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Sample records for abnormal eating attitudes

  1. Risk of Abnormal Eating Attitudes among Turkish Dietetic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziltan, Gul; Karabudak, Efsun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes among Turkish dietetic students and the relations between nutrition education and eating attitudes. The study population was 568 female university students (248 dietetic students, 320 non-dietetic students). Two scales were used: Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)…

  2. Fear, disgust, and abnormal eating attitudes: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Tony; Troop, Nicholas A; Treasure, Janet L; Murphy, Tara

    2002-09-01

    Clinical descriptions of eating disorders emphasize the role of fear (e.g., fear of weight gain, weight phobia, morbid dread of fatness). The present study explored whether disgust, an emotion that is linked intimately with food, may also be an important emotional response to eating and weight-related issues in women with abnormal eating attitudes. Forty nonclinical female participants were presented with a series of food, drink, body shape, and emotion-related stimuli. They were asked to rate each on a number of responses associated with fear and disgust. In addition, participants completed standard questionnaire measures of eating attitudes, phobias, and disgust sensitivity. Ratings of fear and disgust were higher in women with abnormal eating attitudes than in those without for high-calorie foods and for overweight body shapes, but not for drinks and slim body shapes. In response to fear and disgust relevant images, women with abnormal eating attitudes also rated emotional responses higher, but this was restricted to the appropriate emotion (i.e., higher levels of fear in response to fear stimuli and higher levels of disgust in response to disgust stimuli). In women with abnormal eating attitudes, both disgust and fear responses to food and body shape issues are equally salient. Thus, an emphasis on fear in eating disorders, to the exclusion of disgust, may be unwarranted. Copyright 2002 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Factors Associated with Abnormal Eating Attitudes among Greek Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilali, Aggeliki; Galanis, Petros; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Katostaras, Theofanis

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes among Greek adolescents and identify possible risk factors associated with these attitudes. Design: Cross-sectional, school-based study. Setting: Six randomly selected schools in Patras, southern Greece. Participants: The study population consisted of 540 Greek students aged 13-18…

  4. Abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour in female Jewish adolescents. Teachersf awareness of these factors and their attitudes towards a school programme to address these were also investigated. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted.

  5. Abnormal eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document the existence of eating attitudes that may reflect current, pre- or subclinical eating disorders. To establish preliminary prevalence figures for abnormal eating attitudes. Design. Cross-sectional survey of eating attitudes. Setting. Non-clinical, community-based. Subjects. Female high-school pupils.

  6. Abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... “I think about burning up calories when I exercise.” • “I am preoccupied with the thought of having fat on my body.” • “I display self-control around food.” • “I enjoy trying rich new foods”. The lowest mean score pertained to item 9 (mean score 0.02,. SD 0.19). Predictors of total Eating Attitudes Test (26-item ...

  7. Eating attitudes among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Noga Roguin; Sayag, Shlomit; Dahan, Rachel; Hermoni, Doron

    2006-09-01

    Israeli youth lead 27 western countries in dieting. The prevalence of eating disorders has been rising in the last 30 years, causing social problems and medical complications. To examine the prevalence of eating disorders among high school students in a region in northern Israel (Misgav) and to examine the relationship between the parents' employment status and the subject's eating disorder. A structured questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data. The short version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to evaluate the subject's attitudes toward and preoccupation with food, dieting, eating, physical appearance, and personal control over eating. Of 360 students approached, 283 (78%) completed the self-report EAT-26. One of every 5 females and one in every 20 males had an abnormal eating attitude. The rate of pathologic EAT-26 results, 20.8%, falls within the high range of similar community-based samples of female adolescents. There were no differences in EAT-26 score between students with an employed or unemployed mother; however, there was a trend for higher EAT-26 scores among those whose father was unemployed (21.4% vs. 12.7%, chi2 = 0.14). The findings support our hypothesis of a relatively high rate of abnormal eating attitudes (as reflected by high EAT-26 score) in this population. Another possible risk factor is having an unemployed father, which warrants further research and attention. Our next step is to introduce an intervention program in the school and to study its effect.

  8. Weight-related teasing and internalized weight stigma predict abnormal eating attitudes and behaviours in Emirati female university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lily; Tahboub-Schulte, Sabrina; Thomas, Justin

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between abnormal eating attitudes, weight teasing, internalized weight stigma and self-esteem in the United Arab Emirates in a sample of 420 female Emirati undergraduate students (mean age = 23.12 years). Participants completed an online survey including validated and reliable measures. Regression and mediation analyses were used to test for relationships between the factors. Thirty percent of respondents had eating disorder symptomatology, and 44% of respondents reported being frequently teased about their weight. Eating disorder symptomatology was positively correlated with being bothered by teasing from family, friends and others, and internalized weight stigma. Weight- and body-related shame and guilt was the strongest predictor of eating disorder symptomatology. Public health authorities should consider these issues as priorities for action in order to improve the health and wellbeing of young women in the UAE. In addition, it is vital that public health and medical services do not inadvertently condone weight-based teasing or enhance weight stigma and shame. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Prevalence and relationship between physical activity and abnormal eating attitudes in Spanish women university students in Health and Education Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela Carral, José María; Ayán Pérez, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Future education and health professionals will be responsible for promoting physical activity and correct eating habits among the general population. This work aims to describe the prevalence and the degree of correlation between physical level and eating disorders in a sample made of nursing, physiotherapy and education female students. A total of 258 female students doing university courses during the academic year 2009-2010 at the University of Vigo (Pontevedra's Campus) and who were registered in nursing (87), physiotherapy (73) and education (98) took part in this transversal descriptive study. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Eating Attitude Test were used to assess the prevalence of physical activity and eating disturbed attitudes respectively. The data showed that 63 (64,7%) of nursing students and 63 (72,1%) of education students reported the higher physical inactivity values, while 19 (19.4%) and 13 (15,3%) of them were likely to suffer from eating disorders respectively. Significant differences were found between the academic degree and the physical activity level of the sample (chi²=10,265; Sig.expenditure and the existence of eating disturbed attitudes was only significant among education students (OR= 3,58; IC 95%= 1,29-9,93; Sig.students. There is a chance that the performance of intense physical activity could be related to inadequate eating habits.

  10. Abnormal eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    square tests for both association and trend were used to determine whether a significant relationship between abnormal .... This is in keeping with the clinical findings described by. Szabo et al." Overall analysis of specific factor scores ... 0.01), implying that the prevalence rates do not increase in a uniformly linear fashion. _.

  11. Abnormal psychosocial situations and eating disorders in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horesh, N; Apter, A; Ishai, J; Danziger, Y; Miculincer, M; Stein, D; Lepkifker, E; Minouni, M

    1996-07-01

    To assess the relationship between abnormal psychosocial situations and eating disorders in adolescents. Twenty girls with eating disorders, 20 girls with major psychiatric conditions, and 20 healthy controls took part in the study. They were interviewed using a semistructured interview designed by the World Health Organization to diagnose the psychosocial situations included in the International Classification of Disease Axis 5 classification for child and adolescent psychiatry. All subjects were also given the Eating Attitudes Test. Many life events and psychosocial adversities differentiated significantly between the patients and controls. Inappropriate parental pressure was specific only for the subjects with eating disorders compared with the other psychiatric patients. In addition, Eating Attitudes Test scores correlated significantly with hostility toward child, sibling disability, parental overprotection, inappropriate parental pressures, and negative changes in family relationships. These results support the growing literature on the interrelationship between disordered family relationships and eating disorders. They point the way for developing treatment programs dealing with these issues.

  12. Atypical Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in Thai Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jarurin Pitanupong; Chonnakarn Jatchavala

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, and associated factors of atypical eating attitudes and behaviors in Thai medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey examined the eating abnormalities in Thai medical students, conducted in 2014. Research assistants collected data by using; self-reported questionnaires using The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 Thai Version). The statistical analysis used R-program for qualitative variables and logistic regression was applied to ...

  13. Atypical Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in Thai Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarurin Pitanupong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence, and associated factors of atypical eating attitudes and behaviors in Thai medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey examined the eating abnormalities in Thai medical students, conducted in 2014. Research assistants collected data by using; self-reported questionnaires using The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 Thai Version. The statistical analysis used R-program for qualitative variables and logistic regression was applied to determine the correlation and P-value. Results: 141 Thai, medical students (15.9% were reported to have atypical attitudes towards eating, and displayed abnormal eating behaviors. There was no statistically significant correlation of attitude towards eating, and their current eating behaviors according to the medical students’ gender, year of studying and Grade Point Average. However, their eating attitudes and behaviors were, associated with Body Mass index. Normal weight (BMI 18.5- 23.49 and overweight (BMI 23.5-39.9 groups could increase by 2.2 (95% CI =1.2, 4.3 and 2.3 (95% CI=1.1, 4.8 times risk depending on atypical eating attitudes and abnormal eating behaviors respectively, when compared with the underweight group (BMI<18.5. Conclusion: There was no correlated difference in concerns to the Thai medical student’s abnormal eating habits, with gender, years of their study and Grade Point Average. Only normal to over-weight BMI were associated. Overweight male, medical students significantly represented more atypical attitudes towards eating and behaviors than other groups in this population. These results may reveal the changing trends of eating attitudes and behaviors due to the current ideal body image of being more muscular. However, prospective studies are still needed.

  14. Epidemiological risk factor study concerning abnormal attitudes toward eating and adverse dieting behaviours among 12- to 25-years-old Chinese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Z L

    2010-01-01

    Most epidemiological studies of eating disorders have been carried out in North America and Western Europe. There are few exploratory studies in China on the prevalence of eating disorders and influential factors that cause eating disorders. A survey of school and college students aged between 12 and 25 in two cities in China had 1199 participants (95.8% response rate), 767 were female (63.9%) and 432 male (36.1%) Subjects completed questionnaires including the Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26). 9.9% of the females and 2.0% of the males showed high risk scores (EAT ≥ 20) regardless of whether their weight was normal or they were underweight. Such high risk groups showed a significantly higher degree of psychological characteristics relevant to eating disorders in both female and male subjects. Both Chinese females and a group of Chinese males may be at high risk for eating disorders. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  15. [Beauticians' eating attitudes and body attitudes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács-Márton, Réka; Szabó, Pál

    2013-01-01

    Some professional groups (models, actresses, ballet dancers, jockeys and athletes) are considered as risk populations for eating disorders and body image disorders. Beauticians may be a possible risk group, as their work is closely related to beauty and fashion. Eating disorders were assessed using the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Behaviour Severity Scale, body image measures included the Human Figure Drawings Test, the Body Dissatisfaction Subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory, the Body Attitudes Test, and the Body Investment Scale. Questionnaire data of 276 subjects were analysed. The study sample comprised 128 beauticians from Transylvania (5 males, 123 females). This group was compared with a control group consisting of 148 subjects (25 males, 123 females). Such weight reducing methods as dieting, exercise, the use of appetite suppressants and diuretics were significantly more prevalent in the beautician group. Mean total score and the scores of the Dieting subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory were significantly (p beauty industry may represent an increased risk of developing eating disorders.

  16. Eating behaviour, eating attitude and body mass index of dietetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... matching career choice to prospective students.1 A preoccupation with food manifests itself ... relationship and stated that high-risk groups for the development of eating disorders include ..... Table IV: Comparison of body mass index, eating attitudes and eating behaviour of the first-year dietetic students ...

  17. Portuguese validation of the children's eating attitudes test

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    Maria Del Carmen Bento Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT is the most widely used instrument for evaluating eating disorders in adults and adolescents in a variety of cultures and samples. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT. METHOD: Nine hundred and fifty-six Portuguese secondary students (565 girls and 391 boys answered the ChEAT. The test-retest reliability was obtained with data from 206 participants from the total sample who re-answered the questionnaire after 4-6 weeks. Psychometric analyses were carried out for the total sample and separately for girls and boys. RESULTS: Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were satisfactory. Principal components factorial analysis yielded four factors in the total sample, accounting for 42.35% of the total variance. Factor structure was similar in the total sample and in both genders. Factors were labelled: F1 "Fear of Getting Fat", F2 "Restrictive and Purgative Behaviours", F3 "Food Preoccupation" and F4 "Social Pressure to Eat". The concurrent validity, explored using the Contour Drawing Figure Rating Scale (CDRS was high. DISCUSSION: The Portuguese version of the ChEAT is a valid and useful instrument for the evaluation of abnormal eating attitudes and behaviours among Portuguese adolescents.

  18. Application of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) in a rural, Zulu speaking, adolescent population in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Christopher P; Allwood, Clifford W

    2004-10-01

    This study was undertaken as part of an exploration of the potential risk for future eating disorders in the black female population of South Africa. Previous research has documented eating attitudes suggesting that such a risk exists in urban populations. A translated version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was applied in a Zulu speaking, rural population (n=361). A prevalence of 3% for abnormal eating attitudes was established. In keeping with the hypothesis, the findings suggest that the risk for developing an eating disorder in a rural population is somewhat lower. In this regard, there does appear to be an urban-rural divide, which may have implications for the prevention of the emergence of eating disorders in black, South African adolescents. However, the validity of the EAT-26 in this population is a consideration in interpreting the data.

  19. Application of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) in a rural, Zulu speaking, adolescent population in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Christopher P; Allwood, Clifford W

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken as part of an exploration of the potential risk for future eating disorders in the black female population of South Africa. Previous research has documented eating attitudes suggesting that such a risk exists in urban populations. A translated version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was applied in a Zulu speaking, rural population (n=361). A prevalence of 3% for abnormal eating attitudes was established. In keeping with the hypothesis, the findings suggest that the risk for developing an eating disorder in a rural population is somewhat lower. In this regard, there does appear to be an urban-rural divide, which may have implications for the prevention of the emergence of eating disorders in black, South African adolescents. However, the validity of the EAT-26 in this population is a consideration in interpreting the data. PMID:16633489

  20. Psychosocial determinants in the eating attitudes of students

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    M.A. The available research on eating attitudes focuses to a large degree on eating disorders. The literature indicates that psychosocial determinants play a role in the eating attitudes of those individuals who suffer from eating disorders. The eating attitudes of Individuals who do not suffer from eating disorders, however, are also affected by psychosocial determinants. This study sets out to determine which psychosocial determinants play a role in the eating attitudes of a selected stu...

  1. Psychologic correlates of eating attitudes in Turkish female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikel, Feryal Cam; Cumurcu, Birgul Elbozan; Koc, Medine; Etikan, Ilker; Yucel, Basak

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency and correlates of disordered eating attitudes in a university-sample Turkish female population and to evaluate the contribution of maternal psychopathologic symptoms and family functioning. Female students (n = 267; mean age, 21.21 +/- 1.88 years) completed the Eating Attitude Test, Beck Depression Inventory, 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Symptom Check List 90-R, and Family Assessment Device. Mothers (n = 96; mean age = 46.41 +/- 5.31 years) completed the Beck Depression Inventory, 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Symptom Check List 90-R. Twelve percent of the female college students had abnormal eating attitudes. Disordered eating attitudes were positively correlated with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and phobic anxiety. Eating attitude of the student sample was positively correlated with the mothers' obsessive-compulsive symptoms, phobic anxiety, and general psychopathology and "affective involvement" in family functioning. It is necessary to pay attention to the levels of depression, alexithymia, anxiety, and obsession-compulsions, as well as family functioning and maternal psychopathology.

  2. Children's Eating Attitudes Test: Reliability and validation in Japanese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hiromi; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Rieko; Mukai, Takayo; Shintou, Hiroko; Koyanagi, Kenshi; Yamashita, Yushiro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uchimura, Naohisa; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2016-12-01

    Eating disorders (ED) are serious psychosomatic disorders that commonly occur in girls during adolescence. An increase in earlier onset ED has recently been suggested. Therefore, accurate assessment of eating attitudes in children is a necessary part of school mental health. The 26-item Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT-26) is widely used internationally to assess abnormal eating attitudes. The present study aimed to validate the Japanese version of the ChEAT-26. Participants were 7076 school children (aged 10-15years) from large, medium-sized, and small cities, and 44 children with anorexia nervosa. We examined the average ChEAT-26 score by participant attributes, including sex, age, geographical region, and school style. Factor analysis of the ChEAT-26 content was performed with varimax rotation. The optimal cut-off point was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The mean ChEAT-26 score was 7.94 for girls and 5.86 for boys. The mean score was significantly higher in children from larger cities than small cities, and was higher with increasing age, and private schools. Five factors explained 31.4% of the variance. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.81 for the scale. The area under the ROC curve was 0.83; sensitivity was 0.69 and specificity was 0.93 for a cut-off score of 18. The Japanese version of the ChEAT-26 is a reliable and valid psychometric tool that may be useful in the triage and assessment of children with anorexia nervosa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Eating attitudes among adolescent girls in Tehran: A school-based study

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    Hasti Sanaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Eating attitude disorders may indicate an increased risk for eating disorders and their chronic health complications. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of eating attitude disorders and to identify the factors associated with them among female students in Tehran.  Methods: A total of 14–18-year-old high school girls (N=619 completed a standardized self-report Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26 questionnaire and a demographic questionnaire. Mental health problems were investigated by means of the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and the Generalized Anxiety Disorders-2.  Results: Based on EAT-26 scores, 153 (24.7% students had eating attitude disorders. There was no relationship between abnormal eating attitudes and both individual and socioeconomic factors (P>0.05. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that eating attitude disorders were significantly associated with depression [OR=1.8 (1.2-2.8, P=0.007], anxiety [OR=1.6 (1.1-2.4, P=0.04], and perception of body shape as overweight [OR=2.7 (1.7-4.3, P<0.001].  Conclusion: A relatively high rate of eating attitude disorders was found among adolescent school girls in Tehran. Related factors were body image and psychological issues including depression and anxiety. Preventive and screening programs in schools could identify students at risk and prevent development and complications of eating disorders.

  4. Food attitudes, eating behavior, and the information underlying food attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikman, Shelley N; Min, Kate E; Graham, Dan

    2006-07-01

    This research examined healthiness perceptions and how the information underlying food attitudes more generally relate to attitudes and behaviors. Participants completed attitudinal measures and various card-sorting tasks in which they rank ordered foods (pictures and/or nutrition labels) in terms of healthiness. Taste was found to be a stronger predictor of attitudes and past eating behavior than other information underlying attitudes (health, guilt, comfort). Furthermore, participants' healthiness rankings of pictures were not correlated to rankings of the corresponding nutrition labels, suggesting that when determining a food's healthiness, participants do not rely on (or are not aware of) the actual nutritional makeup.

  5. Eating attitudes and body image concerns among female university students in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; Khan, Salim; Abdulrahman, Amani Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    A number of socio-cultural factors have been associated with the emergence of eating disorders in non-western nations. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is characterized by many, if not all of these socio-cultural factors. To date, however there have been very few studies exploring the prevalence of eating disorders symptomatology within the UAE. The present study investigates the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes within Emirati-female university students. It also explores the relationship between these attitudes and body image concerns. A correlational study design was used to explore the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes and their relationship with body image concerns. 228 female students attending Zayed University in the UAE completed the Eating Attitudes Test 26 item version (EAT-26), along with the Figure Rating Scale: a visual scale used to assess current body size/shape estimation, preference, and dissatisfaction. Exactly 24% of the sample scored above the EAT-26 cut-off, indicative of disordered eating attitudes and possible eating disorder. Additionally 74.8% of the participants were dissatisfied with their current estimated body image, furthermore disordered eating attitudes were positively correlated with body image dissatisfaction, and negatively correlated with body image ideals. The prevalence of disordered eating attitudes amongst the present UAE sample broadly mirrors those reported in nations where eating disorders have been widespread for decades. The widespread disordered eating attitudes in the present population may in part arise from body image dissatisfaction and ultra-thin body image ideals. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Disordered eating attitudes: demographic and clinico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were administered to the participants. In addition, their blood pressure, height and weight were measured, and body mass index. (BMI) was ... their body image, accompanied by abnormality in their weight and eating behaviors. ..... pact negatively on the self-esteem of students in College of Technology. The findings from our ...

  7. Factors influencing eating attitudes in secondary- school girls in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome measures. Responses to questions pertaining to environmental as well as individual factors for each respondent ('dieting questionnaire'; self report). Total scores derived from a self-report questionnaire pertaining to eating attitudes (Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26». Statistical analysis, using analysis of variance ...

  8. Eating Attitudes and Body Satisfaction among Asian and Caucasian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sameena; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated whether religious affiliation (Hindu or Muslim) and gender were important factors in explaining difference in unhealthy eating attitudes of Asian adolescents living in United Kingdom compared with Caucasians. Muslim adolescents had most characteristic pattern of eating psychopathology. Muslim boys' eating attitudes were particularly…

  9. [Attitudes to food and eating in an Icelandic cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurbjornsdottir, Olof Drofn; Torfadottir, Johanna Eyrun; Olafsdottir, Anna Sigridur; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2016-07-01

    Few studies exist on eating attitudes and well-being of adults in Iceland. In most Western societies great emphasis is placed on a lean and fit body, nevertheless the number of people gaining weigt keeps increasing. Such circumstances may cause discomfort related to food and food choice. The aim of this study was to examine attitudes towards food and eating among Icelandic adults. We used data from the Icelandic national health survey of 5,861 adults, age 18-79, conducted in 2007. A numerical assessment tool for measuring eating attitude was established, based on answers to questions on eating attitude. We used binary regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for unhealthy eating attitude according to different demographic factors. The prevalence of unhealthy eating attitude according to the measurement tool used in the study was 17% among participants, 22% for women and 11% for men. Unhealthy eating attitude was most prevalent in the age-group 18-29 years (36% of women, 15% of men), among those dissatisfied with their body weight (35% of women, 22% of men) and among those defined as obese (38% of women, 23% of men). Our data show that women are more prone to express unhealthy eating attitude compared to men. Those of younger age, with weight dissatisfaction and with high body mass index are positively associated with unhealthy eating attitude, irrespective of gender. Diet, Dietary restraint, Public Health, Eating attitude, Body weight satisfaction. Correspondence: Laufey Steingrimsdottir, laufey@hi.is.

  10. Olfaction in eating disorders and abnormal eating behavior: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Fagundo, Ana B; Arcelus, Jon; Agüera, Zaida; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Fernández-Real, José M; Tinahones, Francisco J; de la Torre, Rafael; Botella, Cristina; Frühbeck, Gema; Casanueva, Felipe F; Menchón, José M; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The study provides a systematic review that explores the current literature on olfactory capacity in abnormal eating behavior. The objective is to present a basis for discussion on whether research in olfaction in eating disorders may offer additional insight with regard to the complex etiopathology of eating disorders (ED) and abnormal eating behaviors. Electronic databases (Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, Science Direct, and Web of Science) were searched using the components in relation to olfaction and combining them with the components related to abnormal eating behavior. Out of 1352 articles, titles were first excluded by title (n = 64) and then by abstract and fulltext resulting in a final selection of 14 articles (820 patients and 385 control participants) for this review. The highest number of existing literature on olfaction in ED were carried out with AN patients (78.6%) followed by BN patients (35.7%) and obese individuals (14.3%). Most studies were only conducted on females. The general findings support that olfaction is altered in AN and in obesity and indicates toward there being little to no difference in olfactory capacity between BN patients and the general population. Due to the limited number of studies and heterogeneity this review stresses on the importance of more research on olfaction and abnormal eating behavior.

  11. Knowledge and attitudes of psychiatrists towards eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William R; Saeidi, Saeideh; Morgan, John F

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the eating disorder mental health literacy of psychiatrists. A sample of psychiatrists completed a questionnaire measuring knowledge of and attitudes towards eating disorders. Knowledge questions were based on the academic literature, standard diagnostic criteria and national guidelines on the management of eating disorders. Attitude items covered beliefs about the aetiology and treatment of eating disorders, confidence levels in diagnosis and management and the use of compulsory measures in anorexia nervosa. Psychiatrists’ knowledge of eating disorders was variable with specific gaps in both diagnosis and management. Psychiatrists felt more confident in diagnosing eating disorders than managing these conditions. Attitudes towards eating disorders were less stigmatizing than those seen in other health professionals. There is a clear need for greater education of psychiatrists regarding the diagnosis and management of eating disorders. Implementing training programmes and making information readily available could contribute to addressing these issues. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  12. Body image dissatisfaction, nutritional status, and eating attitudes in adolescents - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i2.11937

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Laus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between body image dissatisfaction, nutritional status, and eating attitudes in adolescents from a small town of the interior of São Paulo State. A total of 278 adolescents (106 boys and 172 girls aged between 15 and 18 years had completed measures of body image dissatisfaction through the Figure Rating Scale and eating attitudes by the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 and had their weight and height measured. Girls related more dissatisfaction and abnormal eating behavior than boys and, in both genders the abnormal eating attitudes tend to increase with increasing dissatisfaction. Moreover, dissatisfaction was higher between those individuals classified as overweight and obesity. These results demonstrated that body image dissatisfaction and inappropriate eating behaviors afflict boys and girls even from small cities in developing countries, highlighting the need to undertake epidemiological studies to early recognition of populations at risk of developing eating disorders.

  13. Olfaction in Eating Disorders and Abnormal Eating Behaviour: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Anisul eIslam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study provides a systematic review that explores the current literature on olfactory capacity in abnormal eating behavior to present a basis for discussion on whether research in olfaction in eating disorders may offer additional insights with regard to the complex etiopathology of ED and abnormal eating behaviors. Electronic databases (Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, Science Direct and Web of Science were searched using the components in relation to olfaction and combining them with the components related to abnormal eating behavior. Out of 1,352 articles, 14 articles were selected (820 patients and 385 control participants for this review. The highest number of existing literature on olfaction in ED were carried out with AN patients (78.6% followed by BN (35.7% and obesity (14.3%. The general findings support that olfaction is altered in AN and Obesity and indicates towards there being no differences in olfactory capacity between BN patients and the general population. Due to the limited number of studies and heterogeneity this review stresses on the importance of more research on olfaction and abnormal eating behavior.

  14. Implicit attitudes toward eating stimuli differentiate eating disorder and non-eating disorder groups and predict eating disorder behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, April R; Forrest, Lauren N; Velkoff, Elizabeth A; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Franklin, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    The current study tested whether people with and without eating disorders (EDs) varied in their implicit attitudes toward ED-relevant stimuli. Additionally, the study tested whether implicit evaluations of ED-relevant stimuli predicted ED symptoms and behaviors over a 4-week interval. Participants were people without EDs (N = 85) and people seeking treatment for EDs (N = 92). All participants completed self-report questionnaires and a version of the affect misattribution procedure (AMP) at baseline. The AMP indexed implicit evaluations of average body stimuli, eating stimuli, and ED-symptom stimuli. Participants with EDs completed weekly follow-up measures of ED symptoms and behaviors for 4 weeks. Contrary to predictions, the anorexia nervosa (AN) group did not differ from the no ED group on implicit attitudes toward ED-symptom stimuli, and the bulimia nervosa (BN) group had less positive implicit attitudes toward ED-symptom stimuli relative to the no ED group. In line with predictions, people with AN and BN had more negative implicit attitudes toward average body and eating stimuli relative to the no ED group. In addition, among the ED group more negative implicit attitudes toward eating stimuli predicted ED symptoms and behaviors 4 weeks later, over and above baseline ED symptoms and behaviors. Taken together, implicit evaluations of eating stimuli differentiated people with AN and BN from people without EDs and longitudinally predicted ED symptoms and behaviors. Interventions that increase implicit liking of eating-related stimuli may reduce ED behaviors. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Eating Attitudes and Related Factors in Turkish Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sevim; Ugur, Bayram Ali; Aykurt, Fethi Ahmet; Bektas, Muammer

    2015-06-01

    Changing eating behaviors might trigger obesity, deficiency, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and reactive eating disorders. This study aimed to determine eating attitudes of nursing students in the western Black-Sea region of Turkey as well as to examine the effects of demographic features, self-esteem, body image, income level, and family structure on their eating attitudes. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 310 nursing students between January and February 2014. Data were collected using the personal information form, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Beck Depression Scale (BDS), Body-Cathexis Scale (BCS), and Body Mass Index (BMI). Data were evaluated by descriptive statistics, independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson correlation analysis. About 30.0% of Turkish nursing students had negative eating attitudes. There was a significant positive correlation between the BDS and EAT scores (P EAT scores of nursing students (P eating attitudes. Psychological status, self-esteem, economic level, and place of residence of nursing students may be the potential factors for eating disorders.

  16. Eating Attitudes in Fourth-, Sixth-, and Eighth-Grade Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyne-Winkler, Martha C.

    1994-01-01

    Examined eating attitudes of fourth-, sixth-, and eighth-grade girls (n=379) and relationship between those attitudes and achievement scores, school ability, absenteeism, family income, grade level, family size, age, height/weight ratio, diet history, weight satisfaction, appearance satisfaction, and school anxiety. Found that eating-disordered…

  17. Stress, coping, and disturbed eating attitudes in teenage girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, S; Waller, G; Kroese, B S

    1997-12-01

    This study explored the relationship between stressors and disturbed eating attitudes among adolescent females, assessing the moderating role of coping and the mediating influence of poor self-esteem. Two hundred eighty-six teenage girls were recruited from local schools, and completed standardized measures of stressors, coping, self-esteem, perfectionism, and disturbed eating attitudes. Regression analyses were used to test for moderating and mediating effects. Stressors and emotion-focused coping were found to be associated with low self-esteem, which in turn was strongly associated with disturbed eating attitudes. Stressors were also directly related to disturbed eating attitudes. The findings provide partial support for existing models of the etiology and maintenance of eating psychopathology, but have wider implications for our understanding of the eating disorders and their treatment.

  18. Eating attitudes of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity without eating disorder female patients: differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, M S; Koritar, P; Pisciolaro, F; Mancini, M; Cordás, T A; Scagliusi, F B

    2014-05-28

    The objective was to compare eating attitudes, conceptualized as beliefs, thoughts, feelings, behaviors and relationship with food, of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) patients and a group of obese (OBS) without eating disorders (ED). Female patients from an Eating Disorder (ED) Unit with AN (n=42), BN (n=52) and BED (n=53) and from an obesity service (n=37) in Brazil answered the Disordered Eating Attitude Scale (DEAS) which evaluate eating attitudes with 5 subscales: relationship with food, concerns about food and weight gain, restrictive and compensatory practices, feelings toward eating, and idea of normal eating. OBS patients were recruited among those without ED symptoms according to the Binge Eating Scale and the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns. ANOVA was used to compare body mass index and age between groups. Bonferroni test was used to analyze multiple comparisons among groups. AN and BN patients presented more dysfunctional eating attitudes and OBS patients less dysfunctional (peating." BED patients were worst than OBS for "Relationship with food" and as dysfunctional as AN patients - besides their behavior could be considered the opposite. Differences and similarities support a therapeutic individualized approach for ED and obese patients, call attention for the theoretical differences between obesity and ED, and suggest more research focused on eating attitudes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Teasing as a risk factor for abnormal eating behaviours: A prospective study in an adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumed, Javier; Gimeno, Natalia; Barberá, María; Ruiz, Elías; Conesa, Llanos; Rojo-Bofill, Luis Miguel; Livianos, Lorenzo; Rojo, Luis

    2017-08-14

    There are discrepancies in the literature about the role of teasing in the onset of eating pathology. This article aims to establish the influence of teasing in abnormal eating behaviors and attitudes in the adolescent population. This is a two-year prospective study conducted in 7,167 adolescents between 13 and 15 years of age. In a first assessment, teasing about weight and teasing about abilities were measured by means of the POTS.questionnaire. Its association with eating psychopathology after two years was analyzed controlling nutritional status (BMI), body dissatisfaction, drive to thinness, perfectionism (EDI), emotional symptoms and hyperactivity (SDQ) which had also been measured in the first assessment. The analysis was carried out independently for both genders. The multivariant analysis found no significant or independent effect of teasing about weight or teasing about abilities in the onset of later eating psychopathology. The obtained models were similar for both genders although in girls, but not in boys, controlling BMI was enough to make any effect of teasing disappear. Teasing about weight or abilities has no direct effect, neither in boys nor in girls of 13 to 15 years old, in the development of eating psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening disordered eating attitudes and eating disorders in a sample of Turkish female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Ozcan; Güleç, Nurdan; Ozşahin, Aytekin; Doruk, Ali; Ozdemir, Barbaros; Calişkan, Ufuk

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that college women are particularly susceptible to the development and maintenance of disturbed eating behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of disordered eating attitudes and eating disorders in a sample of Turkish female college students. The Eating Attitudes Test was administered to a sample of 414 female college students. The subjects who had a score of 30 or higher were accepted as having disordered eating attitudes, and all of them have been examined using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition for eating disorders. Of the overall sample, 17.1% of subjects were classified as having disordered eating attitudes. This subgroup of subjects was then compared with the remainder on all the other measures. The differences between students with disordered eating attitudes and those without on sociodemographic variables (except for age) were not statistically significant. The rate was 1% for eating disorders including anorexia nervosa (0.5%) and bulimia nervosa (0.5%). This study suggested that the prevalences of disordered eating attitudes and anorexia nervosa among female college students in Turkey were similar to those found in Western societies, but the rate for bulimia nervosa was lower compared with Western societies.

  1. Attitudes towards psychotherapy manuals among clinicians treating eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn; Mountford, Victoria A; Tatham, Madeleine; Turner, Hannah; Gabriel, Chloe; Webber, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Clinicians have relatively low uptake and implementation of evidence-based psychotherapies for the eating disorders, and this problem appears to be associated with low use of manualized approaches. This study examines clinicians' positive and negative attitudes to manuals, and possible beliefs and emotional factors that might drive those attitudes. The participants were 125 psychological therapists working with eating-disordered patients. Each completed standardised measures of attitudes to manuals and emotional states. A number of beliefs about the content of manuals were associated with both positive attitudes to the outcome of treatment and negative attitudes to their impact on the treatment process. In addition, a more positive mood was associated with more positive attitudes. Suggestions are made regarding how attitudes might be made more positive, in order to facilitate the use of evidence-based therapies for eating disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of an Intuitive Eating Education Program on High School Students' Eating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Nicole; Joram, Elana; Matvienko, Oksana; Woolf, Suzanne; Knesting, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need for school-based nutritional educational programs that promote healthy eating attitudes without increasing an unhealthy focus on restrictive eating or promoting a poor body image. Research suggests that "intuitive eating" ("IE") approaches, which encourage individuals to focus on internal body…

  3. Anorexia nervosa in male adolescents: body image, eating attitudes and psychological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gila, Araceli; Castro, Josefina; Cesena, José; Toro, Josep

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate body image and its relationship with psychological and behavioral traits associated with anorexia nervosa in male patients. Thirty male adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) were compared with 421 male adolescents from the general population. Body image was evaluated with the Subjective Body Dimensions Apparatus. Eating attitudes were evaluated by the Eating Attitudes Test in its 26-item version (EAT-26). In 19 AN patients and 200 boys from the comparison group, the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) was also administered. AN patients had higher mean scores in the EAT-26 and the Body Dissatisfaction scale on the EDI, but not on the other EDI scales. Both groups overestimated all parts of their bodies but AN patients presented a greater overestimation of shoulders (p = .007), hips (p = .01) and thighs (p = .019). Correlations in the anorexic group were high and negative between body overestimation and body mass index and also high but positive between overestimation and the EAT and the Drive for Thinness scale on the EDI. Overestimation did not correlate significantly with other EDI scales. Male patients with anorexia nervosa overestimate some parts of their bodies more often than controls; this overestimation is related to body mass index, abnormal eating attitudes and drive for thinness, but not to other psychological traits evaluated by the EDI.

  4. Maternal attitude towards first trimester screening for fetal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nerea; Burgos, Jorge; Barbazán, Maria José; Recio, Virginia; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txanton

    2016-05-01

    To explore the maternal attitude towards the screening for structural abnormalities at the 11-13-week scan, according to the severity of the abnormality. A secondary aim was to analyse which maternal characteristics influence in the maternal response. This is a descriptive study based on the responses to 300 self-administrated questionnaires completed immediately before routine ultrasounds scan. A totally of 296 (98.7%) women participated in the study. If the baby had any abnormality 93.9% would prefer to know at 12 weeks, 96.6% if the abnormality was lethal, 95.3% if the abnormality involves severe handicap, 91.2% if the abnormality can only be suspected, but not confirmed until the pregnancy is more advanced (16 or 20 weeks), 77.0% if the abnormality was minor and 79.4% women would like to know at 12 weeks if the baby appeared normal. Maternal age, gestational age at the time of the questionnaire and maternal attitude towards termination of pregnancy were the only factors affecting maternal responses. Pregnant women prefer to be informed in the first trimester about any abnormality in their fetuses, even in cases of minor or only suspected abnormalities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Application of the SCOFF, Eating Attitude Test 26 (EAT 26) and Eating Inventory (TFEQ) Questionnaires in young women seeking diet-therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siervo, M; Boschi, V; Papa, A; Bellini, O; Falconi, C

    2005-06-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) affect an increasing proportion of young women in western countries. Psychometric questionnaires represent valuable tools to investigate various and critical areas directly involved in the pathogenesis of EDS and to support diagnosis and therapeutic decisions. 162 young women (16-35 years old) seeking diet therapy were recruited. We classified subjects in normal eating behaviour (NEB) (n = 87), binge eating disorder (BED) (n = 12) and bulimic EDNOS (Eating Disorders not Otherwise Specified) (n = 63). The SCOFF, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT 26) and Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) were administered. Body mass index (BMI) was utilised to assess the nutritional status. An analysis of the reliability and validity (sensitivity and specificity) of the SCOFF, EAT 26 and TFEQ was performed. Body mass index (BMI) of NEB, BED and bulimic EDNOS was 27.7, 35 and 31.1, respectively. BED showed the highest values at the dishinibition, hunger and food preoccupation scales but conversely, they were the least restrained group. The SCOFF was significantly associated with the dishinibition (r = 0.31), hunger (0.31), dieting (r = 0.34) and food preoccupation scales (r = 0.34). The reliability analysis showed that the SCOFF, EAT 26 and TFEQ had a Cronbach alpha of 0.47, 0.85 and 0.75, respectively. The ROC curves identified cut off points of 3, 10 and 25 as the best compromise between specificity and sensitivity for the SCOFF, EAT 26 and TFEQ, respectively. The SCOFF is a valuable tool for the screening of abnormal eating behaviours but the diagnosis should be always confirmed and supported by the administration of other questionnaires and structured interviews. We have also confirmed the high reliability of the EAT 26 and TFEQ even though the utilisation of these questionnaires has generated some issues about their application in populations characterised by loss of control and overeating episodes.

  6. Eating attitudes anda habits on adolescents in the Pilsen region

    OpenAIRE

    CÍROVÁ, Vanda

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the eating habits of pupils at elementary schools and of the third-year students of high school. The theoretical part deals with the definition of teenagers and adolescents eating habits and attitudes, the principles of a healthy diet, fluid intake, the most common eating disorders, metabolic disorders and obesity. The practical part contains the research carried out at selected elementary and secondary schools. Results are compared by gender, education level a...

  7. Eating attitude, lifestyle practices and dietary intakes of female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating attitude was evaluated using the EAT-26 questionnaire, lifestyle practice was assessed using the adapted health promoting lifestyle questionnaire (HPLP II) while 24-hour dietary recall and pretested food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the dietary intakes and pattern of the participants. Data were ...

  8. Eating Attitudes and Behaviors among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey Morris, Katherine D.; Parra, Gilbert R.; Stender, Sarah R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors assessed the influences of several risk factors--self-esteem, history of unwanted sexual contact (USC), depression, and sorority membership--on eating-related and weight-related attitudes and behaviors. Findings provide support for the roles of self-esteem, depression, and USC on restricting attitudes. According to the authors' model,…

  9. Social convergence of disturbed eating attitudes in young adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Waller, G

    2001-02-01

    It has been suggested that a broad range of social factors influence disturbed eating attitudes, but there has been relatively little investigation of the role of peer influence. Drawing from social identity theory, this longitudinal study of a nonclinical group of women examined whether social proximity results in a convergence of eating psychopathology over time. Forty-one nonclinical women (living in 11 communal apartments) completed the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) at three time points (1 week after moving in, 10 weeks later, and a further 14 weeks later). The women's eating and related attitudes were compared across the three time points. Then divergence scores were calculated (showing the spread of EDI scores within each apartment) and compared across the three time points. The spread of scores within the apartments changed significantly, indicating some convergence in those attitudes that are socially valued (restrictive attitudes; body concerns) and divergence in those attitudes that are not socially valued (bulimia). There was also an increase in convergence of levels of perfectionism. The findings support the suggestion that social proximity promotes convergence of socially valued eating characteristics but divergence of socially stigmatised characteristics. Further research is suggested to establish the generalizability of these findings and to identify those who are most at risk of such social effects on eating disturbance.

  10. [Age and attitudes in relation to eating in girls with eating disorders and healthy girls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Beata; Małaj, Grzegorz; Szpakowska, Aneta; Buczyjan, Alina

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare of the D.M. Garner, M.P. Olmsted and J. Polivy Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) results obtained by healthy lower secondary, secondary and college students versus the results obtained with their peers with eating disorders. The examined group consisted of 379 girls attending Lublin lower secondary schools (123 persons), secondary schools (50 persons) and college students (206 persons) as well as 90 girls undergoing medical treatment due to eating disorders (30 lower secondary school students and 30 college students). All these persons were administered the D.M. Garner, M.P. Olmsted and J. Polivy Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI). The tests conducted revealed significant statistical differences between the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) results obtained by secondary school students and college students with eating disorders and those obtained by their healthy peers as well as the lack of significant differences between healthy and ill lower secondary school students. 1. Age is a significant factor related to eating disorders. 2. As regards their attitude in relation to eating and their own body, healthy lower secondary school students are not much different from their peers diagnosed with eating disorders. 3. Incorrect attitudes in relation to eating and their own body in girls with eating disorders increase in a significant way at secondary school and at college periods.

  11. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorders Inventory in Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Assessed criterion and concurrent validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorder Inventory in 82 women with bulimia nervosa. Both tests demonstrated criterion validity by discriminating bulimia nervosa subjects from normals. Only weak support was found for concurrent validity within bulimia subjects. Recommends combination of…

  12. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test: a study of Mexican eating disorders patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Rayón, G; Mancilla-Díaz, J M; Vázquez-Arévalo, R; Unikel-Santoncini, C; Caballero-Romo, A; Mercado-Corona, D

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Mexican version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) in clinical and control populations in Mexico City. 276 female patients with eating disorders [52 with anorexia nervosa (AN), 102 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 122 with eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS)] and a comparison group of 280 normal control female subjects completed the EAT. The EAT had an adequate level of internal consistency in the clinical sample (Cronbach's alpha=0.90). Total score was significantly correlated with criterion group membership (r=0.77, pBulimia, 3) Drive of thinness, 4) Food preoccupation and 5) Perceived social pressure. This study provides evidence that the Mexican version of the EAT is an economical, reliable and potentially useful instrument for research in this field.

  13. Disordered eating attitudes and behaviors in overweight youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Aspen, Vandana Passi; Sinton, Meghan M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Wilfley, Denise E

    2008-02-01

    Disordered eating attitudes and behaviors appear to be quite common in youth, and overweight youth have been identified as a subset of the population at particularly high risk for endorsing such symptoms. Overweight and eating disorder (ED) symptomatology independently confer significant threats to one's physical and psychosocial health, showing strong links with body weight gain and risk for ED development. When concurrent, the risk for negative health outcomes may be compounded. The purpose of this article is to review the current state of the literature as it concerns disordered eating and its correlates in overweight children and adolescents. Extant literature on the prevalence, distribution, correlates, and etiology of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors (i.e., negative attitudes toward shape and weight, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and binge eating) in overweight youth is reviewed and consolidated in order to make assessment and treatment recommendations for healthcare providers. The current literature suggests that early detection of disordered eating in overweight youth should be a priority to provide appropriate intervention, thereby helping to slow the trajectory of weight gain and prevent or reduce the long-term negative consequences associated with both conditions. Future research should focus on explicating developmental pathways, and on developing novel prevention and treatment interventions for overweight youth exhibiting disordered eating patterns.

  14. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder increases the risk of having abnormal eating behaviours in obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docet, M F; Larrañaga, A; Pérez Méndez, L F; García-Mayor, R V

    2012-06-01

    To determine the rate of abnormal eating behaviours in obese adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with obese adult patients without ADHD. This case-control study includes: obese adult patients defined by a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m², screening positive in the adult ADHD self-report scale-V1.1. (ASRS-V1.1), attending the Nutrition Section, as cases; and obese adult patients screening negative, as controls. Weight, height and BMI were determined in all the participants. The rate of abnormal eating behaviours was determined using an eating pattern questionnaire. Forty-five out of 51 (88.2%) cases vs 127 out of 179 (70.9%) controls had abnormal eating behaviours (p=0.01). Eating between-meal snacks was found in 39 (76.5%) cases vs 107 (59.8%) controls (p=0.03), going on binge eating episodes in 28 (54.9%) vs 42 (23.5%) (p=0.00), waking up at night to eat in 11 (21.6%) vs 16 (8.9%) (p=0.01), eating large amounts of food in 13 (25.5%) vs 38 (21.2%) (p=0.52), and eating in secret in 11 (21.6%) vs 16 (8.9%) (p=0.01), respectively. This is the first study that determines the rate of these abnormal eating behaviours in obese adult patients with ADHD in comparison with obese adult patients without ADHD. A high rate of abnormal eating behaviours was observed in obese patients with ADHD. Our results suggest that ADHD is a risk factor for the development of these abnormal eating behaviours, which may be contributing factors of obesity and the unsuccessful treatment of obese patients.

  15. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Eating Disorders Attitude in Girls High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahiminia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Adolescence is one of the important period in growth and evolution process, Also, eating disorders in adolescences, especially girls is one of the major problems in communities. Therefore, an effective education is of special priority for prevention of eating disorders. The current study was performed with the goal of assessment of the effect of nutrition education on eating disorders attitude in girls high school students. Methods: This non-experimental study with a single group pre- and post-test design, was performed using purposive sampling method on 97 students of the first year of high school, in 2015. Data collection tool was EAT-26 standardized questionnaire, which was completed by the participants using self-report method before and 3 months after the education. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. The significance level was set at p<0.05. Results: The mean score of abnormal eating attitude decreased from 1.7±0.04 (before education to 1.4±0.06 (after education. Also, there was a significant statistical difference between the results of before and after education (p=0.0001. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that nutrition education has brought about desired changes in the attitude. However, the increase of nutrition awareness and attitude change can gradually lead to behavior change. Therefore, the current study can help the authorities to include a wider range of nutritional education in the curriculum of students in dorder to prevent eating disorder.

  16. The validity and 4-year test-retest reliability of the Brazilian version of the Eating Attitudes Test-26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a cross-sectional study conducted four years ago to assess the validity of the Brazilian version of the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 for the identification of abnormal eating behaviors in a population of young females in Southern Brazil, 56 women presented abnormal eating behavior as indicated by the EAT-26 and the Edinburgh Bulimic Investigation Test. They were each matched for age and neighborhood to two normal controls (N = 112 and were re-assessed four years later with the two screening questionnaires plus the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. The EAT results were then compared to diagnoses originating from the CIDI. To evaluate the temporal stability of the two screening questionnaires, a test-retest design was applied to estimate kappa coefficients for individual items. Given the prevalence of eating disorders of 6.2%, the CIDI psychiatry interview was applied to 161 women. Of these, 0.6% exhibited anorexia nervosa and 5.6%, bulimia nervosa (10 positive cases. The validity coefficients of the EAT were: 40% sensitivity, 84% specificity, and 14% positive predictive value. Cronbach's coefficient was 0.75. For each EAT item, the kappa index was not higher than 0.344 and the correlation coefficient was lower than 0.488. We conclude that the EAT-26 exhibited low validity coefficients for sensitivity and positive predictive value, and showed a poor temporal stability. It is reasonable to assume that these results were not influenced by the low prevalence of eating disorders in the community. Thus, the results cast doubts on the ability of the EAT-26 test to identify cases of abnormal eating behaviors in this population.

  17. [DAILY AND ABNORMAL EATING BEHAVIORS IN A COMMUNITY SAMPLE OF CHILEAN ADULTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda-Montecinos, Camila; Saldaña, Carmina; Andrés Valle, Ana

    2015-08-01

    this research aimed to characterize the daily eating behavior in a sample of Chilean adults according to their Body Mass Index (BMI) and gender and to analyze the possible links between these variables and abnormal eating behaviors. 657 participants (437 women and 220 men, age range 18-64 years) were evaluated with a battery of self-administered questionnaires. Mean BMI was 25.50 kg/m2 (women 24.96 kg/m2, men 26.58 kg/m2), being significantly higher the mean of BMI in the men group, being the BMI mean of the total sample and that of the male group in the overweight range. participants with overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), in contrast with normal-weight group, tended to do more frequently the following behaviors: skip meals, follow a diet, eat less homemade food, eat faster and in greater quantities, in addition to do a greater number of abnormal eating behaviors of various kinds and to rate significantly higher in clinical scales that evaluated eating restraint and overeating. Men showed significantly more eating behaviors linked with overeating, and women performed more behaviors related with eating restraint and emotional eating. the results suggest that, besides "what" people eat, "how" people eat, in terms of specific behaviors, may contribute to the rapid increase of overweight in Chilean population. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Adolescents' Awareness and Attitude towards Disordered Eating in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated on the knowledge and attitude of secondary school students towards discovered eating. A sample of 300 students from six secondary schools was randomly selected in Owerri Municipal. A questionnaire titled QSKATDE was developed, structured and validated (r = 0.80). Four research questions and ...

  19. VALIDITY OF THE EATING ATTITUDE TEST AMONG EXERCISERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Matheson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Theory testing and construct measurement are inextricably linked. To date, no published research has looked at the factorial validity of an existing eating attitude inventory for use with exercisers. The Eating Attitude Test (EAT is a 26-item measure that yields a single index of disordered eating attitudes. The original factor analysis showed three interrelated factors: Dieting behavior (13-items, oral control (7-items, and bulimia nervosa-food preoccupation (6-items. The primary purpose of the study was to examine the factorial validity of the EAT among a sample of exercisers. The second purpose was to investigate relationships between eating attitudes scores and selected psychological constructs. In stage one, 598 regular exercisers completed the EAT. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to test the single-factor, a three-factor model, and a four-factor model, which distinguished bulimia from food pre-occupation. CFA of the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.66, RMSEA = 0.10, the three-factor-model (RCFI = 0.74; RMSEA = 0.09 showed poor model fit. There was marginal fit for the 4-factor model (RCFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.06. Results indicated five-items showed poor factor loadings. After these 5-items were discarded, the three models were re-analyzed. CFA results indicated that the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.76, RMSEA = 0.10 and three-factor model (RCFI = 0.82, RMSEA = 0.08 showed poor fit. CFA results for the four-factor model showed acceptable fit indices (RCFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.06. Stage two explored relationships between EAT scores, mood, self-esteem, and motivational indices toward exercise in terms of self-determination, enjoyment and competence. Correlation results indicated that depressed mood scores positively correlated with bulimia and dieting scores. Further, dieting was inversely related with self-determination toward exercising. Collectively, findings suggest that a 21-item four-factor model shows promising validity coefficients

  20. [Validation of the Eating Attitudes Test as a screening instrument for eating disorders in general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Fernández, María Angeles; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pedro Manuel; Labrador, Francisco Javier; Raich, Rosa María

    2014-02-20

    To validate the best cut-off point of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), Spanish version, for the screening of eating disorders (ED) in the general population. This was a transversal cross-sectional study. The EAT-40 Spanish version was administered to a representative sample of 1.543 students, age range 12 to 21 years, in the Region of Madrid. Six hundred and two participants (probable cases and a random sample of controls) were interviewed. The best diagnostic prediction was obtained with a cut-off point of 21, with sensitivity: 88.2%; specificity: 62.1%; positive predictive value: 17.7%; negative predictive value: 62.1%. Use of a cut-off point of 21 is recommended in epidemiological studies of eating disorders in the Spanish general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Eating attitudes, health-risk behaviors, self-esteem, and anxiety among adolescent females in a suburban high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M; Schneider, M; Pegler, C; Napolitano, B

    1991-07-01

    In order to determine whether adolescent females with abnormal eating attitudes display lower levels of self-esteem and higher levels of anxiety than their peers, and whether these adolescents participate in health-risk behaviors to a greater or lesser degree than their peers, we administered a series of questionnaires to the females attending a suburban high school in New York State. The questionnaires, completed by 268 students (mean age, 16.2 years), included data on health-risk behaviors and weight attitudes, an Eating Attitudes Test, a self-esteem scale, and an anxiety inventory. Results indicated that almost two-thirds of the students described themselves as overweight, almost three-quarters felt they were above the healthiest weight for their age and height, and almost four-fifths were above the weight at which they would be most happy; 18% of the students scored 30 or more on the Eating Attitudes Test, a score suggestive of an eating disorder. Use of Spearman-rank correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analysis revealed that those with more unhappiness with their weight and higher scores on the eating attitudes test were more likely to have lower self-esteem and higher anxiety and to participate more in health-risk behaviors, including cigarette smoking, alcohol use, drug use, and sexual activity with more total partners. The data from this study further corroborate the growing belief that health-risk behaviors tend to cluster together in vulnerable adolescents and demonstrate that abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors may be part of this cluster, especially in females with low self-esteem and high levels of anxiety.

  2. Eating attitudes and body shape concerns among medical students in Chandigarh

    OpenAIRE

    Nitin Gupta; Rachna Bhargava; Bir Singh Chavan; Pratap Sharan

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Eating disorders are rarely encountered in the Indian subcontinent. Surprisingly, there is sparse literature related to eating attitude distortions and body dissatisfaction in the Indian population. The objective of this study was to explore the eating attitudes and body shape concerns in medical students, with the objectives of determining any gender differences on eating attitudes and body shape concerns, and any predictors of psychological morbidity using demographic...

  3. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26): reliability and validity in Spanish female samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Teresa; Bersabé, Rosa; Jiménez, Manuel; Berrocal, Carmen

    2010-11-01

    This paper focuses on the validation of the Spanish form of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26; Garner, Olmsted, Bohr & Garfinkel, 1982) across two studies. Participants in Study 1 were 778 females recruited from community settings (aged 12-21). Study 2 included 86 females recruited from clinical and 86 females from community settings (aged 12-35). Results from Principal and Simultaneous Component Analyses showed a unidimensional structure of the EAT-26 item scores. Reliability analyses supported the internal consistency of the scale. Study 1 also explores the ability of the EAT-26 to discriminate between subjects with Eating Disorder (ED), Symptomatic or Asymptomatic by means of ROC analyses and using results from the Questionnaire for Eating Disorder Diagnoses (Q-EDD; Mintz, O'Halloran, Mulholland, & Schneider, 1997) as criterion. The EAT-26 demonstrated good specificity but insufficient sensitivity to detect a full or partial ED. Study 2 explores the ability of the questionnaire to discriminate between subjects with and without ED. The EAT-26 demonstrated good specificity and moderate sensitivity to detect ED. Clinical and theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  4. Antifat attitudes in a sample of women with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magallares, Alejandro; Jauregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada; Santed, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    One of the main problems of patients with eating disorders is their body dissatisfaction. Although these individuals usually are not satisfied with their bodies there are not many investigations that focus on how these patients see people with real weight problems. For this reason, in this study it is analyzed how women with eating disorders see obese people. A total of 104 participants (35 with anorexia nervosa, 28 with bulimia nervosa, 16 with eating disorder not otherwise specified and 25 controls) were selected to conduct the study. To measure anti-fat attitudes the Spanish version of the Antifat Attitudes Questionnaire was used. To measure if participants had body dissatisfaction it was used the Spanish versions of the Body Shape Questionnaire. Finally, anthropometric measures (height and weight) were taken in order to calculate the BMI (kg/m(2)), as well as some socio-demographic information. It was found that participants with bulimia nervosa showed scores higher on antifat attitudes than the rest of the participants. Additionally, it was found that this result was influenced by the body dissatisfaction of the participants. These results suggest that negative attitudes toward obese people may influence an individual's body image. One way of maintaining a positive body image (especially, the subjective dimension, body satisfaction) is to compare oneself with those perceived as physically inferior (people with weight problems), a strategy that is especially relevant when the mass media insists in depict extreme thin women. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Shame aversion and maladaptive eating-related attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjrekar, Eishita; Schoenleber, Michelle; Mu, Wenting

    2013-12-01

    Consistent with affect regulation models of eating-related psychopathology, prior research indicates that trait-like shame and state self-conscious emotion are associated with maladaptive eating-related attitudes/behaviors. The present investigation extended past research on shame and maladaptive eating-related attitudes/behaviors by examining the role of shame aversion - the perception of shame as an especially unwanted and painful emotion - in these attitudes/behaviors over and above shame-proneness, general distress, and experiential avoidance. In 488 female undergraduates, shame aversion was positively associated with dieting, self-perceptions of body shape, awareness of food content, and food preoccupation even after taking into account other possible explanatory variables. Additionally, shame aversion moderated shame-proneness' associations with dieting, awareness of food content, and food preoccupation, such that shame-proneness was positively associated with these attitudes/behaviors only when shame aversion was high. Future directions for research and clinical implications of the present findings are discussed. © 2013.

  6. Examining the mediating roles of binge eating and emotional eating in the relationships between stress and metabolic abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret; Whittemore, Robin; Reuning-Scherer, Jonathan; Grilo, Carlos M.; Sinha, Rajita

    2017-01-01

    To test whether binge eating and emotional eating mediate the relationships between self-reported stress, morning cortisol and the homeostatic model of insulin resistance and waist circumference. We also explored the moderators of gender and age. Data were from 249 adults (mean BMI = 26.9 ± 5.1 kg/m2; mean age = 28.3 ± 8.3 years; 54.2 % male; 69.5 % white) recruited from the community who were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Participants completed a comprehensive assessment panel of psychological and physiological assessments including a morning blood draw for plasma cortisol. We found negative relationships between stress and morning cortisol (r = −0.15 to −0.21; p eating or emotional eating as mediators and no support for moderated mediation for either gender or age; however, gender moderated several paths in the model. These include the paths between perceived stress and emotional eating (B = 0.009, p eating (B = 0.01, p = 0.003), and binge eating and increased HOMA-IR (B = 0.149, p = 0.018), which were higher among females. Among women, perceived stress may be an important target to decrease binge and emotional eating. It remains to be determined what physiological and psychological mechanisms underlie the relationships between stress and metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26686376

  7. Eating attitudes, body image and risk for eating disorders in a group of Spanish dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui Lobera, Ignacio; Bolaños-Ríos, Patricia; Valero-Blanco, Eva; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Ángeles

    2016-09-20

    Prevalence of eating disorders (ED) and discrepancies between actual weight and weight perception seem much higher in dancers. The aims analysed in 77 dancers were: risk for ED; relationship between eating attitudes and psychological variables; dieting and self-weighing, and body image distortion. Weight- and body image-related variables, dieting, self-reported physical fitness, specific ED-related variables and other psychological variables were assessed. The robust Huber's model was applied in order to test the inflluence of the variables analysed on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) scores. In case of categorical variables, the Chi-square (χ2-test) or the Fisher's exact test were applied. Higher risk of ED was not obtained. Despite the relationship between EAT-40 and BMI, body appreciation and drive for thinness, scores on EAT-40 and BMI do not suggest higher risk in dancers. Dancers had a similar weight perception than other populations and body dissatisfaction seems not to be worse than the reported in other types of participants. Despite some limitations, our study adds some data in this field of study bearing in mind the use of a cluster of variables previously not taken into account as a whole.

  8. Effect of locus of control on disordered eating in athletes: the mediational role of self-regulation of eating attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffier, S; Paquet, Y; d'Arripe-Longueville, F

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the influence of locus of control on disordered eating as mediated by the self-regulation of eating attitudes. The assessment instruments were adapted for athletes as the entire sample of 179 volunteer University students (M(age)=21.12; SD=2.87) were all regularly involved in competition. The results showed that (a) an internal locus of control had a positive influence on the self-regulation of eating attitudes in social interaction contexts; (b) self-regulatory eating attitudes had a negative influence on disordered eating in contexts of negative affect, social interaction, and lack of anticipation of consequences on performance; and (c) an internal locus of control had an influence on disordered eating through the mediation of self-regulatory eating attitudes in social interaction contexts, and an external locus of control attributed to the coach and sports friends had an influence on disordered eating through the mediation of self-regulatory eating attitudes in contexts of negative affect, social interaction and lack of anticipation of consequences on performance. This study, combined with an earlier study from Scoffier, Maïano, and d'Arripe-Longueville (2009) on the antecedents of athletes' eating disorders, suggests the powerful impact of the social environment on the development of disordered eating in athletes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Eating attitudes, attitudes related to weight gain, and body satisfaction of pregnant adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliboni, Carolina Marques; Alvarenga, Marle Dos Santos

    2015-12-01

    To assess attitudes about eating, weight gain and body image of pregnant adolescents. Pregnant adolescents (n=67) were assessed using the Body Image Questionnaire, the Attitude towards Weight Gain during Pregnancy scale (AWGP) and questions about risk behaviors for eating disorders and unhealthy weight control practices. Associations between variables were analyzed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, Pearson and Spearman tests. The influence of the independent variables regarding skipping meals, body satisfaction and binge eating was evaluated by logistic regression. The average age of the adolescents was 15.3 years (SD=1.14) and their average gestational age was 21.9 weeks (SD=6.53). The average AWGP score was 52.6 points, indicating a positive attitude towards weight gain, and 82.1% of the pregnant girls were satisfied with their bodies. Obese girls had more body dissatisfaction (p=0.001), and overweight girls thought more about food (p=0.02) and eating (p=0.03). The frequency of reported binge eating was 41.8%, and the frequency of skipping meals was 19%. Regression analysis showed that the current Body Mass Index (p=0.03; OR=1.18) and the importance of body awareness and fitness before pregnancy (p=0.03; OR=4.63) were predictors of skipping meals. Higher socioeconomic level (p=0.04; OR=0.55) and greater concern with weight gain (p=0.03; OR=0.32) predicted binge eating. Even though the majority of the pregnant adolescents had positive attitudes toward weight gain and body satisfaction, those heavier and more concerned with weight gain had a higher risk of unhealthy attitudes, while those of lower social class, less concerned with weight gain and less embarrassed about their bodies during pregnancy, had a lower risk of unhealthy attitudes.

  10. Disordered Eating Attitudes and Their Correlates among Iranian High School Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Kooshavar, Deniz; Seyed Sajadi, Neda; Safoura, Safoura; Hamed Behzad, Mahdiyeh; Shahrokhi, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Disordered eating attitudes are contributing factors to the development of eating disorders. Adolescent girls are at high risk for eating diseases. In Iran, there is few data on the subject, especially in Azarian adolescent girls, so we did this study for assessing disordered eating attitudes and their correlates among Iranian Azarbaijani high school girls. In a cross-sectional study, 1887 high school girls were selected. Eating Attitude Test-26 (EAT-26) and socio economical questionnaires were used. The EAT-26 score of 20 or higher defined as disordered eating attitudes. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Program for Social Sciences, by using from descriptive and analytical statistics. Reliability and validity of the translated EAT-26 were 0.80, 0.76, respectively. In studied subjects, mean (SD) of EAT-26 was 11.71(8.48). Totally, 16.7% (C.I with 95%: 15.1- 18.3%) of students had disordered eating attitudes. About half of the participants were unhappy with their body weight and considered themselves as obese. Mean of EAT-26 was higher in this group. Groups, who intent to weight loss, were smoker, and who had age of menarche less than 11 years, also had higher EAT-26 scores. Parent's literacy or job, birth order, family size or income and house ownership had not any significant effect on EAT-26 score. Persian version of EAT-26 has good reliability and validity for assessing disordered eating attitudes in Azarian girl adolescents. Prevalence of disordered eating attitudes among Azarian adolescent girls are in the range of some studies, but are less than Arabian countries, and some European ones. In adolescent girls, body weight dissatisfaction, smoking and early menarche has important role in eating attitudes.

  11. Early improvement in eating attitudes during cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders: the impact of personality disorder cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Emma C; Waller, Glenn; Gannon, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    The personality disorders are commonly comorbid with the eating disorders. Personality disorder pathology is often suggested to impair the treatment of axis 1 disorders, including the eating disorders. This study examined whether personality disorder cognitions reduce the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for eating disorders, in terms of treatment dropout and change in eating disorder attitudes in the early stages of treatment. Participants were individuals with a diagnosed eating disorder, presenting for individual outpatient CBT. They completed measures of personality disorder cognitions and eating disorder attitudes at sessions one and six of CBT. Drop-out rates prior to session six were recorded. CBT had a relatively rapid onset of action, with a significant reduction in eating disorder attitudes over the first six sessions. Eating disorder attitudes were most strongly associated with cognitions related to anxiety-based personality disorders (avoidant, obsessive-compulsive and dependent). Individuals who dropped out of treatment prematurely had significantly higher levels of dependent personality disorder cognitions than those who remained in treatment. For those who remained in treatment, higher levels of avoidant, histrionic and borderline personality disorder cognitions were associated with a greater change in global eating disorder attitudes. CBT's action and retention of patients might be improved by consideration of such personality disorder cognitions when formulating and treating the eating disorders.

  12. Teaching Abnormal Psychology to Improve Attitudes toward Mental Illness and Help-Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Matthew S.; Cattaneo, Lauren B.; Mohr, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal psychology instructors often use traditional and personal methods to educate students about and improve student attitudes toward mental illness and professional help-seeking. Data from abnormal psychology students (N = 190) were used to determine if and how students' attitudes toward mental illness and professional help-seeking attitudes…

  13. Influence of parent's eating attitudes on eating disorders in school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, J; Sancho, C; Arija, M V

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between parents' cognitive and behavioural dimensions and the risk of eating disorders (ED) in non-clinical adolescents. From an initial sample of 1,336 boys and girls with a mean age of 11.37, a total of 258 subjects were selected either as being at risk of ED or as controls. These subjects and their parents comprised the sample at T1 and were followed-up 2 years later (T2). We examined disordered eating attitudes, body dissatisfaction (BD), body mass index (BMI) and ED diagnoses in the adolescents at two points in time. We also used the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 to examine the disordered eating attitudes of their parents at T1. The mother's BD, drive for thinness (DT), ineffectiveness and interoceptive awareness, and the father's DT and perfectionism were related to long-term ED. Logistic regression showed that predictors of ED were being female, mother's DT and social insecurity, and adolescent's BD. The BMI was not a predictor in this model. Father's perfectionism was a risk factor of ED. Specific cognitive and behavioural dimensions of ED in both parents can influence the development of an ED in early adolescents. This should be taken into account in the prevention and family oriented treatment of ED.

  14. Sex differences in attitudes towards females with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Mnich, Eva E; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Löwe, Bernd; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the public's attitudes and predictors of social distance towards women afflicted by eating disorders (anorexia nervosa [AN] and bulimia nervosa [BN]) under specific consideration of the respondents' sex. Eating disorders are still often seen as a women's health issue, and those afflicted remain stigmatized in Western societies. The concept of social distance is a frequently used indicator in awareness campaigns. Sex-specific results could add important information to destigmatization programs. Data originate from a German telephone survey which was conducted in 2011. Vignettes with signs and symptoms either suggestive of AN or BN were presented to the respondents randomly, who subsequently answered questions regarding beliefs about causes, contact to persons afflicted as well as desire for social distance. Stratified multiple linear regression analyses according to disorder under study were performed to examine associations between different predictors and desire for social distance. There were significant sex differences in desire for social distance, causal attributions, and emotional reactions towards women with eating disorders. E.g., with respect to AN, women exhibited a significantly greater desire for social distance than men (peffect concerning other predictors depending on the eating disorder under study. In BN, attribution of brain disease emerged as significant predictor of social distance among men. This is not true for women, where the attribution of weak will significantly predicted the desire for social distance. Sex-dependent differences in attitudes and predictors of social distance towards females afflicted should be met with tailored measures in anti-stigma campaigns, addressing women and men on different levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Eating attitudes and body image in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescent girls in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampei, Míriam A; Sigulem, Dirce M; Novo, Neil F; Juliano, Yara; Colugnati, Fernando A B

    2009-01-01

    Despite investigations into the rapid increase in eating disorders across diverse ethnic groups, conclusions concerning ethnicity and eating disorders are contradictory. The objective of the present study was to investigate eating attitudes in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescents in Brazil. The influence of body mass index (BMI), menarche and social-affective relationships on the development of eating disorders was also assessed. Questionnaires evaluating the incidence of eating disorders and the influence of social-affective relationships were applied to 544 Japanese-Brazilian and Caucasian adolescent girls: 10 to 11-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 122) and Caucasian (n = 176) pre-menarcheal adolescents, and 16 to 17-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 71) and Caucasian (n = 175) post-menarcheal adolescents. Caucasian girls obtained higher scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), showed greater body image dissatisfaction, dieted more often and had more diet models introduced by their mothers and peers than the Japanese-Brazilian girls. CONCLUSION The Caucasian adolescents overall appeared to be more sensitive to aesthetic and social pressures regarding body image than the Japanese adolescents. The high incidence of EAT-26 scores above 20 in the Caucasian pre-menarcheal group indicates that individual body image concerns are developing at an earlier age. Multiple logistic regression revealed several associations between mother-teen interactions and the development of abnormal eating attitudes.

  16. Cosmetic surgery in inpatients with eating disorders: attitudes and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Janelle W; Schreyer, Colleen C; Sarwer, David B; Heinberg, Leslie J; Redgrave, Graham W; Guarda, Angela S

    2012-01-01

    Body image disturbance is frequent among individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery and core to the pathology of eating disorders (ED); however, there is little research examining cosmetic surgery in ED. This study examined body image related measures, ED behaviors, and depression as predictors of attitudes toward cosmetic surgery in 129 women with ED. Patients who had undergone surgery (n=16, 12%) were compared to those who had not. Having a purging diagnosis, linking success to appearance, and making physical appearance comparisons were predictive of more favorable cosmetic surgery attitudes. All of those who had undergone surgery had purging diagnoses and, on average, were older, had higher BMIs, and were more likely to make physical appearance comparisons and know someone who had undergone surgery. In ED, acceptance and pursuit of cosmetic surgery appears to be related to social group influences more than weight and shape disturbance, media influences, or mood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Disordered Eating Cognitions as Predictors of Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Keri B.; Masuda, Akihiko; Cohen, Lindsey L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated whether young adults' disordered eating cognitions predicted attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services. Two hundred and eighty three 18- to 24-year-old undergraduate students completed a survey package that included measures of disordered eating cognitions and help-seeking attitudes. Hierarchical…

  18. Comparison of Eating Attitudes between Adolescent Girls with and without Asperger Syndrome: Daughters' and Mothers' Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyva, Efrosini

    2009-01-01

    Despite the evidence that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) have a propensity for being underweight or having comorbid eating disorders, no previous research has compared the eating attitudes of adolescent girls with AS to typically developing peers. This study compared reports of eating problems provided by the adolescent girls themselves…

  19. Body attitudes in patients with eating disorders at presentation and completion of intensive outpatient day treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exterkate, Cecile C; Vriesendorp, Patricia F; de Jong, Cor A J

    2009-01-01

    Due to the importance of the distorted body experience in eating disorder diagnosis and treatment, we wanted to explore body attitudes of patients with eating disorders before and after 5 months of intensive specialized outpatient day treatment. We assessed 193 patients diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) using the Body Attitude Test (BAT), Body Mass Index (BMI), Eating Disorder Evaluation Scale (EDES) and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90). Eating disorder subtypes differed in BMI, total body attitudes and negative appreciation of body size at intake, but not at termination of treatment. Following treatment, all patient groups reported large improvements in eating disorder pathology and all but the AN-Restrictive (AN-R) group, reported large improvements in overall psychological functioning. The AN patients demonstrated significant improvement in BMI, however the Anorexia Nervosa purging (AN-P) and Anorexia Nervosa restrictive (AN-R) subtypes differed in their changes in body attitudes. AN-R patients indicated no significant improvement in body attitudes. AN-P patients improved in total body attitudes, except one subscale. Patients with Bulimia Nervosa non-purging (BN-NP) subtype, Bulimia Nervosa purging (BN-P) subtype and EDNOS demonstrated similar improvements in total body attitudes (BAT). Body attitudes provide important insights into differences between eating disorder diagnostic categories and their treatment responsiveness.

  20. PREVALENCE OF DISORDERED EATING ATTITUDES AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS IN WUHU, CHINA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiegen; Lu, Mi; Tian, Li; Lu, Wei; Meng, Fanxiang; Chen, Changang; Tang, Tianmiao; He, Lianping; Yao, Yingshui

    2015-10-01

    the purpose of this study is to assess the current status of disordered eating attitudes and its related factors among University students in Anhui province, and to provide a basis for health intervention. this is a cross-sectional study. The University students admitted to the routine health exams were included in current study, and completed self-administered questionnaires which consist of general information and the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26). An EAT-26 score of 20 or higher indicated that a person has disordered eating attitudes. Data were analyzed using the SPSS13.0 software. a total of 1 328 subjects (469 male and 859 female), aged 16-24 years from a university in Wuhu were enrolled in this study. In our survey, the proportion of disordered eating attitudes among male, female, total students were 5.3%, 4.0% and 4.5%, respectively. The proportion of disordered eating attitudes among the students whose family annual income 60,000 were 4.2%, 3.9%, 4.3% and 6.9%, respectively. An interesting finding was that the female students are more likely to have disordered eating attitudes if their parents have more education. our research reveals that the current status of disordered eating attitudes in Anhui province is relatively low. Parents' education level may be related to eating attitudes among University students. It is essential to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders and its associated risk factors in University students whose parents have higher education. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. A 2-year longitudinal study of eating attitudes, BMI, perfectionism, asceticism and family climate in adolescent girls and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, J; Edlund, B; Ghaderi, A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study of 383 Swedish adolescent girls (11 and 13 years old at year 1) and their parents was to examine changes in eating attitudes over a two-year period, and to investigate the predictive value of eating attitudes, perfectionism, asceticism, family climate and body mass index (BMI) for the development of disturbed eating attitudes. The following self-report questionnaires were used: Children's Eating Attitudes test, Eating Attitudes Test, Eating Disorder Inventory for Children, Eating Disorder Inventory 2, I Think I Am and The Family Climate. The frequency of disturbed eating attitudes increased with increased age in the girls. Children's eating attitudes, higher BMI than peers, the girls rating of a less healthy relation to family and their fathers' eating attitudes at year 1 contributed most to the prediction of disturbed eating attitudes for the girls 2 years later. The results suggest that early signs of disturbed eating attitudes and higher BMI than peers may be important predictors for the development of more serious eating disturbances among adolescent girls.

  2. Associations among ADHD, Abnormal Eating and Overweight in a non-clinical sample of Asian children

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Lian; Shi, Huijing; Li, Xiaoru

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been found to be comorbid with obesity in adults, but the association in children is uncertain. Because the underlying mechanism of comorbidity in children has not been researched sufficiently, this study aims to explore the associations among ADHD, abnormal eating, and body mass index (BMI), as well as the mediating effect of depression in children. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 785 primary students in China. The parent-report ver...

  3. Regional grey matter volume abnormalities in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Axel; Vaitl, Dieter; Schienle, Anne

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated whether bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with structural brain abnormalities. Both disorders share the main symptom binge-eating, but are considered differential diagnoses. We attempted to identify alterations in grey matter volume (GMV) that are present in both psychopathologies as well as disorder-specific GMV characteristics. Such information can help to improve neurobiological models of eating disorders and their classification. A total of 50 participants (patients suffering from BN (purge type), BED, and normal-weight controls) underwent structural MRI scanning. GMV for specific brain regions involved in food/reinforcement processing was analyzed by means of voxel-based morphometry. Both patient groups were characterized by greater volumes of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) compared to healthy controls. In BN patients, who had increased ventral striatum volumes, body mass index and purging severity were correlated with striatal grey matter volume. Altogether, our data implicate a crucial role of the medial OFC in the studied eating disorders. The structural abnormality might be associated with dysfunctions in food reward processing and/or self-regulation. The bulimia-specific volume enlargement of the ventral striatum is discussed in the framework of negative reinforcement through purging and associated weight regulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Body shape and eating attitudes among female nursing students in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Y P S; Mathur, S; Kataria, D K

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. Eating disorders have been associated with body image disturbances, disordered eating attitudes, and other psychiatric difficulties. There is limited published literature on body shape and eating attitudes from non-western settings. This article presents the findings of a study of eating attitude and body shape concerns among female nursing students in India. METHODS. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted at a government nursing college associated with a tertiary-level multi-specialty hospital. Instruments used included semi-structured proforma, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), and the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ). Correlations of age and body mass index with EAT-26 and BSQ scores were carried out using Pearson's correlation statistics. The level of statistical significance was accepted at p positive correlation between body mass index and BSQ score. However, body mass index was not found to be correlated with EAT-26 score. CONCLUSIONS. The findings from the current study bring some interesting insights into body shape and eating attitudes of female nursing students from India.

  5. Factors influencing eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in South Africa--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, C P; Hollands, C

    1997-04-01

    To establish factors in the environment, e.g. family, peer or media, as well as individual factors, e.g. self-perception, which may influence eating attitudes. Cross-sectional survey. Non-clinical, community-based. Female high-school pupils. Responses to questions pertaining to environmental as well as individual factors for each respondent ('dieting questionnaire'; self report). Total scores derived from a self-report questionnaire pertaining to eating attitudes (Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)). Statistical analysis, using analysis of variance procedures, to determine significant associations between the two questionnaires. Specific individual wishes, perceptions, behaviours and topics of conversation appear to influence as well as predict eating attitudes. Family, especially maternal, factors play a role in determining eating attitudes. Peer and media (television) factors are not significantly influential. The findings provide preliminary data on factors that influence eating attitudes in a group at risk for the development of eating disorders. The findings have implications for the formulation of preventive strategies within a comprehensive treatment approach.

  6. Effect of a specialist eating disorders service on the knowledge and attitudes of local health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, A P; Baxter, H; Rogers, D

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a specialist eating disorders service on the attitudes and knowledge of local healthcare professionals. A questionnaire was sent to fully qualified psychiatrists, postgraduate trainees in psychiatry and general (internal) medicine, general practitioners (family physicians) and dietitians in two comparable cities: Leicester (which had a specialist eating disorders service) and Nottingham (which did not). Psychiatrists in training in Leicester had a greater knowledge of eating disorders than those in Nottingham. There was greater satisfaction with services in Leicester but no difference in attitudes. The presence of a local eating disorders service enhances postgraduate training and increases knowledge.

  7. Risk of disordered eating attitudes among male adolescents in five Emirates of the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Al-Lalla, Osama

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes among male adolescents in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multistage stratified sampling method was used to select 731 male students aged 15-18 years from five Emirates of the UAE. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to determine the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes in students. The findings revealed that the proportion of disordered eating attitudes in the UAE was relatively high compared with many developing and developed countries and ranged from 33.1% to 49.1%. Moreover, students living in the Emirates of Dubai and Al-Fujairah have double the risk of having disordered eating attitudes compared with students living in the other Emirates. The results suggest the need for screening adolescents for eating disorders, as well as for increased awareness and understanding of eating disorders and their associated risk factors in all male adolescents in the UAE. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fit for Purpose, Psychometric Assessment of the Eating Attitudes Test-26 in an Irish Adolescent Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Fionnuala; Fitzgerald, Amanda; McNicholas, Fiona; Dooley, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) in a sample of Irish adolescents (N=2444). Consistent with previous research, in adolescents, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) failed to replicate the original three-factor structure of the EAT-26. Goodness-of-fit indices provided support for a recently published six-factor EAT-18 model. As the EAT-26 is typically used as a unitary measure by clinicians, a second-order factor model was investigated, which supported a general concept of eating problems. Convergent validity of the EAT-18 was assessed using the Eating Disorder Inventory-3 (EDI-3). Using the 90th percentile, a cut-off score of 13 was identified on the EAT-18 that discriminated between those indicative and non-indicative of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Findings suggest that the revised factor structures may be more suitable for the general adolescent population than the original three-factor EAT-26. Clinical implications of the EAT-18 and future research recommendations are addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Temperament and loving-styles in college women: associations with eating attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worobey, J

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the associations of temperament and love attitudes with eating behaviors in 190 college-aged nonclinical women who completed a survey that included measures of temperament, loving-style, and eating attitudes. Certain temperament and loving-style variables showed significant statistical association with scores on eating attitudes. Specifically, both obsessive and game-playing love-styles were related to the Dieting and Bulimia-Food Preoccupation dimensions of the eating scales, while temperamental fear and anger were related to bulimia and oral control. The role of interpersonal relationships and self-perceptions of temperament may provide a useful perspective for understanding the etiology of eating disorders.

  10. Abnormal eating behavior in video-recorded meals in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianini, Loren; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuanjia; Attia, Evelyn; Walsh, B Timothy; Steinglass, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Eating behavior during meals in anorexia nervosa (AN) has long been noted to be abnormal, but little research has been done carefully characterizing these behaviors. These eating behaviors have been considered pathological, but are not well understood. The current study sought to quantify ingestive and non-ingestive behaviors during a laboratory lunch meal, compare them to the behaviors of healthy controls (HC), and examine their relationships with caloric intake and anxiety during the meal. A standardized lunch meal was video-recorded for 26 individuals with AN and 10 HC. Duration, frequency, and latency of 16 mealtime behaviors were coded using computer software. Caloric intake, dietary energy density (DEDS), and anxiety were also measured. Nine mealtime behaviors were identified that distinguished AN from HC: staring at food, tearing food, nibbling/picking, dissecting food, napkin use, inappropriate utensil use, hand fidgeting, eating latency, and nibbling/picking latency. Among AN, a subset of these behaviors was related to caloric intake and anxiety. These data demonstrate that the mealtime behaviors of patients with AN and HC differ significantly, and some of these behaviors may be associated with food intake and anxiety. These mealtime behaviors may be important treatment targets to improve eating behavior in individuals with AN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Attitudes toward orthorexia nervosa relative to DSM-5 eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Courtney C; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2017-07-01

    A pattern of disordered eating involving a pathological fixation with healthy food consumption, labeled orthorexia nervosa (ON), has recently generated attention; however, research has not yet investigated perceptions of ON-related behaviors. This study examined potential stigmatization of ON, compared with DSM-5 ED diagnoses. Participants (N = 505) were randomly assigned to read a vignette depicting a woman with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge-eating disorder (BED), or ON. They then answered questions about the individual depicted in the vignette. A series of MANOVAs investigated whether opinions and beliefs about the person depicted varied as a function of the disorder described in the vignette. Individuals with ON were perceived as less likely to "improve with treatment" than individuals with BN, and less likely to "pull themselves together," than individuals with BED. Individuals with ON and AN were viewed as "hard[er] to talk to" and more of a "danger to others" compared with individuals with BED. ON was viewed as less distressing, less likely to evoke sympathy, and more acceptable than the other disorders. Finally, "poor living choices" were perceived as contributing more substantially to ON. Participants' attributions of various personality characteristics did not differ based on ED diagnosis. Results suggest that ON is viewed as less severe, more desirable, and more often the result of personal life choices. However, findings also imply that ON is associated with stigma, similar to DSM-5 EDs. These negative attitudes might reinforce ON behaviors, and limit awareness of their potential complications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Attitude of Nigerian women to abnormal menstrual bleeding from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and Norethisterone Enanthate (Net-En) are frequently used progestogen-only injectable contraceptives in many developing countries including Nigeria. Their use is often complicated by abnormal and unpredictable menstrual bleeding patterns. This has often been ...

  13. Altering Attitudes toward Suicide in an Abnormal Psychology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, George

    1980-01-01

    The article describes a report stemming from the development and application of a Suicide Opinion Questionnaire (SOQ)--a 100 item attitudinal and factual instrument designed to cover a wide range of suicidal concerns. Subjects of the study were 17 college students drawn at random from 89 students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course. Results…

  14. [Prevalence of eating disorders assessed using eating attitudes test-26 and their relevant factors in Japanese working women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Miho; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of eating disorders and their relevant factors in Japanese women. Anonymous self-administered questionnaire surveys of 3023 working women aged 20-39 were conducted during health checkups in Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, and Fukuoka in 2012. Eating disorders were assessed using Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26). The factors related to EAT-26 scores ≥20 were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. The prevalences of eating disorders among the participants with EAT-26 scores ≥20 were 2.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8-2.9%] of all the participating women aged 20-39, 3.4% (95% CI: 2.5%-4.3%) of women in their 20s, and 1.2% (95% CI: 0.6%-1.8%) of women in their 30s. Logistic regression analysis showed that EAT-26 scores of ≥20 were associated with the following variables: perceived ideal BMI ≤17.5 kg/m(2) (OR: 4.55, 95% CI: 2.08-9.93), change in body weight in the previous six months (OR: 2.83, 95% CI: 1.61-4.95), being 20-29 years of age (OR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.42-4.89), and the perception of being fat (OR=2.54, 95% CI: 1.24-5.18). The prevalence of eating disorders with EAT-26 scores ≥20 was 2.4% (95% CI: 1.8%-2.9%) among Japanese working women aged 20-39. EAT-26 scores ≥20 were most closely associated with a perceived ideal BMI of ≤17.5 kg/m(2). Eating disorders may be more prevalent among women who want to lose weight to achieve a BMI of ≤17.5 kg/m(2), and these women should be carefully monitored.

  15. Disordered eating attitudes and behaviours in teenaged girls: a school-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J M; Bennett, S; Olmsted, M P; Lawson, M L; Rodin, G

    2001-09-04

    Disordered eating attitudes and behaviours are common in older teens and young women in Western countries. Recent evidence suggests that the prevalence of these disorders is rising and that the age of onset has fallen. In the present study, disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours were evaluated in a large school-based population in Ontario in order to determine their prevalence and demographic distribution. Females, aged 12-18 years, from schools in Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa were invited to complete questionnaires, including 3 subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory (Drive for Thinness, Body Dissatisfaction, Bulimia), the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) and the Diagnostic Survey for Eating Disorders (DSED). Questionnaires were completed by 1739 (70%) of the 2483 adolescent females who were approached. The mean age of subjects in the sample was 14.6 (standard deviation 1.9) years. Thirteen percent of those aged 12-14 years and 16% of those aged 15-18 years had scores above the recommended cut-off (> or = 20) for disordered eating on the EAT-26. Current dieting to lose weight was reported by 23% of participants. Binge eating with associated loss of control was reported by 15% of participants, self-induced vomiting by 8.2% and the use of diet pills by 2.4%. Laxative and diuretic misuse were uncommon. Dieting was associated with an increased risk of binge-eating and purging behaviours. Older age and body mass index in the highest quartile were independently related to symptoms of eating disorders. Disordered eating attitudes and behaviours were present in over 27% of girls aged 12-18 years and were seen to increase gradually throughout adolescence. Prevention programs to diminish the progression and impact of these disorders should be implemented and assessed.

  16. Body attitudes in patients with eating disorders at presentation and completion of intensive outpatient day treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, C.C.; Vriesendorp, P.F.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2009-01-01

    Due to the importance of the distorted body experience in eating disorder diagnosis and treatment, we wanted to explore body attitudes of patients with eating disorders before and after 5 months of intensive specialized outpatient day treatment. We assessed 193 patients diagnosed with Anorexia

  17. Attitudes and beliefs affect frequency of eating out in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attitudes and beliefs reflecting cultural values can have a positive or negative influence on eating behaviors. Eating out may negatively affect diet quality through increased fat intake and larger portion sizes. In a representative sample of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) consisting of 1601 Af...

  18. Body satisfaction and eating attitudes among girls and young women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, Eda; Caglar, Gamze Sinem; Gürsoy, Aslı Yarcı; Yilmaz, Muserref Banu

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of the current study was to examine the associations between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and body dissatisfaction and eating attitudes in a sample of adolescent girls and young women. Body dissatisfaction is 1 of the strongest predictors of the development of negative outcomes such as low self-esteem, and eating disorders. In adolescent age group of patients, both hirsutism and increased body mass index, appearing with PCOS, may be the leading symptoms also resulting or contributing to body dissatisfaction and eating disorder. The sample of 94 Turkish adolescent girls and young women [PCOS (n = 42) vs non-PCOS (n = 52)] completed measures of figure rating scale, the socio-cultural attitudes toward appearance questionnaire, body esteem scale, eating attitude test, and demographics. The results revealed that body esteem was important for predicting eating attitudes in both groups and sociocultural internalization of thinness ideal and body dissatisfaction were also significant factors in PCOS group. However, scores for major study variables (BMI, sociocultural attitudes toward awareness and internalized appearance ideals, body esteem subscales, body dissatisfaction and eating attitudes) in the PCOS group were not significantly higher than those for girls without PCOS. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Distorted weight perception correlates with disordered eating attitudes in Kuwaiti college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkazemi, Dalal; Zafar, Tasleem A; Ebrahim, Mariam; Kubow, Stan

    2018-02-28

    We investigated the presence of disordered eating attitudes and weight perception among young women at body mass index (BMI) values that correspond to underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese weight status. Data were collected from 1,147 female undergraduate students (89% Kuwaiti nationals) recruited from Kuwait University through employment of the eating attitude test (EAT-26) together with an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire to determine the prevalence of symptomatology indicative of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. The mean EAT-26 scores differed significantly between the weight categories. More students with overweight and obesity scored above the established EAT-26 cut off value indicating at risk of disordered eating compared to students who were at a normal weight or underweight (52.1% vs. 38.8%, respectively, X 2 (1) =16.1, p anorexia nervosa. Distorted weight perception was found in all weight categories. The high proportion of disordered eating attitudes among Kuwaiti college women could not be attributed to obesity alone as the type of disordered eating behavior varied more by weight perception than by weight status. The high levels of eating disorder related symptoms could be due to a combination of the social influences, diet, and lifestyle of college students. Such factors need to be considered by healthcare professionals as early as possible with more focused programs towards promotion of healthy weight for college students. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours: Eating habits among students of nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To value in which proportion the nutrition knowledge guarantees in keeping with a healthy diet pattern behaviours. Method: Descriptive, transversal study, carried out with 50 second-year students belonging to the career in Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Seville (Spain, all of them females, with mean age of 21.16 years old. The collection of data related to the daily food ingestion was made following the 24-hours-recount technique and using two tables of food composition for the calculation of the contribution. Students have followed matters such as basic nutrition and life cycle, bromatology, nutrition education and dietetics. Results: There is an absolute fast from breakfast till lunch in more than half of the cases, 16% of the students do not eat anything during the evening, either; and in 20% of the cases the daily food consists in breakfast, lunch and dinner. From an energetic point of view, there is an hypocaloric pattern and, concerning macronutrients, an ingestion excess of fats and proteins. Fibre ingestion remains under current recommendations and iron -in an almost 60%-, calcium and folic acid ingestion are also deficient. Conclusions: It seems as if social pressure and feeding fashions had more weight at the time of determining the attitudes and behaviours in front of food than the fact of owning suitable knowledge on the matter. It is not likely that having that knowledge, even as in our sample, at a technical level, can guarantee proper behaviours and therefore a healthful feeding behaviour.

  1. Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Help for an Eating Disorder: The Role of Stigma and Anticipated Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ashley H.; Vogel, David L.; Wade, Nathaniel G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-stigma, anticipated risks and benefits associated with seeking counseling, and attitudes toward seeking counseling among college students with disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. The results of hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that self-stigma and the anticipated risks and…

  2. Anorexic Eating Attitudes and Behaviors of Male and Female College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wendy L.; Hughes, Honore M.; Katz, Barry; Searight, H. Russell

    1999-01-01

    Examines gender differences in eating attitudes and behaviors in undergraduate college students (N=471). Anorexic symptomatology was found for 20% of the females and 10% of the males. In general, students without symptomatic attitudes and behaviors had a more positive self-concept and reported less psychological distress than did those with eating…

  3. Gender Perspectives on Adolescent Eating Behaviors: A Study on the Eating Attitudes and Behaviors of Junior Secondary Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Yeung, Wai-ling Theresa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research aimed to investigate the eating attitudes and behaviors of junior secondary students in Hong Kong, with a specific focus on possible gender differences. Design: A survey was conducted in 2005 to solicit data about participants' food knowledge, eating attitudes and behavior, perceptions of cooking skills and body weight,…

  4. The prevalence of abnormal eating behaviour in a representative sample of the French diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M; Gallanagh, J; Livingstone, M B; Gaillard, C; Ritz, P

    2008-12-01

    To assess the relationship between abnormal eating behaviour (AEB) and diabetes in a sample of French adult patients with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes. Ninety-four consecutively recruited patients self-completed a series of validated questionnaires. Over one-fourth of men with T1D (26%) or T2D (27%) and 11% of female T2D patients reported consistent and pathological overeating or binge-eating during the previous six months. Glycaemic control in these T1D patients was poorer than in T1D patients defined as normal eaters (NORM) (11.9% versus 9.6%), but did not reach statistical significance (P=0.08), and no significant difference was observed in the T2D group (P=0.61) either. T2D patients reported being markedly more restrained when eating than did the T1D patients (P=0.002), and their restraint increased along with their BMI (Phunger (P=0.02) and disinhibition (P=0.003) than did the NORM patients. AEB is present in French diabetic patients at levels that are probably higher than among the general population. These results highlight the need for: (1) greater awareness among diabetes clinicians of the problem; (2) regular screening of diabetic patients for AEB; and (3) adaptation of therapeutic and dietary recommendations for this patient subgroup.

  5. Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviors Related to Eating Out among University Students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In many countries the frequency of eating out has steadily increased over the last few decades, and this behavioris often associated with unhealthy dietary patterns. This study aimed to describe the levels of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors (KAB related to eating out among university students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the college town in Chongqing, China with a total of 1634 participants. The mean eating out related KAB scores were: knowledge 11.5 ± 2.9, attitude 17.0 ± 2.8, and behaviors 24.2 ± 4.8 (possible total scores: 20, 24, 40 respectively. As the level of knowledge increased, the percentage of highly satisfactory attitude and behaviors increased. Only 10% of the participants did not eat out for lunch and dinner during weekends in the last month. Gender, ethnicity, mother’s education, monthly boarding expenses, living place during the study, and the frequency of eating out for breakfast were statistically associated with the scores of KAB. In conclusion, Chinese junior students had poor knowledge of and behaviors towards eating out and ate out frequently. Educational interventionsto improve knowledge related eating out are needed in order to promote healthy eating out behaviors among Chinese university students.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviors Related to Eating Out among University Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Wenjie; Bai, Ruixue; Zhang, Fan; Sharma, Manoj; Shi, Zumin; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Abdullah, Abu S; Zhao, Yong

    2016-07-12

    In many countries the frequency of eating out has steadily increased over the last few decades, and this behavioris often associated with unhealthy dietary patterns. This study aimed to describe the levels of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors (KAB) related to eating out among university students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the college town in Chongqing, China with a total of 1634 participants. The mean eating out related KAB scores were: knowledge 11.5 ± 2.9, attitude 17.0 ± 2.8, and behaviors 24.2 ± 4.8 (possible total scores: 20, 24, 40 respectively). As the level of knowledge increased, the percentage of highly satisfactory attitude and behaviors increased. Only 10% of the participants did not eat out for lunch and dinner during weekends in the last month. Gender, ethnicity, mother's education, monthly boarding expenses, living place during the study, and the frequency of eating out for breakfast were statistically associated with the scores of KAB. In conclusion, Chinese junior students had poor knowledge of and behaviors towards eating out and ate out frequently. Educational interventionsto improve knowledge related eating out are needed in order to promote healthy eating out behaviors among Chinese university students.

  7. Eating and body attitudes related to noncompetitive bodybuilding in military and general Hungarian male student populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, Liza; Murányi, István; Túry, Ferenc

    2007-02-01

    Pathological eating attitudes and extreme weight control practices occur most commonly in certain female populations. In some young male occupation groups, such as in the armed forces, the appearance of physical strength and muscularity has particular importance. We studied body and eating attitudes and the prevalence of bodybuilding and steroid abuse in 480 military college and 752 general college male students. The Eating Disorder Inventory was used for all subjects. General college students had higher body mass index values than did military students. The prevalence of bodybuilding and steroid abuse was significantly greater in the military population. Comparisons between the study groups and within groups showed significantly different scores on certain Eating Disorder Inventory subscales. The study revealed that male military college students have some protective factors against the psychopathological features of eating disorders.

  8. The discrepancy between implicit and explicit attitudes in predicting disinhibited eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Stephanie P; Forman, Evan M; Meiran, Nachshon; Herbert, James D; Juarascio, Adrienne S; Butryn, Meghan L

    2014-01-01

    Disinhibited eating (i.e., the tendency to overeat, despite intentions not to do so, in the presence of palatable foods or other cues such as emotional stress) is strongly linked with obesity and appears to be associated with both implicit (automatic) and explicit (deliberative) food attitudes. Prior research suggests that a large discrepancy between implicit and explicit food attitudes may contribute to greater levels of disinhibited eating; however this theory has not been directly tested. The current study examined whether the discrepancy between implicit and explicit attitudes towards chocolate could predict both lab-based and self-reported disinhibited eating of chocolate. Results revealed that, whereas neither implicit nor explicit attitudes alone predicted disinhibited eating, absolute attitude discrepancy positively predicted chocolate consumption. Impulsivity moderated this effect, such that discrepancy was less predictive of disinhibited eating for those who exhibited lower levels of impulsivity. The results align with the meta-cognitive model to indicate that attitude discrepancy may be involved in overeating. © 2013.

  9. Psychometric properties of a short version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-8) in a German representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Felicitas; Strauss, Bernhard; Braehler, Elmar; Altmann, Uwe; Berger, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Disordered eating is common for all ages and sexes in the general population. However, only some individuals are known to develop clinically relevant eating disorders. There is a critical need of efficient, reliable and valid screening instruments to measure disordered eating for the general population. The Eating Attitudes Test was shortened into an 8-item-version to screen individuals at high risk of developing clinical eating disorders in a general population sample. Psychometric properties (Cronbach's α, construct and concurrent validity and factor structure), cutoff scores (with sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value) and norms were determined in a representative sample of the German population (N=2527). Factorial validity was investigated using item response modeling. Results confirmed reliability and validity of the questionnaire. Internal consistency and convergent validity were good. Analysis revealed different cutoff points for male and female participants. Values for sensitivity and specificity were satisfying and the positive predictive value was higher compared to other short screening instruments for disordered eating. Factorial analysis revealed a one-factor solution with an excellent model fit. The elimination of one item was discussed. Gender- and age-specific norms are reported. Overall results indicated that the EAT-8 is an efficient instrument suitable for screening purposes in large general population samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Disordered eating attitudes and behaviours among adolescents in Hong Kong: prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Carmen Km; Ng, Cherry Fn; Yu, Chak Man; Young, Betty Wy

    2007-12-01

    To study the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes and behaviours among adolescents in Hong Kong and to examine the socio-demographic and behavioural correlates. Three secondary schools with different academic performance were selected from the Eastern District of Hong Kong. A total of 2382 students enrolled in Forms 1-7 at the three schools completed a specially designed questionnaire. The questionnaire contained questions on socio-demographic information, body weight satisfaction, exposure to mass media, health behaviours as well as the Eating Attitudes Test - 26 (EAT-26). Data were analysed using Student's t-test, chi2 analysis and multivariate logistic regression models. Disordered eating (EAT score > or =20) was present in 52 (3.9%) adolescent boys and 68 (6.5%) adolescent girls. The youngest case was only 11 years old. A high degree of body weight dissatisfaction was shared by our adolescents. Teenage girls, overweight youths and those with poor academic performance were at increased risk of having disordered eating. Strong associations were found between disordered eating and other health-compromising behaviours including smoking, alcohol and soft drug use, delinquent behaviours, suicidal ideation and self-harm behaviours. Exposure to entertainment, beauty and youth magazines was positively related to disordered eating. Disordered eating is prevalent among adolescents in Hong Kong. It remains a significant public health challenge to our community. Prevention programmes targeting youths at the greatest risk should be considered.

  11. Big Five Personality Traits and Eating Attitudes in Intensively Training Dancers: The Mediating Role of Internalized Thinness Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffier-Mériaux, Stéphanie; Falzon, Charlène; Lewton-Brain, Peter; Filaire, Edith; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Dancers are at high risk of developing disordered eating attitudes, notably because of internalized thinness norms. Although the big five personality traits have been shown to be associated with eating attitudes in daily life, in dancers where eating issues and thinness norms internalization could be salient little is known about these associations and the role of the internalization of thinness norms in this relationship. The main objectives of this study were thus to examine the relationships between the personality traits defined in the big five model and the self-regulation of eating attitudes, and to assess the role of internalized thinness norms in this association. The study included 180 intensively training dancers with an average age of 15.6 years (SD = 2.8). Dancers completed questionnaires measuring the big five personality traits, internalization of thinness norms and self-regulation of eating attitudes in sport. Bootstrapped mediation analyses showed that neuroticism was negatively associated with self-regulation of eating attitudes, both directly and indirectly through the mediating role of internalized thinness norms. This study suggested that: (a) neuroticism is a vulnerability factor for self-regulation of eating attitudes in dancers, as already evidenced in the general population, and (b) the internalization of thinness norms is a pathway through which neuroticism affects self-regulation of eating attitudes. The big five model is therefore partially related to the internalization of thinness norms and eating attitudes in dancers. Key pointsThe big five model relates to the internalization of thinness norms and eating attitudes in dancers.Neuroticism is negatively related to the self-regulation of eating attitudes.The internalization of thinness norms is correlated to the relationship between neuroticism and self-regulation of eating attitudes.

  12. Measurement invariance of the Eating Attitudes Test-26 in Caucasian and Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belon, Katherine E; Smith, Jane Ellen; Bryan, Angela D; Lash, Denise N; Winn, Jaime L; Gianini, Loren M

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether the EAT-26 functions similarly in Caucasian and Hispanic samples, the current study investigated the factor structure of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) in 235 undergraduate Caucasian (53.6%) and Hispanic (46.4%) women, and tested for measurement invariance across the two samples. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) of the original 3-factor structure of the EAT resulted in a poor fit in both the Caucasian and Hispanic samples. We then performed a CFA using a previously discovered 4-factor, 16-item structure. This abbreviated measure was a good fit in both the Caucasian and Hispanic samples, and the model was invariant across all dimensions tested. The 16-item EAT is a better-fitting measure in Caucasian and Hispanic women than the commonly used EAT-26. This replicates an earlier finding and generalizes those conclusions to a Hispanic sample. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Factor analysis and cut-off score of the 26-item eating attitudes test in a Greek sample

    OpenAIRE

    ANGELIKI DOUKA; EIRINI GRAMMATOPOULOU,; EMMANOUIL SKORDILIS; DIMITRA KOUTSOUKI

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The study examined the cross-cultural validity of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) in Greece, with 26 items under three subscales ('Dieting', 'Bulimia and Food Preoccupation', 'Oral Control'). Method: A total of 167 Greek undergraduate students (19 to 23 years old), and 20 female patients with Eating Disorders (13 to 42 years old) were examined with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results: The factor analysis of the EAT-26 revealed a 13 items EAT model, with the thr...

  14. The Correlation between Obsessive Compulsive Features and Dimensions of Pathological Eating Attitudes in Non-clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammadzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Obsessive compulsive symptoms are prevalent in individuals with eating disorders at clinical level. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between obsessive compulsive features and pathological eating attitudes. Methods: This research is a correlational study. A sample of 790 university students were selected using stratified random sampling method and investigated by Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R, and Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 questionnaires. Data were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Results: There were a correlation between obsessive-compulsive features and pathological eating attitudes (p<0.001, r=0.38, The results showed that obsessive-compulsive features can predict 15% of pathological eating attitudes (p<0.001, r2=0.15. Conclusion: The identified correlation is possibly related to common components between obsessive compulsive and eating disorders.

  15. Qualidades psicométricas do Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) para adolescentes brasileiros do sexo masculino

    OpenAIRE

    Fortes, Leonardo de Sousa; Amaral, Ana Carolina Soares; Almeida, Sebastião Sousa; Conti, Maria Aparecida; Ferreira, Maria Elisa Caputo

    2017-01-01

    A pesquisa objetivou avaliar as qualidades psicométricas do Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) para adolescentes brasileiros do sexo masculino. A amostra foi composta por 357 jovens, com idade entre 10 e 19 anos. Os resultados evidenciaram que 32,8% variância dos dados foram explicados por um único fator e o instrumento foi capaz de diferenciar seus escores em função do estado nutricional (p0,88), não registrando diferença entre os escores (teste-reteste) (p

  16. Are Elite Female Soccer Athletes at Risk for Disordered Eating Attitudes, Menstrual Dysfunction, and Stress Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; McKeon, Kathryn; Simpson, Scott; Meyer, E Blair; Yemm, Ted; Brophy, Robert

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of stress fractures, menstrual dysfunction and disordered eating attitudes in elite female soccer athletes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Female soccer athletes were recruited from a national level youth soccer club, an NCAA Division I university team, and a women's professional team. Two hundred twenty female soccer athletes with a mean age of 16.4 ± 4 years and BMI of 20.8 ± 2 kg/m(2) completed the study, representing all athletes from the included teams. One-time surveys completed by the athletes. Height and weight were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each athlete. Athletes reported age of menarche, history of missing 3 or more menses within a 12-month period and stress fracture. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to assess the athlete's body perception and attitudes toward eating. Of the 220 soccer athletes, 3 athletes (1.6%) had a low BMI for their age, and 19 (8.6%) reported stress fractures of the lower extremity. Among athletes who had reached menarche, the average onset was 13 + 1 year; menstrual dysfunction were present in 21 (19.3%). On the EAT-26, 1 player scored in the high risk range (>20) and 17 (7.7%) scored in the intermediate risk range (10-19) for eating disorders. Athletes with an EAT-26 score ≥ 10 points had a significantly higher prevalence of menstrual dysfunction in the past year compared to athletes with an EAT-26 score of less than 10 (P = .02). Elite female soccer athletes are susceptible to stress fractures and menstrual dysfunction and have delayed onset of menarche despite normal BMI and appropriate body perception and attitudes towards eating. Further studies are needed to better understand stress fracture risk in female soccer athletes and in other team sports to determine how these findings relate to long-term bone health in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Primary care physicians' knowledge of and attitudes toward the eating disorders: do they affect clinical actions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Laura; Waller, Glenn; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the influence of primary care physicians' knowledge of and attitudes to eating disorders on their treatment decisions. A sample of primary care physicians completed self-report measures on eating disorders and their attitudes towards such patients. They also indicated their diagnosis and treatment decisions in response to case vignettes. Physicians had substantial gaps in knowledge of the eating disorders. Attitudes to anorexia nervosa clustered differently to those toward patients with bulimia nervosa. However, for both disorders, the factor that explained the most variance was illness duration and consequences. There was no association of knowledge and attitudes, and these variables did not predicted the likelihood of diagnosing an eating disorder. However, those with higher knowledge scores were more likely to ensure that a follow-up appointment took place, particularly when they held the attitude that people with anorexia nervosa had personal control over their problem. There is a need for greater education of primary care physicians regarding the diagnosis and treatment of the eating disorders, and for that information to be more readily accessible when it is needed. Their clinical actions need to be guided by more objective sources of information and protocols.

  18. Big Five Personality Traits and Eating Attitudes in Intensively Training Dancers: The Mediating Role of Internalized Thinness Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Scoffier-Mériaux, Charlène Falzon, Peter Lewton-Brain, Edith Filaire, Fabienne d’Arripe-Longueville

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dancers are at high risk of developing disordered eating attitudes, notably because of internalized thinness norms. Although the big five personality traits have been shown to be associated with eating attitudes in daily life, in dancers where eating issues and thinness norms internalization could be salient little is known about these associations and the role of the internalization of thinness norms in this relationship. The main objectives of this study were thus to examine the relationships between the personality traits defined in the big five model and the self-regulation of eating attitudes, and to assess the role of internalized thinness norms in this association. The study included 180 intensively training dancers with an average age of 15.6 years (SD = 2.8. Dancers completed questionnaires measuring the big five personality traits, internalization of thinness norms and self-regulation of eating attitudes in sport. Bootstrapped mediation analyses showed that neuroticism was negatively associated with self-regulation of eating attitudes, both directly and indirectly through the mediating role of internalized thinness norms. This study suggested that: (a neuroticism is a vulnerability factor for self-regulation of eating attitudes in dancers, as already evidenced in the general population, and (b the internalization of thinness norms is a pathway through which neuroticism affects self-regulation of eating attitudes. The big five model is therefore partially related to the internalization of thinness norms and eating attitudes in dancers.

  19. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  20. Psychometric properties of the Eating Attitude Test-26 for female Iranian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Sima; Moloodi, Reza; Zarbaksh, Mohmmad-Reza; Ghaderi, Ata

    2014-06-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to assess the factor structure, the convergent and divergent validity, and the reliability of the Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26) in a sample of female Iranian students. After a rigorous translation and back-translation of the EAT-26, 561 female students from the Tonekabon branch of the Islamic Azad University completed the EAT-26, the Binge Eating Scale (BES), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Six weeks later, 74 of these students participated in a test-retest procedure. The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a five-factor solution that accounted for 50% of the total variance. The factors included "drive for thinness", "restrained eating", "perceived social pressure to eat", "oral control", and "bulimia". These factors demonstrated satisfactory concurrent validity, acceptable to high internal consistency (0.76-0.92), and low test-retest reliability (0.26-0.64). The factors effectively identified the students who were currently on a diet, and those who had never participated in a weight reduction program. The results provide mixed support for the reliability and validity of the EAT-26 for a non-clinical Iranian population. However, its discriminant validity makes it a useful measure for screening purposes and identifying women at risk for developing disordered eating or eating disorders. Future research should replicate this study in both non-clinical and clinical settings in Iran.

  1. Factors influencing eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peer and media (television) factors are not significantly influential. The findings provide preliminary data on factors that influence eating attrtudes in a group at risk for the development of eating disorders. The findings have implications for the formulation of preventive strategies within a comprehensive treatment approach.

  2. Neurobiochemical and psychological factors influencing the eating behaviors and attitudes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, Teresa; Dutkiewicz, Agata; Paszynska, Elzbieta; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Slopien, Agnieszka; Tyszkiewicz-Nwafor, Marta

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the characteristic features which contribute to inappropriate eating attitudes in people suffering from anorexia nervosa, based on an analysis of recent data. Factors influencing these attitudes have a genetic, neurobiological, biochemical, affective-motivational, cognitive, and behavioral background. Another important issue addressed in the paper is a description of the mechanism leading to continuous dietary restrictions. The altered activity of neurotransmitters modulating patients' moods after the consumption of food and a disturbed responsiveness to enterohormones enhance affective-motivational and cognitive aspects which, in turn, impede the improvement of eating behaviors. An understanding of the mechanisms behind the factors affecting the maintenance of inappropriate eating attitudes may contribute to greater effectiveness in the treatment of anorexia nervosa.

  3. The influence of a behavioral weight management program on disordered eating attitudes and behaviors in children with overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follansbee-Junger, Katherine; Janicke, David M; Sallinen, Bethany J

    2010-11-01

    Behavioral interventions targeting children with overweight have been successful in facilitating weight loss; however, there is concern that these programs produce disordered eating attitudes among youth. The purpose of this research was to determine whether youth with overweight receiving one of two behavioral interventions were more likely to report an increase in disordered eating attitudes over time compared to a waitlist control and to determine psychosocial predictors of eating-disordered attitudes at 6-month follow-up. Participants were randomized to one of two behavioral lifestyle interventions or a waitlist control. Data were collected at baseline, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Participants were 68 youths with overweight, aged 8 to 13 years, and their parent(s) who lived in rural north central Florida. The project ran from January 2006 to January 2008. Each treatment condition consisted of 12 group sessions over 16 weeks. Parents completed a demographic form and the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Children completed the Children's Eating Attitudes Test, Schwartz Peer Victimization Scale, and Children's Body Image Scale. Mixed 2×2 analyses of variance were used to examine the effect of treatment on eating attitudes. Hierarchical linear regression was used to assess whether baseline levels of psychosocial variables predicted disordered eating attitudes at follow-up, controlling for baseline eating attitudes and treatment condition. Youth who participated in the behavioral interventions did not report significant increases in disordered eating attitudes over time compared to the waitlist control. Across all conditions, higher levels of body dissatisfaction, peer victimization, parent restrictive feeding practices, and concern for child weight at baseline predicted higher levels of disordered eating attitudes at follow-up. These findings do not provide evidence that behavioral interventions lead to an increase in unhealthy eating attitudes and behaviors

  4. [Entrapped by the beauty industry: eating and body attitudes of those working in the beauty industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács-Márton, Réka; Vásárhelyi, Eva; Szabó, Pál

    2008-01-01

    Some groups of professionals (models, actresses, ballet dancers, jockeys and athletes) are considered as risk populations for eating disorders and body image disorders. We assume that those working in the beauty industry may also be a high risk group for developing eating disorders, as their work is closely related to beauty and fashion. Eating disorders were assessed using the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Behaviour Severity Scale, and the tests for assessment of body image included the Human Figure Drawings Test, the Body dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory, the Body Attitudes Test, and the Body Investment Scale. Questionnaire data of 543 subjects were analysed. The study sample comprised 128 models from Transylvania (5 males, 123 females) and 167 models from Hungary (10 males, 157 females). These groups were compared with control groups in Transylvania and Hungary, consisting of 148 (25 males, 123 females) subjects in Transylvania and 101 subjects (5 males, 95 females) in Hungary. Weight reducing methods, such as dieting, exercise, the use of appetite suppressants and diuretics, were significantly more prevalent in the group of models. The mean total score and the scores of the Dieting and Bulimia subscales were higher in the group of models in comparison with the control group. The prevalence of clinical and subclinical eating disorders was higher in the group of models. The percentage of subjects scoring above the cut-off score on the Body Dissatisfaction Scale of the Eating Disorder Inventory was higher in the Hungarian control group. The Hungarian control subjects scored higher on the General Body Dissatisfaction Scale of the Body Attitudes Test. Models invest more money and time in their body care. The above results suggest that working in beauty industry may pose an increased risk of developing eating disorders.

  5. Children with food refusal: An assessment of parental eating attitudes and their styles of coping with stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Tan

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: The parental perception and definition of eating problemsdoes not necessarily indicate the presence of an eating disorder in a child. In fact, the eating attitudes of the fathers were related to the low percentile weight and height values of the children, and a child’s food refusal was not dependent on the stress coping style used by the parent.

  6. Eating Attitudes, Perfectionism and Body-esteem of Elite Male Judoists and Cyclists

    OpenAIRE

    Filaire, Edith; Rouveix, Matthieu; Pannafieux, Christelle; Ferrand, Claude

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that male athletes who feel pressured to maintain a specific body weight present an elevated risk of subclinical eating disorders. Twelve judoists (19.5 ± 0.5 yr), fifteen cyclists (21.2 ± 2.8 yr) and seventeen non- competitive students matched for BMI and used as controls (21.8 ± 1.8 yr) were studied using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evalua...

  7. Disordered eating attitudes in relation to body image and emotional intelligence in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costarelli, V; Demerzi, M; Stamou, D

    2009-06-01

    A number of different psychological factors have been implicated in the multifactorial aetiology of disordered eating (DE) attitudes and behaviours; however, the possible role of emotional intelligence in DE symptomatology has not been thoroughly investigated in the past. The present study aimed to explore the possible differences in emotional intelligence, body image and anxiety levels in young females with DE attitudes and healthy controls. A total of 92 Greek female university students, 18-30 years old, were recruited. Subjects completed the following questionnaires: the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Multidimensional Body-Self Questionnaire (MBRSQ), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the BarOn Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (BarOn EQ-I). The EAT-26 revealed that 23% of the subjects presented DE attitudes. Women in the DE attitudes group had lower levels of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in comparison to the control group, particularly in factors such as emotional self-awareness (P intelligence, such as emotional self-awareness and interpersonal relationships, which is an important finding in terms of the prevention and management of DE, and warrants further investigation.

  8. Teasing, acculturation, and cultural conflict: psychosocial correlates of body image and eating attitudes among South Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sheethal D; Crowther, Janis H

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined sociocultural correlates of body dissatisfaction and maladaptive eating attitudes among 74 South Asian American women. Participants completed measures assessing three forms of teasing--general appearance, weight/shape, and ethnic--as well as thin-ideal internalization, acculturation, cultural conflict, body dissatisfaction, and maladaptive eating attitudes. Results indicated that all three types of teasing and cultural conflict were significantly related to body dissatisfaction and maladaptive eating attitudes. Cultural conflict was found to mediate the relationship between ethnic teasing and body dissatisfaction. Neither thin-ideal internalization nor acculturation was significantly associated with either body dissatisfaction or maladaptive eating attitudes. However, body dissatisfaction was found to mediate the relationship between weight/shape teasing and maladaptive eating attitudes. Implications of these findings and possible future directions for research on South Asian American women are discussed. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Health concern, food choice motives, and attitudes toward healthy eating: the mediating role of food choice motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Hua Christine

    2008-07-01

    This study addresses how various health concerns might influence not only consumers' food choice motives but also consumers' subsequent attitudes toward healthy eating. This study expects that those consumers with greater health concerns would have different food choice motives and better attitudes toward healthy eating. A self-completion questionnaire was used to gather information. Participants, a random sample of 500 undergraduate students from a national university in Taipei, Taiwan, provided a total of 456 usable questionnaires, representing a valid response rate of 91%. The average age of the respondents at the time of the survey was 21 years and 63% of respondents were females. The relationship between health concern and healthy eating attitudes was confirmed. The relationship between health concern of developing diseases and attitudes toward healthy eating was fully mediated by food choice motives. However, the relationship between calorie consumption health concern and healthy eating attitudes was only partially mediated by food choice motives. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Changes in body weight, body composition, and eating attitudes in high school wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Lenka Humenikova; Betts, Nancy Mulhollen; Payton, Mark Edward

    2009-08-01

    Many wrestlers engage in chronic dieting and rapid "weight cutting" throughout the year to compete in a category below their natural weight. Such weight-management practices have a negative influence on their health and nutritional status, so the National Wrestling Coaches Association implemented a new weight-management program for high school wrestlers in 2006. The purpose of this study was to determine whether seasonal changes in weight, body fat, and eating attitudes occur among high school wrestlers after the implementation of the new weight-management rule. Fifteen high school wrestlers participated in the study. Their weight, body composition, and eating attitudes were measured preseason, in-season, and off-season. Body fat was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Attitudes toward dieting, food, and body weight were assessed using the Eating Attitude Test (EAT). No significant changes in body fat were detected from preseason to off-season. Weight increased from preseason to in-season (p < .05) and off-season (p < .05). Although the EAT score did not change significantly from preseason to off-season, 60% reported "thinking about burning up calories when exercising" during preseason, and only 40% felt that way during the season (p < .05) and 47% during, off-season (p < .05). The wrestlers experienced a significant weight gain from preseason to off-season with no significant changes in body fat. Their eating attitudes did not change significantly from preseason to off-season in this study, but further research using a large sample of high school wrestlers is warranted to confirm these findings.

  11. Eating attitudes, body esteem, perfectionism and anxiety of judo athletes and nonathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouveix, M; Bouget, M; Pannafieux, C; Champely, S; Filaire, E

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence and relationships between disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, musculoskeletal injuries and psychological characteristics in 24 judo athletes (12 females and 12 males) and 31 controls (14 females and 17 males). All these parameters were assessed by a health/medical, dieting and menstrual history questionnaire, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Multidimensional perfectionism scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem, the Body esteem scale, and the Profile of Mood States. Body mass index (BMI) was also computed. Twenty-five percent of female athletes would be "at risk" of EDs (EAT-26 > 20) and 0 % in the other sample groups. Bone injuries sustained over the judo athlete career were reported by 25 % of females and 33.3 % of males, while 35.7 % of the female controls reported bone injuries. The total frequency of menstrual dysfunction among judo athletes was 58.3 %, while 7.1 % of female controls reported oligoamenorrhea. Regression analyses showed that BE-Weight Satisfaction and BMI contributed to 54.6 % and 17 % of the variance, respectively, in the prediction of log-transformed Global EAT scores among female judo athletes. These data indicate that while the prevalence of clinical eating disorders is low in judo athletes, many are "at risk" for an eating disorder, which places them at an increased risk for menstrual irregularity and bone injuries. This study also highlights the relevance of body esteem to eating disorder symptoms.

  12. The Eating Attitudes Test-26 revisited using exploratory structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Therme, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Most previous studies have failed to replicate the original factor structure of the 26-item version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) among community samples of adolescents. The main objective of the present series of four studies (n = 2178) was to revisit the factor structure of this instrument among mixed gender community samples of adolescents using both exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). First, results from the ESEM analyses provided satisfactory goodness-of-fit statistics and reliability coefficients for a six-factor model of the EAT with 18 items (EAT-18) closely corresponding to the original seven-factor structure proposed for the 40-item version of the EAT. Second, these analyses were satisfactorily replicated among a new sample of community adolescents using CFA. The results confirmed the factor loading and intercept invariance of this model across gender and age groups (i.e., early and late adolescence), as well as the complete invariance of the EAT-18 measurement model between ethnicities (i.e., European versus African origins) and across weight categories (i.e., underweight, normal weight and overweight). Finally, the last study provided support for convergent validity of the EAT-18 with the Eating Disorder Inventory and with instruments measuring global self-esteem, physical appearance, social physique anxiety and fear of negative appearance evaluation.

  13. Predicting consumers’ intention to purchase ready- to-eat meals: The role of moral attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsen, N.V.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Hall, G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of integrating moral attitude into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model when predicting intention to consume ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Norway (N = 112), The Netherlands (N = 99), and Finland (N = 134)

  14. Young Girls' Eating Attitudes and Body Image Dissatisfaction: Associations with Communication and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichler, Jessica C.; Crowther, Janis H.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among communication, modeling, body image dissatisfaction, and maladaptive eating attitudes and behaviors in preadolescent girls were investigated in a cross-sectional study of 69 girls in fourth through sixth grade and their mothers. Participants completed questionnaires assessing familial and peer influences, body image…

  15. The Relationship between Quality of Life and Eating Attitudes in Turkish High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumcagiz, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between quality of life and eating attitudes of adolescents. This study was designed as a correlational study. Participants were 640 voluntarily participating 15-18 years old students studying at public high schools in Samsun, Turkey. Data was collected with the Quality of Life Scale for…

  16. Disordered eating attitudes and body shame among athletes, exercisers and sedentary female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankauskiene, R; Pajaujiene, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the disordered eating attitudes and sociocultural body ideals internalization among university athletes (N.=98), exercisers (N.=125) and sedentary (N.=81) undergraduate female students. The mean age (SD) of the sample was 20.17 (2.00). The students completed Eating Attitude Test - 26, Body Areas Satisfaction subscale of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, Body Shame subscale from the Objectified Body Consciousness Scale, Rosenberg Self- Esteem Scale, Appearance subscale from the Motives for Physical Activity Measure--Revised, reported their physical activity and fluid manipulation-related behaviour. We observed no significant differences in disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, self-esteem and fluid manipulation-related behaviour among athletes, exercisers and sedentary female students. Body shame predicted disordered eating in all groups of women. Students high in body shame reported higher levels of disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, appearance-related exercise motives, fluid manipulation-related behaviour and lower self-esteem, regardless of their physical activity level. The results show that internalization of the sociocultural body standards provide a mechanism through which different physical activity levels are associated with negative eating and physical activity-related outcomes in college-aged women.

  17. Stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward bulimia nervosa: the importance of knowledge and eating disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel Florence; Paxton, Susan J; McLean, Siân A; Massey, Robin; Mond, Jonathan M; Hay, Phillipa J; Rodgers, Bryan

    2015-04-01

    Widely held stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward bulimic eating disorders may lead to self-blame and reduced treatment seeking. Knowledge and familiarity with mental disorders may help decrease associated stigma. However, these relationships are not well understood in bulimia nervosa (BN). A community sample of 1828 adults aged 18 to 70 years completed a survey assessing stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward BN, knowledge and familiarity with the disorder, as well as levels of eating disorder symptoms. Knowledge of BN was negatively associated with three dimensions of stigmatization, personal responsibility (ρ = -0.28), unreliability (ρ = -0.19), and advantages of BN (ρ = -0.23). Familiarity revealed no association with stigmatization. Both men and women with high levels of eating disorder symptoms perceived BN as less serious than the participants with low levels of symptoms. Increasing community knowledge about bulimia may help mitigate stigmatization and perceived barriers to treatment.

  18. Eating Attitudes, Perfectionism and Body-esteem of Elite Male Judoists and Cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, Edith; Rouveix, Matthieu; Pannafieux, Christelle; Ferrand, Claude

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that male athletes who feel pressured to maintain a specific body weight present an elevated risk of subclinical eating disorders. Twelve judoists (19.5 ± 0.5 yr), fifteen cyclists (21.2 ± 2.8 yr) and seventeen non- competitive students matched for BMI and used as controls (21.8 ± 1.8 yr) were studied using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evaluate the relationships between eating disorders and psychological characteristics. Athletes completed the tests during their competitive period and controls completed the same scales at the same time. Scores obtained on EAT-26 differed significantly from the control group on EAT (p athletes used weight loss methods. Self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives and diet pills were reported by 4%, 10%, and 8.5% of them, respectively. Increasing exercise was the primary method used by controls to lose body weight. Athletes reported greater negative feelings about their physical appearance and their Body Weight Satisfaction than controls (p athletes. Body-esteem Appearance and depression accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in Dieting scores. There was no difference in perfectionism and mood between athletes and controls. This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors. Key pointsPrevalence of eating disorders has become a growing concern among athletic populations, but very little information is available concerning male athletes.This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors.

  19. Eating Attitudes, Perfectionism and Body-esteem of Elite Male Judoists and Cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, Edith; Rouveix, Matthieu; Pannafieux, Christelle; Ferrand, Claude

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that male athletes who feel pressured to maintain a specific body weight present an elevated risk of subclinical eating disorders. Twelve judoists (19.5 ± 0.5 yr), fifteen cyclists (21.2 ± 2.8 yr) and seventeen non- competitive students matched for BMI and used as controls (21.8 ± 1.8 yr) were studied using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evaluate the relationships between eating disorders and psychological characteristics. Athletes completed the tests during their competitive period and controls completed the same scales at the same time. Scores obtained on EAT-26 differed significantly from the control group on EAT (p athletes used weight loss methods. Self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives and diet pills were reported by 4%, 10%, and 8.5% of them, respectively. Increasing exercise was the primary method used by controls to lose body weight. Athletes reported greater negative feelings about their physical appearance and their Body Weight Satisfaction than controls (p athletes. Body-esteem Appearance and depression accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in Dieting scores. There was no difference in perfectionism and mood between athletes and controls. This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors. Key pointsPrevalence of eating disorders has become a growing concern among athletic populations, but very little information is available concerning male athletes.This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors. PMID:24149224

  20. Prospective associations between problematic eating attitudes in midchildhood and the future onset of adolescent obesity and high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Kaitlin H; Kramer, Michael S; Oken, Emily; Timpson, Nicholas J; Skugarevsky, Oleg; Patel, Rita; Bogdanovich, Natalia; Vilchuck, Konstantin; Davey Smith, George; Thompson, Jennifer; Martin, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Clinically diagnosed eating disorders may have adverse cardiometabolic consequences, including overweight or obesity and high blood pressure. However, the link between problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence, which can lead to disordered eating behaviors, and future cardiometabolic health is, to our knowledge, unknown. We assessed whether variations in midchildhood eating attitudes influence the future development of overweight or obesity and high blood pressure. Of 17,046 children who participated in the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial (PROBIT), we included 13,557 participants (79.5% response rate) who completed the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) at age 11.5 y and in whom we measured adiposity and blood pressure at ages 6.5, 11.5, and 16 y. We assessed whether ChEAT scores ≥85th percentile (indicative of problematic eating attitudes) compared with scores high blood pressure were attenuated (OR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.45 and OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.39 for new-onset systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). Problematic eating attitudes in midchildhood seem to be related to the development of obesity in adolescence, a relatively novel observation with potentially important public health implications for obesity control. PROBIT was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01561612 and isrctn.com as ISRCTN37687716.

  1. [Psychometric quality of the "Eating Attitudes Test" (German version EAT-26D) for measuring disordered eating in pre-adolescents and proposal for a 13-item short version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Uwe; Hentrich, Isabel; Wick, Katharina; Bormann, Bianca; Brix, Christina; Sowa, Melanie; Schwartze, Dominique; Strauß, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    To detect risky eating behavior questionnaires should be economic but at the same time they should fulfill the psychometric quality criteria. Available instruments are too long for the target group (e. g. EDE-Q, 28 items), restricted on primary symptoms (short version of EDI, 23 items) and with minor reliability (e. g. SCOFF and WC-Scale, 5 items each). Using the German version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26D, which comprises 26 items) in a community sample of 1 331 11-13 year old girls and 906 boys from Thuringia, Germany, we measured a internal consistency of Cronbachs' Alpha=0.85 for girls and 0.78 for boys. In a principal factor analysis, we could replicate the 6-factorial structure of previous studies. A confirmatory factor analysis verified the suitability of the EAT-26D for both, girls and boys. Reducing the EAT-26D on the 3 core-factors leads to an economic 13 item short version with an internal consistency of 0.87 for girls and 0.80 for boys. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. BMI at early puerperium: Body image, eating attitudes and mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mento, Carmela; Le Donne, Maria; Crisafulli, Sabrina; Rizzo, Amelia; Settineri, Salvatore

    2017-05-01

    The present study was aimed to verify if body weight could influence self-perception, in terms of body image, mood states, dissatisfaction with physical appearance and risk of eating disorders. In particular, we evaluated the differences between women of normal weight vs. overweight and obese during the delicate phase of puerperium to verify if there were different emotional structures, linked to BMI. Thirty-two women, 16 normal-weight and 16 overweight or obese, belonging to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University Hospital, were individually interviewed. The Body Uneasiness Test (BUT), the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) were used for the evaluation. Findings showed that the BMI in puerperium is significantly correlated to mood states and body perception. Furthermore, significant differences emerged in eating attitudes and behaviours, in specific aspects related to the weight gain phobia and the body shape perception, symptoms classically associated with the risk of developing an eating disorder.

  3. Eating disorder behaviors and attitudes in Japanese adolescent girls and boys in high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Noma, Shun'ichi; Nin, Kazuko; Teramukai, Satoshi; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2015-12-15

    To investigate eating disorder behaviors and attitudes in adolescents, we administered the eating disorder examination questionnaire (EDE-Q) to Japanese adolescent girls and boys. The EDE-Q global scores in Japanese girls and boys, respectively, were significantly lower than those in girls and boys in previous studies. Objective binge eating episodes and extreme dietary restriction were the common behaviors, whereas self-induced vomiting and the misuse of laxatives were uncommon. Differences in the EDE-Q data between Japanese adolescents and adolescents in previous studies from Western countries suggest that there may be certain cultural differences in eating disorder psychopathology in adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Eating attitudes and body shape concerns among medical students in Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Eating disorders are rarely encountered in the Indian subcontinent. Surprisingly, there is sparse literature related to eating attitude distortions and body dissatisfaction in the Indian population. The objective of this study was to explore the eating attitudes and body shape concerns in medical students, with the objectives of determining any gender differences on eating attitudes and body shape concerns, and any predictors of psychological morbidity using demographic and psychosocial parameters. Materials and Methods: Sample comprised medical undergraduate students from all years (I-V pursuing MBBS course at Government Medical College and Hospital, Sector 32, Chandigarh. It was a prospective, cross-sectional study. Instruments used were socioclinical sheet, acculturation index (AI, eating attitudes test-26 (Hindi version, and body shape questionnaire (BSQ (Hindi version. Following written informed consent, all the questionnaires were administered in a group setting to each MBBS batch. Statistical analysis was carried out with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0 using descriptive analysis (frequency, percentage, mean, univariate analysis (Chi-square, t-test, Pearson's correlational analysis, and binary logistic regression (backward. Results: A total of 250 medical students from 5 batches with mean age of 20.15 +/- 1.32 (18-28 years. And 55% (n = 137 were males and 45% (n = 113 were females. On gender comparison, males were more likely to be Hindu and have higher body weight (actual and ideal; females had significantly higher scores on dieting subscale of eating attitudes test-26 and BSQ (total score. On AI, there were no gender differences on family domain variables, with significantly less females reporting pure Western preference for social/peer domain variables. Correlation and logistic regression analysis showed high score on BSQ (median divide as the only statistically significant

  5. Nurses' perception of knowledge, attitudes and reported practice towards patients with eating disorders: A concurrent mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Xin Yi; Tham, Xiang Cong; Kamaruzaman, Netty Ryanie; Yobas, Piyanee Klainin

    2018-02-01

    Eating disorders are complex disorders requiring specialised care, thus knowledge and attitudes are crucial for management. This study aims to examine nurses' knowledge, attitudes, reported practice, and perceptions towards patients with eating disorders in Singapore. A concurrent mixed-methods study was carried out in Southeast Asia's only psychiatric unit with eating disorders programme. Twenty nurses were recruited using census sampling. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics, while qualitative data were analysed with content and thematic analysis. Certain personal factors were associated with nurses' levels of perceived knowledge. Different attitudes towards managing these patients were identified during interview sessions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Public and Healthcare Professionals’ Knowledge and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Lynn Reas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Binge eating disorder (BED is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress in the absence of inappropriate compensatory behaviors for weight control. BED is prevalent in men and women, is associated with elevated psychosocial and functional impairment, and is associated strongly with obesity and related medical comorbidities. The aim is to provide a brief, state-of-the-art review of the major and recent findings to inform educational and awareness campaigns, stigma reduction interventions, as well as current clinical practice and future research. A narrative approach was used to synthesize emerging literature on the public and healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward individuals with BED in comparison to other eating disorders (EDs or mental illness. A total of 13 articles were reviewed. Nine studies investigated community samples and four studies investigated healthcare professionals. The reviewed literature suggested that BED is perceived by the public as less impairing, less severe, and “easier-to-treat” than other EDs. Attitudes and beliefs reflecting perceived blameworthiness and lack of self-discipline were ascribed to vignettes with BED. Community studies indicated a low level of public awareness that BED constitutes a discreet eating disorder. The literature on healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward BED remains very limited. The few existing studies suggest encouraging trends in recognition and diagnostic accuracy, yet there remains a need for increased clinical awareness of BED-associated medical complications and knowledge of full BED diagnostic criteria.

  7. Public and Healthcare Professionals’ Knowledge and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reas, Deborah Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress in the absence of inappropriate compensatory behaviors for weight control. BED is prevalent in men and women, is associated with elevated psychosocial and functional impairment, and is associated strongly with obesity and related medical comorbidities. The aim is to provide a brief, state-of-the-art review of the major and recent findings to inform educational and awareness campaigns, stigma reduction interventions, as well as current clinical practice and future research. A narrative approach was used to synthesize emerging literature on the public and healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward individuals with BED in comparison to other eating disorders (EDs) or mental illness. A total of 13 articles were reviewed. Nine studies investigated community samples and four studies investigated healthcare professionals. The reviewed literature suggested that BED is perceived by the public as less impairing, less severe, and “easier-to-treat” than other EDs. Attitudes and beliefs reflecting perceived blameworthiness and lack of self-discipline were ascribed to vignettes with BED. Community studies indicated a low level of public awareness that BED constitutes a discreet eating disorder. The literature on healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward BED remains very limited. The few existing studies suggest encouraging trends in recognition and diagnostic accuracy, yet there remains a need for increased clinical awareness of BED-associated medical complications and knowledge of full BED diagnostic criteria. PMID:29160843

  8. [The Relationship Between Anger Expression, Body Image and Eating Attitudes in Social Anxiety Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal Yağız, Ayşegül; Kuğu, Nesim; Semiz, Murat; Kavakçı, Önder

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate both the prevalence of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and itsassociation of trait anger and anger expression, eating attitudes and body perceptions in university students having the said disorder. One thousand students from Cumhuriyet University were included in the study. During the initial stage, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) and socio-demographic data form were administered to the students. Those obtaining 30 points or more in LSAS were called for a psychiatric interview. The students diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (n=87) and the control group (n=87) were administered Eating Attitude Test (EAT), Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ) and The State Trait Anger Scale (STAXI). The point prevalence of social anxiety disorder was found to be 9.4% in those attending the study. Trait anger, anger-in and anger-out scores were statistically significantly higher; anger control and multidimensional body-self relations scale points were statistically lower at the SAB group when compared to the control group. The MBSRQ scores correlated negatively, while the EAT scores correlated positively, with anger-in scores in students with SAD. SAD is a common disorder in university students. Our study, showed that repressed anger could adversely affect body image and eating behaviors in SAD. In students having social anxiety disorder, approaches aiming at appropriate anger expression and positive body perception may yield positive results to treatment in students with SAD.

  9. Impact of education on clinicians' attitudes to exposure therapy for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn; D'Souza Walsh, Katrina; Wright, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that clinicians use exposure therapy far less often than the evidence would suggest is justified. This shortfall has been explained as being at least partly a result of clinicians' beliefs and attitudes about exposure and their trait anxiety. Recent studies have shown that attitudes to exposure therapy for anxiety disorders can be improved through a simple educational approach. This study aimed to determine whether a similar educational approach can improve therapists' attitudes to exposure therapy for the eating disorders, and whether clinician's pre-intervention characteristics influenced the impact of the training. Thirty-four eating disorder clinicians (30 female, four male; mean age = 39.0 years; 85.3% Caucasian) attended a 90-min didactic teaching session on the subject of the use of exposure in treatment of eating disorders. Their attitudes to exposure therapy were measured before and after the workshop, in a within-subject design. The outcome was a substantial improvement in attitudes, with a strong effect size (Cohen's d = 1.68) that was comparable to the outcome of a similar intervention among clinicians working with anxiety disorders. The improvement was not related to clinicians' anxiety levels, but was greater among those whose attitudes were more negative at the outset of the teaching. While this finding needs to be tested for long-term maintenance and its relationship to change in clinical practice, it adds to the evidence that a simple educational intervention is sufficient to result in substantial improvement in clinicians' attitudes to exposure therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Worksite Health Program Promoting Changes in Eating Behavior and Health Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Jensen, Sarah; Jahn, Reimo; Steudtner, Mirko; Ochsmann, Elke; Preuß, Geraldine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a worksite multicomponent health promotion intervention on eating behavior and attitudes, changes in body weight, and readiness to make eating behavior changes among workers over a 12-month intervention period. A total of 3,095 workers of a logistic company participated in a quasi-experimental comparison group study design. The intervention group received a multicomponent health training. Two of the main elements of the multicomponent intervention were physical exercise training and nutrition counseling/training. During the pilot year, participants completed a survey at baseline and again after 12 months to assess physical activity-, health-, and diet-related factors. Results showed that participants' body weight did not significantly decrease in the intervention group. Mean weight loss in the intervention groups was 0.5 kg (body mass index = 0.1 kg/m(2)). Eating behaviors in the intervention group improved more than in the comparison group. Some positive intervention effects were observed for the cognitive factors (e.g., changes in eating attitudes). Baseline readiness to change eating behavior was significantly improved over time. We demonstrated initial results of a long-term multicomponent worksite health promotion program with regard to changes in body weight, eating behavior, and attitudes. This evaluation of a 12-month pilot study suggests that a worksite health promotion program may lead to improvements in nutritional health behaviors for a number of workers. An investigation of long-term effects of this multicomponent intervention is strongly recommended. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  11. The association of early childhood cognitive development and behavioural difficulties with pre-adolescent problematic eating attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Richmond

    Full Text Available Few studies have prospectively investigated associations of child cognitive ability and behavioural difficulties with later eating attitudes. We investigated associations of intelligence quotient (IQ, academic performance and behavioural difficulties at 6.5 years with eating attitudes five years later.We conducted an observational cohort study nested within the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial, Belarus. Of 17,046 infants enrolled at birth, 13,751 (80.7% completed the Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT at 11.5 years, most with information on IQ (n = 12,667, academic performance (n = 9,954 and behavioural difficulties (n = 11,098 at 6.5 years. The main outcome was a ChEAT score ≥ 85th percentile, indicative of problematic eating attitudes.Boys with higher IQ at 6.5 years reported fewer problematic eating attitudes, as assessed by ChEAT scores ≥ 85th percentile, at 11.5 years (OR per SD increase in full-scale IQ = 0.87; 0.79, 0.94. No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10 (p for sex-interaction = 0.016. In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94. Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19.Lower IQ, worse non-verbal academic performance and behavioural problems at early school age are positively associated with risk of problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence.

  12. Body image dissatisfaction: gender differences in eating attitudes, self-esteem, and reasons for exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Badmin, Nicola; Sneade, Ian

    2002-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty-five adolescents completed a questionnaire on the subject of eating attitudes, self-esteem, reasons for exercise, and their ideal versus current body size and shape. As predicted, boys were as likely to want to be heavier as lighter, whereas very few girls desired to be heavier. Only girls associated body dissatisfaction with the concept of self-esteem. Male self-esteem was not affected by body dissatisfaction. Specific reasons for exercise were found to correlate with low self-esteem and disordered eating, regardless of sex. The results are discussed in relation to burgeoning published research in this area.

  13. EATING ATTITUDES, PERFECTIONISM AND BODY-ESTEEM OF ELITE MALE JUDOISTS AND CYCLISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Filaire

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that male athletes who feel pressured to maintain a specific body weight present an elevated risk of subclinical eating disorders. Twelve judoists (19.5 ± 0.5 yr, fifteen cyclists (21.2 ± 2.8 yr and seventeen non- competitive students matched for BMI and used as controls (21.8 ± 1.8 yr were studied using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evaluate the relationships between eating disorders and psychological characteristics. Athletes completed the tests during their competitive period and controls completed the same scales at the same time. Scores obtained on EAT-26 differed significantly from the control group on EAT (p < 0.01, Dieting (p < 0.01, and Bulimia scores (p < 0.05. Sixty percent of the athletes used weight loss methods. Self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives and diet pills were reported by 4%, 10%, and 8.5% of them, respectively. Increasing exercise was the primary method used by controls to lose body weight. Athletes reported greater negative feelings about their physical appearance and their Body Weight Satisfaction than controls (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively. Our results also showed that depression mood accounted for 73% of the variance in Bulimia scores and for 64% of the variance in Global EAT scores in athletes. Body-esteem Appearance and depression accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in Dieting scores. There was no difference in perfectionism and mood between athletes and controls. This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors

  14. Prevalence of eating disorder attitudes among men and women with exercise dependence symptoms: a non-athlete population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Fernanda da Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study sought to describe the prevalence of Secondary Exercise Dependence (ScED, i.e. eating disorders attitudes along with exercise dependence symptoms may differ between men and women in a broader exercising population. In this study, 174 regularly exerciser, aged 18-62 years old, who were invited to respond the Exercise Dependence Scale (EDS and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. There were more women than men with ScED. However, only men in the sample presented exercise dependence symptoms without eating disorders attitudes. Eating disorders may or may not exist in those who are exercise dependent in the broad exercising population, although there is a higher prevalence of ScED in women than men.

  15. Temperament and Eating Attitudes in an Adolescent Community Sample: A Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Marzola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Temperament traits like high harm avoidance (HA have been proposed as putative risk factors for the development of eating disorders (EDs. We aimed at studying the relationship between temperament and eating attitudes on a large community sample of adolescents. Method. We recruited 992 high school students aged 14–18. In addition to measuring body mass index (BMI, participants were asked to complete the temperament and character inventory and the food frequency questionnaire. Results. Sixty-two percent of the sample reported overeating, 22.8% reported normal eating, and 15.2% reported under eating. Under and normal eaters had higher BMI than that of over eaters. Harm avoidance was found to be significantly higher in those participants with lower eating intakes whilst novelty seeking was found to be higher in over eaters. Conclusion. An interesting association between temperament (high HA and food approach (under eating emerged. Longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether these traits represent a risk factor for the development of EDs.

  16. Examining Associations of Sexual Attraction and Attitudes on Women's Disordered Eating Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Sarah M; Marks, Amy K; Swenson, Lance P; Pantalone, David W

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to expand the scant research on disordered eating in women identifying same-sex sexual attractions. We used multiple linear regressions to explore potential mechanisms driving disordered eating--both explicit and implicit weight bias and heterosexism--in a cross-sectional, online-recruited community sample of women (N = 437). Participants endorsed a range of sexual attractions from exclusively opposite-sex (21.1%) to exclusively same-sex (19.5%) attraction. Findings revealed no associations between sexual attraction and disordered eating. Awareness of sociocultural norms valuing thinness accounted for disordered eating for all women, regardless of sexual attraction, and was influenced by attitudes regarding weight. Among women endorsing same-sex attractions, self-reported internalized heterosexism influenced disordered eating. Findings contradict long-held beliefs that same-sex attracted women are protected from disordered eating. They emphasize a universal risk, for all women, of sociocultural norms valuing thinness, as well as the risk of internalized heterosexism among same-sex attracted women. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Structural Modeling the Relationship of Food Addiction and Eating Attitudes of Young Adults with Emotional Appetite and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlier, Nevin; Baser, Furkan; Mortas, Hande; Navruz Varli, Semra; Macit, M Sedanur; Tatar, Tugba

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among food addiction, eating attitudes, emotional appetite, and self-esteem of young adults aged 18-30 years by using a structural model. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,058 volunteers (male = 307, female = 751). The hypothesis that self-esteem of young adults influences their eating attitudes was supported in the study (β = -0.081, p food addiction (β = 0.280, p food addiction and between emotional appetite and food addiction. Individuals' eating attitude, food addiction, emotional appetite, and self-esteem scores were found to be related to each other. This article provides valuable data for studies of disordered eating attitudes, emotional state, and food addiction that are thought to be important for young adults in the future.

  18. Attitudes toward obesity in obese persons: A matched comparison of obese women with and without binge eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, R.M.; Masheb, R.M.; White, M.A.; Grilo, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    No research has compared expressions of weight bias across different subgroups of obese individuals. This study compared attitudes toward and beliefs about obesity in women with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and examined whether these attitudes are related to psychological factors. Fifty obese women with BED were compared with an age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched group of 50 obese women without BED on a battery of established measures of anti-fat attitudes and beliefs about weight controllability and psychological factors (self-esteem, depression, and eating disorder features). The age-and BMI-matched groups did not differ with respect to beliefs about obesity or attitudes toward obese persons, or in self-esteem or depression. Correlational analyses conducted separately within each group revealed that women with BED who reported more favorable attitudes towards obese persons had higher self-esteem and lower levels of depression, whereas there were no significant associations between these variables among women without BED. In addition, weight controllability beliefs and eating disorder features were unrelated to self-esteem and depression in both groups. These findings suggest that stigmatizing attitudes endorsed by obese persons are neither tempered nor worsened by psychological distress or eating pathology. Given that stigmatizing attitudes did not differ between obese women with and without BED, it may be that obesity itself, rather than psychological features or disordered eating, increases vulnerability to negative weight-based attitudes. Potential implications for stigma reduction efforts and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:20124783

  19. Do eating attitudes predict early change in eating behaviors among women with bulimic disorders who are treated with cognitive behavioral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Michelle; Meyer, Caroline; Waller, Glenn

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the eating attitudes that are associated with a reduction in bulimic behaviors during the key early stage of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). A case series of 41 patients with bulimia nervosa (full or partial syndrome) took part. They were drawn from the case loads of CBT therapists working in an outpatient specialist eating disorders team. Each patient completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire and recorded the frequency of objective binges, the frequency of vomiting and the number of laxatives taken between Sessions 1 and 6. The participants' reduction in behaviors suggested that the early part of CBT was effective. Correlational analyses showed that those with poorer eating attitudes at the outset of therapy were likely to show the greatest behavioral change by Session 6, in keeping with findings relating to the full duration of CBT. Patients with relatively unhealthy eating attitudes are more likely to show positive behavioral change in the early part of course of CBT. Clinicians might need to encourage patients with bulimic disorders to work harder on behavioral change when the individual has less pathological eating attitudes at the outset. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Maternal attitude to sweet eating habits and risk of overweight in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, I; Breum, L; Sørensen, T I

    1993-01-01

    . A study of a randomly selected cohort of 9-10 year old children from schools in the Copenhagen municipality was performed in 1974. A decade later a follow-up was carried out, and 86% of the target population participated. Overweight was defined as the 90th percentile of body mass index distribution......The possible effect of maternal attitude to sweet eating habits on their offspring's risk of overweight is a common concern. This study addresses the influence of mothers' reports on and attitude to sweet eating habits on the subsequent risk of overweight of their offspring in young adulthood...... (weight/height2 (kg/m2)). The odds ratio of overweight in young adulthood was assessed by logistic regression analysis taking into account body mass index in childhood, gender and social background (both parents' school education, householder's occupational status, and quality of dwellings in childhood...

  1. Impact of female adult eating disorder inpatients? attitudes to compulsive exercise on outcome at discharge and follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Danielsen, Marit; R?, ?yvind; Romild, Ulla; Bj?rnelv, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Background The link between compulsive exercise and eating disorders is well known, but research with clinical samples has been limited. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes in attitudes towards compulsive exercise and its impact on outcome at follow-up in female adult hospitalised patients with eating disorders. Methods The sample consisted of 78 patients: Diagnostic distribution: anorexia nervosa 59?% (n?=?46), approximately 22?% (n?=?16) in bulimia nervosa, and Eating Disord...

  2. Eating disorder training and attitudes among primary care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, David A; Redfern, Roberta; Wanjiku, Stephen; Lazebnik, Rina; Rome, Ellen S

    2013-04-01

    The ability to diagnose eating disorders (ED) is important and difficult for primary care physicians (PCPs). Previous reports suggest that PCPs feel their training is inadequate. To explore residents' interest and comfort diagnosing and treating ED. An internet survey was sent to primary care residencies. Logistic regression models were fitted to identify factors correlated with residents' interest and comfort in diagnosing and treating ED. Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents had higher interest in ED than Pediatric residents, as did female residents and residents exposed to teenagers with unexplained weight loss. Residents in programs with an ED program and faculty interested in ED were more comfortable diagnosing ED. Interest in, and comfort diagnosing and treating ED are associated with specialty type, presence of an ED program, presence of faculty interested in ED, and resident exposure to ED outpatients and teenagers with unexplained weight loss.

  3. Influence of parent's eating attitudes on eating disorders in school adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Canals, J.; Sancho, C.; Arija, M. V.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the relationship between parents? cognitive and behavioural dimensions and the risk of eating disorders (ED) in non-clinical adolescents. Methods From an initial sample of 1,336 boys and girls with a mean age of 11.37, a total of 258 subjects were selected either as being at risk of ED or as controls. These subjects and their paren...

  4. Body-related sport and exercise motives and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Therme, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Motives underlying sport and exercise involvement have recently been hypothesized as potential factors influencing the positive association between sports/exercises involvement and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours (DEAB) among adolescents. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined this hypothesis or the moderating role of gender, context of practice, performance levels and sport type on these relationships. In this study, these questions were addressed among 168 male and 167 female French adolescents involved in various types, contexts and performance levels of sport and exercise. Participants were asked to indicate their main motives for involvement in sport practice and to self-report DEAB (generic DEAB, vomiting-purging behaviours, and eating-related control) on a French adaptation of the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results shared positive associations between body-related sport and exercise motives and most of the DEAB subscales. Furthermore, they show that the relationship between body-related sport and exercise motives and Vomiting-Purging Behaviours differs according to involvement in individual and competitive sports and exercises. Copyright ©2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Autonomous-related self, eating attitude and body satisfaction in young females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruclular, Yasemin; Bariskin, Elif

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed to investigate the relationship between the self, eating attitudes, and body satisfaction within the framework of the autonomous-related self model, in which the healthy functioning self is described as "autonomous" and "related." Female university students (n = 314) with a mean age of 19 (SD = 1.18) were included in the research. The mean body mass index (BMI) of participants was 20.77 (SD = 2.77, range = 15.57-33.06). Participants completed a demographics questionnaire, the Autonomy-Relatedness Scales, Eating Attitudes Test, Body Cathexis Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. Lower autonomy-relatedness (β = -0.13, p Autonomous-Related Self was a meaningful measure of associations between the self and eating psychopathology, but not of the relationship between the self and body satisfaction. It was also important to evaluate objective (e.g., BMI) and subjective (e.g., ideal weight) indicators of weight to better understand the nature of eating patterns and body satisfaction. Future research on autonomy-relatedness and other psychopathology is recommended.

  6. The association between internet addiction and disordered eating attitudes among Turkish high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Koçak, Uğur; Avci, Kadriye; Uzel Taş, Hanife

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes (DEAs) and internet addiction (IA) among a non-clinical sample of adolescents and to investigate the relationship between IA, DEAs, and selected socio-demographic characteristics. A total of 584 adolescents (34.8% n = 203 males and 65.2% n = 381 females) completed three instruments: the Eating Attitude Test-26 (EAT-26), the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), and a socio-demographic questionnaire. It was found that 15.2% (n = 89) of the participants have DEAs, and IA was detected in 10.1% (n = 59) of the participants. There was a statistically significant difference between the IA and non-IA groups in terms of body mass index (χ (2) = 10.31, p < 0.01). We found a significant positive correlation between the IAT and EAT-26 scores (r = 0.34, p < 0.01). The presence of DEAs, male gender, and high BMI were found to be the strongest predictor variables of IA. IA and DEAs are relatively frequent phenomena among young students in Turkey. Future studies should attempt to determine the predictive factors by identifying the causal relations between IA and DEAs.

  7. Fear of negative evaluation and eating attitudes: a replication and extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicola; Meyer, Caroline

    2005-05-01

    Preliminary research has found a link between restrictive eating attitudes and a fear of negative evaluation (FNE). However, such work has focused exclusively on these fears in relation to people in general. The current study sought to replicate and extend these findings by exploring links between restriction and FNE in relation to close friends and relatives. Ninety-one young women completed two versions of the short Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNE). First, they completed the standard scale (in relation to people in general), and then an amended version (in relation to close friends and relatives). Next, they completed the three eating-related subscales of the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI). For the whole group, both general and close FNE were significantly and positively correlated with restrictive (drive for thinness and body dissatisfaction), but not with bulimic attitudes. However, only general FNE had significant individual predictive power on restrictive attitudes when these two forms of FNE were entered into a regression analysis. Among nonclinical populations, negative evaluation fears regarding people in general are linked with restrictive but not with bulimic psychopathology. Copyright 2005 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  8. Australian Healthcare Professionals’ Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Cain

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to investigate Australian healthcare practitioners’ knowledge and attitudes toward binge eating disorder (BED.Method: Participants were 175 healthcare professionals, who were randomized to one of two conditions that assessed diagnostic and treatment knowledge of either comorbid BED and obesity or only obesity via case vignette, as well as weight bias toward obese patients.Results: Results suggested that participants demonstrated a reluctance to diagnose comorbid BED and obesity, that their knowledge of physical complications associated with BED was limited, and that they indicated a narrow range of evidence-based treatment options. When compared with levels of weight bias expressed by healthcare professionals in previous international studies, Australian clinicians were significantly less biased, however, still largely endorsed ‘negative’ attitudes toward obesity.Conclusion: Findings suggest that future clinical training in eating disorders should therefore focus not only on diagnostic criteria, physical complications and treatment options, but also on practitioner attitudes toward eating and weight.

  9. Youth internalizing symptoms, sleep-related problems, and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors: A moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, Marie L; Janicke, David M; Carmody, Julia K; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn C

    2016-04-01

    Internalizing symptoms increase the risk for disordered eating; however, the mechanism through which this relationship occurs remains unclear. Sleep-related problems may be a potential link as they are associated with both emotional functioning and disordered eating. The present study aims to evaluate the mediating roles of two sleep-related problems (sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness) in the relationship between youth internalizing symptoms and disordered eating, and to explore if age moderates these relations. Participants were 225 youth (8-17years) attending a primary care appointment. Youth and legal guardians completed questionnaires about youth disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, internalizing symptoms, sleep disturbance, and daytime sleepiness. Mediation and moderated mediation analyses were utilized. The mediation model revealed both youth sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness independently mediated the association between internalizing symptoms and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, and explained 18% of the variance in disordered eating. The moderated mediation model including youth age accounted for 21% of the variance in disordered eating; youth age significantly interacted with sleep disturbance, but not with daytime sleepiness, to predict disordered eating. Sleep disturbance only mediated the relationship between internalizing symptoms and disordered eating in youth 12years old and younger, while daytime sleepiness was a significant mediator regardless of age. As sleep-related problems are frequently improved with the adoption of health behaviors conducive to good sleep, these results may suggest a relatively modifiable and cost-effective target to reduce youth risk for disordered eating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of parental attitudes in the development of children eating behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, Silvia; Salvioni, Michela; Galimberti, Cinzia

    2008-02-01

    The present paper is a review of available data on effects of parental feeding attitudes and styles on child nutritional behaviour. Food preferences develop from genetically determined predispositions to like sweet and salty flavours and to dislike bitter and sour tastes. There is evidence for existence of some innate, automatic mechanism that regulate appetite. However, from birth genetic predispositions are modified by experience. There are mechanisms of taste development: mere exposure, medicine effect, flavour learning, flavour nutrient learning. Parents play a pivotal role in the development of their child's food preferences and energy intake, with research indicating that certain child feeding practices, such as exerting excessive control over what and how much children eat, may contribute to childhood overweight. Mothers are of particular interest on children's eating behaviour, as they have been shown to spend significantly more time than fathers in direct interactions with their children across several familial situations.A recent paper describes two primary aspects of control: restriction, which involves restricting children's access to junk foods and restricting the total amount of food, and pressure, which involves pressuring children to eat healthy foods (usually fruits and vegetables) and pressuring to eat more in general. The results showed significant correlations between parent and child for reported nutritional behaviour like food intake, eating motivations, and body dis- and satisfaction. Parents create environments for children that may foster the development of healthy eating behaviours and weight, or that may promote overweight and aspects of disordered eating. In conclusion positive parental role model may be a better method for improving a child's diet than attempts at dietary control.

  11. Predicting consumers' intention to consume ready-to-eat meals. The role of moral attitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Sijtsema, Siet J; Hall, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of integrating moral attitude into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model when predicting intention to consume ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Norway (N = 112), The Netherlands (N = 99), and Finland (N = 134......) in spring 2009. A stepwise hierarchical regression was conducted, and the analyses showed that moral attitude is an important predictor of RTE-meal consumption. The feeling of moral obligation, operationalised as a negative feeling of guilt, had a negative effect on peoples' intention to consume ready meals...... in all the three countries tested, and the explained variance (R²) for TPB increased when moral was added as an explanatory factor. However, although the test showed significant results for the effect of attitude towards behavior and moral in all countries, non-significant results were observed...

  12. The effect of parental monitoring on trajectories of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors among adolescents: An individual growth curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Laura E; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Blalock, Dan V

    2016-12-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to examine whether parental monitoring, as reported by adolescents and their parents, predicts more or less favorable trajectories of disordered eating behavior and attitudes over the course of one year in a sample of adolescent males and females. An additional aim was to explore whether these trajectories vary when study analyses are limited to females. Participants included 87 adolescents (mean age = 15.5 ± 1.4) in mental health treatment and their parents. Self-report measures included the Parental Monitoring Questionnaire, completed at baseline, and the Eating Attitudes Test-Dieting Subscale, completed at baseline as well as 6-month and 12-month follow-ups. Individual growth curve (IGC) analyses were used to examine change in disordered eating behavior and attitudes. Adolescents who reported lower parental monitoring showed trajectories characterized by increases in disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. The same pattern emerged when using parent report of monitoring, though only a trend was evident. When analyses were restricted to females, the main effect of parental and adolescent report of monitoring on disordered eating were equally strong. Results may suggest that parents who are less knowledgeable about their adolescents' daily lives, may be less aware of potential disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, and thus less likely to intervene. Findings could be used to inform family-based interventions for this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Positive attitude toward healthy eating predicts higher diet quality at all cost levels of supermarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anju; Monsivais, Pablo; Cook, Andrea J; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Shopping at low-cost supermarkets has been associated with higher obesity rates. This study examined whether attitudes toward healthy eating are independently associated with diet quality among shoppers at low-cost, medium-cost, and high-cost supermarkets. Data on socioeconomic status (SES), attitudes toward healthy eating, and supermarket choice were collected using a telephone survey of a representative sample of adult residents of King County, WA. Dietary intake data were based on a food frequency questionnaire. Thirteen supermarket chains were stratified into three categories: low, medium, and high cost, based on a market basket of 100 commonly eaten foods. Diet-quality measures were energy density, mean adequacy ratio, and total servings of fruits and vegetables. The analytical sample consisted of 963 adults. Multivariable regressions with robust standard error examined relations between diet quality, supermarket type, attitudes, and SES. Shopping at higher-cost supermarkets was associated with higher-quality diets. These associations persisted after adjusting for SES, but were eliminated after taking attitudinal measures into account. Supermarket shoppers with positive attitudes toward healthy eating had equally higher-quality diets, even if they shopped at low-, medium-, or high-cost supermarkets, independent of SES and other covariates. These findings imply that shopping at low-cost supermarkets does not prevent consumers from having high-quality diets, as long as they attach importance to good nutrition. Promoting nutrition-education strategies among supermarkets, particularly those catering to low-income groups, can help to improve diet quality. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Disordered eating attitudes, alexithymia and suicide probability among Turkish high school girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Soylu, Nusret; Avci, Kadriye; Coşkun, Kerem Şenol; Kocak, Uğur; Taş, Hanife Uzel

    2015-03-30

    We aimed to examine association between disordered eating attitudes (DEAs), alexithymia and suicide probability among adolescent females and to explore potential link between alexithymia and suicide probability in subjects with DEAs. 381 female students completed Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and Suicide Probability Scale (SPS). It was found that 13.2% (n=52) of the subjects have DEAs. Results indicated that total TAS-20 score and scores of Difficulty in Identifying Feelings (DIF) and Difficulty in Describing Feelings (DDF) subscales were significantly higher in DEAs group than in those non DEAs group (palexithymic DEAs than the non-alexithymic DEAs group. In order to control potential effect of depression, SPS subscales were used as covariate factors in ANCOVA. Negative Self-Evaluation subscale yielded a statistically significant difference between groups, other subscales did not. Results point out these; DEAs are relatively frequent phenomenon among female students in Turkey and presence of alexithymia was associated with an increased suicide probability in adolescents with DEAs. The results should be evaluated taking into account that depressive symptomatology was not assessed using a depression scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Body Image Satisfaction, Eating Attitudes and Perceptions of Female Body Silhouettes in Rural South African Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Titilola M; Micklesfield, Lisa K; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M; Pettifor, John M; Norris, Shane A

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine the associations between BMI, disordered eating attitude, body dissatisfaction in female adolescents, and descriptive attributes assigned to silhouettes of varying sizes in male and female adolescents, aged 11 to 15, in rural South Africa. Height and weight were measured to determine BMI. Age and sex-specific cut-offs for underweight and overweight/obesity were determined using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs. Body image satisfaction using Feel-Ideal Discrepancy (FID) scores, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), and perceptual female silhouettes were collected through self-administered questionnaires in 385 adolescents from the Agincourt Health and Socio-Demographic Surveillance System (HSDSS). Participants self-reported their Tanner pubertal stage and were classified as early pubertal ( 2). Mid to post pubertal boys and girls were significantly heavier, taller, and had higher BMI values than their early pubertal counterparts (all pbody dissatisfaction (a desire to be thinner or fatter). The girls who wanted to be fatter had a significantly higher BMI than the girls who wanted to be thinner (pbody size among South African adolescents.

  16. How abnormal is binge eating? 18-Year time trends in population prevalence and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, D; Touyz, S; González-Chica, D A; Stocks, N; Hay, P

    2017-08-01

    Although findings suggest that binge eating is becoming increasingly normative, the 'clinical significance' of this behaviour at a population level remains uncertain. We aimed to assess the time trends in binge-eating prevalence and burden over 18 years. Six cross-sectional face-to-face surveys of the Australian adult population were conducted in 1998, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2014, and 2015 (N total = 15 126). Data were collected on demographics, 3-month prevalence of objective binge eating (OBE), health-related quality of life, days out of role, and distress related to OBE. The prevalence of OBE increased six-fold from 1998 (2.7%) to 2015 (13.0%). Health-related quality of life associated with OBE improved from 1998 to 2015, where it more closely approximated population norms. Days out of role remained higher among participants who reported OBE, although decreased over time. Half of participants who reported weekly (56.6%) and twice-weekly (47.1%) OBE reported that they were not distressed by this behaviour. However, the presence of distress related to OBE in 2015 was associated with greater health-related quality-of-life impairment. As the prevalence of binge eating increases over time, associated disability has been decreasing. Implications for the diagnosis of disorders associated with binge eating are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Eating behaviours in relation to emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, E; Larue, J; Rouveix, M

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the abnormal eating attitudes in judoists and the possible relationships between eating attitudes, emotional intelligence, and body dissatisfaction. A total of 20 national judoists and 25 control participants were enrolled in the study. Subjects completed the following questionnaires: The Eating Attitudes Test, The Body Image Assessment Scale-Body Dimensions and the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire. 30 % of the athletes (n=6) and 20% of the controls (n=5) presented disordered eating attitudes although these subjects were of normal weight. They also presented body dissatisfaction and had lower levels of emotional intelligence in comparison to the groups without disordered eating attitudes, particularly in factors such as intrapersonal (p<0.01), adaptability (p<0.05), stress tolerance (p<0.04) and general mood (p<0.04). The athletes reported using different weight loss methods such as self-induced vomiting (20%), fasting (40%), diuretics (15%), and laxatives (50%). Among disordered eating attitude groups (Controls+Judoists), Global EAT-26 was negatively correlated with stress tolerance (p<0.04: r=-0.64), emotional self-awareness (p<0.05: r=-0.70), general mood (p<0.01: r=-0.74), and positively correlated with body dissatisfaction (p<0.01: r=0.79). Results highlight the role of emotion in disordered eating attitudes, which is an important finding in terms of the prevention and management of disordered eating. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Eating Attitudes Test in Young Female Patients with Eating Disorders in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qing; Chan, Raymond C K; Li, Xiaoping; Arcelus, Jon; Yue, Ling; Huang, Jiabin; Gu, Lian; Fan, Qing; Zhang, Haiyin; Xiao, Zeping; Chen, Jue

    2017-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the eating attitudes test (EAT-26) among female adolescents and young adults in Mainland China. This scale was administered to 396 female eating disorder patients and 406 noneating disorder healthy controls, in addition 35 healthy controls completed a retest after a 4-week intervals. Tests for reliability, convergent validity and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to detect the psychometric properties. The EAT-26 demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.822-0.922), test-retest reliability (interclass correlation coefficient = 0.817) and convergent validity(r = 0.450-0.750). The receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the cut-off 14 for anorexia nervosa and 15 for bulimia nervosa represented good compromises with approximate sensitivity (0.66-0.68) and specificity (0.85-0.86). Our findings provided evidence that the Chinese version of the EAT-26 was a psychometrically reliable and valid self-rating instrument for identifying people suffering from an eating disorder in Mainland China. A clinical cut-off range between 14 and 15 could be used, but caution should be exercised because of the low sensitivity of the tool. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  19. Linking eating and weight control attitudes to relationship experiences: A large-scale survey of adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rebekah L; Kelly, Adrian B; Chan, Gary C K; Williams, Joanne W

    2017-07-01

    To examine the extent to which family conflict, peer bullying and psychological distress account for eating and weight loss attitudes in adolescent females. This study examined the degree to which psychological distress mediated the association between family conflict and eating and weight loss attitudes, and the association of bullying and eating and weight loss attitudes. Females aged between 11 and 17 years (N = 5125) were recruited from schools in the State of Victoria (Australia). Key measures included psychological distress, family conflict, and bullying victimisation. A structural model showed good fit, and all predictors were significant. Psychological distress mediated the association between eating and weight loss attitudes, and family problems and bullying. Family conflict and peer bullying were associated with eating and weight loss attitudes and this association may occur via psychological distress. Early intervention programs may benefit from a focus on family and peer relationships. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The relationship between dietary intake and energy availability, eating attitudes and cognitive restraint in students enrolled in undergraduate nutrition degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocks, Tetyana; Pelly, Fiona; Slater, Gary; Martin, Lisa Anne

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the relationship of total energy and macronutrient intake, energy balance and energy availability to eating attitudes and cognitive restraint in students enrolled in undergraduate nutrition degrees. Energy and micronutrient intake was assessed in 63 students (n = 50 nutrition, and n = 13 occupation therapy degrees; n = 51 females, n = 12 males) using three 24-h dietary recalls. Energy requirements were calculated based on measured resting metabolic rate, estimated exercise energy expenditure, and dietary induced thermogenesis. Body composition was assessed using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Eating attitudes and cognitive restraint were measured using previously validated tools. Eighteen percent of nutrition students were classified as having low energy availability (Eating attitudes and cognitive restraint were not associated with total energy or macronutrient intake. However, female nutrition students with high cognitive restraint had greater exercise energy expenditure and thus lower energy availability than those with low cognitive restraint (371 (302) kcal d -1 compared to 145 (206) kcal d -1 , P disordered eating attitudes and cognitive restraint negatively correlated with energy availability (r s  = -0.37, P = 0.02 and r s  = -0.51, P disordered eating attitudes and cognitive restraint may be controlling their energy balance through exercise, as opposed to restricting food intake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Body Image Satisfaction, Eating Attitudes and Perceptions of Female Body Silhouettes in Rural South African Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilola M Pedro

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the associations between BMI, disordered eating attitude, body dissatisfaction in female adolescents, and descriptive attributes assigned to silhouettes of varying sizes in male and female adolescents, aged 11 to 15, in rural South Africa. Height and weight were measured to determine BMI. Age and sex-specific cut-offs for underweight and overweight/obesity were determined using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs. Body image satisfaction using Feel-Ideal Discrepancy (FID scores, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26, and perceptual female silhouettes were collected through self-administered questionnaires in 385 adolescents from the Agincourt Health and Socio-Demographic Surveillance System (HSDSS. Participants self-reported their Tanner pubertal stage and were classified as early pubertal ( 2. Mid to post pubertal boys and girls were significantly heavier, taller, and had higher BMI values than their early pubertal counterparts (all p<0.001. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher in the girls than the boys in both pubertal stages. The majority (83.5% of the girls demonstrated body dissatisfaction (a desire to be thinner or fatter. The girls who wanted to be fatter had a significantly higher BMI than the girls who wanted to be thinner (p<0.001. There were no differences in EAT-26 scores between pubertal groups, within the same sex, and between boys and girls within the two pubertal groups. The majority of the boys and the girls in both pubertal groups perceived the underweight silhouettes to be "unhappy" and "weak" and the majority of girls in both pubertal groups perceived the normal silhouettes to be the "best". These findings suggest a need for policy intervention that will address a healthy body size among South African adolescents.

  2. Correlates of parental feeding practices with pre-schoolers: Parental body image and eating knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Stephanie R; Hart, Laura M; Paxton, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Parental feeding practices have been linked to eating and weight status in young children; however, more research is needed to understand what influences these feeding practices. The aim of this study was to examine how parental feeding practices that are linked to unhealthy eating patterns in young children, are related to parental body image and eating knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours . Participants were 330 mothers of a 2- to 6-year-old child. Mothers completed measures of knowledge of child body image and eating patterns, overvaluation of weight and shape, internalization of general media and athletic ideals, dieting, and parental feeding practices. Higher maternal knowledge of strategies to promote positive child body image and eating patterns predicted lower weight restriction, instrumental, emotional, and pushing to eat feeding practices. Overvaluation of weight and shape predicted use of fat restriction. Maternal internalization of the athletic ideal predicted instrumental and pushing to eat feeding practices. As these feeding practices have been associated with long-term risk of children's weight gain and/or disordered eating, these findings highlight the need for prevention interventions to target knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours of parents of pre-schoolers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Letter to the editor: health professionals' attitudes toward individuals with eating disorders: who do we think they are?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reas, Deborah Lynn; Gulliksen, Kjersti Solhaug; Levallius, Johanna; Isomaa, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Health professionals are not immune to stigmatizing attitudes and stereotypes found in society-at-large. Along with patients and their loved ones, treatment providers are important stakeholders - and gatekeepers - in the successful delivery of mental healthcare. Prevailing attitudes among professionals can facilitate timely recognition, enable access to care and uptake of evidence-based practices, or undermine help-seeking and therapeutic engagement. At an interactive activity at the 2016 Nordic Eating Disorders Society (NEDS) meeting, we asked health professionals to describe individuals with eating disorders. The most common descriptive term used was "anxiety" followed by "thin", "sad", "control", "female", and "suffering/pain". Further research on professionals' attitudes toward individuals with eating disorders is necessary to inform education, awareness, and advocacy efforts following the diagnostic revisions in the DSM-5.

  4. Reformulation of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT): factor structure and scoring method in a non-clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, S D; Han, H; Newton, R L; Martin, C K; York-Crowe, E; Stewart, T M; Williamson, D A

    2006-12-01

    The primary aims of this study were to empirically test the factor structure of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) through both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and to interpret the factor structure of the ChEAT within the context of a new scoring method. The ChEAT was administered to 728 children in the 2nd through 6th grades (from five schools) at two different time points. Exactly half the students were male and half were female. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to empirically test the merits of an alternative 6-point scoring system as compared to the traditionally used 4-point scoring system. With the new scoring procedure, the skewness for all factor scores decreased, which resulted in increased variance in the item scores, as well as the total ChEAT score. Since the internal consistency of two factors in a recently proposed model was not acceptable (ChEAT reported by previous investigations. Intercorrelations among the factors suggested three higher order constructs. These findings indicate that the ChEAT subscales may be sufficiently stable to allow use in non-clinical samples of children.

  5. Predicting consumers' intention to consume ready-to-eat meals. The role of moral attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Sijtsema, Siet J; Hall, Gunnar

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of integrating moral attitude into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model when predicting intention to consume ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Norway (N = 112), The Netherlands (N = 99), and Finland (N = 134) in spring 2009. A stepwise hierarchical regression was conducted, and the analyses showed that moral attitude is an important predictor of RTE-meal consumption. The feeling of moral obligation, operationalised as a negative feeling of guilt, had a negative effect on peoples' intention to consume ready meals in all the three countries tested, and the explained variance (R²) for TPB increased when moral was added as an explanatory factor. However, although the test showed significant results for the effect of attitude towards behavior and moral in all countries, non-significant results were observed for the effect of subjective norm in both The Netherlands and Norway when moral attitude was included to the TPB-model, indicating cultural differences in the social pressure towards ready meal consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Comparison of Eating Attitudes Between Vegans/Vegetarians and Nonvegans/Nonvegetarians in Terms of Orthorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçekoğlu, Pınar; Tunçay, Güzin Yasemin

    2018-04-01

    This descriptive study was performed to compare signs of orthorexia nervosa and eating habits and attitudes of vegans/vegetarians and nonvegans/nonvegetarians. The study sample included 62 people, of whom 31 were vegan/vegetarian and 31 were nonvegan/nonvegetarian. Data were gathered with a personal characteristics form, Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11, Eating Attitudes Test-40 and Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory. There were not any significant differences between scores for Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11, Eating Attitudes Test-40 and Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (p>0,05). As scores for Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11 decreased, predisposition to orthorexia nervosa increased. Therefore, although correlation coefficients were negative, they were considered positive. There was a significant, negative relation between Eating Habits Test-40 scores and Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11 scores (r=-0.290, p=0.002) and between Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory scores and Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11 scores (r=-0.319, p=0.012). As poor eating habits and obsessive symptoms increased, so did orthorectic symptoms. In light of obtained results, it seems that people become vegan/vegetarian mainly for ethical reasons and that veganism/vegetarianism is not associated with obsession of healthy eating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intolerance of uncertainty and metacognitions in a non-clinical sample with problematic and normal eating attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantellou, Anna; Reynolds, Martina

    2010-08-01

    The present study investigates intolerance of uncertainty and metacognitions in individuals with problematic eating attitudes (PEA) and individuals with normal eating attitudes (NEA). It was hypothesised that individuals with PEA will show higher levels of intolerance of uncertainty and metacognitions compared to individuals with NEA, and that the two variables would be positively associated. A non-clinical sample of 116 UK-based university students completed the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30) and Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS). Twenty-seven participants formed the PEA group and 89 the NEA group. Results overall supported the hypotheses, participants with PEA scored significantly higher on three of the five metacognition factors, total metacognition score and intolerance of uncertainty compared to participants with NEA. Positive correlations were also found between intolerance of uncertainty and metacognitions. Findings point towards further examining intolerance of uncertainty and metacognitions in the field of eating disorders. Changing metacognitions and targeting high levels of intolerance of uncertainty could contribute to better treatment outcome for individuals with eating disorders. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [External and internal validity of a multidimensional Locus of control scale of eating attitudes for athletes (LOCSCAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Y; Scoffier, S; d'Arripe-Longueville, F

    2016-10-01

    In the field of health psychology, the control has consistently been considered as a protective factor. This protective role has been also highlighted in eating attitudes' domain. However, current studies use the one-dimensional scale of Rotter or the multidimensional health locus of control scale, and no specific eating attitudes' scale in the sport context exists. Moreover, the social influence in previous scales is limited. According to recent works, the purpose of this study was to test the internal and external validity of a multidimensional locus of control scale of eating attitudes for athletes. One hundred and seventy-nine participants were solicited. A confirmatory factorial analysis was conducted in order to test the internal validity of the scale. The scale external validity was tested in relation to eating attitudes. The internal validity of the scale was verified as well as the external validity, which confirmed the importance of taking into consideration social influences. Indeed, the 2 subscales "Trainers, friends" and "Parents, family" are related respectively positively and negatively in eating disorders. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Racial comparisons in perceptions of maternal and peer attitudes, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders among African American and White women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier, Sarah J; Moore, Melanie P; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2016-01-01

    Although once thought primarily to affect White women, body dissatisfaction and disordered eating exist among all racial groups. In the current study, the authors determined whether the relationship between participants' perceived maternal/peer attitudes toward appearance and the outcomes of body dissatisfaction and eating pathology varied by race. Self-reported data, including measures of body dissatisfaction, disordered eating behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and perceptions of maternal/peer attitudes, were collected from December 2012 to May 2013 at a large Mid-Atlantic university. BMI (β = 0.20, p = .01), perceptions of peers' attitudes toward appearance (β = 0.23, p = .02), and White race (β = 0.33, p peers' attitudes toward appearance such that at high perceptions, African American women reported high levels of body dissatisfaction (β = -0.20, p = .04), but this was not true for White women. Higher perceived peer concern about weight and shape (β = 0.32, p disordered eating. The results of this study have implications for prevention programs that address disordered eating for racially diverse groups of women.

  10. Effects of a reality TV cosmetic surgery makeover program on eating disordered attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Suzanne E; Trace, Sara E; Mitchell, Karen S; Gow, Rachel Walker

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of a reality TV cosmetic surgery program on eating disordered attitudes, behaviors, mood, anxiety, and self-esteem. Participants (N=147 women) completed baseline surveys and were subsequently randomly assigned to one of two conditions: one in which they watched a reality TV cosmetic surgery program (The Swan) and one in which they watched a reality TV home improvement program (Clean Sweep). Assessments were conducted immediately post-video and two weeks later. Women in the cosmetic surgery program group who reported higher internalization of the thin-ideal at baseline manifested lower self-esteem at posttesting. Among White women, those who watched the cosmetic surgery program reported greater perceptions of media pressures to be thin and stronger endorsement of their ability to control their body's appearance after watching the video. These differences persisted over a two-week follow-up period. Reality TV cosmetic surgery makeover programs may contribute to eating disordered attitudes and behaviors among young women, particularly those who have internalized the thin body-ideal. These findings seem to be especially applicable for White women; however, they should be further investigated with more diverse and international samples.

  11. Influence of gender role orientation (masculinity versus femininity) on body satisfaction and eating attitudes in homosexuals, heterosexuals and transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, Stefania; Iannaccone, Mara; Cotrufo, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gender role orientation and eating disorder attitudes and behaviors and body dissatisfaction in a sample of homosexuals, heterosexuals, and transsexuals. We screened 132 homosexuals, 178 heterosexuals (both male and female), and 15 MtF transsexuals by means of an ad hoc socio-demographic schedule; the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 and Symptom Checklist; the Body Uneasiness Test and the Bem Sex Role Inventory. Differences between homosexual, heterosexual, and transsexual participants emerged, but those data seem to be best explained by the constructs of femininity and masculinity than by the biological gender. The empirical evidence of a positive correlation between femininity and eating problems, and the negative correlation between masculinity and eating problems, is full of implications. Eating disorders appear to be diseases of femininity; masculinity seems to be a protective factor, independently by the biological gender.

  12. The prevalence of weight – controlling attitude and eating disorders and their association with anthropometric indices in female adolescent students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohamad hasan Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Adolescence is one of the most critical growth periods in the human's life. Eating disorder is one of the most common nutritional-psychological disorders in this period, which can lead to acute and chronic physical and mental problems. Therefore, regarding the importance of the topic, the present study was designed to determine the prevalence of weight – controlling attitude and eating disorders, and their association with anthropometric indices in female adolescent school students. Materials and Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional descriptive analytical study. 594 high school adolescent girls were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. Nutritional attitude was assessed by use of a nutritional attitude questionnaire. Another specific questionnaire was used to gather demographic and anthropometric information. Data analysis was done using SPSS software, independent t- test and Chi-square (P˂0.05. Results: The information shows that 80% of the studied population are at risk of eating disorders. The number of the obese , over weight and underweight students were significantly more in the group with nutritional attitude disorders. Conclusion: Due to the high prevalence of eating disorders in adolescent girls, and the concomitant obesity and underweight with these disorders, the correction of these attitude could be mentioned as a health priority in this city

  13. [Diagnostic validity and usefulness of the Eating Attitudes Test-26 for the assessment of eating disorders risk in a Colombian male population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constaín, Gustavo A; Rodríguez-Gázquez, María de Los Ángeles; Ramírez Jiménez, Guillermo Andrés; Gómez Vásquez, Gloria María; Mejía Cardona, Laura; Cardona Vélez, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    To establish the diagnostic validity and usefulness of Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) for the risk assessment of eating disorders in a male population. Observational validation study questionnaire. Performed in Medellin city at a community care level of mixed (public and private) psychiatric clinics. The study included 21 male subjects aged ≥14 with DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS), and 93 controls without ED. A convenience sample was used for the cases and a simple, randomised one for controls. A reference standard (structured psychiatrist interview confirming the fulfilment of ED case inclusion criteria) was compared with the EAT-26 questionnaire. Reliability, cultural, semantics, and factorial validation were performed, and the best cut-off score was established with the ROC curve. Four domains remain in the instrument: dieting-bulimia and food pre-occupation, dieting, oral control-dieting, and oral control-bulimia. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.89, and a score of ≥20 is the best cut-off (sensitivity=100% and specificity=97.8%). The positive predictive value was 91.3% and the negative predictive value was 100.0%. EAT-26 questionnaire is an ideal multidimensional instrument for Eating Disorder screening in risk populations, with excellent reliability, sensitivity and specificity values. EAT-26 could be a useful tool to be considered when strategies for early detection of Eating Disorders are implemented in the male population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Eating habits and attitudes towards change in Spanish university students and workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazpe, Itziar; Marqués, María; Sánchez-Tainta, Ana; Rodríguez-Mourille, Ana; Beunza, Juan-José; Santiago, Susana; Fernández-Montero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Universities and workplaces are important targets for the promotion of the nutritional interventions in adult population. The aim of this study was to assess the dietary habits and attitudes towards change in workers and university students from different academic fields. The study data came from a cross-sectional study of a Spanish University population of 1,429 participants. We analyzed the dietary habits and the attitudes toward dietary change. The mean age of workers and students was 37 and 23 years, respectively. Both groups reported eating four meals per day. Among students, the consumption of vegetables, wine, fish and nuts was less frequent whereas carbonated beverages, commercial bakery, fast food and red meat was higher. On the other hand, overall dietary pattern of science students was healthier than other students. Although no significant differences were found between students and workers in attitudes towards change, 32% of employees and 39% of students said they were seriously considering changing them. The dietary pattern was healthier among workers than among students, particularly those participants that studied social sciences degrees. They constituted the most vulnerable segment of the university population from a nutritional point of view. About a third of workers and students considered changing their habits. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards access, availability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibsdall, L.A.; Lambert, N.; Bobbin, R.F.; Frewer, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    To determine low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards fruit and vegetables, in particular issues of access to, affordability of and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables. Design and setting: Questionnaire survey mailed to homes owned by a large UK housing association. Participants:

  16. Impact of female adult eating disorder inpatients' attitudes to compulsive exercise on outcome at discharge and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Marit; Rø, Øyvind; Romild, Ulla; Bjørnelv, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The link between compulsive exercise and eating disorders is well known, but research with clinical samples has been limited. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes in attitudes towards compulsive exercise and its impact on outcome at follow-up in female adult hospitalised patients with eating disorders. The sample consisted of 78 patients: Diagnostic distribution: anorexia nervosa 59 % (n = 46), approximately 22 % (n = 16) in bulimia nervosa, and Eating Disorder not Otherwise Specified respectively. The average follow-up period was 26 months (SD =15 months). Compulsive exercise was measured by the Exercise and Eating Disorder (EED) questionnaire. Other measures were the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Body Attitude Test (BAT), Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP 64), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and body mass index (BMI). Outcome measures were EDI-2 and BMI (patients with admission BMI ≤ 18.5). Paired sample t-tests and mixed model regression analysis were conducted to investigate changes in compulsive exercise and predictors of outcome respectively. All measures revealed significant improvements (p eating disorder symptoms and BMI.

  17. Eating concerns, body dissatisfaction, thinness internalization and antifat attitudes and their relationship with gender ideology in a sample of men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Magallares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are much less common in men than in women. In this paper it is argued that these differences may be explained by the gender ideology that men and women have. Literature suggests that women's ideology internalizes the social norm of slimness and for that reason may develop eating concerns and body dissatisfaction with the pass of the time, while men externalize the value of thinness and that is why they show greater antifat attitudes than women. Data obtained from 450 male students revealed that participants high in a gender ideology scale reported greater antifat attitudes and less thinness internalization, eating concerns and body dissatisfaction. Finally, it is discussed why men and women adopt different strategies to deal with the social norm of thinness.

  18. Disordered eating in Jewish adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhas, Leora; Heinmaa, Margus; Bryden, Pier; Bradley, Susan; Toner, Brenda

    2008-09-01

    To examine the presence and nature of disordered eating attitudes and behaviours among Jewish Canadian adolescents, as compared with non-Jewish Canadian adolescents in an urban community. A secondary goal was to examine whether rates of eating-disordered behaviour differed among the adolescents based on the degree of Jewish religious observance. High school students (n = 868) from the Toronto area completed a demographic and religious practice questionnaire together with the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), a self-report test that discriminated adolescents with syndromal eating disorders from normal adolescents. Jewish females aged 13 to 20 years, but not males, reported significantly more disordered eating behaviours and attitudes, compared with their non-Jewish female counterparts. Twenty-five percent of Jewish females, as compared with 18% of non-Jewish females, scored above the clinical cut-off for the EAT. No differences in vulnerability to disordered eating were found within the group of Jewish females or males related to their degree of religious observance. Adolescent Jewish females, but not males, appear to be at greater risk for abnormal attitudes and behaviours related to eating, compared with their non-Jewish female peers. While the reasons for this finding are unclear, this study is a step toward improving understanding of the relations between sex, culture, religion, and the development of eating disorders. Culturally sensitive and sex-specific prevention strategies and treatment interventions are indicated.

  19. Eating attitudes, body image satisfaction and self-esteem of South African Black and White male adolescents and their perception of female body silhouettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitau, Tabither M; Micklesfield, Lisa K; Pettifor, John M; Norris, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study of urban high schools in Johannesburg, South Africa, sought to examine eating attitudes, body image and self-esteem among male adolescents (n = 391). Anthropometric measurements, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), Rosenberg self-esteem, body image satisfaction and perception of females were collected at age 13, 15 and 17 years. Descriptive analysis was done to describe the sample, and non-parametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test was used to test for significant differences between data that were not normally distributed (EAT-26). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analyses were conducted to test for associations between self-esteem scores and eating attitudes, body mass indices and body image satisfaction scores. To assess the differences between groups that were normally distributed chi-square tests were carried out. Ethnic differences significantly affected adolescent boys' body mass index (BMI), eating attitudes and self-esteem; White boys had higher self-esteem, BMI and normal eating attitudes than the Black boys did. BMI was positively associated with self-esteem (p = 0.01, r = 0.134) and negatively with dieting behaviour in White boys (p = 0.004, r = -0.257), and with lower EAT-26 bulimic and oral control scores in Black boys. In conclusion, the findings highlight ethnic differences and a need to better understand cultural differences that influence adolescent attitudes and behaviour.

  20. Media influence on drive for thinness, body satisfaction, and eating attitudes among young women in Hong Kong and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Tina L; Hu, W Y

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined the impact of thin-ideal media exposure on Chinese women's drive for thinness, attitudes towards body shape, and eating attitude. Women were assigned to one of two video conditions, which portrayed the thin-ideal (experimental) or was neutral (control group), in terms of content. A total of 83 young women from Hong Kong (N = 38) and Shanghai (N = 45), aged between 18 and 25 years (M age  = 22.7) participated in the study. A significant interaction was observed between the experimental video condition and location. Hong Kong women in the experimental group experienced greater levels of body dissatisfaction than Shanghai women exposed to the same condition. Exposure to thin-ideal media produced an increase in drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction and problematic eating attitudes regardless of location, with a greater immediate impact shown in Hong Kong women.

  1. Eat healthy? Attitudes of the German population towards industrially produced cardioprotective food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, F U C E; Luck-Sikorski, C; Krüger, M; Wiacek, C; Braun, P G; Engeli, S; Riedel-Heller, S G

    2018-01-31

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is likely to increase in incidence. Foods with cardioprotective functions, e.g. specific functional food, could reduce CVD risk factors and hence CVD incidence. Little is known about industrially modified foods with cardioprotective functions. In a large German sample (n = 1007), attitudes of consumers in Germany towards industrially produced cardioprotective food were assessed using Cluster analyses. Consumers were contacted via telephone and interviewed using questionnaires. Overall, about 25% knew about industrially produced food with cardioprotective function. Our analysis revealed a small but determined group of consumers who think very skeptical about cardioprotective products, but we also identified a favorable group. These two groups only differed in age, with the skeptical group being ten years older. The rising number of industrially modified products with potential cardioprotective benefit is met by skepticism and a lack of knowledge by German costumers. If large scale studies show health benefits of these products, these will need to be better communicated to German customers in order to address possible doubts or concerns and to encourage healthy eating habits in consumer eating behavior. Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Are there any differences in psychiatric symptoms and eating attitudes between pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum and healthy pregnant women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annagür, Bilge Burçak; Kerimoğlu, Özlem Seçilmiş; Gündüz, Şule; Tazegül, Aybike

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to determine the relationship between eating attitudes and psychiatric symptoms in women with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) and to compare these women with healthy control subjects. The study sample included 48 women with HG, and the control group had 44 pregnant women. The patients were selected from women with HG hospitalized in the obstetric inpatient clinic. All of the participants were in the first trimester of pregnancy. The participants' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were recorded in the obstetric clinic. All of the participants completed a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and Body Image Scale (BIS). Women with HG were more likely to have had a history of HG during their previous pregnancy (P0.05). Depression and anxiety scores were significantly higher in women with HG (P0.05). We suggest that HG appears to be associated with depression and anxiety symptoms rather than deterioration of eating attitudes and body image. However, these results should be confirmed by prospective and clinical studies. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. The effects of avoidance coping and coping self-efficacy on eating disorder attitudes and behaviors: a stress-diathesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneil, Laura; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Mehlenbeck, Robyn; Weismoore, Julie

    2012-12-01

    The present study employed a series of stress-diathesis models to examine whether avoidance coping and poor coping self-efficacy contribute to disordered eating attitudes and behaviors in a sample of college students. The sample included one hundred fifteen undergraduate students (28.7% male; 71.3% female). Participants completed self-report measures to assess daily stressors, coping style, coping self-efficacy, and eating disorder attitudes and behaviors. As predicted, among students with an avoidance coping style, those who reported more daily stressors exhibited higher eating disorder attitudes and behaviors than those with less daily hassles. Contrary to study hypothesis, number of daily hassles did not moderate the association between coping self-efficacy and eating disorder attitudes and behaviors. However, there was a significant main effect for coping self-efficacy, suggesting that students who lack confidence in their coping abilities are more likely to have problematic eating attitudes and behaviors, regardless of their level of daily stress. Clinically, results suggest that students who enter college with an avoidance coping style and poor coping self-efficacy may be at risk for disordered eating, particularly with the onset of associated stress. Teaching students active problem-focused coping skills to deal with daily hassles associated with college life, and providing opportunities for repeated practice to bolster self-efficacy, may help prevent and/or reduce disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in eating attitudes, body esteem and weight control behaviours during adolescence in a South African cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabither M Gitau

    Full Text Available Failure to consume an adequate diet or over consumption during adolescence can disrupt normal growth and development, resulting in undesirable weight change. This leads to an increase in unhealthy weight control practices related to eating and exercise among both adolescent girls and boys to meet the societal 'ideal' body shape. This study therefore aims to examine the longitudinal changes in eating attitudes, body-esteem and weight control behaviours among adolescents between 13 and 17 years; and, to describe perceptions around body shape at age 17 years. A total of 1435 urban South African black and mixed ancestry boys and girls, who had data at both age 13 and 17 years from the Birth to Twenty cohort were included. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires on eating attitudes (EAT-26, body esteem and weight control behaviours for either weight loss or muscle gain attempts. Height and weight were measured at both time points and BMI was calculated. Black females had a higher BMI (p<0.001 and an increased risk of developing eating disorders as well as significant increase in the prevalence of weight loss practices between the ages 13 and 17 years. At age 17 years both Mixed ancestry adolescents had lower body-esteem compared to black adolescents. The prevalence of possible eating disorders was 11% and 13.1% in early and late adolescents respectively. Males and females shared similar opinions on normal silhouettes being the 'best', 'getting respect' and being the 'happiest', while the obese silhouette was associated with the 'worst' and the 'unhappiest', and the underweight silhouette with the "weakest". Black females had a higher BMI and an increased risk of developing eating disorders. Adolescent females engaged more in weight loss practices whereas, males in muscle gain practices indicating that Western norms of thinness as the ideal are becoming more common in South Africa.

  5. The emergence of sex differences in risk for disordered eating attitudes during puberty: a role for prenatal testosterone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Kristen M; Breedlove, S Marc; Sisk, Cheryl L; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2013-05-01

    Research suggests that prenatal testosterone exposure may masculinize (i.e., lower) disordered eating (DE) attitudes and behaviors and influence the lower prevalence of eating disorders in males versus females. How or when these effects become prominent remains unknown, although puberty may be a critical developmental period. In animals, the masculinizing effects of early testosterone exposure become expressed during puberty when gonadal hormones activate sex-typical behaviors, including eating behaviors. This study examined whether the masculinizing effects of prenatal testosterone exposure on DE attitudes emerge during puberty in 394 twins from opposite-sex and same-sex pairs. Twin type (opposite sex vs. same sex) was used as a proxy for level of prenatal testosterone exposure because females from opposite-sex twin pairs are thought to be exposed to testosterone in utero from their male co-twin. Consistent with animal data, there were no differences in levels of DE attitudes between opposite-sex and same-sex twins during pre-early puberty. However, during mid-late puberty, females from opposite-sex twin pairs (i.e., females with a male co-twin) exhibited more masculinized (i.e., lower) DE attitudes than females from same-sex twin pairs (i.e., females with a female co-twin), independent of several "third variables" (e.g., body mass index [BMI], anxiety). Findings suggest that prenatal testosterone exposure may decrease DE attitudes and at least partially underlie sex differences in risk for DE attitudes after mid-puberty. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  6. Protective self-presentation style: association with disordered eating and anorexia nervosa mediated by sociocultural attitudes towards appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachner-Melman, R; Zohar, A H; Elizur, Y; Kremer, I; Golan, M; Ebstein, R

    2009-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a protective self-presentation style (Lennox and Wolfe, 1984) is associated with eating pathology and anorexia nervosa (AN) and that this association is mediated by sociocultural attitudes towards appearance emphasizing the thin ideal. We compared the protective-presentation style of women with AN (N=17), partially recovered women (N=110), fully recovered women (N=73), and female controls (N=374). Ill women had a more protective self-presentation style than partially or fully recovered women, who in turn had a more protective self-presentation style than controls. Sociocultural attitudes towards appearance fully mediated the association between protective self-presentation and disordered eating. Protective self-presentation may therefore be a risk factor for AN and/or a prognostic factor. Implications for therapy and prevention are discussed.

  7. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan Affects C-Reactive Protein, Coagulation Abnormalities, and Hepatic Function Tests among Type 2 Diabetic Patients1234

    OpenAIRE

    Azadbakht, Leila; Surkan, Pamela J.; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Willett, Walter C.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies exist regarding the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on novel cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetic patients. We evaluated the effects of the DASH eating pattern on C-reactive protein (CRP) level, coagulation abnormalities, and hepatic function tests in type 2 diabetic patients. In this randomized, crossover clinical trial, 31 type 2 diabetic patients consumed a control diet or the DASH diet for 8 wk. The DASH diet was rich in fruits, ...

  8. The Relationship of Disordered Eating Attitudes with Stress Level, Bone Turnover Markers, and Bone Mineral Density in Obese Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Okbay G?ne?, Asl?; Alika?ifo?lu, M?jgan; ?en Demird??en, Ezgi; Ergin?z, Ethem; Demir, T?rkay; Kucur, Mine; Ercan, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of stress caused by disordered eating attitudes on bone health in obese adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising 80 obese adolescents was performed from November 2013 to September 2014. Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol levels were measured as a biological marker of stress. Bone turnover was evaluated using bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, serum osteocalcin, and urinary N-telopeptide concentrations. Bone mineral density was measured...

  9. Body image and eating attitudes and behaviors among adolescent heart and lung transplant recipients: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Laura; Anthony, Samantha; Dipchand, Anne I; Kaufman, Miriam; Solomon, Melinda; Stein, Michael; Pollock-BarZiv, Stacey

    2012-09-01

    Adolescents with chronic illnesses are at increased risk for body image and eating disorders; however, this has not been investigated in solid organ transplant recipients. Adolescent transplant recipients are a vulnerable cohort because of the sustained follow-up and immune-suppressing therapies, which often include steroids and may lead to weight gain and cosmetic changes. Consequences of body dissatisfaction such as disordered behaviors have not been well studied in transplant recipients. To examine body image, eating attitudes, and behaviors among 28 adolescent thoracic transplant recipients. Adolescent (11-18 years old) heart and lung transplant recipients a minimum of 3 months after transplant provided informed written consent and completed a standardized questionnaire package about eating attitudes and behaviors; body image and drive for thinness; actual, perceived, and desired weight; and medical and anthropometric information (eg, body mass index) during regular transplant clinics. Of 25 heart and 3 lung transplant recipients (54% female; median age, 14.5 years; median, 1.6 years after transplant), 37% perceived their current weight as too high or low. Moreover, 81% were dissatisfied with their current weight (38% wanted to lose and 44% wanted to gain weight), yet few engaged in disordered behaviors. Despite high levels of self-reported body dissatisfaction, low rates of disordered behaviors were observed. Weight dissatisfaction was high (81%) but bidirectional (to lose or to gain weight). Future assessment of disordered eating behaviors should include insidious activities such as medication nonadherence, in addition to traditional weight-control behaviors such as binge eating, strict dieting, or assiduous exercise. Further research will delineate the impact of body dissatisfaction and eating behaviors and outcomes on long-term transplant survivors, older adolescent cohorts, and other recipients of solid organ transplants.

  10. The effects of parental mental health and social-emotional coping on adolescent eating disorder attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Laura E; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Blalock, Dan V

    2016-10-01

    This study examined whether social-emotional coping skills moderate the association between parental mental health symptoms and adolescent disordered eating attitudes and behaviors in a clinical sample of adolescents with internalizing and/or externalizing symptoms. Fifty-nine adolescent-parent dyads (N = 118 total participants) recruited from a metropolitan area in the Northeastern United States completed assessments at baseline and 12-month follow-up. Generally, higher parental depression and anxiety were only found to be associated with greater disordered eating attitudes and behaviors among adolescents who reported poorer (versus stronger) emotional awareness/expression skills and less (versus greater) ability to regulate emotions. Results may suggest that adolescents who lack the ability to effectively recognize, express, and manage negative emotions that arise in the context of a challenging home environment may be at greater risk for engaging in maladaptive coping behaviors, such as disordered eating. Thus, bolstering adolescent social-emotional coping skills may help protect against adolescent disordered eating. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Survey of Attitudes towards Computerized Self-Help for Eating Disorders within a Community-Based Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Carrie-Anne; Waters, Louise; Schmidt, Ulrike; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder with many physical, psychological and social consequences. Guided self-help (GSH) is recommended in the treatment of BN (NICE, 2004). One of the ways in which to provide GSH is via the internet using evidence-based packages with regular support from a clinician or trained support worker. The aim of this community-based survey was to investigate attitudes towards online self-help for eating disorders and the support required whilst using such an approach. Two-hundred and fifty-three participants with bulimic symptoms completed the survey. The sample was recruited primarily online. The mean age was 29.11 years (SD = 8.67; min = 16, max = 64). Attitudes towards online self-help (SH) for eating disorders were very positive. The inclusion of some form of support to accompany such an intervention was important to the majority of participants. Remote mediums of support such as e-mail, a forum and text messaging were most often selected as helpful. Most participants expressed a preference for weekly support contacts and for flexible support lengths that could respond to support needs as required. Online self-help for eating disorders is a desirable treatment option for many individuals. The information gathered regarding preferences in the type, medium, duration and frequency of support could be used in the development of future self-help strategies in order to maximize uptake, retention and outcomes.

  12. Psychometric Quality of the Dutch Version of the Children's Eating Attitude Test in a Community Sample and a Sample of Overweight Youngsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Theuwis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disturbed eating attitudes may be important precursors of pathological eating patterns and, therefore need to be researched adequately. The Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT is indicated for detecting at-risk attitudes and concerns in youngsters. Method. The present study was designed to provide a preliminary psychometric evaluation of the Dutch version of the ChEAT, by examining reliability and validity in a sample of 166 youngsters. Results. Generally the ChEAT seems to be a reliable instrument. Concurrent validity was demonstrated by positive correlations with measures assessing pathological eating behaviour and with related psychological problems. The discriminant validity was good. Based on ChEAT scores we can distinguish overweight youngsters from the community sample and “dieters” from “non dieters”. Divergent validity and factor structure show still shortcomings. Discussion. The Dutch version of the ChEAT seems to be a promising screening- and research instrument. Future prospective research could focus on a cut-off score for identifying at-risk youngsters.

  13. The Role of School Design in Shaping Healthy Eating-Related Attitudes, Practices, and Behaviors Among School Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Intolubbe-Chmil, Loren; Trowbridge, Matthew; Sorensen, Dina; Huang, Terry T-K

    2016-01-01

    Schools have increasing responsibility to address healthy eating, but physical barriers influence their ability to adopt and sustain recommended strategies. We took advantage of a natural experiment to investigate the role of the physical environment in shaping healthy eating attitudes and practices among school staff members. A school district consolidated its elementary schools and incorporated architectural features to support healthy eating into a building renovation. Surveys along with structured, in-depth interviews were administered prior to and at 12 months postoccupancy. Paired t-tests and McNemar's tests were used to analyze changes in survey indices and interview data were coded for themes. The school implemented new policies and programs, including staff wellness activities. There was a significant decrease in the percent of teachers with a high-fat diet (from 73.68% to 57.14%, p comfort with using the new healthy eating features. We found promising evidence that school architecture can support a school to address healthy eating. To enhance influence of the physical environment, more research is merited to test complementary strategies such as improving ownership of space and increasing self-efficacy to manage space. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  14. Parental rearing and eating psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz-Serrrano, Cristina; Rodríguez-Cano, Teresa; Beato-Fernández, Luis; Latorre-Postigo, José Miguel; Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Vaz-Leal, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the relationship between perceived rearing styles and the clinical expression of Eating Disorders (ED). One hundred and ninety-six patients diagnosed of an ED and 127 healthy student as controls selected from the Nursing College were evaluated for general psychopathology (STAI, BDI II, RSE), and for abnormal eating attitudes (EAT, EDI-II, BITE). The EMBU (‘my memories of upbringing’) was administered for the assessment of perceived parental rearing styles and was used a questionnaire to assess familial variables. In relation to the control group, patients with ED perceived greater rejection, overprotection and less warmth than the controls. Patients who perceived greater paternal favoritism, maternal overprotection and low paternal emotional warmth, showed higher levels of anxiety. Paternal affection and maternal attitudes of rejection, overprotection and favoritism were related to lower self-esteem. Regarding abnormal eating attitudes, body dissatisfaction inversely correlated with paternal emotional care and maternal favoritism. The EDI subscales: ineffectiveness, perfectionism and ascetism were associated to parental rejection. Maternal rejection also related with drive for thinness, interoceptive awareness and impulse regulation. Perceived emotional warmth was related with perfectionism. Bulimia subscale and BITE scores were inversely associated to paternal overprotection and affection, and scored significantly higher in paternal favoritism and rejection from both parents. Perceived parental bonding is different in the various subtypes of EDs. Patients diagnosed of Bulimia Nervosa or Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified perceived greater rejection, less affection and a greater overprotection than Anorexia Nervosa patients and controls.

  15. Behaviours And Attitudes About Body Image And Eating Disorders Among Adolescent Females In Kragujevac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanovic Maja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are often in older teens and young women with prevalence 4-5% with increasing tendency. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of eating disorders among adolescents in the city of Kragujevac, and to examine the relationship between the age and the type of eating disorder that can occur in adolescents.

  16. An Assessment of Perceived Emotional Intelligence and Eating Attitudes among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Michele L.; Jacobs, Sue C.; Page, Kyle S.; Porras, Claudia V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Disordered eating patterns continue to surface on college campuses. Studies are needed to examine the potential influence of emotional intelligence on disordered eating behavior. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess relationships between perceived emotional intelligence factors and eating disorder symptoms among male and…

  17. Adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating and attitudes toward regulatory measures: A Denmark-Hong Kong comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice

    eating habits with healthy eating than Danish respondents. Danish respondents were more likely to practice healthy eating at schools than Hong Kong respondents. Making tanks of cold water freely available everywhere was perceived to be most effective in discouraging the consumption of soft drink. Danish......This study explores cross cultural differences in the perceptions of healthy eating, contexts where healthy or unhealthy eating are practiced, and consumer evaluation of regulatory measures that discourage the consumption of unhealthy foods such as soft drinks. A survey was conducted of 386 Danish...... and Chinese adolescents using a structured questionnaire. Results showed that perceptions of healthy eating were generally based on concepts such as balance and moderation. Unhealthy eating was most frequently practiced at parties and in festive periods. Hong Kong respondents were more likely to associate...

  18. [Eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yasumasa

    2015-02-01

    Eating disorders are characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behavior, including such symptoms as extreme restriction of food intake or binge eating, and severe disturbances in the perception of body shape and weight, as well as a drive for thinness and obsessive fears of becoming fat. Eating disorder is an important cause for physical and psychosocial morbidity in young women. Patients with eating disorders have a deficit in the cognitive process and functional abnormalities in the brain system. Recently, brain-imaging techniques have been used to identify specific brain areas that function abnormally in patients with eating disorders. We have discussed the clinical and cognitive aspects of eating disorders and summarized neuroimaging studies of eating disorders.

  19. Onset of dieting in childhood and adolescence: implications for personality, psychopathology, eating attitudes and behaviors of women with eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Young In; Kim, Jin Kyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Young-Chul

    2017-09-01

    This study examined the MMPI-2 and EDI-2 scores of 205 Korean women with eating disorders to identify difference between early and adulthood onset of dieting groups. 101 women had started dieting in their childhood to adolescence (EARLYdieting group) and 104 had started dieting in their adulthood (ADULTdieting group). Both of the MMPI-2 and EDI-2 scores were significantly different between the two groups before and after adjusting for the duration since the onset of eating disorder. EARLYdieting group scored higher in the MMPI-2 clinical scales 1, 3, 0 and the EDI-2 bulimia scale. EARLYdieting group tended to use a more varied dieting strategy. The findings suggested that starting to diet early in life may be related to more severe psychopathology and dieting behaviors in adulthood.

  20. Night Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Tuncel; Fatma Özlem Orhan

    2009-01-01

    Hunger is an awakening related biological impulse. The relationship between hunger and sleep is moderated by the control of homeostatic and circadian rhytms of the body. Abnormal eating behavior during sleep period could result from different causes. Abnormal eating during the main sleep period has been categorized as either night eating syndrome or sleep related eating disorder. Night eating syndrome (NES) is an eating disorder characterised by the clinical features of morning anorexia, even...

  1. Danish and Chinese adolescents’ perceptions of healthy eating and attitudes toward regulatory measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This article aims to examine young consumers’ perceptions of healthy eating, contexts where healthy or unhealthy eating are practiced, and their valuation of regulatory measures that discourage the consumption of unhealthy foods in two different markets. Design/methodology/approach – A ......Purpose – This article aims to examine young consumers’ perceptions of healthy eating, contexts where healthy or unhealthy eating are practiced, and their valuation of regulatory measures that discourage the consumption of unhealthy foods in two different markets. Design...... and in festive periods. Hong Kong respondents were more likely to associate eating habits with healthy eating than Danish respondents. Danish respondents were more likely to practice healthy eating at schools than Hong Kong respondents. Making tanks of cold water freely available everywhere was perceived...... communication messages that target different perceptions of unhealthy eating, as well as different unhealthy eating contexts. Policy makers should be aware of the difference in local environmental conditions when designing regulations to encourage healthy eating. Originality/value – The study is an innovative...

  2. Attitudes and knowledge levels of nurses and residents caring for adolescents with an eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveneau, Gladys; Feinstein, Ronald; Rosen, Lisa M; Fisher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Although the vast majority of youths with an eating disorder (ED) are treated as outpatients, some require treatment in an inpatient unit. The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes of nurses and pediatric residents towards adolescents and young adults with ED. Nursing questionnaires were distributed through a nurse manager and resident questionnaires were distributed in coordination with the chief residents. A total of 82 individuals (32 nurses and 50 pediatric residents) completed the survey. Only two nurses and six residents had not worked with a patient with an ED in the previous year. The vast majority of nurses and residents recognized that fear of gaining weight, refusal to maintain body weight and, disturbed body image were frequent signs occurring in patients with an ED. Both nurses and residents believed that emotional problems, influence of friends and family, family pressure, influence of the media, and being self-induced were the most likely causes of EDs. Genetics and influence of other medical problems were deemed less likely causes. The majority of residents identified having different rules for different patients and poor communication as factors that make it difficult to take care of ED patients. More than half of all nurses and residents (58.2%) thought that ED patients were responsible for their disease "always" or "in most cases". Residents (68.8%) were more likely than nurses (45.2%) to frequently feel frustrated with ED patients (χ2, p<0.0370). Adolescents with an ED provide a unique challenge to nurses and residents caring for them.

  3. Stigmatizing attitudes differ across mental health disorders: a comparison of stigma across eating disorders, obesity, and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebneter, Daria S; Latner, Janet D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the current article was to compare stigmatizing attitudes toward eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED), with stigma toward another weight-related condition (obesity) and a non-weight-related mental disorder (major depressive disorder [MDD]). Participants (N = 447) read five vignettes describing a woman with AN, BN, BED, obesity, or MDD and responded to questionnaires examining stigmatizing attitudes. The targets with EDs were blamed more for their condition than the targets with MDD, whereas persons with obesity were held more responsible for their condition than any other target. On the other hand, the target with MDD was perceived as more impaired than any other target. Lack of self-discipline was attributed more to the development of BED and obesity than to any other condition. Stigmatizing attitudes vary across mental health disorders, and future research should aim to specifically target stigmatizing beliefs to reduce and prevent discrimination toward mental health disorders and obesity.

  4. Tendency toward Weight Loss among Iranian Adolescent Girls: Study on Perceived Weight, Ideal Body Mass Index and Attitude toward Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Adolescents’ perception of their weight is a strong factor in shaping dietary habits and weight control and management. Among non-overweight and overweight adolescents, both overestimation and underestimation of weight status are associated with harmful effects. This study aimed to examine the relationship between perceived weight and attitude toward eating disorders among adolescent girls living in Karaj, Iran. Materials and Methods Involving a two-stage random sampling, this cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 537 high school girls 14-18 years of age living in Karaj. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 was employed to screen for attitude toward eating disorders. Also, anthropometric measurements (weight and height, perceived and the ideal weights of the participants were assessed.  Results The average age of girls participating in the study was 16.12±1.20. According to the results, 70% of girls had normal body mass index. It was found that the ideal weight of 55% of the girls in the normal body mass index group fell under the lower than normal boundary. Moreover, the prevalence of eating disorders was estimated to be 23.6%. The attitude toward eating disorder was significantly correlated with body mass index of participants and their self-concept (P

  5. Do Depression, Self-Esteem, Body-Esteem, and Eating Attitudes Vary by BMI Among African American Adolescents?

    OpenAIRE

    Witherspoon, Dawn; Latta, Laura; Wang, Yan; Black, Maureen M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine how psychosocial factors vary by body weight and gender among African-American adolescents. Methods A community sample of 235 low-income, predominantly African-American adolescents completed measures of depression, self-esteem, body-esteem, and eating attitudes. Measured weight and height were converted to body mass index (kg/m2) age and gender-adjusted z-scores. Data were analyzed using 2-factor multivariate analysis of variance. Results Obese youths had significantly wo...

  6. Psychosocial consequences of disordered eating attitudes in elite female figure skaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffier, Stéphanie; Woodman, Tim; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model of the effects of athletes' eating disorders on coach, sport friend and parent social relationships and peer social acceptance through physical self-perceptions (i.e. perceived physical appearance and perceived physical ability). The sample comprised 199 elite female figure skaters. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling. Our results showed that the effects of athletes' eating disorders on social relationships were not mediated by physical self-perceptions. Athletes' eating disorders directly negatively influenced the quality of the parent-athlete relationship, thus confirming previous findings in young adults. Contrary to the literature, eating disorders were positively related to perceived physical ability. This paradoxical finding is discussed in relation to achievement theories and the particularity of the sport context. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Eating disorders in the context of preconception care: fertility specialists' knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodino, Iolanda S; Byrne, Susan M; Sanders, Katherine A

    2017-02-01

    To gauge fertility specialists' knowledge, clinical practices, and training needs in regard to eating disorders. Cross-sectional study. Fertility clinics. Eighty Australian and New Zealand fertility specialists who were members of the Fertility Society of Australia. None. Responses to an anonymously completed online questionnaire. Approximately 54% of doctors correctly identified the body mass index relevant to anorexia nervosa, and 30% identified menstrual disturbances for anorexia, while 63.8% of doctors incorrectly nominated maladaptive weight control behaviors as a characteristic of binge eating disorder. While clinicians (83.7%) agreed it was important to screen for eating disorders during preconception assessments, 35% routinely screened for eating disorders and 8.8% indicated that their clinics had clinical practice guidelines for management of eating disorders. A minority of participants (13.8%) felt satisfied with their level of university training in eating disorders, 37.5% of doctors felt confident in their ability to recognize symptoms of an eating disorder, and 96.2% indicated a need for further education and clinical guidelines. On most items examined, knowledge and clinical practices regarding eating disorders did not differ according to doctor gender or years of clinical experience working as a fertility specialist. Knowledge about eating disorders in the context of fertility treatment is important. This study highlights the uncertainty among fertility specialists in detecting features of eating disorders. The findings point to the importance of further education and training, including the development of clinical guidelines specific to fertility health care providers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining the relationships between body image, eating attitudes, BMI, and physical activity in rural and urban South African young adult females using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrottesley, Stephanie V.; Cohen, Emmanuel; Reddy, Ankita; Said-Mohamed, Rihlat; Twine, Rhian; Tollman, Stephen M.; Kahn, Kathleen; Dunger, David B.; Norris, Shane A.

    2017-01-01

    The persistence of food insecurity, malnutrition, increasing adiposity, and decreasing physical activity, heightens the need to understand relationships between body image satisfaction, eating attitudes, BMI and physical activity levels in South Africa. Females aged 18–23 years were recruited from rural (n = 509) and urban (n = 510) settings. Body image satisfaction was measured using Stunkard’s silhouettes, and the 26-item Eating Attitudes questionnaire (EAT-26) was used to evaluate participants’ risk of disordered eating. Minutes per week of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). Significant linear correlates were included in a series of regressions run separately for urban and rural participants. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the relationships between variables. Urban females were more likely to be overweight and obese than rural females (p = 0.02), and had a greater desire to be thinner (p = 0.02). In both groups, being overweight or obese was positively associated with a desire to be thinner (pdisordered eating attitude was associated with body image dissatisfaction in the urban group (β = 1.27, pbody image dissatisfaction was associated with disordered eating (β = 0.63), as well as higher MVPA participation (pdisordered eating attitude, and with a decreased desire to be thinner. Findings indicate a shift in both settings towards more Westernised ideals. Physical activity may provide a means to promote a healthy body image, while reducing the risk of disordered eating. Given the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in both rural and urban women, this study provides insights for future interventions aimed at decreasing adiposity in a healthy way. PMID:29145423

  9. Adaptação transcultural preliminar do Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat para o idioma português The preliminary transcultural adaptation of the Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat for portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Loureiro Barillari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar o instrumento "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat para o idioma português, avaliar a equivalência semântica e a compreensão verbal. MÉTODOS: envolveu quatro etapas: (1 tradução, (2 retradução, (3 revisão técnica e avaliação semântica, (4 pré-teste - avaliação da compreensão verbal por especialistas em transtorno alimentar. RESULTADOS: as 26 questões foram traduzidas e adaptadas para o idioma português. A versão final constou dos mesmos 26 itens apresentando-se de forma clara e de fácil compreensão (valores médios superior a 4,5 - máximo 5,0. CONCLUSÕES: o instrumento encontra-se traduzido e adaptado para o idioma português demonstrando bons resultados no processo de adaptação transcultural. São necessárias análises de validade externa, equivalência de mensuração e reprodutibilidade.OBJECTIVES: to translate and adapt the "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat to Portuguese and evaluate the semantic equivalence and verbal comprehension. METHODS: the process involved four stages: (1 translation, (2 back-translation, (3 technical review and semantic evaluation, (4 pre-test - evaluation of verbal comprehension by specialists in eating disorders. RESULTS: the 26 questions were translated and adapted for Portuguese. The final version contained the same 26 items presented in a clear and easy-tounderstand format (average score higher than 4.5 - maximum 5.0. CONCLUSIONS: the tool has been translated and adapted for Portuguese and the transcultural adaptation process was a success. There is still a need for analyses of external validity, measurement equivalence and reproducibility.

  10. Prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors: Moderating effects of sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, M-C; Maïano, C; Morin, A J S; Therme, P

    2014-08-01

    Very few studies examined the prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEABs) among adolescents involved in sport practice, and their results are mixed and inconclusive. These inconsistencies are most likely due to their methodological heterogeneity and to the fact that none of these studies took into consideration the potentially relevant characteristics of the sport practice context. This study attempts to answer this limitation among French adolescents not involved or involved in various sports contexts defined based on their organization, leanness-centration, and competitive level. Participants were 335 adolescents involved in sport practice, and 435 adolescents not involved in any form of regular sport practice. The DEABs were measured using the Eating Attitudes Test-26. Global results do not showed any significant association between the status of the participants and DEAB. However, these results drastically changed when we considered the potential moderating role of sex and age on these relations. Indeed, sports involvement in general, and involvement in leanness and competitive sports were found to exert sex- and age-differentiated effects on the risks of presenting clinically significant levels of DEAB. This study suggests the importance of monitoring, preventive, and early intervention mechanisms within the context of practice, particularly for adolescent girls. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Do depression, self-esteem, body-esteem, and eating attitudes vary by BMI among African American adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Dawn; Latta, Laura; Wang, Yan; Black, Maureen M

    2013-11-01

    To examine how psychosocial factors vary by body weight and gender among African-American adolescents. A community sample of 235 low-income, predominantly African-American adolescents completed measures of depression, self-esteem, body-esteem, and eating attitudes. Measured weight and height were converted to body mass index (kg/m(2)) age and gender-adjusted z-scores. Data were analyzed using 2-factor multivariate analysis of variance. Obese youths had significantly worse scores on all psychosocial domains than normal weight youths, with no differences between overweight and normal weight youths. Obese youths had significantly worse scores than overweight youths on body-esteem and self-esteem. Female adolescents had significantly worse scores than males on depressed mood, body-esteem, and eating attitudes. Among a community sample of predominantly African-American adolescents, obesity, not overweight, was associated with poor psychosocial health. Findings suggest that overweight may be perceived as normative, and that weight-related programs consider adolescents' psychosocial functioning.

  12. Comparative validity of the chinese versions of the bulimic inventory test edinburgh and eating attitudes test for DSM-IV eating disorders among high school dance and nondance students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Fang, David; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-01-01

    To compare the validity of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and the Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE) as screening tools for eating disorders (EDs), and to identify a new threshold for each questionnaire to detect ED cases among dance and nondance students. Dance students enrolled in high schools with gifted dance programs and nondance students randomly chosen from the same or nearby schools were invited to participate in a 2-phase ED survey. Participants completed the EAT and BITE questionnaires in the first phase. All participants who screened positive and 10% of the participants who screened negative were interviewed blindly using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders Patient Edition. The BITE had better accuracy than the EAT in detecting ED in general among both dance and non-dance students. BITE scores of 19 and 16 were the optimal cutoff values for determining ED among dance and nondance students, respectively. The optimal cutoff value for the EAT to diagnose an ED was 19 for dance students and 12 for nondance students. Both questionnaires showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity in dance students than nondance students at the same cutoff points. The BITE had better diagnostic performance than the EAT in this nonclinical population, although its ability to detect restrictive behaviors is likely as limited as that of the EAT. Plausible explanations for these results and limitations of this study are discussed in the text. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Associations of an abnormal Pap test result with attitudes and beliefs relevant to cervical cancer: a study of rural Appalachian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard A; Vanderpool, Robin; Jones, Cissi

    2016-07-01

    To compare women who recall being informed of an abnormal Pap to those not having this experience relative to attitudes and beliefs pertaining to screening for cervical cancer. Four hundred women were recruited from eight rural Appalachian counties, in 2013 and 2014. Women completed a paper-and-pencil survey after providing written informed consent. Bivariate associations and age-adjusted associations were calculated between the self-reported experience of being told of an abnormal Pap test result and eight attitudes/beliefs relative to the prevention of cervical cancer. Data analyses were performed in 2014. The mean age was 40.2 years (range 30-64 years). Eighteen women chose not to answer the question asking about ever having an abnormal Pap test result, leaving n = 382. Of the 382 women who did answer, 122 (30.6 %) indicated having an abnormal Pap test result and the remaining 260 (65.2 %) indicated never having this experience. With the exception of one item assessing knowledge that HPV is the cause of cervical cancer, between-group differences in attitudes, beliefs, and intent to have a Pap test the next time one is due were not observed. Although we hypothesized that women ever having an abnormal Pap test may have actively sought to learn more about cervical cancer and its prevention, findings suggest that this is not the case. Informing women of an abnormal result could be coupled with a high-intensity counseling designed to improve attitudes and beliefs relative to women's role in protecting themselves from cervical cancer.

  14. Knowledge, attitude and practice towards eating and physical activity among primary school children in Brunei: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murang, Zaidah Rizidah; Tuah, Naa; Naing, Lin

    2017-11-30

    Background Childhood obesity has become a global public health crisis. Many studies have been conducted to explore the knowledge, attitude and practices towards eating and physical activity amongst parents and healthcare workers. However, very little is known amongst children. It is imperative to understand these factors as they have been associated with obesity among children. Objective This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of Bruneian children towards eating and physical activity, in order to identify the factors that influence the development of obesity. Methods The study involved 353 children from four primary schools in Brunei. The data collection tool used was modified validated questionnaires with sections on demographic characteristic, knowledge about obesity, eating habits and physical activity. Results The majority of children (>60%) had good knowledge of obesity and intake of healthy food, but, 84.2% lacked knowledge on the required daily servings of fruits and vegetables. 68.8% purchased food and beverages from their school canteen. 93.8% were aware about the health benefits of physical activity and 70.2% spent only 1-2 h of screen time per day, however, 46.9% did not meet the recommended amount of physical activity although they reported to have performed enough. This suggested that a comprehensive education on food intake requirements and physical activity are necessary in order to better educate children. Conclusion Health educators and public health professionals may find our findings useful in order to plan and develop tailored interventions for children, as well as better promotion of a healthy lifestyle to children and their families.

  15. Nutrition label use mediates the positive relationship between nutrition knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating with dietary quality among university students in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Rachel; Papadaki, Angeliki

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nutrition knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating are predictors of nutrition label use (NLU) and dietary quality in a diverse sample of university students in the UK. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 among 500 students (mean age 24.9 years; 75% females) in 37 UK universities. Nutrition knowledge, attitudes, NLU and dietary quality were assessed using previously validated questionnaires. The majority of participants met dietary recommendations for fat, added sugar and fast food intake, and failed to meet recommendations for calcium, fibre, fruit and vegetable and dairy product intake, resulting in a median dietary quality score of 2.0 (score range = 0-8). Nutrition knowledge differed according to gender, age, body mass index (BMI), nationality and NLU. Attitudes towards healthy eating differed according to BMI and NLU and dietary quality differed according to gender. Nutrition knowledge and attitudes were significant predictors of NLU and dietary quality, with NLU mediating the latter relationship, whereas NLU, when controlled for knowledge and attitudes, negatively predicted dietary quality but did not have a significant independent relationship with diet. Future nutrition interventions to improve dietary quality in this sample of UK university students should focus on improving nutrition knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of abnormal eating behaviors in adolescents in Mexico: Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 Prevalencia de conductas alimentarias anormales de adolescentes en México: Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición ENSANUT 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Armando Barriguete-Meléndez; Claudia Unikel-Santoncini; Carlos Aguilar-Salinas; José Ángel Córdoba-Villalobos; Teresa Shamah; Simón Barquera; Juan A Rivera; Mauricio Hernández-Ávila

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of abnormal eating behaviors in a population-based nationwide survey. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A stratified, probabilistic, multistage design sampling process was used. The Brief Questionnaire for Risky Eating Behaviors was included in the Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT 2006) and administered to participants 10-19 years old (n= 25 166). The study had the power to describe nationwide characteristics by age, regions and urban/rural settings....

  17. The Relation of Sociocultural Factors to Eating Attitudes and Behaviors among Middle School Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated young girls' eating behavior, body satisfaction, weight management, and the cues taken from family, peers, and magazines. Found that a majority received a message from fashion magazines and peers or family that being slender is important and attainable through dieting, indicating that some young girls live under intense weight and…

  18. Genetic and environmental influences on psychological traits and eating attitudes in a sample of Spanish schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Iranzo-Tatay, Carmen; Gimeno-Clemente, Natalia; Barberá-Fons, Maria Antonia; Rojo-Bofill, Luis Miguel; Livianos-Aldana, Lorenzo

    The heritability of eating disorders has been estimated to range from 22% to over 62%.The aim of this study is to determine the relative influence of genetics and environment that contribute to the drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and ineffectiveness, by evaluating sex differences in a sample of adolescent twins from Valencia, Spain. Five hundred eighty-four pairs of adolescent twins between 13 and 18 years of age completed the study. To determine zygosity, teachers responded to a questionnaire on physical similarity. Psychological traits of eating disorders were assessed with four sub-scales of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI); drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and ineffectiveness. Twin models were used to assess genetic and environmental (common and unique) factors affecting these four psychological traits. All four traits showed significant genetic contributions among girls, with heritability estimates of 37.7% for ineffectiveness, 42.8% for perfectionism, 56.9% for drive for thinness, and 65.5% for body dissatisfaction. Among boys, body dissatisfaction showed no additive genetic contributions, indicating significant shared and individual specific environment effects. The three other traits in boys showed significant additive genetic contributions, but were lower than in girls. With the exception of body dissatisfaction in boys, psychological traits of eating disorders show heritability patterns that differ according to sex. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of eating attitudes and behaviours in junior college students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Eating disorders have been described as possible 'culture-bound syndromes', with roots in Western cultural values and conflicts. They may, in fact, be more prevalent within various non-Western cultural groups than previously recognised, as Western values become more widely accepted. Cross-cultural ...

  20. Eating attitudes, body image satisfaction and self-esteem of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BMI was positively associated with self-esteem (p = 0.01, r = 0.134) and negatively with dieting behaviour in White boys (p = 0.004, r = −0.257), and with lower EAT-26 bulimic and oral control scores in Black boys. In conclusion, the findings highlight ethnic differences and a need to better understand cultural differences that ...

  1. A Crosssectional Study to Asses the Eating Disorder among Female Medical Students in a Rural Medical College of Karnataka State

    OpenAIRE

    SHASHANK K J; PRAVEEN G; CHETHAN T K

    2016-01-01

    "Background: Eating Disorder is real complex and divesting condition that can have serious consequences for health, productivity and relationships. They have serious potentially life threatening condition that affects a person's emotional and physical health. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of eating disorders can be elusive, and more than one half of all cases go undetected. Objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes among female medical students in a Medic...

  2. Treatment Protocols for Eating Disorders: Clinicians' Attitudes, Concerns, Adherence and Difficulties Delivering Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    There are several protocols in existence that guide clinicians in the implementation of effective, evidence-based psychological interventions for eating disorders. These have been made accessible in the form of treatment manuals. However, relatively few clinicians use those protocols, preferring to offer more eclectic or integrative approaches. Following a summary of the research that shows that these evidence-based approaches can be used successfully in routine clinical settings, this review considers why there is such poor uptake of these therapies in such settings. This review focuses on the role of service culture and on clinicians' own attitudes, beliefs and emotions. Possible means of enhancing uptake are considered, but these cannot be considered to be ideal solutions at present.

  3. Examining the relationships between body image, eating attitudes, BMI, and physical activity in rural and urban South African young adult females using structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Prioreschi

    Full Text Available The persistence of food insecurity, malnutrition, increasing adiposity, and decreasing physical activity, heightens the need to understand relationships between body image satisfaction, eating attitudes, BMI and physical activity levels in South Africa. Females aged 18-23 years were recruited from rural (n = 509 and urban (n = 510 settings. Body image satisfaction was measured using Stunkard's silhouettes, and the 26-item Eating Attitudes questionnaire (EAT-26 was used to evaluate participants' risk of disordered eating. Minutes per week of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ. Significant linear correlates were included in a series of regressions run separately for urban and rural participants. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to test the relationships between variables. Urban females were more likely to be overweight and obese than rural females (p = 0.02, and had a greater desire to be thinner (p = 0.02. In both groups, being overweight or obese was positively associated with a desire to be thinner (p<0.01, and negatively associated with a desire to be fatter (p<0.01. Having a disordered eating attitude was associated with body image dissatisfaction in the urban group (β = 1.27, p<0.01, CI: 0.38; 2.16, but only with a desire to be fatter in the rural group (β = 0.63, p = 0.04, CI: 0.03; 1.23. In the SEM model, body image dissatisfaction was associated with disordered eating (β = 0.63, as well as higher MVPA participation (p<0.01. These factors were directly associated with a decreased risk of disordered eating attitude, and with a decreased desire to be thinner. Findings indicate a shift in both settings towards more Westernised ideals. Physical activity may provide a means to promote a healthy body image, while reducing the risk of disordered eating. Given the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in both rural and urban women, this study provides

  4. A qualitative study conducted in the USA exploring Latino fathers' beliefs, attitudes and practices related to their young children's eating, physical activity and sedentary behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Wallington, Sherrie F; Muñoz, Mario A; Greaney, Mary L

    2018-02-01

    Increasing evidence documents fathers' influential role in their children's eating, physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB). We aimed to expand limited existing research examining fathers' influence in these areas by exploring Latino fathers' beliefs, attitudes and practices related to eating, PA and SB of their young children. Seven focus group discussions were conducted in Spanish with Latino fathers (n 28) of children aged 2-8 years. Audio recordings were transcribed and translated verbatim without identifiers. Data were analysed using thematic analysis to identify key concepts and themes using NVivo 11 software. Fathers expressed positive beliefs and attitudes about the importance of healthy eating for their young children, themselves and their families. Nevertheless, the majority reported familial practices including eating out, getting take-out, etc. that have been linked to increased obesity risk among Latino children. Fathers were more involved and engaged in children's PA than eating and feeding. However, several fathers reported engaging predominantly in sedentary activities with their children, appeared permissive of children's sedentary habits and struggled to set limits on children's screen-time. We provide new information on Latino fathers' beliefs and child feeding and PA practices that may provide important targets for interventions aimed at promoting healthful eating and PA behaviours of Latino children. Future research should further quantify the influence of Latino fathers' parenting styles and practices on development of children's eating, PA and SB. This information is needed to identify risk factors amenable to interventions and to design culturally appropriate parenting and family-based interventions targeting Latino children's home environment and designed to meet this ethnic group's specific needs.

  5. Physical activity in treatment units for eating disorders: clinical practice and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratland-Sanda, S; Rosenvinge, J H; Vrabel, K A R; Norring, C; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Rø, Ø; Martinsen, E W

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) in eating disorders (ED) may be harmful, but in a therapeutic setting also beneficial. The purpose of this survey was to examine these contradictory aspects of PA in ED specialist treatment settings. We examined whether 1) PA is assessed by the unit, 2) the units have guidelines for managing excessive PA, 3) the units have staff with higher education and special competence in PA and exercise science, 4) how units regard PA in ED, 5) whether regular PA is integrated in the treatment programs, and 6) how the units rate the role of PA in the treatment of ED compared with other mental disorders. Of the 49 units located in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, 41 (84%) responded to a questionnaire. In 28 units (68%) PA was assessed regularly. Excessive PA was considered a harmful symptom in ED, and most units reported guidelines to manage excessive PA. Thirty-two units included PA in their treatment programmes. Clinicians found PA most relevant in the treatment of obesity and, except for binge eating, less for ED. PA was more commonly integrated in treatment compared to previous studies. Future research should address how to manage excessive PA, and the potential beneficial role of PA in the treatment of ED.

  6. Impact of Eating Attitude and Impairment of Physical Quality of Life Between Tertiary Clinic and Primary Clinic Functional Dyspepsia Outpatients in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shimpuku, Mayumi; Futagami, Seiji; Tajima, Natsuki; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Maruki, Yuuta; Kodaka, Yasuhiro; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Gudis, Katya; Kawagoe, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims There is no available data on factors associated with healthcare-seeking behavior for functional dyspepsia (FD) symptoms at either tertiary or primary clinics in Japan. Therefore, we aimed to compare clinical symptoms and life styles such as sleep disorders and eating attitude in FD patients visiting general practitioners at primary clinics with those consulting gastroenterologists at tertiary clinics to clarify healthcare-seeking patterns in Japanese patients. Methods Fifty-o...

  7. Survey on eating disorder-related thoughts, behaviors, and their relationship with food intake and nutritional status in female high school students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Jhen; Lin, Wei; Wong, Yueching

    2011-02-01

    Eating disorders are now a global health problem for adolescents and young female adults. The level of eating disorders among young female adults is growing in Asian countries. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate body image, weight concerns, eating attitudes, dietary intake, and nutritional status related to eating disorders of female high school students in Taiwan. A total of 1605 female high school students participated in this study. The written questionnaire included respondents' demographics and weight concerns, the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), and 24-hour dietary recall. Blood chemistry data were also collected. The data were analyzed using a Student t test, χ(2) analysis, and logistic regression. Disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors were found in 17.11% of participants (measured by an EAT-26 score ≥20). Logistic regression analyses showed that disturbed eating attitudes/behaviors were significantly associated with overestimation of body weight, unrealistic body weight goal, dissatisfaction with body weight, and weight loss experiences. The reported intakes of energy, protein, carbohydrate, zinc, and vitamins B6 and B12 were significantly lower in participants with disturbed eating patterns than in participants without disturbance issues. Conversely, participants with disturbed eating patterns had higher dietary and crude fiber intake than participants without disturbed eating issues. The percentage of participants with abnormal values of total iron-binding capacity and serum iron was significantly higher in those with disturbed eating patterns than in those without disturbed eating patterns. Disturbed eating attitudes/behaviors exist among female adolescents in Taiwan, and these behaviors jeopardize their nutritional status. The possibility of using the EAT-26 as a reference to predict the quality and quantity of food intake among female adolescents is worthy of further study.

  8. 'Would you eat cultured meat?': Consumers' reactions and attitude formation in Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Marcu, Afrodita; Rutsaert, Pieter; Gaspar, Rui; Seibt, Beate; Fletcher, Dave; Barnett, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Cultured meat has evolved from an idea and concept into a reality with the August 2013 cultured hamburger tasting in London. Still, how consumers conceive cultured meat is largely an open question. This study addresses consumers' reactions and attitude formation towards cultured meat through analyzing focus group discussions and online deliberations with 179 meat consumers from Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Initial reactions when learning about cultured meat were underpinned by feelings of disgust and considerations of unnaturalness. Consumers saw few direct personal benefits but they were more open to perceiving global societal benefits relating to the environment and global food security. Both personal and societal risks were framed in terms of uncertainties about safety and health, and possible adverse societal consequences dealing with loss of farming and eating traditions and rural livelihoods. Further reflection pertained to skepticism about 'the inevitable' scientific progress, concern about risk governance and control, and need for regulation and proper labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Maternal mental health symptoms are positively related to emotional and restrained eating attitudes in a statewide sample of mothers participating in a supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Jillian A; Hurley, Kristen M; Caulfield, Laura E; Black, Maureen M

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum, low-income mothers are at risk for mental health symptoms and obesity, and disordered eating attitudes may be associated with both mental health and obesity in this vulnerable population. The study objective is to determine whether higher levels of mental health symptoms are associated with increased odds of emotional and restrained eating attitudes in this sample of Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Data on 711 mothers of infants Emotional and restrained eating attitudes were measured with questions adapted from the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used. Obesity [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30] was explored as a moderating variable. Mothers reporting higher levels of depression symptoms [odds ratio (OR) = 3.93, 95%CI: 2.71-5.69], anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.96, 95%CI: 1.47-2.65), stress symptoms (OR = 2.09, 95%CI: 1.67-2.61) and high overall mental health symptomatology (OR = 3.51, 95%CI: 2.43-5.3) had increased odds of emotional eating attitudes. There were significant associations between symptoms of depression (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12-2.25) and increased odds of restrained eating attitudes. Obesity did not moderate the association. Mothers with mental health symptoms are at risk for disordered eating attitudes, which may increase risk of poor diet. These findings underscore the need for greater focus on addressing maternal mental health status and eating attitudes in the postpartum period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Emotions mediate the relationship between autistic traits and disordered eating: A new autistic-emotional model for eating pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Salma; Rozenblat, Vanja; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Paganini, Chiara; Treasure, Janet; Krug, Isabel

    2016-11-30

    The aim of the study was to assess the extent of overlap between autistic traits, body dissatisfaction and disordered eating and to explore the mediating effects of negative attitudes towards emotional expression and emotion dysregulation. The sample comprised 416 university students (82% females, 17-48 years [M=19.76, SD=3.85]), who completed an online questionnaire assessing eating attitudes and behaviours (including dieting, bulimia and oral control), body dissatisfaction, and autistic traits (including the Autism Quotient [AQ] and its related subscales as well as the Empathising Quotient). Attitudes towards emotional expression and emotion regulation were also assessed. Results revealed that eating pathology correlated highly with all AQ subscales, with the exception of the attention to detail subscale. However, there was no significant relationship between empathising and eating pathology. Path-analyses indicated that emotion dysregulation, but not negative attitudes towards emotional expression, was a significant mediator of the relationship between AQ, body dissatisfaction and eating pathology. Direct relationships were also obtained for the AQ-bulimia and the AQ-oral control paths. Prevention and early intervention programs for eating pathology would likely benefit from addressing abnormalities in emotion processes in individuals who score highly on measures of autistic traits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Eating habits, health attitudes and obesity indices among medical students in northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourdakis, Michael; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos; Papazisis, Georgios; Toulis, Konstantinos; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2010-12-01

    Medical students represent not only the final but also the most crucial opportunity for education in the field of healthy lifestyles and nutritional habits. Eating habits and obesity indices among medical students in southern Greece were described almost a decade ago. However, there is a lack of current, relevant data concerning students living in northern Greece. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the body mass index distribution and nutritional and health-related behavior among medical students in northern Greece. The participants, 187 males (21.5 ± 1.9 years) and 203 females (21.3 ± 2.2 years), filled out a self-report questionnaire. Height and weight measurements were obtained. Dietary practices of fast food consumption (more frequent for males) and regular consumption of fruits and vegetables (more frequent for females) were reported. Females seemed to adopt different practices than males when trying to lose weight and were significantly better informed about the nutrient value of the food consumed. Although the prevalence of overweight (males: 32.1%, females: 8.4%) and obesity (males: 5.9%, females: 1.5%) in the present sample is lower compared to previous data, it remains high according to what would be health promoting. The above findings suggest a need for further improvement in strategies promoting healthier nutrition habits. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Caring for people with type 1 diabetes mellitus engaging in disturbed eating or weight control: a qualitative study of practitioners' attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Stephanie; Deaton, Christi; Whitehead, Julie

    2009-02-01

    To explore the attitudes and practices of hospital-based healthcare professionals toward people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) exhibiting disturbed eating or weight control. Eating disturbances and insulin manipulation are common among individuals with T1DM, although little is known about how these behaviors are assessed and managed in practice. Qualitative study. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 professionals from four hospitals in England, all of which were taped and transcribed verbatim and analysed using a framework approach. Four main themes were identified from the data collected, which related to the classification, detection and treatment of eating disturbances among people with T1DM and professionals' lack of training in this area. For example, interviewees were unclear about what should be considered 'disordered' eating among individuals with T1DM. Participants described a paucity of immediately available services to which individuals could be referred, if they were felt to require extra help, and stated that they felt uncertain about managing these patients without outside support because of their limited training in the treatment of eating disorders. A lack of clarity as to what constitutes a problem among those with T1DM in relation to eating and weight control and an absence of follow-up services for them contributed to a sense of anxiety expressed by interviewees when faced with such a patient. Effective interventions addressing dangerous eating or weight control in people with diabetes are sorely needed, as is better training of healthcare professionals on this topic.

  13. Eating and Exercise Disorders in Young College Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Jennifer A.; Abraham, Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    Used the Eating and Exercise Examination to investigate the eating, weight, shape, and exercise behaviors of 93 male college students. About 20 percent of respondents displayed eating attitudes and behaviors characteristic of eating disorders and disordered eating. They were similar to female students in eating attitudes, undereating, overeating,…

  14. Detección de trastornos alimentarios en niños: adaptación lingüística y conceptual del Children's Eating Attitudes Test (CHEAT Detection of eating disorders in children: linguistic and conceptual adaptation of the Children´S Eating Attitudes Test (CHEAT

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    Luciana Elizathe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio tiene como objetivo presentar la adaptación lingüística y conceptual del Children`s Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT, Maloney, McGuire, & Daniels, 1988, uno de los instrumentos de screening más utilizados internacionalmente para detectar trastornos alimentarios (TA en niños. Con este fin, se procedió a realizar una traducción del instrumento del idioma original -inglés- al idioma local-castellano-. Este primer borrador fue administrado a una primera prueba piloto con niños de entre 9 y 12 años, tras la cual se realizaron modificaciones en la mayoría de los reactivos a fin de adecuarlos al nivel de comprensión y a las expresiones lingüísticas propias de los niños de nuestro medio. A continuación, cinco expertos en TA analizaron el segundo borrador obtenido y evaluaron la adecuación de los ítems para detectar TA en niños. Por último se procedió a evaluar la versión final en una segunda prueba piloto con niños de entre 12 y 13 años. Se mantuvo dicha versión, dado que no se detectaron dificultades. Finalmente, puede concluirse que se cuenta con una adaptación lingüística y conceptualmente adecuada a niños y niñas de nuestro contexto cultural.The purpose of this work is to present the linguistic and conceptual adaptation of the Children´s Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT, Maloney, McGuire & Daniels, 1988, one of the best known screening instruments to detect eating disorders (ED in children. With this end, a translation from the original language -english- to the local one -spanish- was performed. The first draft was tested with children between the ages of 9 to 12 years old, and after that some of the items had to be modified in order to obtain a reliable test of the understanding and linguistic expressions used by the local children. Next, five experts in ED analyzed a second draft and evaluated and assessed the adequacy of the items to evaluate ED in children. Last, a final test was conducted with children

  15. Eating symptomatology and general psychopathology in patients with anorexia nervosa from China, UK and Spain: A cross-cultural study examining the role of social attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Nicola; Chen, Jue; Granero, Roser; Kang, Qing; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Arcelus, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Cultural studies exploring differences in the manifestation of anorexia nervosa (AN) have primarily focus on Western and non-Western cultures. However, no study so far has considered the role that social attitudes (i.e. Collectivist vs. Individualist cultural values) have in the clinical manifestations of eating disorders, including AN patients. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to compare eating and general psychopathology in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with AN from China, Spain, and United Kingdom (UK), in order to study the differences according to belonging to Western or non-Western country, or the country's Individualist Index (IDV). The total sample comprised on 544 adults with a diagnosis of AN recruited from People´s Republic of China (n = 72), UK (n = 117), and Spain (n = 355). Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Our results show significant differences in most of the eating and psychopathological indices between the three countries. Patients from Western societies (Spain and UK) share more similarities regarding psychopathological expression of AN than the non-Western country (China). While Western countries show higher levels of body dissatisfaction, somatization and overall psychopathology, Chinese patients tend to deny or minimize depression, anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms. Besides, the IDV shows cultural differences in the interpersonal sensitivity scale, being AN patients from UK (the more individualistic society) who presented with higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity (i.e. discomfort during interpersonal interactions and more negative expectations concerning interpersonal behavior). In conclusion, our findings suggest that psychopathological expression of AN is better explained by Western/Eastern influence than by individualist/collectivist values. Although the diagnosis for the eating disorder may be the same, differences in the

  16. Eating symptomatology and general psychopathology in patients with anorexia nervosa from China, UK and Spain: A cross-cultural study examining the role of social attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Agüera

    Full Text Available Cultural studies exploring differences in the manifestation of anorexia nervosa (AN have primarily focus on Western and non-Western cultures. However, no study so far has considered the role that social attitudes (i.e. Collectivist vs. Individualist cultural values have in the clinical manifestations of eating disorders, including AN patients. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to compare eating and general psychopathology in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with AN from China, Spain, and United Kingdom (UK, in order to study the differences according to belonging to Western or non-Western country, or the country's Individualist Index (IDV. The total sample comprised on 544 adults with a diagnosis of AN recruited from People´s Republic of China (n = 72, UK (n = 117, and Spain (n = 355. Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Our results show significant differences in most of the eating and psychopathological indices between the three countries. Patients from Western societies (Spain and UK share more similarities regarding psychopathological expression of AN than the non-Western country (China. While Western countries show higher levels of body dissatisfaction, somatization and overall psychopathology, Chinese patients tend to deny or minimize depression, anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms. Besides, the IDV shows cultural differences in the interpersonal sensitivity scale, being AN patients from UK (the more individualistic society who presented with higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity (i.e. discomfort during interpersonal interactions and more negative expectations concerning interpersonal behavior. In conclusion, our findings suggest that psychopathological expression of AN is better explained by Western/Eastern influence than by individualist/collectivist values. Although the diagnosis for the eating disorder may be the same, differences in the

  17. Eating symptomatology and general psychopathology in patients with anorexia nervosa from China, UK and Spain: A cross-cultural study examining the role of social attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Zaida; Brewin, Nicola; Chen, Jue; Granero, Roser; Kang, Qing; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Arcelus, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Cultural studies exploring differences in the manifestation of anorexia nervosa (AN) have primarily focus on Western and non-Western cultures. However, no study so far has considered the role that social attitudes (i.e. Collectivist vs. Individualist cultural values) have in the clinical manifestations of eating disorders, including AN patients. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to compare eating and general psychopathology in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with AN from China, Spain, and United Kingdom (UK), in order to study the differences according to belonging to Western or non-Western country, or the country's Individualist Index (IDV). The total sample comprised on 544 adults with a diagnosis of AN recruited from People´s Republic of China (n = 72), UK (n = 117), and Spain (n = 355). Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Our results show significant differences in most of the eating and psychopathological indices between the three countries. Patients from Western societies (Spain and UK) share more similarities regarding psychopathological expression of AN than the non-Western country (China). While Western countries show higher levels of body dissatisfaction, somatization and overall psychopathology, Chinese patients tend to deny or minimize depression, anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms. Besides, the IDV shows cultural differences in the interpersonal sensitivity scale, being AN patients from UK (the more individualistic society) who presented with higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity (i.e. discomfort during interpersonal interactions and more negative expectations concerning interpersonal behavior). In conclusion, our findings suggest that psychopathological expression of AN is better explained by Western/Eastern influence than by individualist/collectivist values. Although the diagnosis for the eating disorder may be the same, differences in the

  18. [Diagnostic validity and usefulness of the Eating Attitudes Test-26 for the assessment of eating disorders risk in a Colombian female population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constaín, Gustavo A; Ricardo Ramírez, Carmenza; Rodríguez-Gázquez, María de Los Ángeles; Alvarez Gómez, Matilde; Marín Múnera, Catalina; Agudelo Acosta, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    To establish diagnostic validity and usefulness of EAT-26 for the risk assessment of Eating Disorder (ED) in a female population. Observational validation study questionnaire. Performed in a Medellin city community care level of mixed (public and private) psychiatric consultation. Twenty five subjects aged 15 to 25 with DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for anorexia and bulimia nervosa and 111 controls without ED. The case sample was for convenience and in controls an aleatory simple one. Gold standard (structured psychiatrist interview confirming the fulfillment of ED case inclusion criteria) was compared with EAT-26 questionnaire; reliability was assessed, cultural, semantics and factorial validation was made and the best cut-off score was established with the ROC curve. Four domains remain in the instrument: bulimia, dieting, food preoccupation and oral control. The Cronbach's alpha was 92.1% and a score of 11 and over is the best cut-off (sensitivity 100%, and specificity 85.6%). This modified and abbreviated EAT-26 questionnaire is an ideal multidimensional instrument for ED screening in risk population, with excellent reliability and sensitivity values and satisfactory specificity. EAT-26 is a useful measure to be considered when strategies for ED early detection are implemented in young women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. The provision of healthy food in a school tuck shop: does it influence primary-school students' perceptions, attitudes and behaviours towards healthy eating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Francette; Marais, Maritha; Koen, Nelene

    2017-05-01

    To investigate students' tuck shop buying behaviour, choices of lunchbox items and healthy eating perceptions and attitudes at a school with a nutritionally regulated tuck shop and a school with a conventional tuck shop. Mixed-methods research comprising a cross-sectional survey and focus groups. Bloemfontein, South Africa. Randomly selected grade 2 to 7 students from a school with a nutritionally regulated tuck shop (school A; n 116) and a school with a conventional tuck shop (school B; n 141) completed a self-administered questionnaire about perceptions, attitudes, buying behaviours and lunchbox content. Six students per grade (n 72) in each school took part in focus group discussions to further explore concepts pertaining to healthy eating. In school A, older students had a negative attitude towards their 'healthy' tuck shop, while younger students were more positive. School B students were positive towards their conventional tuck shop. In both schools students wanted their tuck shop to allow them to choose from healthy and unhealthy items. School A students mostly bought slushies, iced lollies and baked samoosas, while school B students mostly bought sweets and crisps. The lunchboxes of school A students contained significantly (Pfood environment in its totality. A multi-pronged approach is recommended and awareness must be created among all role players, including parents who are responsible for preparing lunchboxes.

  20. Eating Disorders in Paraguayan Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Maria E.; McIntosh, David E.; Kruczek, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders, once thought to be exclusively a disorder of the more affluent Western countries, are now spreading around the world. Despite the wealth of information on the prevalence of eating disorders in developed countries, epidemiological data for South America is scarce. The 26-item Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26) was used to explore the…

  1. Improving the body image, eating attitudes, and behaviors of young male and female adolescents: a new educational approach that focuses on self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, J A; Abraham, S

    2000-07-01

    This study examines the effect of an interactive, school-based, self-esteem education program on the body image and eating attitudes and behaviors of young male and female adolescents following the program and after 12 months. All 470 eligible students (63% female) aged 11-14 years volunteered to participate. The intervention group students participated in the program, whereas the control group students received their scheduled personal development and health class. The program significantly improved the body satisfaction of the intervention students and significantly changed aspects of their self-esteem; social acceptance, physical appearance, and athletic ability became less important for the intervention students and more important for control students. Female intervention students rated their physical appearance as perceived by others significantly higher than control students and allowed their body weight to increase appropriately by preventing the age increase in weight-losing behaviors of the control students. One year after the intervention, body image and attitude changes were still present. These findings also held for the 116 students (63% females) with low self-esteem and higher anxiety, who were considered at risk for the development of eating disorders. These students also had significantly lower drive for thinness and greater body satisfaction following the intervention and the decreased importance of physical appearance to their self-esteem was present at 12 months. Control at-risk students significantly decreased their body weight, whereas the weight of the intervention at-risk students significantly increased. The intervention program was effective, safe, having no effect on measures of students' anxiety or depression, and was rated highly by students. This is the first controlled educational intervention to successfully improve body image and to produce long-term changes in the attitudes and self-image of young adolescents. This new approach to

  2. Attitude and knowledge changes in collegiate dancers following a short-term, team-centered prevention program on eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-McGehee, Toni M; Green, James M; Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Leeper, James D; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T

    2011-06-01

    Eating knowledge, nutritional knowledge, and psychological changes among female collegiate dancers were examined before and after a 4-wk. team-centered program on sport nutrition, exercise, and disordered eating consequences. Collegiate female dancers from two NCAA Division I institutions participated in a control (n = 19; M age = 19.1 yr., SD = 1.0) or intervention (n = 21; M age = 19.2 yr., SD = 1.2) group. Measures were administered to both groups before and after intervention to assess eating disorders, depression, and nutritional and disordered eating knowledge. There was a statistically significant increase in scores on nutritional and overall eating disorder knowledge in the intervention group compared to the control group. Mean scores on depression, drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, and maturity fears decreased in the intervention group.

  3. Atitudes alimentares e imagem corporal em meninas adolescentes de ascendência nipônica e caucasiana em São Paulo (SP Eating attitudes and body image in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescent girls in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam A. Sampei

    2009-04-01

    social-affective relationships on the development of eating disorders was also assessed. METHODS: Questionnaires evaluating the incidence of eating disorders and the influence of social-affective relationships were applied to 544 Japanese-Brazilian and Caucasian adolescent girls: 10 to 11-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 122 and Caucasian (n = 176 pre-menarcheal adolescents, and 16 to 17-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 71 and Caucasian (n = 175 post-menarcheal adolescents. RESULTS: Caucasian girls obtained higher scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, showed greater body image dissatisfaction, dieted more often and had more diet models introduced by their mothers and peers than the Japanese-Brazilian girls. CONCLUSION: The Caucasian adolescents overall appeared to be more sensitive to aesthetic and social pressures regarding body image than the Japanese adolescents. The high incidence of EAT-26 scores above 20 in the Caucasian pre-menarcheal group indicates that individual body image concerns are developing at an earlier age. Multiple logistic regression revealed several associations between mother-teen interactions and the development of abnormal eating attitudes.

  4. Social physique anxiety and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescents: moderating effects of sport, sport-related characteristics, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Therme, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of adolescents presenting high levels of social physique anxiety (SPA) in sport practice has been hypothesized as potentially problematic in terms of being associated with disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEAB). Indeed, sport practice itself has been reported to be associated with higher levels of SPA and DEAB, and sport settings may sometimes promote unhealthy life habits. Nevertheless, current studies are few and present several limitations. The objective of the present study was to examine these relationships among adolescents involved or not in various types (i.e., leanness and individual) and contexts (i.e., organized and competitive) of sport practice. The sample included 766 French adolescents (337 boys and 429 girls), aged between 11 and 18 years, involved (n = 335) or not (n = 431) in sport practice. SPA and DEAB were assessed using French adaptations of the SPA scale and the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results reveal a significant and positive association between SPA and the DEAB scales. Furthermore, they show a positive relationship between SPA and (a) vomiting-purging behaviors in adolescents involved in individual sports and (b) generic DEAB (i.e., a subscale covering fear of getting fat, food preoccupation, and eating-related guilt), particularly in adolescents involved in individual sports. The relationship between SPA and DEAB does not differ according to adolescents' involvement in sport practice or according to their involvement in organized, competitive, or leanness sport practice more specifically. However, higher levels of SPA and DEAB were observed in adolescents involved in individual sports.

  5. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Kazi Enamul; Kamaluddin, Megat Ahmad; Abdul Razak, Ahmad Zabidi; Abdul Wahid, Afiq Athari

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. Methods A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the...

  6. Prevalence of abnormal eating behaviors in adolescents in Mexico: Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 Prevalencia de conductas alimentarias anormales de adolescentes en México: Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición ENSANUT 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Armando Barriguete-Meléndez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of abnormal eating behaviors in a population-based nationwide survey. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A stratified, probabilistic, multistage design sampling process was used. The Brief Questionnaire for Risky Eating Behaviors was included in the Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT 2006 and administered to participants 10-19 years old (n= 25 166. The study had the power to describe nationwide characteristics by age, regions and urban/rural settings. RESULTS: A high risk for having an eating disorder was found in 0.8% of the total participants (0.4% male adolescents and 1.0% female. Inhabitants in large cities showed higher risk for having an abnormal eating behavior compared to subjects living in other settings. The highest prevalences were found in males > 15 years old and females > 13 years old for all evaluated behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Results show less prevalence of risky eating behaviors among adolescents in comparison to other populations. The female/male ratio was 3:1, far different from the 9:1 shown in a previous study in Mexico City, but similar to results from the US national eating disorders screening.OBJETIVOS: Describir la prevalencia de conductas alimentarias anormales en una encuesta nacional de base poblacional. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Diseño muestral probabilístico, polietápico, por conglomerados y estratificado. Se utilizó el Cuestionario Breve de de Conductas Alimentarias de Riesgo de la ENSANUT 2006, en adolescentes entre 10 y 19 años de edad (n= 25 166 de ambos sexos, con resultado nacional, por región y tipo de localidad. RESULTADOS: En 0.8% de los participantes se encontró alto riesgo de desarrollar un trastorno de conducta alimentaria (0.4% hombres y 1.0% mujeres. La edad de mayor riesgo fue > 15 años en hombres y > 13 en mujeres. Los habitantes de áreas metropolitanas presentan un riesgo mayor que la población rural y urbana. CONCLUSIONES: La prevalencia de conductas

  7. The influence of sociocultural factors on the eating attitudes of Lebanese and Cypriot students: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, N; Gharibeh, N; Katsounari, I

    2013-07-01

    The present comparative cross-cultural study aimed to explore the relationship between eating behaviour and sociocultural influences with respect to appearance and body image in female university students from two cultural contexts, namely Cyprus and Lebanon. The Dutch Eating Behavior questionnaire (DEBQ) and the Perceived Sociocultural Influences on Body Image and Body Change Questionnaire were used to assess sociocultural influences and body image, respectively, in 200 students from each country. The results indicated that the Lebanese students were more likely to engage in emotional and external eating and their body image was impacted to a larger extent by sociocultural agents, including media influences, compared to the Cypriot students. Also, a positive relationship was found between emotional and external eating in both cultures. Finally, sociocultural influences correlated positively with external eating only in the Cypriot sample. Culture-specific factors, such as the societal values and norms, as well as the Westernisation history of each country, are discussed as underpinnings for the differences found. These findings are significant for understanding the rise of eating pathology in these two cultures and provide evidence for a need to consider cultural environment when designing public health policies addressing the negative aspects of nutrition transition. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  8. The moderating effect of gender role on the relationships between gender and attitudes about body and eating in a sample of Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampis, J; Cataudella, S; Busonera, A; De Simone, S; Tommasi, M

    2017-03-13

    The differential prevalence of eating disorders in males and females can be explained by the impact of gender-role orientations. Inside the Italian socio-cultural context, gender socialization can be influenced by stereotypical gender beliefs, and this may contribute to the psychological distress of individuals who identify with discrepant gender roles from their biological sex. Our study explored, within the Italian context, the potential moderating effect of masculinity and femininity on the relationships between gender and attitudes about body and eating. Nine hundred and twenty Italian male and female adolescents (M = 427, F = 493; age 14-21 years) completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI). A moderating effect of gender role on the relationship between gender and bulimia, and drive of thinness emerged. Girls with higher levels of masculinity scored higher on bulimia than did their counterparts with lower levels, and boys with higher levels of femininity scored higher on bulimia and on drive for thinness than did their counterparts with lower levels. Data did not reveal a moderating effect of gender role on the relationship between gender and body satisfaction. Our data suggest that adolescents who endorsed a gender role that is socially considered discrepant from their biological sex (girls with higher levels of masculinity and boys with higher levels of femininity) are more likely to show higher level of bulimia and drive of thinness. This suggests the need for prevention and treatment programmes for eating disorders that take into account individuals' gender-role orientation and the influence that culturally dominant gender beliefs can exert on it.

  9. Eating disorders among classic ballet dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Freitas Monteiro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the prevalence of eating disorders symptoms among classical ballet dancers. Methods: This is an analytical, observational, cross-sectional study, conducted in 2009, that investigated eating disorder symptoms using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 and Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE. The body image of the study population was assessed by the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ. In addition, the anthropometric assessment was performed – measurement of weight, height and skin folds, calculation of body mass index (BMI and body fat percentage. Results: Of all the 139 emale adolescents assessed, 4.4% (n=6 had nutrition problems and 23% (n=23 presented abnormal values of body fat. The analysis of the EAT concluded that 12.3% (n=17 of the girls presented positive results for anorexia nervosa (AN. The BITE results showed that 13.7% (n=19 ofthe girls had unusual eating habits and 6.5% (n=9 presented subclinical bulimia nervosa (BN. As for severity, 3.6% (n=5 of the girls presented clinically significant results and 1.4% (n=2 were diagnosed with high severity. Concerning the results of the BSQ, 15.7% (n=21 of the girls were slightly concerned about body image; 5.2% (n=7 were moderately worried, and 6.7% (n=9 were severely concerned about it. Conclusion: This study did not diagnose the occurrence of eating disorders but found symptoms of AN (Anorexia Nervosa and BN (Bulimia Nervosa. Its main purpose was to alert about the prevalence of the possible development of eating disorders due to the influences of the environment where the teenagers are inserted – under a model defined by the classic ballet dance and the psychological turmoil of adolescence. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p396

  10. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Bulimia What Causes Eating Disorders? Sports and Eating Disorders Effects of Eating Disorders Treatment for Eating Disorders Print ... when they are biologically destined to gain it. Effects of Eating Disorders Eating disorders are serious medical illnesses. They often ...

  11. The adoption of physical activity and eating behaviors among persons with obesity and in the general population: the role of implicit attitudes within the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevance, Guillaume; Caudroit, Johan; Romain, Ahmed J; Boiché, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Obesity can be prevented by the combined adoption of a regular physical activity (PA) and healthy eating behaviors (EB). Researchers mainly focused on socio-cognitive models, such as the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), to identify the psychological antecedents of these behaviors. However, few studies were interested in testing the potential contribution of automatic processes in the prediction of PA and EB. Thus, the main objective of this study was to explore the specific role of implicit attitudes in the pattern of prediction of self-reported PA and EB in the TPB framework, among persons with obesity and in adults from the general population. One hundred and fifty-three adults participated to this cross-sectional study among which 59 obese persons (74% women, age: 50.6 ± 12.3 years, BMI: 36.8 ± 4.03 kg m - ²) and 94 people from the general population (51% women; age: 34.7 ± 8.9 years). Implicit attitudes toward PA and EB were estimated through two Implicit Association Tests. TPB variables, PA and EB were assessed by questionnaire. Regarding to the prediction of PA, a significant contribution of implicit attitudes emerged in obese people, β = .25; 95%[CI: .01, .50]; P = .044, beyond the TPB variables, contrary to participants from the general population. The present study suggests that implicit attitudes play a specific role among persons with obesity regarding PA. Other studies are needed to examine which kind of psychological processes are specifically associated with PA and EB among obese people.

  12. A Pilot Study of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Workshop Intervention for Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adria N.; Follette, Victoria M.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction is a source of significant distress among non-eating-disordered women, but because it is subclinical it is generally not treated. It remains stable throughout adulthood, and has proven resistant to many prevention interventions. This study presents a pilot test of a practical alternative: a 1-day Acceptance and…

  13. Gender Differences in the Relationships between Bullying at School and Unhealthy Eating and Shape-Related Attitudes and Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Claire V.; Fox, Claire L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous research has found links between being a victim of bullying and reporting more unhealthy eating behaviours and cognitions, particularly in girls. However, little is known about the factors that might mediate these relationships. Aim: The present study compared the relationships between bullying, emotional adjustment,…

  14. Night Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tuncel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hunger is an awakening related biological impulse. The relationship between hunger and sleep is moderated by the control of homeostatic and circadian rhytms of the body. Abnormal eating behavior during sleep period could result from different causes. Abnormal eating during the main sleep period has been categorized as either night eating syndrome or sleep related eating disorder. Night eating syndrome (NES is an eating disorder characterised by the clinical features of morning anorexia, evening hyperphagia, and insomnia with awakenings followed by nocturnal food ingestion. Recently night eating syndrome, conceptualized as a delayed circadian intake of food. Sleep-related eating disorder, thought to represent a parasomnia and as such included within the revised International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2, and characterized by nocturnal partial arousals associated with recurrent episodes of involuntary food consumption and altered levels of consciousness. Whether, however, sleep-related eating disorder and night eating syndrome represent different diseases or are part of a continuum is still debated. This review summarizes their characteristics, treatment outcomes and differences between them.

  15. Treatment Protocols for Eating Disorders: Clinicians? Attitudes, Concerns, Adherence and Difficulties Delivering Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    There are several protocols in existence that guide clinicians in the implementation of effective, evidence-based psychological interventions for eating disorders. These have been made accessible in the form of treatment manuals. However, relatively few clinicians use those protocols, preferring to offer more eclectic or integrative approaches. Following a summary of the research that shows that these evidence-based approaches can be used successfully in routine clinical settings, this review...

  16. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaluddin, Megat Ahmad; Abdul Razak, Ahmad Zabidi; Abdul Wahid, Afiq Athari

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. Methods A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the study were reported in the form of descriptive statistics involving frequencies and percentages. Data from 400 respondents were analyzed. Results Our findings showed that the students understood the definition of healthy food and the types of food that are considered healthy. Although the students knew that food such as deep-fried drumsticks and hamburgers contain a high amount of saturated fat and cholesterol, these foods were still consumed by them. There was also a high consumption of foods that are fried and contain sugar, salt and saturated fat. In choosing food, two major factors contributed to the students’ decisions: cleanliness (65.8%) and the preference of their parents (12.3%). Discussion Our findings indicate that by implementing the Integrated School Health Program (ISHP) properly, students’ eating habits can be improved by creating a school with a healthy environment. PMID:27904803

  17. Body talk and body-related co-rumination: associations with body image, eating attitudes, and psychological adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiger, Jonathan A; Winstead, Barbara A

    2013-09-01

    Talk about physical appearance and body image is common among young women. We investigated how body talk (negative, positive/self-accepting, and co-ruminative) is related to body image, body-related cognitive distortions, disordered eating, psychological adjustment, and friendship quality via hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for social desirability and body mass index). In a sample of young adult women (N=203), negative body talk was, as predicted, negatively related to body satisfaction and self-esteem and positively related to appearance investment, body-related cognitive distortions, disordered eating, and depression, but not friendship quality. Self-accepting/positive body talk was negatively related to body-related cognitive distortions and positively related to body satisfaction, self-esteem, and friendship quality. Body-related co-rumination demonstrated adjustment trade-offs, being related to body-related cognitive distortions, disordered eating, and higher friendship quality. Results indicated no advantage to negative body talk, both individual and relationship benefits from positive/self-accepting body talk, and mixed outcomes for body-related co-rumination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Kazi Enamul; Kamaluddin, Megat Ahmad; Abdul Razak, Ahmad Zabidi; Abdul Wahid, Afiq Athari

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the study were reported in the form of descriptive statistics involving frequencies and percentages. Data from 400 respondents were analyzed. Our findings showed that the students understood the definition of healthy food and the types of food that are considered healthy. Although the students knew that food such as deep-fried drumsticks and hamburgers contain a high amount of saturated fat and cholesterol, these foods were still consumed by them. There was also a high consumption of foods that are fried and contain sugar, salt and saturated fat. In choosing food, two major factors contributed to the students' decisions: cleanliness (65.8%) and the preference of their parents (12.3%). Our findings indicate that by implementing the Integrated School Health Program (ISHP) properly, students' eating habits can be improved by creating a school with a healthy environment.

  19. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Enamul Hoque

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. Methods A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the study were reported in the form of descriptive statistics involving frequencies and percentages. Data from 400 respondents were analyzed. Results Our findings showed that the students understood the definition of healthy food and the types of food that are considered healthy. Although the students knew that food such as deep-fried drumsticks and hamburgers contain a high amount of saturated fat and cholesterol, these foods were still consumed by them. There was also a high consumption of foods that are fried and contain sugar, salt and saturated fat. In choosing food, two major factors contributed to the students’ decisions: cleanliness (65.8% and the preference of their parents (12.3%. Discussion Our findings indicate that by implementing the Integrated School Health Program (ISHP properly, students’ eating habits can be improved by creating a school with a healthy environment.

  20. Validación de un cuestionario breve para medir conductas alimentarias de riesgo Validation of a brief questionnaire to measure the risk of abnormal eating behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Unikel-Santoncini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Mostrar los resultados de confiabilidad y validez de un cuestionario para identificar conductas alimentarias de riesgo. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El cuestionario se aplicó a una muestra de mujeres con diagnóstico de trastorno alimentario, en tratamiento en la Clínica de Trastornos de la Conducta Alimentaria, del Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría, en el periodo septiembre-diciembre de 2002, y a una muestra de mujeres estudiantes de nivel medio y medio superior en la Ciudad de México, en octubre del mismo año. Se hizo análisis de consistencia interna (alfa de Cronbach y análisis factorial de componentes principales con rotación oblicua; mediante tablas de 2 x 2 se determinaron el punto de corte, la sensibilidad, la especificidad y los valores predictivos del cuestionario. RESULTADOS: El instrumento tiene una alta confiabilidad (alfa=0.83 y una estructura interna de tres factores con una varianza explicada de 64.7%. El análisis discriminante mostró que casi 90% de los casos fueron correctamente agrupados. CONCLUSIONES: El instrumento presentado es una opción confiable y válida para la evaluación de conductas alimentarias de riesgo en la población de las muestras estudiadas.OBJETIVE: To assess the validity and reliability of a questionnaire for the screening of risk eating behaviors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The questionnaire was applied to female high school students in Mexico City in October2002, as well as to a sample of eating disorder patients seen at the Eating Disorders Unit of the National Institute of Psychiatry between September and December 2002. Statistical methods included internal consistency analysis (Cronbach's alpha and factor and principal component analysis with oblique rotation. The cutoff point, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the questionnaire were determined using 2 x 2 tables. RESULTS: The questionnaire showed a high reliability (·=0.83 and a three-factor structure with 64.7% of the total

  1. 'Would you eat cultured meat?':consumers' reactions and attitude formation in Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Verbeke, Wim; Marcu, Afrodita; Rutsaert, Pieter; Gaspar, Rui; Seibt, Beate; Fletcher, Dave; Barnett, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Cultured meat has evolved from an idea and concept into a reality with the August 2013 cultured hamburger tasting in London. Still, how consumers conceive cultured meat is largely an open question. This study addresses consumers' reactions and attitude formation towards cultured meat through analyzing focus group discussions and online deliberations with 179 meat consumers from Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Initial reactions when learning about cultured meat were underpinned by fe...

  2. Eating Disorders in a Nonclinical Adolescent Population: Implications for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeyer, Juliana Rasic; Muni-Brander, Paulette

    1988-01-01

    Investigated prevalence of adolescent eating disorders across gender, cultural groupings, and socioeconomic status. Administered Eating Attitudes Test, Binge-Eating Questionnaire, and demographic questionnaire to 1,261 high school students. Results indicated high rate of eating disorders in nonclinical adolescent population. Eating disorders…

  3. The Effectiveness of Buckroyd’s Group-Based Therapeutic Approach on Increasing Self-Esteem and Improving Eating Attitude of Obese -20 to 30-Year-Old Females in Esfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Hosseini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Obesity has been increasing around the world and this phenomenon is creating many physical and psychological problems. Hence, this study considered the effectiveness of Buckroyd’s group-based therapeutic approach on increasing self-esteem and improving eating attitude of obese 20- to 30-year-old females in Esfahan. Materials and Methods: This study was semi-experimental, statistical society of which involved all obese females referred to Sepahan Salamat Clinic in Esfahan, during year 2014. Overall, 30 over-weight females, who had a Body Mass Index (BMI between 25 and 35, a minimum education of diploma, and age of 20 to 30 years old were selected purposefully and divided randomly to two equal groups. Buckroyd’s therapy was performed in sixteen sessions and each session lasted two hours twice per week. Research measurements included body mass index, demographic form, self-esteem and eating attitude questionnaires. Variance analysis and frequency measurement were performed with the SPSS-20 software and were used for confirming the hypothesis. Results: Results showed that Buckroyd’s group therapy increased self-esteem (P 0.05. Conclusions: The findings showed that Buckroyd’s therapy approach can be used for increasing self-esteem but cannot be used for improving eating attitude of obese females.

  4. The effects of social relationships and acceptance on disturbed eating attitudes in elite adolescent female athletes: the mediating role of physical self-perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffier, Stéphanie; Maïano, Christophe; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of social relationships (i.e., coach, friends, and parents) and acceptance (i.e., peers) on disturbed eating attitudes (DEAs) in elite adolescent female athletes, through the mediating role of physical self-perception (i.e., perceived physical appearance and perceived physical ability). The sample comprised 227 elite adolescent female athletes (M(age) = 15.75; SD(age) = 3.00) engaged in various esthetic sports. The data was analyzed using structural equation modeling method and mediation analysis. They showed that peer acceptance and quality of parent-athlete relationships have a significant negative influence on DEA in elite adolescent female athletes. Moreover, the quality of relationship with the coach and sport friend has a significant positive influence on DEA in female athletes through the mediating role of perceived physical ability. The quality of relationship with parents and peer acceptance would be a protective factor regarding DEA, whereas the quality of relationships with coach and friend in sport would be risk factors for the development of DEA in adolescent female athletes through the mediating role of perceived physical ability. Recommendations for future use of, and research on, activities are outlined. The effects of social relationships and acceptance on DEA in elite adolescent female athletes: the mediating role of physical self-perceptions.

  5. Do attitudes, intentions and actions of school food coordinators regarding public organic food procurement policy improve the eating environment at school? Results from the iPOPY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chen; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; Mikkelsen, Bent E

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates whether public organic food procurement policies have the potential to induce changes in the school food service environment. A comparative cross-national survey was conducted in public primary and/or secondary schools in Finland, Germany and Italy. The school food coordinators completed a web-based questionnaire on their attitudes, intentions and actions towards organic school food provision. In Germany, 122 out of 2050 schools in the state of Hesse responded. In Finland, 250 out of 998 schools across the country responded. In Italy, 215 out of 940 schools from eight provinces responded. School food coordinators in the sample of schools in the three countries. The German and Finnish school food coordinators separately most agreed with the promotion of healthy eating habits (P organic food (P food and nutrition policy (P food and nutrition policy in pedagogical activities (P = 0·004), to serve nutritional school meals (P organic schools were less likely to adopt a food and nutrition policy (P organic schools. The study suggests that there is a gap in the effects of public organic food procurement policy on building a healthier school food environment.

  6. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Ages and Stages Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School ... Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic material inherited from one generation ...

  7. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss. With anorexia, a person will deny hunger and refuse to eat, practice binge eating and ... to better insure healthy eating patterns, and increases awareness and support. Related Conditions People with eating disorders ...

  8. Eating out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight-loss - eating out; Healthy diet - eating out; Obesity - eating out ... still make a healthy plate. Choose carefully. Avoid eating foods such ... or ask for a take-out box and take half of your meal home. ...

  9. Stigmatizing the other: An exploratory study of unintended consequences of eating disorder public service announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, Irina A; Atwell Seate, Anita; Waks, Leah

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the intended and unintended consequences of eating disorder public service announcements. We assessed participants' attitudes toward eating disorders and people with eating disorders, willingness to interact with people with eating disorders, and experience with eating disorders (covariate) at Time 1. At Time 2, participants were randomly assigned to watch a stigmatizing or a non-stigmatizing eating disorder public service announcement. Exposure to the stigmatizing public service announcement resulted in more negative attitudes toward eating disorders and in less willingness to interact with people with eating disorders, but not in significantly more negative attitudes toward people with eating disorders. The discussion highlights the practical implications for health communication campaigns.

  10. Prevalence of abnormal liver function tests and comorbid psychiatric disorders among patients with anorexia nervosa and eating disorders not otherwise specified in the anorexia nervosa DSM-IV criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kye Hock Robin; Lee, Ee Lian

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) are on the rise in Singapore. Abnormal liver function tests have been reported for up to 12.2% of patients with AN. These patients are also known to present with comorbid psychiatric disorders. This study aims to investigate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and the severity of abnormal liver function tests, and between BMI and the presence of comorbid psychiatric disorders. A retrospective cohort analysis of 373 patients diagnosed with AN or EDNOS at a tertiary hospital was performed. The clinical course of transaminitis and comorbid psychiatric disorders was correlated with the patient's BMI. Patients with a BMI of ≥ 16.6 kg/m(2) at their first consult had a significantly lower risk of having comorbid psychiatric disorders (χ(2) = 32.08, p disorders as compared to patients from the other BMI groups (odds ratio [OR] 0.21). On the other hand, patients with a BMI of < 14.6 kg/m(2) had a significantly higher risk of having transaminitis (χ(2) = 72.5, p < 0.001). They were 11.1 times more likely to develop transaminitis as compared to patients with a BMI of ≥ 14.6 kg/m(2) (OR 11.05). Severity of BMI can be used by clinicians as an indicator to assess for secondary psychiatric comorbidities and/or transaminitis during the first consultation. This could help reduce the morbidity and mortality rates in patients with AN or EDNOS.

  11. Genetic determinants of eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof-Op 't Landt, Margarita Cornelia Theodora

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of studies on different aspects of the genetics of eating disorders is presented. The heritability of disordered eating behavior and attitudes in relation with body mass index (BMI) was evaluated in a large adolescent twin-family sample ascertained through the Netherlands

  12. [Relationship between the attitudes towards improving eating habits and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Data from the 2005 National Health and Nutrition Survey and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiko; Hamasaki, Tomoko; Sato, Shinichi; Ando, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the constructive attitudes towards improving eating habits and their relationship with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) using data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (2005) and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (2005). Individuals aged >30 years (N=3084) were enrolled in this study. Exploratory factor analyses were performed to examine the constructive attitudes towards improving eating habits by using 14 parameters. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis was performed and the Cronbach α value was calculated. Furthermore, the relationship between attitudes towards improving eating habits and MetS prevalence was examined according to gender by using multinomial logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for age, number of members in a household, exercise habits, and rest by sleeping. Two factors were extracted: balanced diet (BD) and control of food intake (CFI) (Cronbach α, 0.82 and 0.75, respectively). The goodness of fit model, based on the structural equation models, was adequate (goodness of fit, 0.96). No relationship was noted between BD and MetS prevalence. The MetS prevalence differed according to gender: "Strongly suspected MetS (sure MetS)", 16.3% (male, 24.4%; female, 10.7%), "Preliminary MetS (pre MetS)", 15.2% (male, 24.1%; female, 8.9%), "non-suspected MetS (non MetS)", 68.5% (male, 51.5%; female, 80.5%). The odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for pre MetS and sure MetS were 0.57 (0.42-0.78) and 0.52 (0.38-0.71) in males and 0.36 (0.25-0.53) and 0.39 (0.27-0.56) in females, respectively, when non MetS was used as a reference. The results of this study indicated that the attitudes towards improving eating habits primarily focused on BD and CFI. Therefore, improving eating habits towards in terms of better CFI would be effective in preventing MetS in both genders.

  13. Child sexual abuse as an etiological factor of overweight and eating disorders - considerations for primary health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opydo-Szymaczek, Justyna; Jarząbek-Bielecka, Grażyna; Kędzia, Witold; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Despite the recognition of the clinical importance of child sexual abuse, primary health care providers are often not ad-equately prepared to perform medical evaluations and diagnose child sexual maltreatment. Paper presents basic symptoms and signs of CSA, which may suggest the need for further patient's diagnosis and referral. Since the great majority of sexually abused children do not have any abnormal physical findings, special attention is paid to the silent warning signs of CSA, such as changes in attitude towards own body and eating habits. Numerous studies suggest that victims of CSA may develop obesity or eating disorders of various forms and intensities.

  14. Eating behavior in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, E; Tesi, F; Ricca, V; Pierazzuoli, E; Barciulli, E; Moretti, S; Di Bernardo, M; Travaglini, R; Carrara, S; Zucchi, T; Placidi, G F; Rotella, C M

    2002-06-01

    Aim of this study was the assessment of the prevalence of eating disorders, and of eating disorder symptoms, in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, compared to non-diabetic subjects. Three samples of individuals were studied: a series of 156 (76 male, 80 female) overweight and obese type 2 diabetic patients, aged 30-65 y, with a body mass index (BMI)>28 kg/m(2) (DM); a series of 192 (20 male, 172 female) obese (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) non-diabetic patients aged 30-65 y seeking treatment for weight loss (OC); and a non-clinical sample of 48 (22 male, 26 female) obese (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) subjects aged 30-65 y selected from the lists of two general practices (OP). Eating behavior was assessed using the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE 12.0D). The prevalence of Binge Eating Disorder was lower than 5% in all the three samples. Median EDE scores in females were significantly higher in OC (3.0) and OP (3.4) than in DM (1.7), while diabetic patients showed higher scores on Restraint than both non-diabetic samples. Among diabetic patients, a significant correlation of EDE scores with HbA(1)c was observed. Type 2 diabetes is unlikely to induce relevant eating disturbances in obese patients, apart from an increase in restraint. Abnormalities of eating attitudes and behavior are associated with an impairment of metabolic control.

  15. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Risk of eating disorders in a non-western setting: an exploratory study in Khartoum state, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Charlotte C L; Ambrosino, Elena

    2017-12-01

    Recent research suggests an emergence of eating disorders [ED] in non-western settings for unknown reasons. This research investigates the presence of ED in Khartoum State [Sudan], and explores relevant factors amongst women at risk of ED and stakeholders involved with mental health care and policy-making. Women from four summer schools were approached and screened for risk of ED using a validated and adapted form of the Eating Attitudes Test-26. Focus groups were performed within the schools, selected participants at high risk were interviewed, and interviews with stakeholders were performed. Around a third (32.6%) of participants scored as having high risk of ED. Interviews showed recurring themes determining eating attitudes including: intention, knowledge, environment and habit. Stakeholders' opinions depended on whether they work directly with those affected by ED or in policy-making. The former advocated increased attention on ED, the latter did not. Overall, services for ED were lacking. A high presence of negative eating attitudes was found amongst screened participants with high risk of ED. Individual intention overrides all other determinants for abnormal eating. Moreover, evidence suggests that westernization may attribute to ED, supporting the view that ED are culturally bound. The differing stakeholders' views, together with other data found in this study, allow a number of recommendations for increasing awareness and identification of ED in Sudan.

  17. Eating disorders in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M B

    1986-01-01

    A total of 748 patients who attended four south London group practices were screened using the eating attitudes test; 1% of women had bulimia nervosa and a further 3% a partial syndrome eating disorder. Eating and weight control behaviour and psychiatric indicators for an eating disorder were analysed. Patients with bulimia nervosa and partial syndromes were remarkably similar. They were mainly women, from the middle to upper classes, in the normal weight range but having had considerable weight fluctuation in the past, more likely to have had a history of menstrual irregularity, often psychologically troubled, and tended to have more family psychopathology. PMID:3099893

  18. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a mental disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  19. Body checking and eating cognitions in Brazilian outpatients with eating disorders and non psychiatric controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachani, Adriana Trejger; Barroso, Lucia Pereira; Brasiliano, Silvia; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Hochgraf, Patrícia Brunfentrinker

    2015-12-01

    Compare inadequate eating behaviors and their relationship to body checking in three groups: patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and a control group (C). Eighty three outpatients with eating disorders (ED) and 40 controls completed eating attitudes and body checking questionnaires. The overall relationship between the eating attitude and body checking was statistically significant in all three groups. The worse the eating attitude, the greater the body checking behavior. However, when we look at each group individually, the relationship was only statistically significant in the AN group (r=.354, p=0.020). The lower the desired weight and the worse the eating attitude, the more people check themselves, although in the presence of an ED the relationship between body checking and food restrictions is greater. In patients displaying the AN subgroup, body checking is also related to continued dietary control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vegetarian Students in Their First Year of College: Are They at Risk for Restrictive or Disordered Eating Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Julianne; Rau, Stephanie I.; Wilson, Mardell A.; Walters, Connor

    2008-01-01

    This study compared restrictive and disordered eating behaviors in vegetarian versus non-vegetarian first-year college students. The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and the abbreviated Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) were used to assess eating behaviors (n=330). The mean restrictive DEBQ and the EAT-26 scores of vegetarians were…

  1. Development of eating behavior: the way from infancy to adolescence. Review of foreign studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durneva M.U.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies examining development of eating behavior in different age groups are reviewed. Determinants of disordered eating attitudes from infancy to adolescent are particularly examined. Family environment and social context are general factors. Knowledge, attitudes and food preferences are individual factors. Eating habits in infancy, early childhood and preschool period related to parent’s eating attitudes; peers and social context are dominant in school period and adolescents. The most effective strategy is to prevent disordered eating attitudes in early childhood. Restriction and pressure are not effective strategies in developing healthy eating.

  2. The role of the endocannabinoid system in eating disorders: neurochemical and behavioural preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Castelli, Maria Paola; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has long been known as a modulator of several physiological functions, among which the homeostatic and hedonic aspects of eating. CB1 receptors are widely expressed in brain regions that control food intake, reward and energy balance. Animal and human studies indicate that CB1 receptor agonists possess orexigenic effects enhancing appetite and increasing the rewarding value of food. Conversely, CB1 antagonists have been shown to inhibit the intake of food. Eating disorders include a range of chronic and disabling related pathological illnesses that are characterized by aberrant patterns of feeding behaviour and weight regulation, and by abnormal attitudes and perceptions toward body shape image. The psychological and biological factors underlying eating disorders are complex and not yet completely understood. However in the last decades, converging evidence have led to hypothesise a link between defects in the endocannabinoid system and eating disorders, including obesity. Here we review the neurochemical and behavioural preclinical evidence supporting the role of the endocannabinoid system in eating disorders to offer the reader an update regarding the state of the art. Despite the recent withdrawal from the market of rimonabant for treating obesity and overweight individuals with metabolic complications due to its psychiatric side effects, preclinical findings support the rationale for the clinical development of drug which modulate the endocannabinoid system in the treatment of eating disorders.

  3. Eating behavior and body image among psychology students

    OpenAIRE

    Bosi,Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Uchimura,Kátia Yumi; Luiz,Ronir Raggio

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize eating habits and possible risk factors associated with eating disorders among psychology students, a segment at risk for eating disorders. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study. The questionnaires Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE), Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) and a variety that considers related issues were applied. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 11.0 was utilized in analysis. The study population w...

  4. Relationships Between Self-Reported and Observed Parenting Behaviour, Adolescent Disordered Eating Attitudes and Behaviours, and the 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism: Data From the Australian Temperament Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblat, Vanja; Ryan, Joanne; Wertheim, Eleanor; King, Ross; Olsson, Craig A; Letcher, Primrose; Krug, Isabel

    2017-09-01

    This study examined whether self-reported and observationally measured parental behaviours were associated with disordered eating, and investigated possible moderation by a serotonin-transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Study 1 included 650 adolescents from the Australian Temperament Project who completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 Drive for Thinness and Bulimia scales at 15/16 years and were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR. Parents completed an Australian Temperament Project-devised measure of parental warmth and harsh punishment. Study 2 included a subgroup of 304 participants who also engaged in a video-recorded family interaction, with observed parental warmth and hostility coded by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scale. Greater self-reported parental warmth was associated with lower bulimia scores. Conversely, observationally measured parental warmth was associated with lower drive for thinness, but not bulimia. Self-reported parental harsh punishment was associated with bulimia only, with observed parental hostility associated with neither outcome. 5-HTTLPR genotype did not moderate the relationship between parent behaviours and adolescent disordered eating. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Predictors of attitudes toward cosmetic surgery among U.S. and Colombian college women: the roles of eating behaviors and demographic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Carrion

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-cultural studies on eating behaviors and relatedconstructs can identify cultural and social factorsthat contribute to eating disorder symptomatology.Eating disorders (EDs are a major cause for concernin the U.S., and recent studies in Colombia have showngrowing rates among their female population. In addition,cosmetic surgery procedures have been increasingrapidly in both the U.S. and Colombia, and preliminaryresearch suggests a positive relation between disorderedeating and endorsement of plastic surgery. In samplesof college women from Colombia and the U.S., we investigatedpatterns of association between disorderedeating variables and cosmetic surgery acceptance. Ourapproach utilized separate analyses for various subcomponentsof disordered eating (to determine their uniqueassociations with cosmetic surgery acceptance whileadjusting for potentially relevant covariates and examiningcross-cultural patterns. Participants were studentsat an urban, public college in the U.S. (n=163 and anurban, private college in Colombia (n=179. Overall,our findings suggested that participants from Colombiawith greater disordered eating were more likely to endorsecosmetic surgery for social reasons, while thosefrom the U.S. were more likely to consider undergoingcosmetic surgery for personal reasons. Differing findingsbetween the two samples may be due to cultural andsocial factors, which we delineate. These findings alsohave potential implications for presurgical counselingof cosmetic surgery candidates.

  6. Healthy eating at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria Louisa; Egberg Mikkelsen, Bent

    Unhealthy eating are common among adolescents and the school is a well suited setting for promoting healthy eating. For the school to play a role here, however an environment must be created, in which the school and the students develop a sense of ownership for a healthy food and nutrition "regime......". This paper highlights the role that the organisation of food provision plays by comparing the attitudes of students towards in-school food provision as opposed to out-of-school provision where food is provided by outside caterers. Schools having internal food production and schools having external food....... Therefore in designing school meal programs aiming at being supportive for healthy eating, it is necessary to try to integrate the food provision in the life of the school....

  7. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

  8. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Publications About Eating Disorders Research Results PubMed: Journal Articles about Eating Disorders Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health Information Resource Center Hours: 8:30 a.m. ...

  9. Safe Eats - Eating Out and Bringing In

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Safety for Moms-To-Be: Safe Eats - Eating Out & Bringing In Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... Eggs | Fruits, Veggies & Juices | Ready-to-Eat Foods | Eating Out & Bringing In When you eat out, look at ...

  10. Emotional eating in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricca, Valdo; Castellini, Giovanni; Fioravanti, Giulia; Lo Sauro, Carolina; Rotella, Francesco; Ravaldi, Claudia; Lazzeretti, Lisa; Faravelli, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between emotional states and eating behaviors is complex, and emotional eating has been identified as a possible factor triggering binge eating in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder. Few studies considered emotional eating in patients with anorexia nervosa. The present study evaluated the clinical correlates of emotional eating in 251 eating-disordered (EDs) subjects (70 AN restricting type, 71 AN binge eating/purging type, 110 BN purging type) and in a group of 89 healthy control subjects. Subjects were assessed by means of a clinical interview (Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and several self-reported questionnaires, including the Emotional Eating Scale (EES). No significant differences were found between the 3 EDs groups in terms of EES total score, and all patients with ED showed higher EES scores compared with control subjects. Emotional eating was associated with subjective binge eating in AN binge eating/purging type and with objective binge eating in patients with BN. Among patients with AN restricting type, emotional eating was associated with restraint, but this association was lost when controlling for fear of loss of control over eating, which was the principal determinant of restraint. Emotional eating and fear of loss of control over eating are significantly associated with specific eating attitudes and behaviors, according to the different diagnoses. Emotional eating is a relevant psychopathologic dimension that deserves a careful investigation in both anorectic and bulimic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiology of eating disorders in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Burns, Jonathan K.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of reviewThis is the first review of studies on the epidemiology of eating disorders on the African continent.Recent findingsThe majority of articles found through our search did not assess formal diagnoses, but only screened for eating attitudes and behaviors. Only four studies - including

  12. Eating Disorders: A Problem in Athletics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckes-Miller, Mardie E.; Black, David R.

    1988-01-01

    A review of research regarding athletes' eating habits suggests that they may practice eating disorder habits and poor weight management behaviors as well as have poor attitudes and knowledge regarding nutrition, indicating their immediate need for appropriate education about the possible detrimental effects of such practices. (CB)

  13. Conductas y actitudes alimentarias, imagen corporal y perfeccionismo en estudiantes universitarias mujeres Eating behaviors and attitudes, body image and perfectionism in female college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Salvador Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar estudiantes universitarias mujeres con y sin riesgo de trastorno alimentario, en función de características asociadas a dichas patologías. Muestra: 83 mujeres de 19 a 31 años, estudiantes de una universidad pública de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. Procedimiento: las participantes completaron un Cuestionario de datos, Contour Drawing Rating Scale (Thompson & Gray, 1995, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (Garner, 1991; adaptación Rutsztein et al., 2006 y la Almost Perfect Scale Revised (Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi & Ashby, 2001; adaptación Arana, Keegan & Rutsztein, 2009. Resultados: las mujeres con riesgo de trastorno alimentario presentan mayor porcentaje de insatisfacción con la imagen corporal y vómitos autoinducidos, además de puntajes superiores en la mayoría de las subescalas del EDI-2 y en la subescala Discrepancia de la APS-R. Conclusiones: las mujeres con riesgo de trastorno alimentario presentan un mayor nivel de perfeccionismo desadaptativo. Estos hallazgos son relevantes para el desarrollo de tratamientos para sintomatología específica de trastorno alimentario.Objective: to compare female university students with and without risk of eating disorders, based on characteristics associated with these disorders. Sample: 83 women aged 19 to 31 years old, students from a public university in the City of Buenos Aires. Procedure: Participants completed a Data questionnaire, Contour Drawing Rating Scale (Thompson & Gray, 1995, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (Garner, 1991; adaptation Rutsztein et al., 2006 and the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi & Ashby, 2001; adaptation Arana, Keegan & Rutsztein, 2009. Results: Women presenting risk of eating disorders have a higher percentage of body image dissatisfaction and self-induced vomiting, as well as higher scores in most of the subscales of the EDI-2 and the Discrepancy subscale of the APS-R. Conclusions: Women presenting risk of eating

  14. University hosts Eating Issues and Body Image Awareness Week

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrt, Katie

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Eating Disorders Task Force will host the Eating Issues and Body Image Awareness Week through Feb. 26. The event features a variety of activities to encourage participants to identify and practice healthy eating and body image attitudes. The activities are free and open to the public.

  15. Prevalence of distorted body image in young Koreans and its association with age, sex, body weight status, and disordered eating behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong SC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seong-Chul Hong,1 Young-Eun Jung,2 Moon-Doo Kim,2 Chang-In Lee,2 Mi-Yeul Hyun,3 Won-Myong Bahk,4 Bo-Hyun Yoon,5 Kwang Heun Lee6 1Department of Preventive Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, 3College of Nursing, Jeju National University, Jeju, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 5Department of Psychiatry, Naju National Hospital, Naju, Republic of Korea; 6Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju, Republic of Korea Purpose: To define the prevalence of distorted body image in 10–24-year-old Koreans and determine its relationship with sex, age, body weight status, and disordered eating behaviors.Methods: A total of 3,227 young Koreans were recruited from elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as from universities. The participants completed a self-reported questionnaire on body image, eating behaviors (Eating Attitude Test-26, and body weight status.Results: The prevalence of a distorted body image in males was 49.7% and that in females was 51.2%. Distorted body image was more frequent in adolescents (age, 10–17 years than in young adults (age, 18–24 years. The highest prevalence (55.3% was reported in female elementary school students (age, 10–12 years. Distorted body image was associated with disordered eating behaviors and abnormal body weight status.Conclusion: These results suggest that distorted body image is a public health problem, given its high frequency in young Koreans, and that it is associated with abnormal body weight status and disordered eating behaviors. Keywords: distorted body image, weight status, disordered eating behaviors, young Koreans, Eating Attitude Test, BMI  

  16. Binge eating disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorder - binge eating; Eating - binge; Overeating - compulsive; Compulsive overeating ... as having close relatives who also have an eating disorder Changes in brain chemicals Depression or other emotions, ...

  17. Habitual sleep duration and eating disorders in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R A; Rozette, E

    1986-02-01

    To measure the relationship between habitual sleep duration and eating disorders, the responses of groups of 34 short- and 43 longer-sleeping college students to the EAT-26 Test were compared. The short-sleepers scored twice as high and were five times more likely to exhibit abnormal eating patterns than the longer-sleeping group.

  18. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and psychological comorbidity in eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, L; Martinotti, G; Carenti, M L; Romo, L; Oumaya, M; Pham-Scottez, A; Rouillon, F; Gorwood, P; Janiri, L

    2017-05-22

    There is some evidence that eating disorders (ED) and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) share common clinical features and that ADHD might contribute to the severity of eating disorders. A greater understanding of how the presence of comorbid ADHD may affect the psychopathological framework of eating disorder seems of primary importance. The aim of our study was to evaluate rates of ADHD in three ED subgroups of inpatients: anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R), anorexia nervosa binge-eating/purging type (AN-BP) and bulimia nervosa (BN). The secondary aim was the evaluation of the associated psychological characteristics. The sample consisted of 73 females inpatients (mean age 28.07 ± 7.30), all with longstanding histories of eating disorder (ED). The presence of a diagnosis of ADHD was evaluated in a clinical interview based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. The following psychometric instruments were used: the eating attitude test (EAT-40), the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE), the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale (BADDS), the Hamilton scales for Anxiety (HAM-A) and Depression (HAM-D), and the Barrat Impulsivity Scale (BIS-10). Among the three ED subgroups, 13 patients reported comorbidity with ADHD; three in the AN-R subtype, nine in the AN-BP and one in the BN. The remaining 60 patients (n = 34 AN-R; n = 19 AN-BP; n = 7 BN) presented only a diagnosis of ED. The EAT (p = 0.04) and HAM-A (p = 0.02) mean scores were significantly higher in patients with comorbid ADHD. In our study the comorbidity between ADHD and ED appeared to be frequent, particularly among patients with AN-BP. ED inpatients with higher level of anxiety and more abnormal eating attitudes and bulimic symptoms should be assessed for potentially associated ADHD.

  19. Adult picky eaters with symptoms of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: comparable distress and comorbidity but different eating behaviors compared to those with disordered eating symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickgraf, Hana F; Franklin, Martin E; Rozin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    One presentation of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is characterized by picky eating, i.e., selective eating based on the sensory properties of food. The present study has two aims. The first is to describe distress and impairment in individuals with ARFID secondary to picky eating. The second is to determine whether eating behaviors hypothesized to be specific to picky eating can differentiate picky eaters with and without ARFID from typical eaters (e.g., individuals not reporting picky or disordered eating) and individuals who strongly endorse attitudes associated with anorexia and bulimia (eating disordered attitudes). Participants were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk ( N =  325) and an online support group for adult picky eaters ( N =  81). Participants were grouped based on endorsement of picky eating, ARFID symptoms, and elevated eating disordered attitudes on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). The resulting four eating behavior groups were compared on measures of distress and impairment (e.g., anxiety/depression and, obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms, eating-related quality of life) and on measures of eating behaviors associated with picky eating (e.g., food neophobia, inflexibility about preparation and presentation of preferred foods, sensitivity to sensory stimuli, and eating from a very narrow range of foods). The groups were compared using one way ANOVA with post-hoc Tamhane's T2 tests. On measures of distress and impairment, participants with ARFID reported higher scores than both typical eaters and picky eaters without ARFID, and comparable scores to those with disordered eating attitudes. Three of four measures of picky eating behavior, eating inflexibility, food neophobia, and eating from a range of 20 or fewer foods, distinguished picky eaters with and without ARFID form typical eaters and those with disordered eating attitudes. Picky eaters with ARFID reported greater food neophobia and eating inflexibility

  20. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gucciardi, Enza; Celasun, Nalan; Ahmad, Farah; Stewart, Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Eating disorders are an increasing public health problem among young women. Anorexia and bulimia may give rise to serious physical conditions such as hypothermia, hypotension, electrolyte imbalance, endocrine disorders, and kidney failure. Key Issues Eating disorders are primarily a problem among women. In Ontario in 1995, over 90% of reported hospitalized cases of anorexia and bulimia were women. In addition to eating disorders, preoccupation with weight, body image and...

  1. Evaluating the effects of a peer-support model: reducing negative body esteem and disordered eating attitudes and behaviours in grade eight girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carmen; Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Saraceni, Reana

    2012-01-01

    During adolescence girls become increasingly preoccupied with unrealistic ideals about body weight, often leading to dieting and unhealthy compensatory behaviours. These practices have been linked to adverse psychological, social, and health consequences. Peer-support groups offer promise in addressing risk factors for disordered eating. This study explored the effects of peer-support on measures of body satisfaction, weight loss/weight gain behaviour, internalization of media ideals, weight based teasing, and communication, for a cohort of grade 8 girls. High-risk participants demonstrated trends toward decreased internalization of media ideals and increased body satisfaction at post-test. Implications and future research direction are discussed.

  2. Eating Disorder Risk and Body Dissatisfaction Based on Muscularity and Body Fat in Male University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Carrie; George, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between risk of eating disorders, body dissatisfaction, and perceptual attractiveness in male university students. Participants: Research was conducted January-April 2012 and involved 339 male and 441 female students. Methods: Eating disorder risk was assessed with the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and body…

  3. Eating Competence: Definition and Evidence for the Satter Eating Competence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satter, Ellyn

    2007-01-01

    The evidence- and practice-based Satter Eating Competence Model (ecSatter) outlines an inclusive definition of the interrelated spectrum of eating attitudes and behaviors. The model is predicated on the utility and effectiveness of biopsychosocial processes: hunger and the drive to survive, appetite and the need for subjective reward and the…

  4. Associations of adolescent emotional and loss of control eating with 1-year changes in disordered eating, weight, and adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojek, Monika M K; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B; Kelly, Nichole R; Thompson, Katherine A; Mehari, Rim D; Marwitz, Shannon E; Demidowich, Andrew P; Galescu, Ovidiu A; Brady, Sheila M; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2017-05-01

    Adolescent emotional-eating, referring to eating in response to negative affective states, is frequently reported by those with loss of control (LOC) eating. Although LOC eating has been shown to predict exacerbated disordered eating and excess weight/adiposity gain, the extent to which emotional-eating, either alone or in combination with LOC, predicts adverse outcomes has not been determined. Thus, we examined associations of baseline emotional-eating with changes in disordered eating, BMI, and adiposity over 1-year, and to what degree the presence or absence of baseline LOC moderated these associations. 189 non-treatment-seeking youth (15.4 ± 1.4y; 66% female; 67% non-Hispanic White, 38% overweight [BMI ≥ 85th %ile]) completed the emotional-eating Scale for Children/Adolescents and the Eating Disorder Examination interview at baseline and again at 1-year. Air displacement plethysmography assessed adiposity at both time points. Baseline emotional-eating alone was not significantly associated with the development of objective binge eating or changes in disordered eating attitudes, BMI or adiposity 1-year later. However, baseline emotional-eating interacted with the presence of baseline LOC in the prediction of 1-year outcomes. Among adolescents with LOC eating, greater baseline emotional-eating was related to increased disordered eating attitudes (p = .03), BMI (p = .04), and adiposity (p = .04) at 1-year, after correcting for false discovery rate. Emotional-eating among youth also reporting LOC was associated with adverse outcomes over 1-year. Adolescents who report both behaviors may represent a subset of individuals at especially high risk for exacerbated disordered eating and excess weight gain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:551-560). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Prevention of eating disorders in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira; Gomes, Ainá Innocencio da Silva; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves; Soares, Eliane de Abreu

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are serious mental diseases that frequently appear in female athletes. They are abnormal eating behaviors that can be diagnosed only by strict criteria. Disordered eating, although also characterized as abnormal eating behavior, does not include all the criteria for diagnosing eating disorders and is therefore a way to recognize the problem in its early stages. It is important to identify factors to avoid clinical progression in this high-risk population. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss critical information for the prevention of eating disorders in female athletes. This review discusses the major correlates for the development of an eating disorder. We also discuss which athletes are possibly at highest risk for eating disorders, including those from lean sports and female adolescent athletes. There is an urgent need for the demystification of myths surrounding body weight and performance in sports. This review includes studies that tested different prevention programs' effectiveness, and the majority showed positive results. Educational programs are the best method for primary prevention of eating disorders. For secondary prevention, early identification is essential and should be performed by preparticipation exams, the recognition of dietary markers, and the use of validated self-report questionnaires or clinical interviews. In addition, more randomized clinical trials are needed with athletes from multiple sports in order for the most reliable recommendations to be made and for some sporting regulations to be changed.

  6. Normal and Abnormal Behavior in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Spinner, Miriam R.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluation of normal and abnormal behavior in the period to three years of age involves many variables. Parental attitudes, determined by many factors such as previous childrearing experience, the bonding process, parental psychological status and parental temperament, often influence the labeling of behavior as normal or abnormal. This article describes the forms of crying, sleep and wakefulness, and affective responses from infancy to three years of age.

  7. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  8. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vegetables on hand and ready to eat. Other good snacks include low-fat yogurt, peanut butter and celery, or whole-grain crackers and cheese. Serve lean meats and other good sources of protein , such as fish, eggs, beans, ...

  9. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a healthy way to eat? • What is a balanced diet? • Why is protein important to my body? • What ... Protein foods 5. Dairy foods What is a balanced diet? A balanced diet should include a combination of ...

  10. Eating Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases Reports to Congress Tribal Leader Letters Urban Leader Letters ... eating is a responsibility of our communities, schools, clinics, society, and families. We all have a role. There is much we can do to promote ...

  11. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    TUČKOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to create an eating disorder prevention program. The thesis particularly focuses on the eating disorder problems during adolescence and early adulthood along with the explanation and specification of basic terms, history and cause of the disorder. A strong emphasis is placed on the possibilities of the prevention. A qualitative research was carried out within the scope of this thesis and it brought useful data about the students and their knowledge of the ea...

  12. Eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kontić Olga; Vasiljević Nadja; Trišović Marija; Jorga Jagoda; Lakić Aneta; Jašović-Gašić Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis...

  13. Eating disturbances among adolescent schoolgirls in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Tamara Yousef; Al-Domi, Hayder Abdullah; Mashal, Rima Hussein; Jibril, Musa Abdel-Khaleq

    2010-02-01

    Several studies indicated that the prevalence of eating disorders has increased among adolescent girls. The aim of the present study, therefore, is to investigate the occurrence and correlates of eating disorders among adolescent girls in Amman, Jordan. A sample of 432 adolescent girls aged 10-16 years were recruited from public and private schools in Amman. Information was collected from adolescent schoolgirls through a socio-demographic data sheet, eating attitude test, body shape and eating habits questionnaires. One third of participants had eating disorders, including bulimia nervosa (0.6%), binge eating disorder (1.8%) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (31%), however no anorexic cases were found. Findings also suggested that pubertal, familial and social variables were associated with eating disorders occurrence. Eating disturbances were prevalent among the present population sample. Participants have been more preoccupied with their body weight due to socio-cultural norms that are reinforced by media messages. Further research is needed to develop intervention programs to control eating disorders occurrence in Jordan. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cognitive behavior therapy for eating disorders versus normalization of eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Brodin, U; Zandian, M

    2017-05-15

    We examine the science and evidence supporting cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for the treatment of bulimia nervosa and other eating disorders. Recent trials focusing on the abnormal cognitive and emotional aspects of bulimia have reported a remission rate of about 45%, and a relapse rate of about 30% within one year. However, an early CBT trial that emphasized the normalization of eating behavior had a better outcome than treatment that focused on cognitive intervention. In support of this finding, another treatment, that restores a normal eating behavior using mealtime feedback, has an estimated remission rate of about 75% and a relapse rate of about 10% over five years. Moreover, when eating behavior was normalized, cognitive and emotional abnormalities were resolved at remission without cognitive therapy. The critical aspect of the CBT treatment of bulimia nervosa therefore may actually have been the normalization of eating behavior. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Disordered eating practices in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satherley, R; Howard, R; Higgs, S

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review evidence concerning disordered eating practices in dietary-controlled gastrointestinal conditions. Three key questions were examined: a) are disordered eating practices a feature of GI disorders?; b) what abnormal eating practices are present in those with GI disorders?; and c) what factors are associated with the presence of disordered eating in those with GI disorders? By exploring these questions, we aim to develop a conceptual model of disordered eating development in GI disease. Five key databases, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1900-2014) and MEDLINE (1950-2014), PubMed, PsycINFO (1967-2014) and Google Scholar, were searched for papers relating to disordered eating practices in those with GI disorders. All papers were quality assessed before being included in the review. Nine papers were included in the review. The majority of papers reported that the prevalence of disordered eating behaviours is greater in populations with GI disorders than in populations of healthy controls. Disordered eating patterns in dietary-controlled GI disorders may be associated with both anxiety and GI symptoms. Evidence concerning the correlates of disordered eating was limited. The presence of disordered eating behaviours is greater in populations with GI disorders than in populations of healthy controls, but the direction of the relationship is not clear. Implications for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontić Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behavior in the nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, i.e. extreme dieting, or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are characteristic forms of compensatory behavior of patients with eating disorder. The most appropriate course of treatment is determined by evaluating the patient’s health condition, associated with behavior and eating habits, the experience of one’s own body, character traits of personality, and consequently the development and functioning of the individual. The final treatment plan is individual. Eating disorders are a growing medical problem even in this part of the world. Prevention should be planned in cooperation with different sectors so as to stop the epidemic of these diseases.

  17. Suicide attempts and clinical severity of eating disorders : an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Paulo P. P.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Machado, Bárbara César; Torres, António Roma; Brandão, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines whether eating disorders patients with suicide attempts present differences in disordered eating and clinical traits compared to those without suicide attempts. Method: 144 patients with eating disorders (65 anorexia nervosa and 79 bulimia nervosa) completed the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI; Garner, Omstead & Polivy, 1983), the Symptom Checklist - 90- Revised (SCL-90; Derrogatis, 1977), and a questionnaire to assess eating behaviors and attitudes, information reg...

  18. Spanish high level handicapped sportsmen and eating disorders: are they at risk?.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Javier Martín-Almena; Juan Francisco Romero-Collazos; María Pilar Montero-López

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eating disorders have an important effect on health and sport performance. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether the sport practice acts as a risk factor or a protective factor for eating disorders. Aim: To examine the risk of eating disorders in Spanish disabled high level sportsmen and sportswomen. Methods: The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) was performed in 60 physical or visual disabled subjects who belonged to Paralympics or Promising youngster teams. Result...

  19. Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, S. Bryn; Ziyadeh, Najat J.; Forman, Sara; Prokop, Lisa A.; Keliher, Anne; Jacobs, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Early identification and treatment of disordered eating and weight control behaviors may prevent progression and reduce the risk of chronic health consequences. Methods: The National Eating Disorders Screening Program coordinated the first-ever nationwide eating disorders screening initiative for high schools in the United States in 2000. Students completed a self-report screening questionnaire that included the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and items on vomiting or exercising ...

  20. Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Garvine, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Inquiry into the initial attitudes toward mental illness of students taking an abnormal psychology class indicates students' concerns and preconceptions and provides a basis for shaping the course to respond to student needs. (JH)

  1. The school counsellor's role in recognizing eating disorders and implementing preventive measures

    OpenAIRE

    Berčnik, Sanja

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses eating disorders. Eating disorders are defined as a serious health threat due to an abnormal relation to food which has become a way of coping with stress. They are also often linked to personality disorders. We have focused mainly on the three most common types of eating disorder – anorexia, bulimia, and compulsive (binge) eating – their recognizable features, the causes that lead to eating disorders, and on preventive measures practiced in ...

  2. Treatment of nocturnal eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael J; Schenck, Carlos H

    2009-09-01

    Identifying abnormal nocturnal eating is critically important for patient care and public health. Obesity is a global pandemic and a leading cause of preventable mortality in the United States, with more than 100,000 deaths annually. Normally, nighttime energy homeostasis is maintained, despite an absence of food intake, through appetite suppression and alterations in glucose metabolism that result in stable energy stores. Two conditions break this nighttime fast and are associated with weight gain as well as medical and neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) is characterized by isolated nocturnal eating, whereas the night-eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian delay in meal timing leading to evening hyperphagia, nocturnal eating, and morning anorexia. Recently, SRED has been associated with the benzodiazepine receptor agonist zolpidem. Both SRED and NES are treatable and represent potentially reversible forms of obesity. In SRED, the antiseizure medication topiramate and dopaminergics have both demonstrated promising results. Nocturnal eating associated with NES has responded well to sertraline.

  3. Qualitative study of eating habits in Bruneian primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talip, Tajidah; Serudin, Rajiah; Noor, Salmah; Tuah, Nik

    2017-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a serious public health issue globally and poor eating habits are an important contributing factor. This study aimed to explore the perceptions, practices and attitudes towards healthy eating in Bruneian primary school children. A qualitative study was conducted among 40 subjects involving 18 children (aged 9-10 years old), 12 parents and 10 teachers, who were recruited from two primary schools using convenience sampling. Five focus group discussion sessions were conducted, and recorded discussions were translated. The transcripts were entered into NVivo10 and thematic analysis was conducted. All participants had differing perceptions of the term 'healthy eating'. Children reported 'healthy eating' by identifying foods or food groups they perceived as healthy and unhealthy. Only a few mentioned fruits and vegetables as essential to a healthy diet. Parents mainly perceived 'healthy eating' as consuming 'any quality food' that contains 'vitamins and minerals'. Teachers described a healthy diet as including balanced and varied dietary practices, having breakfast and eating regularly at the right, set times. They also associated eating healthily with traditional, home-grown and home-cooked food. All participants had positive attitudes towards healthy eating, however most children demonstrated unhealthy eating habits and frequently consumed unhealthy foods. The Bruneian primary school children reported favourable knowledge despite having poor healthy eating habits. The factors influencing participants eating behavior included food preferences, familial factors (parental style and parenting knowledge), food accessibility and availability, time constraints, as well as convenience. These factors hindered them from adopting healthy eating practices.

  4. Social safeness and disordered eating: Exploring underlying mechanisms of body appreciation and inflexible eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Catarina; Ferreira, Cláudia; Mendes, Ana Laura; Trindade, Inês A

    2017-06-01

    Feelings of social safeness and connectedness have been associated with adaptive emotion regulation processes and well-being indicators. Further, literature has demonstrated that interpersonal experiences play an important role in the etiology and maintenance of body and eating psychopathology. However, the study of the role of social variables and emotion regulation processes in the engagement in inflexible eating rules and eating psychopathology is still in its early stages. The current study aims to fill some gaps within the literature and explore the mediator role of body appreciation and inflexible eating rules in the link between social safeness and disordered eating. Participants were 253 women, aged between 18 and 50 years old, who completed a series of online self-report measures. Results from the tested path analysis model showed that social safeness holds a significant effect on eating psychopathology, through the mechanisms of body appreciation and inflexible eating rules. Also, results suggested that women who present higher levels of social safeness tend to present a more positive and respectful attitude towards their body and decreased adoption of inflexible eating rules, which seem to explain lower levels of disordered eating behaviours. These findings seem to present empirical support for the development of intervention programs that promote a positive, affectionate and healthy relationship with one's body image, in order to prevent the inflexible adherence to eating rules and disordered eating behaviours.

  5. Normative body dissatisfaction and eating psychopathology in teenage girls: the impact of inflexible eating rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristiana; Ferreira, Cláudia; Trindade, Inês A; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2016-03-01

    Adolescence has been considered a critical time for the development of body image-related difficulties and disordered eating behaviours, especially in females. Although adherence to eating rules has been linked to disordered eating, literature has not yet explored how the inflexible subscription to those rules impacts on eating psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to explore whether inflexible eating impacts on the relationships between weight and body image-related variables, and disordered eating. Participated in this study are 497 female adolescents from the community, aged between 14 and 18 years old, who completed self-report measures. Results revealed that the majority of the participants were dissatisfied with their weight and body shape. Moreover, 6.64 % of the participants demonstrated severe eating psychopathology. A path analysis revealed that BMI, body dissatisfaction and social comparisons based on physical appearance impact on disordered eating behaviours, through the mechanism of inflexible adherence to eating rules. This model explained 52 % of eating psychopathology's variance. Findings highlight the relevance of body image-related difficulties in adolescence and additionally they emphasise the importance of promoting more flexible attitudes towards eating in prevention and intervention programmes with female adolescents.

  6. Risk of eating disorders among university students in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengpid, Supa; Peltzer, Karl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin

    2015-02-01

    As there is a lack of information on eating disorders in Bangladesh, the aim of this study was to explore the eating disorder attitudes and behaviors among undergraduate university students in the country. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey and anthropometric measurement were conducted with undergraduate students who were recruited randomly from classes. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to determine the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes. The sample included 800 university students (56.6% men and 43.4% women), with a mean age of 21.0 years (SD=32.5). Using the EAT-26, 37.6% of the students were classified as being at risk for an eating disorder. In multivariate analysis, being a late adolescent (17-19 years), high religious involvement, overweight body perception, low body appreciation, having had cosmetic surgery, and current binge drinking were found to be associated with an eating disorder risk. Very high rates of eating disorder risk were found. This result calls for increased awareness and understanding of eating disorders, and related risk factors and interventions in university students in Bangladesh.

  7. Body image and health: eating disorders and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasik, Carolyn Bradner

    2014-09-01

    Eating behavior in adolescents can be as high risk as other behaviors that arise during this period and can have serious health consequences. This article presents a framework for screening and treatment of abnormal adolescent eating behavior by the primary care provider. A review of the types of disordered eating is presented along with suggested ways to screen. Indications for subspecialty eating disorder referrals and key aspects of screening and intervention in adolescent obesity and eating disorders are also reviewed. Specific attention is paid to the aspects of care that can be provided in primary care and multidisciplinary care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of eating disorders in female athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira; Gomes, Ainá Innocencio da Silva; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves; Soares, Eliane de Abreu

    2014-01-01

    Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira Coelho,1 Ainá Innocencio da Silva Gomes,2 Beatriz Gonçalves Ribeiro,2 Eliane de Abreu Soares11Nutrition Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University, Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Macaé Campus, Granja dos Cavaleiros, Macaé, BrazilAbstract: Eating disorders are serious mental diseases that frequently appear in female athletes. They are abnormal eating behaviors that can ...

  9. Can Violence cause Eating Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juli, Maria Rosaria

    2015-09-01

    The origin and course of eating disorders and nutrition have a multifactorial etiology and should therefore take into consideration: psychological factors, evolutionary, biological and socio-cultural (Juli 2012). Among the psychological factors we will focus on violence (in any form) and in particular on the consequences that they have on women, which vary in severity. Recent studies show that women get sick more than men, both from depression and eating disorders, with a ratio of 2:1; this difference begins in adolescence and continues throughout the course of life (Niolu 2010). The cause of this difference remains unclear. Many studies agree that during adolescence girls have negative feelings more frequently and for a longer duration caused by stressful life events and difficult circumstances, such as abuse or violence. This results in an increased likelihood of developing a symptom that will be connected to eating disorders and/or depression. As far as the role of food is concerned in eating disorders, it has a symbolic significance and offers emotional comfort. Eating means to incorporate and assimilate, and even in an ideal sense, the characteristics of the foods become part of the individual. Feelings that lead to binges with food are normally a result of feelings related to abuse or violence and lead to abnormal behavior which leads to binging and the final result being that the person is left feeling guilty and ashamed. Research confirms that 30% of patients who have been diagnosed with eating disorders, especially bulimia, have a history of sexual abuse during childhood. Ignoring the significance of this factor can result in the unleashing of this disease as the patient uses the disorder as his expressive theater (Mencarelli 2008). Factors that contribute to the possibility of developing an eating disorder are both the age of the patient at the time of the abuse and the duration of the abuse. The psychological effects that follow may include dissociative

  10. Comportamento alimentar e imagem corporal entre estudantes de educação física Eating disorders and body image among physical education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Magalhães Bosi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar práticas alimentares e possíveis fatores de risco associados a transtornos do comportamento alimentar entre estudantes de Educação Física em uma universidade pública do município do Rio de Janeiro. MÉTODO: Estudo seccional, elegendo-se como população-alvo um segmento de risco para o surgimento de transtornos alimentares. Foram aplicados os questionários Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ e uma variável que considera os dois instrumentos associados. RESULTADOS: Detectou-se resultado positivo em 6,9% (IC95%: 3,6-11,7% no EAT-26. No BITE, para sintomas elevados e gravidade intensa, foram encontradas prevalências de 5% (IC95%: 2,4-9,5% e 2,5% (IC95%: 0,7-6,3%, respectivamente. Constatou-se que 26,29% das estudantes apresentavam comportamento alimentar anormal. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados deste estudo indicam que se deve atentar para comportamentos alimentares de risco nesse grupo, justificando-se um olhar diferenciado em relação a esses futuros educadores.OBJECTIVE: To characterize eating practices and possible risk factors associated with eating disorders among physical education students in a public university of the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: Sectional study, electing as target population a risk group for the emergence of eating disorders. The questionnaires Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ and a variety that considers related issues were applied. RESULTS: A positive result was detected in 6.9% of cases (IC95%: 3.6-11.7% on EAT-26. On BITE, for elevated symptoms and severe cases, a prevalence of 5% was found (IC95%: 2.4-9.5% and 2.5% (IC95%: 0.7-6.3%, respectively. It was evidenced that 26.29% of students presented abnormal eating behavior. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate the need to pay attention to risk eating behaviors in this

  11. Reactivity to interpersonal stress in patients with eating disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies using an experimental paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Treasure, Janet; Kan, Carol; Cardi, Valentina

    2018-04-01

    Reactivity to interpersonal stress in patients with eating disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies using an experimental paradigm. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XXX-XXX, 2018.- Social difficulties have been implicated in the development and maintenance of eating disorder symptoms. The aim of this work was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of experimental studies testing patientsö reactivity to interpersonal stress, compared to healthy controls. Thirty-four studies were included. Meta-analyses were conducted on 16 studies and on following outcomes: attention bias and interference to threatening faces, cortisol, heart rate and negative affect before and after exposure to interpersonal stress. Patients showed heightened attention bias and interference to threatening faces. Lower heart rate after exposure to interpersonal stress and greater negative affect before and after interpersonal stress were observed in the clinical group compared to controls. Surprisingly, only a small minority of studies included measures of abnormal eating behaviour and attitudes. This seems a missed opportunity for testing the causal and maintaining role that abnormalities in interpersonal stress response play in eating disorders. Nonetheless, findings corroborate the hypothesis that patients' response to interpersonal stress differs from that of healthy controls. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Parental knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding overweight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents have significant influence in the development of children's eating behaviour and food choices. Their knowledge and attitudes towards nutritional status play an important part in childhood growth, as parents become role models in shaping children's eating habits. The aim of this study was to assess parental ...

  13. Longitudinal relationships between fathers’, mothers’, and adolescents’ restrained eating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, H.M.; Strien, T. van; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Family members can exert important direct and indirect influence on the eating behaviours of children; these include modelling, and transmission of preferences, beliefs, and attitudes. Current studies on family similarities in dieting behaviours however show inconsistent results. The present study

  14. Impulsivity and eating behavior in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Santiago, María José

    2017-02-01

    Introduction: Impulsivity is a personality trait related with the control of behaviour and emotions and it is found in different psychopathological alterations, including those referred to eating behaviour. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship among the infl uence of the aesthetic body shape model, eating behaviour (and risk for specific disorders), body mass index and impulsivity. Method: A total of 178 males were included in the study, with a mean age of 20.18 ± 2.48. Height and weight were assessed in order to obtain the body mass index. All participants fulfilled the following questionnaires: Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11), Questionnaire of Infl uences on the Body Shape Model for males (CIMEC-V) and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40). Results: With respect to possible cases of eating disorders, 5.06% were found. Scores of some items of BIS-11 correlated significantly with the EAT-40 and CIMEC-V scores. Overweight participants (39.89%) showed higher level of impulsivity as well as those with EAT-40 scores above the cut-off point for that test. Conclusions: The assessment of impulsivity from a psychological point of view might be a preventive tool with regards to disordered eating behaviours. Respecting the patients with eating disorders/overweight/obesity, that assessment might be a relevant aspect in order to improve the therapeutical approach.

  15. Attitudes and attitude change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    attitude theory. Why is this important? Attitudinal concepts can be found in every area of marketing. Concepts like ad liking, brand attitude, quality perception, product preference, perceived benefit, perceived risk, perceived value, and customer satisfaction can all be understood as particular types......, attitude objects are simply the things we like or dislike. Consumer researchers are mainly interested in attitude objects of two classes, products and services, including the attributes, issues, persons, communications, situations, and behaviours related to them. Research on consumer attitudes takes two...... perspectives: Understanding attitude structure: how is an attitude cognitively represented in a consumer's mind, including its components (intra-attitudinal structure) and its associations with other psychological variables (inter-attitudinal structure)? Understanding information processing: what...

  16. Prevention of eating disorders in female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho GMO

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira Coelho,1 Ainá Innocencio da Silva Gomes,2 Beatriz Gonçalves Ribeiro,2 Eliane de Abreu Soares11Nutrition Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University, Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Macaé Campus, Granja dos Cavaleiros, Macaé, BrazilAbstract: Eating disorders are serious mental diseases that frequently appear in female athletes. They are abnormal eating behaviors that can be diagnosed only by strict criteria. Disordered eating, although also characterized as abnormal eating behavior, does not include all the criteria for diagnosing eating disorders and is therefore a way to recognize the problem in its early stages. It is important to identify factors to avoid clinical progression in this high-risk population. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss critical information for the prevention of eating disorders in female athletes. This review discusses the major correlates for the development of an eating disorder. We also discuss which athletes are possibly at highest risk for eating disorders, including those from lean sports and female adolescent athletes. There is an urgent need for the demystification of myths surrounding body weight and performance in sports. This review includes studies that tested different prevention programs' effectiveness, and the majority showed positive results. Educational programs are the best method for primary prevention of eating disorders. For secondary prevention, early identification is essential and should be performed by preparticipation exams, the recognition of dietary markers, and the use of validated self-report questionnaires or clinical interviews. In addition, more randomized clinical trials are needed with athletes from multiple sports in order for the most reliable recommendations to be made and for some sporting regulations to be changed.Keywords: nutrition, disordered eating, sport, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa

  17. College Students' Judgment of Others Based on Described Eating Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Rebecca; Young, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: The literature available on attitudes toward eating patterns and people choosing various foods suggests the possible importance of "moral" judgments and desirable personality characteristics associated with the described eating patterns. Purpose: This study was designed to replicate and extend a 1993 study of college students'…

  18. German version of the intuitive eating scale: Psychometric evaluation and application to an eating disordered population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyck, Zoé; Herbert, Beate M; Happ, Christian; Kleveman, Gillian V; Vögele, Claus

    2016-10-01

    Intuitive eating has been described to represent an adaptive eating behaviour that is characterised by eating in response to physiological hunger and satiety cues, rather than situational and emotional stimuli. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2 (IES-2) has been developed to measure such attitudes and behaviours on four subscales: unconditional permission to eat (UPE), eating for physical rather than emotional reasons (EPR), reliance on internal hunger and satiety cues (RHSC), and body-food choice congruence (B-FCC). The present study aimed at validating the psychometric properties of the German translation of the IES-2 in a large German-speaking sample. A second objective was to assess levels of intuitive eating in participants with an eating disorder diagnosis (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder). The proposed factor structure of the IES-2 could be confirmed for the German translation of the questionnaire. The total score and most subscale scores were negatively related to eating disorder symptomatology, problems in appetite and emotional awareness, body dissatisfaction, and self-objectification. Women with eating disorders had significantly lower values on all IES-2 subscale scores and the total score than women without an eating disorder diagnosis. Women with a binge eating disorder (BED) diagnosis had higher scores on the UPE subscale compared to participants with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), and those diagnosed with AN had higher scores on the EPR subscale than individuals with BN or BED. We conclude that the German IES-2 constitutes a useful self-report instrument for the assessment of intuitive eating in German-speaking samples. Further studies are warranted to evaluate psychometric properties of the IES-2 in different samples, and to investigate its application in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Immersive Eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Dannie Michael; Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Bjørner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents a pilot study evaluating a simple approach allowing users to eat real food while exploring a virtual environment (VE) through a head-mounted display (HMD). Two cameras mounted on the HMD allowed for video-based stereoscopic see-through when the user’s head orientation pointed...

  20. Evaluation of disordered eating tendencies in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlier, Nevin; Navruz Varli, Semra; Macit, M Sedanur; Mortas, Hande; Tatar, Tugba

    2017-12-01

    It was aimed to determine the prevalence of high disordered eating tendencies and its relationship with food addiction, emotional eating and self esteem in participants at 18 and 33 years age group. This study was planned as a cross-sectional study and conducted with 1359 young adult volunteers (M = 386, F = 973) with an average age of 22.4 ± 2.84 years. Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), Emotional Appetite Questionnaire (EMAQ) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) were used. EAT-26 score above 20 was considered as eating disorders risk cutoff. Participants with disordered eating tendencies have higher rates (22.4%) of food addiction compared to participants without high disordered eating tendencies (7.2%). There is no difference for EMAQ and YFAS scores; however, there is a significant difference for RSES and EAT-26 scores according to gender. A positive association of EAT-26 with YFAS and EMAQ-negative scores and a negative association of EAT-26 with RSES and EMAQ-positive were found. There is association among EAT-26, YFAS, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Emotional Appetite Questionnaire scores. This study provides information for future studies about high disordered eating tendencies, food addiction and mood that are thought to be important in young adults. Level V (cross-sectional descriptive study).

  1. [Lack of assertiveness in patients with eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar A, Rosa; Manzo G, Rodrigo; Casanova Z, Dunny

    2006-03-01

    Low self-assertion has been noted as an important feature among patients with eating disorders. To verify, in a female population, if assertiveness is related or has a predictive capacity for the development of eating disorders. An structured clinical interview, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) and the Rathus Assertiveness Scale (RAS) were administered to 62 patients that fulfilled the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for eating disorders and to 120 female students without eating problems. Patients with eating disorders ranked significantly higher on the EAT-40 and its factors (p <0.001) and showed a lower level of assertiveness on the RAS (p <0.001). Assertiveness measured by RAS and its factors was inversely related to EAT-40 and its items (r= -0.21). The predictive capability of the lack of self-assertion in the development of an eating disorder reached 53%, when patients with eating disorders and subjects at risk were considered together and compared to students without such disorder. Lack of assertiveness is a significant trait in patients with eating disorders; it may worsen its outcome and even perpetuate symptoms. Low self-assertion may be considered a predictive factor in the development of an eating disorder and must be managed from a preventive or therapeutic point of view.

  2. Validation of the Swedish translation of eating assessment tool (S-EAT-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Riitta; Safa, Stephanie; Östberg, Per

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion The Swedish Eating Assessment Tool (S-EAT-10) is a reliable and valid self-administered tool in assessment of dysphagia in adult Swedish patients with high internal consistency, reliability, and discriminative validity. The normative data show that a score of 3 or more is abnormal. S-EAT-10 is recommended to be used in preliminary diagnostics of dysphagia. Objective To translate and adapt the EAT-10 for use in the Swedish patient population, and to present norms and measures of discriminative validity and reliability of a Swedish version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (S-EAT-10). Methods Prospective consecutive clinical study. In total, 134 community-dwelling adult respondents/controls without dysphagia completed the S-EAT-10, as did 119 patients referred for fiberendoscopic evaluation of swallowing at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Patient vs control status was used as the criterion for discriminative validity assessment by logistic regression analysis. Results The mean S-EAT-10 score was 0.2 (range = 0-3) for controls and 18 (range = 0-38) for patients. Based on a cut-off score of ≥ 3 which was considered to be reflective of abnormalities, sensitivity was 98.5% and specificity 94.1%. Internal consistency reliability was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88), as was test-re-test reliability (ICC = 0.90).

  3. Should different marketing communication strategies be used to promote healthy eating among male and female adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kara; Ng, Yu-Leung; Prendergast, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine how interpersonal norms, media norms, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy had an influence on healthy eating intention among adolescents. A probability sample of 544 adolescents aged 12 to 18 was conducted. Results indicated that girls had a more favorable attitude and intention toward healthy eating than boys. Healthy eating intention among boys was predicted by attitude, perceived behavioral control, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy, and among girls was predicted by perceived behavioral control and self-efficacy. Different marketing strategies to promote healthy eating among adolescent boys and girls should be adopted.

  4. Social and Cultural Factors Related to Eating Problems among Adolescents in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichstrom, Lars; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) to 11,315 Norwegian adolescents. Scores showed only minor variations according to social class and none according to urbanization and region. Adolescent girls involved in aesthetic sports dieted marginally more than other sporting girls. Non-Western immigrant adolescents had higher EAT scores as compared to…

  5. [Television and eating disorders. Study of adolescent eating behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, A P; Verticale, M S; Vallero, E; Bellone, S; Nespoli, L

    1997-06-01

    The media, mainly TV, play a significant social and cultural role and may affect the prevalence and incidence of eating disorders such as bulimia and anorexia nervosa. Their influence acts mainly by favoring a tall and thin body as the only fashionable for female adolescents: your social success depends primarily and totally by your physical appearance and you can, (and must), shape your body as you like better. Our research aims t analyze the attitude of adolescent people toward the TV and to investigate on: 1) time spent watching TV programs; 2) the influence of TV on the personal choices of goods to buy; 3) the ideal body images; 4) choice of TV programs. Sixty-seven healthy adolescents (36 F-31 M) were included in our study as controls together with 24 female adolescents with eating disorders (DCA) diagnosed according to the DSM-IV and EAT/26 criteria. Our results show a psychological dependence of DCA adolescents from the TV (longer period of time spent watching TV programs, buying attitudes more influenced by TV advertising). The thin and tall body image is preferred by the DCA girls as well as by the controls; however the body appearance and proportions have a predominant and utmost importance only for the eating disorder females. The masculine subjects instead have a preference for a female and masculine opulent body appearance. To prevent the observed increase in prevalence and incidence of eating disorders among adolescents, it is appropriate to control the messages, myths and false hood propagated by media, TV in particular.

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  7. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  8. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. ACOG. ...

  9. Eating Well While Eating Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a little planning, it's easy to eat healthy foods at the mall. Here are some choices: a single slice of veggie pizza grilled, not fried, sandwiches (for example, a grilled chicken breast sandwich) deli sandwiches on whole-grain bread a small hamburger a bean burrito a baked ...

  10. The relationship between psychological symptoms and frequency of eating disorders in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Çam, Hasan Hüseyin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses that are associated with significant physical complications. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of disordered eating attitudes and their relationship to psychological symptoms among adolescent students.  Methods: 338 high school students participated in this descriptive study. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire consisting of the Eating Attitude Test-26 (EAT˗26), the Duke Health Profile and...

  11. Eating disorders and spirituality in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lauren; Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Mechling, Brandy M; MacKain, Sally; Kim-Godwin, Yeounsoo; Leopard, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Associations were examined between eating disorder symptoms and spiritual well-being in a convenience sample of college students. Undergraduate nursing students at a university in a Mid-Atlantic coastal beach community were recruited for the study. A total of 115 students completed the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS); the Sick, Control, One Stone, Fat, Food (SCOFF) screening questionnaire; and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). Approximately one quarter of students had positive screens for an eating disorder, and 40% admitted to binging/purging. SWBS scores reflected low life satisfaction and a lack of clarity and purpose among students. A significant association was found between EAT-26 scores and SWBS Existential Well-Being (EWB) sub-scale scores (p = 0.014). SCOFF scores were significantly associated with SWBS EWB scores (p = 0.001). Symptoms of eating disorders were pervasive. Future research that assesses the impact of spiritual factors on eating disorders may help health care providers better understand the unique contributions to the development of eating disorders. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(1), 30-37.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Puberty and the manifestations of loss of control eating in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Anna; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Kelly, Nichole R; Hannallah, Louise M; Pickworth, C Katie; Grygorenko, Mariya V; Brady, Sheila M; Condarco, Tania A; Kozlosky, Merel; Demidowich, Andrew P; Yanovski, Susan Z; Shomaker, Lauren B; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the manifestations of pediatric loss of control (LOC) eating at different stages of pubertal development. Participants were a nonclinical sample of 468 youth (8-17 years). Physical examination determined pubertal stage. LOC eating and disordered eating attitudes were assessed with the Eating Disorder Examination. In a randomized crossover design, a subset (n = 244) ate ad libitum from two test meals designed to capture normal and LOC eating. There were no differences in the prevalence rates or frequency of reported LOC eating episodes across pubertal stages (ps ≥ 0.50). There were, however, puberty by LOC eating interactions in disordered eating attitudes and palatable food consumption (ps ≤ .05), even after adjusting for age and body composition. LOC eating was associated with elevated global disordered eating attitudes, weight concern, and shape concern in post-pubertal youth (ps ≤ .001), but not pre-pubertal youth (ps ≥ .49). In late-puberty, youth with LOC eating consumed less energy from protein (p weight and shape concerns and more obesogenic food consumption patterns. Interventions for LOC eating during pre-puberty should be evaluated to determine if they are particularly beneficial for the prevention of exacerbated eating disorder psychopathology and adverse weight outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Parental representation in eating disorder patients with suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, N; Kobayashi, J; Tachikawa, H; Sato, S; Hori, M; Suzuki, T; Shiraishi, H

    2000-08-01

    We examined parental, personality, and symptomatological characteristics in relation to suicide attempts among eating disorder patients. Fifty-one eating disorder inpatients, divided into two groups according to lifetime suicide attempts, and 107 non-psychiatric subjects were compared on the following variables: Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), Global Clinical Score (GCS), Eating Disorder Inventory-91 (EDI-91), Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT), clinical and personality characteristics, and family backgrounds. Suicidal patients reported significantly higher overprotection by both parents than non-suicidal patients and non-psychiatric subjects. Suicidal patients had a more prevalent history of child abuse, affective instability, unstable self-image, avoidance of abandonment, maladaptive perfectionism, personality disorder, and mood disorder. There were no differences in symptomatological factors or the severity of the eating disorders. The results suggest that high overprotection is associated with suicidal behaviour in eating disorder patients. The association between overprotective parenting and personality characteristics, and methods of suicide prevention are discussed briefly.

  14. Validation and reliability of the Italian EAT-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, A; Lazzari, R

    1998-12-01

    The Italian from of the short, 26-item Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) has been administered to 1277 Roman high-school students, mostly females, as a screening device. Ninety-five students with a total score > 20 and 40 students with a low score, were randomly selected, interviewed and diagnosed. The EAT-26 proved to be more sensitive to the presence of an eating disorder than to a specific clinical entity. Item analysis performed on the EAT-26 variables showed satisfactory reliability coefficients. Factor analysis using an oblique rotation was similar to that obtained by Garner et al. (1). Factor analysis with an orthogonal rotation (Cattell's screen test) identified five factors. Results suggested that the EAT-26 isolates cases at risk of clinical spectrum eating disorders.

  15. Eating disorders and eating pathology in young adult and adult patients with ESSENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Louise; Gillberg, Christopher; Råstam, Maria; Wentz, Elisabet

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and incidence of traditional eating disorders (EDs, e.g., anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (BED)) in individuals with childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of EDs and eating pathology in young adults and adults with ADHD and/or ASD, and to investigate the relationship between EDs and associated symptoms, on the one hand, and other psychiatric disorders, intelligence, and BMI, on the other hand, in this population. In an outpatient setting, 228 consecutively referred adults were neuropsychiatrically evaluated and assessed with regard to intelligence (WAIS-III), psychiatric comorbidities (SCID-I), personality disorders (SCID-II), eating disorders (SCID-I) and eating pathology (Eating Attitudes Test (EAT)). For the entire sample, a total of 18 individuals (7.9%) had a current or previous eating disorder, with AN and BED being the most frequent. The male:female ratio was 1:2.5. According to EAT, 10.1% of the individuals scored within the range of severely disturbed eating behavior, and 13% moderately disturbed eating behavior. Individuals with ADHD more often affirmed eating pathology such as focusing on thoughts of calories and body dissatisfaction compared to individuals with ASD. Eating disorder symptomatology seems to be overrepresented in adults with neuropsychiatric disorders compared with the general population. The gender ratio for EDs in adults with neuropsychiatric disorders is not nearly as skewed as in the general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Binge-Eating Disorder and Comorbid Conditions: Differential Diagnosis and Implications for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrome, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with symptoms of binge-eating disorder (BED) are not diagnosed. Perhaps the biggest obstacles are the failure of physicians to recognize BED as a distinct disorder and the lack of awareness among patients that binge-eating is a well-studied abnormal behavior that is amenable to treatment. In addition, patients may avoid seeking treatment because they feel a general sense of shame over their eating habits and do not want to bring up these symptoms during visits with their physicians. In general, negative attitudes and biases regarding overweight and obesity are common. The presence of medical and psychiatric comorbidities also contributes to the challenge of diagnosis, as many doctors focus on treating those comorbidities, thereby delaying treatment for the BED and leading to suboptimal care. Once BED is diagnosed along with any comorbid conditions, medications for the treatment of the comorbidities must be carefully considered so that BED symptoms are not exacerbated. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  17. Incidence of eating disorders in Navarra (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga-Ramos, Francisca; De Irala-Estévez, Jokin; Cano-Prous, Adrián; Gual-García, Pilar; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Cervera-Enguix, Salvador

    2005-03-01

    To estimate the overall annual incidence and age group distribution of eating disorders in a representative sample of adolescent female residents of Navarra, Spain. We studied a representative sample of 2734 adolescent Navarran females between 13 and 22 years of age who were free of any eating disorder at the start of our study. Eighteen months into the study, we visited the established centers and the eating attitudes test (EAT-40) and eating disorder inventory (EDI) Questionnaires were administered to the entire study population. We obtained a final response of 92%. All adolescents whose EAT score was over 21 points and a randomized sample of those who scored 21 or below, were interviewed. Any person meeting the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN) or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) was considered a case. We detected 90 new cases of eating disorders. Taking into consideration the randomly selected group whose EAT score was 21 points or below, we estimated the overall weighted incidence of eating disorders to be 4.8% (95% CI: 2.8-6.8), after 18 months of observation, in which EDNOS predominated with an incidence of 4.2% (95% CI: 2.0-6.3). The incidence of AN was 0.3% (95% CI: 0.2-0.5), while that of BN was also found to be 0.3% (95% CI: 0.2-0.5). The highest incidence was observed in the group of adolescents between 15 and 16 years of age. The overall incidence of ED in a cohort of 2509 adolescents after 18 months of follow-up was 4.8% (95% CI: 2.8-6.8), with EDNOS outweighing the other diagnoses. The majority of new cases of eating disorders were diagnosed between ages 15 and 16.

  18. Body satisfaction, emotional intelligence, and the development of disturbed eating: a survey of Taiwanese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yueching; Lin, Jing-Shan; Chang, Yu-Jhen

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between adolescents' emotional intelligence and the tendency to develop an eating disorder. Senior high school students in Taiwan were recruited for the study. A 3- part anonymous questionnaire measured demographic information, body weight satisfaction, and expectation of body weight. Students also completed the Adolescent Emotional Intelligence Scale and the Eating Disorders Attitude- 26 Test (EAT-26). Height and weight were also measured. The mean of EAT-26 score was 8.66 ± 7.36, and 8.6% students were at high risk to develop eating disorders. Gender, body weight, body dissatisfaction and the expected body shape were significantly related to disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours. Scores of EAT-26 were positively correlated with emotional perception, emotional expression, and emotional application. Disturbed eating behaviours exist among adolescents in Taiwan, and these behaviours may be related to emotional intelligence. However further studies with larger samples are needed.

  19. Validity and reliability of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belafsky, Peter C; Mouadeb, Debbie A; Rees, Catherine J; Pryor, Jan C; Postma, Gregory N; Allen, Jacqueline; Leonard, Rebecca J

    2008-12-01

    The Eating Assessment Tool is a self-administered, symptom-specific outcome instrument for dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10). The investigation consisted of 4 phases: 1) line-item generation, 2) line-item reduction and reliability, 3) normative data generation, and 4) validity analysis. All data were collected prospectively. Internal consistency was assessed with the Cronbach alpha. Test-retest reliability was evaluated with the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient. Normative data were obtained by administering the instrument to a community cohort of healthy volunteers. Validity was assessed by administering the instrument before and after dysphagia treatment and by evaluating survey differences between normal persons and those with known diagnoses. A total of 629 surveys were administered to 482 patients. The internal consistency (Cronbach alpha) of the final instrument was 0.960. The test-retest intra-item correlation coefficients ranged from 0.72 to 0.91. The mean (+/- SD) EAT-10 score of the normal cohort was 0.40 +/- 1.01. The mean EAT-10 score was 23.58 +/- 13.18 for patients with esophageal dysphagia, 23.10 +/- 12.22 for those with oropharyngeal dysphagia, 9.19 +/- 12.60 for those with voice disorders, 22.42 +/- 14.06 for those with head and neck cancer, and 11.71 +/- 9.61 for those with reflux. The patients with oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia and a history of head and neck cancer had a significantly higher EAT-10 score than did those with reflux or voice disorders (p EAT-10 score of the patients with dysphagia improved from 19.87 +/- 10.5 to 5.2 +/- 7.4 after treatment (p EAT-10 has displayed excellent internal consistency, test-retest reproducibility, and criterion-based validity. The normative data suggest that an EAT-10 score of 3 or higher is abnormal. The instrument may be utilized to document the initial dysphagia severity and monitor the

  20. Eating habits of students in the second and third years of elementary school in northeastern Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Orthaber, Mateja; Potočnik, Katja

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental elements of healthy eating for children and adolescents is a high-quality and varied diet that will help develop good habits for future life. Therefore, we presented some statistics on the eating habits of children and adolescents in elementary school and the organization of school meals in our country. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the basic characteristics of the eating habits of students. We included their opinions and attitudes toward eating at home and ...

  1. Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects mood and some compulsive behaviors, may also play a role in binge eating. In most cases, the unhealthy overeating habits that develop into binge eating start during childhood. These habits might be a result of eating ...

  2. Maternal effects on daughters' eating pathology and body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eric; Toray, Tamina; Wang, Mei Chuan; Valdez, Noreen N

    2008-01-01

    Effects of maternal eating behaviors and attitudes, maternal feedback to daughter about weight issues, mother-daughter relationship closeness, media influences, and mothers' perceptions of daughters shape on daughters' body image and eating pathology were examined using 91 pairs of mothers and college-aged daughters. Hierarchical multiple regressions using daughters' BMI as the first step were separately performed for daughters' body image and eating pathology. Variables predictive of daughters' body image included negative feedback from mother, mother's disapproval of daughter's figure, and mothers' eating behaviors and attitudes as perceived by daughters. A similar pattern was found for daughters' eating pathology scores with the addition of mothers' tendency to internalize media messages regarding thinness and beauty significantly adding to the prediction. Maternal influence through modeling may be best assessed by using the daughters' perceptions of their mothers because this corresponds to what the daughter was aware of in their mothers' eating attitudes and behaviors. Negative feedback from mothers about daughters' figures and eating patterns significantly increased daughters' difficulties in these areas. Mothers who showed a greater internalization of media messages about thinness were most likely to have daughters with eating pathologies.

  3. Penapisan Gejala Gangguan Makan Menggunakan EAT-26 pada Mahasiswi Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Sumatera Utara 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Hanisah Binti Haji Ishak

    2011-01-01

    Eating disorders are a group of conditions characterized by abnormal eating habit that may involve either insufficient of excessive food intake to the detriment of an individual’s physical and emotional health. The main objective of this study is to establish the screening results of eating disorder among female students in the Faculty of Medicine USU year 2010 using the standard EAT-26 questionnaire. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted throughout March 2010 till December 2...

  4. Survey on eating disorders related thoughts, behaviors and dietary intake in female junior high school students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mei-Rong; Chang, Yu-Jhen; Lien, Pei-Ju; Wong, Yueching

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate body weight satisfaction, eating attitudes and dietary intake related to eating disorders of female junior high school students in Taiwan. In a cross-sectional survey, 835 female junior high school students participated in this study. The questionnaire items included respondents' demographic information as well as weight and body image concerns. Developmental and attitudinal scales such as the body shape-related teasing scale, Pubertal Development Scale, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) and 24-hour dietary recall were also used to collect data. Data were analyzed using a Student's t test, chi-square test and logistic regression. Disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors were found in 10.4 % of participants (measured by EAT-26?20). The multivariate logistic regressions showed that disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors were associated with weight/shape-related teasing experiences and dissatisfaction with body weight. The reported intakes of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, cholesterol, zinc and vitamins B-6, B-12, were significantly lower in participants with disturbed eating patterns than in participants without disturbed eating. Conversely, participants with disturbed eating patterns had higher dietary and crude fiber intake than participates without disturbed eating. Disturbed eating behaviors exist among female adolescents in Taiwan, and these behaviors jeopardize their necessary dietary intake requirements. More research using the EAT-26 as a measure to predict the quality and quantity of food intake among female adolescents warrants further study.

  5. Influence of awareness of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top on eating behavior and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaizumi, Kanae; Harada, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Ai; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of awareness of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top on eating behavior and obesity in Japan. Participants were 1,558 Japanese male and female adults (40.2±12.2 years) who had been registered with a social research company. The cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted via the Internet in November 2007. Potential respondents were invited to complete the survey via e-mail, which contained a link to the survey Uniform Resource Locator (URL). The measures were awareness of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top, eating knowledge scores, eating attitude scores, and eating behaviors scores, according to the recommendations of the Health Japan 21 and the Food Balance Guide Spinning Top. Obesity was assessed by self-reported body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. The relationships between awareness of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top, eating knowledge scores, eating attitude scores, eating behavior scores, and obesity were analyzed using path analysis. Path analysis revealed that awareness of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top was associated with BMI and waist circumference via eating behavior scores. In addition, eating knowledge scores and eating attitude scores were mediators of the association between awareness of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top and eating behavior scores. These results suggest that promotion of the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top would be a useful strategy to encourage healthy eating and prevent obesity in the Japanese population.

  6. Disordered eating attitudes: demographic and clinico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) were administered to the participants. In addition, their blood pressure, height and weight were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Results: The study participants comprised of ...

  7. EAT skolemadsordning

    OpenAIRE

    Æbelø, Amanda; Bastholm, Amanda Mains; Buch, Mathilde Sophie; Asmussen, Søs Træger; Petersen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    The area of Health Promotion has been investigated numerous of times since the concept was introduced by WHO in the political area in 1948. Health Promotion has been used in many areas of social work ever since, and in Denmark the talk of Health Promotion has been a part of the political debate since 1984. This project brings into focus the EAT-program which is developed by the Copenhagen House of Food in collaboration with the Children and Youth Committee in Copenhagen. The background for th...

  8. Easily Eat

    OpenAIRE

    Manzanares Braza, Fabián

    2017-01-01

    Easily Eat es una aplicacion web, innovadora y característica por uno de sus peculiares accesos. Dicha aplicación, además de contar con un buscador de restaurantes, está pensada para aquellas personas que les gusta saber lo que van a comer. De esta manera, cualquier usuario de esta aplicación podrá ver con detalles el restaurante que desee, de los registrados en la aplicación, así como las diferentes cartas o menús que ofrecen y todos los detalles de sus platos. De esta manera, no puedes tene...

  9. Latent Profile Analysis to Determine the Typology of Disinhibited Eating Behaviors in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Anna; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Crosby, Ross D.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Field, Sara E.; Mooreville, Mira; Reina, Samantha A.; Kozlosky, Merel; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We used latent profile analysis (LPA) to classify children and adolescents into subtypes based on the overlap of disinhibited eating behaviors—eating in the absence of hunger, emotional eating, and subjective and objective binge eating. Method Participants were 411 youth (8–18y) from the community who reported on their disinhibited eating patterns. A subset (n=223) ate ad libitum from two test meals. Results LPA produced five subtypes that were most prominently distinguished by objective binge eating (OBE; n=53), subjective binge eating (SBE; n=59), emotional eating (EE; n=62), a mix of emotional eating and eating in the absence of hunger (EE-EAH; n=172), and no disinhibited eating (No-DE; n=64). Accounting for age, sex, race, BMI-z, the four disinhibited eating groups had more problem behaviors than no disinhibited eating (p=.001). OBE and SBE subtypes had greater BMI-z, percent fat mass, disordered eating attitudes, and trait anxiety than EE, EAH-EE, and No-DE subtypes (pseating concern (peating may be distinguished by psychological characteristics and objective eating behavior. Prospective data are required to determine whether subtypes predict the onset of eating disorders and obesity. PMID:23276121

  10. [Attitude change toward body image: the role of elaboration on attitude strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, Margarita; Briñol, Pablo; Horcajo, Javier

    2010-02-01

    Attitude change toward body image: The role of elaboration on attitude strength. Attitudes toward body image have been shown to play a central role in the understanding and treating of eating disorders. In the present research, participants' attitudes toward their body image were changed through a persuasive procedure involving high mental elaboration (self-persuasion) or through a less engaging procedure involving less active participation (passive exposure). As expected, participants in these two groups showed more favourable attitudes toward their bodies than those in the control group. Despite that both treatments were equally efficient in changing attitudes, the strength associated with those attitudes was significantly different depending on the amount of thinking involved in the process of change. Specifically, attitudes were stronger in the high rather than low thinking group of treatment. This finding is important because the strength of the attitude may determine the long-term consequences of an intervention.

  11. Academic examination stress increases disordered eating symptomatology in female university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costarelli, V; Patsai, A

    2012-09-01

    It is well documented that stress and anxiety can affect eating behaviour and food intake in humans. The purpose of the current study was to explore the possible effect of academic examination stress on disordered eating attitudes, emotional eating, restraint eating, body image, anxiety levels and self-esteem in a group of female university students. The interrelationships of the above parameters were also examined. Sixty Greek female university students, 18-25 years old, have been recruited and completed, on two separate occasions: a) during an examination stress period, and b) during a control period, the following questionnaires: the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Rosenberg Self- Esteem Scale, the Body Image Pictorial Instrument Scale (COLLINS) and a specially designed General Background Questionnaire. Subjects reported significantly higher levels of disordered eating attitudes (EAT-26, p=0.01), higher levels of anxiety (p=0.000) and lower levels of self-esteem (p=0.016) during the examination stress period compared to the control period. Disordered eating attitudes (EAT-26) were significantly positively correlated with emotional eating (p=0.04) and restrained eating (p=0.010) and negatively correlated with levels of self-esteem (p=0.05) and perceived desired body image (p=0.008) during the exam stress period. Finally, EAT-26 was significantly positively correlated with levels of anxiety in both study periods. Academic examination stress seems to increase disordered eating symptomatology in female university students and is associated with lower levels of self-esteem, an important finding which warrants further investigation.

  12. [Eating disorders and sexual function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravvariti, V; Gonidakis, Fr

    2016-01-01

    Women suffering from eating disorders, present considerable retardation and difficulties in their psychosexual development during adolescence. This leads to primary or secondary insufficiencies in their adult sexual life. The cause of these difficulties seems to be a series of biological, family and psychosocial factors. The majority of the research findings indicate that eating disorders have a negative impact on the patient's sexual function. The factors related to eating disorders symptomatology that influence sexuality are various and differ among each eating disorder diagnostic categories. Considering anorexia nervosa, it has been reported that women have negative attitudes to sexual issues and their body. Their sexual motivation increases when they engage in psychotherapy and their body weight is gradually restored. Starvation and its consequences on the human physiology and especially on the brain function seem to be the main factor that leads to reduced sexual desire and scarce sexual activity. Moreover, personality traits that are common in patients suffering from anorexia nervosa such as compulsivity and rigidity are also related with difficulties initiating and retaining romantic and sexual relationships. Usually patients suffering from anorexia nervosa report impaired sexual behavior and lack of interest to engage in a sexual relationship. Considering Bulimia Nervosa, impulsivity and difficulties in emotion regulation that are common features of the individuals that suffer from bulimia nervosa are also related to impulsive and sometimes self-harming sexual behaviors. Moreover women sufferers often report repulsion, anger and shame towards their body and weight, mainly due to the distorted perception that they are fat and ugly. It is interesting that a number of research findings indicate that although patients suffering from bulimia nervosa are more sexually active and have more sexual experiences than patients suffering from anorexia nervosa, both

  13. The relationship between psychological symptoms and frequency of eating disorders in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Çam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses that are associated with significant physical complications. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of disordered eating attitudes and their relationship to psychological symptoms among adolescent students.  Methods: 338 high school students participated in this descriptive study. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire consisting of the Eating Attitude Test-26 (EAT˗26, the Duke Health Profile and a socio-demographic questionnaire. An EAT-26 score of 20 or higher was defined as the presence of disordered eating attitudes. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 16.0, through the use of both descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The frequency of eating disorder attitudes was found to be 18.3% (7.1% among boys and 21.3% among girls. The  results indicate that there are statistically significant associations between the risk of developing eating disorders and age, gender and mental health. Conclusion: Eating disorders are becoming more prevalent amongst adolescents, particularly among females. As eating disorder are strongly associated with adolescent mental health, intervention programmes should be implemented, with a focus on adolescent developmental challenges and issues for both sexes, particularly in school education syllabi.Key words: Eating disorders, frequency, adolescents, psychological symptoms

  14. Body image dissatisfaction and eating symptoms in mothers of adolescents with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelo, A Weisz; de Chermont Prochnik Estima, C; Nakano, E Yoshio; Conti, M Aparecida; Cordás, T Athanássios

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess body dissatisfaction and eating symptoms in mothers of eating disorder (ED) female patients and to compare results with those of a control group. The case group consisted of 35 mothers of female adolescents (aged between 10 and 17 yrs) diagnosed with ED who attended the Interdisciplinary Project for Care, Teaching and Research on Eating Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence (PROTAD) at Clínicas Hospital Institute of Psychiatry of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School. Demographic and socioeconomic data were collected. Eating symptoms were assessed using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and body image was assessed by the Body Image Questionnaire (BSQ) and Stunkard Figure Rating Scale (FRS). The case group was compared to a control group consisting of 35 mothers of female adolescents (between 10 and 17 years) who attended a private school in the city of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. With regard to EAT, BSQ and FRS scores, we found no statistically significant differences between the two groups. However, we found a positive correlation between BMI and BSQ scores in the control group (but not in the case group) and a positive correlation between EAT and FRS scores in the case group (but not in the control group). It appears to be advantageous to assess body image by combining more than one scale to evaluate additional components of the construct.

  15. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  16. The assessment of the family of people with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, J; Sepulveda, A R; MacDonald, P; Whitaker, W; Lopez, C; Zabala, M; Kyriacou, O; Todd, G

    2008-07-01

    The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for eating disorders recommend that carers should be provided with information and support and that their needs should be considered if relevant. The aim of this paper is to describe how to structure an assessment of carers needs so that the family factors that can contribute to the maintenance of eating disorder symptoms are examined. We describe in detail the pattern of interpersonal reactions that can result when a family member has an eating disorder. Shared traits such as anxiety, compulsivity and abnormal eating behaviours contribute to some of the misperceptions, misunderstandings and confusion about the meaning of the eating disorder for family members. Unhelpful attributions can fuel a variety of emotional reactions (criticism, hostility, overprotection, guilt and shame). Gradually these forces cause family members to accommodate to the illness or be drawn in to enable some of the core symptoms. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. An examination of the relation of gender, mass media influence, and loneliness to disordered eating among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A; Pritchard, M E

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found that mass media influence and loneliness relate to disordered eating behaviors in women, but little is known about this relation in men. The present study examined the relations among disordered eating patterns, gender, mass media influence, and loneliness in male and female college students. Results of a stepwise regression revealed that disordered eating attitudes and behaviors (as measured by the Eating Attitudes Test-26) were predicted by mass media influence, gender, and loneliness, respectively. In the present study both male and female college students appear susceptible to developing disordered eating patterns. Clinicians may wish to address unrealistic comparisons to media and client interpersonal skills when designing treatment plans.

  18. The prevalence and predictors of disordered eating in women with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satherley, Rose-Marie; Howard, Ruth; Higgs, Suzanne

    2016-12-01

    The need for dietary management in coeliac disease may lead to the development of disordered eating. This study examined the prevalence of disordered eating and factors predicting disordered eating in women with coeliac disease, compared with other dietary-controlled conditions. A cross-sectional, online survey assessing psychological well-being, disordered eating behaviours (Eating Attitudes Test 26 (EAT-26); Binge Eating Scale (BES)) was distributed using online forums, to those with coeliac disease (N = 157), inflammatory bowel disease (N = 116), type two diabetes (N = 88) and healthy controls (N = 142). Hierarchical regressions were conducted to explore and compare the predictors of EAT-26 and BES scores across all groups. Within the coeliac disease group, a cluster analysis was conducted to examine types of disordered eating. Higher EAT-26 scores were found in those with coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease compared with healthy controls and type two diabetes; participants with a chronic health condition had higher BES than healthy control participants. The factors associated with EAT-26 scores differed across the dietary-controlled health conditions, with dietary management being important for those with coeliac disease. Psychological distress was associated with binge-eating behaviour across all groups. Cluster analyses found two types of disordered eating in coeliac disease; a binge eating type and a restrictive type. Disordered eating attitudes and behaviours are more prevalent in participants with chronic health conditions relative to healthy controls. The presence of binge eating behaviours in coeliac disease may be related to non-coeliac disease specific factors such as the distress associated with dietary-controlled illness. EAT-26 scores in coeliac disease are associated with disease specific factors, unique to following the gluten-free diet. These factors are important for identifying and supporting those with coeliac disease and

  19. Eating Disorders Among Female Students of Taif University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Azeem Taha, Azza Ali; Abu-Zaid, Hany Ahmed; El-Sayed Desouky, Dalia

    2018-03-01

    Eating disorders are a common health problem among adolescents, and females are especially vulnerable to them. There is lack of information on the prevalence of eating disorders in Saudi Arabia. The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence of eating disorders among female undergraduate university students in Taif city, Saudi Arabia. The study was undertaken in the female section at Taif university from November 1, 2016 to March 30, 2017. Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to determine the prevalence of eating disorders. The questionnaire was distributed among undergraduate students and their anthropometric measurements were assessed after obtaining their consent. The sample included 1200 university students with a median age of 21 years (range 17-33). Nonparametric tests were used to assess relationship between variables. Chi-squared test was used to compare items of the disordered eating attitudes and behaviors between positive and negative EAT respondents. Using the cutoff score of 20 on EAT-26 test, 35.4% of the students were classified at risk for eating disorders. Medical and obese students achieved the highest significant EAT scores. A high prevalence of eating disorders was found among females at Taif university, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Our findings call for prevention of these disorders and we recommend establishing a national screening program among Saudi university female students for early detection and management of these problems. © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  20. Eating disorders in Silesian schools - pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczegielniak, Anna; Pałka, Karol; Krysta, Krzysztof; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena

    2012-09-01

    Modern media have a huge impact on eating habits, which result in pathologies among young people, especially females. Fashion models have become a pattern for ordinary women, however the difference in a mean weight between these two groups is increasing. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between school students' results in EAT-26 self-report questionnaire and their daily diet behavior and to analyze the occurrence of eating disorders among students in schools of the region of Silesia in Poland. Our survey was based on the EAT-26 (Eating Attitude Test) and Behavioral Four Questions Test. 150 questionnaires were given to students of Secondary Schools, 116 were filled out correctly. The interviewed group consisted of 85 girls and 31 boys. Average age was 17.24±1.18. All of the data were analyzed statistically. Average BMI was 21,06; half of the recruited subjects had correct BMI whereas over 40% of them presented underweight. Within 116 responses from the EAT-26 nearly 93% belonged to the group with a small risk of the development of future eating disorders. Nevertheless, over 6% of the survey participants were in the group at high risk. In the Behavioral Four Questions Test 10% participants turned out to be in the compulsive overeating group, other ones in the group of a probable development of anorexia (7%) or bulimia nervosa (3%). There is a strong correlation between particular daily activities and the score achieved in EAT-26, however there is no significant correlation between the calculated BMI and EAT-26 results. Specific socio-cultural factors are faced by public services. They refer both to health promotion programs and the organization of spare time spent by teenagers outside schools.

  1. Plant abnormality diagnosis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Akira.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention diagnose an abnormal event occurred in a large-scaled plant, such as a nuclear power plant. The device comprises the following four functions. (1) Abnormality candidates are estimated based on an intelligence base storing characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and physical amounts of the plant components, and detected abnormality and measured values. Among the candidates, one which coincidents with the measured value such as an actual process amount is judged as a first cause. (2) In addition, a real time plant behavior is estimated based on parameters determining a plant operation mode. The candidate for the abnormality cause is estimated by the comparison between the result of the estimation and the measured value such as a process amount. (3) Characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and the physical amount of the plant components are structured stepwise thereby identifying the first abnormality cause. (4) Inactuated or failed portions of the components for restoring the abnormality to normal state are identified based on the intelligence base simultaneously with the estimation for the first abnormality cause. (I.S.)

  2. Interventions to promote healthy eating habits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traill, W. B.; Shankar, B.; Branbila-Macias, J.

    2010-01-01

    on healthy eating interventions in EU Member States and review existing information on the effectiveness of interventions using a three-stage procedure (i) Assessment of the intervention's impact on consumer attitudes, consumer behaviour and diets; (ii) The impact of the change in diets on obesity and health...... and economics disciplines. Particular attention will be paid to lessons that can be learned from private sector that are transferable to the healthy eating campaigns in the public sector. Through consumer surveys and workshops with other stakeholders, EATWELL will assess the acceptability of the range...

  3. Altered Eating Behaviors in Female Victims of Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Susan P Y; Chang, Judy C

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about altered eating behaviors that are associated with the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization. Our aim was to explore the experiences and perspectives of IPV victims regarding their eating behaviors and their attitudes toward and use of food. We conducted focus groups and individual interviews with 25 IPV victims identified at a domestic violence agency and asked them about their eating behaviors and how, if at all, these behaviors related to their experience of IPV. Qualitative analysis of the transcribed encounters identified themes explicating the relationship between their eating behaviors and experiences of IPV. All women described altered eating behaviors related to IPV that were categorized into several major themes: (a) somatization (victims experience significant somatic symptoms as a result of abuse); (b) avoiding abuse (victims modify their eating behaviors to avoid abuse); (c) coping (victims use food to handle the psychological effects of abuse); (d) self-harm (victims use food to hurt themselves as a reaction to the abuse); and (e) challenging abusive partners (victims use their eating behaviors to retaliate against their abusers). IPV can provoke altered eating behaviors in victims that may be harmful, comforting, or a source of strength in their abusive relationships. Understanding the complex relationship between IPV and victims' altered eating behaviors is important in promoting healthy eating among victims. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Determinants of healthy eating in children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer P; Evers, Susan; McKenna, Mary

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the state of knowledge and research gaps in the area of determinants of healthy eating among children and youth. The article is structured around individual and collective determinants that affect healthy eating in children and youth. We defined healthy eating as "eating practices and behaviours that are consistent with improving, maintaining and/or enhancing health." Relevant databases were searched for papers published between January 1992 and March 2003 that focussed on children or youth and reported at least one factor relevant to healthy eating. Among collective factors, familial factors and the nature of foods available in the physical environment, including at home, schools and in fast-food establishments, stand out as significant influences on healthy eating in children and youth. The media, particularly television, also have an enormous potential influence and can overshadow familial influences. Individual factors identified include knowledge, attitudes and food preferences; only the latter have been identified as a strong determinant of healthy eating in both children and adolescents. The results of the review identified a significant body of literature in the area of determinants of healthy eating in children and youth; however, very little of this research has taken place in Canada. Only a few determinants, such as economic factors and food security, the content of media nutritional messages, and the issue of flavours, neophobia and food preferences, have undergone some examination by Canadian researchers. Research priorities for Canada in the area of determinants of healthy eating and surveillance of eating behaviours are identified.

  5. The health-related quality of life in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padierna, A; Quintana, J M; Arostegui, I; Gonzalez, N; Horcajo, M J

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the perception of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in ambulatory patients with eating disorders in relation to the severity of eating symptomatology and psychological comorbidity. One hundred ninety-seven study patients were consecutively recruited at the Eating Disorders Outpatient Clinic. Short Form-36 items (SF-36), a generic HRQoL questionnaire, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) were used to measure different aspects of HRQoL. The results of the SF-36 were compared with the norms of the Spanish general population for women 18-34 years of age. Patients with eating disorders were more dysfunctional in all areas of the SF-36 compared with women in the general population. There were no differences among the eating disorder diagnostic groups. Higher scores on the EAT-40 and the HAD were associated with a perception of greater impairment on all SF-36 subscales. The evaluation of HRQoL in these patients confirms the impact of these disorders on daily life in areas not directly related to eating disorders. The SF-36 is useful for discriminating among different levels of severity of eating disorders and other psychological comorbidities of these patients.

  6. Impact of Disordered Eating and Psychological Functioning on Overweight Adolescents Participating in a Placebo-Controlled Medication and Behavioral Weight Loss Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-23

    report binge eating at either time. Findings from this trial indicated significant differences in weight loss based on binge eating over time...and/or current obesity, both binge eating and dieting, but not disturbed eating attitudes, predicted increased fat gain over a four year time period...subjective binge episodes (or LOC eating ), objective overeating (OO) without LOC, or no episode. OBEs are episodes involving reports of unambiguously large

  7. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  8. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  10. Vloga svetovalnega delavca pri prepoznavanju motenj hranjenja in preventivnem delovanju: The school counsellor's role in recognizing eating disorders and implementing preventive measures:

    OpenAIRE

    Berčnik, Sanja

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses eating disorders. Eating disorders are defined as a serious health threat due to an abnormal relation to food which has become a way of coping with stress. They are also often linked to personality disorders. We have focused mainly on the three most common types of eating disorder – anorexia, bulimia, and compulsive (binge) eating – their recognizable features, the causes that lead to eating disorders, and on preventive measures practiced in ...

  11. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  12. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  13. Binge Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Turan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Binge Eating Disorder, characterized by frequent and persistent overeating episodes that are accompanied by feeling of loss of control over eating without regular compensatory behaviors and was identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as a new eating disorder category. Binge Eating Disorder is the most common eating disorder among adults. Binge Eating Disorder is associated with significant morbidity, including medical complications related to obesity, eating disorder psychopathology, psychiatric comorbidity; reduced quality of life, and impaired social functioning. Current treatments of Binge Eating Disorder include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy and bariatric surgery. In this review, the definition, epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and also mainly treatment of Binge Eating Disorder are discussed.

  14. Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Judith M E; Wheat, Mary E; Freund, Karen

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe how primary care clinicians can detect an eating disorder and identify and manage the associated medical complications. DESIGN A review of literature from 1994 to 1999 identified by a medlinesearch on epidemiology, diagnosis, and therapy of eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Detection requires awareness of risk factors for, and symptoms and signs of, anorexia nervosa (e.g., participation in activities valuing thinness, family history of an eating disorder, amenorrhea, lanugo hair) and bulimia nervosa (e.g., unsuccessful attempts at weight loss, history of childhood sexual abuse, family history of depression, erosion of tooth enamel from vomiting, partoid gland swelling, and gastroesophageal reflux). Providers must also remain alert for disordered eating in female athletes (the female athlete triad) and disordered eating in diabetics. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary team including a primary care practitioner, nutritionist, and mental health professional. The role of the primary care practitioner is to help determine the need for hospitalization and to manage medical complications (e.g., arrhythmias, refeeding syndrome, osteoporosis, and electrolyte abnormalities such as hypokalemia). CONCLUSION Primary care providers have an important role in detecting and managing eating disorders. PMID:10940151

  15. The mass media exposure and disordered eating behaviours in Spanish secondary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, María; Lameiras, María; Sepulveda, Ana R; Rodríguez, Yolanda; Carrera, María V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between disordered eating behaviours/attitudes and mass media exposure in a cross-sectional national survey of 1165 Spanish secondary students (age between 14 and 16 years). A battery of questionnaires were used to investigate mass media influence, body dissatisfaction, physical appearance, sociocultural attitudes and self-esteem. Likewise, the EAT-26 questionnaire was used to assess disordered eating behaviours/attitudes, identifying that 6.6% (n = 32) of the male and 13.6% (n = 68) of the female students reached a cut-off point of 20 or above. The main finding was that female and male adolescents with disordered eating showed an increased exposure to TV and magazine sections related to body image, specifically regarding music video channels, in comparison with those without eating disordered, gender-matched counterparts. However, findings indicate that media exposure was different to some degree between males and females with disordered eating behaviour. Males with disordered eating behaviours and attitudes were associated with higher TV and magazine exposure to health sections and also greater body dissatisfaction, internalisation of the thin-ideal and social and appearance comparison. In females, disordered eating was associated with higher TV and magazine exposure to dieting, fashion and sport sections, greater body dissatisfaction, internalisation and awareness of the thin-ideal and lower self-esteem. Understanding the mechanism involved in the media exposure's influence on adolescents is critical in preventing disordered eating.

  16. Eating disorders in elite floorball : - A qualitative study of elite floorball coaches’ experience of eating disorders and what support they feel they need to help the players

    OpenAIRE

    Lindahl, Linn

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundFloorball is Sweden's third largest sport and in elite floorball eating disorders have increasingly been noted. This may partly depend on the attitudes and demands of coaches. Studies indicate that elite coaches lack the knowledge to manage an eating disorder. ObjectiveTo explore elite floorball coaches experience of eating disorders and what support they feel they need to help the players. MethodSemi-structured interviews were conducted with five elite floorball coaches. The recrui...

  17. Validez y utilidad diagnóstica de la escala Eating Attitudes Test-26 para la evaluación del riesgo de trastornos de la conducta alimentaria en población masculina de Medellín, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Constaín

    2017-04-01

    Conclusiones: El EAT-26 es un instrumento multidimensional con excelentes valores de confiabilidad, sensibilidad y especificidad, ideal para cribado de posibles TCA en población de riesgo, y podría ser de utilidad en atención primaria para la detección temprana en población masculina.

  18. Eating behavior and body image among psychology students Comportamento alimentar e imagem corporal entre estudantes de Psicologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Magalhães Bosi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize eating habits and possible risk factors associated with eating disorders among psychology students, a segment at risk for eating disorders. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study. The questionnaires Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ and a variety that considers related issues were applied. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 11.0 was utilized in analysis. The study population was composed of 175 female students, with a mean age of 21.2 (DP ± 3.6 years. RESULTS: A positive result was detected on the EAT-26 for 6.9% of the cases (CI95%: 3.6-11.7%. The prevalence of increased symptoms and intense gravity, according to the BITE questionnaire was 5% (CI95%: 2.4-9.5% and 2.5% (CI95%: 0.7-6.3%, respectively. According to the findings, 26.29% of the students presented abnormal eating behavior. The population with moderate/severe BSQ scores presented dissatisfaction with corporal weight. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that attention must be given to eating behavior risks within this group. A differentiated gaze is justified with respect to these future professionals, whose practice is jeopardized in cases in which they are themselves the bearers of installed symptoms or precursory behavior.OBJETIVO: Caracterizar práticas alimentares e possíveis fatores de risco associados a transtornos do comportamento alimentar entre estudantes de Psicologia, segmento de risco para o surgimento de transtornos alimentares. MÉTODO: Estudo seccional utilizando-se os questionários Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 e Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, utilizando-se, ainda, uma variável que considera os dois primeiros instrumentos associados, sendo a análise feita através do Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 11.0. Foram analisadas 175 estudantes do sexo feminino, com uma média de idade de 21,2 (DP ± 3

  19. Oral Manifestations of Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Neeta Misra; Anshul Mehra; Pradyuman Misra; Jaya Mehra

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorders are potentially life-threatening disorders. In this article, we discuss the oral manifestations of eating disorders so as to enable dental practitioners to recognize the effects of eating disorders and to manage the patients with eating disorders.

  20. Increased hunger and speed of eating in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyper, Arnold H; Kopfer, Kim; Huang, Wei-Min; Re'em, Yochai

    2014-05-01

    This quality improvement program examined self-reported hunger, over-eating, and eating speed in obese and normal-weight children and adolescents prior to an interventional component. Food frequency questionnaires were presented to 127 obese and 42 normal-weight patients, and perceived hunger, food intake and eating speed were rated. Obese patients reported significantly greater hunger than normal-weight patients (62.2% vs. 21.4%, pHunger and speed of eating were also highly associated (phunger and eating speed were highly prevalent in these obese pediatric patients and may reflect abnormalities of satiety and satiation.

  1. Disordered eating patterns in coeliac disease: a framework analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satherley, R-M; Higgs, S; Howard, R

    2017-12-01

    The need for dietary-management in coeliac disease may lead to the development of disordered eating patterns. A theoretical model of disordered eating has been proposed to explain disordered eating in coeliac disease. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of typical and disordered eating in coeliac disease to gain a greater understanding of these processes and explore specific pathways within this model. We interviewed 21 individuals with coeliac disease, recruited from a previous database, about their experiences with food and food environments. Information about disordered eating status was assessed via questionnaire. The interviews were analysed qualitatively using Framework analysis, which was underpinned by the theoretical model of disordered eating in coeliac disease. Experiences differed between participants scoring high on measures of disordered eating and those who scored low (typical eaters). Participants scoring high on measures of disordered eating were concerned about the consequences of their gluten-free diet on body image and they described eating patterns similar to binge/restrict cycles. Typical eaters reported being able to integrate their dietary self-management into their daily lives; however, general concerns around food and cross-contamination were associated with a restriction in food intake. Coeliac disease has a varied impact on eating patterns. The need to follow a gluten-free diet and to be vigilant around food has to be balanced with concerns around food availability and cross-contamination which have the potential to contribute towards disordered eating attitudes and behaviours. The findings suggest that the theoretical model of disordered eating provides an adequate explanation of disordered eating patterns in coeliac disease. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  2. Spanish high level handicapped sportsmen and eating disorders: are they at risk?.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Martín-Almena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating disorders have an important effect on health and sport performance. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether the sport practice acts as a risk factor or a protective factor for eating disorders. Aim: To examine the risk of eating disorders in Spanish disabled high level sportsmen and sportswomen. Methods: The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 was performed in 60 physical or visual disabled subjects who belonged to Paralympics or Promising youngster teams. Results: Low rates for eating disorders risk were found. Only one subject was considered at risk. Multiple regressions análisis performed with the complete sample revealed no associations between gender, type of handicap, and sport category and EAT-26. Conclusion: Controlling gender effect, visual impairment was related to EAT-26 score in women.

  3. Eating disorder risk and body dissatisfaction based on muscularity and body fat in male university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Carrie; George, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between risk of eating disorders, body dissatisfaction, and perceptual attractiveness in male university students. Research was conducted January-April 2012 and involved 339 male and 441 female students. Eating disorder risk was assessed with the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and body dissatisfaction and perceptual attractiveness determined with the Bodybuilder Image Grid (BIG). There was a positive correlation (r=.16, pEAT and fat dissatisfaction and a negative correlation (r=-.14, pEAT score indicating that they were at risk for an eating disorder. Males chose a significantly more muscular and leaner body type than what females chose to be attractive. College-aged males may be at risk for eating disorders based on distortions in their perceived ideal body image, both for fat and muscle.

  4. Promoting sustainable consumption and healthy eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Chen

    and food cultures. The questionnaire researched the attitude, policies and serving practices regarding promoting organic foods and healthy eating habits through school food service and classroom activities. The data illustrated that schools with organic supply or policies children tend to behave healthier...... to investigate the effectiveness of organic food intervention in school meals and nutritional curricular activities results in healthier eating behaviours among children. The research was conducted among school food coordinators (school staff in charge of the school food service) in the public primary......, and schools were also more likely to promote nutritional education and availability of healthy food items. The study among the school food coordinators document that schools have a huge potential to promote nutritional education, healthy eating patterns and sustainable consumption. However, some difficulties...

  5. Eating disorders in ballet dancing students: problems and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Josep; Guerrero, Marta; Sentis, Joan; Castro, Josefina; Puértolas, Carles

    2009-01-01

    To study the prevalence of symptoms of eating disorders and risk eating behaviours and the relationship between life at a dance school and the risk of developing an eating disorder (ED) in an adolescent population of Spanish dance students. Questionnaires were used to assess attitudes to eating, cultural influences on the body shape model, eating disorders (DSM-IV) and risk factors for eating disorders in 76 adolescent dance students (age 12-17 years) at the Barcelona Theatre Institute. Subjects were compared with a community sample of 453 female adolescents. To study the relationship between ED and characteristics of this particular school, an original questionnaire was administered to 105 students at the school aged from 12 to 21 years. The prevalence of eating disorders and several risk attitudes and behaviours were similar in the dance students and the female adolescents from the general population. Students at risk of eating disorders perceived greater pressure from coaches concerning eating, appearance, weight and artistic performance; they felt less satisfied with their weight and weighed themselves more often; they avoided performing so as not to exhibit their body in public, disliked comparing their body with their peers and believed that audiences paid a great deal of attention to their bodies. In contrast, Body Mass Index (BMI) had hardly any influence on these experiences. Depressive symptoms were associated almost exclusively with experience of stressors and aversive situations. Dance school students do not necessarily present a greater risk of ED than other girls of the same age. The risk of ED may be associated with greater pressure from coaches, with attitudes related to the ED itself, or with depressive symptoms, rather than with the BMI.

  6. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on ... when you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or ...

  7. Eating right during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenatal care - eating right ... is hard work for a woman's body. Eating right is one of the best things you can ... a well-rounded diet with all of the right nutrients and getting at least 30 minutes of ...

  8. Males and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys and ...

  9. DASH Eating Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sodium Americans eat comes from processed and prepared foods, such as breads, cold cuts, pizza, poultry, soups, sandwiches and burgers, cheese, pasta and meat dishes, and salty snacks. Therefore, healthier choices when shopping and eating out are particularly important. ...

  10. The evolving genetic foundations of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, K L; Kaye, W H; Strober, M

    2001-06-01

    Data described earlier are clear in establishing a role for genes in the development of eating abnormalities. Estimates from the most rigorous studies suggest that more than 50% of the variance in eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors can be accounted for by genetic effects. These high estimates indicate a need for studies identifying the specific genes contributing to this large proportion of variance. Twin and family studies suggest that several heritable characteristics that are commonly comorbid with AN and BN may share genetic transmission with these disorders, including anxiety disorders or traits, body weight, and possibly major depression. Moreover, some developmental research suggests that the genes involved in ovarian hormones or the genes that these steroids affect also may be genetically linked to eating abnormalities. Molecular genetic research of these disorders is in its infant stages. However, promising areas for future research have already been identified (e.g., 5-HT2A receptor gene, UCP-2/UCP-3 gene, and estrogen receptor beta gene), and several large-scale linkage and association studies are underway. These studies likely will provide invaluable information regarding the appropriate phenotypes to be included in genetic studies and the genes with the most influence on the development of these disorders.

  11. EATING DISORDERS IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, T.N.; Suresh, T.R.; Jayaram, Vasantha; Fernandez, M. Peter

    1995-01-01

    Data on the nature and extent of major eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia is lacking in non-white, native populations of the developing world, leaving a gap in understanding the determinants of these disorders. In a study on 210 medical students examined by a two-stage survey method, 31 subjects were found to have distress relating to their eating habits and body size not amounting to criterion-based diagnosis of eating disorders. The characteristics of this eating distress syndro...

  12. Negative emotion and disordered eating among obese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, Jeanne L; Yates, Alayne; Aruguete, Mara S; DeBord, Kurt A

    2005-12-01

    The present study examined the relationship between negative emotions, body dissatisfaction, exercise, and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors among obese college students. It also examined whether there were gender differences in these variables. A total of 88 males and 102 females, who reported a BMI score above 30, completed a survey. Females reported higher levels of disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, and more frequent dieting than males and as predicted, males reported higher levels of exercise behaviors. Body dissatisfaction, anger discomfort, and self dissatisfaction all correlated with drive for thinness for both genders. Anger discomfort was the only variable to predict disordered eating for both genders. The results support numerous studies that have found that females are at greater risk of disordered eating than males, and also suggest that anger management may be an important component in treatment of disordered eating among obese young adults.

  13. Eating disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, A; Catino, M; De Luca, F A; Morgese, G; Chiarelli, F

    1999-06-01

    Although the causes of eating disorders remain unclear, epidemiological evidence suggests that peripubertal changes in body shape and weight predispose young women to develop unhealthy eating attitudes. A psychiatric diagnosis of an eating disorder can be made in up to 10% of young women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes). Eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, pose a particularly serious risk to health in young diabetic people. Several features associated with type 1 diabetes and its treatment, such as weight gain, dietary restraint and food preoccupation, may predispose young diabetic women to develop a clinical or subclinical eating disorder. The coexistence of these conditions could lead to poor metabolic control and an increased risk of microvascular complications.

  14. Eating epilepsy: clinical and neuro image aspects - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchpiguel, Carlos A.; Yacubian, Elza Marcia T.; Fiore, Lia Arno; Jorge, Carmen Lisa; Yamaga, Liliam I.; Watanabe, Tomoco; Bacheschi, Luis A.; Scaff, Milberto; Magalhaes, Alvaro E.A.

    1994-01-01

    Eating epilepsy is an uncommon form of reflex epilepsy. The authors present a case report of a patient with clinical diagnosis of eating epilepsy who was submitted to clinical tests, neuroimaging studies (MRI and SPECT) and surface EEG. Multiple intercritical EEGs showed sharp discharges in the posterior left temporal area. The MRI did not show any abnormality. The intercritical brain SPECT showed clear hypoperfusion in the posterior left temporal area; so confirming the epileptogenic focus in producing the partial complex seizures triggered by eating. (author)

  15. Eating Healthy for Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    You are what you eat—and so is your baby. In addition to being smokefree, eating well during pregnancy is one of the best and most important things you can do for yourself and your baby. But healthy “eating for two” is more than just eating more.

  16. Emotional Eating Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, T. van; Gibson, E.L.; Wade, T.

    2017-01-01

    The Emotional Eating Scale (EES) was constructed to allow a detailed analysis of the relationship between negative mood and disordered eating in obese people with binge eating disorder (Arnow et al. 1995). The questionnaire was published in the appendix of the 1995 publication in the journal

  17. Eating Disorders Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us in our mission. F.E.A.S.T.'s Eating Disorders Glossary Welcome to our comprehensive quick-reference eating ... Conversion Weight Manipulation Weight restoration, weight restored Zinc Eating disorders biology & pharmacology Antidepressants BDNF - brain-derived neurotophic factor ...

  18. Kids and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Kids and Eating Disorders KidsHealth / For Kids / Kids and Eating Disorders What's ... and pee) withdrawing from social activities What Causes Eating Disorders? There really is no single cause for an ...

  19. A Web nursing intervention to prevent Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Quirós Abajo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating Disorders are an important health problem of our society because of their rising incidence in the last years, as well as their high cost in terms of Public Health. Nowadays the best option to face this problem is through prevention. The objective of the present work is to evaluate if a Web nursing intervention based on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy can prevent Eating Disorders by reducing risk factors in 15 to 18 years old women.Methodology: It is a randomized clinical trial in which the experimental group will receive the Web nursing intervention and the control group will not receive any kind of preventive intervention related to Eating Disorders. The study will be developed in six Secondary Education Institutes of the areas 9 and 10 of Madrid Community. Women at risk will be selected by the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ. Risk factors such as body image dissatisfaction, eating and depressive symptoms will be evaluated. Measurements will be, besides BSQ, the Body Attitudes Test (BAT, the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.

  20. An exploratory survey of eating behaviour patterns in adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, A; Battini, V; Chiorri, C; Masini, B

    2010-12-01

    Empirical research has always treated adolescents' eating habits from a variable-centered perspective, but this approach may miss the configurations of eating behaviours that uniquely describe discrete groups of individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate prototypical patterns of eating habits in a large sample of Italian adolescents and their behavioural and psychological correlates. Data were gathered from 1388 students (F=60%, mean age 14.90±1.34 yrs), who were asked to fill in an original questionnaire surveying dietary habits, body weight attitudes, body image, sport activities and sources of information about food. Perfectionism, self-esteem, self-efficacy and care for food were also assessed as well-known psychological risk factors for Eating Disorders. Five prototypical eating behaviour patterns were identified through cluster analysis. Cluster membership was associated (pgender, age and age- and gender-correct BMI percentile, perceived relevance of physical appearance in achieving success in life; one's weight and body image evaluation, dieting, physical activity, self-efficacy, self-esteem and care for food. Clusters did not differ in perfectionism score and in frequency of consulting different sources of information about food and weight, except in the case of dieticians. The identification of prototypical eating habits patterns revealed a large range of wrong eating attitudes and behaviours among Italian adolescents. Such data suggest the need to develop and implement adequate prevention programs.

  1. Eating-related environmental factors in underweight eating disorders and obesity: are there common vulnerabilities during childhood and early adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, I; Villarejo, C; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Perpiñá, C; Vilarrasa, N; Granero, R; Cebolla, A; Botella, C; Montserrat-Gil de Bernabe, M; Penelo, E; Casella, S; Islam, M A; Orekhova, E; Casanueva, F F; Karwautz, A; Menchón, J M; Treasure, J; Fernández-Aranda, F

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there is an association between individual, social and family influences and dysfunctional eating patterns early in life and the likelihood of developing a subsequent underweight eating disorder (ED) or obesity. The total sample comprised 152 individuals (underweight ED, n = 45; obese patients, n = 65; healthy controls; n = 42) from Barcelona, Spain. The Cross-Cultural Questionnaire (CCQ) was used to assess early eating influences as well as individual and family eating patterns and attitudes towards food. Even though a few shared eating influences emerged for both groups, unique factors were also observed. Whereas relationship with friends, teasing about eating habits by family members and the mass media were of specific relevance to the underweight ED group, the patient's own physical appearance, body dissatisfaction, teasing about eating habits by friends, teasing about body shape by family members and dysfunctional eating patterns were unique to obesity. Overlapping environmental risk factors provide evidence for integral prevention and intervention approaches that simultaneously tackle a range of weight-related problems. The unique factors might be important for targeting high-risk individuals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  2. Belief and behavior aspects of the EAT-26: The case of schoolgirls in Belize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Fye, Eileen P; Lin, Jielu

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates components of eating attitudes in a sample of Belizean schoolgirls and argues for separate analysis of eating beliefs and eating behaviors using the EAT-26 in populations undergoing rapid cultural change. The EAT-26 was utilized in a novel manner, preserving the ethnographic and empirical distinction between belief and behavior components of eating attitudes. Participants included a sample of secondary schoolgirls (n = 80) undergoing acculturative stress. Participants reported more disordered eating beliefs than behaviors. Respondents having higher belief scores than behavior scores were more likely to prefer thinner body build and to be concerned about boys' assessments of their bodies. Girls with higher behavior scores were less likely to report eating when hungry and stopping when full. In conclusion, discriminant validity was found between attitudinal and behavioral aspects of the EAT-26 as evidenced by face validity and patterns in predicting body image preference and desired weight change. Such a distinction has implications for assessing risk for disordered eating among populations undergoing acculturative stress. Among such populations, while behavioral symptoms might be absent or present in subclinical levels, disordered beliefs associated with psychological distress or potential precursors to eating-disordered behavior might be detected and should be investigated further.

  3. Eating Expectancies in Relation to Eating Disorder Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Keatts, Dara A; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the relation between eating expectancies, assessed via the Eating Expectancy Inventory, and eating disorder recovery. Individuals formerly seen for an eating disorder were categorized as having an active eating disorder ( n = 53), as partially recovered ( n = 15), or as fully recovered ( n = 20). The expectancies of these groups were compared to each other and to 67 non-eating disorder controls. Results revealed that three of the five eating expectancies differed across groups. Non-eating disorder controls and fully recovered individuals endorsed similar levels of the expectancies that eating helps manage negative affect, eating is pleasurable and useful as a reward, and eating leads to feeling out of control. Partially recovered individuals looked more similar to active eating disorder cases on these expectancies. The other two expectancies did not differ across groups. Results provide some indication that certain eating expectancies may be associated with eating disorder recovery.

  4. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...

  5. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism. Farida El-Baz a. , Mohamed Saad Zaghloul a. , Ezzat El Sobky a. ,. Reham M Elhossiny a,. *, Heba Salah a. , Neveen Ezy Abdelaziz b a Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt b Children with Special ...

  7. Examining women's perceptions of their mother's and romantic partner's interpersonal styles for a better understanding of their eating regulation and intuitive eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Noémie; Carbonneau, Elise; Cantin, Mélynda; Gagnon-Girouard, Marie-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Intuitive eating is a positive approach to weight and eating management characterized by a strong reliance on internal physiological hunger and satiety cues rather than emotional and external cues (e.g., Tylka, 2006). Using a Self-Determination Theory framework (Deci & Ryan, 1985), the main purpose of this research was to examine the role played by both the mother and the romantic partner in predicting women's intuitive eating. Participants were 272 women (mean age: 29.9 years) currently involved in a heterosexual romantic relationship. Mothers and romantic partners were both found to have a role to play in predicting women's intuitive eating via their influence on women's motivation for regulating eating behaviors. Specifically, both the mother's and partner's controlling styles were found to predict women's controlled eating regulation, which was negatively related to their intuitive eating. In addition, autonomy support from the partner (but not from the mother) was found to positively predict intuitive eating, and this relationship was mediated by women's more autonomous regulation toward eating. These results were uncovered while controlling for women's body mass index, which is likely to affect women's eating attitudes and behaviors. Overall, these results attest to the importance of considering women's social environment (i.e., mother and romantic partner) for a better understanding of their eating regulation and ability to eat intuitively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Eating disorders in young adults with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: a controlled study.

    OpenAIRE

    Fairburn, C G; Peveler, R C; Davies, B; Mann, J I; Mayou, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the prevalence of clinical eating disorders and lesser degrees of disturbed eating in young adults with insulin dependent diabetes and a matched sample of non-diabetic female controls. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey of eating habits and attitudes in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. SETTING--Outpatient clinic catering for young adults with diabetes; community sample of non-diabetic women drawn from the lists of two general practices. SUBJECTS--100 patients with insul...

  9. Service-Learning in Higher Education: Focus on Eating Disorder Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roofe, Nina; Brinegar, Jennifer; Seymour, Gayle

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary service-learning projects are mutually beneficial for communities and students. This service-learning project focused on eating disorder prevention and involved students majoring in nutrition, art, and psychology at a public Southern university. The nutrition majors completed the Eating Attitudes Test before and after the…

  10. The Healthy Eating Handbook for Yukon First Nations. Occasional Publication No. 39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardelli, Vanessa M.; Wein, Eleanor E.

    The purpose of this handbook is to develop positive attitudes and skills toward healthy eating and healthy lifestyles among Yukon First Nations people. The introduction describes traditional food sources of the Yukon and how Native peoples met their nutritional needs by eating a variety of wild animal, fish, and plant foods. However, current…

  11. Screening high school students for eating disorders: results of a national initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn; Ziyadeh, Najat J; Forman, Sara; Prokop, Lisa A; Keliher, Anne; Jacobs, Douglas

    2008-10-01

    Early identification and treatment of disordered eating and weight control behaviors may prevent progression and reduce the risk of chronic health consequences. The National Eating Disorders Screening Program coordinated the first-ever nationwide eating disorders screening initiative for high schools in the United States in 2000. Students completed a self-report screening questionnaire that included the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and items on vomiting or exercising to control weight, binge eating, and history of treatment for eating disorders. Multivariate regression analyses examined sex and racial/ethnic differences. Almost 15% of girls and 4% of boys scored at or above the threshold of 20 on the EAT-26, which indicated a possible eating disorder. Among girls, we observed few significant differences between ethnic groups in eating disorder symptoms, whereas among boys, more African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latino boys reported symptoms than did white boys. Overall, 25% of girls and 11% of boys reported disordered eating and weight control symptoms severe enough to warrant clinical evaluation. Of these symptomatic students, few reported that they had ever received treatment. Population screening for eating disorders in high schools may identify at-risk students who would benefit from early intervention, which could prevent acute and long-term complications of disordered eating and weight control behaviors.

  12. Assessment of the menstrual cycle, eating disorders and self-esteem of Polish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Bąk-Sosnowska, Monika; Sajdak, Dominika; Białka, Agnieszka; Kobiołka, Agnieszka; Franik, Grzegorz; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2017-03-01

    Eating disorders are an important factor in menstrual cycle disorders in girls. Moreover, low self-esteem among adolescent girls may be a risk factor for eating disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the menstrual cycle, eating habits and self-esteem of Polish adolescents. The study was conducted from January 2014 to March 2015 and included 623 girls, aged 15-19, from randomly selected junior high schools in Silesia, Poland, in which their menstrual cycle, risk of eating disorders and self-esteem were evaluated. A five-part questionnaire was used to assess basic demographic data, lifestyle and physical activity, gynecological history, as well as Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES) and Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26). Irregular menstrual cycles were observed in 236 (37.88%) girls; 5.20% presented secondary amenorrhea. Based on the EAT-26 test, 101 (16.21%) girls were indicated being at risk for an eating disorder. Low self-esteem was observed in 340 (54.57%) study girls on the base of SES. Girls with irregular menses had higher scores on the EAT-26 test in subscales: EAT-overall score, EAT-diet and EAT-bulimia, while lower scores on the SES. In our study, we did not observe a significant relationship between exercise intensity, body mass, BMI and menstrual cycle regularity. Low self-esteem among adolescent girls may be a risk factor for eating disorders which could interrupt the menstrual cycle.

  13. Exploring Familial Themes in Malaysian Students’ Eating Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Car Mun Kok

    2013-01-01

    Food-related attitudes and habits are integral to overall well-being, especially among international college students who often practice poor eating habits and experience high levels of stress from factors like school and sociocultural adjustment. Utilizing in-depth interviews, this study explored how family experiences impact food-related habits, attitudes, and beliefs of Malaysian college students in the U.S. Findings indicate that early experiences with family substantially impact current ...

  14. Eating Disorders in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to International Classification of Diseases by World Health Organization, eating disorders are behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances [1]. Eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, atypical anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, atypical bulimia nervosa, overeating associated with other psychological disturbances and vomiting associated with other psychological disturbances [1]. Maladaptive eating pattern and inadequate physical activity are seen in adolescents with eating disorders and obesity [2]. Those with comorbid eating disorder and obesity have a poorer prognosis and are at higher risk for future medical problems.

  15. Epidemiology of eating disorders in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Burns, Jonathan K; Hoek, Hans W

    2016-11-01

    This is the first review of studies on the epidemiology of eating disorders on the African continent. The majority of articles found through our search did not assess formal diagnoses, but only screened for eating attitudes and behaviors. Only four studies - including only one recent study - provided specific epidemiological data on anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and/or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). No cases of anorexia nervosa according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria were found among a total of 1476 (young) females. The combined point-prevalence rate of bulimia nervosa is 0.87% (95% CI 0.22-1.51) and of EDNOS is 4.45% (95% CI 2.74-6.16) in young women in Africa. The epidemiological study of eating disorders in Africa is still in its infancy. Over time in total four studies providing epidemiological data on specific, formally assessed eating disorders were found. No cases of anorexia nervosa were reported in African epidemiological studies, which concurs with the very low prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa in Latin Americans and in African Americans in the USA. With the DSM-5 criteria for anorexia nervosa, some women in the African studies would have fulfilled the criteria for anorexia nervosa. The prevalence rate of bulimia nervosa in women in Africa is within the range reported for western populations, as well as African Americans and Latin Americans.

  16. Detection of radiation-induced genetic damage using sperm abnormality assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazume, Masayuki; Okamoto, Masanori; Nakai, Sayaka

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative experiment on radiation-induced sperm abnormalities was made with mice, golden hamsters, and crab-eating monkeys. Sperm sites showing morphological abnormalities following irradiation were divided into head, neck, head plus neck, and others (including middle piece and tail). Local x-ray irradiation (200 KVp at a rate of 30 rad min) to the testes was undertaken in mice and golden hamsters, and local gamma-ray irradiation ( 137 Cs at a rate of 30 rad min) to the testes were undertaken in crab-eating monkeys. The head and neck were sensitive to radiation, showing morphological abnormalities. The number of abnormal sperms reached the peak at 5 - 6 wk after irradiation in mice and golden hamsters; at 6 wk with 300 rad and at 8 wk with 100 and 200 rad in crab-eating monkeys. Doubling doses for sperm abnormalities were 30 rad in mice and approximately 50 rad in golden hamsters. The dose-response curves on sperm abnormalities in crab-eating monkeys approximated to those in golden hamsters. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Radiology of eating disorders: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, David J; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Scoffings, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders are a major challenge for health professionals, with many patients receiving ineffective care due to underdiagnosis or poor compliance with treatment. The incidence of eating disorders is increasing worldwide, producing an increasing burden on healthcare systems, and they most often affect young patients, with significant long-term complications. The effects of long-term malnutrition manifest in almost every organ system, and many can be detected radiologically, even without overt clinical findings. Musculoskeletal complications including osteoporosis result in a high incidence of insufficiency fractures, with long-term implications for bone health and growth, while respiratory complications are often recognized late due to disordered physiologic responses to infection. Gastrointestinal complications are numerous and in extreme cases may result in fatal outcomes after acute gastric dilatation and rupture subsequent to binge eating. In patients with severely disordered eating, in particular anorexia nervosa, marked derangement of electrolyte levels may result in refeeding syndrome, which requires emergent management. Recognition of such complications is critical to effective patient care and requires radiologists to be aware of the spectrum of imaging abnormalities that may be seen. Since many patients are reluctant to disclose their underlying condition, radiologists also play a critical role in identifying previously undiagnosed eating disorders. ©RSNA, 2013.

  18. Disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and mood state in female adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Sousa FORTES

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, mood, and disordered eating in female adolescents. Methods Three hundred and seventy one adolescents aged between 12 and 16 years of age participated in this research. The Body Shape Questionnaire, Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Brunel Mood Scale, and the Eating Attitudes Test - 26 were used to assess, respectively, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, mood state, and disordered eating. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to determine the relationship between the independent variables and the Eating Attitudes Test subscale scores. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to compare the Eating Attitudes Test subscale scores according to body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and mood state classifications. Results The findings showed that body dissatisfaction (p=0.001, perfectionism (p=0.04, and mood state (p=0.05 were associated with disordered eating in the female adolescents evaluated. Despite the statistically significant results obtained for all independent variables, it is worth mentioning that body dissatisfaction was the main determinant of disordered eating in the multiple regression model. Conclusion It can be concluded that body dissatisfaction explains the variance in disordered eating; however, it is also important to note that perfectionism and mood state are also associated to the disordered eating in female adolescents, although to a lesser extent.

  19. A preliminary examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherne, Camden E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M; Shank, Lisa M; Schvey, Natasha A; Brady, Sheila M; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6-12years with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29years±1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8% White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n=19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n=33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n=199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p=0.001) and adiposity (p=0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (pdisordered eating attitudes (p=0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (pdisordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A Preliminary Examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherne, Camden E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M.; Shank, Lisa M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6–12y with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29y ± 1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8 % White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n = 19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n = 33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n = 199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p = 0.001) and adiposity (p = 0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p disordered eating attitudes (p = 0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  1. Eating and health behaviors in vegans compared to omnivores: Dispelling common myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Sydney; Coffino, Jaime A; Hormes, Julia M

    2017-11-01

    Studies comparing eating behaviors in individuals avoiding meat and other animal products to omnivores have produced largely inconclusive findings, in part due to a failure to obtain sufficiently large samples of vegan participants to make meaningful comparisons. This study examined eating and health behaviors in a large community sample of dietary vegans ("vegans"), compared to omnivores. Participants (n = 578, 80.4% female) completed an online questionnaire assessing a range of eating- and other health-related attitudes and behaviors. Vegans (62.0%, n = 358) and omnivores (38.1%, n = 220) were comparable in terms of demographics. Vegans scored significantly lower than omnivores the Eating Disorder Examination - Questionnaire (multivariate p eating behavior. They also were more likely to consider themselves "healthy" (p eating styles, body mass index, smoking or exercise behaviors, or problems related to alcohol consumption. Effect sizes for comparisons on eating-related measures were generally small, with η p 2 ranging from effects for comparisons on measures of other health behaviors ranged from small to medium (Φ = 0.09 to 0.33 and η p 2 eating attitudes and behaviors, and when they do, differences indicate slightly healthier attitudes and behaviors towards food. Similarly, vegans closely resembled omnivores in non-eating related health behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Re-embodying Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2014-01-01

    Health experts advise and expect patients to eat healthily after bariatric surgery. For patients, difficulties with eating might have been a long-standing, problematic part of life—a part that is not necessarily healed by surgery. Empirical research on patients’ experiences of eating practices after bariatric surgery is lacking. Aiming to contribute to the development of clinical practice, we explored meanings attached to eating in the long term and sought descriptions of change and bodily sensations. We interviewed 14 patients at least 5 years after bariatric surgery. The surgical restriction forced changes in the way patients sensed their own body in eating, but the uncertainty related to maintaining weight loss in the long term remained. Meanings attached to eating transcended food as choices situated in a nourishment and health perspective, and were not necessarily changed. Eating was an existential and embodied practice, which remained an ambiguous and sensitive matter after surgery. PMID:25156217

  3. Personality and coping in patients with eating disorders and obesity / Personalidade e coping em pacientes com transtornos alimentares e obesidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tomaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the differential use of coping and personality trait of patients with eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, and Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified - EDNOS, obesity as well as in subjects from the general population. 109 subjects participated in the study (60 with eating disorder or obesity diagnostics; 49 from the general population. The instruments were Personality Trait Scale, Coping Response Inventory and Eating Attitudes Scale (EAS. It was observed significant differences on EAS according to the type of population, demonstrating this instrument's adequacy as psychopathological screening for eating disorders. Moreover, individuals presenting high neuroticism and who discharge their emotion to cope with their problems have more inadequate eating attitudes as shown by EAS (R=0.291, p=0.011. These results are discussed through theories related to the Big Five personality traits, coping, eating disorders and obesity.

  4. Preferred descriptions for loss of control while eating and weight among patients with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Christina A; Galbraith, Katharine; Lydecker, Janet A; Ivezaj, Valentina; Barnes, Rachel D; White, Marney A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-12-30

    Patients with binge eating disorder (BED) typically also have excess weight, making them vulnerable to stigmatizing attitudes about mental illness and obesity. Further, one of the diagnostic features of BED is experiencing a loss of control during binge eating episodes. It is possible that patients feel negatively judged when clinicians assess for loss of control as it may activate stereotypes of patients with obesity lacking willpower. We developed a questionnaire to assess preferences for common loss of control descriptions and gathered data on preferences for weight-related terms among 46 patients with BED. Analyses revealed the majority of common descriptors for loss of control eating were viewed neutrally, with loss of control being the most preferred term. Descriptions suggesting patients were addicted to food or did not consider stopping eating once they started binge eating were viewed negatively. The following weight descriptions were viewed negatively: heaviness, large size, obesity, excess fat, and fatness. Terms such as BMI, and unhealthy body weight or BMI were viewed more favorably and weight was the most preferred term. These findings provide empirical support for healthcare providers' use of terms to use and terms to avoid when talking to patients with BED about eating and weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Eating-related Intrusive Thoughts Inventory: exploring the dimensionality of eating disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpiñá, Conxa; Roncero, María; Belloch, Amparo; Sánchez-Reales, Sergio

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to examine the structure and validity of the Eating-related Intrusive Thoughts Inventory (INPIAS), a self-report questionnaire designed to assess eating disorders related to intrusive thoughts (EDITs), and second, to explore the existence of a continuum ranging from normal to abnormal thought intrusions related to eating, weight, and shape. Participants were 574 (408 women) nonclinical community individuals. Analyses revealed that EDITs can be clustered into three sets: appearance-dieting, need to exercise, and thoughts-impulses related to eating disorders. EDITs' consequences showed a two-factor structure: emotional consequences/personal meaning and thought-action fusion responsibility; and four factors of strategies: "anxiety," suppression, obsessive-compulsive rituals, and distraction. The sample was then divided according to reported restrained eating. The High dietary restraint group reported a higher frequency of EDITs, whereas differences in the other factors were mediated by depression, anxiety, and obsessionality. The results suggest that eating disorder-related cognitions are experienced by nonclinical individuals, and distributed on a continuum.

  6. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  7. Emotional eating moderates the relationship of night eating with binge eating and body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian; Allison, Kelly C; Platte, Petra

    2014-03-01

    Night eating syndrome is marked by substantial evening or nocturnal food intake, insomnia, morning anorexia, and depressed mood. Night eating severity has been positively associated with body mass index (BMI), binge eating frequency, and emotional eating tendencies. We conducted an online questionnaire study among students (N=729) and explored possible interactive effects between those variables. Night eating severity, binge eating frequency, BMI and emotional eating were all positively correlated with each other. Regression analyses showed that night eating severity was particularly related to more frequent binge episodes and higher BMI at high levels of emotional eating but unrelated to those variables at low levels of emotional eating. Thus, eating as a means of emotion regulation appears to be an important moderator of the relationship between night eating and both binge eating and BMI. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  8. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  9. Why we eat what we eat : Psychological influences on eating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sproesser, Gurdrun

    2012-01-01

    The present dissertation addresses psychological influences on eating behavior.Understanding why people eat what they eat in everyday life, that is, motives for eating behavior, is crucial for the development of interventions to promote normal eating and to prevent eating disorders. Furthermore, enhancing knowledge about both, individual and situational factors facilitating (pull factors) or impeding (push factors) healthy eating is essential for the prevention and treatment of obesity and it...

  10. A Study on the Socialization of Dining : IV Students Eating Out, Eating Habits and Eating Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    西脇, 泰子; Yasuko, Nishiwaki; 聖徳学園女子短期大学; Shotoku Gakuen Women's Junior College

    1993-01-01

    This survey was conducted on this school's students, with a view to looking at changes in eating habits, centered on eating out. How studests perceptions regarding their eating habits outside the home were measured and evaluated. Results included the following : 1. Eating out has increased. Most respondents replied that eating out was more convenient. 2. Many students have little knowledge regarding a well-balanced, nutritious meal. They have poor eating habits. 3. Few students eat breakfast....

  11. Disordered eating behaviors and body image in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Fernanda Reistenbach; Stenzel, Lucia Marques; Schneider, Cláudia Dornelles

    2013-01-01

    To identify disordered eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction, as well as their relationship to body fat (BF), among male athletes in high risk sports for eating disorders. One hundred and fifty-six male athletes were divided into the following categories: weight-class sports, sports where leanness improves performance, and sports with aesthetic ideals. BF was assessed and three questionnaires were used: the Eating Attitudes Test; the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh; the Body Shape Questionnaire. Disordered eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction were found in 43 (27.6%) and 23 athletes (14.7%), respectively, and an association was detected between the two variables (p disordered eating behaviors did not differ in %BF (11.0 ± 5.2% and 9.8 ± 4.0%, respectively; p = 0.106). However, athletes with body image dissatisfaction had higher %BF than those who were satisfied (12.6 ± 5.9% and 9.7 ± 3.9%, respectively; p = 0.034). There were no differences in BF, frequency of disordered eating behaviors, and body image dissatisfaction between sports categories. Nearly one-quarter of athletes showed disordered eating behaviors, which was associated with body image dissatisfaction. Athletes with higher %BF were more likely to be dissatisfied with body image. There was no difference in eating behavior and body image between athletes from different sports categories.

  12. Disordered eating behaviors and body image in male athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Reistenbach Goltz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify disordered eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction, as well as their relationship to body fat (BF, among male athletes in high risk sports for eating disorders. Methods: One hundred and fifty-six male athletes were divided into the following categories: weight-class sports, sports where leanness improves performance, and sports with aesthetic ideals. BF was assessed and three questionnaires were used: the Eating Attitudes Test; the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh; the Body Shape Questionnaire. Results: Disordered eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction were found in 43 (27.6% and 23 athletes (14.7%, respectively, and an association was detected between the two variables (p < 0.001. Athletes with and without disordered eating behaviors did not differ in %BF (11.0±5.2% and 9.8±4.0%, respectively; p = 0.106. However, athletes with body image dissatisfaction had higher %BF than those who were satisfied (12.6±5.9% and 9.7±3.9%, respectively; p = 0.034. There were no differences in BF, frequency of disordered eating behaviors, and body image dissatisfaction between sports categories. Conclusion: Nearly one-quarter of athletes showed disordered eating behaviors, which was associated with body image dissatisfaction. Athletes with higher %BF were more likely to be dissatisfied with body image. There was no difference in eating behavior and body image between athletes from different sports categories.

  13. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  14. [Are eating disorders addictions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, Johann F; Biebl, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    The various eating disorders, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder, are characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior and are seen as typical "psychosomatic disorders". The subdivision of anorexia nervosa into two subtypes, namely "anorexia nervosa restricting type" and "anorexia nervosa bulimic type" has proved to be very good. It is to be assumed that eating disorders are not a homogeneous group, and that the various subtypes of eating disorders are also heterogeneous at several levels. Co-morbid psychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders, anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, and personality disorders, are often found in eating- disordered patients. Many anorectics of the restrictive type and orthorectics show co-morbid psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and avoidant or obsessive-compulsive personality disorders, while a co-morbidity of affective disorders, addiction, personality disorders, especially multi-impulsivity and borderline personality disorder, is frequently found in anorectics of bulimic type, bulimics, and binge eaters. Addictive behavior manifests itself in permanent preoccupation with food and eating, withdrawal symptoms, continuation of disturbed eating behavior in spite of negative consequences, loss of control, and frequent relapse. There are some indications that there is a basic psychological disturbance common to eating disorders, especially bulimia nervosa, and to substance-related disorders, namely a personality disorder with an emotional instability and multi-impulsivity. The possible associations between eating disorders and mental disorders, particularly addictions, will be discussed.

  15. Depressive mood, eating disorder symptoms, and perfectionism in female college students: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villamisar, Domingo; Dattilo, John; Del Pozo, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    Although perfectionism has long been established as an important risk factor for depressive mood and eating disorders, the mechanisms through which this temperamental predisposition mediates the relationship between depressive mood and eating disorder symptoms are still relatively unclear. In this study we hypothesized that both perfectionism dimensions, self-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism, would mediate the relationship between current symptoms of depression and eating disorders in a non-clinical sample of Spanish undergraduate females. Two hundred sixteen female undergraduate students of the University Complutense of Madrid (Spain) completed the Spanish versions of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), OBQ-44, and BDI-II and BAI. Results demonstrated the importance of socially prescribed perfectionism in mediation of the relationship between depressive mood and symptoms of eating disorders. Socially prescribed perfectionism mediates the relationship between depressive mood and eating disorder symptoms for female college students.

  16. Holy anorexia: Eating disorders symptomatology and religiosity among Muslim women in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; O'Hara, Lily; Tahboub-Schulte, Sabrina; Grey, Ian; Chowdhury, Nayeefa

    2017-12-05

    There is a substantial body of literature reporting a negative association between religiosity and psychiatric symptoms. In the context of eating disorders, however, this relationship appears to be reversed. The few studies exploring the relationship between religiosity and eating disorders have mostly focused on the Judeo-Christian religious traditions in Western nations. The present study examines this relationship among Muslim college women from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). All participants (N = 1069) independently completed the religious commitment inventory (RCI-10) and the eating attitudes test (EAT-26). As hypothesised, there was a positive association between religiosity and eating disorders symptoms. Furthermore, those scoring above the EAT-26 cut-off reported significantly greater levels of religiosity. These findings suggest that heightened religiosity among young Emirati women may represent a vulnerability factor for eating disorders. Preventative initiatives in the UAE should consider focusing on religiosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the relationship between facets of mindfulness and eating pathology in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T

    2011-01-01

    Although researchers have examined the efficacy of acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions in the treatment of eating disorders, few studies have explored the association between trait mindfulness and eating pathology. Therefore, the purpose of the current investigation was to examine the unique associations between multiple facets of mindfulness (acting with awareness, nonreactivity, nonjudgment, describing, and observing) and eating pathology. Undergraduate women (N = 276) completed the Eating Attitudes Test-26, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, and the 21-item version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that four mindfulness facets (awareness, nonreactivity, nonjudgment, and describing) were uniquely associated with eating pathology above and beyond anxiety and depression symptoms. Results are discussed with regard to the potential role of various facets of trait mindfulness in eating pathology as well as the possible utility of mindfulness-based treatments for eating disorders.

  18. Disturbed eating tendency and related factors in grade four to six elementary school students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen; Tsao, Shu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated Taiwanese elementary school students' status in terms of body size, body satisfaction and disturbed eating tendencies. In a cross-sectional survey, 1,261 elementary school children from grades four to six participated in this study. We used an anonymous selfreported questionnaire, which included: demographics and body satisfaction; Children's Eating Attitude Test -26 (ChEAT-26); Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale; and Influence of Significant Others Scale and Media Impact Scale. We found that 58.4% of the children were of normal weight, and 32.7% of the boys and 22.2% of the girls were over-weight or obese. Moreover, 39% of the children wanted to be thinner. The mean ChEAT-26 score was 8.71±8.35, and 10.5% of the children were at high risk for disturbed eating tendencies (ChEAT-26≥20), including 8.4% of the boys and 12.6% of the girls. Scores on the ChEAT-26, Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale, Influence of Significant Others Scale and Media Impact Scale were positively correlated. The level of external control and the influence of significant others and the media were significantly higher in children with disturbed eating attitudes than in those without them. Multivariable logistic regressions showed that disturbed eating attitudes were associated with body satisfaction, locus of control, and the level of influence of significant others and the media. Disturbed eating behaviors exist among elementary school students in Taiwan. This survey highlights the need for education in acquiring healthy mental attitudes and eating behaviors by elementary school students.

  19. [Prevalence of eating disorders among women with polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadett, Mohácsi; Szemán-N, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age. Symptomes and complications of PCOS have adverse effect on quality of life among concerned women. Most research findings suggest that PCOS is associated with eating disorders, but there are inconsistent results in connection with their relationship in the published literature. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of eating disorders among women with PCOS. Body mass index (BMI), Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and Eating Behaviour Severity Scale (EBSS) were used to measure eating attitudes and behaviors. Furthermore PCOS symptomes were measured by Ferriman-Gallwey Score, Global Acne Grading Score, Savin Scale and other pcos symptoms were also accessed. A total of 318 women were included in this analysis. The sample consists of a PCOS group (N=95), a control group (N=100) and a hyperandrogen group (N=123). The Prevalence of clinical bulimia nervosa was 5.3%, subclinical anorexia nervosa 1.1% and subclinical bulimia nervosa was 10.5% among PCOS women. 1.6% subclinical bulimia nervosa was detected in the hyperandrogen group. The results of the study indicate that the prevalence of clinical and subclinical bulimia nervosa is increased among women with PCOS compared to healthy women. Eating disorders can have significant negative influence on the outcome of the treatment of PCOS. To sum up, these findings suggest that it should be necessary to pay attention to the screening of eating disorders, and the findings also reveals that psychological treatment of eating disorders among women with PCOS is relevant.

  20. Men, Muscles, and Eating Disorders: an Overview of Traditional and Muscularity-Oriented Disordered Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Brown, Tiffany A; Murray, Stuart B

    2017-06-01

    There is growing recognition that eating disorder (ED) symptoms, particularly those of a muscularity-oriented nature, are more common in men than previously understood. The purpose of the current review is to describe contemporary directions and implications of research on traditional and muscularity-oriented ED symptoms among males. Evidence indicates that ED symptoms occur in a substantial minority of men. Importantly, recent research has focused on muscularity-oriented body image and disordered eating in males, demonstrating the prevalence, correlates, and consequences of maladaptive muscularity-oriented attitudes and behaviors. A growing number of assessments are available to measure these constructs in males, and preliminary treatment considerations have begun to be addressed in the literature. Research on male EDs and body image is increasingly focusing on muscularity-oriented manifestations. Continued empirical work will be critical to improve our understanding of the onset, maintenance, and treatment of muscularity-oriented disordered eating in males.

  1. Acculturation, Media Exposure, and Eating Disorders in Cuban American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Dulce M.; Hunter, George C.; Lozzi, Bettina

    This study examined the dual roles of continued close ties with the Cuban community and culture of origin, as well as influences of print and broadcast media, in the development of attitudes toward both type and propensity toward eating disorders among young Cuban-American women. Continued exclusive or primary use of Spanish language in the home,…

  2. The Relationship between Media Consumption and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kristen; Cantor, Joanne

    1997-01-01

    Shows that, for women, the use of thinness-depicting and thinness-promoting (TDP) media predicted disordered-eating symptomatology, drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, and ineffectiveness. Shows that TDP media use predicted men's endorsement of personal thinness and dieting and select attitudes in favor of thinness and dieting for women.…

  3. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  4. Abnormal glucose tolerance and lipid abnormalities in Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discussion. Regardless of varying diagnostic classification, abnormal glucose tolerance is a well-documented risk factor. 16 Abnormalities in. Because ofthe small number offemale MI survivors, the effect of obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance on lipid levels was studied in the male patients only. There was no significant.

  5. Sasang types may differ in eating rate, meal size, and regular appetite: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Duong Duc; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Eating behaviours may be implicated in the increasing prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders. The Sasang typology, a unique form of traditional Korean medicine, classifies individuals into four constitutional types that differ in a distinctive complex of external manifestations and innate natures, including eating behaviours. Our aim is to portray a picture of the distinguishing characteristics of eating behaviours across Sasang types and to provide suggestions for future studies. Six Korean and one English database were searched to acquire relevant articles. Ten peer-reviewed relevant research articles were found. The extracted data were categorised into the domains of i) food preferences; ii) eating rate; iii) eating initiation and termination; iv) meal size; v) regularity of eating; vi) regular appetite; vii) eating disorders; and viii) psychological factors. Eating rate and meal size were the issues of most concern that more frequently were different among Sasang types. The TaeEum type seemed to have obesity-linked eating behaviours, including a rapid eating rate, large meal sizes, and a strong appetite, whereas those attitudes seemed to be in contrast with those of the SoEum type. The SoYang type shared similarities with both the TaeEum and SoEum types. Future studies should be conducted with more reliable, objective, and quantitative assessment tools such as the Three Eating Factor Questionnaire or the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire.

  6. ADOLESCENTS’ HEALTHY EATING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne

    This PhD thesis contributes with knowledge about adolescent healthy eating by studying consumer socialisation, social influence and behavioural change in relation to adolescent healthy eating. The introduction provides the important reasons for studying adolescents and healthy eating and explains...... relevant literature on consumer socialisation, social influence and behaviour change through interventions employing feedback in relation to adolescent healthy eating, it is argued that a socio-cognitive approach to consumer socialisation and behaviour change provides a richer and more nuanced...... understanding of adolescent healthy eating. Based on this, the thesis presents three research questions which are investigated in three research papers. The research questions are: 1. Which roles do parents and adolescents have in healthy eating socialisation? 2. How does the social influence from parents...

  7. A pilot study on the effect of Basic Body Awareness Therapy in patients with eating disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Helvik-Skjaerven, Liv; Labajos-Manzanares, M Teresa; Martínez-de-Salazar-Arboleas, Alma; Sánchez-Guerrero, Eduardo

    2011-07-01

    To analyse the feasibility of Basic Body Awareness Therapy in people with eating disorders. A randomized controlled trial; the assessors were not blinded to the group allocation. The eating disorders department within a hospital setting. Twenty-eight outpatients with eating disorders for less than five years. All patients received standard outpatient treatment. The intervention group (n = 14) also received Basic Body Awareness Therapy for seven weeks. Eating Disorder Inventory, Eating Attitude Test, Body Attitude Test and Quality of Life Scale SF-36. Analysing the differences between both groups, significant differences were found in Eating Disorder Inventory (mean difference: 26.3; P = 0.015) and in its subscales 'drive to thinness' (P = 0.003), 'body dissatisfaction' (P = 0.025) and 'ineffectiveness' (P = 0.014). Also in Body Attitude Test (mean difference: 33.0; P = 0.012), Eating Attitude Test-40 (mean difference: 17.7; P = 0.039) and SF-36 in the section 'mental health' (mean difference: 13.0; P = 0.002). This study has shown some effectiveness of Basic Body Awareness Therapy in improving some symptoms in outpatients with eating disorders. Further studies should include larger samples, double-blinded and placebo methodologies, and should focus on questions such as which eating disorder diagnoses benefit most from physical therapy.

  8. Stress, shift duty, and eating behavior among nurses in Central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajwal, Ali M

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the association between stress, shift work, and eating behavior among non-Saudi female nurses working in Central Saudi Arabia. A sample of 395 non-Saudi female nurses from 2 major hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia participated in this cross-sectional study. The nurses completed a questionnaire from November 2013 to January 2014 that included items relating to stress and eating behavior using the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ). The questionnaire also contained items pertaining to socio-demographic data, body mass index, shift work, and hours worked per week.  For all eating styles, stress, and shift duty influenced the amount of food nurses consumed, but was more significant under a restrained eating style. Under this eating style, a significantly higher percentage of nurses reported eating more fast food, snacks, and binging, while fruits and vegetables were the least likely to be eaten under stress. High stressed nurses were more likely to present with abnormal restrained eating (odds ratio [OR]=1.52, p=0.004), emotional (OR=1.24; p=0.001), and external (OR=1.21; p=0.001) DEBQ scores. Working nighttime shift duty was positively associated with restrained eating (OR=1.53; p=0.029) and emotional eating (OR=1.24; p=0.001), but negatively associated with external eating (OR=0.45; p=0.001).  Our findings suggest that stress and shift duty were associated with eating habits.

  9. Influência da percepção do peso e do índice de massa corporal nos comportamentos alimentares anormais Influence of body mass index and body weight perception on eating disorders symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica Nunes

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a associação entre a percepção do peso corporal, o índice de massa corporal e os comportamentos alimentares anormais. MÉTODOS: Delineamento transversal, de base populacional, com mulheres de 12 a 29 anos, da zona urbana de Porto Alegre, RS (n=513. Para medir a prevalência de comportamentos alimentares anormais utilizou-se o Teste de Atitudes Alimentares 26 (EAT-26 e o Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo (BITE, considerados separadamente e em conjunto, e a percepção do peso corporal por meio de 2 perguntas estruturadas: qual era o peso que a mulher julgava ideal e a auto-avaliação sobre seu peso. O índice de massa corporal (IMC foi calculado por medida de peso e altura aferidos. RESULTADOS: Considerando os instrumentos conjuntamente, 30,2% das mulheres tinham comportamento alimentar de risco, e 11,3% apresentaram comportamento alimentar anormal. Além disso, 82% das mulheres apresentaram IMC normal, sendo que 2% eram magras, e 16% apresentaram IMC de sobrepeso/obesidade. Das mulheres estudadas, 46% tinham o ideal de pesar menos, e 37,8% consideravam-se gordas. Entre as mulheres com IMC normal, 25,2% das que se achavam normais apresentavam comportamento alimentar de risco, e 5,7 % comportamento alimentar anormal. Das mulheres que se consideravam gordas, 47,2% apresentaram comportamento alimentar de risco, e 19,2% tinham comportamento alimentar anormal. Mulheres que se sentiam gordas apresentaram um risco quatro vezes maior de apresentar comportamentos alimentares anormais (razão de odds 4,50; IC 95% 2,88-7,01; pOBJECTVE: To investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI, body weight perception and eating disorder symptoms. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted among women aged between 12 and 29 years old in Porto Alegre, Brazil (n=513. The prevalence of eating disorder symptoms was assessed by using two instruments: the Eating Attitudes Test - 26 (EAT-26 and the Bulimic

  10. [The auto-addictive hypothesis of pathological eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienard, Yasmine; Vamecq, Joseph

    2004-10-23

    The pathogenic role of self-addiction. Addiction to an endogenous chemical is a new paradigm termed 'self-addiction'. It may contribute to the development of certain habits, the pathological nature of which may set-in on the basis of this "self-addictive"dimension. Pathological eating habits could be inscribed in this perspective. Two extreme situations. In well-fed populations, the ingestion of food does not represent a limiting phase in the global feeding process. Its pathological management may, however, lead to two extreme situations: the absence of ingestion (anorexia) and excessive ingestion (bulimia). In favour of the self-addictive hypothesis. Eating disorders are associated with abnormal levels of endorphins and share clinical similarities with psychoactive drug abuse. The key role of endorphins has recently been demonstrated in animals with regard to certain aspects of normal, pathological and experimental eating habits (food restriction combined with stress, locomotor hyperactivity). The factors leading to pathological eating habits. Neurobiological bases for eating disorders and their durability have recently come to light in the recent implication of abnormalities in the recompense system in the onset of addiction. The endorphin self-addictive model in fact appears the most pertinent with regard to the clinical profile of eating habits and integrates the role of stress.

  11. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  12. Binge Eating Disorder and Night Eating Syndrome: A Comparative Study of Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Stunkard, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors compared eating patterns, disordered eating, features of eating disorders, and depressive symptoms in persons with binge eating disorder (BED; n = 177), with night eating syndrome (NES; n = 68), and in an overweight comparison group without BED or NES (comparison; n = 45). Participants completed semistructured interviews and several…

  13. Causes of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivy, Janet; Herman, C Peter

    2002-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa have emerged as the predominant eating disorders. We review the recent research evidence pertaining to the development of these disorders, including sociocultural factors (e.g., media and peer influences), family factors (e.g., enmeshment and criticism), negative affect, low self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction. Also reviewed are cognitive and biological aspects of eating disorders. Some contributory factors appear to be necessary for the appearance of eating disorders, but none is sufficient. Eating disorders may represent a way of coping with problems of identity and personal control.

  14. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Teens / A Guide to Eating for Sports What's in this article? Eat Extra for Excellence Athletes and Dieting Eat a Variety of Foods Muscular Minerals and Vital Vitamins Protein Power Carb ...

  15. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... para deportistas Eat Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down ... from getting sick. Eating a balanced diet, including lots of different fruits and veggies, should provide the ...

  16. Men: Eat Right, Stay Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention and Wellness Food and Nutrition Men: Eat Right, Stay Healthy Men: Eat Right, Stay Healthy Share Print Men, are you paying ... you’ve got to learn how to eat right to stay healthy all life long. Are you ...

  17. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Teens / A Guide to Eating for Sports What's in this article? Eat Extra for Excellence Athletes ... per day to meet their energy needs. So what happens if teen athletes don't eat enough? ...

  18. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guide to Eating for Sports What's in this article? Eat Extra for Excellence Athletes and Dieting Eat ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  19. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guide to Eating for Sports What's in this article? Eat Extra for Excellence Athletes and Dieting Eat ... to dehydration. In large amounts, salt can cause nausea, vomiting, cramps, and diarrhea and may damage the ...

  20. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.