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Sample records for ablative hydrodynamic instabilities

  1. Hydrodynamic instabilities in an ablation front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of an ablation front is studied for situations in which the wavelength of the perturbations is larger than the distance to the critical surface where the driving radiation is absorbed. An analytical model is presented, and it shows that under conditions in which the thermal flux is limited within the supercritical region of the ablative corona, the front may behave like a flame or like an ablation front, depending on the perturbation wavelength. For relatively long wavelengths the critical and ablation surfaces practically lump together into a unique surface and the front behaves like a flame, whereas for the shortest wavelengths the ablation front substructure is resolved.

  2. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Delorme, B.; Martinez, D.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Igumenshchev, I.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Riazuelo, G.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Grech, M.; Chicanne, C.; Theobald, M.; Borisenko, N.; Orekhov, A.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Remington, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  3. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Riazuelo, G. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Delorme, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Martinez, D.; Remington, B.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Igumenshchev, I.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory of Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-15

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  4. Three-dimensional simulations of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities in indirectly driven targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Remington, B.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    To model ignition in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosion, the authors must understand the behavior of instabilities that can cause breakup of the pellet shell. During a capsule implosion, shocks that transit the shell cause growth of perturbations at the surface or at an interface because of a Richtmyer-Meshkov type of instability. Following shock breakout, or earlier for a shaped pulse, the low-density ablated plasma accelerates the pusher, and the ablation front is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Ablation and finite density gradients have the effect of stabilizing the short wavelength modes. Unstable modes present on the outer surface grow and feed through to the inner surface. Once the shell encounters the rebounding shock from the capsule center, it decelerates and the inner surface becomes RT unstable. If perturbations grow large enough, pusher material mixes into the core, degrading implosion performance. Capsule designs for the NIF depend on ablative stabilization and saturation to prevent perturbations initially present on the capsule surface from growing large enough to quench ignition. Here, the authors examine the first simulations and experiments to study the effect of 3-D perturbation shape on instability growth and saturation in indirectly driven targets. The first section discusses HYDRA, the radiation hydrodynamics code developed for these simulations. The subsequent section examines 3-D shape effects in single-mode perturbations in planar foil simulations and experiments. A discussion of the evolution of multimode perturbations on planar foils is followed by a discussion of 3-D simulations of instability growth in Nova capsule implosions.

  5. Hydrodynamic instabilities at ablation front: numerical investigation on stabilization by adiabat shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olazabal-Loume, M.; Hallo, L. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CELIA UMR 5107, 33 - Talence (France)

    2006-06-15

    This study deals with the hydrodynamic stability of a planar target in the context of inertial confinement fusion direct drive. Recently, different schemes have been proposed in order to reduce ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth. They are based on the target adiabatic shaping in the ablation zone. In this work, we consider an adiabatic shaping scheme by relaxation: a prepulse is followed by a relaxation period where the laser is turned off. A numerical study is performed with a perturbation code dedicated to the linear stability analysis. The simulations show stabilizing effects of the relaxation scheme on the linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. Influence of the picket parameters is also discussed. (authors)

  6. Impact of ablator thickness and laser drive duration on a platform for supersonic, shockwave-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, G.; Shimony, A.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Soltis, J. D.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss changes to a target design that improved the quality and consistency of data obtained through a novel experimental platform that enables the study of hydrodynamic instabilities in a compressible regime. The experiment uses a laser to drive steady, supersonic shockwave over well-characterized initial perturbations. Early experiments were adversely affected by inadequate experimental timescales and, potentially, an unintended secondary shockwave. These issues were addressed by extending the 4x1013 W/cm2 laser pulse from 19 ns to 28 ns, and increasing the ablator thickness from 185 μm to 500 μm. We present data demonstrating the performance of the platform.

  7. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

    1993-02-17

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes.

  8. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Pickworth, L.; Pino, J. E.; Raman, K.; Tipton, R.; Weber, C. R.; Baker, K. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatarik, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Masse, L.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Tommasini, R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; Crippen, J.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Rice, N.; Wilde, C. H.; Volegov, P. L.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. In the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platforms were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.

  9. Hydrodynamic modeling of ns-laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Autrique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is a versatile and widespread technique, applied in an increasing number of medical, industrial and analytical applications. A hydrodynamic multiphase model describing nanosecond-laser ablation (ns-LA is outlined. The model accounts for target heating and mass removal mechanisms as well as plume expansion and plasma formation. A copper target is placed in an ambient environment consisting of helium and irradiated by a nanosecond-laser pulse. The effect of variable laser settings on the ablation process is explored in 1-D numerical simulations.

  10. Numerical analysis of anisotropic diffusion effect on ICF hydrodynamic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olazabal-Loumé M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anisotropic diffusion on hydrodynamic instabilities in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF flows is numerically assessed. This anisotropy occurs in indirect-drive when laminated ablators are used to modify the lateral transport [1,2]. In direct-drive, non-local transport mechanisms and magnetic fields may modify the lateral conduction [3]. In this work, numerical simulations obtained with the code PERLE [4], dedicated to linear stability analysis, are compared with previous theoretical results [5]. In these approaches, the diffusion anisotropy can be controlled by a characteristic coefficient which enables a comprehensive study. This work provides new results on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM and Darrieus-Landau (DL instabilities.

  11. Hydrodynamic Instability Experiments at the GEKKO XII/HIPER Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azechi, Hiroshi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Shigemori, Keisuke; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sakaiya, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Kang, Young-Gwang; Nagatomo, Hideo; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2000-10-01

    We have constructed the HIPER laser system that combines all 12 beams of the existing GEKKO XII laser to irradiate a target from one side.The laser pulse in standard operation consists of partially coherent light for foot (green) and two-dimensional SSD for main drive (blue). We will test in the first series of experiment the ablation pressure and its uniformity, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and instability at explosion phase.\\x81@ Although the primary objective is to test hydrodynamic stability of an ignition target (both in fast ignition and conventional self-ignition), the HIPER laser is expected to be a major tool for a number of high energy-density physics, such as laboratory astrophysics, equation-of-state study.

  12. A hydrodynamic approach to QGP instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, E

    2013-01-01

    We show that the usual linear analysis of QGP Weibel instabilities based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann equation may be reproduced in a purely hydrodynamic model. The latter is derived by the Entropy Production Variational Method from a transport equation including collisions, and can describe highly nonequilibrium flow. We find that, as expected, collisions slow down the growth of Weibel instabilities. Finally, we discuss the strong momentum anisotropy limit.

  13. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Rotating Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KarlBuehler

    2000-01-01

    Rotating flow systems are often used to study stability phenomena and structure developments.The closed spherical gap prblem is generalized into an open flow system by superimposing a mass flux in meridional direction.The basic solutions at low Reynolds numbers are described by analytical methods.The nonlinear supercritical solutions are simulated numerically and realized in experiments.Novel steady and time-dependent modes of flows are obtained.The extensive results concern the stability behaviour.non-uniqueness of supercritical solutions,symmetry behaviour and transitions between steady and time-dependent solutions.The experimental investigations concern the visualization of the various instabilities and the quatitative description of the flow structures including the laminar-turbulent transition.A Comparison between theoretical and experimental results shows good agreement within the limit of rotational symmetric solutions from the theory.

  14. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in High-Energy-Density Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Our understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities, in high-energy-density (HED) settings over past two decades has progressed enormously. The range of conditions where hydrodynamic instabilities are experimentally observed now includes direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where surprises continue to emerge, linear and nonlinear regimes, classical interfaces vs. stabilized ablation fronts, tenuous ideal plasmas vs. high density Fermi degenerate plasmas, bulk fluid interpenetration vs. mixing down to the atomic level, in the presence of magnetic fields and/or intense radiation, and in solid state plastic flow at high pressures and strain rates. Regimes in ICF can involve extreme conditions of matter with temperatures up to kilovolts, densities of a thousand times solid densities, and time scales of nanoseconds. On the other hand, scaled conditions can be generated that map to exploding stars (supernovae) with length and time scales of millions of kilometers and hours to days or even years of instability evolution, planetary formation dynamics involving solid-state plastic flow which severely modifies the RT growth and continues to challenge reliable theoretical descriptions. This review will look broadly at progress in probing and understanding hydrodynamic instabilities in these very diverse HED settings, and then will examine a few cases in more depth to illustrate the detailed science involved. Experimental results on large-scale HED facilities such as the Omega, Nike, Gekko, and Shenguang lasers will be reviewed and the latest developments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Z machine will be covered. Finally, current overarching questions and challenges will be summarized to motivate research directions for future. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  16. Theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial-confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, LiFeng; Ye, WenHua; He, XianTu; Wu, JunFeng; Fan, ZhengFeng; Xue, Chuang; Guo, HongYu; Miao, WenYong; Yuan, YongTeng; Dong, JiaQin; Jia, Guo; Zhang, Jing; Li, YingJun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Min; Ding, YongKun; Zhang, WeiYan

    2017-05-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) has been considered a promising, nearly inexhaustible source of sustainable carbon-free power for the world's energy future. It has long been recognized that the control of hydrodynamic instabilities is of critical importance for ignition and high-gain in the inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) hot-spot ignition scheme. In this mini-review, we summarize the progress of theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in the ICF central hot-spot implosion in our group over the past decade. In order to obtain sufficient understanding of the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF, we first decompose the problem into different stages according to the implosion physics processes. The decomposed essential physics pro- cesses that are associated with ICF implosions, such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), convergent geometry effects, as well as perturbation feed-through are reviewed. Analyti- cal models in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries have been established to study different physical aspects, including density-gradient, interface-coupling, geometry, and convergent effects. The influence of ablation in the presence of preheating on the RTI has been extensively studied by numerical simulations. The KHI considering the ablation effect has been discussed in detail for the first time. A series of single-mode ablative RTI experiments has been performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility. The theoretical and simulation research provides us the physical insights of linear and weakly nonlinear growths, and nonlinear evolutions of the hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF implosions, which has directly supported the research of ICF ignition target design. The ICF hot-spot ignition implosion design that uses several controlling features, based on our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, to address shell implosion stability, has

  17. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  18. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    OpenAIRE

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  19. Hydrodynamics of pedestrians' instability in floodwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Oumeraci, Hocine; Castelli, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    People's safety is the first objective to be fulfilled by flood risk mitigation measures, and according to existing reports on the causes of casualties, most of the fatalities are due to inappropriate behaviour such as walking or driving in floodwaters. Currently available experimental data on people instability in floodwaters suffer from a large dispersion primarily depending on the large variability of the physical characteristics of the subjects. This paper introduces a dimensionless mobility parameter θP for people partly immersed in flood flows, which accounts for both flood and subject characteristics. The parameter θP is capable of identifying a unique threshold of instability depending on a Froude number, thus reducing the scatter of existing experimental data. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical model describing the detailed geometry of a human body and reproducing a selection of critical pairs of water depth and velocity is presented. The numerical results in terms of hydrodynamic forces and force coefficients are analysed and discussed. Both the mobility parameter θP and the numerical results hint at the crucial role of the Froude number and relative submergence as the most relevant dimensionless numbers to interpret the loss of stability. Finally, the mobility parameter θP is compared with an analogous dimensionless parameter for vehicles' instability in floodwaters, providing a new contribution to support flood risk management and educating people.

  20. SPHYNX: SPH hydrocode for subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities and strong shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezon, Ruben M.; Garcia-Senz, Domingo

    2017-09-01

    SPHYNX addresses subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities and strong shocks; it is Newtonian, grounded on the Euler-Lagrange formulation of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics technique, and density based. SPHYNX uses an integral approach for estimating gradients, a flexible family of interpolators to suppress pairing instability, and incorporates volume elements to provides better partition of the unity.

  1. Hydrodynamic instability measurements in DT-layered ICF capsules using the layered-HGR platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Sater, J.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF implosion are reported. Previous instability measurements on the National Ignition Facility have used plastic capsules to measure ablation front Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Hydro.-Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. These capsules substituted an additional thickness of plastic ablator material in place of the cryogenic layer of Deuterium- Tritium (DT) fuel. The present experiments are the first to include a DT ice layer, which enables measurements of the instability growth occurring at the fuel-ablator interface. Instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface is seeded differently in two independent NIF experiments. In the first case, a perturbation on the outside of the capsule feeds through and grows on the interface. Comparisons to an implosion without a fuel layer produce a measure of the fuel's modulation. In the second case, a modulation was directly machined on the inner ablator before the fuel layer was added. The measurement of growth in these two scenarios are compared to 2D rad-hydro modeling.

  2. Hydrodynamic Instability of Ionization Fronts in HII Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J; Ryutov, D; Remington, B; Takabe, H; Pound, M

    2003-08-21

    The authors investigate hydrodynamic instability of accelerating ionization fronts with two dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. When recombination in the ionized region is turned off, Rayleigh-Taylor instability is effective. Perturbation grows up with classical Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. In the case with recombination, the local difference of absorption profile works to smooth the surface. The perturbation does not grow and the amplitude follows a damped oscillations with time.

  3. Measurements of Reduced Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Adiabat Shaped Implosions at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Daniel; Macphee, Andrew; Milovich, Jose; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Clark, Dan; Robey, Harry; Peterson, Luc; Baker, Kevin; Weber, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Radiographic measurements of ablation front perturbation growth were performed using adiabat-shaped drives which are shown to have lower ablation front growth than the low foot drive. This is partly due to faster Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) oscillations during the shock transit phase of the implosion moving the node in the growth factor spectrum to lower mode numbers reducing the peak growth amplitude. This is demonstrated experimentally by a reversal of the perturbation phase at higher mode numbers (120-160). These results show that the ablation front growth and fuel adiabat can be controlled somewhat-independently and are providing insight into new, more stable, ignition designs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Numerical simulations of hydrodynamic instabilities: perturbation codes Pansy, Perle, and 2D code Chic applied to a realistic LIL target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L.; Olazabal-Loume, M.; Maire, P.H.; Breil, J.; Schurtz, G. [CELIA, 33 - Talence (France); Morse, R.L. [Arizona Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Tucson (United States)

    2006-06-15

    This paper deals with ablation front instabilities simulations in the context of direct drive inertial confinement fusion. A simplified deuterium-tritium target, representative of realistic target on LIL (laser integration line at Megajoule laser facility) is considered. We describe here two numerical approaches: the linear perturbation method using the perturbation codes Perle (planar) and Pansy (spherical) and the direct simulation method using our bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code Chic. Our work shows a good behaviour of all methods even for large wavenumbers during the acceleration phase of the ablation front. We also point out a good agreement between model and numerical predictions at ablation front during the shock wave transit.

  5. CHF Enhancement by Surface Patterning based on Hydrodynamic Instability Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    If the power density of a device exceeds the CHF point, bubbles and vapor films will be covered on the whole heater surface. Because vapor films have much lower heat transfer capabilities compared to the liquid layer, the temperature of the heater surface will increase rapidly, and the device could be damaged due to the heater burnout. Therefore, the prediction and the enhancement of the CHF are essential to maximizing the efficient heat removal region. Numerous studies have been conducted to describe the CHF phenomenon, such as hydrodynamic instability theory, macrolayer dryout theory, hot/dry spot theory, and bubble interaction theory. The hydrodynamic instability model, proposed by Zuber, is the predominant CHF model that Helmholtz instability attributed to the CHF. Zuber assumed that the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength is related to the Helmholtz wavelength. Lienhard and Dhir proposed a CHF model that Helmholtz instability wavelength is equal to the most dangerous RT wavelength. In addition, they showed the heater size effect using various heater surfaces. Lu et al. proposed a modified hydrodynamic theory that the Helmholtz instability was assumed to be the heater size and the area of the vapor column was used as a fitting factor. The modified hydrodynamic theories were based on the change of Helmholtz wavelength related to the RT instability wavelength. In the present study, the change of the RT instability wavelength, based on the heater surface modification, was conducted to show the CHF enhancement based on the heater surface patterning in a plate pool boiling. Sapphire glass was used as a base heater substrate, and the Pt film was used as a heating source. The patterning surface was based on the change of RT instability wavelength. In the present work the study of the CHF was conducted using bare Pt and patterned heating surfaces.

  6. A generalized biharmonic equation and its applications to hydrodynamic instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mihir B Banerjee; J R Gupta; R G Shandil

    2002-06-01

    Problems concerning characterization of eigenvalues of some linear and homogenous differential systems by the Pellew and Southwell method of conjugate eigenfunctions in the domain of hydrodynamic instability are discussed and a general mathematical framework described. In this general survey we look back on and rewrite this work almost in exactly the way it evolved out of a few naive looking calculations in hydrodynamic instability. We show in the process the close relationship that exists between mathematical analysis and its applications with due credit to intuition as the main source of mathematical activity.

  7. Nonconservative higher-order hydrodynamic modulation instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmoun, O.; Hsu, H. C.; Kibler, B.; Chabchoub, A.

    2017-08-01

    The modulation instability (MI) is a universal mechanism that is responsible for the disintegration of weakly nonlinear narrow-banded wave fields and the emergence of localized extreme events in dispersive media. The instability dynamics is naturally triggered, when unstable energy sidebands located around the main energy peak are excited and then follow an exponential growth law. As a consequence of four wave mixing effect, these primary sidebands generate an infinite number of additional sidebands, forming a triangular sideband cascade. After saturation, it is expected that the system experiences a return to initial conditions followed by a spectral recurrence dynamics. Much complex nonlinear wave field motion is expected, when the secondary or successive sideband pair that is created is also located in the finite instability gain range around the main carrier frequency peak. This latter process is referred to as higher-order MI. We report a numerical and experimental study that confirms observation of higher-order MI dynamics in water waves. Furthermore, we show that the presence of weak dissipation may counterintuitively enhance wave focusing in the second recurrent cycle of wave amplification. The interdisciplinary weakly nonlinear approach in addressing the evolution of unstable nonlinear waves dynamics may find significant resonance in other nonlinear dispersive media in physics, such as optics, solids, superfluids, and plasma.

  8. Neutrino signature of supernova hydrodynamical instabilities in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborra, Irene; Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Raffelt, Georg

    2013-09-20

    The first full-scale three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (SN) simulations with sophisticated neutrino transport show pronounced effects of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) for two high-mass progenitors (20 and 27 M([Symbol: see text])). In a low-mass progenitor (11.2 M([Symbol: see text])), large-scale convection is the dominant nonradial hydrodynamic instability in the postshock accretion layer. The SASI-associated modulation of the neutrino signal (80 Hz in our two examples) will be clearly detectable in IceCube or the future Hyper-Kamiokande detector, depending on progenitor properties, distance, and observer location relative to the main SASI sloshing direction. The neutrino signal from the next galactic SN can, therefore, diagnose the nature of the hydrodynamic instability.

  9. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI JingSong; WANG Tao; LI Ping; ZOU LiYong; LIU CangLi

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI), a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly, the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases: The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube;the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability, which is conducted on the AWE's shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data, good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models accelerated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM), which are adopted in our experiments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces, and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer experiment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface, and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer, bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images, and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely, especially at late times.

  10. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI),a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly,the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases:The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability,which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data,good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models acceler-ated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM),which are adopted in our experi-ments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces,and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer ex-periment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface,and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer,bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images,and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely,especially at late times.

  11. Numerical simulations of hydrodynamic instabilities: Perturbation codes PANSY, PERLE, and 2D code CHIC applied to a realistic LIL target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallo, L.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Maire, P. H.; Breil, J.; Morse, R.-L.; Schurtz, G.

    2006-06-01

    This paper deals with ablation front instabilities simulations in the context of direct drive ICF. A simplified DT target, representative of realistic target on LIL is considered. We describe here two numerical approaches: the linear perturbation method using the perturbation codes Perle (planar) and Pansy (spherical) and the direct simulation method using our Bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code Chic. Numerical solutions are shown to converge, in good agreement with analytical models.

  12. Ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilkenny, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    As shown elsewhere an ablatively imploded shell is hydrodynamically unstable, the dominant instability being the well known Rayleigh-Taylor instability with growth rate {gamma} = {radical}Akg where k = 2{pi}/{lambda} is the wave number, g is the acceleration and A the Attwood number ({rho}{sub hi} {minus} {rho}{sub lo})/({rho}{sub hi} + {rho}{sub lo}) where {rho}{sub hi} is the density of the heavier fluid and {rho}{sub lo} is the density of the lighter fluid. A theoretical understanding of ablative stabilization has gradually evolved, confirmed over the last five years by experiments. The linear growth is very well understood with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation for planar geometry with wavelengths in the region of 30--100{mu}m. There is an accurate, albeit phenomenological dispersion relation. The non-linear growth has been measured and agrees with calculations. In this lecture, the authors go into the fundamentals of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the experimental measurements that show it is stabilized sufficiently by ablation in regimes relevant to ICF.

  13. Hydrodynamic instability of nanofluids in a channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianzhong; Xia, Yi [Department of Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, People’s Republic of China (China); Bao, Fubing, E-mail: mecjzlin@zju.edu.cn [Institution of Fluid Mechanics, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018, People’s Republic of China (China)

    2014-10-01

    A linear hydrodynamic instability of nanofluids in a channel flow is investigated. The instability equations of nanofluids are derived and solved numerically. The validity of the numerical formulations and schemes is tested by comparing the present results with the available experimental data and theoretical results. The results show that the existence of particles suppresses the flow instability, but cannot completely eliminate it. As particle mass loading is increased, the region of unstable wavenumbers is reduced from that of the pure Newtonian flow and the largest growth rate that governs the flow instability is reduced. The Stokes number has an effect on the instability behavior of the nanofluids. As the Stokes number and Knudsen number decrease, the critical Reynolds numbers increase and the unstable regions of small perturbations decrease, along with a decrease in the largest growth rates that govern the flow instability, therefore reinforcing the flow stability. Larger particles reduce the peak value of the velocity disturbance and hence attenuate the flow instability. (paper)

  14. Hydrodynamic Mixing of Ablator Material into the Compressed Fuel and Hot Spot of Direct-Drive DT Cryogenic Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Luo, R. W.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic mixing of ablator material into the compressed fuel and hot spot of direct-drive DT cryogenic implosions is diagnosed using time-integrated, spatially resolved xray spectroscopy. The laser drive ablates most of the 8- μm-thick CH ablator, which is doped with trace amounts of Ge ( 0.5 at.) and surrounds the cryogenic DT layer. A small fraction of the ablator material is mixed into the compressed shell and the hot spot by the ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser imprint, the target mounting stalk, and surface debris. The amount of mix mass inferred from spectroscopic analysis of the Ge K-shell emission will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Active control of magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igochine, Valentin (ed.) [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Written and edited by leading plasma physics researchers. Provides a toolkit for scientists and engineers aiming to optimize plasma performance. Comprehensive treatment of different plasma instabilities. During the past century, world-wide energy consumption has risen dramatically, which leads to a quest for new energy sources. Fusion of hydrogen atoms in hot plasmas is an attractive approach to solve the energy problem, with abundant fuel, inherent safety and no long-lived radioactivity. However, one of the limits on plasma performance is due to the various classes of magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities that may occur. The physics and control of these instabilities in modern magnetic confinement fusion devices is the subject of this book. Written by foremost experts, the contributions will provide valuable reference and up-to-date research reviews for ''old hands'' and newcomers alike.

  16. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ablation fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriz A.R.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front is studied by considering the simplest possible modulations in the acceleration. Explicit analytical expressions for the instability growth rate and for the boundaries of the stability region are obtained by considering a sequence of Dirac deltas. Besides, general square waves allow for studying the effect of the driving asymmetries on the stability region as well as the optimization process. The essential role of compressibility is phenomenologically addressed in order to find the constraints it imposes on the stability region.

  17. Conformations, hydrodynamic interactions, and instabilities of sedimenting semiflexible filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Saggiorato, G; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-01-01

    The conformations and dynamics of semiflexible filaments subject to a homogeneous external (gravitational) field, e.g., in a centrifuge, are studied numerically and analytically. The competition between hydrodynamic drag and bending elasticity generates new shapes and dynamical features. We show that the shape of a semiflexible filament undergoes instabilities as the external field increases. We identify two transitions that correspond to the excitation of higher bending modes. In particular, for strong fields the filament stabilizes in a non-planar shape, resulting in a sideways drift or in helical trajectories. For two interacting filaments, we find the same transitions, with the important consequence that the new non-planar shapes have an effective hydrodynamic repulsion, in contrast to the planar shapes which attract themselves even when their osculating planes are rotated with respect to each other. For the case of planar filaments, we show analytically and numerically that the relative velocity is not n...

  18. Active control of magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities in hot plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, world-wide energy consumption has risen dramatically, which leads to a quest for new energy sources. Fusion of hydrogen atoms in hot plasmas is an attractive approach to solve the energy problem, with abundant fuel, inherent safety and no long-lived radioactivity.  However, one of the limits on plasma performance is due to the various classes of magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities that may occur. The physics and control of these instabilities in modern magnetic confinement fusion devices is the subject of this book. Written by foremost experts, the contributions will provide valuable reference and up-to-date research reviews for "old hands" and newcomers alike.

  19. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Valcke, Sander; Roediger, Elke; Dejonghe, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate whether Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), equipped with artificial conductivity, is able to capture the physics of density/energy discontinuities in the case of the so-called shearing layers test, a test for examining Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. We can trace back each failure of SPH to show KH rolls to two causes: i) shock waves travelling in the simulation box and ii) particle clumping, or more generally, particle noise. The probable cause of shock waves is the Local Mixing Instability (LMI), previously identified in the literature. Particle noise on the other hand is a problem because it introduces a large error in the SPH momentum equation. We also investigate the role of artificial conductivity (AC). Including AC is necessary for the long-term behavior of the simulation (e.g. to get $\\lambda=1/2, 1$ KH rolls). In sensitive hydrodynamical simulations great care is however needed in selecting the AC signal velocity, with the default formulation leading to too much ...

  20. Local Radiative Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Instabilities in Optically Thick Media

    CERN Document Server

    Blaes, Omer M; Blaes, Omer; Socrates, Aristotle

    2003-01-01

    We examine the local conditions for radiative damping and driving of short wavelength, propagating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in static, optically thick, stratified equilibria. We show that so-called strange modes in stellar oscillation theory and magnetic photon bubbles are intimately related and are both fundamentally driven by the background radiation pressure acting on density and opacity fluctuations in compressible waves. We identify the necessary criteria for unstable driving of these waves, and show that this driving can exist in both gas and radiation pressure dominated media, as well as pure Thomson scattering media in the MHD case. We discuss the physical origin of these instabilities, and briefly describe the conditions under which they might be manifested in both stellar envelopes and accretion disks.

  1. A hydrodynamic approach to the study of Weibel instability

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    We show that the usual linear analysis of Weibel instability based on the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation may be reproduced in a purely hydrodynamic model. The latter is derived from a transport equation including collisions in the framework of Divergence Type Theories (DTT), complemented with the Entropy Production Variational Method (EPVM), a procedure that naturally involves the collision integral. We consider a distribution function that is the product of an equilibrium component times a non-equilibrium part determined by the EPVM. We consider a plasma of massless particles, i.e. a highly relativistic system. The dynamical equations that describe its evolution are written as conservation laws for the energy-momentum tensor, the electric current and a third order tensor. For an anisotropic but axially symmetric background with $p_x=p_y\

  2. Preparing for an Explosion: Hydrodynamic Instabilities and Turbulence in Presupernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Both observations and direct numerical simulations are discordant with predictions of conventional stellar evolution codes for the latest stages of a massive star's life prior to core collapse. We suggest that the problem lies in the treatment of turbulent convection in these codes, which ignores finite amplitude fluctuations in velocity and temperature, and their nonlinear interaction with nuclear burning. The hydrodynamic instabilities that may arise prompt us to discuss a number of far-reaching implications for the fates of massive stars. In particular, we explore connections to enhanced presupernova mass loss, unsteady nuclear burning and consequent eruptions, swelling of the stellar radius that may trigger violent interactions with a companion star, and potential modifications to the core structure that could dramatically impact calculations of the core-collapse mechanism itself. These modifications may be of fundamental importance to the interpretation of measured isotopic anomalies in meteorites, chang...

  3. Three Dimensional Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Protostellar Disks with Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, B. K.; Cassen, P.; Durisen, R. H.; Link, R.

    1997-05-01

    We present a series of extended three dimensional hydrodynamics calculations of protostellar cores in order to investigate the role of thermal energetics. One set of protostellar core models, denoted Hot Models, are isentropic equilibrium states formed by the axisymmetric collapse of uniformly rotating singular isothermal spheres. These objects are continuous star/disk systems, in which the star, the disk, and the star/disk boundary can be resolved in 3D in our hydrodynamics code. Since the disks of these equilibria are forced to have the same entropy as the stars, they are hotter than is typically considered appropriate for protostellar disks. Thus, the second set of models, denoted Cooled Models, are generated by first cooling the Hot Models in axisymmetry, and then calculating their subsequent nonaxisymmetric evolution. We compare evolutions of the Hot and Cooled models in which the disk is treated both adiabatically and isothermally, representing two extremes in cooling. The Hot models are marginally unstable to spiral disturbances that do not alter the protostellar core over many rotation periods. The Cooled models are highly unstable to multiple spirals, particularly two-armed spirals, which transport significant angular momentum and mass in a few dynamical times. In the isothermal evolution, the instability leads to the disruption of the disk and concentration of material into several dense, thin arcs. We compare these calculations with previous results and discuss the implications for star and solar system formation. This research is supported by grants NAGW-3399 DURISEN and RTOP 344-30-5101 CASSEN.

  4. Preparing for an explosion: Hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence in presupernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nathan; Arnett, W. David, E-mail: nathans@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Both observations and numerical simulations are discordant with predictions of conventional stellar evolution codes for the latest stages of a massive star's life before core collapse. The most dramatic example of this disconnect is in the eruptive mass loss occurring in the decade preceding Type IIn supernovae. We outline the key empirical evidence that indicates severe pre-supernova instability in massive stars, and we suggest that the chief reason that these outbursts are absent in stellar evolution models may lie in the treatment of turbulent convection in these codes. The mixing length theory that is used ignores (1) finite amplitude fluctuations in velocity and temperature and (2) their nonlinear interaction with nuclear burning. Including these fluctuations is likely to give rise to hydrodynamic instabilities in the latest burning sequences, which prompts us to discuss a number of far-reaching implications for the fates of massive stars. In particular, we explore connections to enhanced pre-supernova mass loss, unsteady nuclear burning and consequent eruptions, swelling of the stellar radius that may trigger violent interactions with a companion star, and potential modifications to the core structure that could dramatically alter calculations of the core-collapse explosion mechanism itself. These modifications may also impact detailed nucleosynthesis and measured isotopic anomalies in meteorites, as well as the interpretation of young core-collapse supernova remnants. Understanding these critical instabilities in the final stages of evolution may make possible the development of an early warning system for impending core collapse, if we can identify their asteroseismological or eruptive signatures.

  5. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  6. Hydrodynamic size distribution of gold nanoparticles controlled by repetition rate during pulsed laser ablation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-02-01

    Most investigations on the laser generation and fragmentation of nanoparticles focus on Feret particle size, although the hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles is of great importance, for example in biotechnology for diffusion in living cells, or in engineering, for a tuned rheology of suspensions. In this sense, the formation and fragmentation of gold colloidal nanoparticles using femtosecond laser ablation at variable pulse repetition rates (100-5000 Hz) in deionized water were investigated through their plasmon resonance and hydrodynamic diameter, measured by Dynamic Light Scattering. The increment of the repetition rate does not influence the ablation efficiency, but produces a decrease of the hydrodynamic diameter and blue-shift of the plasmon resonance of the generated gold nanoparticles. Fragmentation, induced by inter-pulse irradiation of the colloids was measured online, showing to be more effective low repetition rates. The pulse repetition rate is shown to be an appropriate laser parameter for hydrodynamic size control of nanoparticles without further influence on the production efficiency.

  7. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  8. Probabilistic events in shock driven multiphase hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Wolfgang; Denissen, Nick; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Multiphase flows are an important and complex topic of research with a rich parameter space. Historically many simplifications and assumptions have been made to allow simulation techniques to be applied to these systems. Some common assumptions include no partilce-particle effects, evenly distributed particle fields, no phase change, or even constant particle radii. For some flows, these assumptions may be applicable but as the systems undergo complex accelerations and eventually become turbulent these multiphase parameters can create significant effects. Through the use of FLAG, a multiphysics hydrodynamics code developed at Los Alamos national laboratory, these assumptions can be relaxed or eliminated to increase fidelity and guide the development of experiments. This talk will build on our previous work utilizing simulations on the shock driven multiphase instability with a new investigation into a greater parameter space provided by additional multiphase effects; including a probabilistic particle field, various particle radii, and particle-particle effects on the evolution of commonly studied interfaces. Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-16-25652.

  9. Instability of aqueous solutions of polyacrylamide in a hydrodynamic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makogon, B. P.; Bykova, E. N.; Bezrukova, M. A.; Klenin, S. I.; Ivanyuta, Yu. F.; Povkh, I. L.; Toryanik, A. I.

    1985-09-01

    This article discusses findings obtained regarding the effect of a hydrodynamic field on the reduced viscosity, effect of turbulent friction reduction, light scattering, double refraction, and optical density of aqueous solutions of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide.

  10. Jeans instability and hydrodynamic roots of Landau damping

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkovich, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Landau damping of Langmuir waves is shown to have hydrodynamic roots, and, in principle, might have been predicted (along with Langmuir waves) several decades earlier, soon after Jeans (1902) paper appeared.

  11. Introduction to the focus issue: chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, A; Eckert, K; Kalliadasis, S

    2012-09-01

    Pattern forming instabilities are often encountered in a wide variety of natural phenomena and technological applications, from self-organization in biological and chemical systems to oceanic or atmospheric circulation and heat and mass transport processes in engineering systems. Spatio-temporal structures are ubiquitous in hydrodynamics where numerous different convective instabilities generate pattern formation and complex spatiotemporal dynamics, which have been much studied both theoretically and experimentally. In parallel, reaction-diffusion processes provide another large family of pattern forming instabilities and spatio-temporal structures which have been analyzed for several decades. At the intersection of these two fields, "chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities" resulting from the coupling of hydrodynamic and reaction-diffusion processes have been less studied. The exploration of the new instability and symmetry-breaking scenarios emerging from the interplay between chemical reactions, diffusion and convective motions is a burgeoning field in which numerous exciting problems have emerged during the last few years. These problems range from fingering instabilities of chemical fronts and reactive fluid-fluid interfaces to the dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems in the presence of chaotic mixing. The questions to be addressed are at the interface of hydrodynamics, chemistry, engineering or environmental sciences to name a few and, as a consequence, they have started to draw the attention of several communities including both the nonlinear chemical dynamics and hydrodynamics communities. The collection of papers gathered in this Focus Issue sheds new light on a wide range of phenomena in the general area of chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities. It also serves as an overview of the current research and state-of-the-art in the field.

  12. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  13. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Jacquet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Martinez, D.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Felker, S.; Haan, S. W.; Remington, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF laser beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances (≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods (≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.

  14. Hydrodynamic ion sound instability in systems of a finite length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkarov, O.; Chapurin, O.; Smolyakov, A.; Kaganovich, I.; Ilgisonis, V.

    2016-09-01

    Plasmas permeated by an energetic ion beam is prone to the kinetic ion-sound instability that occurs as a result of the inverse Landau damping for ion velocity. It is shown here that in a finite length system there exists another type of the ion sound instability which occurs for v02 excitation of the lower-hybrid waves in Hall thruster. It is expected that this mechanism of ion sound and lower hybrid instabilities may be operative in E × B plasma discharges in which the ion beam is created by the application of the external voltage.

  15. A hydrodynamic linear instability in a system of confined colloidal rollers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Chaikin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    In a typical flow instability, the fastest growing wavelength is selected by two or more competing stresses. In this talk I will discuss a very different kind of instability, controlled by a single geometric parameter. We study theoretically a new instability which has been observed experimentally and numerically: the fingering of a front of suspended microrollers near a floor. Our continuum model shows that this instability is linear and that the size scale selection arises only from hydrodynamic interactions between the particles and the wall, independently of the driving forces and viscosity. We believe that this instability mechanism is quite generic and selects the instability length scale in a number of suspension/colloid systems near a wall. This work was supported primarily by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) program of the National Science Foundation under Award Number DMR-1420073.

  16. Experimental Observation of Nonlinear Mode Coupling In the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the transition from linear to highly nonlinear regimes. This work is part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF and of particular importance to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where careful attention to the form of the rise to final peak drive is calculated to prevent the RT instability from shredding the ablator in-flight and leading to ablator mixing into the cold fuel. The growth of the ablative RT instability was investigated using a planar plastic foil with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations and diagnosed using x-ray radiography. The foil was accelerated for 12ns by the x-ray drive created in a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. The dependence on initial conditions was investigated by systematically changing the modulation amplitude, ablator material and the modulation pattern. For each of these cases bubble mergers were observed and the nonlinear evolution of the RT instability showed insensitivity to the initial conditions. This experiment provides critical data needed to validate current theories on the ablative RT instability for indirect drive that relies on the ablative stabilization of short-scale modulations for ICF ignition. This paper will compare the experimental data to the current nonlinear theories. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  17. A pure hydrodynamic instability in shear flows and its application to astrophysical accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Sujit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We provide the possible resolution for the century old problem of hydrodynamic shear flows, which are apparently stable in linear analysis but shown to be turbulent in astrophysically observed data and experiments. This mismatch is noticed in a variety of systems, from laboratory to astrophysical flows. There are so many uncountable attempts made so far to resolve this mismatch, beginning with the early work of Kelvin, Rayleigh, and Reynolds towards the end of the nineteenth century. Here we show that the presence of stochastic noise, whose inevitable presence should not be neglected in the stability analysis of shear flows, leads to pure hydrodynamic linear instability therein. This explains the origin of turbulence, which has been observed/interpreted in astrophysical accretion disks, laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first solution to the long standing problem of hydrodynamic instability of Rayleigh stable flows.

  18. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D. [IFIMAR (CONICET-UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Deán Funes (7600) 3350 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  19. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT NUMERICAL INTERFACE METHODS ON HYDRODYNAMICS INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCOIS, MARIANNE M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DENDY, EDWARD D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LOWRIE, ROBERT B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LIVESCU, DANIEL [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEINKAMP, MICHAEL J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-11

    The authors compare the effects of different numerical schemes for the advection and material interface treatments on the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, using the RAGE hydro-code. The interface growth and its surface density (interfacial area) versus time are investigated. The surface density metric shows to be better suited to characterize the difference in the flow, than the conventional interface growth metric. They have found that Van Leer's limiter combined to no interface treatment leads to the largest surface area. Finally, to quantify the difference between the numerical methods they have estimated the numerical viscosity in the linear-regime at different scales.

  20. X-ray lasing as a result of an induced instability in an ablative capillary discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellwi, S. S.; Juschkin, L.; Ferri, S.; Kunze, H. J.; Koshelev, K. N.; E. Louis,

    2001-01-01

    We report lasing of the CVI Balmer-alpha line at 18.22 nm using the new technique of an induced MHD instability in an ablative capillary discharge. A large spike of this line during the second half-cycle of the discharge is observed. The spike is identified as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a

  1. The numerical study of shock-induced hydrodynamic instability and mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tao; Bai Jing-Song; Li Ping; Zhong Min

    2009-01-01

    Based on multi-fluid volume fraction and piecewise parabolic method (PPM), a multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and applied to the problems of shock-induced hydrodynamic interfacial instability and mixing. Simulations of gas/liquid interface instability show that the influences of initial perturbations on the fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth are significant, especially at the late stages, while grids have only a slight effect on the FMZ width, when the interface is impulsively accelerated by a shock wave passing through it. A numerical study of the hydrodynamic interfacial instability and mixing of gaseous flows impacted by re-shocks is presented. It reveals that the numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results and the mixing growth rate strongly depends on initial conditions. Ultimately, the jelly layer experiment relevant to the instability impacted by exploding is simulated. The shape of jelly interface, position of front face of jelly layer, crest and trough of perturbation versus time are given; their simulated results are in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. X-ray shadow imprint of hydrodynamic instabilities on the surface of inertial confinement fusion capsules by the fuel fill tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Martinez, D. A.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Moore, A.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Stadermann, M.; Weber, C. R.

    2017-03-01

    Measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth for a high-density carbon ablator for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility are reported. We observe significant unexpected features on the capsule surface created by shadows of the capsule fill tube, as illuminated by laser-irradiated x-ray spots on the hohlraum wall. These shadows increase the spatial size and shape of the fill tube perturbation in a way that can significantly degrade performance in layered implosions compared to previous expectations. The measurements were performed at a convergence ratio of ˜2 using in-flight x-ray radiography. The initial seed due to shadow imprint is estimated to be equivalent to ˜50-100 nm of solid ablator material. This discovery has prompted the need for a mitigation strategy for future inertial confinement fusion designs as proposed here.

  3. Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in a Dynamic Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    For liquid-propellant combustion, the Landau/Levich hydrodynamic models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Analysis of these extended models is greatly facilitated by exploiting the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio rho. Neglecting thermal coupling effects, an asymptotic expression was then derived for the cellular stability boundary A(sub p)(k) where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. The results explicitly indicate the stabilizing effects of gravity on long-wave disturbances, and those of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limit of weak gravity, hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion becomes a long-wave, instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumbers. In addition, surface tension and viscosity (both liquid and gas) each produce comparable effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to the previous analyses in which one or more of these effects was neglected. For A(sub p)= O, the Landau/Levich results are recovered in appropriate limiting cases, although this typically corresponds to a hydrodynamically unstable parameter regime for p nitrate (HAN)-based liquid propellants, which often exhibit negative pressure sensitivities. While nonsteady combustion may correspond to secondary and higher-order bifurcations above the cellular boundary, it may also be a manifestation of this pulsating type of hydrodynamic instability. In the present work, a nonzero temperature sensitivity is incorporated into our previous asymptotic analyses. This entails a coupling of the energy equation to the previous purely hydrodynamic problem, and leads to a

  4. Investigating the Magnetorotational Instability with Dedalus, and Open-Souce Hydrodynamics Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Keaton J; /UC, Berkeley, aff SLAC

    2012-08-31

    The magnetorotational instability is a fluid instability that causes the onset of turbulence in discs with poloidal magnetic fields. It is believed to be an important mechanism in the physics of accretion discs, namely in its ability to transport angular momentum outward. A similar instability arising in systems with a helical magnetic field may be easier to produce in laboratory experiments using liquid sodium, but the applicability of this phenomenon to astrophysical discs is unclear. To explore and compare the properties of these standard and helical magnetorotational instabilities (MRI and HRMI, respectively), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities were added to Dedalus, an open-source hydrodynamics simulator. Dedalus is a Python-based pseudospectral code that uses external libraries and parallelization with the goal of achieving speeds competitive with codes implemented in lower-level languages. This paper will outline the MHD equations as implemented in Dedalus, the steps taken to improve the performance of the code, and the status of MRI investigations using Dedalus.

  5. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  6. Hydrodynamic instability in the open system of the iodate-arsenous acid reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Pimienta, Véronique; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2013-10-28

    Hydrodynamic instability arising in horizontally propagating vertical chemical fronts leading to the formation of a single stable convection roll is investigated experimentally in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction for various stoichiometry. In the presence of a free surface, the tilted reaction front becomes more elongated due to the evaporation of the surface active iodine and the decrease in the surface tension during the reaction. The experimental conditions are then identified where Marangoni instability represents the driving force for the distortion of the reaction front at the surface.

  7. Numerical simulations of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in planar inertial-confinement-fusion targets using the FastRad3D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Karasik, M.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a central issue in the performance of laser-accelerated inertial-confinement-fusion targets. Historically, the accurate numerical simulation of this instability has been a challenging task for many radiation hydrodynamics codes, particularly when it comes to capturing the ablatively stabilized region of the linear dispersion spectrum and modeling ab initio perturbations. Here, we present recent results from two-dimensional numerical simulations of the ablative RT instability in planar laser-ablated foils that were performed using the Eulerian code FastRad3D. Our study considers polystyrene, (cryogenic) deuterium-tritium, and beryllium target materials, quarter- and third-micron laser light, and low and high laser intensities. An initial single-mode surface perturbation is modeled in our simulations as a small modulation to the target mass density and the ablative RT growth-rate is calculated from the time history of areal-mass variations once the target reaches a steady-state acceleration. By performing a sequence of such simulations with different perturbation wavelengths, we generate a discrete dispersion spectrum for each of our examples and find that in all cases the linear RT growth-rate γ is well described by an expression of the form γ = α [ k g / ( 1 + ɛ k L m ) ] 1 / 2 - β k V a , where k is the perturbation wavenumber, g is the acceleration of the target, Lm is the minimum density scale-length, Va is the ablation velocity, and ɛ is either one or zero. The dimensionless coefficients α and β in the above formula depend on the particular target and laser parameters and are determined from two-dimensional simulation results through the use of a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure. While our findings are generally consistent with those of Betti et al. (Phys. Plasmas 5, 1446 (1998)), the ablative RT growth-rates predicted in this investigation are somewhat smaller than the values previously reported for the

  8. On pulsating and cellular forms of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolis, S.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

    1997-11-01

    An extended Landau/Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion, one that allows for a local dependence of the burning rate on the (gas) pressure at the liquid/gas interface, exhibits not only the classical hydrodynamic cellular instability attributed to Landau, but also a pulsating hydrodynamic instability associated with sufficiently negative pressure sensitivities. Exploiting the realistic limit of small values of the gas-to-liquid density ratio {rho}, analytical formulas for both neutral stability boundaries may be obtained by expanding all quantities in appropriate powers of {rho} in each of three distinguished wavenumber regimes. In particular, composite analytical expressions are derived for the neutral stability boundaries A{sub p}(k), where A{sub p} is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. For the cellular boundary, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for negative values of A{sub p}, which is characteristic of many hydroxylammonium nitrate-based liquid propellants over certain pressure ranges. In contrast, the pulsating hydrodynamic stability boundary is insensitive to gravitational and surface-tension effects, but is more sensitive to the effects of liquid viscosity since, for typical nonzero values of the latter, the pulsating boundary decreases to larger negative values of A{sub p} as k increases through O(1) values.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor finger instability mixing in hydrodynamic shell convection models

    CERN Document Server

    Mocak, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Mixing processes in stars driven by composition gradients as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are not anticipated. They are supported only by hydrodynamic studies of stellar convection. We find that such mixing occurs below the bottom edge of convection zones in our multidimensional hydrodynamic shell convection models. It operates at interfaces created by off-center nuclear burning, where less dense gas with higher mean molecular weight is located above denser gas with a lower mean molecular weight. We discuss the mixing under various conditions with hydrodynamic convection models based on stellar evolutionary calculations of the core helium flash in a 1.25 Msun star, the core carbon flash in a 9.3 Msun star, and of oxygen burning shell in a star with a mass of 23 Msun. We simulate the hydrodynamic behavior of shell convection during various phases of stellar evolution with the Eulerian hydrodynamics code HERAKLES in two and three spatial dimensions. Initial models for this purpose are obtained by...

  10. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing (Review of NVIIEF efforts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Yu.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01

    This report describes an extensive program of investigations conducted at Arzamas-16 in Russia over the past several decades. The focus of the work is on material interface instability and the mixing of two materials. Part 1 of the report discusses analytical and computational studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing. The EGAK codes are described and results are illustrated for several types of unstable flow. Semiempirical turbulence transport equations are derived for the mixing of two materials, and their capabilities are illustrated for several examples. Part 2 discusses the experimental studies that have been performed to investigate instabilities and turbulent mixing. Shock-tube and jelly techniques are described in considerable detail. Results are presented for many circumstances and configurations.

  11. Linear Simulations of the Cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Hydrodynamics and MHD

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Song

    2013-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when density-stratified interfaces are impulsively accelerated, typically by a shock wave. We present a numerical method to simulate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cylindrical geometry. The ideal MHD equations are linearized about a time-dependent base state to yield linear partial differential equations governing the perturbed quantities. Convergence tests demonstrate that second order accuracy is achieved for smooth flows, and the order of accuracy is between first and second order for flows with discontinuities. Numerical results are presented for cases of interfaces with positive Atwood number and purely azimuthal perturbations. In hydrodynamics, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth of perturbations is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor growth phase. In MHD, numerical results indicate that the perturbations can be suppressed for sufficiently large perturbation wavenumbers and magnetic fields.

  12. Hydrodynamic Instability in High-speed Direct Laser Deposition for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeny; Klimova, Olga; Babkin, Konstantin

    High speed direct laser deposition, when product forms from metal powder, transferred by gas-powder jet, supplied coaxially or non-coaxially to focused laser beam, in one of most prospective additive technologies for production parts for aircraft engines. The limit of process productivity is connected with development of hydrodynamic instability of the melt pool in conditions of high power laser action and material supply by gas-powder jet. Theoretical analysis and experiments allowed clarified a physical nature of instability appearance, determine a stability conditions and invent a methods which allow avoid instability in deposition process. Nozzles for direct laser deposition, designed with consideration of stability conditions, allow get a level of process productivity more then 2 kg/h. The developed technology of deposition and technological equipment, based on high power fiber laser, has been used for manufacturing of parts for "high temperature" unit of aircraft engine.

  13. The Nature of the Radiative Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Radiatively Supported Thomson Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Shaviv, N J

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheres having a significant radiative support are shown to be intrinsically unstable at luminosities above a critical fraction Gamma_crit ~ 0.5-0.85 of the Eddington limit, with the exact value depending on the boundary conditions. Two different types of absolute radiation-hydrodynamic instabilities of acoustic waves are found to take place even in the electron scattering dominated limit. Both instabilities grow over dynamical time scales and both operate on non radial modes. One is stationary and arises only after the effects of the boundary conditions are taken into account, while the second is a propagating wave and is insensitive to the boundary conditions. Although a significant wind can be generated by these instabilities even below the classical Eddington luminosity limit, quasi-stable configurations can exist beyond the Eddington limit due to the generally reduced effective opacity. The study is done using a rigorous numerical linear analysis of a gray plane parallel atmosphere under the Eddingto...

  14. Instability of an ablatively-accelerated slab in the case of non-normal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Kane, J O [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Pound, M W [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Remington, B A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    When a surface of a radiation-absorbing material is illuminated by a sufficiently intense radiation, the gas ablated from the surface produces reactive a force causing an acceleration of the initial matter and setting a stage for instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type. New effects associated with the non-normal incidence of the radiation are analysed. It has been shown that, at large enough tilt, the instability becomes significantly faster than in the 'normal' case and unstable modes acquire finite phase velocity along the surface. The most unstable perturbations are rolls whose orientation depends on the angular distribution of radiation. These results are of interest for laboratory studies of ablation fronts and for the theory of photoevaporation fronts in astrophysics.

  15. Ablative Stabilization of the Deceleration-Phase Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, control No. 2000-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobatchev, V.; Betti, R.

    2000-10-01

    The growth rates of the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability for imploding inertial confinement fusion capsules are calculated and compared with the results of numerical simulations. It is found that the unstable spectrum and the growth rates are significantly reduced by the finite ablation flow at the shell's inner surface. For typical direct-drive capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility, the unstable spectrum exhibits a cutoff for {ell} {approx} 90.

  16. Filamentation due to the Weibel Instability in two counterstreaming laser ablated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Yuan, Dawei; Gao, Lan; Liu, Xun; Chen, Yangao; Jia, Qing; Hua, Neng; Qiao, Zhanfeng; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Baoqiang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Zhao, Gang; Ji, Hantao; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Weibel-type filamentation instability was observed in the interaction of two counter streaming laser ablated plasma flows, which were supersonic, collisionless, and closely relevant to astrophysical conditions. The plasma flows were created by irradiating a pair of oppositely standing plastic (CH) foils with 1ns-pulsed laser beams of total energy of 1.7 kJ in two laser spots. With characteristics diagnosed in experiments, the calculated features of Weibel-type filaments are in good agreement with measurements.

  17. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Paul R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockefeller, Gabriel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kares, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  18. On the Existence of Hydrodynamic Instability in Single Diffusive Bottom Heavy Systems with Permeable Boundaries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Gupta; R G Shandil

    2011-11-01

    We utilize the reformulated equations of the classical theory, as derived by Banerjee et al.(J. Math. Anal. Appl. 175 (1993) 458), to establish mathematically, the existence of hydrodynamic instability in single diffusive bottom heavy systems, when considered in the more general framework of the boundary conditions of the type specified by Beavers and Joseph (J. Fluid Mech. 30 (1967) 197), in the parameter regime $T_0_2>1$, where $T_0$ and 2 being some properly chosen mean temperature and coefficient of specific heat (at constant volume) variation due to temperature variation respectively.

  19. Hydrodynamic instabilities and mix studies on NIF: predictions, observations, and a path forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E. I.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Petrasso, R.; Pino, J.; Ralph, J. E.; Raman, K.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Spears, B. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L. J.; Tipton, R.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Weber, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The goals of the Mix Campaign are to determine how mix affects performance, locate the “mix cliff”, locate the source of the mix, and develop mitigation methods that allow performance to be increased. We have used several different drive pulse shapes and capsule designs in the Mix Campaign, to understand sensitivity to drive peak power, level of coast, rise time to peak power, adiabat, and dopant level in the capsule. Ablator material mixing into the hot spot has been shown conclusively with x-ray spectroscopy. The observed neutron yield drops steeply when the hot spot mix mass becomes too large. The mix appears to be driven by ablation- front Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. A high foot, higher adiabat drive has a more stable ablation front and has allowed the mix mass in the hot spot to be reduced significantly. Two recent high foot shots achieved neutron yields > 1015 and measured neutron yield over clean 1D simulation (YOC) > 50%, which was one of the central goals of the Mix Campaign.

  20. Initiation, ablation, precursor formation, and instability analysis of thin foil liner Z-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesener, Isaac Curtis

    This dissertation presents the results of mostly experimental work studying the early-time behavior of thin foil liners as compared to wire-array Z-pinches. It involves three studies, covering initiation, ablation and precursor formation, and instability analysis. Initiation was studied by observing the optical emission of various thickness (0.6-23.5 μm Cu) liners using a streak camera. It was found that thinner liners initiated sooner, more quickly, and more uniformly than thicker liners. This correlated well with both an increase in instantaneous dJ/dt at the time of first emission as well as the inductive voltage at the time of first emission. The threshold for uniform initiation was dJ/dt>3.5×1016Acm -2s-1. Uniform initiation is important for liners because nonuniformities could lead to enhanced instabilities and poor liner performance (compression, x-ray production, etc.). Ablation and precursor formation of wire-arrays (16x75 μm Cu) and liners (6 μm Cu) were studied using r-θ density maps and radial mass profiles created by an axial X pinch radiography diagnostic. These images show very strong differences in this stage of the Z-pinch. Wire-arrays develop complex, azimuthally varying ablation structures that lead to dense precursors. Liners, however, show significantly reduced and azimuthally uniform ablation leading to an order of magnitude less dense precursor on axis. This is likely due to the discrete versus continuous nature of wire-arrays versus liners. With wire-arrays, plasma that is created on the outside of the wires can reach the array axis by being swept through the gaps between the stationary wire cores. In contrast, liners have no “gaps” for plasma to flow through. Therefore, any plasma that is created on the outside of the liner is trapped there until the bulk of the liner moves with the implosion. Consequently, only the plasma that is created on the inside of the liner is able to contribute to precursor formation. This is an important

  1. Three-Dimensional Single-Mode Nonlinear Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, R.; Betti, R.; Sanz, J.; Liu, B.; Frank, A.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (ART) instability is studied in three dimensions for conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion targets. The simulations are performed using our newly developed code ART3D and an astrophysical code AstroBEAR. The laser ablation can suppress the growth of the short-wavelength modes in the linear phase but may enhance their growth in the nonlinear phase because of the vortex-acceleration mechanism. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the bubble velocity grows faster than predicted in the classical 3-D theory. When compared to 2-D results, 3-D short-wavelength bubbles grow faster and do not reach saturation. The unbounded 3-D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. The vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes into the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume. A density plateau is observed inside a nonlinear ART bubble and the plateau density is higher for shorter-wavelength modes. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. NIF laboratory astrophysics simulations investigating the effects of a radiative shock on hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, A. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Kalantar, D.; MacLaren, S.; Raman, K.; Miles, A.; Trantham, Matthew; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K.; Doss, F. W.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    This poster will describe simulations based on results from ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the effects of radiative shock on hydrodynamically unstable surfaces. The experiments performed on NIF uniquely provide the necessary conditions required to emulate radiative shock that occurs in astrophysical systems. The core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars is such an example wherein the interaction between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar medium creates a region susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. Radiative and nonradiative experiments were performed to show that R-T growth should be reduced by the effects of the radiative shocks that occur during this core-collapse. Simulations were performed using the radiation hydrodynamics code Hyades using the experimental conditions to find the mean interface acceleration of the instability and then further analyzed in the buoyancy drag model to observe how the material expansion contributes to the mix-layer growth. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under Grant Number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  3. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.A.Smalyuk; S.V.Weber; D.T.Casey; D.S.Clark; J.E.Field; S.W.Haan; A.V.Hamza; D.E.Hoover; O.L.Landen; A.Nikroo; H.F.Robey; C.R.Weber

    2015-01-01

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional(3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility(NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841(2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3D simulations. At a convergence ratio of~2.4, the measured modulation levels were~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. Future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘nativeroughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.

  4. Analysis of Hydrodynamic (Landau) Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1997-01-01

    which steady, planar burning is unstable to nonsteady, and/or nonplanar (cellular) modes of burning. These instabilities thus lead to a number of interesting phenomena, such as the sloshing type of waves that have been observed in mixtures of HAN and TriEthanolAmmonium Nitrate (TEAN) with water. Although the Froude number was treated as an O(1) quantity in these studies, the limit of small inverse Froude number corresponding to the microgravity regime is increasingly of interest and can be treated explicitly, leading to various limiting forms of the models, the neutral stability boundaries, and, ultimately, the evolution equations that govern the nonlinear dynamics of the propagating reaction front. In the present work, we formally exploit this limiting parameter regime to compare some of the features of hydrodynamic instability of liquid-propellant combustion at reduced gravity with the same phenomenon at normal gravity.

  5. Hydrodynamical instabilities induced by atomic diffusion in A stars and their consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Deal, M; Vauclair, S

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Atomic diffusion, including the effect of radiative accelerations on individual elements, leads to important variations of the chemical composition inside the stars. The accumulation in specific layers of the elements, which are the main contributors of the local opacity, leads to hydrodynamical instabilities that modify the internal stellar structure and surface abundances. Our aim is to study these effects and compare the resulting surface abundances with spectroscopic observations Methods. We computed the detailed structure of A-type stars including these effects. We used the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code (TGEC), where radiative accelerations are computed using the Single Valued Parameter (SVP) method, and we added double-diffusive convection with mixing coefficients deduced from three-dimensional (3D) simulations. Results. We show that the modification of the initial chemical composition has important effects on the internal stellar mixing and leads to different surface abundances of the elements. ...

  6. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional modulations in radiation-driven implosions with "low-foot" and "high-foot" drives at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Chen, K.-C.; Clark, D. S.; Farrell, M.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D.; Kroll, J. J.; Landen, O. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth has been studied using three-dimensional (3-D) broadband modulations by comparing "high-foot" and "low-foot" spherical plastic (CH) capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial perturbations included capsule outer-surface roughness and capsule-mounting membranes ("tents") that were similar to those used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The tents with thicknesses of 31-nm, 46-nm, and 109-nm were used in the experiments. The outer-surface roughness in the "low-foot" experiment was similar to the standard specification, while it was increased by ˜4 times in the "high-foot" experiment to compensate for the reduced growth. The ablation-front instability growth was measured using a Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography platform at a convergence ratio of ˜3. The dominant capsule perturbations, generated by the tent mountings, had measured perturbation amplitudes comparable to the capsule thickness with the "low-foot" drive. These tent perturbations were reduced by ˜3 to 10 times in implosions with the "high-foot" drive. Unexpectedly, the measured perturbations with initially thinner tents were either larger or similar to the measured perturbations with thicker tents for both "high-foot" and "low-foot" drives. While the measured instability growth of 3-D broadband perturbations was also significantly reduced by ˜5 to 10 times with the "high-foot" drive, compared to the "low-foot" drive, the growth mitigation was stronger than expected based on previous "growth-factor" results measured with two-dimensional modulations [D. T. Casey et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 011102 (2014)]. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the 3-D modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule having a stronger effect on the overall growth of capsule perturbations than the outer-surface capsule roughness.

  7. How archer fish achieve a powerful impact: hydrodynamic instability of a pulsed jet in Toxotes jaculatrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailati, Alberto; Zinnato, Luca; Cerbino, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Archer fish knock down insects anchored to vegetation by hitting them with a precisely aimed jet of water. The striking force of the jet at the impact is such to overcome the strong anchoring forces of insects. The origin of the effectiveness of such hunting mechanism has been long searched for inside of the fish, in the unsuccessful attempt to identify internal structures dedicated to the amplification of muscular power. Here we perform a kinematic analysis of the jet emitted by two specimens of Toxotes jaculatrix. We estimate that at the impact the jet conveys a typical specific power of about 3000 W/kg, which is well above the maximum specific power of the order of 500 W/kg deliverable by a vertebrate muscle. Unexpectedly, we find that the amplification of muscular power occurs outside of the fish, and is due to a hydrodynamic instability of the jet akin to those occurring in Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing. The investigated fish are found to modulate the velocity of the jet at the orifice to favor the formation of a single, large, water drop that hits the prey abruptly with a large momentum. The observed mechanism represents a remarkable example of use of an external hydrodynamic lever that does possibly not entail the high evolutionary cost needed for the development of highly specialized internal structures dedicated to the storing of mechanical energy.

  8. How archer fish achieve a powerful impact: hydrodynamic instability of a pulsed jet in Toxotes jaculatrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Vailati

    Full Text Available Archer fish knock down insects anchored to vegetation by hitting them with a precisely aimed jet of water. The striking force of the jet at the impact is such to overcome the strong anchoring forces of insects. The origin of the effectiveness of such hunting mechanism has been long searched for inside of the fish, in the unsuccessful attempt to identify internal structures dedicated to the amplification of muscular power. Here we perform a kinematic analysis of the jet emitted by two specimens of Toxotes jaculatrix. We estimate that at the impact the jet conveys a typical specific power of about 3000 W/kg, which is well above the maximum specific power of the order of 500 W/kg deliverable by a vertebrate muscle. Unexpectedly, we find that the amplification of muscular power occurs outside of the fish, and is due to a hydrodynamic instability of the jet akin to those occurring in Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing. The investigated fish are found to modulate the velocity of the jet at the orifice to favor the formation of a single, large, water drop that hits the prey abruptly with a large momentum. The observed mechanism represents a remarkable example of use of an external hydrodynamic lever that does possibly not entail the high evolutionary cost needed for the development of highly specialized internal structures dedicated to the storing of mechanical energy.

  9. Analytic approach to nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities driven by time-dependent accelerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-09-28

    We extend our earlier model for Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities to the more general class of hydrodynamic instabilities driven by a time-dependent acceleration g(t) . Explicit analytic solutions for linear as well as nonlinear amplitudes are obtained for several g(t)'s by solving a Schroedinger-like equation d{sup 2}{eta}/dt{sup 2} - g(t)kA{eta} = 0 where A is the Atwood number and k is the wavenumber of the perturbation amplitude {eta}(t). In our model a simple transformation k {yields} k{sub L} and A {yields} A{sub L} connects the linear to the nonlinear amplitudes: {eta}{sup nonlinear} (k,A) {approx} (1/k{sub L})ln{eta}{sup linear} (k{sub L}, A{sub L}). The model is found to be in very good agreement with direct numerical simulations. Bubble amplitudes for a variety of accelerations are seen to scale with s defined by s = {integral} {radical}g(t)dt, while spike amplitudes prefer scaling with displacement {Delta}x = {integral}[{integral}g(t)dt]dt.

  10. Fractal flame structure due to the hydrodynamic Darrieus-Landau instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rixin; Bai, Xue-Song; Bychkov, Vitaly

    2015-12-01

    By using large scale numerical simulations, we obtain fractal structure, which develops at originally planar flame fronts due to the hydrodynamic Darrieus-Landau (DL) instability bending the fronts. We clarify some important issues regarding the DL fractal flames, which have been debated for a long time. We demonstrate an increase of the flame propagation speed with the hypothetic channel width, which controls the length scale of the instability development. We show that this increase may be fitted by a power law indicating the mean fractal properties of the flame front structure. The power exponent in this law is found to be not a universal constant, rather it depends on the flame properties—on the density drop at the front. Using box counting on the simulated flame front shapes we show the fractal flame dimension at the intermediate scale is smaller than the one given by the power law, but it has a similar dependency on the density drop. We also obtain a formation of pockets at the DL fractal flame fronts, which previously has been associated only with turbulent burning.

  11. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing: Review of VNIIEF efforts. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Y.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The report presents the basic results of some calculations, theoretical and experimental efforts in the study of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and the turbulent mixing which is caused by their evolution. Since the late forties the VNIIEF has been conducting these investigations. This report is based on the data which were published in different times in Russian and foreign journals. The first part of the report deals with calculations an theoretical techniques for the description of hydrodynamic instabilities applied currently, as well as with the results of several individual problems and their comparison with the experiment. These methods can be divided into two types: direct numerical simulation methods and phenomenological methods. The first type includes the regular 2D and 3D gasdynamical techniques as well as the techniques based on small perturbation approximation and on incompressible liquid approximation. The second type comprises the techniques based on various phenomenological turbulence models. The second part of the report describes the experimental methods and cites the experimental results of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meskov instability studies as well as of turbulent mixing. The applied methods were based on thin-film gaseous models, on jelly models and liquid layer models. The research was done for plane and cylindrical geometries. As drivers, the shock tubes of different designs were used as well as gaseous explosive mixtures, compressed air and electric wire explosions. The experimental results were applied in calculational-theoretical technique calibrations. The authors did not aim at covering all VNIIEF research done in this field of science. To a great extent the choice of the material depended on the personal contribution of the author in these studies.

  12. Formation of polygonal fault systems as a result of hydrodynamical instabilities in clay-rich deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Teodolina; Antoine, Raphael; Rabinowicz, Michel; Baratoux, David; Darrozes, José; Kurita, Kei; D'Uston, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    Fine grained deposits as chalks and clays are characterised by the development of polygonal fault systems [1]. For the clay-rich deposits, two different environments are associated with their formation. First, on continents, dewatering leads to the development of polygonal desiccation cracks which have a centimetric to metric size [2]. Polygonal faults are also observed in sub-marine sedimentary deposits and here, can reach hectometric to kilometric size [3]. Since the giant polygons develop on basins with no clear evidences of tectonic stresses, the fracturing is attributed to stresses due to horizontal density variations generated during the basin subsidence. Several models have been proposed to explain the formation of the giant polygons and the two main hypotheses are the syneresis (spontaneous horizontal contraction) proposed by [4] and the low coefficient of friction of clay proposed by [5]. However, new understandings in the clay rheology and in the hydrodynamical instabilities, controlling the development of compaction in unconsolidated and consolidated clay deposits, permit us to propose an alternative hypothesis. We consider that the development of giant polygons results from the superposition of hydrodynamical instabilities leading to the formation of (i) mm-size agglomerates of clay particles while the deposit is unconsolidated [6], followed after by the consolidation of this layer, then (ii) hectometric to kilometric compaction spheres develop [7] and (iii) finally ends with the occurrence of hydrothermal and plastic convections. We show that the crucial conditions for the development of hectometric to kilometric size polygonal fault systems are: 1) the high permeability of the clay-rich deposit composed of mm-size agglomerates and 2) the dramatic increase of the strength of the clay as the deposit consolidates. [1] Dewhurst et al., (1999), Mar. Petr. Geol., 16 (8), 793-810. [2] Weinberger (1999), J. Struct. Geol., 21, 379-386. [3] Andresen and Huuse

  13. A hydrodynamic approach to the study of anisotropic instabilities in dissipative relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    We develop a purely hydrodynamic formalism to describe collisional, anisotropic instabilities in a relativistic plasma, that are usually described with kinetic theory tools. Our main motivation is the fact that coarse-grained models of high particle number systems give more clear and comprehensive physical descriptions of those systems than purely kinetic approaches, and can be more easily tested experimentally as well as numerically. Also they make it easier to follow perturbations from linear to nonlinear regimes. In particular, we aim at developing a theory that describes both a background nonequilibrium fluid configurations and its perturbations, to be able to account for the backreaction of the latter on the former. Our system of equations includes the usual conservation laws for the energy-momentum tensor and for the electric current, and the equations for two new tensors that encode the information about dissipation. To make contact with kinetic theory, we write the different tensors as the moments of a nonequilibrium one-particle distribution function (1pdf) which, for illustrative purposes, we take in the form of a Grad-like ansatz. Although this choice limits the applicability of the formalism to states not far from equilibrium, it retains the main features of the underlying kinetic theory. We assume the validity of the Vlasov-Boltzmann equation, with a collision integral given by the Anderson-Witting prescription, which is more suitable for highly relativistic systems than Marle’s (or Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) form, and derive the conservation laws by taking its corresponding moments. We apply our developments to study the emergence of instabilities in an anisotropic, but axially symmetric background. For small departures of isotropy we find the dispersion relation for normal modes, which admit unstable solutions for a wide range of values of the parameter space.

  14. Flagellum synchronization inhibits large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities in sperm suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöller, Simon F.; Keaveny, Eric E.

    2016-11-01

    Sperm in suspension can exhibit large-scale collective motion and form coherent structures. Our picture of such coherent motion is largely based on reduced models that treat the swimmers as self-locomoting rigid bodies that interact via steady dipolar flow fields. Swimming sperm, however, have many more degrees of freedom due to elasticity, have a more exotic shape, and generate spatially-complex, time-dependent flow fields. While these complexities are known to lead to phenomena such as flagellum synchronization and attraction, how these effects impact the overall suspension behaviour and coherent structure formation is largely unknown. Using a computational model that captures both flagellum beating and elasticity, we simulate suspensions on the order of 103 individual swimming sperm cells whose motion is coupled through the surrounding Stokesian fluid. We find that the tendency for flagella to synchronize and sperm to aggregate inhibits the emergence of the large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities often associated with active suspensions. However, when synchronization is repressed by adding noise in the flagellum actuation mechanism, the picture changes and the structures that resemble large-scale vortices appear to re-emerge. Supported by an Imperial College PhD scholarship.

  15. Hydrodynamic instabilities in the developing region of an axially rotating pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda-Barea, A; Fabrellas-García, C; Parras, L; Pino, C del, E-mail: cpino@uma.es [Universidad de Málaga, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Industrial, Ampliación Campus de Teatinos, 29071, Málaga, España (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    We conduct experiments in a rotating Hagen–Poiseuille flow (RHPF) through flow visualizations when the flow becomes convectively and absolutely unstable at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, Re. We characterize periodic patterns at a very high swirl parameter, L, when the flow overcomes the absolutely unstable region. These non-steady helical filaments wrapped around the axis appear in the developing region of the pipe. Experimentally, we compute the onset of these oscillations in the (L, Re)-plane finding that the rotation rate decreases as the Reynolds number increases in the process of achieving the time-dependent state. Additionally, we report information regarding frequencies and wavelengths that appear downstream of the rotating pipe for convectively and absolutely unstable flows, even for very high swirl parameters at which the flow becomes time-dependent in the developing region. We do not observe variations in the trends of these parameters, so these hydrodynamic instabilities in the developing region do not affect the unstable travelling waves downstream of the pipe. (paper)

  16. Evidence for a bubble-competition regime in indirectly driven ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D A; Smalyuk, V A; Kane, J O; Casner, A; Liberatore, S; Masse, L P

    2015-05-29

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130  μm thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation front is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. The mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.

  17. Experiments on the Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Instabilities of Ablatively Accelerated Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    ARRAY C1UNTAINING T7IE F07WAI’L MASS L R.M.L I AN ARRAY LON4AINING 1HE BACKWARD MALS C i.Q0f I33 THlE TOJAL IORWARE’ MAS$ C TRME IS THE TOTAL BACKWARD...laser axis of this mal bec;iuse: (I , the full-., ionized mass densities for AI surface appears stationary for the duration of the 3 𔃼,o and Cli dffer...C i %. C’ 0 w 0 G)C 0 C w. W~ 0 m w I * I- =4 (.3 It ) Cl) U) a 0 oc )0C M- ojo m’ 0- #- s... I- 1-0- . -WW Z7 I - cr Lu IO0 if It ifi" 0--X E L CL A

  18. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  19. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  20. Hourglass control for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics removes tensile and rank-deficiency instabilities. Hourglass control for SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzenmüller, G. C.; Sauer, M.; May, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a stabilization scheme for elastoplastic Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which overcomes two major challenges: (i) the tensile instability inherent to the updated Lagrangian approach is suppressed and (ii) the rank-deficiency instability inherent to the nodal integration approach is cured. To achieve these goals, lessons learned from the Finite-Element Method are transferred to SPH. In particular, an analogue of hourglass control is derived for SPH, which locally linearizes the deformation field to obtain stable and accurate solutions, without the need to resort to stabilization via excessive artificial viscosity. The resulting SPH scheme combines the ability of updated Lagrangian SPH to model truly large deformations with the accuracy and stability needed to faithfully perform simulations. This claim is supported by the analysis of problematic cases and the simulation of an impact scenario.

  1. Monami as an oscillatory hydrodynamic instability in a submerged sea grass bed

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Ravi; Bandi, M M; Mahadevan, Amala

    2014-01-01

    The onset of monami, the synchronous waving of sea grass beds driven by a steady flow, is modeled as a linear instability of the flow. Our model treats the drag exerted by the grass in establishing the steady flow profile, and in damping out perturbations to it. This damping leads to a finite threshold flow for the instability, which agrees with experimental observations. This role of vegetation drag differentiates our mechanism from the previous hypothesis that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability underlies monami.

  2. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the nonlinear development of the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in a rotating annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycansky, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations are presented which may help assess the effectiveness of the instability in transporting angular momentum in the equatorial zones of stars and planets which are stably stratified with respect to convection. The calculations were made by numerically integrating the 2D axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, including viscosity and heat conduction. The instability was followed into the nonlinear regime. The maximum rms velocity amplitude was found to correlate well with the product of the linear growth rate and radial length scale of the instability, consistent with the idea that the instability grows to an amplitude such that an eddy turnover time becomes equal to the growth time defined by the inverse of the growth rate. The time scale for angular momentum to be redistributed to a state of marginal stability was consistent with this picture. The results suggest that in physical situations a state of marginal stability will be maintained, since departures from such a state will be rapidly corrected.

  3. Shock-Driven Hydrodynamic Instability Growth Near Phase Boundaries and Material Property Transitions: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, Pedro [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Fortin, Elizabeth [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Opie, Saul [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gautam, Sudrishti [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Ashish [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lynch, Jenna [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Chen, Yan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Activities for this grant included: 1) Development of dynamic impact experiments to probe strength and phase transition influence on dynamic deformation, 2) development of modern strength and phase aware simulation capabilities, 3) and post-processing of experimental data with simulation and closed form analytical techniques. Two different dynamic experiments were developed to probe material strengths in solid metals (largely copper and iron in this effort). In the first experiment a flyer plate impacts a flat target with an opposite rippled surface that is partially supported by a weaker window material. Post mortem analysis of the target sample showed a strong and repeatable residual plastic deformation dependence on grain orientation. Yield strengths for strain rates near 105 s-1 and plastic strains near ~50% were estimated to be around 180 to 240 MPa, varying in this range with grain orientation. Unfortunately dynamic real-time measurements were difficult with this setup due to diagnostic laser scattering; hence, an additional experimental setup was developed to complement these results. In the second set of experiments a rippled surface was ablated by a controlled laser pulsed, which launched a rippled shock front to an opposite initially flat diagnostic surface that was monitored in real-time with spatially resolved velocimetry techniques, e.g., line VISAR in addition to Transient Imaging Displacement Interferometry (TIDI) displacement measurements. This setup limited the displacements at the diagnostic surface to a reasonable level for TIDI measurements (~ less than one micrometer). These experiments coupled with analytical and numerical solutions provided evidence that viscous and elastic deviatoric strength affect shock front perturbation evolution in clearly different ways. Particularly, normalized shock front perturbation amplitudes evolve with viscosity (η) and perturbation wavelength (λ) as η/λ, such that increasing viscosity

  4. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  5. Monami as an oscillatory hydrodynamic instability in a submerged sea grass bed

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ravi; Bandi, M. M.; Mahadevan, Amala; Mandre, Shreyas

    2014-01-01

    The onset of monami ~-- the synchronous waving of sea grass beds driven by a steady flow -- is modeled as a linear instability of the flow. Unlike previous works, our model considers the drag exerted by the grass in establishing the steady flow profile, and in damping out perturbations to it. We find two distinct modes of instability, which we label Mode 1 and Mode 2. Mode 1 is closely related to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability modified by vegetation drag, whereas Mode 2 is unrelated to Kelvin-H...

  6. On the physical origin of the generic instabilities present in linearized dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    García-Perciante, A L; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the generic instabilities that appear in the framework of relativistic linear irreversible thermodynamics, describing the fluctuations of a simple fluid close to equilibrium, arise due to the inclusion of heat in the energy-momentum tensor that governs the fluid evolution. Further, it is also shown how such instabilities can be avoided within a relativistic linear framework if a Meixner-like approach to the phenomenological equations is employed.

  7. Experimental evidence of a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at the ablation front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L.; Martinez, D.; Haan, S. W.; Kane, J.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.

    2016-05-01

    Under the Discovery Science program, the longer pulses and higher laser energies provided by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been harnessed to study, first time in indirect-drive, the highly nonlinear stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) at the ablation front. A planar plastic package with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled gold radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130 μm thick foil, a factor 3x larger than previously achieved on other laser facilities. As a consequence, we have measured the ablative RTI in transition from the weakly nonlinear stage up to the deep nonlinear stage for various initial conditions. A bubble merger regime has been observed and the ablative stabilization strength varied by changing the plastic dopant from iodine to germanium.

  8. Planar hydrodynamic instability computations and experiments with rugby-shaped hohlraums at the Omega laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Liberatore, S.; Galmiche, D.; Casner, A.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J. P.; Villette, B.

    2008-05-01

    Implosion of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule is very sensitive to the growth of sphericity perturbations. The control of the feeding of such perturbations and their transport ('feedthrough') through the ablator is a key point to reach ignition. Since 2002 [1, 2], experiments have been designed and performed on the Omega laser facility in order to study these phenomena in planar geometry. A new 'rugby shaped' hohlraum was used [3, 4]. We present experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulations.

  9. Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion -- I. Inviscid Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

    1999-03-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a nonzero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the (disturbance-wavenumber, pressure-sensitivity) plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a nonsteady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  10. Long duration gamma-ray bursts: hydrodynamic instabilities in collapsar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Paul A; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    We present 3D numerical simulations of the early evolution of long-duration gamma-ray bursts in the collapsar scenario. Starting from the core-collapse of a realistic progenitor model, we follow the formation and evolution of a central black hole and centrifugally balanced disk. The dense, hot accretion disk produces freely-escaping neutrinos and is hydrodynamically unstable to clumping and to forming non-axisymmetric (m=1, 2) modes. We show that these spiral structures, which form on dynamical timescales, can efficiently transfer angular momentum outward and can drive the high required accretion rates (>=0.1-1 M_sun) for producing a jet. We utilise the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, Gadget-2, modified to implement relevant microphysics, such as cooling by neutrinos, a plausible treatment approximating the central object and relativistic effects. Finally, we discuss implications of this scenario as a source of energy to produce relativistically beamed gamma-ray jets.

  11. The mic-mac connection inside stars: the interdependence of atomic diffusion and hydrodynamic instabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Vauclair, S.

    2016-01-01

    The interdependence of microscopic (atomic) and macroscopic (hydrodynamic) processes inside stars and their consequences for stellar structure and evolution were recognized by Jean-Paul Zahn several decades ago. He was a pioneer in that respect, discussing the importance of the macroscopic motions related to stellar rotation, in competition with the chemical stratification induced by gravitational settling and radiative accelerations. This has been much developed in recent years, in connectio...

  12. A snapshot of internal waves and hydrodynamic instabilities in the southern Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovatsky, Iossif; Wijesekera, Hemantha; Jarosz, Ewa; Lilover, Madis-Jaak; Pirro, Annunziata; Silver, Zachariah; Centurioni, Luca; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Measurements conducted in the southern Bay of Bengal (BoB) as a part of the ASIRI-EBoB Program portray the characteristics of high-frequency internal waves in the upper pycnocline as well as the velocity structure with episodic events of shear instability. A 20 h time series of CTD, ADCP, and acoustic backscatter profiles down to 150 m as well as temporal CTD measurements in the pycnocline at z = 54 m were taken to the east of Sri Lanka. Internal waves of periods ˜10-40 min were recorded at all depths below a shallow (˜20-30 m) surface mixed layer in the background of an 8 m amplitude internal tide. The absolute values of vertical displacements associated with high-frequency waves followed the Nakagami distribution with a median value of 2.1 m and a 95% quintile 6.5 m. The internal wave amplitudes are normally distributed. The tails of the distribution deviate from normality due to episodic high-amplitude displacements. The sporadic appearance of internal waves with amplitudes exceeding ˜5 m usually coincided with patches of low Richardson numbers, pointing to local shear instability as a possible mechanism of internal-wave-induced turbulence. The probability of shear instability in the summer BoB pycnocline based on an exponential distribution of the inverse Richardson number, however, appears to be relatively low, not exceeding 4% for Ri generation of asymmetric breaking internal waves and Holmboe instabilities is above ˜25%.

  13. Pulsating hydrodynamic instability and thermal coupling in an extended Landau/Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion. 2. Viscous analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen B. Margolis

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during liquid-propellant deflagration in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau, form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, that sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes the pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wavenumbers are sufficiently small. In the present work, this analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wavenumber perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wavenumbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  14. A hydrodynamic instability is used to create aesthetically appealing patterns in painting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zetina

    Full Text Available Painters often acquire a deep empirical knowledge of the way in which paints and inks behave. Through experimentation and practice, they can control the way in which fluids move and deform to create textures and images. David Alfaro Siqueiros, a recognized Mexican muralist, invented an accidental painting technique to create new and unexpected textures. By pouring layers of paint of different colors on a horizontal surface, the paints infiltrate into each other creating patterns of aesthetic value. In this investigation, we reproduce the technique in a controlled manner. We found that for the correct color combination, the dual viscous layer becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable: the density mismatch of the two color paints drives the formation of a spotted pattern. Experiments and a linear instability analysis were conducted to understand the properties of the process. We also argue that this flow configuration can be used to study the linear properties of this instability.

  15. Silicon-Class Ablators for NIC Ignition Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Darwin; Salmonson, Jay; Haan, Steve

    2012-10-01

    We present design studies using silicon-class ablators (i.e., Si, SiC, SiB6, and SiB14) for NIC ignition capsules. These types of ablators have several advantages in that they: (a) require no internal dopant layers and are robust to M-band radiation; (b) have smooth outer surfaces; (c) have stable fuel-ablator interface; and (d) have good 1-D performance. The major disadvantage for some of the ablators in this class is the relatively smaller ablation stabilization. Consequently, the ablator is more susceptible to breakup caused by RT instabilities. However, smoother outer surfaces on this class of ablators can reduce the effect of RT instabilities. 2-D simulations of SiC ablators show ignition failure despite smooth surfaces and good 1-D performance. But SiB6 and SiB14 ablators exhibit promising behaviors. SiB6 (SiB14) ablators have high 1-D ignition margin and high peak core hydrodynamic pressure 880 (900) Gbar. The ablation scale length for SiB6 is longer than that for SiC and for SiB14 is comparable to that of plastic. Therefore, we expect acceptable performance for SiB6 and less RT growth for SiB14. 2-D simulations are now in progress.

  16. Measurement of ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution from laser imprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Delorme, B.; Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in plastic (CH2) foils. The two-dimensional (2-D) perturbations were created by laser imprinting using a special phase plate with a 2-D single mode, ˜70 μm wavelength sinusoidal intensity pattern on the plastic foil. The growth of imprinted perturbations was measured by face-on, X-ray radiography using Sm and Ta backlighters in 30-μm and 50-μm thick plastic foils, respectively. After the initial imprinting phase, the 2-D perturbations grew due to ablative RM instability before the onset of foil acceleration when they were further amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Experimental results agree reasonably well with 2-D hydrodynamic simulations and analytic models showing that the modulation growth in areal density is due to ablative RM instability.

  17. Hydrodynamics of fingering instability in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Peyman; Ashouri, Majid; Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2016-10-01

    The hydrodynamics of two immiscible fluids in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell under the influence of a magnetic field is studied, both theoretically and numerically. A linear stability analysis is conducted to determine the effect of magnetic fields on the formation of viscous fingers. As a result, an analytical solution is found to calculate the growth rate of perturbations. For numerical simulation of the two-phase flow, the interfacial tension is treated as a body force using the continuum surface force model and the interface tracking is performed by the volume of fluid method. The variations of the width and growth rate of fingers in an unstable displacement versus Hartmann number, a dimensionless number characterizing the strength of the applied magnetic field, are investigated. By varying the value of Hartmann number systematically, a suppressing effect on the formation of viscous fingers is observed. Consequently, it is detected that there exists a minimum Hartmann number preventing the formation of viscous fingers and ensuring a stable displacement. Our numerical simulations are in agreement with the results of the linear stability analysis and quantify the effect of magnetic fields in mitigating viscous fingering effects and improving the efficiency of the fluid displacement.

  18. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  19. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  20. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have

  1. Design and fabrication of a CH/Al dual-layer perturbation target for hydrodynamic instability experiments in ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xie, Zhiyong [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, Shanghai 201800 (China); Du, Ai [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ye, Junjian [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Zhihua; Shen, Jun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhou, Bin, E-mail: zhoubin863@tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Sinusoidal perturbed Al foil was prepared by single-point diamond turning. • Perturbed Al foil was measured by surface profiler and white light interferometer. • Perturbed Al foil and CH layer adhered with each other via a hot-press process. • Parameters and cross-section of the CH–Al perturbation target was characterized. - Abstract: A polystyrene (CH)/aluminum (Al) dual-layer perturbation target for hydrodynamic instability experiments in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) was designed and fabricated. The target was composed of a perturbed 40 μm Al foil and a CH layer. The detailed fabrication method consisted of four steps. The 40 μm Al foil was first prepared by roll and polish process; the perturbation patterns were then introduced on the surface of the Al foil by the single-point diamond turning (SPDT) technology; the CH layer was prepared via a simple method which called spin-coating process; finally, the CH layer was directly coated on the perturbation surface of Al foil by a hot-press process to avoid the use of a sticker and to eliminate the gaps between the CH layer and the Al foil. The parameters of the target, such as the perturbation wavelength (T) and perturbation amplitude (A), were characterized by a QC-5000 tool microscope, an alpha-step 500 surface profiler and a NT1100 white light interferometer. The results showed that T and A of the target were about 52 μm and 7.34 μm, respectively. Thickness of the Al foil (H1), thickness of the CH layer (H2), and cross-section of the dual-layer target were characterized by a QC-5000 tool microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). H1 and H2 were about 40 μm and 15 μm, respectively, the cross-sectional photographs of the target showed that the CH layer and the Al foil adhered perfectly with each other.

  2. One type of hydrodynamic instability in joule heating of a fluid near an ion-selective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, N. V.; Khasmatulina, N. Yu.; Ganchenko, G. S.; Kalaidin, E. N.; Kiriy, V. A.; Demekhin, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    The stability of the equilibrium state of an electrolyte in a horizontal microgap between two ionselective surfaces in an electric field is studied with the Joule heating of the fluid taken into account. It is established that the Joule heating can lead to instability at the potential differences, which are several times smaller than those in the isothermal case. The effects of microscale thermal instability differ from the Rayleigh-Benard thermal convection: the destabilization occurs upon heating in the upper part of the gap.

  3. Effect of nanosecond pulse laser ablation on the surface morphology of Zr-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the ripple patterns formation on the surface of Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass using a nanosecond pulse laser ablation in air with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The strong thermal ablation phenomenon could be observed on vit1 BMG surface at laser energy of 200 mJ as a result of the adhibition of confining overlay. Many periodic ripples had formed on the edge of the ablated area at laser energy of 400 mJ because of the high intensity pulsed laser beam. The underlying mechanism of the periodic ripples formation could be explained by the K-H hydrodynamic instability theory. It had been shown that laser ablation with 600 mJ and 200 pulses results in the formation of many micro-cracks on the ablated area. Further analysis showed that the spatial occupation of the laser ablated area and the spacing between two adjacent ripples increased as the laser energy and the number of incident laser pulses increasing. The surface ripples feature on the edge of ablated area became more obvious with increasing laser pulses, but it was not correlated closely with the laser energies variation.

  4. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglitskiy, Y. [Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia 22150 (United States); Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J. [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Metzler, N. [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2012-10-15

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the 'feedout' of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  5. Simulation of laser-driven, ablated plasma flows in collisionless shock experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Ross, J. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Fu, W.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2013-03-01

    Experiments investigating the physics of interpenetrating, collisionless, ablated plasma flows have become an important area of research in the high-energy-density field. In order to evaluate the feasibility of designing experiments that will generate a collisionless shock mediated by the Weibel instability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, computer simulations using the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) radiation-hydrodynamics model have been carried out. This paper reports assessment of whether the experiment can reach the required scale size while maintaining the low interflow collisionality necessary for the collisionless shock to form. Comparison of simulation results with data from Omega experiments shows the ability of the CRASH code to model these ablated systems. The combined results indicate that experiments on the NIF are capable of reaching the regimes necessary for the formation of a collisionless shock in a laboratory experiment.

  6. Diagnosing implosion velocity and ablator dynamics at NIF (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Anna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grim, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jungnam, Jerry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rundberg, Bob [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilhelmy, Jerry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-07-09

    An enhanced understanding of the unique physics probed in a burning NIP capsule is important for both nuclear weapons physics and thermonuclear ignition. In this talk we introduce a new diagnostic idea, designed to measure dynamic aspects of the capsule implosion that are not currently accessible. The current set of diagnostics for the NIF experiments includes reaction history (a time resolved measure of the d + t burn), neutron time-of-flight and spectrometry and spatial imaging of the neutron production and scattering. Although valuable, this abbreviated set of diagnostics cannot determine key dynamical properties of the implosion, such as implosion velocity (v{sub impl}) and ablator thickness. To surpass the present limits of {approx} 10{sup 15} d+t reactions, it will be necessary to increase significantly the implosion energy delivered to the DT fuel by finely tuning the balance between the remaining (imploding) ablator mass and velocity. If too much mass remains, the implosion velocity will be too slow, and the subsecpwnt PdV work will not be sufficient to overcome cooling via conduction and radiation. If too little mass remains, hydrodynamic instabilities will occur, resulting in unpredictable and degraded performance. Detailed calculations suggest the ablator must reach an implosion velocity of 3-4 x 10{sup 7} cm/sec and an areal density of {rho}{Delta}R {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2} in order to achieve ignition. The authors present a new scheme to measure these important quantities using neutron reactions on the ablator material. During the burn, the ablator is moving relative to the 14.1 MeV d+t neutrons that are traversing the capsule. The resulting neutron-ablator Doppler shift causes a few unique nuclear reactions to become sensitive detectors of the ablator velocity at peak burn time. The 'point-design' capsule at the NIF will be based on a {sup 9}Be ablator, and the {sup 9}Be(n,p){sup 9}Li reaction has an energy threshold of 14.2 MeV, making it

  7. An introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    1992-01-01

    This book is an introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics for both astronomy and physics students. It provides a comprehensive and unified view of the general problems associated with fluids in a cosmic context, with a discussion of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. It is the only book on hydrodynamics that addresses the astrophysical context. Researchers and students will find this work to be an exceptional reference. Contents include chapters on irrotational and rotational flows, turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and instabilities.

  8. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate ${J}\\times{B}$ heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  9. Catheter Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ablation. Visit Cardiac ablation procedures and Cardiac conduction system for more information about this topic. Related ... National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  10. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  11. Prediction of Algebraic Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretzky, Paula; King, Kristina; Hill, Nicole; Keithley, Kimberlee; Barlow, Nathaniel; Weinstein, Steven; Cromer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A widely unexplored type of hydrodynamic instability is examined - large-time algebraic growth. Such growth occurs on the threshold of (exponentially) neutral stability. A new methodology is provided for predicting the algebraic growth rate of an initial disturbance, when applied to the governing differential equation (or dispersion relation) describing wave propagation in dispersive media. Several types of algebraic instabilities are explored in the context of both linear and nonlinear waves.

  12. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D; Zheng, C Y; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-08-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using an elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate J×B heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  13. Relativistic Hydrodynamics with Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    DeBuhr, Jackson; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Hirschmann, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    Methods to solve the relativistic hydrodynamic equations are a key computational kernel in a large number of astrophysics simulations and are crucial to understanding the electromagnetic signals that originate from the merger of astrophysical compact objects. Because of the many physical length scales present when simulating such mergers, these methods must be highly adaptive and capable of automatically resolving numerous localized features and instabilities that emerge throughout the computational domain across many temporal scales. While this has been historically accomplished with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) based methods, alternatives based on wavelet bases and the wavelet transformation have recently achieved significant success in adaptive representation for advanced engineering applications. This work presents a new method for the integration of the relativistic hydrodynamic equations using iterated interpolating wavelets and introduces a highly adaptive implementation for multidimensional simulati...

  14. Seeding of capsule instability growth by fill tubes and support rods for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphee, Andrew; Casey, Daniel; Clark, Daniel; Field, John; Haan, Steven; Hammel, Bruce; Kroll, Jeremy; Landen, Otto; Martinez, David; Milovich, Jose; Nikroo, Abbas; Rice, Neal; Robey, Harry; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Stadermann, Michael; Weber, Christopher; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Collaboration; Atomics Collaboration, General

    2016-10-01

    Features associated with the target support tent and deuterium-tritium fuel fill tube and support rods can seed hydrodynamic instabilities leading to degraded performance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We performed in-flight radiography of ICF capsules in the vicinity of the capsule support tent and fill tube surrogates to investigate instability growth associated with these features. For both plastic and high density carbon ablators, the shadow of the 10 μm diameter glass fill-tube cast by the x-ray spots on the hohlraum wall were observed to imprint radial instabilities around the fill tube/capsule interface. Similarly, instability growth was observed for the shadow cast by 12 μm diameter silicon carbide capsule support rods mounted orthogonal to the fill tube as a tent alternative for a plastic ablator. The orientation of the shadows is consistent with raytracing. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in boiling-water reactors; Etude experimentale des instabilites hydrodynamiques survenant dans les reacteurs nucleaires a ebullition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabreca, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-01

    The subjects is an experimental out-of pile loop study of the hydrodynamic oscillations occurring in boiling-water reactors. The study was carried out at atmospheric pressure and at pressure of about 8 atmospheres, in channels heated electrically by a constant and uniform specified current. In the test at 8 atmospheres the channel was a round tube of approximately 6 mm interior diameter. At 1 atmosphere a ring-section channel was used, 10 * 20 mm in diameter, with an inner heating tube and an outer tube of pyrex. It was possible to operate with natural convection and also with forced convection with test-channel by-pass. The study consists of 3 parts: 1. Preliminary determination of the laws governing pressure-drop during boiling. 2. Determination of the fronts at which oscillation appears, within a wide range of the parameters involved. 3. A descriptive study of the oscillations and measurement of the periods. The report gives the oscillation fronts with natural and forced convection for various values of the singular pressure drop at the channel inlet and for various riser lengths. The results are presented in non-dimensional form, which is available, in first approximation, for all geometric scales and for all fluids. Besides the following points were observed: - the wall (nature and thickness) can be an important factor ; - oscillation can occur in a horizontal channel. (author) [French] II a ete effectue une etude experimentale, en boucle hors-pile, des oscillations hydrodynamiques survenant dans les reacteurs a ebullition. L'etude a ete effectuee a la pression atmospherique et a une pression voisine de 8 atmospheres dans des canaux chauffes electriquement a puissance imposee constante et uniforme. Dans les essais a 8 atmospheres le canal etait un tube circulaire de diametre interieur 6 mm environ. A 1 atmosphere le canal etait de section annulaire 10 * 20 mm avec un tube interieur chauffant et un tube exterieur en pyrex. Le fonctionnement etait possible

  16. Bump evolution driven by the x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov effect in plastic inertial confinement fusion Ablators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loomis Eric

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities are a primary concern for the ICF program. Recently, observed jetting and parasitic mix into the fuel were attributed to isolated defects on the outer surface of the capsule. Strategies for mitigation of these defects exist, however, they require reduced uncertainties in Equation of State (EOS models prior to invoking them. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (bumps due to x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov in plastic ablators to validate these models. Experiments used hohlraums with radiation temperatures near 70 eV driven by 15 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY, which sent a ∼1.25Mbar shock into a planar CH target placed over one laser entrance hole. Targets consisted of 2-D arrays of quasi-gaussian bumps (10 microns tall, 34 microns FWHM deposited on the surface facing into the hohlraum. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα − 2.76keV backlighter was used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements were also performed to determine target conditions. Simulations using the LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 models required the simulated laser power be turned down to 80 and 88%, respectively to match observed shock speeds. Both LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 simulations agreed with measured bump areal densities out to 6 ns where ablative RM oscillations were observed in previous laser-driven experiments, but did not occur in the x-ray driven case. The QEOS model, conversely, over predicted shock speeds and under predicted areal density in the bump.

  17. Relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luciano, Rezzolla

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is a very successful theoretical framework to describe the dynamics of matter from scales as small as those of colliding elementary particles, up to the largest scales in the universe. This book provides an up-to-date, lively, and approachable introduction to the mathematical formalism, numerical techniques, and applications of relativistic hydrodynamics. The topic is typically covered either by very formal or by very phenomenological books, but is instead presented here in a form that will be appreciated both by students and researchers in the field. The topics covered in the book are the results of work carried out over the last 40 years, which can be found in rather technical research articles with dissimilar notations and styles. The book is not just a collection of scattered information, but a well-organized description of relativistic hydrodynamics, from the basic principles of statistical kinetic theory, down to the technical aspects of numerical methods devised for the solut...

  18. Theoretical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Milne-Thomson, L M

    2011-01-01

    This classic exposition of the mathematical theory of fluid motion is applicable to both hydrodynamics and aerodynamics. Based on vector methods and notation with their natural consequence in two dimensions - the complex variable - it offers more than 600 exercises and nearly 400 diagrams. Prerequisites include a knowledge of elementary calculus. 1968 edition.

  19. Hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  20. Ship Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  2. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  3. Nanoflow hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Daivis, Peter J.;

    2011-01-01

    We show by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations that the Navier-Stokes equation does not correctly describe water flow in a nanoscale geometry. It is argued that this failure reflects the fact that the coupling between the intrinsic rotational and translational degrees of freedom becomes...... important for nanoflows. The coupling is correctly accounted for by the extended Navier-Stokes equations that include the intrinsic angular momentum as an independent hydrodynamic degree of freedom. © 2011 American Physical Society....

  4. ADVANCES IN THE TENSILE INSTABILITY OF SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS APPLIED TO SOLID DYNAMICS%固体介质中SPH方法的拉伸不稳定性问题研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅学金; 强洪夫; 杨月诚

    2007-01-01

    光滑粒子流体动力学法(smoothed particle hydrodynamics,SPH)是一种基于核估计的无网格Lagrange 数值方法.它用粒子方程离散流体动力学的连续方程,既可以处理有限元难于处理的大变形和严重扭曲问题,又可以处理有限差分法不易处理的自由边界和材料界面的问题,在固体力学中的冲击、爆炸和裂纹模拟中具有广阔的发展前最.但是,该算法的拉伸不稳定性(tensile instability)问题是它在固体力学领域中应用的最大障碍.对SPH稳定性分析表明,算法不稳定性的条件仅与应力状态和核函数的2阶导数有关.目前,应力点法(stress points)、Lagrange核函数法、人工应力法(artificial stress)、修正光滑粒子法(corrective smoothed particle method,CSPM)和守恒光滑法(conservative smoothing)以及其他一些方法成功地改善了SPH的拉伸不稳定性,但是每一种方法都不能彻底解决SPH的拉伸不稳定性问题.本文介绍了SPH法的方程和Von Neumann稳定性分析的思想,以及国内外在这几个方面的研究成果及其最新进展,同时指出目前研究中存在的问题和研究的方向.

  5. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Ostrovsky, L. A.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the early history of an important field of “sturm and drang” in modern theory of nonlinear waves. It is demonstrated how scientific demand resulted in independent and almost simultaneous publications by many different authors on modulation instability, a phenomenon resulting in a variety of nonlinear processes such as envelope solitons, envelope shocks, freak waves, etc. Examples from water wave hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, nonlinear optics, and convection theory are given.

  6. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  7. Hydrodynamic stability and stellar oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H M Antia

    2011-07-01

    Chandrasekhar’s monograph on Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic stability, published in 1961, is a standard reference on linear stability theory. It gives a detailed account of stability of fluid flow in a variety of circumstances, including convection, stability of Couette flow, Rayleigh–Taylor instability, Kelvin–Helmholtz instability as well as the Jean’s instability for star formation. In most cases he has extended these studies to include effects of rotation and magnetic field. In a later paper he has given a variational formulation for equations of non-radial stellar oscillations. This forms the basis for helioseismic inversion techniques as well as extension to include the effect of rotation, magnetic field and other large-scale flows using a perturbation treatment.

  8. Hydrodynamics of pronuclear migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule (MT) filaments play a key role in many processes involved in cell devision including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and pronuclear positioning. We present a direct numerical technique to simulate MT dynamics in such processes. Our method includes hydrodynamically mediated interactions between MTs and other cytoskeletal objects, using singularity methods for Stokes flow. Long-ranged many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using a highly efficient and scalable fast multipole method, enabling the simulation of thousands of MTs. Our simulation method also takes into account the flexibility of MTs using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory as well as their dynamic instability. Using this technique, we simulate pronuclear migration in single-celled Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Two different positioning mechanisms, based on the interactions of MTs with the motor proteins and the cell cortex, are explored: cytoplasmic pulling and cortical pushing. We find that although the pronuclear complex migrates towards the center of the cell in both models, the generated cytoplasmic flows are fundamentally different. This suggest that cytoplasmic flow visualization during pronuclear migration can be utilized to differentiate between the two mechanisms.

  9. Introduction to Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    We give a pedagogical review of relativistic hydrodynamics relevant to relativistic heavy ion collisions. Topics discussed include linear response theory derivation of 2nd order viscous hydrodynamics including the Kubo formulas, kinetic theory derivation of 2nd order viscous hydrodynamics, anisotropic hydrodynamics and a brief review of numerical algorithms. Emphasis is given to the theory of hydrodynamics rather than phenomenology.

  10. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, J.O.

    1999-06-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al., Astrophys. J.478, L75 (1997) The Nova laser is used to shock two-layer targets, producing Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the interfaces between the layers, analogous to instabilities seen at the interfaces of SN 1987A. Because the hydrodynamics in the laser experiments at intermediate times (3-40 ns) and in SN 1987A at intermediate times (5 s-10{sup 4} s) are well described by the Euler equations, the hydrodynamics scale between the two regimes. The experiments are modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS, thus serving as a benchmark for PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike and bubble velocities in the experiment using potential flow theory and a modified Ott thin shell theory is presented. A numerical study of 2D vs. 3D differences in instability growth at the O-He and He-H interface of SN 1987A, and the design for analogous laser experiments are presented. We discuss further work to incorporate more features of the SN in the experiments, including spherical geometry, multiple layers and density gradients. Past and ongoing work in laboratory and laser astrophysics is reviewed, including experimental work on supernova remnants (SNRs). A numerical study of RM instability in SNRs is presented.

  11. Impact of oxygen on the 300-K isotherm of Laser Megajoule ablator using ab initio simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin-Lalu, P.; Recoules, V.; Salin, G.; Huser, G.

    2015-11-01

    The ablator material for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules on the Laser Mégajoule is a glow-discharge polymer (GDP) plastic. Its equation of state (EOS) is of primary importance for the design of such capsules, since it has direct consequences on shock timing and is essential to mitigate hydrodynamic instabilities. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), we have investigated the 300-K isotherm of amorphous CH1.37O0.08 plastic, whose structure is close to GDP plastic. The 300-K isotherm, which is often used as a cold curve within tabular EOS, is an important contribution of the EOS in the multimegabar pressure range. AIMD results are compared to analytic models within tabular EOS, pointing out large discrepancies. In addition, we show that the effect of oxygen decreases 300-K isotherm pressure by 10%-15%. The implication of these observations is the ability to improve ICF target performance, which is essential to achieve fusion ignition.

  12. Submarine hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Renilson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This book adopts a practical approach and presents recent research together with applications in real submarine design and operation. Topics covered include hydrostatics, manoeuvring, resistance and propulsion of submarines. The author briefly reviews basic concepts in ship hydrodynamics and goes on to show how they are applied to submarines, including a look at the use of physical model experiments. The issues associated with manoeuvring in both the horizontal and vertical planes are explained, and readers will discover suggested criteria for stability, along with rudder and hydroplane effectiveness. The book includes a section on appendage design which includes information on sail design, different arrangements of bow planes and alternative stern configurations. Other themes explored in this book include hydro-acoustic performance, the components of resistance and the effect of hull shape. Readers will value the author’s applied experience as well as the empirical expressions that are presented for use a...

  13. Numerical simulation of copper ablation by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, PengJi; Li, YuHong

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified self-consistent one-dimensional hydrodynamic lagrangian fluid code, laser ablation of solid copper by ultrashort laser pulses in vacuum was simulated to study fundamental mechanisms and to provide a guide for drilling periodic microholes or microgratings on the metal surface. The simulated laser ablation threshold is a approximate constancy in femtosecond regime and increases as the square root of pulse duration in picosecond regime. The ablation depth as a function of pulse duration shows four different regimes and a minimum for a pulse duration of ~ 12ps for various laser fluences. The influence of laser-induced plasma shielding on ablation depth is also studied.

  14. Resolving mixing in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Agertz, O

    2009-01-01

    Standard formulations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are unable to resolve mixing at fluid boundaries. We use an error and stability analysis of the generalised SPH equations of motion to prove that this is due to two distinct problems. The first is a leading order error in the momentum equation. This should decrease with increasing neighbour number, but does not because numerical instabilities cause the kernel to be irregularly sampled. We identify two important instabilities: the clumping instability and the banding instability, and we show that both are cured by a suitable choice of kernel. The second problem is the local mixing instability (LMI). This occurs as particles attempt to mix on the kernel scale, but are unable to due to entropy conservation. The result is a pressure discontinuity at boundaries that pushes fluids of different entropy apart. We cure the LMI by using a temperature weighted density estimate that both reduces errors in the continuity equation and allows individual particle...

  15. Particle hydrodynamics with tessellation techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, S

    2009-01-01

    Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a well-established approach to model fluids in astrophysical problems, thanks to its geometric flexibility and ability to automatically adjust the spatial resolution to the clumping of matter. However, a number of recent studies have emphasized inaccuracies of SPH in the treatment of fluid instabilities. The origin of these numerical problems can be traced back to spurious surface effects across contact discontinuities, and to SPH's inherent prevention of mixing at the particle level. We here investigate a new fluid particle model where the density estimate is carried out with the help of an auxiliary mesh constructed as the Voronoi tessellation of the simulation particles instead of an adaptive smoothing kernel. This Voronoi-based approach improves the ability of the scheme to represent sharp contact discontinuities. We show that this eliminates spurious surface tension effects present in SPH and that play a role in suppressing certain fluid instabilities. ...

  16. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  17. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  18. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with mixing zone; Instabilite de Kelvin-Helmholtz avec zone de melange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong-Techer, R. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/DIR-SFME), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    This thesis is part of the FATHER experiment and the analyze of the hydrodynamical instabilities which appear during the mixing of two liquids of same volume mass with shearing speed in the mixing zone. The aim is to understand the possible influence of a Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamical instability with mixing zone, compared to classical Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with interface and with theoretical results of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. (A.L.B.)

  19. Simulation of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, R. V.; Antonov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a mathematical model for femtosecond laser ablation of metals is proposed, based on standard two-temperature model connected with 1D hydrodynamic equations. Wide-range equation of state has been developed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data for aluminium and copper. A good agreement for both metals with numerical results and experiment shows that this model can be employed for choosing laser parameters to better accuracy in nanoparticles production by ablation of metals.

  20. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.; Wallace, R.J.; Rubenchik, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kane, J.; Arnett, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Stewart Observatory; Drake, R.P. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McCray, R. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  1. Laboratory blast wave driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn

    2008-11-01

    This presentation discusses experiments involving the evolution of hydrodynamic instabilities in the laboratory under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. These instabilities are driven by blast waves, which occur following a sudden, finite release of energy, and consist of a shock front followed by a rarefaction wave. When a blast wave crosses an interface with a decrease in density, hydrodynamic instabilities will develop. Instabilities evolving under HED conditions are relevant to astrophysics. These experiments include target materials scaled in density to the He/H layer in SN1987A. About 5 kJ of laser energy from the Omega Laser facility irradiates a 150 μm plastic layer that is followed by a low-density foam layer. A blast wave structure similar to those in supernovae is created in the plastic layer. The blast wave crosses an interface having a 2D or 3D sinusoidal structure that serves as a seed perturbation for hydrodynamic instabilities. This produces unstable growth dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the nonlinear regime. We have detected the interface structure under these conditions using x-ray backlighting. Recent advances in our diagnostic techniques have greatly improved the resolution of our x-ray radiographic images. Under certain conditions, the improved images show some mass extending beyond the RT spike and penetrating further than previously observed or predicted by current simulations. The observed effect is potentially of great importance as a source of mass transport to places not anticipated by current theory and simulation. I will discuss the amount of mass in these spike extensions, the associated uncertainties, and hypotheses regarding their origin We also plan to show comparisons of experiments using single mode and multimode as well as 2D and 3D initial conditions. This work is sponsored by DOE/NNSA Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058 (Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances) and DE-FG52-04NA00064 (National Laser User

  2. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Basan, Markus; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.158101

    2011-01-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate, and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Ablator/Fuel Interface during Early Stages of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Liam; Glosli, James; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, high-powered laser beams are used to compress a small target to generate fusion reactions. A critical issue in achieving this is the understanding of mix at the ablator/fuel interface. Mixing occurs at various length scales, ranging from atomic inter-species diffusion to hydrodynamic instabilities. Because the interface is preheated by energy from the incoming shock, it is important to understand the dynamics before the shock arrives. The interface is in the warm dense matter phase with a deuterium/tritium fuel mixture on one side and a plastic mixture on the other. We would like to understand various aspects of the evolution, including the state of the interface when the main shock arrives, the role of electric field generation at the interface, and the character and time scales for diffusion. We present a multiscale approach to model these processes, which combines molecular dynamics to simulate the ionic degrees of freedom with orbital-free density functional theory to calculate the electronic structure. Simulation results are presented and connections to hydrodynamic models are discussed. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-01

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  5. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A. [and others

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel J.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents an overview and introduction to smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics in theory and in practice. Firstly, we give a basic grounding in the fundamentals of SPH, showing how the equations of motion and energy can be self-consistently derived from the density estimate. We then show how to interpret these equations using the basic SPH interpolation formulae and highlight the subtle difference in approach between SPH and other particle methods. In doing so, we also critique several 'urban myths' regarding SPH, in particular the idea that one can simply increase the 'neighbour number' more slowly than the total number of particles in order to obtain convergence. We also discuss the origin of numerical instabilities such as the pairing and tensile instabilities. Finally, we give practical advice on how to resolve three of the main issues with SPMHD: removing the tensile instability, formulating dissipative terms for MHD shocks and enforcing the divergence constraint on the particles, and we give the current status of developments in this area. Accompanying the paper is the first public release of the NDSPMHD SPH code, a 1, 2 and 3 dimensional code designed as a testbed for SPH/SPMHD algorithms that can be used to test many of the ideas and used to run all of the numerical examples contained in the paper.

  7. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in solar spicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ebadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magneto hydrodynamic waves, propagating along spicules, may become unstable and the expected instability is of Kelvin-Helmholtz type. Such instability can trigger the onset of wave turbulence leading to an effective plasma heating and particle acceleration. In present study, two-dimensional magneto hydrodynamic simulations performed on a Cartesian grid is presented in spicules with different densities, moving at various speeds depending on their environment. Simulations being applied in this study show the onset of Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and transition to turbulent flow in spicules. Development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to momentum and energy transport, dissipation, and mixing of fluids. When magnetic fields are involved, field amplification is also possible to take place

  8. Hydrodynamic simulations with the Godunov SPH

    CERN Document Server

    Murante, Giuseppe; Brunino, Riccardo; Cha, Suneg-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    We present results based on an implementation of the Godunov Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (GSPH), originally developed by Inutsuka (2002), in the GADGET-3 hydrodynamic code. We first review the derivation of the GSPH discretization of the equations of moment and energy conservation, starting from the convolution of these equations with the interpolating kernel. The two most important aspects of the numerical implementation of these equations are (a) the appearance of fluid velocity and pressure obtained from the solution of the Riemann problem between each pair of particles, and (b the absence of an artificial viscosity term. We carry out three different controlled hydrodynamical three-dimensional tests, namely the Sod shock tube, the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a shear flow test, and the "blob" test describing the evolution of a cold cloud moving against a hot wind. The results of our tests confirm and extend in a number of aspects those recently obtained by Cha (2010): (i) GSPH provi...

  9. Mechanical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Krysinski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a study of the stability of mechanical systems, i.e. their free response when they are removed from their position of equilibrium after a temporary disturbance. After reviewing the main analytical methods of the dynamical stability of systems, it highlights the fundamental difference in nature between the phenomena of forced resonance vibration of mechanical systems subjected to an imposed excitation and instabilities that characterize their free response. It specifically develops instabilities arising from the rotor-structure coupling, instability of control systems, the se

  10. Collective instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  11. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  12. An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hicks, D.L. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.

  13. Elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication

    CERN Document Server

    Dowson, D; Hopkins, D W

    1977-01-01

    Elasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication deals with the mechanism of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, that is, the lubrication regime in operation over the small areas where machine components are in nominal point or line contact. The lubrication of rigid contacts is discussed, along with the effects of high pressure on the lubricant and bounding solids. The governing equations for the solution of elasto-hydrodynamic problems are presented.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication and representation of contacts by cylinders, followed by a discussio

  14. Elementary classical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chirgwin, B H; Langford, W J; Maxwell, E A; Plumpton, C

    1967-01-01

    Elementary Classical Hydrodynamics deals with the fundamental principles of elementary classical hydrodynamics, with emphasis on the mechanics of inviscid fluids. Topics covered by this book include direct use of the equations of hydrodynamics, potential flows, two-dimensional fluid motion, waves in liquids, and compressible flows. Some general theorems such as Bernoulli's equation are also considered. This book is comprised of six chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the fundamental principles of fluid hydrodynamics, with emphasis on ways of studying the motion of a fluid. Basic c

  15. The short circuit instability in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbard, A.; McNally, C.P.; Mac Low, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a magneto-hydrodynamic instability which occurs, among other locations, in the inner, hot regions of protoplanetary disks, and which alters the way in which resistive dissipation of magnetic energy into heat proceeds. This instability can be likened to both an electrical short circuit...... and lightning, as it concentrates the dissipation of magnetic energy by means of the enhanced release of free electrons. This instability can generate very high temperatures, making it an excellent candidate for thermally processing protoplanetary disk solids, from annealing silicates to melting chondrules...

  16. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4{He}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4{He} is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  17. Theory and Experiments on Chemical Instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-31

    following institutions and conferences: 1981 Jan. 8 X Reunion de Fisica Estadistica , Cocoyoc, Mexico, Resonances and Control Features Feb. 13 Michigan State...Aeronautics and Astronautics, Invited Remarks, Palo Alto, CA 1982 Feb. 25,26 Industrial Affiliates Program ": .’ Hydrodynamic and Chemical Instabilities

  18. Approximate theory of highly absorbing polymer ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furzikov, N. P.

    1990-04-01

    Surface interference, nonlinearly saturated instability of laser-induced thermodestruction, and subsequent oscillation of absorption mode permit the description of analytical ablation thresholds and depths per pulse of polymers having high absorption at laser wavelengths, e.g., polyimide and poly(ethylene terephtalate). Inverse problem solution for polycarbonate and ablation invariant designing are also realized.

  19. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, Mubarak

    2016-01-01

    We study an azimuthally-symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma using quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. We compare results obtained using the quasiparticle method with the standard anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. We consider the predictions of the three methods for the differential particle spectra and mean transverse momentum. We find that the three methods agree for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, but show differences at large $\\eta/s$. Additionally, we find that the standard anisotropic hydrodynamics method shows suppressed production at low transverse-momentum compared to the other two methods, and the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative at large $p_T$ in viscous hydrodynamics.

  20. Recombination instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1967-01-01

    A recombination instability is considered which may arise in a plasma if the temperature dependence of the volume recombination coefficient, alpha, is sufficiently strong. Two cases are analyzed: (a) a steady-state plasma produced in a neutral gas by X-rays or high energy electrons; and (b) an af...

  1. Combining Hydrodynamic and Evolution Calculations of Rotating Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deupree, R. G.

    1996-12-01

    Rotation has two primary effects on stellar evolutionary models: the direct influence on the model structure produced by the rotational terms, and the indirect influence produced by rotational instabilities which redistribute angular momentum and composition inside the model. Using a two dimensional, fully implicit finite difference code, I can follow events on both evolutionary and hydrodynamic timescales, thus allowing the simulation of both effects. However, there are several issues concerning how to integrate the results from hydrodynamic runs into evolutionary runs that must be examined. The schemes I have devised for the integration of the hydrodynamic simulations into evolutionary calculations are outlined, and the positive and negative features summarized. The practical differences among the various schemes are small, and a successful marriage between hydrodynamic and evolution calculations is possible.

  2. Hydrodynamics and black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Oz, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how the AdS/CFT correspondence (the Holographic Principle) relates field theory hydrodynamics to perturbations of black hole (brane) gravitational backgrounds. The hydrodynamics framework is first presented from the field theory point of view, after which the dual gravitational description is outlined, first for relativistic fluids and then for the nonrelativistic case. Further details of the fluid/gravity correspondence are then discussed, including the bulk geometry and the dynamics of the black hole horizon.

  3. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  4. Circulation in blast driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in many natural phenomena (e.g. supernova collapse) and engineering applications (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) is often initiated through hydrodynamic instabilities. Explosions in these systems give rise to blast waves which can interact with perturbations at interfaces between different fluids. Blast waves are formed by a shock followed by a rarefaction. This wave profile leads to complex time histories of interface acceleration. In addition to the instabilities induced by the acceleration field, the rarefaction from the blast wave decompresses the material at the interface, further increasing the perturbation growth. After the passage of the wave, circulation circulation generated by the blast wave through baroclinic vorticity continues to act upon the interface. In this talk, we provide scaling laws for the circulation and amplitude growth induced by the blast wave. Numerical simulations of the multifluid Euler equations solved using a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method are used to validate the theoretical results.

  5. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  6. [Carpal instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  7. Hydrodynamics of soft active matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, M. C.; Joanny, J. F.; Ramaswamy, S.; Liverpool, T. B.; Prost, J.; Rao, Madan; Simha, R. Aditi

    2013-07-01

    This review summarizes theoretical progress in the field of active matter, placing it in the context of recent experiments. This approach offers a unified framework for the mechanical and statistical properties of living matter: biofilaments and molecular motors in vitro or in vivo, collections of motile microorganisms, animal flocks, and chemical or mechanical imitations. A major goal of this review is to integrate several approaches proposed in the literature, from semimicroscopic to phenomenological. In particular, first considered are “dry” systems, defined as those where momentum is not conserved due to friction with a substrate or an embedding porous medium. The differences and similarities between two types of orientationally ordered states, the nematic and the polar, are clarified. Next, the active hydrodynamics of suspensions or “wet” systems is discussed and the relation with and difference from the dry case, as well as various large-scale instabilities of these nonequilibrium states of matter, are highlighted. Further highlighted are various large-scale instabilities of these nonequilibrium states of matter. Various semimicroscopic derivations of the continuum theory are discussed and connected, highlighting the unifying and generic nature of the continuum model. Throughout the review, the experimental relevance of these theories for describing bacterial swarms and suspensions, the cytoskeleton of living cells, and vibrated granular material is discussed. Promising extensions toward greater realism in specific contexts from cell biology to animal behavior are suggested, and remarks are given on some exotic active-matter analogs. Last, the outlook for a quantitative understanding of active matter, through the interplay of detailed theory with controlled experiments on simplified systems, with living or artificial constituents, is summarized.

  8. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  9. Theory of electrohydrodynamic instabilities in electrolytic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, R.; Alexander, S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper develops the theory of the hydrodynamic stability of an electrolytic cell as a function of the imposed electric current. A new electrohydrodynamic instability is encountered when the current is forced to exceed the Nernst limit. The convection is driven by the volume force exerted by the electric field on space charges in the electrolyte. This intrinsic instability is found to be easily masked by extrinsic convection sources such as gravity or stirring. A linear stability analysis is performed and a dimensionless number Le is derived whose value determines the convection pattern.

  10. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  11. Influence of Helium in Gravitational Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Galindo, M. G.; Cardona, O.; Klapp, J.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Hemos analizado los modos hid rod inamicos de un modelo de fluido de dos componentes (hidr6geno y helio), y hemos obtenido la condici6n de inestabilidad para masas mayores que 1.39 veces la bien conocida masa dejeans. ABSTRACT, We have analysed the hydrodynamical modes of a two component fluid model (hydrogen and helium), and we have obtained the instability condition for masses greater than 1.39 times the well-known Jeans mass. K words: COSMOLOGY - GRAVITATION - INSTABILITIES

  12. Anisotropic hydrodynamics -- basic concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rapid longitudinal expansion of the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies are generated. The magnitude of these momentum-space anisotropies can be so large as to violate the central assumption of canonical viscous hydrodynamical treatments which linearize around an isotropic background. In order to better describe the early-time dynamics of the quark gluon plasma, one can consider instead expanding around a locally anisotropic background which results in a dynamical framework called anisotropic hydrodynamics. In this proceedings contribution we review the basic concepts of the anisotropic hydrodynamics framework presenting viewpoints from both the phenomenological and microscopic points of view.

  13. High-Density Carbon (HDC) Ablator for NIC Ignition Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, D.; Haan, S.; Salmonson, J.; Milovich, J.; Callahan, D.

    2012-10-01

    HDC ablators show high performance based on simulations, despite the fact that the shorter pulses for HDC capsules result in higher M-band radiation compared to that for plastic capsules. HDC capsules have good 1-D performance because HDC has relatively high density (3.5 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator that absorbs more radiation. HDC ablators have good 2-D performance because the ablator surface is more than an order-of-magnitude smoother than Be or plastic ablators. Refreeze of the ablator near the fuel region can be avoided by appropriate dopant placement. Here we present two HDC ignition designs doped with W and Si. For the design with maximum W concentration of 1.0 at% (and respectively with maximum Si concentration of 2.0 at%): peak velocity = 0.395 (0.397) mm/ns, mass weighted fuel entropy = 0.463 (0.469) kJ/mg/eV, peak core hydrodynamic stagnation pressure = 690 (780) Gbar, and yield = 17.3 (20.2) MJ. 2-D simulations show that yield is close to 80% YoC even with 2.5x of nominal surface roughness on all surfaces. The clean fuel fraction is about 75% at peak velocity. Doping HDC with the required concentration of W and Si is in progress. A first undoped HDC Symcap is scheduled to be fielded later this year.

  14. Dispersive hydrodynamics: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondini, G.; El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.; Miller, P. D.

    2016-10-01

    This Special Issue on Dispersive Hydrodynamics is dedicated to the memory and work of G.B. Whitham who was one of the pioneers in this field of physical applied mathematics. Some of the papers appearing here are related to work reported on at the workshop "Dispersive Hydrodynamics: The Mathematics of Dispersive Shock Waves and Applications" held in May 2015 at the Banff International Research Station. This Preface provides a broad overview of the field and summaries of the various contributions to the Special Issue, placing them in a unified context.

  15. Stochastically driven instability in rotating shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-01-01

    Origin of hydrodynamic turbulence in rotating shear flows is investigated. The particular emphasis is the flows whose angular velocity decreases but specific angular momentum increases with increasing radial coordinate. Such flows are Rayleigh stable, but must be turbulent in order to explain observed data. Such a mismatch between the linear theory and observations/experiments is more severe when any hydromagnetic/magnetohydrodynamic instability and then the corresponding turbulence therein is ruled out. The present work explores the effect of stochastic noise on such hydrodynamic flows. We essentially concentrate on a small section of such a flow which is nothing but a plane shear flow supplemented by the Coriolis effect. This also mimics a small section of an astrophysical accretion disk. It is found that such stochastically driven flows exhibit large temporal and spatial correlations of perturbation velocities, and hence large energy dissipations of perturbation, which presumably generate instability. A ra...

  16. Accurate, Meshless Methods for Magneto-Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a pair of meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the 'meshless finite mass' (MFM) and 'meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods. These capture advantages of both smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) schemes. Here, we extend these to include ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains div*B~0 to high accuracy. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with a state-of-the-art implementation of SPH MHD. In every one of a large suite of test problems, the new methods are competitive with moving-mesh and AMR schemes using constrained transport (CT) to ensure div*B=0. They are able to correctly capture the growth and structure of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), MHD turbulence, and the launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than AMR codes. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods e...

  17. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  18. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  19. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  20. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most o...

  1. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  2. Hydrodynamic aspect of caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franci Gabrovsek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available From a hydrological point of view, active caves are a series of connected conduits which drain water through an aquifer. Water tends to choose the easiest way through the system but different geological and morphological barriers act as flow restrictions. The number and characteristics of restrictions depends on the particular speleogenetic environment, which is a function of geological, geomorphological, climatological and hydrological settings. Such a variety and heterogeneity of underground systems has presented a challenge for human understanding for many centuries. Access to many underground passages, theoretical knowledge and recent methods (modeling, water pressure-resistant dataloggers, precise sensors etc. give us the opportunity to get better insight into the hydrodynamic aspect of caves. In our work we tried to approach underground hydrodynamics from both theoretical and practical points of view. We present some theoretical background of open surface and pressurized flow in underground rivers and present results of some possible scenarios. Moreover, two case studies from the Ljubljanica river basin are presented in more detail: the cave system between Planinsko polje and Ljubljansko barje, and the cave system between Bloško polje and Cerkniško polje. The approach and methodology in each case is somewhat different, as the aims were different at the beginning of exploration. However, they both deal with temporal and spatial hydrodynamics of underground waters. In the case of Bloško polje-Cerkniško polje system we also explain the feedback loop between hydrodynamics and Holocene speleogenesis.

  3. The hydrodynamic instability of powerful cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdmane, R.A.; Ulmanis, L.Ya.; Valdamanis, Ya.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical calculation is the basis for analyzing the issues of stability of the speed profile in channels of powerful cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic (MGD) pumps. A one dimensional hydraulic model is used in the calculations. The questions about stability of movement relative to transverse perturbations in speed are discussed. It is shown that at high values of the parameter epsilon and the radius of the channel the movement is unstable with respect to the transverse shifts. The results are of interest for studies of liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generators.

  4. Hydrodynamics of the Dirac spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yizhuang, E-mail: yizhuang.liu@stonybrook.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Warchoł, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.warchol@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, PL-30348 Krakow (Poland); Zahed, Ismail, E-mail: ismail.zahed@stonybrook.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We discuss a hydrodynamical description of the eigenvalues of the Dirac spectrum in even dimensions in the vacuum and in the large N (volume) limit. The linearized hydrodynamics supports sound waves. The hydrodynamical relaxation of the eigenvalues is captured by a hydrodynamical (tunneling) minimum configuration which follows from a pertinent form of Euler equation. The relaxation from a phase of unbroken chiral symmetry to a phase of broken chiral symmetry occurs over a time set by the speed of sound.

  5. Moldable cork ablation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  6. Very-high-growth-factor Planar Ablative Rayleigh Taylor Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; Glendinning, S G; Edwards, M J; Milovich, J L; Sorce, C M; Collins, G W; Haan, S W; Page, R H

    2006-10-30

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is an important factor in bounding the performance envelope of ignition targets. This paper describes an experiment for ablative RT instability that for the first time achieves growth factors close to those expected to occur in ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The large growth allows small seed perturbations to be detected and can be used to place an upper bound on perturbation growth at the ablation front resulting from microstructure in the preferred Be ablator. The experiments were performed on the Omega laser using a halfraum 1.2 mm long by 2 mm diameter with a 75% laser entrance hole. The halfraum was filled with {approx} 1 atm of neopentane to delay gold plasma from closing the diagnostic line of sight down the axis of the halfraum. The ablator was mounted at the base of the halfraum, and was accelerated by a two stepped X-ray pulse consisting of an early time section {approx} 100 eV to emulate the NIF foot followed by an approximately constant {approx} 150 eV drive sustained over an additional 5-7ns. It is this long pulse duration and late time observation that distinguishes the present work from previous experiments, and is responsible for the large growth that is achieved. The growth of a 2D sinusoidal perturbation machined on the drive side of the ablator was measured using face-on radiography. The diagnostic view remained open until {approx} 11 ns with maximum growth factors measured to be {approx} 200. The trajectory of the ablator was measured using streaked backlit radiography. The design and analysis of the experiments is described, and implications for experiments on ignition target ablators are discussed.

  7. Global aspects of elliptical instability in tidally distorted accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ryu, D; Vishniac, E T; Ryu, Dongsu; Goodman, Jeremy; Vishniac, Ethan T

    1995-01-01

    Tidally distorted accretion disks in binary star systems are subject to a local hydrodynamic instability which excites m=1 internal waves. This instability is three dimensional and approximately incompressible. We study the global aspects of this local instability using equations derived under the shearing sheet approximation, where the effects of the azimuthal variation along distorted orbital trajectories are included in source terms which oscillate with local orbital phase. Linear analyses show that the excitation of the instability is essentially local, i.e. insensitive to radial boundary conditions. The region of rapid growth feeds waves into the region of slow or negligible growth, allowing the instability to become global. The global growth rate depends the maximum local growth rate, the size of the rapid growth region, and the local group velocity. We present an empirical expression for the global growth rate. We note that the local nature of the instability allows the excitation of waves with m\

  8. femtosecond laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Margetic, Vanja

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation was investigated as a solid sampling method for elemental chemical analysis. In comparison to the sampling with longer laser pulses, two aspects could be improved by using ultrashort pulses: elimination of the elemental fractionation from the ablation crater, which is necessary for an accurate quantitative analysis, and better control of the material removal (especially for metals), which increases the spatial resolution of microanalysis. Basic aspects of ultrashort...

  9. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (L{sub n} {>=} 500 {mu}m) at the quarter-critical density (N{sub qc}) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of L{sub n} approaching {approx}400 {mu}m have been created; (2) the density scale length at N{sub qc} scales as L{sub n}({mu}m) Asymptotically-Equal-To (R{sub DPP} Multiplication-Sign I{sup 1/4}/2); and (3) the electron temperature T{sub e} at N{sub qc} scales as T{sub e}(keV) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.95 Multiplication-Sign {radical}(I), with the incident intensity (I) measured in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (R{sub DPP}) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons f{sub hot} is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 6} for G{sub c} < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 1.2} for G{sub c} {>=} 4, with the

  10. SPHGal: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with improved accuracy for Galaxy simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Walch, Stefanie; Moster, Benjamin P; Oser, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    We present the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics implementation SPHGal which incorporates several recent developments into the GADGET code. This includes a pressure-entropy formulation of SPH with a Wendland kernel, a higher order estimate of velocity gradients, a modified artificial viscosity switch with a strong limiter, and artificial conduction of thermal energy. We conduct a series of idealized hydrodynamic tests and show that while the pressure-entropy formulation is ideal for resolving fluid mixing at contact discontinuities, it performs conspicuously worse when strong shocks are involved due to the large entropy discontinuities. Including artificial conduction at shocks greatly improves the results. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can be resolved properly and dense clouds in the blob test dissolve qualitatively in agreement with other improved SPH implementations. We further perform simulations of an isolated Milky Way like disk galaxy and find a feedback-induced instability developing if too much arti...

  11. Termination of the magnetorotational instability via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, Tomasz; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Müller, Ewald; Aloy, Miguel-Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be a powerful mechanism amplifying the magnetic field in core collapse supernovae. However, whether initially weak magnetic fields can be amplified by this instability to dynamically relevant strengths is still a matter of active scientific debate. One of the main uncertainties concerns the process that terminates the growth of the instability. Parasitic instabilities of both Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and tearing-mode type have been suggested to play a crucial role in this process, disrupting MRI channel flows and quenching magnetic field amplification. We performed two-dimensional and three-dimensional sheering-disc simulations of a differentially rotating proto-neutron star layer in non-ideal MHD with unprecedented high numerical resolution. Our simulations show that KH parasitic modes dominate tearing modes in the regime of large hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, as encountered in proto-neutron stars. They also determine the maximum magnetic field stress ac...

  12. Black Widow Pulsar radiation hydrodynamics simulation using Castro: Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios Sazo, Maria; Zingale, Michael; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    A black widow pulsar (BWP) is a millisecond pulsar in a tight binary system with a low mass star. The fast rotating pulsar emits intense radiation, which injects energy and ablates the companion star. Observation of the ablation is seen as pulsar eclipses caused by a larger object than the companion star Roche lobe. This phenomenon is attributed to a cloud surrounding the evaporating star. We will present the methodology for modeling the interaction between the radiation coming from the pulsar and the companion star using the radiation hydrodynamics code Castro. Castro is an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code that solves the compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows with simultaneous refinement in space and time. The code also includes self-gravity, nuclear reactions and radiation. We are employing the gray-radiation solver, which uses a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. In our setup, we are modeling the companion star with the radiation field as a boundary condition, coming from one side of the domain. In addition to a model setup in 2-d axisymmetry, we also have a 3-d setup, which is more physical given the nature of the system considering the companion is facing the pulsar on one side. We discuss the progress of our calculations, first results, and future work.The work at Stony Brook was supported by DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant DE-FG02-87ER40317

  13. Hydrodynamics of marine and offshore structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FALTINSEN O. M

    2014-01-01

    An overview of hydrodynamic problems related to the broad variety of ships and sea structures involved in transportation, oil and gas exploration and production, marine operations, recovery of oil-spill, renewable energy, infrastructure and aquaculture is given. An approximate hydroelastic model for wave and current induced response of a floating fish farm with circular plastic collar and net cage is discussed. Weakly nonlinear potential-flow problems such as slow-drift motions and stationkeeping, springing of ships and ringing are given special attention. Body-fixed coordinate system is recommended in weakly nonlinear potential-flow ana-lysis of bodies with sharp corners. Dynamic ship instabilities, Mathieu-type instabilities, chaos and two-phase flow involving inter-face instabilities are discussed. It is advocated that slamming must be coupled with structural mechanics in order to find important time scales of the many physical effects associated with slamming and that both water entry and exit matter in describing the global wetdeck slamming effects. Further, sloshing-induced slamming in prismatic LNG tanks is perhaps the most complicated slamming problem because many fluid mechanic and thermodynamic parameters as well as hydroelasticity may matter.

  14. Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic stability

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekhar, S

    1981-01-01

    Dr. Chandrasekhar's book received high praise when it first appeared in 1961 as part of Oxford University Press' International Series of Monographs on Physics. Since then it has been reprinted numerous times in its expensive hardcover format. This first lower-priced, sturdy paperback edition will be welcomed by graduate physics students and scientists familiar with Dr. Chandrasekhar's work, particularly in light of the resurgence of interest in the Rayleigh-Bénard problem. This book presents a most lucid introduction to the Rayleigh-Bénard problem: it has also been applauded for its thorough, clear coverage of the theory of instabilities causing convection. Dr. Chandrasekhar considers most of the typical problems in hydromagnetic stability, with the exception of viscous shear flow; a specialized domain deserving a book unto itself. Contents include: Rotation; Stability of More General Flows; Bénard Problem; Gravitational Equilibrium and Instability; Stability of a Magnetic Field; Thermal Instability of a L...

  15. RESEARCH ON THE HYDRODYNAMIC STABILITY OF FIBRE SUSPENSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Zhen-jiang

    2003-01-01

    The stability of wall-bounded fibre suspensions was studied. The linear stability analysis was performed applying the flow stability theory and slender-body theory. The results of numerical analysis show that fibres and their hydrodynamic interactions reinforce the flow stability. Investigation of fibre orientation and vorticity in the suspension revealed the mechanisms behind the instability. Drag reduction properties in the transition regime were also presented. The experiments using dye emission and PIV techniques verified theoretical results.

  16. High-order hydrodynamic algorithms for exascale computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Nathaniel Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-05

    Hydrodynamic algorithms are at the core of many laboratory missions ranging from simulating ICF implosions to climate modeling. The hydrodynamic algorithms commonly employed at the laboratory and in industry (1) typically lack requisite accuracy for complex multi- material vortical flows and (2) are not well suited for exascale computing due to poor data locality and poor FLOP/memory ratios. Exascale computing requires advances in both computer science and numerical algorithms. We propose to research the second requirement and create a new high-order hydrodynamic algorithm that has superior accuracy, excellent data locality, and excellent FLOP/memory ratios. This proposal will impact a broad range of research areas including numerical theory, discrete mathematics, vorticity evolution, gas dynamics, interface instability evolution, turbulent flows, fluid dynamics and shock driven flows. If successful, the proposed research has the potential to radically transform simulation capabilities and help position the laboratory for computing at the exascale.

  17. Hydrodynamics of coalescing binary neutron stars ellipsoidal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, D; Lai, Dong; Shapiro, Stu

    1994-01-01

    We employ an approximate treatment of dissipative hydrodynamics in three dimensions to study the coalescence of binary neutron stars driven by the emission of gravitational waves. The stars are modeled as compressible ellipsoids obeying a polytropic equation of state; all internal fluid velocities are assumed to be linear functions of the coordinates. The hydrodynamic equations then reduce to a set of coupled ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the principal axes of the ellipsoids, the internal velocity parameters and the binary orbital parameters. Gravitational radiation reaction and viscous dissipation are both incorporated. We set up exact initial binary equilibrium configurations and follow the transition from the quasi-static, secular decay of the orbit at large separation to the rapid dynamical evolution of the configurations just prior to contact. A hydrodynamical instability resulting from tidal interactions significantly accelerates the coalescence at small separation, leading to app...

  18. Scalability of Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Shikui

    2009-01-01

    Many hydrodynamic processes can be studied in a way that is scalable over a vastly relevant physical parameter space. We systematically examine this scalability, which has so far only briefly discussed in astrophysical literature. We show how the scalability is limited by various constraints imposed by physical processes and initial conditions. Using supernova remnants in different environments and evolutionary phases as application examples, we demonstrate the use of the scaling as a powerful tool to explore the interdependence among relevant parameters, based on a minimum set of simulations. In particular, we devise a scaling scheme that can be used to adaptively generate numerous seed remnants and plant them into 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova-dominated interstellar medium.

  19. Experiments to measure ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth of Gaussian bumps in plastic capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sorce, Chuck [LLE; Landen, Otto [LLNL; Braun, Dave [LLNL

    2010-06-02

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities have been of primary concern to the ICF program since its inception. To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF, targets must be designed for high implosion velocities, which requires higher in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) and diminished shell stability. Controlling capsule perturbations is thus of the utmost importance. Recent simulations have shown that features on the outer surface of an ICF capsule as small as 10 microns wide and 100's of nanometers tall such as bumps, divots, or even dust particles can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Recent x-ray images of implosions on the NIF may be evidence of such mixing. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (Gaussian bumps) due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. The platform that has been developed uses halfraums with radiation temperatures near 75 eV (Rev. 4 foot-level) driven by 15-20 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sends a ~2.5 Mbar shock into a planar CH foil. Gaussian-shaped bumps (20 microns wide, 4-7 microns tall) are deposited onto the ablation side of the target. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα - 2.8 keV) backlighter is used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements will also be made with Omega's active shock breakout (ASBO) and streaked optical pyrometery (SOP) diagnostics in conjunction with filtered x-ray photodiode arrays (DANTE) to determine drive conditions in the target. These data will be used to discriminate between EOS

  20. Burst Mechanisms in Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, E

    1999-01-01

    Different mechanisms believed to be responsible for the generation of bursts in hydrodynamical systems are reviewed and a new mechanism capable of generating regular or irregular bursts of large dynamic range near threshold is described. The new mechanism is present in the interaction between oscillatory modes of odd and even parity in systems of large but finite aspect ratio, and provides an explanation for the bursting behavior observed in binary fluid convection. Additional applications of the new mechanism are proposed.

  1. Relativistic cosmological hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the relativistic cosmological hydrodynamic perturbations. We present the general large scale solutions of the perturbation variables valid for the general sign of three space curvature, the cosmological constant, and generally evolving background equation of state. The large scale evolution is characterized by a conserved gauge invariant quantity which is the same as a perturbed potential (or three-space curvature) in the comoving gauge.

  2. Hydrodynamics of insect spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, On Shun; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    Microorganism motility plays important roles in many biological processes including reproduction. Many microorganisms propel themselves by propagating traveling waves along their flagella. Depending on the species, propagation of planar waves (e.g. Ceratium) and helical waves (e.g. Trichomonas) were observed in eukaryotic flagellar motion, and hydrodynamic models for both were proposed in the past. However, the motility of insect spermatozoa remains largely unexplored. An interesting morphological feature of such cells, first observed in Tenebrio molitor and Bacillus rossius, is the double helical deformation pattern along the flagella, which is characterized by the presence of two superimposed helical flagellar waves (one with a large amplitude and low frequency, and the other with a small amplitude and high frequency). Here we present the first hydrodynamic investigation of the locomotion of insect spermatozoa. The swimming kinematics, trajectories and hydrodynamic efficiency of the swimmer are computed based on the prescribed double helical deformation pattern. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, and explore the dependence of the swimming performance on the geometric and dynamical parameters.

  3. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-08-07

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms.

  4. Sedimentation and gravitational instability of Escherichia coli Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique; Collaboration between Laboratory FAST; LPS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The successive run and tumble of Escherichia coli bacteria provides an active matter suspension of rod-like particles with a large swimming diffusion. As opposed to inactive elongated particles, this diffusion prevents clustering and instability in the gravity field. We measure the time dependent E . coli concentration profile during their sedimentation. After some hours, due to the dioxygen consumption, a motile / non-motile front forms leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor type gravitational instability. Analyzing both sedimentation and instability in the framework of active particle suspensions, we can measure the relevant bacteria hydrodynamic characteristics such as its single particle sedimentation velocity and its hindrance volume.

  5. Nonlinear instability and convection in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, P.; Ansari, I.H.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Lohse, Detlef; Alam, M.

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear instability of the density-inverted granular Leidenfrost state and the resulting convective motion in strongly shaken granular matter are analysed via a weakly nonlinear analysis of the hydrodynamic equations. The base state is assumed to be quasi-steady and the effect of harmonic

  6. Nonlinear instability and convection in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, P.; Ansari, I.H.; Meer, van der R.M.; Lohse, D.; Alam, M.

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear instability of the density-inverted granular Leidenfrost state and the resulting convective motion in strongly shaken granular matter are analysed via a weakly nonlinear analysis of the hydrodynamic equations. The base state is assumed to be quasi-steady and the effect of harmonic shak

  7. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  8. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  9. Dynamo activities driven by magneto-rotational instability and Parker instability in galactic gaseous disk

    OpenAIRE

    Machida, Mami; NAKAMURA, Kenji E.; Kudoh, Takahiro; Akahori, Takuya; Yoshiaki, SOFUE; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    We carried out global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of dynamo activities in galactic gaseous disks without assuming equatorial symmetry. Numerical results indicate the growth of azimuthal magnetic fields non-symmetric to the equatorial plane. As magneto-rotational instability (MRI) grows, the mean strength of magnetic fields is amplified until the magnetic pressure becomes as large as 10% of the gas pressure. When the local plasma $\\beta$ ($ = p_{\\rm gas}/p_{\\rm mag}$) be...

  10. Validating hydrodynamic growth in National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L., E-mail: peterson76@llnl.gov; Casey, D. T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Raman, K. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present new hydrodynamic growth experiments at the National Ignition Facility, which extend previous measurements up to Legendre mode 160 and convergence ratio 4, continuing the growth factor dispersion curve comparison of the low foot and high foot pulses reported by Casey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 011102(R) (2014)]. We show that the high foot pulse has lower growth factor and lower growth rate than the low foot pulse. Using novel on-capsule fiducial markers, we observe that mode 160 inverts sign (changes phase) for the high foot pulse, evidence of amplitude oscillations during the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase of a spherically convergent system. Post-shot simulations are consistent with the experimental measurements for all but the shortest wavelength perturbations, reinforcing the validity of radiation hydrodynamic simulations of ablation front growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules.

  11. Axisymmetric smoothed particle hydrodynamics with self-gravity

    CERN Document Server

    García-Senz, D; Cabezon, R M; Bravo, E

    2008-01-01

    The axisymmetric form of the hydrodynamic equations within the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) formalism is presented and checked using idealized scenarios taken from astrophysics (free fall collapse, implosion and further pulsation of a sun-like star), gas dynamics (wall heating problem, collision of two streams of gas) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF, -ablative implosion of a small capsule-). New material concerning the standard SPH formalism is given. That includes the numerical handling of those mass points which move close to the singularity axis, more accurate expressions for the artificial viscosity and the heat conduction term and an easy way to incorporate self-gravity in the simulations. The algorithm developed to compute gravity does not rely in any sort of grid, leading to a numerical scheme totally compatible with the lagrangian nature of the SPH equations.

  12. A generalized transport-velocity formulation for smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xiangyu Y., E-mail: xiangyu.hu@tum.de; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2017-05-15

    The standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method suffers from tensile instability. In fluid-dynamics simulations this instability leads to particle clumping and void regions when negative pressure occurs. In solid-dynamics simulations, it results in unphysical structure fragmentation. In this work the transport-velocity formulation of Adami et al. (2013) is generalized for providing a solution of this long-standing problem. Other than imposing a global background pressure, a variable background pressure is used to modify the particle transport velocity and eliminate the tensile instability completely. Furthermore, such a modification is localized by defining a shortened smoothing length. The generalized formulation is suitable for fluid and solid materials with and without free surfaces. The results of extensive numerical tests on both fluid and solid dynamics problems indicate that the new method provides a unified approach for multi-physics SPH simulations.

  13. Foundations of radiation hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    1999-01-01

    Radiation hydrodynamics is a broad subject that cuts across many disciplines in physics and astronomy: fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, and radiative transfer, among others. The theory developed in this book by two specialists in the field can be applied to the study of such diverse astrophysical phenomena as stellar winds, supernova explosions, and the initial phases of cosmic expansion, as well as the physics of laser fusion and reentry vehicles. As such, it provides students with the basic tools for research on radiating flows.Largely self-contained,

  14. Calculation of Nozzle Ablation During Arcing Period in an SF6 Auto-Expansion Circuit Breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junmin; Lu, Chunrong; Guan, Yonggang; Liu, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    The nozzle ablation process is described as two phases of heat and ablation in the interruption for an SF6 circuit breaker in this paper. Their mathematical models are established with the Fourier heat conduction differential equation respectively. The masses of nozzle ablation with different arc durations and arc currents are calculated through the model of the nozzle ablation combined with an MHD (magneto-hydrodynamic) arc model. The time of the temperature rise on the inner surface of the nozzle under a given energy flux and of reaching the pyrolysis temperature under different energy fluxes is respectively analyzed. The relations between the mass of nozzle ablation and breaking current and arc duration are obtained. The result shows that the absorbing energy process before the nozzle ablation can be neglected under the condition of the energy flux entering into nozzle q > 109 W/m2. The ablation is the severest during the high-current phase and the ablation mass increases rapidly with the breaking current and with arc duration respectively. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51177005 and 51477004)

  15. Introduction to Hydrodynamic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, P. G.

    2002-09-01

    Instability of flows and their transition to turbulence are widespread phenomena in engineering and the natural environment. They are important in applied mathematics, astrophysics, biology, geophysics, meteorology, oceanography, physics, and engineering. This is a graduate-level textbook to introduce these phenomena by modeling them mathematically, and describing numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. The visualization of instabilities is emphasized with many figures. Many worked examples and exercises for students illustrate the ideas of the text. Readers are assumed to be fluent in linear algebra, advanced calculus, elementary theory of ordinary differntial equations, complex variable and the elements of fluid mechanics. The book is aimed at graduate students, but is very useful for specialists in other fields.

  16. Nonmodal analysis of helical and azimuthal magnetorotational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Mamatsashvili, G

    2016-01-01

    The helical and the azimuthal magnetorotational instabilities operate in rotating magnetized flows with relatively steep negative or extremely steep positive shear. The corresponding lower and upper Liu limits of the shear, which determine the threshold of modal growth of these instabilities, are continuously connected when some axial electrical current is allowed to pass through the rotating fluid. We investigate the nonmodal dynamics of these instabilities arising from the nonnormality of shear flow in the local approximation, generalizing the results of the modal approach. It is demonstrated that moderate transient/nonmodal amplification of both types of magnetorotational instability occurs within the Liu limits, where the system is stable according to modal analysis. We show that for the helical magnetorotational instability this magnetohydrodynamic behavior is closely connected with the nonmodal growth of the underlying purely hydrodynamic problem.

  17. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on magnetic instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F; Kasprzyk, Ch; Paredes, A; Ruediger, G; Seilmayer, M

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields of planets, stars and galaxies are generated by self-excitation in moving electrically conducting fluids. Once produced, magnetic fields can play an active role in cosmic structure formation by destabilizing rotational flows that would be otherwise hydrodynamically stable. For a long time, both hydromagnetic dynamo action as well as magnetically triggered flow instabilities had been the subject of purely theoretical research. Meanwhile, however, the dynamo effect has been observed in large-scale liquid sodium experiments in Riga, Karlsruhe and Cadarache. In this paper, we summarize the results of some smaller liquid metal experiments devoted to various magnetic instabilities such as the helical and the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, the Tayler instability, and the different instabilities that appear in a magnetized spherical Couette flow. We conclude with an outlook on a large scale Tayler-Couette experiment using liquid sodium, and on the prospects to observe magnetically triggered ...

  18. Rayleigh Taylor Instability Growth in NIC Capsules with Engineered Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, K. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Clark, D. S.; Farley, D. R.; Landen, O. L.; Scott, H.; Moreno, K.; Vesey, R. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Golovkin, I.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.

    2011-10-01

    In order to achieve thermonuclear burn and energy gain in ICF capsules, the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities must be understood and controlled. Experiments are planned to measure time dependent hydrodynamic instability growth of engineered defects on the surface of NIC capsules using x-ray radiography. We will present an analysis of synthetic radiography from 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations with various x-ray drive fluxes and show how these results will be used to assess code predictions of instability growth and mix. We will also discuss how these results correlate with capsule performance and observables from hot spot self emission imaging and Ge spectroscopy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Molecular hydrodynamics from memory kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as $t^{-3/2}$. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. We finally discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales and the cross-over between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  20. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics for electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andy; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B.; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2016-11-01

    We formulate and study computationally the low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamic equations for electrolyte solutions. We are interested in studying transport in mixtures of charged species at the mesoscale, down to scales below the Debye length, where thermal fluctuations have a significant impact on the dynamics. Continuing our previous work on fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent mixtures of incompressible isothermal miscible liquids [A. Donev et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 037103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4913571], we now include the effect of charged species using a quasielectrostatic approximation. Localized charges create an electric field, which in turn provides additional forcing in the mass and momentum equations. Our low Mach number formulation eliminates sound waves from the fully compressible formulation and leads to a more computationally efficient quasi-incompressible formulation. We demonstrate our ability to model saltwater (NaCl) solutions in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings. We show that our algorithm is second order in the deterministic setting and for length scales much greater than the Debye length gives results consistent with an electroneutral approximation. In the stochastic setting, our model captures the predicted dynamics of equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations. We also identify and model an instability that appears when diffusive mixing occurs in the presence of an applied electric field.

  1. Tumor ablations in IMRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ IntroductionMagnetic resonance imaging based guidance control and monitoring of minimally invasive intervention has developed from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. Magnetic-resonance-guided interstitial therapy in principle is defined as a treatment technique for ablating deepseated tumors in the human body.

  2. Dynamical instabilities in disc-planet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Protoplanetary discs may become dynamically unstable due to structure induced by an embedded giant planet. In this thesis, I discuss the stability of such systems and explore the consequence of instability on planetary migration. I begin with non-self-gravitating, low viscosity discs and show that giant planets induce shocks inside its co-orbital region, leading to a profile unstable to vortex formation around a potential vorticity minimum. This instability is commonly known as the vortex or Rossby wave instability. Vortex-planet interaction lead to episodic phases of migration, which can be understood in the framework of type III migration. I then examine the effect of disc self-gravity on gap stability. The linear theory of the Rossby wave instability is extended to include disc gravity, which shows that self-gravity is effective at stabilising the vortex instability at small azimuthal wavenumber. This is consistent with the observation that more vortices develop with increasing disc mass in hydrodynamic si...

  3. Warm dense mater: another application for pulsed power hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics (PPH) is an application of low-impedance pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology to the study of advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties. PPH can potentially be applied to the study of the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state, viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to slightly above solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Conditions characteristic of WDM are difficult to obtain, and even more difficult to diagnose. One approach to producing WDM uses laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers are applying these techniques. Pulsed power hydrodynamic techniques, such as large convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through multiple shock compression and heating of normal density material between a massive, high density, energetic liner and a high density central 'anvil' are possible ways to reach relevant conditions. Another avenue to WDM conditions is through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. In this paper we will examine the challenges to pulsed power technology and to pulsed power systems presented by the opportunity to explore this interesting region of parameter space.

  4. Efficiency of thermal relaxation by radiative processes in protoplanetary discs: constraints on hydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malygin, M. G.; Klahr, H.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Hydrodynamic, non-magnetic instabilities can provide turbulent stress in the regions of protoplanetary discs, where the magneto-rotational instability can not develop. The induced motions influence the grain growth, from which formation of planetesimals begins. Thermal relaxation of the gas constrains origins of the identified hydrodynamic sources of turbulence in discs. Aims: We aim to estimate the radiative relaxation timescale of temperature perturbations in protoplanetary discs. We study the dependence of the thermal relaxation on the perturbation wavelength, the location within the disc, the disc mass, and the dust-to-gas mass ratio. We then apply thermal relaxation criteria to localise modes of the convective overstability, the vertical shear instability, and the zombie vortex instability. Methods: For a given temperature perturbation, we estimated two timescales: the radiative diffusion timescale tthick and the optically thin emission timescale tthin. The longest of these timescales governs the relaxation: trelax = max (tthick, tthin). We additionally accounted for the collisional coupling to the emitting species. Our calculations employed the latest tabulated dust and gas mean opacities. Results: The relaxation criterion defines the bulk of a typical T Tauri disc as unstable to the development of linear hydrodynamic instabilities. The midplane is unstable to the convective overstability from at most 2au and up to 40au, as well as beyond 140au. The vertical shear instability can develop between 15au and 180au. The successive generation of (zombie) vortices from a seeded noise can work within the inner 0.8au. Conclusions: A map of relaxation timescale constrains the origins of the identified hydrodynamic turbulence-driving mechanisms in protoplanetary discs. Dynamic disc modelling with the evolution of dust and gas opacities is required to clearly localise the hydrodynamic turbulence, and especially its non-linear phase.

  5. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  6. Fluctuations in Relativistic Causal Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Mishra, Ananta P

    2013-01-01

    The formalism to calculate the hydrodynamics fluctuation using the quasi-stationary fluctuation theory of Onsager to the relativistic Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics is already known. In this work we calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations in relativistic causal theory of Muller, Israel and Stewart and other related causal hydrodynamic theories. We show that expressions for the Onsager coefficients and the correlation functions have form similar to the ones obtained by using Navier-Stokes equation. However, temporal evolution of the correlation functions obtained using MIS and the other causal theories can be significantly different than the correlation functions obtained using the Navier-Stokes equation. Finally, as an illustrative example, we explicitly plot the correlation functions obtained using the causal-hydrodynamics theories and compare them with correlation functions obtained by earlier authors using the expanding boost-invariant (Bjorken) flows.

  7. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  8. Dynamic Instability of Rapidly Rotating Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, B. K.; Durisen, R. H.; Johnson, M. S.; Davis, G. A.

    1994-12-01

    Modern studies of collapse and fragmentation of protostellar clouds suggest a wide variety of outcomes, depending on the assumed initial conditions. Individual equilibrium objects which result from collapse are likely to be in rapid rotation and can have a wide range of structures. We have undertaken a survey of parameter space in order to examine the role of dynamic instabilities in the subsequent evolution of these objects. For the purposes of conducting a systematic study, we so far have considered only the n = 3/2 polytropic equilibrium states that might form from the collapse of uniformly rotating spherical clouds. By varying the central concentration of the assumed initial cloud, we obtain equilibrium states distinguished primarily by their different specific angular momentum distributions. These equilibrium states span the range between starlike objects with angular momentum distributions analogous to the Maclaurin spheroids and objects more accurately described as massive Keplerian disks around stars. Using a new SCF code to generate the n = 3/2 axisymmetric equilibrium states and an improved 3D hydrodynamics code, we have investigated the the onset and nature of global dynamic instabilities in these objects. The starlike objects are unstable to barlike instabilities at T/|W| gtorder 0.27, where T/|W| is the ratio of total rotational kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy. These instabilities are vigorous and lead to violent ejection of mass and angular momentum. As the angular momentum distribution shifts to the other extreme, one- and two-armed spiral instabilities begin to dominate at considerably lower T/|W|. These instabilities appear to be driven by the SLING and swing mechanisms. In extremely flattened disks, one-armed spirals dominate all other disturbances but eventually saturate at nonlinear amplitude without producing fragmentation. We conclude that the nature of the global instabilities encountered during the process of star formation

  9. Lifshitz Superfluid Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We construct the first order hydrodynamics of quantum critical points with Lifshitz scaling and a spontaneously broken symmetry. The fluid is described by a combination of two flows, a normal component that carries entropy and a super-flow which has zero viscosity and carries no entropy. We analyze the new transport effects allowed by the lack of boost invariance and constrain them by the local second law of thermodynamics. Imposing time-reversal invariance, we find eight new parity even transport coefficients. The formulation is applicable, in general, to any superfluid/superconductor with an explicit breaking of boost symmetry, in particular to high $T_c$ superconductors. We discuss possible experimental signatures.

  10. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and moments which the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull.The first part of the text is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections (with and without cavitation......) and about wings. It then treats propellers in uniform flow, first via advanced actuator disc modelling, and then using lifting-line theory. Pragmatic guidance is given for design and evaluation of performance, including the use of computer modelling.The second part covers the development of unsteady forces...... arising from operation in non-uniform hull wakes. First, by a number of simplifications, various aspects of the problem are dealt with separately until the full problem of a non-cavitating, wide-bladed propeller in a wake is treated by a new and completely developed theory. Next, the complicated problem...

  11. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  12. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  13. Magnetically-Driven Convergent Instability Growth platform on Z.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Patrick; Mattsson, Thomas; Martin, Matthew; Benage, John F.,

    2017-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth is a fundamentally limiting process in many applications. In High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) systems such as inertial confinement fusion implosions and stellar explosions, hydro instabilities can dominate the evolution of the object and largely determine the final state achievable. Of particular interest is the process by which instabilities cause perturbations at a density or material interface to grow nonlinearly, introducing vorticity and eventually causing the two species to mix across the interface. Although quantifying instabilities has been the subject of many investigations in planar geometry, few have been done in converging geometry. During FY17, the team executed six convergent geometry instability experiments. Based on earlier results, the platform was redesigned and improved with respect to load centering at installation making the installation reproducible and development of a new 7.2 keV, Co He-a backlighter system to better penetrate the liner. Together, the improvements yielded significantly improved experimental results. The results in FY17 demonstrate the viability of using experiments on Z to quantify instability growth in cylindrically convergent geometry. Going forward, we will continue the partnership with staff and management at LANL to analyze the past experiments, compare to hydrodynamics growth models, and design future experiments.

  14. Evaluating shoulder instability treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder instability common occurs. When treated nonoperatively, the resulting societal costs based on health care utilization and productivity losses are significant. Shoulder function can be evaluated using patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs). For shoulder instability, these include the

  15. Jeans instability in superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hason, Itamar; Oz, Yaron [Tel-Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the effect of a gravitational field on the sound modes of superfluids. We derive an instability condition that generalizes the well-known Jeans instability of the sound mode in normal fluids. We discuss potential experimental implications. (orig.)

  16. Calibrating an updated smoothed particle hydrodynamics scheme within gcd+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, D.; Okamoto, T.; Gibson, B. K.; Barnes, D. J.; Cen, R.

    2013-01-01

    We adapt a modern scheme of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to our tree N-body/SPH galactic chemodynamics code gcd+. The applied scheme includes implementations of the artificial viscosity switch and artificial thermal conductivity proposed by Morris & Monaghan, Rosswog & Price and Price to model discontinuities and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities more accurately. We first present hydrodynamics test simulations and contrast the results to runs undertaken without artificial viscosity switch or thermal conduction. In addition, we also explore the different levels of smoothing by adopting larger or smaller smoothing lengths, i.e. a larger or smaller number of neighbour particles, Nnb. We demonstrate that the new version of gcd+ is capable of modelling Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities to a similar level as the mesh code, athena. From the Gresho vortex, point-like explosion and self-similar collapse tests, we conclude that setting the smoothing length to keep Nnb as high as ˜58 is preferable to adopting smaller smoothing lengths. We present our optimized parameter sets from the hydrodynamics tests.

  17. MHD Instability Analysis of Liquid Metal Free Surface Jet Flow in Non-Uniform Magnetic Fields (Part Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUZenyu; KANGWeishan; PANChuanjie; DENHongyin; ZHANGYanxu

    2003-01-01

    In lost paper of magneto-hydrodynamic instability analysis of liquid metal free surface jet flow (Part Ⅰ), the magneto-hydrodynamic instability was analyzed for the jet flow in a transverse non-uniform magnetic field, BT. But, as all known, for the real conditions of liquid metal limiter-divertor plasma-facing components are in toroidal and poloidal fields. So, we try to analyze the magneto-hydrodynamic instability of the jet flow (hereby only for circular shape cross section jet flow) in the zone of non-uniform magnetic fields,

  18. Critical phenomena employed in hydrodynamic problems A case study of Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Assenheimer, M; Assenheimer, Michel; Steinberg, Victor

    1996-01-01

    By virtue of Rayleigh-Benard convection, we illustrate the advantages of combining a hydrodynamic pattern forming instability with a thermodynamic critical point. This has already lead to many novel unexpected observations and is further shown to possess opportunities for the study of exciting fundamental problems in nonequilibrium systems.

  19. Hydrodynamics of domain walls in ferroelectrics and multiferroics: Impact on memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. F.; Evans, D. M.; Gregg, J. M.; Gruverman, A.

    2016-07-01

    The standard "Kittel Law" for the thickness and shape of ferroelectric, ferroelastic, or ferromagnet domains assumes mechanical equilibrium. The present paper shows that such domains may be highly nonequilibrium, with unusual thicknesses and shapes. In lead germanate and multiferroic lead zirconate titanate iron tantalate domain wall instabilities resemble hydrodynamics (Richtmyer-Meshkov and Helfrich-Hurault, respectively).

  20. Ablation of Submicrometer Holes Using an Extreme-Ultraviolet Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossall, Andrew K.; Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg J.; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-06-01

    Simulations and experiments are used to study extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser drilling of submicrometer holes. The ablation process is studied with a 2D Eulerian hydrodynamic code that includes bound-free absorption processes relevant to the interaction of EUV lasers with a solid material. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured ablated depths for on-target irradiances of up to 1×10 10 W cm-2 . An increase in the irradiance to 1×10 12 W cm-2 is predicted to ablate material to a depth of 3.8 μ m from a single pulse with a hole diameter 3 to 4 times larger than the focal spot size. The model allows for the simulation of the interaction of a laser pulse with the crater created by a previous shot. Multiple-pulse lower-fluence irradiation configurations under optimized focusing conditions, i.e., approaching the diffraction limit, are shown to be advantageous for applications requiring mesoscale [(100 nm )- (1 μ m ) ] features and a high level of control over the ablation profile.

  1. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A;

    1998-01-01

    convective cooling by induction of a flow around the electrode tip increases lesion dimensions and power consumptions. Furthermore we conclude that for the given target temperature the power consumption is positively correlated with lesion volume (p ...This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation...... larger for septal applications than apical applications (p convective cooling by induction of flow yielded larger lesion volume, depth and width (p

  2. Local potential analysis of MHD instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, K. K.; Wilson, S. J.

    1985-02-01

    The use of the local potential method for studying instabilities of MHD fluids is examined. The mathematical method is similar to that developed by the authors for studying the time-dependent radiative transfer problem and the radiative stability of interstellar masers. The scheme is based on the universal evolution criterion proposed by Glansdorff and Prigogine (1964) as demonstrated by Hays (1965) for the heat equation and Schechter and Himmelblau (1965) for the Benard problem in hydrodynamics. The scheme for securing stability criteria is demonstrated for two particular cases.

  3. Instability in electromagnetically driven flows Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Imazio, Paola Rodriguez; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have reported numerical simulations of the MHD flow driven by a travelling magnetic field (TMF) in an annular channel, at low Reynolds number. It was shown that the stalling of such induction pump is strongly related to magnetic flux expulsion. In the present article, we show that for larger hydrodynamic Reynolds number, and with more realistic boundary conditions, this instability takes the form of a large axisymmetric vortex flow in the (r,z)-plane, in which the flui...

  4. Interfacial Instabilities Driven by Self-Gravity in the ISM: Onset and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueckstaedt, R. M.; Hunter, J. H., Jr.

    2000-12-01

    As the sites of all present day star formation within the Milky Way, cold molecular clouds are a vital link in the evolution of tenuous interstellar gas into stars. Any comprehensive theory of star formation must include a study of the hydrodynamic processes that effect molecular cloud morphology. In the ISM, hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence play large roles in shaping clouds and creating regions capable of gravitational collapse. One of the key forces in the interstellar environment is self-gravity. Regardless of the mechanism initially responsible for creating density enhancements, self-gravity must ultimately drive the final collapse. A recent study has shown that self-gravity also gives rise to an interfacial instability that persists in the static limit when a density discontinuity exists (Hunter, Whitaker & Lovelace 1997). This instability also persists in the absence of a constant gravitational acceleration, unlike the familiar Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Analytic studies in Cartesian geometry predict that for perturbations proportional to exp(-iωt), the instability has an incompressible growth rate ω2= -2πG(ρ 1-ρ 2)2/(ρ1+ρ2). The growth rate is independent of the perturbation wavelength. Studies have also included cases in cylindrical geometry in which a static density interface has proven stable to kink modes but unstable to sausage modes. In the case of sausage modes, (perturbations in the radial direction), there exists a critical wavelength below which the instability does not appear. In this paper, we present two-dimensional numerical models designed to examine this self-gravity driven instability. A hydrodynamic code with self-gravity is used to test the analytic predictions in Cartesian and cylindrical geometries and to follow the instability into the nonlinear regime. We consider how the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities, including self-gravity driven instabilities, can have a role in shaping the ISM. We discuss implications for

  5. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  6. Research on Cellular Instabilities of Lean Premixed Syngas Flames under Various Hydrogen Fractions Using a Constant Volume Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Meng Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the intrinsic instabilities of H2/CO lean (φ = 0.4 to φ = 1.0 premixed flames at different hydrogen fractions ranging from 0% to 100% at elevated pressure and room temperature was performed in a constant volume vessel using a Schlieren system. The unstretched laminar burning velocities were compared with data from the previous literature and simulated results. The results indicate that excellent agreements are obtained. The cellular instabilities of syngas-air flames were discussed and critical flame radii were measured. When hydrogen fractions are above 50%, the flame tends to be more stable as the equivalence ratio increases; however, the instability increases for flames of lower hydrogen fractions. For the premixed syngas flame with hydrogen fractions greater than 50%, the decline in cellular instabilities induced by the increase in equivalence ratio can be attributed to a reduction of diffusive-thermal instabilities rather than increased hydrodynamic instabilities. For premixed syngas flames with hydrogen fractions lower than 50%, as the equivalence ratio increases, the cellular instabilities become more evident because the enhanced hydrodynamic instabilities become the dominant effect. For premixed syngas flames, the enhancement of cellular instabilities induced by the increase in hydrogen fraction is the result of both increasing diffusive-thermal and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  7. Special Relativistic Hydrodynamics with Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2016-12-01

    Special relativistic hydrodynamics with weak gravity has hitherto been unknown in the literature. Whether such an asymmetric combination is possible has been unclear. Here, the hydrodynamic equations with Poisson-type gravity, considering fully relativistic velocity and pressure under the weak gravity and the action-at-a-distance limit, are consistently derived from Einstein’s theory of general relativity. An analysis is made in the maximal slicing, where the Poisson’s equation becomes much simpler than our previous study in the zero-shear gauge. Also presented is the hydrodynamic equations in the first post-Newtonian approximation, now under the general hypersurface condition. Our formulation includes the anisotropic stress.

  8. Special relativistic hydrodynamics with gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jai-chan

    2016-01-01

    The special relativistic hydrodynamics with weak gravity is hitherto unknown in the literature. Whether such an asymmetric combination is possible was unclear. Here, the hydrodynamic equations with Poisson-type gravity considering fully relativistic velocity and pressure under the weak gravity and the action-at-a-distance limit are consistently derived from Einstein's general relativity. Analysis is made in the maximal slicing where the Poisson's equation becomes much simpler than our previous study in the zero-shear gauge. Also presented is the hydrodynamic equations in the first post-Newtonian approximation, now under the {\\it general} hypersurface condition. Our formulation includes the anisotropic stress.

  9. Developing laser ablation in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for actinide detection with AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauder, W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); University of Notre Dame, Nuclear Science Laboratory, 124 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Pardo, R.C.; Kondev, F.G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Palchan, T. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, 9600 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Collon, P. [University of Notre Dame, Nuclear Science Laboratory, 124 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paul, M. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    A laser ablation material injection system has been developed at the ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for use in accelerator mass spectrometry experiments. Beam production with laser ablation initially suffered from instabilities due to fluctuations in laser energy and cratering on the sample surface by the laser. However, these instabilities were rectified by applying feedback correction for the laser energy and rastering the laser across the sample surface. An initial experiment successfully produced and accelerated low intensity actinide beams with up to 1000 counts per second. With continued development, laser ablation shows promise as an alternative material injection scheme for ECR ion sources and may help substantially reduce cross talk in the source.

  10. Relativistic Gravothermal Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Roupas, Zacharias

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic instabilities of the self-gravitating, classical ideal gas are studied in the case of static, spherically symmetric configurations in General Relativity taking into account the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. One type of instabilities is found at low energies, where thermal energy becomes too weak to halt gravity and another at high energies, where gravitational attraction of thermal pressure overcomes its stabilizing effect. These turning points of stability are found to depend on the total rest mass $\\mathcal{M}$ over the radius $R$. The low energy instability is the relativistic generalization of Antonov instability, which is recovered in the limit $G\\mathcal{M} \\ll R c^2$ and low temperatures, while in the same limit and high temperatures, the high energy instability recovers the instability of the radiation equation of state. In the temperature versus energy diagram of series of equilibria, the two types of gravothermal instabilities make themselves evident as a double spiral! The two energy l...

  11. Filamentation Instability of Counterstreaming Laser-Driven Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Fiksel, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Chang, P.-Y.; Germaschewski, K.; Hu, S. X.; Nilson, P. M.

    2013-11-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counterstreaming, ablatively driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP Laser System. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Filamentation instability of counter-streaming laser-driven plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Chang, P -Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2013-01-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counter-streaming, ablatively-driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP laser system. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of solid tumors. Among these methods, radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RF ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options and is considered as a viable alternate to surgery for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer. Recently, RF ablation has been demonstrated to be a safe and valuable treatment option for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable lung malignancies. Resection should remain the standard therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but RF ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Initial favourable outcomes encourage combining radiotherapy and RF ablation, especially for treating larger tumors. In the setting of colorectal cancer lung metastases, survival rates provided by RF ablation in selected patients, are substantially higher than those obtained with any chemotherapy regimens and provide indirect evidence that RF ablation therapy improves survival in patients with limited lung metastatic disease.

  14. Numerical Simulation of the Hydrodynamical Combustion to Strange Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Niebergal, Brian; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a numerical solution to the burning of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star into stable (u,d,s) quark matter. Our method solves hydrodynamical flow equations in 1D with neutrino emission from weak equilibrating reactions, and strange quark diffusion across the burning front. We also include entropy change due to heat released in forming the stable quark phase. Our numerical results suggest burning front laminar speeds of 0.002-0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived using only a reactive-diffusive description. Analytic solutions to hydrodynamical jump conditions with a temperature dependent equation of state agree very well with our numerical findings for fluid velocities. The most important effect of neutrino cooling is that the conversion front stalls at lower density (below approximately 2 times saturation density). In a 2-dimensional setting, such rapid speeds and neutrino cooling may allow for a flame wrinkle instability to develop, possibly...

  15. Moving mesh cosmology: the hydrodynamics of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sijacki, Debora; Keres, Dusan; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison between the well-known SPH code GADGET and the new moving-mesh code AREPO on a number of hydrodynamical test problems. Through a variety of numerical experiments we establish a clear link between test problems and systematic numerical effects seen in cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Our tests demonstrate deficiencies of the SPH method in several sectors. These accuracy problems not only manifest themselves in idealized hydrodynamical tests, but also propagate to more realistic simulation setups of galaxy formation, ultimately affecting gas properties in the full cosmological framework, as highlighted in papers by Vogelsberger et al. (2011) and Keres et al. (2011). We find that an inadequate treatment of fluid instabilities in GADGET suppresses entropy generation by mixing, underestimates vorticity generation in curved shocks and prevents efficient gas stripping from infalling substructures. In idealized tests of inside-out disk formation, the convergence rate of g...

  16. Bosonization and quantum hydrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girish S Setlur

    2006-03-01

    It is shown that it is possible to bosonize fermions in any number of dimensions using the hydrodynamic variables, namely the velocity potential and density. The slow part of the Fermi field is defined irrespective of dimensionality and the commutators of this field with currents and densities are exponentiated using the velocity potential as conjugate to the density. An action in terms of these canonical bosonic variables is proposed that reproduces the correct current and density correlations. This formalism in one dimension is shown to be equivalent to the Tomonaga-Luttinger approach as it leads to the same propagator and exponents. We compute the one-particle properties of a spinless homogeneous Fermi system in two spatial dimensions with long-range gauge interactions and highlight the metal-insulator transition in the system. A general formula for the generating function of density correlations is derived that is valid beyond the random phase approximation. Finally, we write down a formula for the annihilation operator in momentum space directly in terms of number conserving products of Fermi fields.

  17. Engineering Hydrodynamic AUV Hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.

    2016-12-01

    AUV stands for autonomous underwater vehicle. AUVs are used in oceanography and are similar to gliders. MBARIs AUVs as well as other AUVs map the ocean floor which is very important. They also measure physical characteristics of the water, such as temperature and salinity. My science fair project for 4th grade was a STEM activity in which I built and tested 3 different AUV bodies. I wanted to find out which design was the most hydrodynamic. I tested three different lengths of AUV hulls to see which AUV would glide the farthest. The first was 6 inches. The second was 12 inches and the third was 18 inches. I used clay for the nosecone and cut a ruler into two and made it the fin. Each AUV used the same nosecone and fin. I tested all three designs in a pool. I used biomimicry to create my hypothesis. When I was researching I found that long slim animals swim fastest. So, my hypothesis is the longer AUV will glide farthest. In the end I was right. The longer AUV did glide the farthest.

  18. Ablation of solids by femtosecond lasers ablation mechanism and ablation thresholds for metals and dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Gamaly, E G; Tikhonchuk, V T; Luther-Davies, B

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of ablation of solids by intense femtosecond laser pulses is described in an explicit analytical form. It is shown that at high intensities when the ionization of the target material is complete before the end of the pulse, the ablation mechanism is the same for both metals and dielectrics. The physics of this new ablation regime involves ion acceleration in the electrostatic field caused by charge separation created by energetic electrons escaping from the target. The formulae for ablation thresholds and ablation rates for metals and dielectrics, combining the laser and target parameters, are derived and compared to experimental data. The calculated dependence of the ablation thresholds on the pulse duration is in agreement with the experimental data in a femtosecond range, and it is linked to the dependence for nanosecond pulses.

  19. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a shear flow in an initially unmagnetized plasma, unlike in the (magneto)hydrodynamics case. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroom-like electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. Macroscopic ($\\gg c/\\omega_{pe}$) fields are shown to be generated by these microscopic shear instabilities, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission and to seed MHD processes at long time-scales.

  20. Kinetic Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Sagert, Irina; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role in the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. As a first test we study the evolution of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface of a light and a heavy fluid in the presence of a gravitational acceleration. To suppress small-wavelength instabilities caused by the irregularity in the separation layer we use a large particle mean free path. The latter leads to the development of a diffusion layer as particles propagate from one fluid into the other. For small amplitudes, when the instability is i...

  1. Ablation of solids by femtosecond lasers: ablation mechanism and ablation thresholds for metals and dielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Gamaly, E. G.; Rode, A. V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Luther-Davies, B.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of ablation of solids by intense femtosecond laser pulses is described in an explicit analytical form. It is shown that at high intensities when the ionization of the target material is complete before the end of the pulse, the ablation mechanism is the same for both metals and dielectrics. The physics of this new ablation regime involves ion acceleration in the electrostatic field caused by charge separation created by energetic electrons escaping from the target. The formulae ...

  2. Reciprocal relations in dissipationless hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikovsky, L. A., E-mail: leva@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Hidden symmetry in dissipationless terms of arbitrary hydrodynamics equations is recognized. We demonstrate that all fluxes are generated by a single function and derive conventional Euler equations using the proposed formalism.

  3. Relativistic Hydrodynamics on Graphic Cards

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhard, Jochen; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    We show how to accelerate relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using graphic cards (graphic processing units, GPUs). These improvements are of highest relevance e.g. to the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC where (ideal and dissipative) relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm (SHASTA), which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  4. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-12-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of nonhydrodynamic modes.

  5. On the instability of a modified cup-burner flame in the infrared spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Bitala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the modification of a standardised cup-burner apparatus. The replacement of the original glass chimney is performed by shielding a nitrogen co-flow enabled measurement at a wavelength of 3.9 μm. This modification, together with a special arrangement of the measuring system (spectral filtering, data acquisition and post-processing, permitted the observation of various types of hydrodynamic instabilities, including transition states. The advantages of our arrangement are demonstrated with an ethylene non-premixed flame with high sooting tendency. Two known modes of hydrodynamic instability (varicose and sinuous that occur in buoyant flames were studied and described quantitatively. Based on the intensity of the infrared emissions, we identified and qualitatively described the modes of periodic hydrodynamic instability that are accompanied by flame tip opening, which has not been observed for this type of flame.

  6. Shoulder instability; Schulterinstabilitaeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainiz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    In the shoulder, the advantages of range of motion are traded for the disadvantages of vulnerability to injury and the development of instability. Shoulder instability and the lesion it produces represent one of the main causes of shoulder discomfort and pain. Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to their causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options: instabilities are classified in traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome, and in microtraumatic instabilities. Plain radiographs ('trauma series') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful reposition. Direct MR arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation the different injury patterns on the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast CT-arthrography with use of multidetector CT scanners may be an alternative imaging modality, however, regarding the younger patient age, MR imaging should be preferred in the diagnostic work-up of shoulder instabilities. (orig.)

  7. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies liquid mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu; Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States); Nonaka, Andy; Bell, John B. [Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Garcia, Alejandro L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, California 95192 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We develop a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamic equations describing transport of mass and momentum in a multispecies mixture of incompressible miscible liquids at specified temperature and pressure, which generalizes our prior work on ideal mixtures of ideal gases [Balakrishnan et al., “Fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies nonreactive mixtures,” Phys. Rev. E 89 013017 (2014)] and binary liquid mixtures [Donev et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusively mixing fluids,” Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 9(1), 47-105 (2014)]. In this formulation, we combine and extend a number of existing descriptions of multispecies transport available in the literature. The formulation applies to non-ideal mixtures of arbitrary number of species, without the need to single out a “solvent” species, and includes contributions to the diffusive mass flux due to gradients of composition, temperature, and pressure. Momentum transport and advective mass transport are handled using a low Mach number approach that eliminates fast sound waves (pressure fluctuations) from the full compressible system of equations and leads to a quasi-incompressible formulation. Thermal fluctuations are included in our fluctuating hydrodynamics description following the principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We extend the semi-implicit staggered-grid finite-volume numerical method developed in our prior work on binary liquid mixtures [Nonaka et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of binary liquid mixtures,” http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2300 (2015)] and use it to study the development of giant nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations in a ternary mixture subjected to a steady concentration gradient. We also numerically study the development of diffusion-driven gravitational instabilities in a ternary mixture and compare our numerical results to recent experimental measurements [Carballido-Landeira et al., “Mixed-mode instability of a

  8. Annual Report 2006 for Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2007-04-05

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining data using a backlit pinhole with a 100 ps backlighter and beginning to develop the ability to look into the shock tube with optical or x-ray diagnostics. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, using dual-axis radiographic data with backlit pinholes and ungated detectors to complete the data set for a Ph.D. student. We lead a team that is developing a proposal for experiments at the National Ignition Facility and are involved in experiments at NIKE and LIL. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers. We assemble the targets for the experiments at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. We also have several projects underway in our laboratory involving our x-ray source. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  9. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  10. CALIBRATED HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezar Gülbaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land development and increase in urbanization in a watershed affect water quantityand water quality. On one hand, urbanization provokes the adjustment of geomorphicstructure of the streams, ultimately raises peak flow rate which causes flood; on theother hand, it diminishes water quality which results in an increase in Total SuspendedSolid (TSS. Consequently, sediment accumulation in downstream of urban areas isobserved which is not preferred for longer life of dams. In order to overcome thesediment accumulation problem in dams, the amount of TSS in streams and inwatersheds should be taken under control. Low Impact Development (LID is a BestManagement Practice (BMP which may be used for this purpose. It is a land planningand engineering design method which is applied in managing storm water runoff inorder to reduce flooding as well as simultaneously improve water quality. LID includestechniques to predict suspended solid loads in surface runoff generated over imperviousurban surfaces. In this study, the impact of LID-BMPs on surface runoff and TSS isinvestigated by employing a calibrated hydrodynamic model for Sazlidere Watershedwhich is located in Istanbul, Turkey. For this purpose, a calibrated hydrodynamicmodel was developed by using Environmental Protection Agency Storm WaterManagement Model (EPA SWMM. For model calibration and validation, we set up arain gauge and a flow meter into the field and obtain rainfall and flow rate data. Andthen, we select several LID types such as retention basins, vegetative swales andpermeable pavement and we obtain their influence on peak flow rate and pollutantbuildup and washoff for TSS. Consequently, we observe the possible effects ofLID on surface runoff and TSS in Sazlidere Watershed.

  11. Laser ablation of titanium in liquid in external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9 Institutskiy per., 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in liquid is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. • Applied cathodic bias leads to increase in average size of self-organized nanostructures formed upon ablation of titanium target. • Laser ablation of Ti target in external electric field results in generation of elongated titanium oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in water is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. It is demonstrated that both lateral size of nanostructures (NS) on Ti surface and their density depend on the electric field applied to the target. Scanning Electron Microscopy of NS reveals the shift of their size distribution function toward larger sizes with applied field (cathodic bias, 25 V DC). Density of mushroom-like NS with applied electric field amounts to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. X-ray diffraction of generated nanoparticles (NPs) shows difference in the crystallographic structure of NPs of non-stoichiometric Ti oxides generated with and without electric field. This conclusion is corroborated with the optical absorption spectroscopy of obtained colloids. Transmission Electron Microscopy of NPs also shows difference in morphology of particles produced with and without cathodic bias. The results are interpreted on the basis of instability of the melt on Ti surface in the electric field.

  12. Waves and instability in a one-dimensional microfluidic array

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Bin; Feng, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Motion in a one-dimensional (1D) microfluidic array is simulated. Water droplets, dragged by flowing oil, are arranged in a single row, and due to their hydrodynamic interactions spacing between these droplets oscillates with a wave-like motion that is longitudinal or transverse. The simulation yields wave spectra that agree well with experiment. The wave-like motion has an instability which is confirmed to arise from nonlinearities in the interaction potential. The instability's growth is spatially localized. By selecting an appropriate correlation function, the interaction between the longitudinal and transverse waves is described.

  13. Shear Flow instability in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D; Chakrabarti, N

    2013-01-01

    Linear stability analysis of strongly coupled incompressible dusty plasma in presence of shear flow has been carried out using Generalized Hydrodynamical(GH) model. With the proper Galilean invariant GH model, a nonlocal eigenvalue analysis has been done using different velocity profiles. It is shown that the effect of elasticity enhances the growth rate of shear flow driven Kelvin- Helmholtz (KH) instability. The interplay between viscosity and elasticity not only enhances the growth rate but the spatial domain of the instability is also widened. The growth rate in various parameter space and the corresponding eigen functions are presented.

  14. Jeans instability with exchange effects in quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M., E-mail: jamil.gcu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jung, Y.-D. [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-08-15

    Jeans instability is examined in magnetized quantum dusty plasmas using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered via exchange-correlation potential, recoil effect, and Fermi degenerate pressure, in addition to thermal effects of plasma species. It is found that the electron exchange and correlation potential have significant effects over the threshold value of wave vector and Jeans instability. The presence of electron exchange and correlation effect shortens the time of dust sound that comparatively stabilizes the self gravitational collapse. The results at quantum scale are helpful in understanding the collapse of the self-gravitating dusty plasma systems.

  15. Radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesfeld, ACP; Tan, ES; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five patients (16 males, mean age 46 years.) underwent radiofrequency ablation because of either paroxysmal (13 patients) or persistent atrial fibrillation (12 patients). Ablation aimed at earliest activation of spontaneous and catheter-induced repetitive ectopy in left and right atria and ap

  16. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  17. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderschueren, Geert Maria Joris Michael

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of spinal and non-spinal osteoid osteomas. Furthermore, the technical requirements needed for safe radiofrequency ablation and the clinical outcome after radiofrequency

  18. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  19. Emission from Pair-Instability Supernovae with Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Wheeler, J Craig; Whalen, Daniel J; Smidt, Joseph; Wiggins, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Pair Instability Supernovae have been suggested as candidates for some Super Luminous Supernovae, such as SN 2007bi, and as one of the dominant types of explosion occurring in the early Universe from massive, zero-metallicity Population III stars. The progenitors of such events can be rapidly rotating, therefore exhibiting different evolutionary properties due to the effects of rotationally-induced mixing and mass-loss. Proper identification of such events requires rigorous radiation hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations that capture not only the behavior of the light curve but also the spectral evolution of these events. We present radiation hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations for 90-300 Msun rotating pair-instability supernovae covering both the shock break-out and late light curve phases. We also investigate cases of different initial metallicity and rotation rate to determine the impact of these parameters on the detailed spectral characteristics of these events. In agreement wi...

  20. The hydrodynamics of colloidal gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsigmond; Wang, Gang; Swan, James

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Models for microstructural evolution during colloidal gelation have often struggled to match experimental results with long standing questions regarding the role of hydrodynamic interactions. In nearly all models, these interactions are neglected entirely. In the present work, we report simulations of gelation with and without hydrodynamic interactions between the suspended particles executed in HOOMD-blue. The disparities between these simulations are striking and mirror the experimental-theoretical mismatch in the literature. The hydrodynamic simulations agree with experimental observations, however. We explore a simple model of the competing transport processes in gelation that anticipates these disparities, and conclude that hydrodynamic forces are essential. Near the gel boundary, there exists a competition between compaction of individual aggregates which suppresses gelation and coagulation of aggregates which enhances it. The time scale for compaction is mildly slowed by hydrodynamic interactions, while the time scale for coagulation is greatly accelerated. This enhancement to coagulation leads to a shift in the gel boundary to lower strengths of attraction and lower particle concentrations when compared to models that neglect hydrodynamic interactions. Away from the gel boundary, differences in the nearest neighbor distribution and fractal dimension persist within gels produced by both simulation methods. This result necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how dynamic, discrete element models for gelation kinetics are developed as well as how collective hydrodynamic interactions influence the arrest of attractive colloidal dispersions.

  1. Three Dimensional Hydrodynamics of Protostars and Protostellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Brian Keith

    1995-01-01

    Stars form when a rotating cloud of gas and dust collapses under the influence of its own gravity. Modern studies of the collapse and fragmentation of rotating protostellar clouds suggest a wide variety of outcomes, depending on the assumed initial conditions. The post-collapse objects are subject to dynamic instabilities which may produce significant mass and angular momentum transport or, if violent enough, could lead to the breakup of the original object. I have considered the isentropic equilibrium states that might form from the collapse of uniformly rotating spherical clouds. By varying the central concentration of the assumed initial cloud, I obtain equilibrium states distinguished primarily by their different specific angular momentum distributions. Using a new code to generate the axisymmetric equilibrium states and an improved adiabatic 3D hydrodynamics code to evolve them, I have investigated the onset and nature of global dynamic instabilities in these objects. The objects corresponding to uniform initial conditions are unstable to barlike distortions at high rotation rates. These instabilities are vigorous and lead to violent ejection of mass and angular momentum. In contrast, the rapidly rotating equilibrium objects that correspond to highly centrally condensed initial clouds are subject to low-order spiral instabilities. In extremely flattened models, one -armed spirals dominate all other disturbances but do not lead to fragmentation. Significant amounts of angular momentum can be transported on very short time scales; in the most extreme case, 30% of the total angular momentum is moved from the central regions outward in about half a year. Even when the instabilities do not lead to transport or ejection of material, the original object can be significantly restructured, leading to flaring and surface distortions at large radii. The central concentration of the assumed initial cloud appears to be a good predictor of the dynamic instabilities which

  2. Instabilities and soot formation in spherically expanding, high pressure, rich, iso-octane-air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockett, R D [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Flame instabilities, cellular structures and soot formed in high pressure, rich, spherically expanding iso-octane-air flames have been studied experimentally using high speed Schlieren cinematography, OH fluorescence, Mie scattering and laser induced incandescence. Cellular structures with two wavelength ranges developed on the flame surface. The larger wavelength cellular structure was produced by the Landau-Darrieus hydrodynamic instability, while the short wavelength cellular structure was produced by the thermal-diffusive instability. Large negative curvature in the short wavelength cusps caused local flame quenching and fracture of the flame surface. In rich flames with equivalence ratio {phi} > 1.8, soot was formed in a honeycomb-like structure behind flame cracks associated with the large wavelength cellular structure induced by the hydrodynamic instability. The formation of soot precursors through low temperature pyrolysis was suggested as a suitable mechanism for the initiation of soot formation behind the large wavelength flame cracks.

  3. Sixth International Symposium on Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics (BIFD2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bar-Yoseph, P. Z.; Brøns, Morten; Gelfgat, A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamic stability is of fundamental importance in fluid dynamics. As a well-established subject of scientific investigation, it continues to attract great interest in the fluid mechanics community. Bifurcations and instabilities are observed in all areas of fundamental and applied fluid...... dynamics and remain a challenge for experimental, theoretical and computational studies. Examples of prototypical hydrodynamic instabilities are the Rayleigh–Bénard, Taylor–Couette, Bénard–Marangoni, Rayleigh–Taylor, and Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities. A fundamental understanding of bifurcation patterns...... International Symposium on Instability and Bifurcations in Fluid Dynamics (BIFD) held at the ESPCI, Paris, 15–17 July2015. With four invited and nearly 400 contributed talks, the symposium gave an overview of the state of the art of the field including experimental, theoretical, and computational approaches...

  4. Absolute versus convective helical magnetorotational instability in a Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Priede, Jānis

    2008-01-01

    We analyze numerically the magnetorotational instability of a Taylor-Couette flow in a helical magnetic field (HMRI) using the inductionless approximation defined by a zero magnetic Prandtl number (Pm=0). The Chebyshev collocation method is used to calculate the eigenvalue spectrum for small amplitude perturbations. First, we carry out a detailed conventional linear stability analysis with respect to perturbations in the form of Fourier modes that corresponds to the convective instability which is not in general self-sustained. The helical magnetic field is found to extend the instability to a relatively narrow range beyond its purely hydrodynamic limit defined by the Rayleigh line. There is not only a lower critical threshold at which HMRI appears but also an upper one at which it disappears again. The latter distinguishes the HMRI from a magnetically-modified Taylor vortex flow. Second, we find an absolute instability threshold as well. In the hydrodynamically unstable regime before the Rayleigh line, the t...

  5. Cavitation Instabilities in Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    gas handling turbomachines . The fluctuation of the cavity length is plotted in Fig.8 under the surge mode oscillation vi . The major differences...Cavitation Instabilities of Turbomachines .” AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol.17, No.3, 636-643. [5] Tsujimoto, Y., (2006), “Flow Instabilities in

  6. Instability in evolutionary games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimo Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phenomena of instability are widely observed in many dissimilar systems, with punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution and economic crises being noticeable examples. Recent studies suggested that such instabilities, quantified by the abrupt changes of the composition of individuals, could result within the framework of a collection of individuals interacting through the prisoner's dilemma and incorporating three mechanisms: (i imitation and mutation, (ii preferred selection on successful individuals, and (iii networking effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We study the importance of each mechanism using simplified models. The models are studied numerically and analytically via rate equations and mean-field approximation. It is shown that imitation and mutation alone can lead to the instability on the number of cooperators, and preferred selection modifies the instability in an asymmetric way. The co-evolution of network topology and game dynamics is not necessary to the occurrence of instability and the network topology is found to have almost no impact on instability if new links are added in a global manner. The results are valid in both the contexts of the snowdrift game and prisoner's dilemma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The imitation and mutation mechanism, which gives a heterogeneous rate of change in the system's composition, is the dominating reason of the instability on the number of cooperators. The effects of payoffs and network topology are relatively insignificant. Our work refines the understanding on the driving forces of system instability.

  7. Treatment of hip instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, G M; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Greidanus, N; Duncan, C P

    2001-10-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is a major source of patient morbidity, second only to aseptic loosening. Certain patient groups have been identified as having a greater risk of instability, including patients undergoing revision arthroplasty as early or late treatment for proximal femoral fractures.

  8. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, . In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  9. Numerical Hydrodynamics in Special Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí José Maria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is concerned with a discussion of numerical methods for the solution of the equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD. Particular emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods in SRHD. Results of a set of demanding test bench simulations obtained with different numerical SRHD methods are compared. Three applications (astrophysical jets, gamma-ray bursts and heavy ion collisions of relativistic flows are discussed. An evaluation of various SRHD methods is presented, and future developments in SRHD are analyzed involving extension to general relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. The review further provides FORTRAN programs to compute the exact solution of a 1D relativistic Riemann problem with zero and nonzero tangential velocities, and to simulate 1D relativistic flows in Cartesian Eulerian coordinates using the exact SRHD Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction.

  10. Comparative hydrodynamics of bacterial polymorphism

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2011-01-01

    Most bacteria swim through fluids by rotating helical flagella which can take one of twelve distinct polymorphic shapes. The most common helical waveform is the "normal" form, used during forward swimming runs. To shed light on the prevalence of the normal form in locomotion, we gather all available experimental measurements of the various polymorphic forms and compute their intrinsic hydrodynamic efficiencies. The normal helical form is found to be the most hydrodynamically efficient of the twelve polymorphic forms by a significant margin - a conclusion valid for both the peritrichous and polar flagellar families, and robust to a change in the effective flagellum diameter or length. The hydrodynamic optimality of the normal polymorph suggests that, although energetic costs of locomotion are small for bacteria, fluid mechanical forces may have played a significant role in the evolution of the flagellum.

  11. Quantum Plasmas An Hydrodynamic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the basic concepts and new methods in the emerging scientific area known as quantum plasmas. In the near future, quantum effects in plasmas will be unavoidable, particularly in high density scenarios such as those in the next-generation intense laser-solid density plasma experiment or in compact astrophysics objects. Currently, plasmas are in the forefront of many intriguing questions around the transition from microscopic to macroscopic modeling of charged particle systems. Quantum Plasmas: an Hydrodynamic Approach is devoted to the quantum hydrodynamic model paradigm, which, unlike straight quantum kinetic theory, is much more amenable to investigate the nonlinear realm of quantum plasmas. The reader will have a step-by-step construction of the quantum hydrodynamic method applied to plasmas. The book is intended for specialists in classical plasma physics interested in methods of quantum plasma theory, as well as scientists interested in common aspects of two major areas of...

  12. HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TWO BODIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of model tests, potential flow theory, and viscous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method, the hydrodynamic interactions between two underwater bodies were investigated to determine the influencing factors, changing rule, interaction mechanism, and appropriate methods describing them. Some special phenomena were discovered in two series of near-wall interaction experiments. The mathematical model and predicting methods were presented for interacting forces near wall, and the calculation results agreed well with the experimental ones. From the comparisons among numerical results with respect to nonviscosity, numerical results with respect to viscosity, and measured results, data on the influence of viscosity on hydrodynamic interactions were obtained. For hydrodynamic interaction related to multi-body unsteady motions with six degrees of freedom that is difficult to simulate in tests, numerical predictions of unsteady interacting forces were given.

  13. Hydrodynamic shocks in microroller suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Chaikin, Paul; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    We combine experiments, large-scale simulations, and continuum models to study the emergence of coherent structures in a suspension of magnetically driven microrollers sedimented near a floor. Collective hydrodynamic effects are predominant in this system, leading to strong density-velocity coupling. We characterize a uniform suspension and show that density waves propagate freely in all directions in a dispersive fashion. When sharp density gradients are introduced in the suspension, we observe the formation of a shock. Unlike Burgers' shocklike structures observed in other active and driven confined hydrodynamic systems, the shock front in our system has a well-defined finite width and moves rapidly compared to the mean suspension velocity. We introduce a continuum model demonstrating that the finite width of the front is due to far-field nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions and governed by a geometric parameter, the average particle height above the floor.

  14. Numerical Hydrodynamics in Special Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, José Maria; Müller, Ewald

    2003-01-01

    This review is concerned with a discussion of numerical methods for the solution of the equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD). Particular emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods in SRHD. Results of a set of demanding test bench simulations obtained with different numerical SRHD methods are compared. Three applications (astrophysical jets, gamma-ray bursts and heavy ion collisions) of relativistic flows are discussed. An evaluation of various SRHD methods is presented, and future developments in SRHD are analyzed involving extension to general relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. The review further provides FORTRAN programs to compute the exact solution of a 1D relativistic Riemann problem with zero and nonzero tangential velocities, and to simulate 1D relativistic flows in Cartesian Eulerian coordinates using the exact SRHD Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction.

  15. Anisotropic hydrodynamics: Motivation and methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Michael

    2014-06-15

    In this proceedings contribution I review recent progress in our understanding of the bulk dynamics of relativistic systems that possess potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies. In order to deal with these momentum-space anisotropies, a reorganization of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics can be made around an anisotropic background, and the resulting dynamical framework has been dubbed “anisotropic hydrodynamics”. I also discuss expectations for the degree of momentum-space anisotropy of the quark–gluon plasma generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC from second-order viscous hydrodynamics, strong-coupling approaches, and weak-coupling approaches.

  16. Hydrodynamics of oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, Carl

    1960-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of Oceans and Atmospheres is a systematic account of the hydrodynamics of oceans and atmospheres. Topics covered range from the thermodynamic functions of an ideal gas and the thermodynamic coefficients for water to steady motions, the isothermal atmosphere, the thermocline, and the thermosphere. Perturbation equations, field equations, residual equations, and a general theory of rays are also presented. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic equations and their solutions, with the aim of illustrating the laws of dynamics. The nonlinear

  17. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  18. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  19. Optical Electronic Bragg Reflection Sensor System with Hydrodynamic Flow Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    This project, as described in the following report, involved design and fabrication of fiber optic sensors for the detection and measurement of dynamic fluid density variations. These devices are created using UV (ultraviolet) ablation and generally modified transverse holographic fiber grating techniques. The resulting phase gratings created on or immediately underneath the flat portion of D-shaped optical waveguides are characterized as evanescent field sensing devices. The primary applications include the sensor portion of a real-time localized or distributed measurement system for hydrodynamic flow, fluid density measurements, and phase change phenomena. Several design modifications were implemented in an attempt to accomplish the tasks specified in our original proposal. In addition, we have established key collaborative relationships with numerous people and institutions.

  20. Elliptical instability in hot Jupiter systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Gal, Patrice Le; Moutou, Claire; Leconte, J; Sauret, Alban

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have already considered the influence of tides on the evolution of systems composed of a star and a close-in companion to tentatively explain different observations such as the spin-up of some stars with hot Jupiters, the radius anomaly of short orbital period planets and the synchronization or quasi-synchronization of the stellar spin in some extreme cases. However, the nature of the mechanism responsible for the tidal dissipation in such systems remains uncertain. In this paper, we claim that the so-called elliptical instability may play a major role in these systems, explaining some systematic features present in the observations. This hydrodynamic instability, arising in rotating flows with elliptical streamlines, is suspected to be present in both planet and star of such systems, which are elliptically deformed by tides. The presence and the influence of the elliptical instability in gaseous bodies, such as stars or hot Jupiters, are most of the time neglected. In this paper, using numeri...

  1. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures...

  2. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  3. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation in Barrett's Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani J.A. Konda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency ablation (RFA is an endoscopic modality used in the treatment of Barrett's esophagus. RFA may be performed using a balloon-based catheter or using one of the probe catheters that attaches to the distal end of the endoscope. Here we demonstrate step-by-step instruction in using radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of Barrett's esophagus and highlight key concepts in the technique.

  5. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  6. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. With respect to an earlier version of the article, the present update provides additional information on numerical schemes, and extends the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general relativistic hydrodynamics. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of available numerical schemes is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is presented. These include gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes, and hydrodynamical evolutions of neutron stars. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances on the formulation of the gravitational field and hydrodynamic equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them.

  7. Anomalous hydrodynamics in two dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rabin Banerjee

    2016-02-01

    A new approach is presented to discuss two-dimensional hydrodynamics with gauge and gravitational anomalies. Exact constitutive relations for the stress tensor and charge current are obtained. Also, a connection between response parameters and anomaly coefficients is discussed. These are new results which, in the absence of the gauge sector, reproduce the results found by the gradient expansion approach.

  8. Hydrodynamic Noise and Surface Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-08

    Lighthill, 3,4 Ffowcs-Wiiliams, 5-7 and Morse and Ingard .8 Ffowcs-Williams’ 7 excellent review identifies five distinctly different theoretical...Williams, "Hydrodynamic Noise," Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics (Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, CA), vol. 1, 1969, pp. 197-222. 8. P. Morse and K. V. Ingard

  9. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  10. Singular diffusionless limits of double-diffusive instabilities in magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirillov, Oleg N

    2016-01-01

    We study local instabilities of a differentially rotating viscous flow of electrically conducting incompressible fluid subject to an external azimuthal magnetic field. In the presence of the magnetic field the hydrodynamically stable flow can demonstrate the azimuthal magnetorotational instability (AMRI) both in the diffusionless case and in the double--diffusive case with viscous and ohmic dissipation. Performing stability analysis of the amplitude transport equations of the short--wavelength approximation, we find that the threshold of the diffusionless AMRI via the Hamilton-Hopf bifurcation is a singular limit of the thresholds of the viscous and resistive AMRI corresponding to the dissipative Hopf bifurcation and manifests itself as the Whitney umbrella singular point. A smooth transition between the two types of instabilities is possible only if the magnetic Prandtl number is equal to unity, $\\rm Pm=1$. At a fixed ${\\rm Pm}\

  11. Rossby Wave Instability of Thin Accretion Disks - III. Nonlinear Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, H; Wendroff, B; Liska, R

    2000-01-01

    (abridged) We study the nonlinear evolution of the Rossby wave instability in thin disks using global 2D hydrodynamic simulations. The key questions we are addressing in this paper are: (1) What happens when the instability becomes nonlinear? Specifically, does it lead to vortex formation? (2) What is the detailed behavior of a vortex? (3) Can the instability sustain itself and can the vortex last a long time? Among various initial equilibria that we have examined, we generally find that there are three stages of the disk evolution: (1) The exponential growth of the initial small amplitude perturbations. This is in excellent agreement with the linear theory; (2) The production of large scale vortices and their interactions with the background flow, including shocks. Significant accretion is observed due to these vortices. (3) The coupling of Rossby waves/vortices with global spiral waves, which facilitates further accretion throughout the whole disk. Even after more than 20 revolutions at the radius of vortic...

  12. Three-Dimensional Dynamical Instabilities in Galactic Ionization Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, D J; Whalen, Daniel J.; Norman, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Ionization front instabilities have long been of interest for their suspected role in a variety of phenomena in the galaxy, from the formation of bright rims and 'elephant trunks' in nebulae to triggered star formation in molecular clouds. Numerical treatments of these instabilities have historically been limited in both dimensionality and input physics, leaving important questions about their true evolution unanswered. We present the first three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical calculations of both R-type and D-type ionization front instabilities in galactic environments (i.e., solar metallicity gas). Consistent with linear stability analyses of planar D-type fronts, our models exhibit many short-wavelength perturbations growing at early times that later evolve into fewer large-wavelength structures. The simulations demonstrate that both self-consistent radiative transfer and three-dimensional flow introduce significant morphological differences to unstable modes when compared to earlier two-dimensional ...

  13. Vertical shear instability in accretion disc models with radiation transport

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, Moritz H R

    2014-01-01

    The origin of turbulence in accretion discs is still not fully understood. While the magneto-rotational instability is considered to operate in sufficiently ionized discs, its role in the poorly ionized protoplanetary disc is questionable. Recently, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has been suggested as a possible alternative. Our goal is to study the characteristics of this instability and the efficiency of angular momentum transport, in extended discs, under the influence of radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. We use multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to model a larger section of an accretion disc. First we study inviscid and weakly viscous discs using a fixed radial temperature profile in two and three spatial dimensions. The simulations are then extended to include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. In agreement with previous studies we find for the isothermal disc a sustained unstable state with a weak positive angular momentum transport of the o...

  14. Atrial fibrillation ablation using a closed irrigation radiofrequency ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Keith; Mounsey, John Paul; Chung, Eugene; Roomiani, Pahresah; Morse, Michael Andew; Patel, Ankit; Gehi, Anil

    2012-05-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective therapy for symptomatic, medically refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Open-irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheters produce transmural lesions at the cost of increased fluid delivery. In vivo models suggest closed-irrigated RF catheters create equivalent lesions, but clinical outcomes are limited. A cohort of 195 sequential patients with symptomatic AF underwent stepwise AF ablation (AFA) using a closed-irrigation ablation catheter. Recurrence of AF was monitored and outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models. Mean age was 59.0 years, 74.9% were male, 56.4% of patients were paroxysmal and mean duration of AF was 5.4 years. Patients had multiple comorbidities including hypertension (76.4%), tobacco abuse (42.1%), diabetes (17.4%), and obesity (mean body mass index 30.8). The median follow-up was 55.8 weeks. Overall event-free survival was 73.6% with one ablation and 77.4% after reablation (reablation rate was 8.7%). Median time to recurrence was 26.9 weeks. AF was more likely to recur in patients being treated with antiarrhythmic therapy at the time of last follow-up (recurrence rate 30.3% with antiarrhythmic drugs, 13.2% without antiarrhythmic drugs; hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.4, P = 0.024) and in those with a history of AF greater than 2 years duration (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9, P = 0.038). Our study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AFA with closed-irrigation ablation catheters. We demonstrate comparable outcomes to those previously reported in studies of open-irrigation ablation catheters. Given the theoretical benefits of a closed-irrigation system, a large head-to-head comparison using this catheter is warranted. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  16. Instabilities in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Csernai, László P; Papp, G

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of dynamical perturbations is examined in nuclear multifragmentation in the frame of Vlasov equation. Both plane wave and bubble type of perturbations are investigated in the presence of surface (Yukawa) forces. An energy condition is given for the allowed type of instabilities and the time scale of the exponential growth of the instabilities is calculated. The results are compared to the mechanical spinodal region predictions. PACS: 25.70 Mn

  17. Recent advances in the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics technique: Building the code SPHYNX

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezon, Ruben M; Figueira, Joana

    2016-01-01

    A novel computational hydrocode oriented to Astrophysical applications is described, discussed and validated in the following pages. The code, called SPHYNX, is of Newtonian type and grounded on the Euler-Lagrange formulation of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics technique. The distinctive features of the code are: the use of an integral approach to estimating the gradients; the use of a flexible family of interpolators called sinc kernels, which suppress pairing instability; and the incorporation of a new type of volume elements which provides a better partition of the unity. The ensuing hydrodynamic code conserves mass, linear and angular momentum, energy, entropy and preserves kernel normalization even in strong shocks. By a careful choice of the index of the sinc kernel and the number of neighbors in the SPH summations, there is a substantial improvement in the estimation of gradients. Additionally, the new volume elements reduce the so-called tensile instability. Both features help to suppress much of t...

  18. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Shweta, E-mail: jshweta09@gmail.com; Sharma, Prerana [Department of Physics, Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, M.P.456010 (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University Ujjain, M. P. - 456010 (India)

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  19. Transition regime of the one-dimensional two-stream instability

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, K V

    2014-01-01

    The transition between kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes of the one-dimensional two-stream instability is numerically analyzed, and the correction coefficients to the well-known textbook formulae are calculated. The approximate expressions are shown to overestimate the growth rate several times in a wide parameter area.

  20. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation byradiofrequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianmattia del Genio; Federica del Genio; Pietro Schettino; Paolo Limongelli; Salvatore Tolone; Luigi Brusciano; Manuela Avellino; Chiara Vitiello; Giovanni Docimo; Angelo Pezzullo; Ludovico Docimo

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benignlesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is anestablished endoscopic technique for the eradication ofBarrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation ofesophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA)have been reported. We report a case of esophagealpapilloma successfully treated with a single sessionof radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation ofthe lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using anew catheter inserted through the working channelof endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue wasremoved by a specifically designed cup. Completeablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy withbiopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of asa new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patientswith esophageal papilloma.

  1. Evolution of self-gravitating magnetized disks. II- Interaction between MHD turbulence and gravitational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Fromang, S; Terquem, C; De Villiers, J P; Fromang, Sebastien; Balbus, Steven A.; Terquem, Caroline; Villiers, Jean-Pierre De

    2004-01-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of the evolution of self--gravitating and weakly magnetized disks with an adiabatic equation of state. Such disks are subject to the development of both the magnetorotational and gravitational instabilities, which transport angular momentum outward. As in previous studies, our hydrodynamical simulations show the growth of strong m=2 spiral structure. This spiral disturbance drives matter toward the central object and disappears when the Toomre parameter Q has increased well above unity. When a weak magnetic field is present as well, the magnetorotational instability grows and leads to turbulence. In that case, the strength of the gravitational stress tensor is lowered by a factor of about~2 compared to the hydrodynamical run and oscillates periodically, reaching very small values at its minimum. We attribute this behavior to the presence of a second spiral mode with higher pattern speed than the one which dominates in the hydrodynamical simulations...

  2. Enzo+Moray: Radiation Hydrodynamics Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations with Adaptive Ray Tracing

    CERN Document Server

    Wise, John H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological hydrodynamics code, Enzo. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilised to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole (BH) feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large timesteps and poor sampling, therefore we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. (2006, 2009). We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionisation front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities, and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an...

  3. Breaking of Galilean Invariance in the Hydrodynamic Formulation of Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacocca, Ezio; Silva, T. J.; Hoefer, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Microwave magnetodynamics in ferromagnets are often studied in the small-amplitude or weakly nonlinear regime corresponding to modulations of a well-defined magnetic state. However, strongly nonlinear regimes, where the aforementioned approximations are not applicable, have become experimentally accessible. By reinterpreting the governing Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion, we derive an exact set of equations of dispersive hydrodynamic form that are amenable to analytical study even when full nonlinearity and exchange dispersion are included. The resulting equations are shown to, in general, break Galilean invariance. A magnetic Mach number is obtained as a function of static and moving reference frames. The simplest class of solutions are termed uniform hydrodynamic states (UHSs), which exhibit fluidlike behavior including laminar flow at subsonic speeds and the formation of a Mach cone and wave fronts at supersonic speeds. A regime of modulational instability is also possible, where the UHS is violently unstable. The hydrodynamic interpretation opens up novel possibilities in magnetic research.

  4. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  5. First-Principles Investigations on Thermal Conductivity and Average Ionization of CH Ablators Under Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    A plastic CH ablator (polystyrene) is often used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target designs. Upon intense laser or x-ray ablations, a CH ablator can be shocked to warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions. Many-body coupling and quantum electron degeneracy are expected to play an essential role in determining the properties of such warm dense plasmas. Using ab initio methods of quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), we have performed investigations on the principal Hugoniot of a CH ablator, the first-principles equation-of-state table of CH, and its effect on ICF simulations. In this presentation, we focus on the thermal conductivity and average ionization of CH-ablators under a wide range of plasma temperatures and densities. The resulting thermal conductivity (κ) and average ionization () show large differences from the usual model predictions in the WDM regime. These results, being fitted with analytical functions of plasma density and temperature, have been incorporated into radiation -hydrodynamics codes. Their effects on the ICF implosion simulations will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Scientific Campaign 10 at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  6. Brain vascular and hydrodynamic physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the brain in vulnerable infants undergoing surgery is a central aspect of perioperative care. Understanding the link between blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption leads to a more informed approach to bedside care. In some cases, we need to consider how high can we let the partial pressure of carbon dioxide go before we have concerns about risk of increased cerebral blood volume and change in intracranial hydrodynamics? Alternatively, in almost all such cases, we have to address the question of how low can we let the blood pressure drop before we should be concerned about brain perfusion? This review, provides a basic understanding of brain bioenergetics, hemodynamics, hydrodynamics, autoregulation and vascular homeostasis to changes in blood gases that is fundamental to our thinking about bedside care and monitoring. PMID:24331089

  7. Hydrodynamic interactions in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Leonardo, R.; Keen, S.; Ianni, F.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Ruocco, G.

    2008-09-01

    We measure hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles confined in a thin sheet of fluid. The reduced dimensionality, compared to a bulk fluid, increases dramatically the range of couplings. Using optical tweezers we force a two body system along the eigenmodes of the mobility tensor and find that eigenmobilities change logarithmically with particle separation. At a hundred radii distance, the mobilities for rigid and relative motions differ by a factor of 2, whereas in bulk fluids, they would be practically indistinguishable. A two dimensional counterpart of Oseen hydrodynamic tensor quantitatively reproduces the observed behavior, once the relevant boundary conditions are recognized. These results highlight the importance of dimensionality for transport and interactions in colloidal systems and proteins in biological membranes.

  8. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  9. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Abhisek [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gerhard, Jochen [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Germany; Torrieri, Giorgio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física " Gleb Wataghin" (IFGW), Sao Paulo, Brazil; Read jr, Kenneth F. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  10. Non-boost-invariant dissipative hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Strickland, Michael; Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The one-dimensional non-boost-invariant evolution of the quark-gluon plasma, presumably produced during the early stages of heavy-ion collisions, is analyzed within the frameworks of viscous and anisotropic hydrodynamics. We neglect transverse dynamics and assume homogeneous conditions in the transverse plane but, differently from Bjorken expansion, we relax longitudinal boost invariance in order to study the rapidity dependence of various hydrodynamical observables. We compare the results obtained using several formulations of second-order viscous hydrodynamics with a recent approach to anisotropic hydrodynamics, which treats the large initial pressure anisotropy in a non-perturbative fashion. The results obtained with second-order viscous hydrodynamics depend on the particular choice of the second-order terms included, which suggests that the latter should be included in the most complete way. The results of anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics agree for the central hot part of the system, ho...

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  12. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Florence; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We present a scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, a hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterized by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by nonaxisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  13. Instability in electromagnetically driven flows Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Imazio, Paola Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have reported numerical simulations of the MHD flow driven by a travelling magnetic field (TMF) in an annular channel, at low Reynolds number. It was shown that the stalling of such induction pump is strongly related to magnetic flux expulsion. In the present article, we show that for larger hydrodynamic Reynolds number, and with more realistic boundary conditions, this instability takes the form of a large axisymmetric vortex flow in the (r,z)-plane, in which the fluid is locally pumped in the direction opposite to the one of the magnetic field. Close to the marginal stability of this vortex flow, a low-frequency pulsation is generated. Finally, these results are compared to theoretical predictions and are discussed within the framework of experimental annular linear induction electromagnetic pumps.

  14. Instability in electromagnetically driven flows. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Imazio, Paola; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    In a previous paper, we have reported numerical simulations of the magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a travelling magnetic field in an annular channel, at low Reynolds number. It was shown that the stalling of such induction pump is strongly related to magnetic flux expulsion. In the present article, we show that for larger hydrodynamic Reynolds number, and with more realistic boundary conditions, this instability takes the form of a large axisymmetric vortex flow in the (r, z)-plane, in which the fluid is locally pumped in the direction opposite to the one of the magnetic field. Close to the marginal stability of this vortex flow, a low-frequency pulsation is generated. Finally, these results are compared to theoretical predictions and are discussed within the framework of experimental annular linear induction electromagnetic pumps.

  15. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence

    2016-01-01

    We present a new scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect-ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, an hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterised by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by non-axisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  16. Suppression of Instability in Rotatory Hydromagnetic Convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joginder S Dhiman

    2000-08-01

    Recently discovered hydrodynamic instability [1], in a simple Bénard configuration in the parameter regime 02 > 1 under the action of a nonadverse temperature gradient, is shown to be suppressed by the simultaneous action of a uniform rotation and a uniform magnetic field both acting parallel to gravity for oscillatory perturbations whenever $(\\mathscr{Q}_1/^2+\\mathscr{J}/^4) > 1$ and the effective Rayleigh number $\\mathcal{R}$(1-02) is dominated by either 274(1 + 1/1)/4 or 274/2 according as 1 ≥ 1 or 1 ≤ 1 respectively. Here 0 is the temperature of the lower boundary while 2 is the coefficient of specific heat at constant volume due to temperature variation and 1, $\\mathcal{R}, \\mathscr{Q}$ and $\\mathscr{T}$ respectively denote the magnetic Prandtl number, the Rayleigh number, the Chandrasekhar number and the Taylor number.

  17. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  18. Soliton propagation in relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fogaça, D A; 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2007.03.104

    2013-01-01

    We study the conditions for the formation and propagation of Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons in nuclear matter. In a previous work we have derived a KdV equation from Euler and continuity equations in non-relativistic hydrodynamics. In the present contribution we extend our formalism to relativistic fluids. We present results for a given equation of state, which is based on quantum hadrodynamics (QHD).

  19. Hydrodynamic Evolution of GRB Afterglow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a relativistic fireball which decelerates as it sweeps up ambient matter. Not only the radiative and adiabatic cases, but also the realistic intermediate cases are calculated. We perform numerical calcula-tion for various ambient media and sizes of beaming expansion, and find that the deceleration radius R0 may play an important role for the hydrodynamic evolution of GRB afterglow.

  20. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strickland Michael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, 〈 pL2〉 ≪ 〈 pT2〉. In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  1. Statistical hydrodynamic models for mixing instability flows in turbulent regime: theoretical 0D evaluation criteria and comparison of one and two-fluid approaches; Modeles hydrodynamiques statistiques pour les ecoulements d'instabilites de melange en regime developpe: criteres theoriques d'evaluation ''0D'' et comparaison des approches mono et bifluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A

    2001-07-01

    Theoretical criteria are defined to perform quick analytical evaluations of statistical hydro models for turbulent mixing flows induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. They are based on a global energy balance analysis of the mixing zone ('0D' projection) in the limit of zero Atwood number, for incompressible fluids, and in self-similar regime. It is then shown that single-fluid descriptions must be replaced by two-fluid descriptions, particularly for the Rayleigh-Taylor case with variable acceleration. The interaction between a shock and heterogeneities is also considered. Various approaches for the development of new models are finally given. (author)

  2. Suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by gyroviscosity and sheared axial flow in imploding plasma pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lin; JIAN Guang-de; QIU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    The synergistic stabilizing effect of gyroviscosity and sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible viscid magneto-hydrodynamic equations. The gyroviscosity (or finite Larmor radius) effects are introduced in the momentum equation through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. Dispersion relation with the effect of a density discontinuity is derived. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are easily stabilized by the gyroviscosity effects. The long wavelength modes are stabilized by the sufficient sheared axial flow. However, the synergistic effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This synergistic effect can compress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to a narrow wave number region. Even with a sufficient gyroviscosity and large enough flow velocity, the synergistic effect can completely suppressed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in whole wave number region.

  3. Thermal effects in the dissipative instability of the electron beam-plasma systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, B. [Physics Department and Laser-plasma Research Institute of Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Research Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha, PO Box 55134-44, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, PO Box 19395-1795, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: b-shokri@cc.sbu.ac.ir; Khorashadizadeh, S.M. [Physics Department of Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-04-10

    The effects of the thermal motion of the charged particles in the dissipative instability of the under and over-limiting currents of a relativistic electron beam in a fully magnetized beam-plasma waveguide is investigated. It is shown that by increasing the temperature of the plasma electrons, the resonant frequency of the waveguide slightly increases and the growth rates of the instability development decreases. In addition, an increase of the temperature of the plasma electron can change the dissipative hydrodynamic instability to the collisionless kinetic instability. Furthermore, the dissipative instability of the overlimiting electron beam is shown to be more sensitive with respect to the electron plasma temperature compared to the underlimiting electron beam case.

  4. Vortices in stratified protoplanetary disks : from baroclinic instability to vortex layers

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, S; Dizes, S Le

    2016-01-01

    Large scale vortices could play a key role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks, particularly in the dead-zone where no turbulence associated with magnetic field is expected. Their possible formation by the subcritical baroclinic instability is a complex issue due to the vertical structure of the disk and to the elliptical instability.} {In two-dimensional disks the baroclinic instability is studied as a function of the thermal transfer efficiency. In three-dimensional disks we explore the importance of radial and vertical stratification on the processes of vortex formation and amplification.} {Numerical simulations are performed using a fully compressible hydrodynamical code based on a second order finite volume method. We assume a perfect gas law in inviscid disk models in which heat transfer is due to either relaxation or diffusion.} {In 2D, the baroclinic instability with thermal relaxation leads to the formation of large-scale vortices, which are unstable with respect to the elliptic instability. In ...

  5. Laser ablation studies of nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Mkrtychev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The first experimental measurements of the threshold energy density values for the laser ablation of glass nanocomposites with nanodimensional coatings have been carried out under the action of the YAG–Nd laser power pulse radiation. The coatings in question were of different compositions and had been created by the sol–gel technology. The procedure for determining the laser ablation threshold energy density values was worked out on the base of the breakdown probability level of 0.5. The statistical processing of the measurement data over all the samples allowed obtaining the dependence of the ablation destruction threshold energy parameters on the coating physical and chemical properties such as the sample transmission in the visible region of the spectrum, coating thickness, the chemical composition of the film-forming solution, and on the pulse duration of laser radiation.

  6. Bacterial Swarming: social behaviour or hydrodynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermant, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial swarming of colonies is typically described as a social phenomenon between bacteria, whereby groups of bacteria collectively move atop solid surfaces. This multicellular behavior, during which the organized bacterial populations are embedded in an extracellular slime layer, is connected to important features such as biofilm formation and virulence. Despite the possible intricate quorum sensing mechanisms that regulate swarming, several physico-chemical phenomena may play a role in the dynamics of swarming and biofilm formation. Especially the striking fingering patterns formed by some swarmer colonies on relatively soft sub phases have attracted the attention as they could be the signatures of an instability. Recently, a parallel has been drawn between the swarming patterns and the spreading of viscous drops under the influence of a surfactant, which lead to similar patterns [1]. Starting from the observation that several of the molecules, essential in swarming systems, are strong biosurfactants, the possibility of flows driven by gradients in surface tension, has been proposed. This Marangoni flows are known to lead to these characteristic patterns. For Rhizobium etli not only the pattern formation, but also the experimentally observed spreading speed has been shown to be consistent with the one expected for Marangoni flows for the surface pressures, thickness, and viscosities that have been observed [2]. We will present an experimental study of swarming colonies of the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the pattern formation, the surfactant gradients and height profiles in comparison with predictions of a thin film hydrodynamic model.[4pt] [1] Matar O.K. and Troian S., Phys. Fluids 11 : 3232 (1999)[0pt] [2] Daniels, R et al., PNAS, 103 (40): 14965-14970 (2006)

  7. Electrostatic streaming instability modes in complex viscoelastic quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.

    2016-11-01

    A generalized quantum hydrodynamic model is procedurally developed to investigate the electrostatic streaming instability modes in viscoelastic quantum electron-ion-dust plasma. Compositionally, inertialess electrons are anticipated to be degenerate quantum particles owing to their large de Broglie wavelengths. In contrast, inertial ions and dust particulates are treated in the same classical framework of linear viscoelastic fluids (non-Newtonian). It considers a dimensionality-dependent Bohmian quantum correction prefactor, γ = [(D - 2)/3D], in electron quantum dynamics, with D symbolizing the problem dimensionality. Applying a regular Fourier-formulaic plane-wave analysis around the quasi-neutral hydrodynamic equilibrium, two distinct instabilities are explored to exist. They stem in ion-streaming (relative to electrons and dust) and dust-streaming (relative to electrons and ions). Their stability is numerically illustrated in judicious parametric windows in both the hydrodynamic and kinetic regimes. The non-trivial influential roles by the relative streams, viscoelasticities, and correction prefactor are analyzed. It is seen that γ acts as a stabilizer for the ion-stream case only. The findings alongside new entailments, as special cases of realistic interest, corroborate well with the earlier predictions in plasma situations. Applicability of the analysis relevant in cosmic and astronomical environments of compact dwarf stars is concisely indicated.

  8. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatmentoption for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis,thermal ablation techniques provide a valid nonsurgicaltreatment alternative, thanks to their minimalinvasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile,proven efficacy in local disease control, virtuallyunlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Differentenergy sources are currently employed in clinics asphysical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgicalthermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency(RF) currents are the most used, whilemicrowave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasinglypopular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidlybecame the standard of care in ablation, especially inthe treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFAexhibits substantial performance limitations in thetreatment of large lesions and/or tumors located nearmajor heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the FarEastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promisingresults but also severe limitations in the controllabilityof the emitted field and in the high amount of poweremployed for the ablation of large tumors, resultingin a poor coagulative performance and a relativelyhigh complication rate, nowadays shows better resultsboth in terms of treatment controllability and of overallcoagulative performance, thanks to the improvementof technology. In this review we provide an extensiveand detailed overview of the key physical and technicalaspects of MWA and of the currently available systems,and we want to discuss the most relevant published dataon MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinicalresults and to the type and rate of complications, both inabsolute terms and in comparison with RFA.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulations with CRASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.-C.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-03-01

    CRASH is a code package developed for the predictive study of radiative shocks. It is based on the BATSRUS MHD code used extensively for space-weather research. We desire to extend the applications of this code to the study of hydrodynamically unstable systems. We report here the results of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) simulations with CRASH, as a necessary step toward the study of such systems. Our goal, motivated by the previous comparison of simulations and experiment, is to be able to simulate the magnetic RTI with self-generated magnetic fields produced by the Biermann Battery effect. Here we show results for hydrodynamic RTI, comparing the effects of different solvers and numerical parameters. We find that the early-time behavior converges to the analytical result of the linear theory. We observe that the late-time morphology is sensitive to the numerical scheme and limiter beta. At low-resolution limit, the growth of RTI is highly dependent on the setup and resolution, which we attribute to the large numerical viscosity at low resolution.

  10. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  11. Measurement of areal density in the ablators of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules via detection of ablator (n, n'γ) gamma-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hsu, H. H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Duffy, T.

    2013-04-01

    We report the first gamma-ray-based measurements of the areal density of ablators in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions. The measurements, made at the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], used observations of gamma rays arising from inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons on 12C nuclei in the compressed plastic ablators. The emission of 12C(n,n'γ) gamma rays from the capsules is detected using the Gamma Reaction History instrument [H. W. Herrmann et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032047 (2010)] operating at OMEGA. From the ratio of a capsule's 12C(n,n'γ) emission to the emission from the same processes in an in situ reference graphite "puck" of known mass and geometry [N. M. Hoffman et al., in IFSA 2011 proceedings (submitted)], we determine the time-averaged areal density of 12C in the capsule's compressed ablator. Measured values of total ablator areal density for thirteen imploded capsules, in the range 23 ± 10 to 58 ± 14 mg/cm2, are comparable to values calculated in 1D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, and measured by charged-particle techniques.

  12. Entropy-limited hydrodynamics: a novel approach to relativistic hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercilena, Federico; Radice, David; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We present entropy-limited hydrodynamics (ELH): a new approach for the computation of numerical fluxes arising in the discretization of hyperbolic equations in conservation form. ELH is based on the hybridisation of an unfiltered high-order scheme with the first-order Lax-Friedrichs method. The activation of the low-order part of the scheme is driven by a measure of the locally generated entropy inspired by the artificial-viscosity method proposed by Guermond et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 230(11):4248-4267, 2011, doi: 10.1016/j.jcp.2010.11.043). Here, we present ELH in the context of high-order finite-differencing methods and of the equations of general-relativistic hydrodynamics. We study the performance of ELH in a series of classical astrophysical tests in general relativity involving isolated, rotating and nonrotating neutron stars, and including a case of gravitational collapse to black hole. We present a detailed comparison of ELH with the fifth-order monotonicity preserving method MP5 (Suresh and Huynh in J. Comput. Phys. 136(1):83-99, 1997, doi: 10.1006/jcph.1997.5745), one of the most common high-order schemes currently employed in numerical-relativity simulations. We find that ELH achieves comparable and, in many of the cases studied here, better accuracy than more traditional methods at a fraction of the computational cost (up to {˜}50% speedup). Given its accuracy and its simplicity of implementation, ELH is a promising framework for the development of new special- and general-relativistic hydrodynamics codes well adapted for massively parallel supercomputers.

  13. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishnu M Bannur

    2001-10-01

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability. It contains new, nonelectromagnetic, neutrino-plasma (or electroweak) stable and unstable modes also. The growth of the instability is weak for the highly relativistic neutrino flux, but becomes stronger for weakly relativistic neutrino flux in the case of parameters appropriate to the early universe and supernova explosions. However, this mode is dominant only for the beam velocity greater than 0.25 and in the other limit electroweak unstable mode takes over.

  14. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other...... scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...

  15. Transient effects in unstable ablation fronts and mixing layers in HEDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarisse, J.-M.; Gauthier, S.; Dastugue, L.; Vallet, A.; Schneider, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report results obtained for two elementary unstable flow configurations relevant to high energy density physics: the ablation front instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor -instability induced mixing layer. These two flows are characterized by a transience of their perturbation dynamics. In the ablative flow case, this perturbation dynamics transience takes the form of finite-durations of successive linear-perturbation evolution phases until reaching regimes of decaying oscillations. This behaviour is observed in various regimes: weakly or strongly accelerated ablation fronts, irradiation asymmetries or initial external-surface defects, and is a result of the mean-flow unsteadiness and stretching. In the case of the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability induced mixing layer, perturbation dynamics transience manifests itself through the extinction of turbulence and mixing as the flow reaches a stable state made of two stably stratified layers of pure fluids separated by an unstratified mixing layer. A second feature, also due to compressibility, takes the form of an intense acoustic wave production, mainly localized in the heavy fluid. Finally, we point out that a systematic short-term linear-perturbation dynamics analysis should be undertaken within the framework of non-normal stability theory.

  16. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  17. Soft thrombus formation in radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demolin, JM; Eick, OJ; Munch, K; Koullick, E; Nakagawa, H; Wittkampf, FHM

    2002-01-01

    During RF catheter ablation, local temperature elevation can result in coagulum formation on the ablation electrode, resulting in impedance rise. A recent study has also demonstrated the formation of a so-called soft thrombus during experimental ablations. This deposit poorly adhered to the catheter

  18. Catheter ablation of parahisian premature ventricular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, June Hong; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-12-01

    Catheter ablation is performed in selected patients with a symptomatic premature ventricular complex (PVC) or PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Ablation of PVC from the His region has a high risk of inducing a complete atrioventricular block. Here we report successful catheter ablation of a parahisian PVC in a 63-year-old man.

  19. Laser ablation and optical surface damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    Laser ablation usually accompanies optical surface damage to bare surfaces and coatings. Investigations of optical damage mechanisms by observation of ablation processes at laser fluences very close to the optical damage threshold are described. Several promising surface characterization methods for investigating damage mechanisms are also described. The possible role of laser ablation in initiating or promoting optical surface damage is discussed.

  20. Laser ablation mechanisms and optical surface damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    1991-05-01

    Laser ablation usually accompanies optical surface damage to bare surfaces and coatings. Investigations of optical damage mechanisms by observation of ablation processes at laser fluences very close to the optical damage threshold are described. Several promising surface characterization methods for investigating damage mechanisms are also described. The possible role of laser ablation in initiating or promoting optical surface damage is discussed.

  1. Dynamic imaging and hydrodynamics study of high velocity, laser-accelerated thin foil targets using multiframe optical shadowgraphy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Tripathi; S Chaurasia; P Leshma; L J Dhareshwar

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of the study of thin target foil–laser interaction experiments is to understand the physics of hydrodynamics of the foil acceleration, which is highly relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This paper discusses a simple, inexpensive multiframe optical shadow-graphy diagnostics developed for dynamic imaging of high velocity laser-accelerated target foils of different thicknesses. The diagnostic has a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 m and 500 ps respectively in the measurements. The target velocity is in the range of 106 - 107 cm/s. Hydrodynamic efficiency of such targets was measured by energy balance experiments together with the measurement of kinetic energy of the laser-driven targets. Effect of target foil thickness on the hydrodynamics of aluminum foils was studied for determining the optimum conditions for obtaining a directed kinetic energy transfer of the accelerated foil. The diagnostics has also been successfully used to study ablatively accelerated targets of other novel materials.

  2. Nanosecond laser ablation of bulk Al, Bronze, and Cu: ablation rate saturation and laserinduced oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    R. Maisterrena-Epstein; S. Camacho-López; L. Escobar-Alarcón; M. A. Camacho-López

    2007-01-01

    In this work we report about the characteristics of nanosecond laser ablation, in atmospheric air, of bulk Al, Bronze, and Cu. Average per pulse laser ablation rate and its dependence on ablation depth is presented for these three metals. We will demonstrate and discuss some distinctive features of the ablation saturation effect of the above metals. We will also present results on laser-induced oxidation of the metals which results off the ablation event. We studied the laser-induced oxidatio...

  3. Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrödinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

  4. Azimuthal Magnetorotational Instability at low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, A; Willis, A P; Avila, M

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered to be one of the most powerful sources of turbulence in hydrodynamically stable quasi-Keplerian flows, such as those governing accretion disk flows. Although the linear stability of these flows with applied external magnetic field has been studied for decades, the influence of the instability on the outward angular momentum transport, necessary for the accretion of the disk, is still not well known. In this work we model Keplerian rotation with Taylor-Couette flow and imposed azimuthal magnetic field using both linear and nonlinear approaches. We present scalings of instability with Hartmann and Reynolds numbers via linear analysis and direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the two magnetic Prandtl numbers of $1.4 \\cdot 10^{-6}$ and $1$. Inside of the instability domains modes with different axial wavenumbers dominate, resulting in sub-domains of instabilities, which appear different for each $Pm$. The DNS show the emergence of 1- and 2-frequency spatio-te...

  5. Mixing through shear instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a stratified shear layer. This shear instability is believed to be responsible for extra mixing in differentially rotating stellar interiors and is the prime candidate to explain the abundance anomalies observed in many rotating stars. All mixing prescriptions currently in use are based on phenomenological and heuristic estimates whose validity is often unclear. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the mixing efficiency as a function of the Richardson number and compare our results with some semi-analytical formalisms of mixing.

  6. Symmetry-breaking instability in a prototypical driven granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Meerson, Baruch

    2002-08-01

    Symmetry-breaking instability of a laterally uniform granular cluster (strip state) in a prototypical driven granular gas is investigated. The system consists of smooth hard disks in a two-dimensional box, colliding inelastically with each other and driven, at zero gravity, by a "thermal" wall. The limit of nearly elastic particle collisions is considered, and granular hydrodynamics with the Jenkins-Richman constitutive relations is employed. The hydrodynamic problem is completely described by two scaled parameters and the aspect ratio of the box. Marginal stability analysis predicts a spontaneous symmetry-breaking instability of the strip state, similar to that predicted recently for a different set of constitutive relations. If the system is big enough, the marginal stability curve becomes independent of the details of the boundary condition at the driving wall. In this regime, the density perturbation is exponentially localized at the elastic wall opposite the thermal wall. The short- and long-wavelength asymptotics of the marginal stability curves are obtained analytically in the dilute limit. The physics of the symmetry-breaking instability is discussed.

  7. Filamentation instability in two counter-streaming laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Dong, Quan-Li; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Hua, Neng; Qiao, Zhan-Feng; Zhu, Bao-Qiang; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhao, Gang; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-12-01

    The filamentation instability was observed in the interaction of two counter-streaming laser ablated plasma flows, which were supersonic, collisionless, and also closely relevant to astrophysical conditions. The plasma flows were created by irradiating a pair of oppositely standing plastic (CH) foils with 1ns-pulsed laser beams of total energy of 1.7 kJ in two laser spots. With characteristics diagnosed in experiments, the calculated features of Weibel-type filaments are in good agreement with measurements. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074297, 11674146, and 11220101002) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01500.

  8. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Alexandre; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows are investigated using $3$D Floquet numerical computations. A minimal three-modes analytical model that reproduce and explains some of the full Floquet results is derived. The growth-rate $\\sigma$ of the most unstable modes (at small scale, low Reynolds number $Re$ and small wavenumber $q$) is found to scale differently in the presence or absence of anisotropic kinetic alpha (\\AKA{}) effect. When an $AKA$ effect is present the scaling $\\sigma \\propto q\\; Re\\,$ predicted by the $AKA$ effect theory [U. Frisch, Z. S. She, and P. L. Sulem, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987)] is recovered for $Re\\ll 1$ as expected (with most of the energy of the unstable mode concentrated in the large scales). However, as $Re$ increases, the growth-rate is found to saturate and most of the energy is found at small scales. In the absence of \\AKA{} effect, it is found that flows can still have large-scale instabilities, but with a negative eddy-viscosity sca...

  9. RANS SIMULATION OF HYDROFOIL EFFECTS ON HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS OF A PLANING CATAMARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Najafi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of high-speed crafts’ hydrodynamic coefficients will help to analyze the dynamics of these kinds of vessels and the factors affecting their dynamic stabilities. Also, it can be useful and effective in controlling the vessel instabilities. The main purpose of this study is to determine the coefficients of longitudinal motions of a planing catamaran with and without a hydrofoil using RANS method to evaluate the foil effects on them. Determination of hydrodynamic coefficients by experimental approach is costly, and requires meticulous laboratory equipment; therefore, utilizing numerical methods and developing a virtual laboratory seems highly efficient. In the present study, the numerical results for hydrodynamic coefficients of a high-speed craft are verified against Troesch’s (1992 experimental results. In the following, after determination of hydrodynamic coefficients of a planing catamaran with and without foil, the foil effects on its hydrodynamic coefficients are evaluated. The results indicate that most of the coefficients are frequency independent especially at high frequencies.

  10. Black Branes in a Box: Hydrodynamics, Stability, and Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Emparan, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We study the effective hydrodynamics of neutral black branes enclosed in a finite cylindrical cavity with Dirichlet boundary conditions. We focus on how the Gregory-Laflamme instability changes as we vary the cavity radius R. Fixing the metric at the cavity wall increases the rigidity of the black brane by hindering gradients of the redshift on the wall. In the effective fluid, this is reflected in the growth of the squared speed of sound. As a consequence, when the cavity is smaller than a critical radius the black brane becomes dynamically stable. The correlation with the change in thermodynamic stability is transparent in our approach. We compute the bulk and shear viscosities of the black brane and find that they do not run with R. We find mean-field theory critical exponents near the critical point.

  11. Long-lived "critters" formed by hydrodynamic clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Donev, Aleksandar; Chaikin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Self-assembly in colloidal systems often requires finely tuning the interactions between particles. When colloids are active, or moving due to an external drive, the assembly is even harder to achieve. Here we show that long-lived compact motile structures, called "critters", can be formed just with hydrodynamic interactions. They naturally emerge from a recently discovered fingering instability in a system of microrollers near a floor. Our 3D large-scale simulations show that these critters are a stable state of the system, move much faster than individual rollers, and quickly respond to a changing drive. The formation of critters is robust to any initial condition and our experiments suggest that similar structures are formed even in a thermal colloidal system. We believe the critters are a promising tool for microscopic transport, flow, aggregation and mixing.

  12. Galaxy clusters as hydrodynamics laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Elke; Sheardown, Alexander; Fish, Thomas; ZuHone, John; Hunt, Matthew; Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-08-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters shows a wealth of hydrodynamical features that trace the growth of clusters via the infall of galaxies or smaller subclusters. Such hydrodynamical features include the wakes of the infalling objects as well as the interfaces between the host cluster’s ICM and the atmosphere of the infalling object. Furthermore, the cluster dynamics can be traced by merger shocks, bow shocks, and sloshing motions of the ICM.The characteristics of these dynamical features, e.g., the direction, length, brightness, and temperature of the galaxies' or subclusters' gas tails varies significantly between different objects. This could be due to either dynamical conditions or ICM transport coefficients such as viscosity and thermal conductivity. For example, the cool long gas tails of of some infalling galaxies and groups have been attributed to a substantial ICM viscosity suppressing mixing of the stripped galaxy or group gas with the hotter ambient ICM.Using hydrodynamical simulations of minor mergers we show, however, that these features can be explained naturally by the dynamical conditions of each particular galaxy or group infall. Specifically, we identify observable features to distinguish the first and second infall of a galaxy or group into its host cluster as well as characteristics during apocentre passage. Comparing our simulations with observations, we can explain several puzzling observations such as the long and cold tail of M86 in Virgo and the very long and tangentially oriented tail of the group LEDA 87445 in Hydra A.Using our simulations, we also assess the validity of the stagnation pressure method that is widely used to determine an infalling galaxy's velocity. We show that near pericentre passage the method gives reasonable results, but near apocentre it is not easily applicable.

  13. Photochemical Ablation of Organic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    As discovered by Srinivasan in 1982, irradiation of materials by far UV laser light can lead to photochemical ablation, a process distinct from normal thermal ablation in which the laser primarily heats the material. A versatile mesoscopic model for molecular dynamics simulations of the laser ablation phenomena is presented. The model incorporates both the thermal and photochemical events, that is, both heating of the system and UV induced bond-cleavage followed by abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The results from the simulations are compared to experimental data and the basic physics and chemistry for each irradiation regime are discussed. Initial results from polymer ablation simulations will be presented. L. V. Zhigilei, P. B. S. Kodali and B. J. Garrison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 2845-2853 (1998); L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, Journal of Applied Physics, 88, 1281-1298 (2000). Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  14. The Effect of the Charge Fluctuation of Dust Particles on Ion-acoustic Wave Excited Through Ioniza tion Instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华建军; 刘金远; 马腾才

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the charge fluctuation of dust particles on ion acoustic wave (IAW) excited through ionization instability was investigated. The hydrodynamic equations and linear time-dependent perturbation theory served as the starting point of theory, by which the dispersion relation and growth rate of the IAW were given. By comparing the results with the case of constant dust charges, it was found that the charge fluctuation of dust particles reduces the instability of the wave mode.

  15. Hydrodynamic characteristics of UASB bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Siby; Tare, Vinod

    2011-10-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of UASB bioreactors operated under different organic loading and hydraulic loading rates were studied, using three laboratory scale models treating concocted sucrose wastewater. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis using dispersion model and tanks-in-series model was directed towards the characterization of the fluid flow pattern in the reactors and correlation of the hydraulic regime with the biomass content and biogas production. Empty bed reactors followed a plug flow pattern and the flow pattern changed to a large dispersion mixing with biomass and gas production. Effect of increase in gas production on the overall hydraulics was insignificant.

  16. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  17. Turbulence Models of Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张直明; 王小静; 孙美丽

    2003-01-01

    The main theoretical turbulence models for application to hydrodynamic lubrication problems were briefly reviewed, and the course of their development and their fundamentals were explained. Predictions by these models on flow fields in turbulent Couette flows and shear-induced countercurrent flows were compared to existing measurements, and Zhang & Zhang' s combined k-ε model was shown to have surpassingly satisfactory results. The method of application of this combined k-ε model to high speed journal bearings and annular seals was summarized, and the predicted results were shown to be satisfactory by comparisons with existing experiments of journal bearings and annular seals.

  18. Catheter ablation - new developments in robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, K R Julian; Schmidt, Boris; Köktürk, Bülent; Tilz, Roland; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Konstantinidou, Melanie; Wissner, Erik; Metzner, Andreas; Ouyang, Feifan; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2008-12-01

    Catheter ablation has become the curative treatment modality for various arrhythmias. Extending the indications for catheter ablation from simple supraventricular tachycardias to complex arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia or atrial fibrillation, the investigator faces prolonged procedure times, fluoroscopy exposure and the need for stable and reproducible catheter movement. Recently, remote-controlled robotic catheter ablation has emerged as a novel ablation concept to meet these requirements. This review describes the two available robotic ablation systems and summarizes their clinical applications and current human experience.

  19. Highly-anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2016-01-01

    The framework of leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics is supplemented with realistic equation of state and self-consistent freeze-out prescription. The model is applied to central proton-nucleus collisions. The results are compared to those obtained within standard Israel-Stewart second-order viscous hydrodynamics. It is shown that the resulting hadron spectra are highly-sensitive to the hydrodynamic approach that has been used.

  20. Progress toward Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a High-Energy-Density Plasma on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.; Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    In the realm of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, there exist three primary hydrodynamic instabilities of concern: Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH). Although the RT and the RM instabilities have been readily observed and diagnosed in the laboratory, the KH instability remains relatively unexplored in HED plasmas. Unlike the RT and RM instabilities, the KH instability is driven by a lifting force generated by a strong velocity gradient in a stratified fluid. Understanding the KH instability mechanism in HED plasmas will provide essential insight into oblique shock systems, jets, mass stripping, and detailed RT-spike development. In addition, our KH experiment will help provide the groundwork for future transition to turbulence experiments. We present 2D FLASH simulations and experimental data from our initial attempts to create a pure KH system using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  1. Photonic Doppler velocimetry of laser-ablated ultrathin metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A R; Rodriguez, G; Clarke, S A; Thomas, K A

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining velocity information from the interaction of a laser pulse on a metal layer provides insight into the rapid dynamics of material removal and plasma plume physics during ablation. A traditional approach involves using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) on a reflective metal surface. However, when the target is a thin metal layer, the cohesion of the surface is quickly lost resulting in a large spread of particle velocities that cannot be easily resolved by VISAR. This is due to material ejection"confusing" the VISAR measurement surface, effectively washing out the spatial fringe visibility in the VISAR interferometer. A new heterodyne-based optical velocimeter method is the photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). Because PDV tracks motion in a frequency encoded temporal electro-optical signal, velocity information is preserved and allows for multiple velocity components to be recorded simultaneously. The challenge lies in extracting PDV velocity information at short (nanosecond) laser ablation time scales with rapidly varying heterodyne beats by using electronic, optical, and analytical techniques to recover the velocity information from a fleeting signal. Here we show how we have been able to obtain velocity information on the nanosecond time scale and are able to compare it to hydrodynamic simulations. Also, we examine refinements to our PDV system by increasing the bandwidth, utilizing different probes, and sampling different analysis techniques.

  2. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Nasraoui, S

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N(3). For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δ(m)=(3√[3]/16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N(3)/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  3. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Boehly, T. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Bonino, M. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Collins, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Craxton, R. S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Delettrez, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Edgell, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Epstein, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Follett, R. K. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Forrest, C. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yu. Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Harding, D. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Henchen, R. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Janezic, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kelly, J. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kessler, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kosc, T. Z. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Loucks, S. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marozas, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Maximov, A. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McCrory, R. L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McKenty, P. W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Michel, D. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Nora, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Radha, P. B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Regan, S. P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shmayda, W. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Short, R.W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shvydky, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Skupsky, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yaakobi, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  4. Design and Construction of a Shock Tube Experiment for Multiphase Instability Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John; Black, Wolfgang; Avgoustopoulos, Constantine; Allen, Roy; Kathakapa, Raj; Guo, Qiwen; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are important phenomena that have a wide range of practical applications in engineering and physics. One such instability, the shock driven multiphase instability (SDMI), arises when a shockwave accelerates an interface between two particle-gas mixtures with differing multiphase properties. The SDMI is present in high energy explosives, scramjets, and supernovae. A practical way of studying shock wave driven instabilities is through experimentation in a shock tube laboratory. This poster presentation will cover the design and data acquisition process of the University of Missouri's Fluid Mixing Shock Tube Laboratory. In the shock tube, a pressure generated shockwave is passed through a multiphase interface, creating the SDMI instability. This can be photographed for observation using high speed cameras, lasers, and advance imaging techniques. Important experimental parameters such as internal pressure and temperature, and mass flow rates of gases can be set and recorded by remotely controlled devices. The experimental facility provides the University of Missouri's Fluid Mixing Shock Tube Laboratory with the ability to validate simulated experiments and to conduct further inquiry into the field of shock driven multiphase hydrodynamic instabilities. Advisor.

  5. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  6. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Andrew Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths (~ micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  7. Collisions and separations in 2D hydrodynamical code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asida, Shimon

    1991-06-01

    Hydrodynamic problems involving the collision or separation of zones of different materials include the following types: armor penetration by a jet formed in the explosion of a shaped charge or by a kinetic projectile, and instabilities in cosmic jets. Calculations of hydrodynamic processes are based on numerical simulations which solve the differential equations by means of difference equations. A special grid is defined and the physical system is advanced via finite steps in time; in a Eulerian treatment, the grid is stationary in space whereas in a Lagrangian treatment it moves together with the fluid. In Lagrangian methods, the grid is defined on the fluid and the boundaries between materials are formed by the edges of computational cells, so that the shape of the grid depends on the shape of the boundary. Where there is a strong flow, the cells distort and the grid must be frequently redefined to enable the calculation to continue. Boundary collisions cause difficulty in defining a grid. In Eulerian methods, where the computational grid is defined over all the space through which the materials flow, it is necessary to use cells with non-homogeneous contents to follow the boundaries; such calculations are more complicated and less accurate. The aim of the present work was to develop a Lagrangian method for treating such collisions. The code, based on an existing 2D Lagrangian code with the addition of a new collision mechanism, uses a mixed computational grid, comprising squares and triangles, with which it is possible to describe systems.

  8. Shock instability in dissipative gases

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Sirmas, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves in thermally relaxing gases, such as ionizing, dissociating and vibrationally excited gases, can become unstable. To date, the mechanism controlling this instability has not been resolved. Previous accounts of the D'yakov-Kontorovich instability, and Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson behaviour could not predict the experimentally observed instability. To address the mechanism controlling the instability, we study the propagation of shock waves in a ...

  9. Hydrodynamics `experiments' on supernovae and on Nova - the laser*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Bruce A.

    1996-11-01

    To make progress in understanding the complex phenomena of supernovae (SN), one does not have the luxury of setting up clean, well controlled experiments in the universe to test the physics of our models and theories. Consequently, creating a surrogate environment to serve as an experimental astrophysics testbed would be highly beneficial. The existence of highly sophisticated, modern research lasers in the 1-50 kJ class, developed largely as a result of the world-wide effort in inertial confinement fusion, opens a new potential for creating just such an experimental testbed utilizing well-controlled, well-diagnosed laser plasmas. The next generation MJ-class ``superlasers" planned for the U.S. and France offer incentive to invest effort now on gaining experience using current laser facilities to develop genuinely useful laser-plasma astrophysics experiments. I will discuss two areas of physics critical to an understanding of supernovae that are amenable to supporting research on large lasers: nonlinear hydrodynamic instability evolution in 2D and 3D and (2) the radiative shock hydrodynamics of colliding plasmas such as SN ejecta-circumstellar matter interactions. The astrophysical relevance of these areas to supernovae will be developed in a companion talk.^2 *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48. ^1In collaboration with S. G. Glendinning, J. Kane, J. Castor, A. Rubenchik, J. Colvin, R. P. Drake, R. London, E. Liang, and R. McCray. ^2Roger Chevalier, "The radiative hydrodynamics of supernova shock waves", these proceedings.

  10. Some open questions in hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dyndal, Mateusz

    2014-01-01

    When speaking of unsolved problems in physics, this is surprising at first glance to discuss the case of fluid mechanics. However, there are many deep open questions that come with the theory of fluid mechanics. In this paper, we discuss some of them that we classify in two categories, the long term behavior of solutions of equations of hydrodynamics and the definition of initial (boundary) conditions. The first set of questions come with the non-relativistic theory based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Starting from smooth initial conditions, the purpose is to understand if solutions of Navier-Stokes equations remain smooth with the time evolution. Existence for just a finite time would imply the evolution of finite time singularities, which would have a major influence on the development of turbulent phenomena. The second set of questions come with the relativistic theory of hydrodynamics. There is an accumulating evidence that this theory may be relevant for the description of the medium created in high en...

  11. A pulsed power hydrodynamics approach to exploring properties of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics, as an application of low-impedance, pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology developed over the last decade to study advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties, can potentially be applied to the study of the behavior and properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties, such as equation of state and conductivity, of warm dense matter is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to a few times solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Warm dense matter conditions can be achieved by laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers is applying these techniques using petawatt scale laser systems, but the microscopic size scale of the WDM produced in this way limits access to some physics phenomena. Pulsed power hydrodynamics techniques, either through high convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques both offer the prospect for producing warm dense matter in macroscopic quantities. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. Similarly, liner compression of normal density material, perhaps using multiple reflected shocks can provide access to the challenging region above normal density -- again with the requirement of very large amounts of driving energy. In this paper we will provide an introduction to techniques that might be applied to explore this

  12. Spin waves and spin instabilities in quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, P A

    2014-01-01

    We describe main ideas of method of many-particle quantum hydrodynamics allows to derive equations for description of quantum plasma evolution. We also present definitions of collective quantum variables suitable for quantum plasmas. We show that evolution of magnetic moments (spins) in quantum plasmas leads to several new branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered. Instabilities appearing due to interaction of magnetic moments of neutrons with plasma are described.

  13. Glue septal ablation: A promising alternative to alcohol septal ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercan Okutucu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is defined as myocardial hypertrophy in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the magnitude of present hypertrophy. In about 70% of patients with HCM, there is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT obstruction (LVOTO and this is known as obstructive type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM. Cases refractory to medical treatment have had two options either surgical septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation (ASA to alleviate LVOT gradient. ASA may cause some life-threatening complications including conduction disturbances and complete heart block, hemodynamic compromise, ventricular arrhythmias, distant and massive myocardial necrosis. Glue septal ablation (GSA is a promising technique for the treatment of HOCM. Glue seems to be superior to alcohol due to some intrinsic advantageous properties of glue such as immediate polymerization which prevents the leak into the left anterior descending coronary artery and it is particularly useful in patients with collaterals to the right coronary artery in whom alcohol ablation is contraindicated. In our experience, GSA is effective and also a safe technique without significant complications. GSA decreases LVOT gradient immediately after the procedure and this reduction persists during 12 months of follow-up. It improves New York Heart Association functional capacity and decrease interventricular septal wall thickness. Further studies are needed in order to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of this technique.

  14. Nonlinear hydrodynamic stability and transition; Proceedings of the IUTAM Symposium, Nice, France, Sept. 3-7, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoretical and experimental research on nonlinear hydrodynamic stability and transition is presented. Bifurcations, amplitude equations, pattern in experiments, and shear flows are considered. Particular attention is given to bifurcations of plane viscous fluid flow and transition to turbulence, chaotic traveling wave covection, chaotic behavior of parametrically excited surface waves in square geometry, amplitude analysis of the Swift-Hohenberg equation, traveling wave convection in finite containers, focus instability in axisymmetric Rayleigh-Benard convection, scaling and pattern formation in flowing sand, dynamical behavior of instabilities in spherical gap flows, and nonlinear short-wavelength Taylor vortices. Also discussed are stability of a flow past a two-dimensional grid, inertia wave breakdown in a precessing fluid, flow-induced instabilities in directional solidification, structure and dynamical properties of convection in binary fluid mixtures, and instability competition for convecting superfluid mixtures.

  15. Genetic instability in Gynecological Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-hua; ZHOU Hong-lin

    2003-01-01

    Defects of mismatch repair (MMR) genes also have beenidentified in many kinds of tumors. Loss of MMR functionhas been linked to genetic instability especially microsatelliteinstability that results in high mutation rate. In this review, wediscussed the microsatellite instability observed in thegynecological tumors. We also discussed defects in the DNAmismatch repair in these tumors and their correlation to themicrosatellite instability, as well as the gene mutations due tothe microsatellite instability in these tumors. From thesediscussion, we tried to understand the mechanism ofcarcinogenesis in gynecological tumors from the aspect ofgenetic instability due to mismatch repair defects.

  16. Design of an electromagnetic accelerator for turbulent hydrodynamic mix studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Morrison, J.J.; Dimonte, G.; Remington, B.A.

    1993-12-08

    An electromagnetic accelerator in the form of a linear electric motor (LEM) has been designed to achieve controlled acceleration profiles of a carriage containing hydrodynamically unstable fluids for the investigation of the development of turbulent mix. The Rayleigh- Taylor instability is investigated by accelerating two dissimilar density fluids using the LEM to achieve a wide variety of acceleration and deceleration profiles. The acceleration profiles are achieved by independent control of rail and augmentation currents. A variety of acceleration-time profiles are possible including: (1) constant, (2) impulsive and (3) shaped. The LEM and support structure are a robust design in order to withstand high loads with deflections and to mitigate operational vibration. Vibration of the carriage during acceleration could create artifacts in the data which would interfere with the intended study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The design allows clear access for diagnostic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence radiography, shadowgraphs and particle imaging velocimetry. Electromagnetic modeling codes were used to optimize the rail and augmentation coil positions within the support structure framework. Results of contemporary studies for non-arcing sliding contact of solid armatures are used for the design of the driving armature and the dynamic electromagnetic braking system. A 0. 6MJ electrolytic capacitor bank is used for energy storage to drive the LEM. This report will discuss a LEM design which will accelerate masses of up to 3kg to a maximum of about 3000g{sub o}, where g{sub o} is accelerated due to gravity.

  17. Active Matter: Liquid-Crystal Hydrodynamics With a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2011-07-01

    Coherently moving flocks of beasts, birds and bacteria are an example of polar nematic liquid-crystalline order in the living world. The highly ordered local structures seen in the configurations of the biopolymeric filaments, energized by molecular motors, in the cytoskeleton of a living cell are another example; and chemically or mechanically agitated orientable particles such as catalytic colloidal rods or monolayers of macroscopic bits of wire are a third. There has been a great deal of progress in understanding the states, phase transitions, and fluctuations of these nonequilibrium systems, known broadly as Active Matter, and the methods used are a nice generalization of the hydrodynamic approach to liquid crystals. Among the interesting results that have emerged are some curious instabilities in bulk as well as thin-film geometries; the peculiar kinetics of domain growth of active nematics; anomalies in the dynamics of a stiff filament in an active medium, and the twisted instabilities of chiral active liquid crystals. My talk will provide some background, summarize the achievements of the field, including those of our group, and identify open problems and future directions.

  18. Testing a one-dimensional prescription of dynamical shear mixing with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, P. V. F.; Röpke, F. K.; Hirschi, R.; Georgy, C.; Jones, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The treatment of mixing processes is still one of the major uncertainties in 1D stellar evolution models. This is mostly due to the need to parametrize and approximate aspects of hydrodynamics in hydrostatic codes. In particular, the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in rotating stars, for example, dynamical shear instability, evades consistent description. Aims: We intend to study the accuracy of the diffusion approximation to dynamical shear in hydrostatic stellar evolution models by comparing 1D models to a first-principle hydrodynamics simulation starting from the same initial conditions. Methods: We chose an initial model calculated with the stellar evolution code GENEC that is just at the onset of a dynamical shear instability but does not show any other instabilities (e.g., convection). This was mapped to the hydrodynamics code SLH to perform a 2D simulation in the equatorial plane. We compare the resulting profiles in the two codes and compute an effective diffusion coefficient for the hydro simulation. Results: Shear instabilities develop in the 2D simulation in the regions predicted by linear theory to become unstable in the 1D stellar evolution model. Angular velocity and chemical composition is redistributed in the unstable region, thereby creating new unstable regions. After a period of time, the system settles in a symmetric, steady state, which is Richardson stable everywhere in the 2D simulation, whereas the instability remains for longer in the 1D model due to the limitations of the current implementation in the 1D code. A spatially resolved diffusion coefficient is extracted by comparing the initial and final profiles of mean atomic mass. Conclusions: The presented simulation gives a first insight on hydrodynamics of shear instabilities in a real stellar environment and even allows us to directly extract an effective diffusion coefficient. We see evidence for a critical Richardson number of 0.25 as regions above this threshold remain

  19. Instabilities in sensory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  20. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-11-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles based on the fundamental nonlinear phenomenon of modulation instability. In particular, we demonstrate that modulation instability can lead to the formation of long-lived standing and moving nonlinear localized modes of several distinct types such as bright and dark solitons, oscillons, and domain walls. We analyze the properties of these nonlinear localized modes and reveal different scenarios of their dynamics including transformation of one type of mode to another. We believe this work paves a way towards the development of nonlinear nanophotonics circuitry.

  1. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  2. Gravitational instabilities of superspinars

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    Superspinars are ultracompact objects whose mass M and angular momentum J violate the Kerr bound (cJ/GM^2>1). Recent studies analyzed the observable consequences of gravitational lensing and accretion around superspinars in astrophysical scenarios. In this paper we investigate the dynamical stability of superspinars to gravitational perturbations, considering either purely reflecting or perfectly absorbing boundary conditions at the "surface" of the superspinar. We find that these objects are unstable independently of the boundary conditions, and that the instability is strongest for relatively small values of the spin. Also, we give a physical interpretation of the various instabilities that we find. Our results (together with the well-known fact that accretion tends to spin superspinars down) imply that superspinars are very unlikely astrophysical alternatives to black holes.

  3. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  4. Hydrodynamic correlation functions in nematic liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Carle, D.; Laidlaw, W.G.

    1976-01-01

    The result, recently discovered by Forster, that the strength factors of the nonpropagating modes in certain hydrodynamic correlation functions in nematic liquid crystals are not fully determined by the hydrodynamic matrix is reconsidered. Using time reversal and space inversion symmetry one finds t

  5. Hydrodynamic Overview at Hot Quarks 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    This presents an overview of relativistic hydrodynamic modeling in heavy-ion collisions prepared for Hot Quarks 2016, at South Padre Island, TX, USA. The influence of the initial state and viscosity on various experimental observables are discussed. Specific problems that arise in the hydrodynamical modeling at the Beam Energy Scan are briefly discussed.

  6. Measurement of the hydrodynamic resistance of microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakiela, Slawomir

    2016-10-07

    Here, we demonstrate a novel method of measurement which determines precisely the hydrodynamic resistance of a droplet flowing through a channel. The obtained results show that the hydrodynamic resistance of a droplet in a microchannel achieves its maximum for lengths of the droplet ranging from 3w to 4w and that interactions between beads in a train exist.

  7. Hydrodynamic correlation functions in nematic liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Carle, D.; Laidlaw, W.G.

    1976-01-01

    The result, recently discovered by Forster, that the strength factors of the nonpropagating modes in certain hydrodynamic correlation functions in nematic liquid crystals are not fully determined by the hydrodynamic matrix is reconsidered. Using time reversal and space inversion symmetry one finds t

  8. Shock wave mediated plume chemistry for molecular formation in laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-16

    Laser ablation is used in a variety of applications albeit formation mechanisms of molecules and nanoclusters are not well understood. We investigated the formation mechanisms of AlO molecules during complex interactions between an Al laser plume expanding into ambient air at atmospheric pressure levels. To produce the plasma a high-purity Al target was ablated using 1064 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Our results show that the plasma chemistry leading to the formation of AlO is mediated by shock waves. During the early times of plasma expansion, the generated shock waves at the plume edges act as a barrier for the combustion process and the molecular formation is prevalent after the shockwave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of Al and AlO highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and its relation to plume hydrodynamics.

  9. Modeling of ablation threshold dependence on pulse duration for dielectrics with ultrashort pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-01-01

    We present a numerical model of plasma formation in ultrafast laser ablation on the dielectrics surface. Ablation threshold dependence on pulse duration is predicted with the model and the numerical results for water agrees well with the experimental data for pulse duration from 140 fs to 10 ps. Influences of parameters and approximations of photo- and avalanche-ionization on the ablation threshold prediction are analyzed in detail for various pulse lengths. The calculated ablation threshold is strongly dependent on electron collision time for all the pulse durations. The complete photoionization model is preferred for pulses shorter than 1 ps rather than the multiphoton ionization approximations. The transition time of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption needs to be considered when pulses are shorter than 5 ps and it can also ensure the avalanche ionization (AI) coefficient consistent with that in multiple rate equations (MREs) for pulses shorter than 300 fs. The threshold electron density for AI is only crucial for longer pulses. It is reasonable to ignore the recombination loss for pulses shorter than 100 fs. In addition to thermal transport and hydrodynamics, neglecting the threshold density for AI and recombination could also contribute to the disagreements between the numerical and the experimental results for longer pulses.

  10. The instability of markets

    CERN Document Server

    Huberman, B A; Huberman, Bernardo A; Youssefmir, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments in the global liberalization of equity and currency markets, coupled to advances in trading technologies, are making markets increasingly interdependent. This increased fluidity raises questions about the stability of the international financial system. In this paper, we show that as couplings between stable markets grow, the likelihood of instabilities is increased, leading to a loss of general equilibrium as the system becomes increasingly large and diverse.

  11. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  12. Carpal instability nondissociative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Kitay, Alison

    2012-09-01

    Carpal instability nondissociative (CIND) represents a spectrum of conditions characterized by kinematic dysfunction of the proximal carpal row, often associated with a clinical "clunk." CIND is manifested at the midcarpal and/or radiocarpal joints, and it is distinguished from carpal instability dissociative (CID) by the lack of disruption between bones within the same carpal row. There are four major subcategories of CIND: palmar, dorsal, combined, and adaptive. In palmar CIND, instability occurs across the entire proximal carpal row. When nonsurgical management fails, surgical options include arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy, soft-tissue reconstruction, or limited radiocarpal or intercarpal fusions. In dorsal CIND, the capitate subluxates dorsally from its reduced resting position. Dorsal CIND usually responds to nonsurgical management; refractory cases respond to palmar ligament reefing and/or dorsal intercarpal capsulodesis. Combined CIND demonstrates signs of both palmar and dorsal CIND and can be treated with soft-tissue or bony procedures. In adaptive CIND, the volar carpal ligaments are slackened and are less capable of inducing the physiologic shift of the proximal carpal row from flexion into extension as the wrist ulnarly deviates. Treatment of choice is a corrective osteotomy to restore the normal volar tilt of the distal radius.

  13. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  14. Nonlinear tides in a homogeneous rotating planet or star: global modes and elliptical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian J; Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the global modes and instabilities of homogeneous rotating ellipsoidal fluid masses, which are the simplest global models of rotationally and tidally deformed gaseous planets or stars. The tidal flow in a short-period planet may be unstable to the elliptical instability, a hydrodynamic instability that can drive tidal evolution. We perform a global (and local WKB) analysis to study this instability using the elegant formalism of Lebovitz & Lifschitz. We survey the parameter space of global instabilities with harmonic orders $\\ell\\leq 5$, for planets with spins that are purely aligned (prograde) or anti-aligned (retrograde) with their orbits. In general, the instability has a much larger growth rate if the planetary spin and orbit are anti-aligned rather than aligned. We have identified a violent instability for anti-aligned spins outside of the usual frequency range for the elliptical instability (when $\\frac{n}{\\Omega}\\lesssim -1$, where $n$ and $\\Omega$ are the orbital and spin angular freque...

  15. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Strickland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We use quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally-symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. In quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics, a single finite-temperature quasiparticle mass is introduced and fit to the lattice data in order to implement a realistic equation of state. We compare results obtained using the quasiparticle method with the standard method of imposing the equation of state in anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. Using these three methods, we extract the primordial particle spectra, total number of charged particles, and average transverse momentum for various values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s. We find that the three methods agree well for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, eta/s, but differ at large eta/s. We find, in particular, that when using standard viscous hydrodynamics, the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative...

  16. Hydrodynamic Approaches in Relativistic Heavy Ion Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza, Rafael Derradi; Kodama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation with the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to...

  17. Hydrodynamics research of wastewater treatment bioreactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Nan-qi; ZHANG Bing; ZHOU Xue-fei

    2009-01-01

    To optimize the design and improve the performance of wastewater treatment bioreactors, the review concerning the hydrodynamics explored by theoretical equations, process experiments, modeling of the hydrody-namics and flow field measurement is presented. Results of different kinds of experiments show that the hydro-dynamic characteristics can affect sludge characteristics, mass transfer and reactor performance significantly. A-long with the development of theoretical equations, turbulence models including large eddy simulation models and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are widely used at present. Standard and modified k-ε models are the most widely used eddy viscosity turbulence models for simulating flows in bioreactors. Numericalsimulation of hydrodynamics is proved to be efficient for optimizing design and operation. The development of measurement techniques with high accuracy and low intrusion enables the flow filed in the bioreactors to be transparent. Integration of both numerical simulation and experimental measurement can describe the hydrody-namics very well.

  18. Hydrodynamic Nambu Brackets derived by Geometric Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Blender, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A geometric approach to derive the Nambu brackets for ideal two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamics is suggested. The derivation is based on two-forms with vanishing integrals in a periodic domain, and with resulting dynamics constrained by an orthogonality condition. As a result, 2D hydrodynamics with vorticity as dynamic variable emerges as a generic model, with conservation laws which can be interpreted as enstrophy and energy functionals. Generalized forms like surface quasi-geostrophy and fractional Poisson equations for the stream-function are also included as results from the derivation. The formalism is extended to a hydrodynamic system coupled to a second degree of freedom, with the Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection as an example. This system is reformulated in terms of constitutive conservation laws with two additive brackets which represent individual processes: a first representing inviscid 2D hydrodynamics, and a second representing the coupling between hydrodynamics and thermodynamics. The results can b...

  19. Hydrodynamics of evaporating sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Several dynamical stages of the Marangoni convection of an evaporating sessile drop are obtained. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop and the diffusion of vapor in air. The stages are characterized by different number of vortices in the drop and the spatial location of vortices. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a non-monotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size, which is calculated similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. The number of vortices quickly decreases with time, resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortex structure finally evolves into the single convection vortex in the drop, existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  20. Decoherent Histories and Hydrodynamic Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Halliwell, J J

    1998-01-01

    For a system consisting of a large collection of particles, a set of variables that will generally become effectively classical are the local densities (number, momentum, energy). That is, in the context of the decoherent histories approach to quantum theory, it is expected that histories of these variables will be approximately decoherent, and that their probabilites will be strongly peaked about hydrodynamic equations. This possibility is explored for the case of the diffusion of the number density of a dilute concentration of foreign particles in a fluid. It is shown that, for certain physically reasonable initial states, the probabilities for histories of number density are strongly peaked about evolution according to the diffusion equation. Decoherence of these histories is also shown for a class of initial states which includes non-trivial superpositions of number density. Histories of phase space densities are also discussed. The case of histories of number, momentum and energy density for more general...

  1. Integration of quantum hydrodynamical equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyanova, Vera G.; Sanin, Andrey L.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics equations describing the dynamics of quantum fluid are a subject of this report (QFD).These equations can be used to decide the wide class of problem. But there are the calculated difficulties for the equations, which take place for nonlinear hyperbolic systems. In this connection, It is necessary to impose the additional restrictions which assure the existence and unique of solutions. As test sample, we use the free wave packet and study its behavior at the different initial and boundary conditions. The calculations of wave packet propagation cause in numerical algorithm the division. In numerical algorithm at the calculations of wave packet propagation, there arises the problem of division by zero. To overcome this problem we have to sew together discrete numerical and analytical continuous solutions on the boundary. We demonstrate here for the free wave packet that the numerical solution corresponds to the analytical solution.

  2. Nonstandard Gaits in Unsteady Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Michael; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    Marine biology has long inspired the design and engineering of underwater vehicles. The literature examining the kinematics and dynamics of fishes, ranging from undulatory anguilliform swimmers to oscillatory ostraciiform ones, is vast. Past numerical studies of these organisms have principally focused on gaits characterized by sinusoidal pitching and heaving motions. It is conceivable that more sophisticated gaits could perform better in some respects, for example as measured by thrust generation or by cost of transport. This work uses an unsteady boundary-element method to numerically investigate the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of high-Reynolds-number swimmers whose gaits are encoded by Fourier series or by Jacobi elliptic functions. Numerical results are presented with an emphasis on identifying particular wake structures and modes of motion that are associated with optimal swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research through MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  3. Introduction to Magneto-Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Guy

    Magneto-Hydrodynamics (hereafter MHD) describes plasmas on large scales and more generally electrically conducting fluids. This description does not discriminate between the various fluids that constitute the medium. In laboratory, it allows to globally describe a plasma machine, for instance a toroidal nuclear fusion reactor like a Tokamak. In astrophysics it plays an essential role in the description of cosmic objects and their environments, as well as the media, such as the interstellar or the intergalactic medium. A set of phenomena are specific to MHD description. Some of them will be presented in this lecture such as the tension effect, confinement, magnetic diffusivity, magnetic field freezing, Alfvén waves, magneto-sonic waves, reconnection. A celebrated phenomenon of MHD will not be introduced in this brief lecture, namely the dynamo effect.

  4. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2014-05-01

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  5. The role of the magnetorotational instability in the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig, E-mail: kagan@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ < 53°. Nonaxisymmetric MRI modes grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  6. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  7. The hydrodynamics of dolphin drafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihs Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drafting in cetaceans is defined as the transfer of forces between individuals without actual physical contact between them. This behavior has long been surmised to explain how young dolphin calves keep up with their rapidly moving mothers. It has recently been observed that a significant number of calves become permanently separated from their mothers during chases by tuna vessels. A study of the hydrodynamics of drafting, initiated in the hope of understanding the mechanisms causing the separation of mothers and calves during fishing-related activities, is reported here. Results Quantitative results are shown for the forces and moments around a pair of unequally sized dolphin-like slender bodies. These include two major effects. First, the so-called Bernoulli suction, which stems from the fact that the local pressure drops in areas of high speed, results in an attractive force between mother and calf. Second is the displacement effect, in which the motion of the mother causes the water in front to move forwards and radially outwards, and water behind the body to move forwards to replace the animal's mass. Thus, the calf can gain a 'free ride' in the forward-moving areas. Utilizing these effects, the neonate can gain up to 90% of the thrust needed to move alongside the mother at speeds of up to 2.4 m/sec. A comparison with observations of eastern spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris is presented, showing savings of up to 60% in the thrust that calves require if they are to keep up with their mothers. Conclusions A theoretical analysis, backed by observations of free-swimming dolphin schools, indicates that hydrodynamic interactions with mothers play an important role in enabling dolphin calves to keep up with rapidly moving adult school members.

  8. Comparison of two methods of mathematical modeling in hydrodynamic sealing gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutil Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of work is to compare two possible methods of mathematical modeling of hydrodynamic instabilities. This comparison is performed by monitoring the formation and evolution of Taylor vortices in hydrodynamic sealing gap. Sealing gaps are a part of the hydraulic machines with the impeller, such as turbines and pumps, and they have an effect on the volumetric efficiency of these devices. This work presents two examples of sealing gaps. These examples are closed sealing gap and modified sealing gap with expansion chamber. On these two examples are applied procedures of solution contained in CFD software (ANSYS Fluent 14.5. In ANSYS Fluent is two possible basic approaches of solution this task: the moving wall method and the sliding mesh method. The result of work is monitoring the impact of the expansion chamber on the formation of hydrodynamic instabilities in the sealing gap. Another result is comparison of two used methods of mathematical modeling, which shows that both methods can be used for similar tasks.

  9. Energy balance of a laser ablation plume expanding in a background gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The energy balance of a laser ablation plume in an ambient gas for nanosecond pulses has been investigated on the basis of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM), which provides a relatively simple and clear description of the essential hydrodynamics. This approach also leads to an insightful...... description in dimensionless units of how the initial kinetic energy of the plume is dissipated into kinetic and thermal energy of the background gas. Eventually when the plume has stopped, the initial kinetic energy of the plume is converted into thermal energy of the plume and background gas....

  10. Shoulder instability; Schultergelenkinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, J.; Imhof, H. [Abteilung Osteoradiologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limitated range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging. (orig.) [German] Die Schultergelenkinstabilitaet ist haeufig fuer wiederholt auftretende Schmerzen sowie eine eingeschraenkte Beweglichkeit im Glenohumeralgelenk verantwortlich. Sie kann als Folge eines vorangegangenen Traumas, einer generellen Hyperlaxitaet oder infolge wiederholter Mikrotraumen entstehen. Die Differenzierung zwischen traumatischer und atraumatischer Form der Gelenkinstabilitaet erfordert eine sorgfaeltige Anamnese und eine genaue klinische Untersuchung. Die Gelelenklaxitaet als Differenzialdiagnose muss von der echten Instabilitaet unterschieden werden, die Instabilitaet wird dann im Rahmen des klinischen Status nach Grad und Richtung der glenohumeralen Translation unterteilt. Zur Diagnose knoecherner Laesionen werden das konventionelle Roentgen sowie die CT herangezogen. MRT sowie MR-Arthrographie dienen zur Detektion

  11. Superfluid instability of r-modes in "differentially rotating" neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Hogg, M

    2012-01-01

    Superfluid hydrodynamics affects the spin-evolution of mature neutron stars, and may be key to explaining timing irregularities such as pulsar glitches. However, most models for this phenomenon exclude the global instability required to trigger the event. In this paper we discuss a mechanism that may fill this gap. We establish that small scale inertial r-modes become unstable in a superfluid neutron star that exhibits a rotational lag, expected to build up due to vortex pinning as the star spins down. Somewhat counterintuitively, this instability arises due to the (under normal circumstances dissipative) vortex-mediated mutual friction. We explore the nature of the superfluid instability for a simple incompressible model, allowing for entrainment coupling between the two fluid components. Our results recover a previously discussed dynamical instability in systems where the two components are strongly coupled. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that the system is secularly unstable (with a growth ...

  12. Impact of the gravity of a Schwarzschild black hole upon the Rossby wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casse, F.; Varniere, P.; Meliani, Z.

    2017-01-01

    In an early work, the Rossby wave instability was proposed to explain the variability thought to originate in the close vicinity of black holes but this was done in the pseudo-Newtonian approach. Here we present the first general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics simulations of this instability not only proving its theorized existence in a full GR environment but also studying the effect of the strong gravity on the instability. To that end, we performed a set of simulations increasingly closer to the black hole with our new GR version of the MPI-AMRVAC code. This allows us to study the minute changes in the behaviour of the instability. We found that a pseudo-Newtonian approach gives adequate results provided that the time-shifting induced by the black hole gravity is taken into account. Hence, to view the disc as a distant observer would, a full GR ray-tracing post-treatment of the simulations is a must.

  13. Resistive double-diffusive instability in the dead-zones of protostellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Latter, Henrik N; Balbus, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    We outline a novel linear instability that may arise in the dead-zones of protostellar disks, and possibly the fluid interiors of planets and protoplanets. In essence it is an axisymmetric buoyancy instability, but one that would not be present in a purely hydrodynamical gas. The necessary ingredients for growth include a negative radial entropy gradient (of any magnitude), weak magnetic fields, and efficient resistive diffusion (in comparison with thermal diffusion). The character of the instability is local, axisymmetric, and double-diffusive, and it attacks lengths much shorter than the resistive scale. Like the axisymmetric convective instability, it draws its energy from the negative radial entropy gradient; but by utilising the diffusing magnetic field, it can negate the stabilising influence of rotation. Its nonlinear saturated state, while not transporting appreciable angular momentum, could drive radial and vertical mixing, which may influence the temperature structure of the disk, dust dynamics and,...

  14. Electrostatic two-stream instability in Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Mohammadnejad, M.; Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper the electrostatic two-stream instability is investigated for a large range of plasma number-density using the quantum hydrodynamic model by incorporating the relativistic degeneracy, electron-exchange, quantum diffraction and strong parallel quantizing magnetic field effects. It is found that the electron diffraction effect significantly alters the instability growth rate in a wide range of plasma number density. Two cases of classical and quantum Landau quantization limits are compared and the parametric instability condition is closely inspected. It is remarked that for a given streaming speed the instability is bounded by an upper plasma number-density limit. It is also shown that for a given stream speed there is a maximal growth rate corresponding to specific plasma number-density and perturbation wavelength. Current study can help in better understanding of electron-beam plasma interactions and energy exchange for a wide area of number densities ranging from solid density, inertial confined plasmas, big planetary cores and compact stars. It may also be useful in understanding of electrostatic beam-plasma interactions and origin of large magnitude sustainable electrical currents in super-intense plasmas with critically high magnetic fields such as, pulsars, white dwarf interiors and neutron star crusts.

  15. Three-Dimensional Dynamical Instabilities in Galactic Ionization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Norman, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Ionization front instabilities have long been of interest for their suspected role in a variety of phenomena in the Galaxy, from the formation of bright rims and "elephant trunks" in nebulae to triggered star formation in molecular clouds. Numerical treatments of these instabilities have historically been limited in both dimensionality and input physics, leaving important questions about their true evolution unanswered. We present the first three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical calculations of both R-type (rarefied) and D-type (dense) ionization front instabilities in Galactic environments (i.e., solar-metallicity gas). Consistent with linear stability analyses of planar D-type fronts, our models exhibit many short-wavelength perturbations that grow at early times and later evolve into fewer large-wavelength structures. The simulations demonstrate that both self-consistent radiative transfer and three-dimensional flow introduce significant morphological differences to unstable modes when compared to earlier two-dimensional approximate models. We find that the amplitude of the instabilities in the nonlinear regime is primarily determined by the efficiency of cooling within the shocked neutral shell. Strong radiative cooling leads to long, extended structures with pronounced clumping, while weaker cooling leads to saturated modes that devolve into turbulent flows. These results suggest that expanding H II regions may either promote or provide turbulent support against the formation of later generations of stars, with potential consequences for star formation rates in the Galaxy today.

  16. One-Armed Spiral Instability in a Model Protostar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Pickett, B. K.; Durisen, R. H.

    1995-05-01

    Analytic and numerical work by several research groups over the last five years have shown that one-armed spiral instabilities (e.g. SLING) may play a crucial role in the evolution of protostars and protostellar disks. One-armed spirals have been shown to be effective at transporting angular momentum and mass and producing modest fragmentation. We have recently conducted a numerical survey of global nonaxisymmetric instabilities in self-gravitating, rapidly rotating protostar models (Pickett et al. 1995, ApJ., submitted). One interesting result is that the protostar models which correspond to equilibrium objects formed from the dynamical collapse of centrally condensed molecular clouds are quite unstable to one-armed spiral disturbances. These one-armed instabilities occur under conditions not anticipated by the work of others. Although significant mass and angular momentum transport occurs, the protostar does not fragment. This poster presents a detailed investigation of the dramatic one-armed mode detected in Pickett et al. (1995). We use a variety of initial conditions and a second-order 3D hydrodynamics code to probe the nature of the instability in three dimensions. The relevance of this work to the formation of binaries and planetary systems will be discussed. This work is supported by NASA grant NAGW-3399.

  17. Irradiation Instability at the Inner Edges of Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    An instability can potentially operate in highly irradiated disks where the disk sharply transitions from being radially transparent to opaque (the 'transition region'). Such conditions may exist at the inner edges of transitional disks around T Tauri stars and accretion disks around AGNs. We derive the criterion for this instability, which we term the 'irradiation instability', or IRI. We also present the linear growth rate as a function of beta, the ratio between radiation force and gravity, and c_s, the sound speed of the disk, obtained using two methods: a semi-analytic analysis of the linearized equations and a numerical simulation using the GPU-accelerated hydrodynamical code PEnGUIn. In particular, we find that IRI occurs at beta~0.1 if the transition region extends as wide as ~0.05r, and at higher beta values if it is wider. Furthermore, in the nonlinear evolution of the instability, disks with a large beta and small c_s exhibit 'clumping': extreme local surface density enhancements, reaching a few te...

  18. Progress in theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2009-04-01

    A review is given of the basic results of modern theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma. Both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations are considered. Main attention is given to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), discovered earlier by Velikhov, and the rotational-convective instability (RCI) discussed in a number of papers of astrophysical trend. For qualitative explanation of the results, a local approach is used which, with equilibrium plasma pressure gradient and/or nonsymmetry of perturbations, requires operation with nonlocal azimuthal perturbed magnetic field. The gravity and effects of pressure anisotropy are taken into account. In addition to hydrodynamic, the electrodynamic approach is formulated. The drift effects are considered. Analyzed are the ideal instabilities and those depending on the dissipative effects: viscosity and heat conductivity. The MRI is considered at presence of the charged dust particles. Besides the local approach, the nonlocal approach is formulated for the plasma model with a steplike profile of angular rotation frequency. Alongside with perturbations which frequencies are small compared to the ion cyclotron frequency, the perturbations are analyzed with frequencies larger than the ion cyclotron frequency. The latter corresponds to the Hall regime and subregime of nonmagnetized plasma.

  19. Transient Ablation Regime in Circuit Breakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandre MARTIN; Jean-Yves TREPANIER; Marcelo REGGIO; GUO Xue-yan

    2007-01-01

    Nozzle wall ablation caused by high temperature electric arcs is studied in the context of high voltage SF6 circuit breakers.The simplified ablation model used in litterature has been updated to take into account the unsteady state of ablation.Ablation rate and velocity are now calculated by a kinetic model using two layers of transition,between the bulk plasma and the ablating wall.The first layer (Knudsen layer),right by the wall,is a kinetic layer of a few mean-free path of thickness.The second layer is collision dominated and makes the transition between the kinetic layer and the plasma bulk.With this new coupled algorithm,it is now possible to calculate the temperature distribution inside the wall,as well as more accurate ablation rates.

  20. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length plasmas for two-plasmon-decay planar-target experiments on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shaw, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Bates, J. W.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because it generates high-energy electrons that can preheat the target, thereby reducing target performance. Hydrodynamic simulations to design a new experimental platform to investigate TPD and other laser-plasma instabilities relevant to direct-drive-ignition implosions at the National Ignition Facility are presented. The proposed experiments utilize planar plastic targets with an embedded Mo layer to characterize generation of hot electrons through Mo Kα fluorescence and hard x-ray emission. Different laser-irradiation geometries approximate conditions near both the equator and the pole of a polar-direct-drive implosion.

  1. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  2. Neocuproine Ablates Melanocytes in Adult Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly-Pol, Thomas; Johnson, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    The simplest regeneration experiments involve the ablation of a single cell type. While methods exist to ablate the melanocytes of the larval zebrafish,1,2 no convenient method exists to ablate melanocytes in adult zebrafish. Here, we show that the copper chelator neocuproine (NCP) causes fragmentation and disappearance of melanin in adult zebrafish melanocytes. Adult melanocytes expressing eGFP under the control of a melanocyte-specific promoter also lose eGFP fluorescence in the presence of...

  3. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  4. Aromatic Thermosetting Copolyesters for Ablative TPS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Better performing ablative thermal protection systems than currently available are needed to satisfy requirements of the most severe crew exploration vehicles, such...

  5. The atrial fibrillation ablation pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib...

  6. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablat...

  7. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  8. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  9. Dust-lower-hybrid instability with fluctuating charge in quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, M.; Ali, M.; Rasheed, A.; Zubia, K.; Salimullah, M.

    2015-03-01

    The instability of Dust-Lower-Hybrid (DLH) wave is examined in detail in the uniform dusty magnetoplasmas. The time dependent charging effects on dust particles around its equilibrium charge Qd0 are taken into account based on Orbit-Limited Probe theory. The quantum characteristics of the system like Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure are dealt using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. The external magnetic field and size of the dust particles have new physical effects over the dissipative instability of DLH wave in the quantum plasma regime.

  10. Relativistic effects on the modulational instability of electron plasma waves in quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudev Ghosh; Swarniv Chandra; Sailendra Nath Paul

    2012-05-01

    Relativistic effects on the linear and nonlinear properties of electron plasma waves are investigated using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model for a twocomponent electron–ion dense quantum plasma. Using standard perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) containing both relativistic and quantum effects has been derived. This equation has been used to discuss the modulational instability of the wave. Through numerical calculations it is shown that relativistic effects significantly change the linear dispersion character of the wave. Unlike quantum effects, relativistic effects are shown to reduce the instability growth rate of electron plasma waves.

  11. Investigation of the maximum amplitude increase from the Benjamin-Feir instability

    CERN Document Server

    Karjanto, N; Peterson, P

    2011-01-01

    The Nonlinear Schr\\"odinger (NLS) equation is used to model surface waves in wave tanks of hydrodynamic laboratories. Analysis of the linearized NLS equation shows that its harmonic solutions with a small amplitude modulation have a tendency to grow exponentially due to the so-called Benjamin-Feir instability. To investigate this growth in detail, we relate the linearized solution of the NLS equation to a fully nonlinear, exact solution, called soliton on finite background. As a result, we find that in the range of instability the maximum amplitude increase is finite and can be at most three times the initial amplitude.

  12. Whipping Instability of Electrodriven Jets and Production of Micro- and Nano-fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrikh, Sergey; Yu, Jian; Brenner, Michael; Rutledge, Gregory

    2003-03-01

    Electrodriven jets of polymeric fluids undergo a set of hydrodynamic instabilities causing either breaking of the jet into the droplets (electrospraying) or dramatic thinning of the jet and resulting in production of superfine fibers with diameters ranging form 10nm to 10micron (electrospinning). We present here a theoretical analysis of the whipping instability responsible for the thinning of the jet. The model tackles non-linear aspects or whipping behavior and predicts several important features of unstable electrodriven jet such as the final diameter. We find the model predictions to agree well with our experimental data.

  13. Dust-lower-hybrid instability with fluctuating charge in quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ali, M. [Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, NUST, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Zubia, K. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-03-15

    The instability of Dust-Lower-Hybrid (DLH) wave is examined in detail in the uniform dusty magnetoplasmas. The time dependent charging effects on dust particles around its equilibrium charge Q{sub d0} are taken into account based on Orbit-Limited Probe theory. The quantum characteristics of the system like Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure are dealt using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. The external magnetic field and size of the dust particles have new physical effects over the dissipative instability of DLH wave in the quantum plasma regime.

  14. Stick-slip instability of soft contact in the presence of surfactant films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaud, Anne

    2003-11-01

    Stick-slip instability in soft contact is a common problem in lubricating soft bearings. Although it is a much less explored area of application, it is also important in tactile perception when surfactants are rinsed from skin. Here, we designed a "wet" tribometer in a rotating geometry where the friction force between a ball and a soft flat substrate was monitored when it was totally submerged in a surfactant solution. The onset of the stick-slip instability was studied as a function of the surfactant adsorption and the hydrodynamic conditions (speed, viscosity, load). The results were analyzed by using an analogy with deformable roll coating flows.

  15. Fabrication of Dual-mode CH Planar Perturbation Target for Laser Ablative R-T Instability Experimental Study%激光烧蚀 R-T 不稳定性研究中的双模式 CH 平面调制靶制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐俊; 谢志勇; 杜艾; 叶君建; 张志华; 沈军; 周斌

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the difference of the nonlinear evolution of Rayleigh‐Taylor instability under the same driven condition while the initial perturbation amplitude was different .The aluminum alloy templates with different perturbation amplitudes at two sides of its surface were fabricated via single‐point diamond turning technology .Then the perturbation pattern was transferred from the template to the CH film via spin coat‐ing process ,and the dual‐mode CH planar perturbation target was prepared .Parameters of the aluminum alloy template and the CH target ,such as the perturbation period and perturbation amplitude were characterized by QC‐5000 tool microscope ,alpha‐step 500 surface profiler and NT1100 white light interferometer .Results show that both the tem‐plate and the CH planar perturbation target have different perturbation patterns at two sides of their surfaces .The perturbation periods at two sides are both 54 μm ,while the perturbation amplitude is 4.8 μm and 1.9 μm at the left and right sides ,respectively . The equilibrium position of the perturbation pattern at two sides is in the same horizon‐tal plane .Parameters of the template and the target are consistent with the designed value ,the perturbation pattern is transferred from the aluminum alloy template to the CH film successfully ,and the dual‐mode CH planar perturbation target which meets the requirements of the Rayleigh‐Taylor instability experiment was fabricated .%为研究同一次激光驱动下初始扰动幅值不同时瑞利‐泰勒(Rayleigh‐Taylor ,R‐T )不稳定性非线性演化的差别,采用单点金刚石车削技术,以太空铝合金为材料加工了两侧具有不同扰动幅度的模板。然后利用旋转涂覆工艺将模板表面的扰动图形转移至CH薄膜表面,制得了双模式CH平面调制靶。通过QC‐5000型光学显微镜、alpha‐step 500型台阶仪、NT1100型白光干涉仪等对铝合金模板及CH平面调

  16. A Displayer of Stellar Hydrodynamics Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, José Antonio Escartín; Senz, Domingo García

    The graphics display tool that we present here was originally developed to meet the needs of the Astronomy and Astrophysics group at the UPC (GAA). At present, it is used to display the plots obtained from hydrodynamic simulations using the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) method. It is, however, a generic program that can be used for other multidimensional hydrodynamic methods. The application combines the most widely used features of other programs (most of them commercial) such as GnuPlot, Surfer, Grapher, IDL, Voxler, etc.

  17. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzetta, E. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  18. Quantum ideal hydrodynamics on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, Tommy

    2013-01-01

    After discussing the problem of defining the hydrodynamic limit from microscopic scales, we give an introduction to ideal hydrodynamics in the Lagrange picture, and show that it can be viewed as a field theory, which can be quantized using the usual Feynman sum-over-paths prescription. We then argue that this picture can be connected to the usually neglected thermal microscopic scale in the hydrodynamic expansion. After showing that this expansion is generally non-perturbative, we show how the lattice can be used to understand the impact quantum and thermal fluctuations can have on the fluid behavior.

  19. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  20. Wall ablation of heated compound-materials into non-equilibrium discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Kong, Linghan; Geng, Jinyue; Wei, Fuzhi; Xia, Guangqing

    2017-02-01

    The discharge properties of the plasma bulk flow near the surface of heated compound-materials strongly affects the kinetic layer parameters modeled and manifested in the Knudsen layer. This paper extends the widely used two-layer kinetic ablation model to the ablation controlled non-equilibrium discharge due to the fact that the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation is often violated as a result of the interaction between the plasma and solid walls. Modifications to the governing set of equations, to account for this effect, are derived and presented by assuming that the temperature of the electrons deviates from that of the heavy particles. The ablation characteristics of one typical material, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are calculated with this improved model. The internal degrees of freedom as well as the average particle mass and specific heat ratio of the polyatomic vapor, which strongly depends on the temperature, pressure and plasma non-equilibrium degree and plays a crucial role in the accurate determination of the ablation behavior by this model, are also taken into account. Our assessment showed the significance of including such modifications related to the non-equilibrium effect in the study of vaporization of heated compound materials in ablation controlled arcs. Additionally, a two-temperature magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model accounting for the thermal non-equilibrium occurring near the wall surface is developed and applied into an ablation-dominated discharge for an electro-thermal chemical launch device. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the non-equilibrium plasma and the solid propellant surface. Both the mass exchange process caused by the wall ablation and plasma species deposition as well as the associated momentum and energy exchange processes are taken into account. A detailed comparison of the results of the non-equilibrium model with those of an equilibrium model is presented. The non-equilibrium results

  1. Modulational instability of nematic phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Mithun; K Porsezian

    2014-02-01

    We numerically observe the effect of homogeneous magnetic field on the modulationally stable case of polar phase in = 2 spinor Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Also we investigate the modulational instability of uniaxial and biaxial (BN) states of polar phase. Our observations show that the magnetic field triggers the modulational instability and demonstrate that irrespective of the magnetic field effect the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases show modulational instability.

  2. Political Instability and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Swagel, Phillip; Roubini, Nouriel; Ozler, Sule; Alesina, Alberto

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between political instability and per capita GDP growth in a sample of 113 countries for the period 1950-1982. We define ?political instability? as the propensity of a government collapse, and we estimate a model in which political instability and economic growth are jointly determined. The main result of this paper is that in countries and time periods with a high propensity of government collapse, growth is significantly lower than otherwise. This ef...

  3. Weibel instability with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bing [Strong-field and Ultrafast Photonics Lab, Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Weibel instability in plasma, where the ion distribution is isotropic and the electron component of the plasma possesses the anisotropic temperature distribution, is investigated based on the kinetic theory in context of nonextensive statistics mechanics. The instability growth rate is shown to be dependent on the nonextensive parameters of both electron and ion, and in the extensive limit, the result in Maxwellian distribution plasma is recovered. The instability growth rate is found to be enhanced as the nonextensive parameter of electron increases.

  4. Buoyancy-driven instabilities of acid-base fronts: the case of a color indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolfo, L. A.; Kuster, S.; Trevelyan, P. M. J.; El Hasi, C.; Zalts, A.; Almarcha, C.; D'Onofrio, A.; de Wit, A.

    2011-11-01

    Buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities of acid-base fronts are studied both experimentally and theoretically in the case where an aqueous solution of a strong acid is put above a denser aqueous solution of a color indicator in the gravity field. The neutralization reaction between the acid and the color indicator as well as their differential diffusion modifies the initially stable density profile in the system and can trigger convective motion both above and below the initial contact line. The type of patterns observed as well as their wavelength and the speed of the reaction front are shown to depend on the value of the initial concentrations of the acid and of the color indicator and on their ratio. A reaction-diffusion model explains how the hydrodynamic instability scenarios change when the concentration of the reactants are varied.

  5. On the consistency of Reynolds stress turbulence closures with hydrodynamic stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, Ridha; Blaisdell, Gregory A.

    1995-01-01

    The consistency of second-order closure models with results from hydrodynamic stability theory is analyzed for the simplified case of homogeneous turbulence. In a recent study, Speziale, Gatski, and MacGiolla Mhuiris showed that second-order closures are capable of yielding results that are consistent with hydrodynamic stability theory for the case of homogeneous shear flow in a rotating frame. It is demonstrated in this paper that this success is due to the fact that the stability boundaries for rotating homogeneous shear flow are not dependent on the details of the spatial structure of the disturbances. For those instances where they are -- such as in the case of elliptical flows where the instability mechanism is more subtle -- the results are not so favorable. The origins and extent of this modeling problem are examined in detail along with a possible resolution based on rapid distortion theory (RDT) and its implications for turbulence modeling.

  6. On hydrodynamic shear turbulence in Keplerian disks via transient growth to bypass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Chagelishvili, G D; Tevzadze, A G; Lominadze, J G

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of hydrodynamic shear turbulence in non-magnetized Keplerian disks. We wish to draw attention to a route to hydrodynamic turbulence which seems to be little known by the astrophysical community, but which has been intensively discussed among fluid dynamicists during the past decade. In this so-called `bypass' concept for the onset of turbulence, perturbations undergo a transient growth, and they may reach an amplitude that is sufficiently large to allow positive feedback through nonlinear interactions. This transient growth is linear in nature, and thus it differs in principle from the well-known nonlinear instability. We describe the type of perturbations that according to this process are the most likely to lead to turbulence, namely non-axisymmetric vortex mode perturbations in the two dimensional limit. We show that the apparently inhibiting action of the Coriolis force on the dynamics of such vortical perturbations is substantially diminished due to the pressure perturba...

  7. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation after an unsuccessful surgical ablation and biological prosthetic mitral valve replacement: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E. Mamchur

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Catheter ablation is an effective method for AF treatment following an ineffective surgical RF ablation procedure and biological prosthetic MV replacement. The use of bioprosthetic MVs allows for performing safe catheter ablation without subsequent prosthetic dysfunction.

  8. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Wickham, Logan; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau-Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids.

  9. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  10. [Aspirin suppresses microsatellite instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinger, S; Dietmaier, W; Beyser, K; Bocker, T; Hofstädter, F; Fishel, R; Rüschoff, J

    1999-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exhibit cancer preventive effects and have been shown to induce regression of adenomas in FAP patients. In order to elucidate the probable underlying mechanism, the effect of NSAIDs on mismatch repair related microsatellite instability was investigated. Six colorectal cancer cell lines all but one deficient for human mismatch repair (MMR) genes were examined for microsatellite instability (MSI) prior and after treatment with Aspirin or Sulindac. For rapid in vitro analysis of MSI a microcloning assay was developed by combining Laser microdissection and random (PEP-) PCR prior to specific MSI-PCR. Effects of NSAIDs on cell cycle and apoptosis were systematically investigated by using flow cytometry and cell-sorting. MSI frequency in cells deficient of MMR genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6) was markedly reduced after long-term (> 10 weeks) NSAID treatment. This effect was reversible, time- and concentration dependent. However, in the hPMS2 deficient endometrial cancer cell line (HEC-1-A) the MSI phenotype kept unchanged. According to cell sorting, non-apoptotic cells were stable and apoptotic cells were unstable. These results suggest that aspirin/sulindac induces a genetic selection for microsatellite stability in a subset of MMR-deficient cells and may thus provide an effective prophylactic therapy for HNPCC related colorectal carcinomas.

  11. Instability of enclosed horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, Bernard S

    2013-01-01

    We study the classical massless scalar wave equation on the region of 1+1-dimensional Minkowski space between the two branches of the hyperbola $x^2-t^2=1$ with vanishing boundary conditions on it. We point out that there are initially finite-energy initially, say, right-going waves for which the stress-energy tensor becomes singular on the null-line $t+x=0$. We also construct the quantum theory of this system and show that, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state, there are coherent states built on this for which there is a similar singularity in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in 1+3-dimensional situations with 'enclosed horizons' such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a stationary box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be a similar singularity at the horizon and that would signal an instability when matter perturbations and/or gravity are switched on. Such an instability ...

  12. Libration driven multipolar instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Herreman, Wietze

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that...

  13. Subjeans Condensations due to a Thermal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, R.; Valio, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Las observaciones recientes muestran que las nubes moleculares no son homogeneas, sino que tienen condensaciones. Se observa que estas condensaciones estan libres gravitacionalmente. C6mo se forman estas condensaciones? Sugerimos explicar estas conden sac jones como debidas a que la inestabilidad termica ayuda a la gravedad. Se estudi6 una funci5n de enfriamiento por gramo de la forma general A p T , en donde p y T son la densidad y la temperatura. Estamos interesados en el valor maximo de para la cual el colapso ocurre. Se estudiaron varios mode- los. Nuestros resultados indican que los valores de comparables con aquellos sugeridos por la literatura (1 < son suficientes para provocar el colapso de masas inferiores a la masa de Jeans por medio de inestabilidad termica, ayudada por gravedad y asi se forman las condensaciones libres gravitacionalmente. ABSTRACT: Recent observations show that molecular clouds are not homogeneous, but clumpy. Some clumps are observed to be gravitationally unbound. How did these clumps then form? We suggest explaining these condensation as due to thermal instability aiding gravit y The cooling function per gram studied is of the general form A p T,where pand T are the density and temperature, respectively. We are interested in the maximum value of for which collapse still occurs. Various models are studied. Our results indicate that values comparable to those suggested in the literature (1 < %< 2) are sufficient to trigger the collapse of subjeans masses by thermal instability, when aided by gravity, and form the observed gravitationally unbound clumps. Keq o : HYDRODYNAMICS - INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

  14. Hydrodynamically driven colloidal assembly in dip coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Morris, Jeffrey F; Stone, Howard A

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca(2/3)/sqrt[Bo] particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  15. Adiabatic hydrodynamics: The eightfold way to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Haehl, Felix M; Rangamani, Mukund

    2015-01-01

    We provide a complete solution to hydrodynamic transport at all orders in the gradient expansion compatible with the second law constraint. The key new ingredient we introduce is the notion of adiabaticity, which allows us to take hydrodynamics off-shell. Adiabatic fluids are such that off-shell dynamics of the fluid compensates for entropy production. The space of adiabatic fluids is quite rich, and admits a decomposition into seven distinct classes. Together with the dissipative class this establishes the eightfold way of hydrodynamic transport. Furthermore, recent results guarantee that dissipative terms beyond leading order in the gradient expansion are agnostic of the second law. While this completes a transport taxonomy, we go on to argue for a new symmetry principle, an Abelian gauge invariance that guarantees adiabaticity in hydrodynamics. We suggest that this symmetry is the macroscopic manifestation of the microscopic KMS invariance. We demonstrate its utility by explicitly constructing effective ac...

  16. Radiofrequency and microwave tumor ablation in patients with implanted cardiac devices: Is it safe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skonieczki, Brendan D., E-mail: bskonieczki@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); Wells, Catherine, E-mail: cwells1@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wasser, Elliot J., E-mail: ewasser@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); Dupuy, Damian E., E-mail: ddupuy@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: To identify malfunction of implanted cardiac devices during or after thermal ablation of tumors in lung, kidney, liver or bone, using radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) energy. Materials and methods: After providing written consent, 19 patients (15 men and 4 women; mean age 78 years) with pacemakers or pacemaker/defibrillators underwent 22 CT image-guided percutaneous RF or MW ablation of a variety of tumors. Before and after each procedure, cardiac devices were interrogated and reprogrammed by a trained cardiac electrophysiology fellow. Possible pacer malfunctions included abnormalities on electrocardiographic (EKG) monitoring and alterations in device settings. Our institutional review board approved this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study. Informed consent for participation in this retrospective study was deemed unnecessary by our review board. Results: During 20 of 22 sessions, no abnormalities were identified in continuous, EKG tracings or pacemaker functions. However, in two sessions significant changes, occurred in pacemaker parameters: inhibition of pacing during RF application in one, session and resetting of mode by RF energy in another session. These changes did not, result in hemodynamic instability of either patient. MW ablation was not associated with, any malfunction. In all 22 sessions, pacemakers were undamaged and successfully reset to original parameters. Conclusion: RF or MW ablation of tumors in liver, kidney, bone and lung can be performed safely in patients with permanent intra-cardiac devices, but careful planning between radiology and cardiology is essential to avoid adverse outcomes.

  17. Nonlinear tides in a homogeneous rotating planet or star: global simulations of the elliptical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian J

    2016-01-01

    I present results from the first global hydrodynamical simulations of the elliptical instability in a tidally deformed gaseous planet (or star) with a free surface. The elliptical instability is potentially important for tidal evolution of the shortest-period hot Jupiters. I model the planet as a spin-orbit aligned or anti-aligned, and non-synchronously rotating, tidally deformed, homogeneous fluid body. A companion paper presented an analysis of the global modes and instabilities of such a planet. Here I focus on the nonlinear evolution of the elliptical instability. This is observed to produce bursts of turbulence that drive the planet towards synchronism with its orbit in an erratic manner. If the planetary spin is initially anti-aligned, the elliptical instability also drives spin-orbit alignment on a similar timescale as the spin synchronisation. The instability generates differential rotation inside the planet in the form of zonal flows, which play an important role in the saturation of the instability,...

  18. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  19. Split Stream Flow Past a Blunt Trailing Edge with Application to Combustion Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    woven cotton cheesecloth, a slightly denser muslin cheesecloth, and polyester filter felt. To vary the velocity ratio, honeycomb, mesh, and cloth...good characterization of hydrodynamic instabilities for the case of non -reacting flows is the first step to understand how combustion and heat...properties of water at room temperature and the average velocity of the two streams. The shedding frequency was non -dimensionalized using a Strouhal number

  20. Gravitational instability of planetary gaps and its effect on orbital migration

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Gap formation by giant planets in self-gravitating disks may lead to a gravitational edge instability (GEI). We demonstrate this GEI with global 3D and 2D self-gravitating disk-planet simulations using the ZEUS, PLUTO and FARGO hydrodynamic codes. High resolution 2D simulations show that an unstable outer gap edge can lead to outwards orbital migration. Our results have important implications for theories of giant planet formation in massive disks.