to calibrate user supplied blackbody sources and to characterize low-background IR detectors and...

  14. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  15. Textile electrodes for EEG recording--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfhede, Johan; Seoane, Fernando; Thordstein, Magnus

    2012-12-07

    The overall aim of our research is to develop a monitoring system for neonatal intensive care units. Long-term EEG monitoring in newborns require that the electrodes don't harm the sensitive skin of the baby, an especially relevant feature for premature babies. Our approach to EEG monitoring is based on several electrodes distributed over the head of the baby, and since the weight of the head always will be on some of them, any type of hard electrode will inevitably cause a pressure-point that can irritate the skin. Therefore, we propose the use of soft conductive textiles as EEG electrodes, primarily for neonates, but also for other kinds of unobtrusive long-term monitoring. In this paper we have tested two types of textile electrodes on five healthy adults and compared them to standard high quality electrodes. The acquired signals were compared with respect to morphology, frequency distribution, spectral coherence, correlation and power line interference sensitivity, and the signals were found to be similar in most respects. The good measurement performance exhibited by the textile electrodes indicates that they are feasible candidates for EEG recording, opening the door for long-term EEG monitoring applications.

  16. Textile Electrodes for EEG Recording — A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfhede, Johan; Seoane, Fernando; Thordstein, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of our research is to develop a monitoring system for neonatal intensive care units. Long-term EEG monitoring in newborns require that the electrodes don’t harm the sensitive skin of the baby, an especially relevant feature for premature babies. Our approach to EEG monitoring is based on several electrodes distributed over the head of the baby, and since the weight of the head always will be on some of them, any type of hard electrode will inevitably cause a pressure-point that can irritate the skin. Therefore, we propose the use of soft conductive textiles as EEG electrodes, primarily for neonates, but also for other kinds of unobtrusive long-term monitoring. In this paper we have tested two types of textile electrodes on five healthy adults and compared them to standard high quality electrodes. The acquired signals were compared with respect to morphology, frequency distribution, spectral coherence, correlation and power line interference sensitivity, and the signals were found to be similar in most respects. The good measurement performance exhibited by the textile electrodes indicates that they are feasible candidates for EEG recording, opening the door for long-term EEG monitoring applications. PMID:23223149

  17. Quantitative change of EEG and respiration signals during mindfulness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahani, Asieh; Wahbeh, Helane; Nezamfar, Hooman; Miller, Meghan; Erdogmus, Deniz; Oken, Barry

    2014-05-14

    This study investigates measures of mindfulness meditation (MM) as a mental practice, in which a resting but alert state of mind is maintained. A population of older people with high stress level participated in this study, while electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiration signals were recorded during a MM intervention. The physiological signals during meditation and control conditions were analyzed with signal processing. EEG and respiration data were collected and analyzed on 34 novice meditators after a 6-week meditation intervention. Collected data were analyzed with spectral analysis, phase analysis and classification to evaluate an objective marker for meditation. Different frequency bands showed differences in meditation and control conditions. Furthermore, we established a classifier using EEG and respiration signals with a higher accuracy (85%) at discriminating between meditation and control conditions than a classifier using the EEG signal only (78%). Support vector machine (SVM) classifier with EEG and respiration feature vector is a viable objective marker for meditation ability. This classifier should be able to quantify different levels of meditation depth and meditation experience in future studies.

  18. Spectral EEG Features of a Short Psycho-physiological Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teplan Michal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Short-lasting psycho-physiological relaxation was investigated through an analysis of its bipolar electroencephalographic (EEG characteristics. In 8 subjects, 6-channel EEG data of 3-minute duration were recorded during 88 relaxation sessions. Time course of spectral EEG features was examined. Alpha powers were decreasing during resting conditions of 3-minute sessions in lying position with eyes closed. This was followed by a decrease of total power in centro-parietal cortex regions and an increase of beta power in fronto-central areas. Represented by EEG coherences the interhemispheric communication between the parieto-occipital regions was enhanced within a frequency range of 2-10 Hz. In order to discern between higher and lower levels of relaxation distinguished according to self-rated satisfaction, EEG features were assessed and discriminating parameters were identified. Successful relaxation was determined mainly by the presence of decreased delta-1 power across the cortex. Potential applications for these findings include the clinical, pharmacological, and stress management fields.

  19. Decoding English Alphabet Letters Using EEG Phase Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YiYan; Wang, Pingxiao; Yu, Yuguo

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the phase pattern and power of the low frequency oscillations of brain electroencephalograms (EEG) contain significant information during the human cognition of sensory signals such as auditory and visual stimuli. Here, we investigate whether and how the letters of the alphabet can be directly decoded from EEG phase and power data. In addition, we investigate how different band oscillations contribute to the classification and determine the critical time periods. An English letter recognition task was assigned, and statistical analyses were conducted to decode the EEG signal corresponding to each letter visualized on a computer screen. We applied support vector machine (SVM) with gradient descent method to learn the potential features for classification. It was observed that the EEG phase signals have a higher decoding accuracy than the oscillation power information. Low-frequency theta and alpha oscillations have phase information with higher accuracy than do other bands. The decoding performance was best when the analysis period began from 180 to 380 ms after stimulus presentation, especially in the lateral occipital and posterior temporal scalp regions (PO7 and PO8). These results may provide a new approach for brain-computer interface techniques (BCI) and may deepen our understanding of EEG oscillations in cognition. PMID:29467615

  20. PHYSIOLOGIC PATTERNS OF SLEEP ON EEG, MASKING OF EPILEPTIFORM ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Glukhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic patterns of sleep on EEG can sometimes be similar to epileptiform activity and even to the EEG pattern of epileptic seizures, but they have no connection to epilepsy and their incorrect interpretation may lead to overdiagnosis of epilepsy. These sleep patterns include vertex transients, K-complexes, hypnagogic hypersynchrony, 14 and 6 Hz positive bursts, wicket-potentials, etc. The main distinctive features of acute physiological phenomena of sleep unlike epileptiform activity are stereotyped, monomorphic morphology of waves, which frequently has rhythmic, arcuate pattern, often with change of lateralization, mainly dominated in the first stages of sleep (N1-N2, with their reduction in the deeper stages and transition to delta sleep (N3. The correct interpretation of physiological sharp-wave phenomena of sleep on EEG requires considerable training and experience of the physician. Our review includes a variety of physiological sleep patterns, which can mimic epileptiform activity on EEG, their criteria of diagnostic with demonstration of own illustrations of EEG.