WorldWideScience

Sample records for ablative heat shield

  1. X-ray Micro-Tomography of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Francesco; Ferguson, Joseph; Borner, Arnaud; Mansour, Nagi N.; Barnard, Harold S.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is a non-destructive characterization technique that allows imaging of materials structures with voxel sizes in the micrometer range. This level of resolution makes the technique very attractive for imaging porous ablators used in hypersonic entry systems. Besides providing a high fidelity description of the material architecture, micro-tomography enables computations of bulk material properties and simulations of micro-scale phenomena. This presentation provides an overview of a collaborative effort between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, aimed at developing micro-tomography experiments and simulations for porous ablative materials. Measurements are carried using x-rays from the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab on different classes of ablative materials used in NASA entry systems. Challenges, strengths and limitations of the technique for imaging materials such as lightweight carbon-phenolic systems and woven textiles are discussed. Computational tools developed to perform numerical simulations based on micro-tomography are described. These enable computations of material properties such as permeability, thermal and radiative conductivity, tortuosity and other parameters that are used in ablator response models. Finally, we present the design of environmental cells that enable imaging materials under simulated operational conditions, such as high temperature, mechanical loads and oxidizing atmospheres.Keywords: Micro-tomography, Porous media, Ablation

  2. Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is performing preliminary development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure (HOST) heat shield for planetary entry. Results of this development will...

  3. Revised neutral gas shielding model for pellet ablation - combined neutral and plasma shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Schuresko, D.D.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ablation and penetration of pellets in early ORMAK and ISX-A experiments were reliably predicted by the neutral gas shielding model of Milora and Foster. These experiments demonstrated that the principle components of the model - a self-generated shield which reduces the heat flux at the plasma surface - were correct. In more recent experiments with higher temperature plasmas, this model consistently predicts greater penetration than observed in the experiments. Upgarding known limitations of the original model brings the predicted and observed penetration values into agreement. These improvements include: (1) treating the incident electrons as having distribution in energy rather than being monoenergetic; (2) including the shielding effects of cold, dense plasma extending along the magnetic field outside the neutral shield; and (3) modifying the finite plasma, self-limiting incident heat flux so that it represents a collisionless plasma limit rather than a collisional limit. Comparisons are made between the models for a selection of ISX-B Alcator-C, and TFTR shots. The net effect of the changes in the model is an increase in pellet ablation rates and decrease in penetration for current and future experiments

  4. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  5. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  6. Highly heat removing radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Norio; Hozumi, Masahiro.

    1990-01-01

    Organic materials, inorganic materials or metals having excellent radiation shielding performance are impregnated into expanded metal materials, such as Al, Cu or Mg, having high heat conductivity. Further, the porosity of the expanded metals and combination of the expanded metals and the materials to be impregnated are changed depending on the purpose. Further, a plurality of shielding materials are impregnated into the expanded metal of the same kind, to constitute shielding materials. In such shielding materials, impregnated materials provide shielding performance against radiation rays such as neutrons and gamma rays, the expanded metals provide heat removing performance respectively and they act as shielding materials having heat removing performance as a whole. Accordingly, problems of non-informity and discontinuity in the prior art can be dissolved be provide materials having flexibility in view of fabrication work. (T.M.)

  7. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L. Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, D.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Poor definition of the heating profiles that occur during normal operation of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas has complicated the mechanical design of ICRF system components. This paper reports that at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Faraday shield analysis is being used in defining rf heating profiles. In recent numerical analyses of proposed hardware for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) and DIII-D, rf magnetic fields at Faraday shield surfaces were calculated, providing realistic predictions of the induced skin currents flowing on the shield elements and the resulting dissipated power profile. Detailed measurements on mock-ups of the Faraday shields for DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirmed the predicted magnetic field distributions. A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the DIII-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed

  8. Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C)

  9. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Orion Heat Shield Manufacturing Producibility Improvements for the EM-1 Flight Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, William J.; Stewart, Michael; Harris, Richard F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes how the ORION program is incorporating improvements in the heat shield design and manufacturing processes reducing programmatic risk and ensuring crew safety in support of NASA's Exploration missions. The approach for the EFT-1 heat shield utilized a low risk Apollo heritage design and manufacturing process using an Avcoat TPS ablator with a honeycomb substrate to provide a one piece heat shield to meet the mission re-entry heating environments. The EM-1 mission will have additional flight systems installed to fly to the moon and return to Earth. Heat shield design and producibility improvements have been incorporated in the EM-1 vehicle to meet deep space mission requirements. The design continues to use the Avcoat material, but in a block configuration to enable improvements in consistant and repeatable application processes using tile bonding experience developed on the Space Shuttle Transportation System Program.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  12. Heat transfer pipe shielding device for heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Jun.

    1991-01-01

    The front face and the rear face of a frame that surrounds the circumference of the water chamber body of a multi-tube heat exchanger are covered by a rotational shielding plate. A slit is radially formed to the shielding plate for the insertion of a probe or cleaner to the heat transfer pipe and a deflector is disposed on the side opposite to the slit. The end of the heat transfer pipe to be inspected is exposed to the outer side by way of the slit by the rotation of the shielding plate, and the probe or cleaner is inserted in the heat transfer pipe to conduct an eddy current injury monitoring test or cleaning. The inside of the water chamber and the heat transfer pipe is exhausted by a ventilation nozzle disposed to the frame. Accordingly, a shielding effect upon inspection and cleaning can be obtained and, in addition, inspection and exhaustion at the cleaning position can be conducted easily. Since the operation for attachment and detachment is easy, the effect of reducing radiation dose per unit can be obtained by the shortening of the operation time. (N.H.)

  13. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  15. Effect of Nanoclay on Mechanical Properties and Ablation Behavior of a Nitrile-Based Heat Insulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Arabgol

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal insulation of rocket motor chamber is one of the most important functions of elastomeric ablative material. Combustion of solid rocket motor propellant produces turbulent media containing gases with a velocity more than 1000 m/s, temperature and pressure more than 3000°C and 10 MPa, respectively,which destroys all metallic alloys. Elastomeric nanocomposite heat insulators are more attractive subjects in comparison to their non-elastomeric counterparts, due to their excellent thermal stresses and larger deformation bearing capacity. Nitrile rubber with high thermal properties is a proper candidate in such applications. Development in ablation performance of these heat shields is considered as an important challenge nowadays. A few works have been recently carried out using organoclay to enhancethe ablation and mechanical properties of heat insulators. In this work, an elastomeric heat insulator with superior ablative and mechanical properties was presented using nanotechnology. The results showed that an elastomeric nanocomposite heat insulator containing 15 wt% organoclay exhibits superior characteristics compared to its composite counterpart such as: 46% more tensile strength, 60% more elongationat-break, 1.7 times higher modulus (at 100% strain, 62% higher “insulating index number” and 36% lower mass ablation and erosion rates under a standard test with a heat flux of 2500 kW/m2 for 15 s.

  16. Chemothermal Therapy for Localized Heating and Ablation of Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Shan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemothermal therapy is a new hyperthermia treatment on tumor using heat released from exothermic chemical reaction between the injected reactants and the diseased tissues. With the highly minimally invasive feature and localized heating performance, this method is expected to overcome the ubiquitous shortcomings encountered by many existing hyperthermia approaches in ablating irregular tumor. This review provides a relatively comprehensive review on the latest advancements and state of the art in chemothermal therapy. The basic principles and features of two typical chemothermal ablation strategies (acid-base neutralization-reaction-enabled thermal ablation and alkali-metal-enabled thermal/chemical ablation are illustrated. The prospects and possible challenges facing chemothermal ablation are analyzed. The chemothermal therapy is expected to open many clinical possibilities for precise tumor treatment in a minimally invasive way.

  17. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilios Alexiades; David Autrique

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu) target in a helium (He) background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model th...

  18. Design and fabrication of radiation shielded laser ablation ICP-MS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Yeong Keong; Han, Sun Ho; Park, Soon Dal; Park, Yang Soon; Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, Won Ho

    2006-09-15

    In relation to high burn up and extended fuel cycle for the fuel cycle efficiency, we need to take chemical analysis of spent nuclear fuel for the integrity of nuclear fuel at high burn up. to measure the isotopic distribution of fission product in a high burn up nuclear fuel, radiation shielded laser ablation system was designed and fabricated. By probing the sample with a laser beam, micro sampling system for the mass analyzer was successfully developed. This report describes the structural design and the function of developed radiation shielded LA system. This system will be used for the analysis of isotopic distribution from core to rim of a spent nuclear fuel prepared from the hot-cell in PIE facility and/or an irradiated fuel from research reactor.

  19. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  20. Ablative overlays for Space Shuttle leading edge ascent heat protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    Ablative overlays were evaluated via a plasma-arc simulation of the ascent pulse on the leading edge of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Overlay concepts included corkboard, polyisocyanurate foam, low-density Teflon, epoxy, and subliming salts. Their densities ranged from 4.9 to 81 lb per cu ft, and the thicknesses varied from 0.107 to 0.330 in. Swept-leading-edge models were fabricated from 30-lb per cu ft silicone-based ablators. The overlays were bonded to maintain the surface temperature of the base ablator below 500 F during ascent. Foams provided minimum-weight overlays, and subliming salts provided minimum-thickness overlays. Teflon left the most uniform surface after ascent heating.

  1. Effects of polarization-charge shielding in microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M. S.; Lin, S. M.; Chiang, W. Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R., E-mail: krchu@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Heating of dielectric objects by radio frequency (RF) and microwaves has long been a method widely employed in scientific research and industrial applications. However, RF and microwave heating are often susceptible to an excessive temperature spread due to uneven energy deposition. The current study elucidates an important physical reason for this difficulty and proposes an effective remedy. Non-spherical samples are placed in an anechoic chamber, where it is irradiated by a traveling microwave wave with 99% intensity uniformity. Polarization charges induced on the samples tend to partially cancel the incident electric field and hence reduce the heating rate. The polarization-charge shielded heating rate is shown to be highly dependent on the sample's shape and its orientation relative to the wave electric field. For samples with a relatively high permittivity, the resultant uneven heating can become a major cause for the excessive temperature spread. It is also demonstrated that a circularly polarized wave, with its rapidly rotating electric field, can effectively even out the heating rate and hence the temperature spread.

  2. Thermal stress evaluation of the Viking RTG heat shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadter, J.T.; Weiss, R.O.

    1976-03-01

    Thermal stress analyses of the Viking RTG heat shield are presented. The primary purpose of the analyses was to determine the effects of the end cap and the finite length of the heat shield on the peak tensile stress in the barrel wall. The SAAS III computer code was used to calculate the thermal stresses; axisymmetric and plane section analyses were performed for a variety of temperature distributions. The study consisted of three parts. In the first phase, the influence of the end cap on the barrel wall stresses was examined by parametrically varying the modulus of elasticity of the contact zone between the end cap and the barrel. The second phase was concerned with stresses occurring as a result of an orbital decay reentry trajectory, and the effects of the magnitude and shape of the axial temperature gradient. The final part of the study was concerned with the circumferentially nonuniform temperature distribution which develops during a side-on stable reentry. The last part includes a comparison of stresses generated for a hexagonal cross section with those generated for a circular cross section

  3. Castor-1C spent fuel storage cask decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rector, D.R.; McCann, R.A.; Jenquin, U.P.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-12-01

    This report documents the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Services (GNS) CASTOR-1C cask used in a spent fuel storage demonstration performed at Preussen Elektra's Wurgassen nuclear power plant. The demonstration was performed between March 1982 and January 1984, and resulted in cask and fuel temperature data and cask exterior surface gamma-ray and neutron radiation dose rate measurements. The purpose of the analyses reported here was to evaluate decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding computer codes. The analyses consisted of (1) performing pre-look predictions (predictions performed before the analysts were provided the test data), (2) comparing ORIGEN2 (decay heat), COBRA-SFS and HYDRA (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) results to data, and (3) performing post-test analyses if appropriate. Even though two heat transfer codes were used to predict CASTOR-1C cask test data, no attempt was made to compare the two codes. The codes are being evaluated with other test data (single-assembly data and other cask data), and to compare the codes based on one set of data may be premature and lead to erroneous conclusions

  4. Heat shield manifold system for a midframe case of a gas turbine engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Clinton A.; Eng, Jesse; Schopf, Cheryl A.

    2017-07-25

    A heat shield manifold system for an inner casing between a compressor and turbine assembly is disclosed. The heat shield manifold system protects the outer case from high temperature compressor discharge air, thereby enabling the outer case extending between a compressor and a turbine assembly to be formed from less expensive materials than otherwise would be required. In addition, the heat shield manifold system may be configured such that compressor bleed air is passed from the compressor into the heat shield manifold system without passing through a conventional flange to flange joint that is susceptible to leakage.

  5. A Reliability Comparison of Classical and Stochastic Thickness Margin Approaches to Address Material Property Uncertainties for the Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepka, Steve; Vander Kam, Jeremy; McGuire, Kathy

    2018-01-01

    The Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) margin process uses a root-sum-square approach with branches addressing trajectory, aerothermodynamics, and material response uncertainties in ablator thickness design. The material response branch applies a bond line temperature reduction between the Avcoat ablator and EA9394 adhesive by 60 C (108 F) from its peak allowed value of 260 C (500 F). This process is known as the Bond Line Temperature Material Margin (BTMM) and is intended to cover material property and performance uncertainties. The value of 60 C (108 F) is a constant, applied at any spacecraft body location and for any trajectory. By varying only material properties in a random (monte carlo) manner, the perl-based script mcCHAR is used to investigate the confidence interval provided by the BTMM. In particular, this study will look at various locations on the Orion heat shield forebody for a guided and an abort (ballistic) trajectory.

  6. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  7. Influence of the shielding effect on the formation of a micro-texture on the cermet with nanosecond pulsed laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiandong; Liang, Liang; Jiang, Lelun; Liu, Xin

    2018-04-01

    The degree of laser pulse overlapping in a laser scanning path has a significant impact on the ablation regime in the laser machining of a micro-texture. In this Letter, a nanosecond pulsed laser is used to prepare the micro-scaled groove on WC-8Co cermet under different scanning speeds. It is observed that as the scanning speed increases, the ablated trace morphology in the first scanning pass transits from a succession of intermittent deep dimples to the consecutive overlapped shallow pits. The test result also indicates that ablated trace morphology with respect to the low scanning speed stems from a plume shielding effect. Moreover, the ablation regime considering the shielding effect in micro-groove formation process is clarified. The critical scanning speed that can circumvent the shielding effect is also summarized with respect to different laser powers.

  8. Ablation dynamics - from absorption to heat accumulation/ultra-fast laser matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Remund, Stefan; Jäggi, Beat; Schmid, Marc; Neuenschwander, Beat

    2018-05-01

    Ultra-short laser radiation is used in manifold industrial applications today. Although state-of-the-art laser sources are providing an average power of 10-100 W with repetition rates of up to several megahertz, most applications do not benefit from it. On the one hand, the processing speed is limited to some hundred millimeters per second by the dynamics of mechanical axes or galvanometric scanners. On the other hand, high repetition rates require consideration of new physical effects such as heat accumulation and shielding that might reduce the process efficiency. For ablation processes, process efficiency can be expressed by the specific removal rate, ablated volume per time, and average power. The analysis of the specific removal rate for different laser parameters, like average power, repetition rate or pulse duration, and process parameters, like scanning speed or material, can be used to find the best operation point for microprocessing applications. Analytical models and molecular dynamics simulations based on the so-called two-temperature model reveal the causes for the appearance of limiting physical effects. The findings of models and simulations can be used to take advantage and optimize processing strategies.

  9. Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Ellerby, Don; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Heat shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project is a NASA STMD and SMD co-funded effort. The goal is to develop and mission infuse a new ablative Thermal Protection System that can withstand extreme entry. It is targeted to support NASA's high priority missions, as defined in the latest decadal survey, to destinations such as Venus and Saturn in-situ robotic science missions. Entry into these planetary atmospheres results in extreme heating. The entry peak heat-flux and associated pressure are estimated to be between one and two orders of magnitude higher than those experienced by Mars Science Laboratory or Lunar return missions. In the recent New Frontiers community announcement NASA has indicated that it is considering providing an increase to the PI managed mission cost (PIMMC) for investigations utilizing the Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) and in addition, NASA is considering limiting the risk assessment to only their accommodation on the spacecraft and the mission environment. The HEEET ablative TPS utilizes 3D weaving technology to manufacture a dual layer material architecture. The 3-D weaving allows for flat panels to be woven. The dual layer consists of a top layer designed to withstand the extreme external environment while the inner or insulating layer by design, is designed to achieve low thermal conductivity, and it keeps the heat from conducting towards the structure underneath. Both arc jet testing combined with material properties have been used to develop thermal response models that allows for comparison of performance with heritage carbon phenolic. A 50% mass efficiency is achieved by the dual layer construct compared to carbon phenolic for a broad range of missions both to Saturn and Venus. The 3-D woven flat preforms are molded to achieve the shape as they are compliant and then resin infusion with curing forms a rigid panels. These panels are then bonded on to the aeroshell structure. Gaps

  10. Moving heat source in a confined channel: Heat transfer and boiling in endovenous laser ablation of varicose veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Amit; Oliveira, Jorge L. G.; van der Geld, Cees W. M.; Malskat, Wendy S. J.; van den Bos, Renate; Nijsten, Tamar; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Motion of a moving laser light heat source in a confined volume has important applications such as in endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) of varicose veins. This light heats up the fluid and the wall volume by absorption and heat conduction. The present study compares the flow and temperature fields in

  11. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Meuller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  12. Laser ablation under different electron heat conduction models in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuanggui; Ren, Guoli; Huo, Wen Yi

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of three different electron heat conduction models on the laser ablation of gold plane target. Different from previous studies, we concentrate on the plasma conditions, the conversion efficiency from laser into soft x rays and the scaling relation of mass ablation, which are relevant to hohlraum physics study in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. We find that the simulated electron temperature in corona region is sensitive to the electron heat conduction models. For different electron heat conduction models, there are obvious differences in magnitude and spatial profile of electron temperature. For the flux limit model, the calculated conversion efficiency is sensitive to flux limiters. In the laser ablation of gold, most of the laser energies are converted into x rays. So the scaling relation of mass ablation rate is quite different from that of low Z materials.

  13. Evaluation of Heat Shields from RTS Wright Industries Magnesium and Uranium Beds

    CERN Document Server

    Korinko, P S

    2002-01-01

    Heat shields from a factory test of the furnaces that will be used to heat the magnesium and uranium beds for the tritium extraction facility (TEF) were examined to determine the cause of discoloration. The samples were examined using visual, optical microscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  14. Shielded regeneration heating element for a particulate filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2011-01-04

    An exhaust system includes a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream from an engine. The PF filters particulates within an exhaust from the engine. A heating element heats particulate matter in the PF. A catalyst substrate or a flow converter is disposed upstream from said heating element. The catalyst substrate oxidizes the exhaust prior to reception by the heating element. The flow converter converts turbulent exhaust flow to laminar exhaust flow prior to reception by the heating element.

  15. Heating effect of substrate of pulsed laser ablation deposition technique towards the orientation of carbon microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, L.S.; Irmawati Ramli; Noorhana Yahya; Abdul Halim Shaari

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Carbon thin film has been successfully deposited by second harmonic Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation deposition, PLAD. The topology and morphology of the deposited layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) whereas emission dispersion X-ray (EDX) was used to determine the existence of elements that constitutes the microstructure. Substrate heated at 500 degree Celsius during the laser ablation showed the most homogenous lollipop microstructure as compared to mainly pillars of microstructure ablated at lower substrate temperature. It is found that this also avoid further diffusion of carbon into catalyst in forming iron carbide. (author)

  16. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  17. Moving heat source in a confined channel: Heat transfer and boiling in endovenous laser ablation of varicose veins : Heat transfer and boiling in endovenous laser ablation of varicose veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A.; Oliveira, J.L.G.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Malskat, Wendy S.J.; van den Bos, Renate; Nijsten, Tamar; van Gemert, M.J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Motion of a moving laser light heat source in a confined volume has important applications such as in endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) of varicose veins. This light heats up the fluid and the wall volume by absorption and heat conduction. The present study compares the flow and temperature fields in

  18. Non-Fourier heat conduction and phase transition in laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Li, Jian; He, Zhaofu

    2017-11-01

    The phase transition in heat conduction of polytetrafluoroethylene-like polymers was investigated and applied in many fields of science and engineering. Considering more details including internal absorption of laser radiation, reflectivity of material and non-Fourier effect etc., the combined heat conduction and phase transition in laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene were modeled and investigated numerically. The thermal and mechanic issues in laser ablation were illustrated and analyzed. Especially, the phenomenon of temperature discontinuity formed in the combined phase transition and non-Fourier heat conduction was discussed. Comparisons of target temperature profiles between Fourier and non-Fourier heat conduction in melting process were implemented. It was indicated that the effect of non-Fourier plays an important role in the temperature evolvement. The effect of laser fluence was proven to be significant and the thermal wave propagation was independent on the laser intensity for the non-Fourier heat conduction. Besides, the effect of absorption coefficients on temperature evolvements was studied. For different ranges of absorption coefficients, different temperature evolvements can be achieved. The above numerical simulation provided insight into physical processes of combined non-Fourier heat conduction and phase transition in laser ablation.

  19. Antithermal shield for rockets with heat evacuation by infrared radiation reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan RUSU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available At high speed, the friction between the air mass and the rocket surface causes a localheating of over 1000 Celsius degrees. For the heat protection of the rocket, on its outside surfacethermal shields are installed.Studying the Coanda effect, the fluid flow on solids surface, respectively, the author Ioan Rusuhas discovered by simply researches that the Coanda effect could be /extended also to the fluid flowon discontinuous solids, namely, on solids provided with orifices. This phenomenon was named by theauthor, the expanded Coanda effect. Starting with this discovery, the author has invented a thermalshield, registered at The State Office for inventions and Trademarks OSIM, deposit F 2010 0153This thermal shield:- is built as a covering rocket sheet with many orifices installed with a minimum space fromthe rocket body- takes over the heat fluid generated by the frontal part of the rocket and avoids the directcontact between the heat fluid and the rocket body- ensures the evacuation of the infrared radiation, generated by the heat fluid flowing overthe shield because of the extended Coanda effect by reflection from the rocket bodysurface.

  20. Evaluation of alternative methods of simulating asymmetric bulk heating in fusion reactor blanket/shield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Wadkins, R.P.; Wessol, D.E.

    1981-10-01

    As a part of Phase O, Test Program Element-II of the Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program, a study was conducted by EG and G Idaho, Inc., to identify, characterize, and recommend alternative approaches for simulating fusion bulk heating in blanket/shield components. This is the report on that effort. Since the usefulness of any simulation approach depends upon the particular experiment considered, classes of problem types (thermal-hydraulic, thermomechanical, etc.) and material types (structure, solid breeder, etc.) are developed. The evaluation of the various simulation approaches is performed for the various significant combinations of problem class and material class. The simulation approaches considered are discrete-source heating, direct resistance, electromagnetic induction, microwave heating, and nuclear heating. From the evaluations performed for each experiment type, discrete - source heating emerges as a good approach for bulk heating simulation in thermal - hydraulics experiments, and nuclear heating appears to be a good approach in experiments addressing thermomechanics and combined thermal-hydraulic/thermomechanics

  1. Wall ablation of heated compound-materials into non-equilibrium discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Kong, Linghan; Geng, Jinyue; Wei, Fuzhi; Xia, Guangqing

    2017-02-01

    The discharge properties of the plasma bulk flow near the surface of heated compound-materials strongly affects the kinetic layer parameters modeled and manifested in the Knudsen layer. This paper extends the widely used two-layer kinetic ablation model to the ablation controlled non-equilibrium discharge due to the fact that the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation is often violated as a result of the interaction between the plasma and solid walls. Modifications to the governing set of equations, to account for this effect, are derived and presented by assuming that the temperature of the electrons deviates from that of the heavy particles. The ablation characteristics of one typical material, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are calculated with this improved model. The internal degrees of freedom as well as the average particle mass and specific heat ratio of the polyatomic vapor, which strongly depends on the temperature, pressure and plasma non-equilibrium degree and plays a crucial role in the accurate determination of the ablation behavior by this model, are also taken into account. Our assessment showed the significance of including such modifications related to the non-equilibrium effect in the study of vaporization of heated compound materials in ablation controlled arcs. Additionally, a two-temperature magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model accounting for the thermal non-equilibrium occurring near the wall surface is developed and applied into an ablation-dominated discharge for an electro-thermal chemical launch device. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the non-equilibrium plasma and the solid propellant surface. Both the mass exchange process caused by the wall ablation and plasma species deposition as well as the associated momentum and energy exchange processes are taken into account. A detailed comparison of the results of the non-equilibrium model with those of an equilibrium model is presented. The non-equilibrium results

  2. X-Ray Micro-Tomography Applied to Nasa's Materials Research: Heat Shields, Parachutes and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Francesco; Borner, Arnaud; Ferguson, Joseph C.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Stern, Eric C.; Barnard, Harold S.; Macdowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is used to support the research on materials carried out at NASA Ames Research Center. The technique is applied to a variety of applications, including the ability to characterize heat shield materials for planetary entry, to study the Earth- impacting asteroids, and to improve broadcloths of spacecraft parachutes. From micro-tomography images, relevant morphological and transport properties are determined and validated against experimental data.

  3. Experimental Investigation on the Specific Heat of Carbonized Phenolic Resin-Based Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Te; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Lisong; Cai, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    As typical phenolic resin-based ablative materials, the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic composites are widely used in aerospace field. The specific heat of the carbonized ablators after ablation is an important thermophysical parameter in the process of heat transfer, but it is rarely reported. In this investigation, the carbonized samples of the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic were obtained through carbonization experiments, and the specific heat of the carbonized samples was determined by a 3D DSC from 150 °C to 970 °C. Structural and compositional characterizations were performed to determine the mass fractions of the fiber and the carbonized product of phenolic which are the two constituents of the carbonized samples, while the specific heat of each constituent was also measured by 3D DSC. The masses of the carbonized samples were reduced when heated to a high temperature in the specific heat measurements, due to the thermal degradation of the carbonized product of phenolic resin in the carbonized samples. The raw experimental specific heat of the two carbonized samples and the carbonized product of phenolic resin was modified according to the quality changes of the carbonized samples presented by TGA results. Based on the mass fraction and the specific heat of each constituent, a weighted average method was adopted to obtain the calculated results of the carbonized samples. Due to the unconsolidated property of the fiber samples which impacts the reliability of the DSC measurement, there is a certain deviation between the experimental and calculated results of the carbonized samples. Considering the similarity of composition and structure, the data of quartz glass and graphite were used to substitute the specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber, respectively, resulting in better agreements with the experimental ones. Furthermore, the accurate specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber bundles was obtained by

  4. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  5. Temperature distribution due to the heat generation in nuclear reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L.M.R.

    1985-01-01

    A study is performed for calculating nuclear heating due to the interaction of neutrons and gamma-rays with matter. Modifications were implemented in the ANISN and DOT 3.5 codes, that solve the transport equation using the discrete ordinate method, in one two-dimensions respectively, to include nuclear heating calculations in these codes. In order to determine the temperature distribution, using the finite difference method, a numerical model was developed for solving the heat conduction equation in one-dimension, in plane, cylindrical and spherical geometries, and in two-dimensions, X-Y and R-Z geometries. Based on these models, computer programs were developed for calculating the temperature distribution. Tests and applications of the implemented modifications were performed in problems of nuclear heating and temperature distribution due to radiation energy deposition in fission and fusion reactor shields. (Author) [pt

  6. Studies of the impurity pellet ablation in the high-temperature plasma of magnetic confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, V. Yu.; Bakhareva, O. A.; Kuteev, B. V.; Tendler, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ablation of impurity pellets in tokamak and stellarator plasmas is investigated. Different mechanisms for shielding the heat fluxes from the surrounding plasma to the pellet surface are discussed. A model for impurity pellet ablation is developed that can account for both neutral and electrostatic shielding. It is shown that the experimental values of the impurity pellet ablation rate are well described by the neutral gas shielding model over a wide range of plasma temperatures and densities. Taking into account the electrostatic shielding leads to worse agreement between the predictions of the model and the experimental data; this result still remains unclear. Scaling laws are obtained that allow one to estimate the local ablation rate of impurity pellets made of various materials over a wide range of plasma parameters in the neutral gas shielding model

  7. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kany, A.M.I.; El-Gohary, M.I.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barriers of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure. (Author)

  8. Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation Heat Energy Transfer in an Ex-Vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Shivani; Lavito, Sandi; Grobner, Elizabeth; Grobner, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Little work has been done to consider the temperature changes and energy transfer that occur in the tissue outside the vein with ultrasound-guided vein ablation therapy. In this experiment, a Ex-Vivo model of the human calf was used to analyze heat transfer and energy degradation in tissue surrounding the vein during endovascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A clinical vein ablation protocol was used to determine the tissue temperature distribution in 10 per cent agar gel. Heat energy from the radiofrequency catheter was measured for 140 seconds at fixed points by four thermometer probes placed equidistant radially at 0.0025, 0.005, and 0.01 m away from the RFA catheter. The temperature rose 1.5°C at 0.0025 m, 0.6°C at 0.005 m, and 0.0°C at 0.01 m from the RFA catheter. There was a clinically insignificant heat transfer at the distances evaluated, 1.4 ± 0.2 J/s at 0.0025 m, 0.7 ± 0.3 J/s at 0.0050 m, and 0.3 ± 0.0 J/s at 0.01 m. Heat degradation occurred rapidly: 4.5 ± 0.5 J (at 0.0025 m), 4.0 ± 1.6 J (at 0.0050 m), and 3.9 ± 3.6 J (at 0.01 m). Tumescent anesthesia injected one centimeter around the vein would act as a heat sink to absorb the energy transferred outside the vein to minimize tissue and nerve damage and will help phlebologists strategize options for minimizing damage.

  9. Evaporation and vapor shielding of CFC targets exposed to plasma heat fluxes relevant to ITER ELMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.M.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Landman, I.S.; Pestchanyi, S.E.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fibre composite NB31 was tested at plasma gun facility MK-200UG by plasma heat fluxes relevant to Edge Localised Modes in ITER. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of carbon fibre composite, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. The obtained experimental data are compared with the results of numerical modeling.

  10. A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum, a novel model was presented for the target ablation and plume expansion. The simulation of the target ablation was based on one-dimensional heat conduction, taking into account temperature dependent material properties, phase transition, dielectric transition and phase explosion. While the simulation of the plume expansion was based on one-dimensional gas-dynamical equation, taking into account ionization, plume absorption and shielding. By coupling the calculations of the target ablation and plume expansion, the characteristics of the target and plume were obtained. And the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of ablation threshold and depth within the fluence range of the tested laser. Subsequently, investigations were carried out to analyze the mechanisms of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation. The calculated results showed that the maximum surface temperature remained at about 90% of the critical temperature (0.9Tc due to phase explosion. Moreover, the plume shielding has significant effects on the laser ablation, and the plume shielding proportion increase as the laser fluence increasing. The ambient pressure belows 100 Pa is more suitable for laser ablation, which can obtained larger ablation depth.

  11. Safety verification of radiation shielding and heat transfer for a model for dry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Haiyan; Tang, Xiaobin; Wang, Peng; Chen, Feida; Chai, Hao; Chen, Da

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New type of dry spent fuel storage was designed. • MC method and FEM were used to verify the reliability of new storage. • Radiation shield and heat transfer both meet IAEA standards: 2 mSv/h, 0.1 mSv/h and 190 °C, 85 °C. • Provided possibilities for future implementation of this type of dry storage. - Abstract: The goal of this research is to develop a type of dry spent fuel storage called CHN-24 container, which could contain an equivalent load of 45 GWD/MTU of spent fuel after 10 years cooling. Basically, radiation shielding performance and safe removal of decay heat, which play important roles in the safety performance, were checked and validated using the Monte Carlo method and finite element analysis to establish the radiation dose rate calculation model and three-dimensional heat transfer model for the CHN-24 container. The dose rates at the surface of the container and at a distance of 1 m from the surface were 0.42 mSv/h and 0.06 mSv/h, respectively. These conform to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) radioactive material transportation safety standards 2 mSv/h and 0.1 mSv/h. The results shows that the CHN-24 container maintains its structural and material integrity under the condition of normal thermal steady-state heat transfer as well as in case of extreme fire as evinced by transient-state analysis. The temperature inside and on the surface of the container were 150.91 °C and 80 °C under normal storage conditions, which indicated that the design also conform to IAEA heat transfer safety standards of 190 °C and 85 °C

  12. Shielding plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishima, Kenji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: In shielding plugs of an LMFBR type reactor, to restrain natural convection of heat in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell, to prevent the lowering of heat-insulation performance, and to alleviate a thermal stress in a reactor container and the shield shell. Constitution: A ring-like leaf spring split in the direction of height is disposed in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell. In consequence, the space is partitioned in the direction of height and, therefore, if axial temperature conditions and space width are the same and the space is low, the natural convection is hard to occur. Thus the rise of upper surface temperature of the shielding plugs can prevent the lowering of the heat insulation performance which will result in the increment of shielding plug cooling capacity, thereby improving reliability. In the meantime, since there is mounted an earthquake-resisting support, the thermal shield layer will move for a slight gap in case of an earthquake, being supported by the earthquake-resisting support, and the movement of the thermal shield layer is restricted, thereby maintaining integrity without increasing the stroke of the ring-like spring. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Development of high-performance shielding material by heat curing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Toshimasa; Hirao, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Okuno, Koichi; Sato, Osamu [National Maritime Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A high-performance shielding material is developed by a heat curing method. It is mainly made of a thermosetting resin, lead powder, and a boron compound. To make the resin, a single functional monomer stearyl methacrylate (SMA) is used. To get good dispersion of lead and the boron compound in the resin, the viscosity of the SMA is increased by adding a small amount of a peroxide into the liquid monomer and heating up to the temperature of 100 .deg. C. Next, a peroxide, lead powder, a boron compound, a three functional monomer, and a curing accelerator are mixed into the viscous SMA. The mixture is cured in an atmosphere of nitrogen after removing bubbles using a vacuum pump. Measured properties of the cured material are as follows. The curing rate of SMA is 97 %. The density is kept 2.35 g/cm{sub 3} in the range from room temperature to 150 .deg. C. The weight-change measured by a thermogravimetry is 0.16 % in the range from room temperature to 200 .deg. C. Details of fragments in the gas released from the material is analyzed by a gas chromatography and a mass spectrometry. The hydrogen content of the material is 6.04x10 {sub 22} /cm{sub 3} . The shielding effect is calculated for a fission source by an Sn code ANISN. The shielding effect of the curing material is excellent. For example, concrete shield of a certain thickness can be replaced by the material having a thickness less than a half of concrete. Several samples of the material are irradiated at an irradiation equipment of the research reactor JRR-4 installed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. At the 14{sub th} day after irradiating with the thermal neutron fluence of 6.6x10{sub 15} /cm{sub 2} , the radioactivity is less than one tenth of 75 Bq/g above which materials are regulated as the radioactive substance in Japan.

  14. Estimating Orion Heat Shield Failure Due To Ablator Cracking During The EFT-1 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kam, Jeremy C.; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Orion EFT-1 heatshield suffered from two major certification challenges: First, the mechanical properties used in design were not evident in the flight hardware and second, the flight article itself cracked during fabrication. The combination of these events motivated the Orion Program to pursue an engineering-level Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as part of heatshield certification rationale. The PRA provided loss of Mission (LOM) likelihoods considering the probability of a crack occurring during the mission and the likelihood of subsequent structure over-temperature. The methods and input data for the PRA are presented along with a discussion of the test data used to anchor the results. The Orion program accepted an EFT-1 Loss of Vehicle (LOV) risk of 1-in-160,000 due to in-mission Avcoat cracking based on the results of this analysis. Conservatisms in the result, along with future considerations for Exploration Missions (EM) are also addressed.

  15. Minimal vascular flows cause strong heat sink effects in hepatic radiofrequency ablation ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kai S; Poch, Franz G M; Rieder, Christian; Schenk, Andrea; Stroux, Andrea; Frericks, Bernd B; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E; Ritz, Jörg P; Zurbuchen, Urte

    2016-08-01

    The present paper aims to assess the lower threshold of vascular flow rate on the heat sink effect in bipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) ex vivo. Glass tubes (vessels) of 3.4 mm inner diameter were introduced in parallel to bipolar RFA applicators into porcine liver ex vivo. Vessels were perfused with flow rates of 0 to 1,500 ml/min. RFA (30 W power, 15 kJ energy input) was carried out at room temperature and 37°C. Heat sink effects were assessed in RFA cross sections by the decrease in ablation radius, area and by a high-resolution sector planimetry. Flow rates of 1 ml/min already caused a significant cooling effect (P ≤ 0.001). The heat sink effect reached a maximum at 10 ml/min (18.4 mm/s) and remained stable for flow rates up to 1,500 ml/min. Minimal vascular flows of ≥1 ml/min cause a significant heat sink effect in hepatic RFA ex vivo. A lower limit for volumetric flow rate was not found. The maximum of the heat sink effect was reached at a flow rate of 10 ml/min and remained stable for flow rates up to 1,500 ml/min. Hepatic inflow occlusion should be considered in RFA close to hepatic vessels. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  16. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS INVESTIGATION ON THE USE OF HEAT SHIELDS FOR THERMAL MANAGEMENT IN A CAR UNDERHOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Lam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations inside a car underhood are largely controlled by the heat originating from the engine block and the exhaust manifold. Excessive temperatures in the underhood can lead to the faster deterioration of engine components and may affect the thermal comfort level inside the passenger cabin. This paper presents computational fluid dynamics investigations to assess the performance of a heat shield in lowering the peak temperature of the engine components and firewall in the underhood region of a typical passenger car. The simulation used the finite volume method with the standard k-ε turbulence model and an isothermal model for the heat transfer calculations. The results show that the heat shield managed to reduce the peak temperature of the engine components and firewall by insulating the intense heat from the engine block and exhaust and regulating the airflow inside the underhood region.

  17. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior

  18. Erosion and migration of tungsten employed at the central column heat shield of ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K.; Gong, X.; Balden, M.; Hildebrandt, D.; Maier, H.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Schneider, W.

    2002-01-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade, tungsten was employed as plasma facing material at the central column heat shield in the plasma main chamber. The campaign averaged tungsten erosion flux was determined by measuring the difference of the W-layer thickness before and after the experimental campaign using ion beam analysis methods. The observed lateral variation and the total amount of eroded tungsten are attributed to erosion by impact of ions from the scrape-off layer plasma. Migration and redeposition of eroded tungsten were investigated by quantitative analysis of deposited tungsten on collector probes and wall samples. The obtained results, as well as the spectroscopically observed low tungsten plasma penetration probability, indicate that a major fraction of the eroded tungsten migrates predominantly through direct transport channels in the outer plasma scrape-off layer without entering the confined plasma

  19. Thermal fatigue cracks in gas turbine heat shield plates; Thermoermuedungsrisse in Hitzeschildplatten von Gasturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany). Gas Turbine Plant Berlin Labs.

    2012-07-01

    There are numerous possible designations for the damage mechanism described in this case study. As a consequence, the terminology is far from being consistent. In this context, the Anglo-Saxon language area has to be taken into consideration. On the one hand many failure analysis reports have to be written in English, on the other hand it is meanwhile expected to use English terms in reports written in German, the latter in an effort to standardize the internal nomenclature. Therefore, it is advisable for damage analysts to know technical terms in both languages, at least for the most important damage mechanisms occurring in their respective fields of activity. In the present case, individual ceramic coated metal heat shield plates have been replaced after several ten thousand operating hours and several hundred start-up and shut-down procedures, i.e. machine start-ups, due to cracks in the central locating hole.

  20. Efficient hydrogen production using heat in neutron shield of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Hiwatari, Ryouji; Yoshida, Tomoaki

    2001-01-01

    In future perspective of energy supply, a hydrogen energy cycle is expected to play an important role as a CO 2 free fuel for mobile or co-generation systems. Fusion power plants should offer advantages, compatibilities and/or synergistic effects with or in such future energy systems. In this paper, a comprehensive power station, in which a fusion plant is integrated with a hydrogen production plant, is proposed. A tenuous heat source in the outboard shield, which is unsuitable to produce high-pressure and high-temperature steam for efficient electric power generation, is used for the hydrogen production. This integrated system provides some synergistic effects and it would be advantageous over any independent use of each plant. (author)

  1. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to

  2. Heat Stress-Induced PI3K/mTORC2-Dependent AKT Signaling Is a Central Mediator of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Survival to Thermal Ablation Induced Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Thompson

    Full Text Available Thermal ablative therapies are important treatment options in the multidisciplinary care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but lesions larger than 2-3 cm are plagued with high local recurrence rates and overall survival of these patients remains poor. Currently no adjuvant therapies exist to prevent local HCC recurrence in patients undergoing thermal ablation. The molecular mechanisms mediating HCC resistance to thermal ablation induced heat stress and local recurrence remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the HCC cells with a poor prognostic hepatic stem cell subtype (Subtype HS are more resistant to heat stress than HCC cells with a better prognostic hepatocyte subtype (Subtype HC. Moreover, sublethal heat stress rapidly induces phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR dependent-protein kinase B (AKT survival signaling in HCC cells in vitro and at the tumor ablation margin in vivo. Conversely, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2-dependent AKT phosphorylation or direct inhibition of AKT function both enhance HCC cell killing and decrease HCC cell survival to sublethal heat stress in both poor and better prognostic HCC subtypes while mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1-inhibition has no impact. Finally, we showed that AKT isoforms 1, 2 and 3 are differentially upregulated in primary human HCCs and that overexpression of AKT correlates with worse tumor biology and pathologic features (AKT3 and prognosis (AKT1. Together these findings define a novel molecular mechanism whereby heat stress induces PI3K/mTORC2-dependent AKT survival signaling in HCC cells and provide a mechanistic rationale for adjuvant AKT inhibition in combination with thermal ablation as a strategy to enhance HCC cell killing and prevent local recurrence, particularly at the ablation margin.

  3. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  4. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.; Landman, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m 2 on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m 2 . Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  5. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  6. New possibility of magnetic ripple shielding for specific heat measurements in hybrid magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarnawski, Z.; Meulen, der, H. van; Franse, J.J.M.; Kadowaki, K.; Veenhuizen, P.A.; Klaasse, J.

    1988-01-01

    A test of the new high Tc superconducting materials for magnetic ripple shielding has been carried out. It was found that magnetic ripples of 0.0009 T (peak-to-peak) in the frequency range below 20 kHz can be completely shielded in high static fields by a 2 mm thick Y-Ba-Cu-O screen.

  7. Interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone: Contributions of preferential heating at the bone surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Serena J.; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter D.; Cam, Richard N.; Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Preferential heating of bone due to high ultrasound attenuation may enhance thermal ablation performed with cathetercooled interstitial ultrasound applicators in or near bone. At the same time, thermally and acoustically insulating cortical bone may protect sensitive structures nearby. 3D acoustic and biothermal transient finite element models were developed to simulate temperature and thermal dose distributions during catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound ablation near bone. Experiments in ex vivo tissues and tissue-mimicking phantoms were performed to validate the models and to quantify the temperature profiles and ablated volumes for various distances between the interstitial applicator and the bone surface. 3D patient-specific models selected to bracket the range of clinical usage were developed to investigate what types of tumors could be treated, applicator configurations, insertion paths, safety margins, and other parameters. Experiments show that preferential heating at the bone surface decreases treatment times compared to when bone is absent and that all tissue between an applicator and bone can be ablated when they are up to 2 cm apart. Simulations indicate that a 5-7 mm safety margin of normal bone is needed to protect (thermal dose tumors 1.0-3.8 cm (L) and 1.3-3.0 cm (D) near or within bone were ablated (thermal dose > 240 CEM43°C) within 10 min without damaging the nearby spinal cord, lungs, esophagus, trachea, or major vasculature. Preferential absorption of ultrasound by bone may provide improved localization, faster treatment times, and larger treatment zones in tumors in and near bone compared to other heating modalities.

  8. Heat Sink Effect on Tumor Ablation Characteristics as Observed in Monopolar Radiofrequency, Bipolar Radiofrequency, and Microwave, Using Ex Vivo Calf Liver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C.; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices. With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored. With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres. Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected. Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5. MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink. PMID:25738477

  9. Material and electromagnetic properties of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron heating antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Becraft, W.R.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Tsai, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Faraday shields for ion cyclotron antennas must transmit magnetic waves and absorb little RF power. To investigate these properties, we have constructed 27 Faraday shields in many configurations, including chevrons, tubes, straps, concentric rings, various layered shields, conventionally leafed straps, and replicas of the Faraday shields for ASDEX, the Joint European Torus (JET), TEXTOR, and Alcator-C. We have measured the magnetic flux and observed loading at various operating resistances by using dielectric sheets or magnetic-coupled loads. Each Faraday shield effects a net change in the characteristic inductance of the antenna, resulting in a reduction of wave coupling. However, the load experienced by the antenna is not always reduced because the Faraday shield itself acts as a load. We differentiate between these effects experimentally. The net result of the study is that the Faraday shields now in use cost up to a factor of 50% of coupling. This, of course, reduces the power handling capability by 50% as well. However, configurations exist that are easily cooled and result in a reduction of less than 5% in loading

  10. Material and electromagnetic properties of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron heating antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Baity, F.W.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Tsai, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Faraday shields for ion cyclotron antennas must transmit magnetic waves and adsorb little rf power. To investigate these properties, we have constructed 27 Faraday shields in many configurations, including chevrons, tubes, straps, concentric rings, various layered shields, conventionally leafed straps, and replicas of the Faraday shields for ASDEX, the Joint European Torus (JET), TEXTOR, and Alcator-C. We have measured the magnetic flux and observed loading at various operating resistances by using dielectric sheets or magnetic-coupled loads. Each Faraday shield effects a net change in the characteristic inductance of the antenna, resulting in a reduction of wave coupling. However, the load experienced by the antenna is not always reduced because the Faraday shield itself acts as a load. We differentiate between these effects experimentally. The net result of the study is that the Faraday shields now in use cost up to a factor of 50% of coupling. This, of course, reduces the power handling capability by 50% as well. However, configurations exist that are easily cooled and result in a reduction of less than 5% in loading

  11. Experimental assessment on the thermal effects of the neutron shielding and heat-transfer fin of dual purpose casks on open pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Kyoung-Sik; Yu, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Ju-Chan; Seo, Ki-Seog; Choi, Woo-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An open pool fire test was performed to estimate not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin of the dual purpose cask. • The heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced, when the neutron shielding burns. • The surface temperatures are lower in the present of the heat transfer fins. • If inflammable material is used as the components of the cask, evaluating thermal integrity using the thermal test would be desirable. - Abstract: Dual purpose casks are used for storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. They must therefore satisfy the requirements prescribed in the Korea Nuclear Safety Security Commission Act 2014-50, the IAEA Safety Standard Series No. SSR-6, and US 10 CFR Part 71. These regulatory guidelines classify the dual purpose cask as a Type B package and state that a Type B package must be able to withstand a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. NS-4-FR is used as neutron shielding of the dual purpose cask. Heat transfer fins are embedded to enhance heat transfer from the cask body to the outer-shell because the thermal conductivity of NS-4-FR is not good. However, accurately simulating not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin in the thermal analysis is not easy. Therefore, an open pool fire test was conducted using a one-sixth slice of a real cask to estimate these effects at a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. The temperature at the central portion of the neutron shielding was lower when the neutron shielding in contact with the outer cask burned because the neutron shielding absorbed the surrounding latent heat as the neutron shielding burned. Therefore, the heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced. The surface temperature was lower when a heat transfer fin was installed because the high heat generated by the flame was transferred to the

  12. Experimental assessment on the thermal effects of the neutron shielding and heat-transfer fin of dual purpose casks on open pool fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kyoung-Sik, E-mail: nksbang@kaeri.re.kr; Yu, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Ju-Chan; Seo, Ki-Seog; Choi, Woo-Seok

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • An open pool fire test was performed to estimate not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin of the dual purpose cask. • The heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced, when the neutron shielding burns. • The surface temperatures are lower in the present of the heat transfer fins. • If inflammable material is used as the components of the cask, evaluating thermal integrity using the thermal test would be desirable. - Abstract: Dual purpose casks are used for storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. They must therefore satisfy the requirements prescribed in the Korea Nuclear Safety Security Commission Act 2014-50, the IAEA Safety Standard Series No. SSR-6, and US 10 CFR Part 71. These regulatory guidelines classify the dual purpose cask as a Type B package and state that a Type B package must be able to withstand a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. NS-4-FR is used as neutron shielding of the dual purpose cask. Heat transfer fins are embedded to enhance heat transfer from the cask body to the outer-shell because the thermal conductivity of NS-4-FR is not good. However, accurately simulating not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin in the thermal analysis is not easy. Therefore, an open pool fire test was conducted using a one-sixth slice of a real cask to estimate these effects at a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. The temperature at the central portion of the neutron shielding was lower when the neutron shielding in contact with the outer cask burned because the neutron shielding absorbed the surrounding latent heat as the neutron shielding burned. Therefore, the heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced. The surface temperature was lower when a heat transfer fin was installed because the high heat generated by the flame was transferred to the

  13. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiles, L.E.; Lombardo, N.J.; Heeb, C.M.; Jenquin, U.P.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Creer, J.M.; McCann, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions

  14. Heat and mass transfer in a liquid pool with wall ablation and composition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Q.T.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the thermal-hydraulics of a melt pool coupled with the physical chemistry for the purpose of describing the behaviour of mixtures of materials (non-eutectic). Evolution of transient temperature in a liquid melt pool heated by volumetric power dissipation has been described with solidification on the cooled wall. The model has been developed and is validated for the experimental results given by LIVE experiment, performed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. Under the conditions of these tests, it is shown that the interface temperature follows the liquidus temperature (corresponding to the composition of the liquid bath) during the whole transient. Assumption of interface temperature as liquidus temperature allows recalculating the evolution of the maximum melt temperature as well as the local crust thickness. Furthermore, we propose a model for describing the interaction between a non-eutectic liquid melt pool (subjected to volumetric power dissipation) and an ablated wall whose melting point is below the liquidus temperature of the melt. The model predictions are compared with results of ARTEMIS 2D tests. A new formulation of the interface temperature between the liquid melt and the solid wall (below liquidus temperature) has been proposed. (author) [fr

  15. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  16. Residual heat deposition in dental enamel during IR laser ablation at 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, D; Ragadio, J; Champion, A

    2001-01-01

    The principal factor limiting the rate of laser ablation of dental hard tissue is the risk of excessive heat accumulation in the tooth. Excessive heat deposition or accumulation may result in unacceptable damage to the pulp. The objective of this study was to measure the residual heat deposition during the laser ablation of dental enamel at those IR laser wavelengths well suited for the removal of dental caries. Optimal laser ablation systems minimize the residual heat deposition in the tooth by efficiently transferring the deposited laser energy to kinetic and internal energy of ejected tissue components. The residual heat deposition in dental enamel was measured at laser wavelengths of 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 microm and pulse widths of 150 nsec -150 microsec using bovine block "calorimeters." Water droplets were applied to the surface before ablation with 150 microsec Er:YAG laser pulses to determine the influence of an optically thick water layer on reducing heat deposition. The residual heat was at a minimum for fluences well above the ablation threshold where measured values ranged from 25-70% depending on pulse duration and wavelength for the systems investigated. The lowest values of the residual heat were measured for short (heat deposition during ablation with 150 microsec Er:YAG laser pulses. Residual heat deposition can be markedly reduced by using CO(2) laser pulses of less than 20 microsec duration and shorter Q-switched Er:YAG and Er:YSGG laser pulses for enamel ablation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Neutron shieldings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarutani, Kohei

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the stresses resulted by the core bendings to the base of an entrance nozzle. Constitution: Three types of round shielding rods of different diameter are arranged in a hexagonal tube. The hexagonal tube is provided with several spacer pads receiving the loads from the core constrain mechanism at its outer circumference, a handling head for a fuel exchanger at its top and an entrance nozzle for self-holding the neutron shieldings and flowing heat-removing coolants at its bottom. The diameters for R 1 , R 2 and R 3 for the round shielding rods are designed as: 0.1 R 1 2 1 and 0.2 R 1 2 1 . Since a plurality of shielding rods of small diameter are provided, soft structure are obtained and a plurality of coolant paths are formed. (Furukawa, Y.)

  18. Experimental Studies of the Aerothermal Characteristics of the Project Orion CEV heat Shield in High Speed Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, T.P.; MacLean, M.; Holden, M.S.; Cassady, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental program has been completed by CUBRC exploring laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows over a 7.0% scale model of the Project ORION CEV geometry. This program was executed primarily to answer questions concerning the increase in heat transfer on the windward, or "hot shoulder" of the CEV heat shield from laminar to turbulent flow. To answer these questions CUBRC constructed and instrumented a 14.0 inch diameter Project ORION CEV model and ran a range of Reynolds numbers based on diameter from 1.0 to over 40 million at a Mach number of 8.0. These Reynolds numbers were selected to cover laminar to turbulent heating data on the "hot shoulder". Data obtained during these runs will be used to guide design decisions as they apply to heat shield thickness and extent. Several experiments at higher enthalpies were achieved to obtain data for code validation with real gas effects and transition. CUBRC also performed computation studies of these experiments to aid in the data reduction process and study turbulence modeling.

  19. Structural analysis of the Passive Magnetic Shield for the ITER Heating Neutral Beam Injector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, Santiago, E-mail: santiago.cabrera@ciemat.es [CIEMAT Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rincón, Esther; Ahedo, Begoña; Alonso, Javier; Barrera, Germán; Ramos, Francisco; Ríos, Luis [CIEMAT Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-Ouazzani, Anass; García, Pablo [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Agarici, Gilbert [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3 – 07/08, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The ITER Passive Magnetic Shield (PMS) main function is to protect the Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) from the external magnetic field coming from the tokamak, and to shield the NB cell from the radiation coming from all activated components. The shielding from the external magnetic field is performed in association with the Active Compensation Cooled Correction Coils (ACCC). The Bushing and Transmission Line (TL) PMS also provides structural support for HV bushing, allowing its maintenance and providing air sealing function between NBI cell and High Voltage deck room. The paper summarizes the structural analyses performed in order to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of the HNB PMS under operation combined with seismic event. The RCC-MR Code is used to validate the design, assuming creep is negligible, since the structure is expected to be at room temperature. P-type damage is assessed.

  20. Model-based analysis of nonstationary thermal mode in premises with an insolation passive heating system with a three-layer translucent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avezova, N.R.; Avezov, R.R.; Rashidov, Y.K. et al.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the model-based study of nonstationary thermal mode in premises with an insolation passive heating system with a three-layer translucent shield are presented. The article is aimed at determining daily variations in the air temperature of the heated premise on typical heating season days and analyzing the optimization of the thermal capacity of the short-term (daily) thermal battery of the heating system on this basis. (author)

  1. Experimental study of carbon materials behavior under high temperature and VUV radiation: Application to Solar Probe+ heat shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, J.; Sans, J.-L.; Balat-Pichelin, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Solar Probe Plus (SP+) mission is to understand how the solar corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. To achieve these goals, in situ measurements are necessary and the spacecraft has to approach the Sun as close as 9.5 solar radii. This trajectory induces extreme environmental conditions such as high temperatures and intense Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation (VUV). To protect the measurement and communication instruments, a heat shield constituted of a carbon material is placed on the top of the probe. In this study, the physical and chemical behavior of carbon materials is experimentally investigated under high temperatures (1600-2100 K), high vacuum (10 -4 Pa) and VUV radiation in conditions near those at perihelion for SP+. Thanks to several in situ and ex situ characterizations, it was found that VUV radiation induced modification of outgassing and of mass loss rate together with alteration of microstructure and morphology.

  2. Investigation of effect of post weld heat treatment conditions on residual stress for ITER blanket shield blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun-Chea, E-mail: hcjung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sa-Woong [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Hee [Division of Convergence Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-Wook [Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Min-Su; Shim, Hee-Jin [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • PWHT for ITER blanket shield block should be performed for dimensional stability. • Investigation of the effect of PWHT conditions on properties was performed. • Instrumented indentation method for evaluation of properties was used. • Residual stress and hardness decreased with increasing PWHT temperature. • Optimization of PWHT conditions would be needed for satisfaction of requirement. - Abstract: The blanket shield block (SB) shall be required the tight tolerance because SB interfaces with many components, such as flexible support keypads, First Wall (FW) support contact surfaces, FW central bolt, electrical strap contact surfaces and attachment inserts for both FW and Vacuum Vessel (VV). In order to fulfil the tight tolerance requirement, stress relieving shall be performed for dimensional stability after cover welding operation. In this paper, effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) conditions, temperature and holding time, was investigated on the residual stress and hardness. The 316L Stainless Steel (SS) was prepared and welded by manual TIG welding by using filler material with 2.4 mm of diameter. Welded 316L SS plate was machined to prepare the specimen for PWHT. PWHT was implemented at 250, 300, 400 °C for 2 and 3 h (400 °C only) and residual stress after relaxation were determined. The evaluation of residual stress and hardness for each specimen was carried out by instrumented indentation technique. The residual stress and hardness were decreased with increasing the heat treatment temperature and holding time.

  3. Radiation shielding lead shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei, Shoichi.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns lead shields for radiation shielding. Shield boxes are disposed so as to surround a pipeline through which radioactive liquids, mists or like other objects are passed. Flanges are formed to each of the end edges of the shield boxes and the shield boxes are connected to each other by the flanges. Upon installation, empty shield boxes not charged with lead particles and iron plate shields are secured at first at the periphery of the pipeline. Then, lead particles are charged into the shield boxes. This attains a state as if lead plate corresponding to the depth of the box is disposed. Accordingly, operations for installation, dismantling and restoration can be conducted in an empty state with reduced weight to facilitate the operations. (I.S.)

  4. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment.......Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  5. Wake Shield Target Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-01-01

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed

  6. Study of temperature effect on the physical properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete radiation shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kany, A.M.I.; EL-Fouly, M.M.; EL-Gohary, M.I.; Makatious, A.S.; Kamal, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental studies have been carried out to determine the change in unit weigh, compressive strength, water content and neutron macroscopic cross section of a new type of concrete shields made from egyptian ilmenite and serpentine ores when heated for long period at temperatures up to 600 degree C. Results show that the unit weight of the cure concrete has a value of 2.98 Ton/M 3 and decreases with increasing temperature, while the compressive strength reaches a maximum value of 19 Ton/M 2 at 100 degree C. The differential thermal analysis (D.T.A.) of this concrete shows three endothermic peaks at 100 degree C, 48 degree C and 740 degree C. Also, the thermogravimetry analysis (T.G.A.) shows that the cure concrete retains about 11% water content of the total sample weigh and still retains 4.5% of its initial value when heated for long period at 600 degree C. Results also show that the neutron macroscopic cross section (for neutrons of energies < 1 MeV) of the ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete decreases to 18.6% of its initial value after heating to 600 degree C

  7. I2S-LWR Activation Analysis of Heat Exchangers Using Hybrid Shielding Methodology with SCALE6.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, M.; Pevec, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept developed by Georgia Tech is a novel PWR reactor delivering electric power of 1000 MWe while implementing inherent safety features typical for Generation III+ small modular reactors. The main safety feature is based on integral primary circuit configuration, bringing together compact design of the reactor core with 121 fuel assembly (FA), control rod drive mechanism (CRDM), 8 primary heat exchangers (PHE), 4 passive decay heat removal systems (DHRS), 8 pumps, and other integral components. A high power density core based on silicide fuel is selected to achieve a high thermal power which is extracted with PHEs placed in the annual region between the barrel and the vessel. The complex and integrated design of I2S-LWR leads to activation of integral components, mainly made from stainless steel, so accurate and precise Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are needed to quantify potential dose rates to personnel during routine maintenance operation. This shielding problem is therefore very challenging one, posing a non-trivial neutron flux solution in a phase space. This paper presents the performance of the hybrid shielding methodologies CADIS/FW-CADIS implemented in the MAVRIC sequence of the SCALE6.1 code package. The main objective was to develop a detailed MC shielding model of the I2S-LWR reactor along with effective variance reduction (VR) parameters and to calculate neutron fluence rates inside PHEs. Such results are then utilized to find neutron activation rate distribution via 60Co generation inside of a stack of microchannel heat exchangers (MCHX), which will be periodically withdrawn for the maintenance. 59Co impurities are the main cause of (n,gamma) radiative gamma dose to personnel via neutron activation since 60Co has half-life of 5.27 years and is emitting high energy gamma rays (1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV). The developed MC model was successfully used to find converged fluxes inside all 8 stacks of

  8. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    Details are given of a cylindrical electric penetration assembly for carrying instrumentation leads, used in monitoring the performance of a nuclear reactor, through the containment wall of the reactor. Effective yet economical shielding protection against both fast neutron and high-energy gamma radiation is provided. Adequate spacing within the assembly allows excessive heat to be efficiently dissipated and means of monitoring all potential radiation and gas leakage paths are provided. (UK)

  9. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vargas-Arista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughness and critical crack length, and a transgranular brittle final fracture with an area fraction of dimple zones connecting cleavage facets. A fractographic analysis proved that as the normalizing time increased the crack length decreased. The increase in the river patterns on the fatigue crack propagation in zone II was also evidenced and final brittle fracture because of transgranular quasicleavage was observed. Larger grains induced a deterioration of the fatigue resistance of the HAZ.

  10. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    11. Khokhlova, V.A., et al., Effects of nonlinear propagation, cavitation , and boiling in lesion formation by high intensity focused ultrasound in...intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed as an emerging non-invasive strategy for cancer treatment by thermal ablation of tumor tissue. The...Concepts, Seattle, WA) operating at its fundamental frequency (1.1 MHz) or its third harmonics (3.3 MHz). The ultrasound imaging system was a 5/7

  11. MINIVER: Miniature version of real/ideal gas aero-heating and ablation computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Computer code is used to determine heat transfer multiplication factors, special flow field simulation techniques, different heat transfer methods, different transition criteria, crossflow simulation, and more efficient thin skin thickness optimization procedure.

  12. Development of a pencil-type single shield graphite quasi-adiabatic calorimeter and comparison of its performance with a double-shield graphite calorimeter for the measurement of nuclear heat deposition rate in a fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneja, O.P.; Rosselet, M.; Ligou, J.; Gardel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, heat deposition rate measurements were reported that used a quasi-adiabatic double-shield graphite calorimeter. It was found that for a better understanding of nuclear heating due to incident radiation, having a calorimeter that could be conveniently moved axially and radially inside large material blocks would be advisable. Here, a simpler design, based on three elements, i.e., core, jacket, and shield is conceived. The fabrication and testing details are presented, and the performance of the current calorimeter is compared with a double-shield calorimeter under similar conditions. Such a system is found to be extremely sensitive and can be employed successfully at the LOTUS facility for future nuclear heat deposition rate measurements in large blocks of materials. The current design paves the way for the convenient testing of a large amount of kerma factor data required for constructing future fusion machines. The same configuration with minor changes can be extended to most of the fusion materials of interest. The core of the new calorimeter measures 11 mm in diameter and height and has overall dimensions of 24 mm in diameter and 180 mm in height. The response of the calorimeter is measured by placing it in front of the Haefely neutron generator. 12 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Direct measurements of sample heating by a laser-induced air plasma in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Janna; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Angel, S Michael

    2012-08-01

    Direct measurements of temperature changes were made using small thermocouples (TC), placed near a laser-induced air plasma. Temperature changes up to ~500 °C were observed. From the measured temperature changes, estimates were made of the amount of heat absorbed per unit area. This allowed calculations to be made of the surface temperature, as a function of time, of a sample heated by the air plasma that is generated during orthogonal pre-ablation spark dual-pulse (DP) LIBS measurements. In separate experiments, single-pulse (SP) LIBS emission and sample ablation rate measurements were performed on nickel at sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to the maximum surface temperature that was calculated using the TC measurement results (500 °C). A small, but real sample temperature-dependent increase in both SP LIBS emission and the rate of sample ablation was found for nickel samples heated up to 500 °C. Comparison of DP LIBS emission enhancement values for bulk nickel samples at room temperature versus the enhanced SP LIBS emission and sample ablation rates observed as a function of increasing sample temperature suggests that sample heating by the laser-induced air plasma plays only a minor role in DP LIBS emission enhancement.

  14. The other side of the coin: urban heat islands as shields from extreme cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2017-12-01

    Extensive studies focusing on urban heat islands (UHIs) during hot periods create a perception that UHIs are invariably hazardous to human health and the sustainability of cities. Consequently, cities have invested substantial resources to try to mitigate UHIs. These urban policies can have serious repercussions since the health risks associated with cold weather are in fact higher than for heat episodes, yet wintertime UHIs have hardly been explored. We combine ground observations from 12 U.S. cities and high-resolution simulations to show that UHIs not only warm urban areas in the winter, but also further intensify during cold waves by up to 1.32 ± 0.78 oC (mean ± standard deviation) at night. Urban heat islands serve as shelters against extreme colds and provide invaluable benefits of reducing health risks and heating demand. More importantly, our simulations indicate that standard UHI mitigation measures such as green or cool roofs reduce these cold time amenities to different extents. Cities, particularly in cool and cold temperate climates, should hence revisit policies and efforts that are only desgined for hot periods. A paradigm shift is urgently needed to give an equal weight to the wintertime benefits of UHIs in the sustainability and resilience blueprints of cities.

  15. Transient heating effects on tungsten: Ablation of Be layers and enhanced fuzz growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.H.; Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.; Dittmar, T.; Hakola, A.; Höschen, T.; Likonen, J.; Nishijima, D.; Toudeshki, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed laser in the PISCES-B facility is used to simulate transient heating events such as ELMs and disruptions on W. The first study of enhanced nano-scale W tendril growth (“fuzz”) due to cyclic fast transient heating of W exposed to low energy (E He+ ∼ 30 eV) He + ions is presented. Fuzz due to transient heating is up to ∼10× thicker than the steady state fuzz thickness with no laser heating. A general thermal activation model yields higher values for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor than previously reported in steady state experiments with E He+ ∼ 60 eV. Transient heating of W exposed to D plasma with Be seeding shows that the removal threshold of Be follows simple energy considerations based on the heat of formation of Be

  16. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  17. Investigation the effect of outdoor air infiltration on the heat-shielding characteristics the outer walls of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vytchikov, Yu. S.; Kostuganov, A. B.; Saparev, M. E.; Belyakov, I. G.

    2018-03-01

    The presented article considers the influence of infiltrated outdoor air on the heat-shielding characteristics of the exterior walls of modern residential and public buildings. A review of the sources devoted to this problem confirmed its relevance at the present time, especially for high-rise buildings. The authors of the article analyzed the effect of longitudinal and transverse air infiltration on the heat-shielding characteristics of the outer wall of a 25-story building that was built in Samara. The results showed a significant reduction of the reduced resistance to the heat transfer of the outer wall when air is infiltrated through it. There are the results of full-scale examination of external walls to confirm the calculated data. Based on the results of the study carried out by the authors of the article, general recommendations on the internal finishing of the outer walls of high-rise buildings are given.

  18. Does Artificial Ascites Induce the Heat-Sink Phenomenon during Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of the Hepatic Subcapsular Area?: an in vivo Experimental Study Using a Rabbit Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Choi, Dong Il; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). One rabbit from the 'W' group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups 'W' and 'R' throughout the procedures (39.2± 0.4 .deg. C in group W and 33.4±4.3 .deg. C in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4±237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0±468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6±665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group 'C' rabbits (p = 0.030). Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region

  19. Does artificial ascites induce the heat-sink phenomenon during percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area?: an in vivo experimental study using a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2+/-0.4 degrees C in group W and 33.4+/-4.3 degrees C in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4+/-237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0+/-468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6+/-665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region.

  20. Heat shields for aircraft - A new concept to save lives in crash fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, C. B.; Parker, J. A.; Fish, R. H.; Henshaw, J.; Newland, J. H.; Tempesta, F. L.

    1971-01-01

    A passenger compartment surrounded by a fire-retardant shell, to protect the occupants long enough for the fire to burn out or for fire-fighting equipment to reach the aircraft and extinguish it, is proposed as a new concept for saving lives in crash fires. This concept is made possible by the recent development of two new fire-retardant materials: a very lightweight foam plastic, called polyisocyanurate foam, and an intumescent paint. Exposed to heat, the intumescent paint expands to many times its original thickness and insulates the surface underneath it. Demonstration tests are illustrated, described and discussed. However, some problems, such as preventing fuselage rupture and protecting windows, must be solved before such a system can be used.

  1. An experimental study of Alfven wave heating using electrostatically shielded antennas in TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, G.G.; Joye, B.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of electrostatic screens in ICRH for the protection of the plasma from the near fields of rf antennas, it has always been considered that low voltages at low frequency have made such screens unnecessary in Alfven wave heating (AWH). Despite this, AWH performs rather poorly as a heating method; the results being confused by a density rise up to 300 % of the target density. It is known that the density increase arises neither from impurity injection nor from a change in recycling. In addition, an extensive range of phenomena have been observed in the plasma scrape-off layer (SOL). During AWH, the SOL density is observed to decrease, the SOL floating potential is perturbed in a way that reflects the Alfven wave spectrum, the antennas charge negatively and draw a large current from the plasma and harmonics have been observed on the edge wave fields. The cause and correlation of these effects with each other and their impression on the bulk plasma response was not known. Experimental results from the TORTUS tokamak have indicated that the density increase might be eliminated by electrostatic screens. In their case, two AWH experiments were performed. In the first, an unshielded OFHC copper loop antenna was excited at a given power and, in the second, the same antenna was excited at the same power after installation of an aluminium, TiN coated, slotted screen. The density increase in the first case was shown to be completely eliminated in the second, although spectroscopic measurements revealed a difference in the plasma O(II) and Cu(I) content for each case. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  2. Fusion surface material melting, ablation, and ejection under high heat loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, M.R.; Doster, J.M.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Limiters, divertor plates, and sections of the first wall are exposed to intense heat loads during normal operation and plasma disruptions. This results in severe thermal stresses as well as erosion of the surface material. Large surface areas of compact high-field tokamaks are expected to be exposed to these high heat loads. The need for a fast and accurate computational model describing the heat transfer and phase change process has arisen as a part of the larger model of the plasma-edge region. The authors report on a solution scheme that has been developed that minimizes computational time for this time-dependent, one-dimensional, moving boundary problem. This research makes use of the heat balance integral technique, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than previous finite difference techniques. In addition, we report on the effect of molten material ejection (by external forces) on the total surface erosion rate

  3. The Laser ablation of a metal foam: The role of electron-phonon coupling and electronic heat diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandi, Yudi; Grossi, Joás; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of energetic laser pulses on a metal foam may lead to foam ablation. The processes occurring in the foam may differ strongly from those in a bulk metal: The absorption of laser light, energy transfer to the atomic system, heat conduction, and finally, the atomistic processes—such as melting or evaporation—may be different. In addition, novel phenomena take place, such as a reorganization of the ligament network in the foam. We study all these processes in an Au foam of average porosity 79% and an average ligament diameter of 2.5 nm, using molecular dynamics simulation. The coupling of the electronic system to the atomic system is modeled by using the electron-phonon coupling, g, and the electronic heat diffusivity, κe, as model parameters, since their actual values for foams are unknown. We show that the foam coarsens under laser irradiation. While κe governs the homogeneity of the processes, g mainly determines their time scale. The final porosity reached is independent of the value of g.

  4. Synergistic skin heat shock protein expression in response to combined laser treatment with a diode laser and ablative fractional lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Uwe; Sonja, Grunewald; Haedersdal, Merete

    2014-06-01

    Diode laser-based skin heating has been shown to minimise scars by interfering with wound healing responses through the induction of heat shock proteins (HSP). HSP are also induced after ablative fractional laser (AFXL) wound healing. AFXL itself is highly recommended for scar treatment. Therefore, the sequential combination of both modalities may produce superior outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the pretreatment effects of a diode laser before AFXL on wound healing responses in terms of HSP up-regulation in an in vitro model. Immediate responses and responses on days 1, 3 or 6 post-procedure were studied in an in vitro porcine skin model (n = 240). Untreated samples served as control. Immunohistochemical investigation (Hsp70) was performed in all untreated controls, diode laser-, AFXL-, and in diode laser + AFXL-treated samples. Hsp70 was shown to be up-regulated by all interventions between days 1 and 6 after interventions. The largest effect was caused by the combination of a diode laser and an AFXL procedure. Diode laser exposure induces a skin HSP response that can be further enhanced by sequential AFXL treatment. Clinical studies are necessary to investigate the dose response of HSP on scar formation and refine suitable laser exposure settings.

  5. On a computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and heating during focused ultrasound ablation of liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A.; Sheu, Tony W.H.; Thiriet, Marc; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    The influences of blood vessels and focused location on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors are studied numerically. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model construction is based on the linear Westervelt and bioheat equations as well as the nonlinear Navier–Stokes equations for the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. Different blood vessel diameters and focal point locations were investigated. We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that in large blood vessels both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can considerably change the temperature field and the thermal lesion near blood vessels. If the blood vessel is located within the beam width, both acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects should be addressed. The temperature rise on the blood vessel wall generated by a 1.0 MHz focused ultrasound transducer with the focal intensity 327 W/cm 2 was 54% lower when acoustic streaming effect was taken into account. Subject to the applied acoustic power the streaming velocity in a 3 mm blood vessel is 12 cm/s. Thirty percent of the necrosed volume can be reduced, when taking into account the acoustic streaming effect. -- Highlights: • 3D three-field coupling physical model for focused ultrasound tumor ablation is presented. • Acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects on ultrasound heating are investigated. • Acoustic streaming can considerably affect the temperature distribution. • The lesion can be reduced by 30% due to the acoustic streaming effect. • Temperature on the blood vessel wall is reduced by 54% due to the acoustic streaming effect

  6. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  7. Transpiration cooling assisted ablative thermal protection of aerospace substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.B.; Iqbal, N.; Haider, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Ablatives are heat-shielding materials used to protect aerospace substructures. These materials are sacrificial in nature and provide protection primarily through the large endothermic transformation during exposure to hyper thermal environment such as encountered in re-entry modules. The performance of certain ablatives was reported in terms of their TGA/DTA in Advanced Materials-97 (pp 57-65). The focus of this earlier research resided in the consolidation of interface between the refractory inclusion and the host polymeric matrix to improve thermal resistance. In the present work we explore the scope of transpiration cooling in ablative performance through flash evaporation of liquid incorporated in the host EPDM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer) matrix. The compression-molded specimens were exposed separately to plasma flame (15000 C) and oxyacetylene torch (3000 C) and the back face transient temperature is recorded in situ employing a thermocouple/data logger system. Both head on impingement (HOI) and parallel flow (PF) through a central cavity in the ablator were used. It is observed that transpiration cooling is effective and yields (a) rapid thermal equilibrium in the specimen, (b) lower back face temperature and (c) lower ablation rate, compared to conventional ablatives. SEM/EDS analysis is presented to amplify the point. (author)

  8. Development of heat resistant concrete and its application to concrete casks. Improvement of neutron shielding performance of concrete in high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owaki, Eiji; Hata, Akihito; Sugihara, Yutaka; Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Mantani, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete with hydrogen, which is able to shield neutron at more than 100degC, was developed. Using this new type concrete, a safety concrete cask having the same concept of metal casks was designed and produced. The new type cask omitted the inhalation and exhaust vent of the conventional type concrete casks. The new concrete consists of Portland cement added calcium hydroxide, iron powder and iron fiber. It showed 2.17 g/cm 3 density, 10.8 mass% water content, 1.4 W/(m·K) thermal conductivity at 150degC. Increasing of heat resistance made possible to produce the perfect sealing type structure, which had high shielding performance of radiation no consideration for streaming of radiation. Moreover, a monitor of sealing can be set. General view of concrete casks, outer view of 1/3 scaled model, cask storage system in the world, properties of new developed heat resistant concrete, results of shielding calculation are contained. (S.Y.)

  9. Moldable cork ablation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  10. Particulates reduction in laser-ablated YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films by laser-induced plume heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koren, G.; Baseman, R.J.; Gupta, A.; Lutwyche, M.I.; Laibowitz, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental demonstration of reduction in the number and size of particulates formed in the laser ablation deposition of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin films is obtained by the use of a second laser which further heats and fragments the blowoff material in the plume formed by the first laser. This results in a smoother film with higher critical current density as compared to that obtained without the second laser irradiation of the plume

  11. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ=9.3-μm CO2 laser: heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A mechanically scanned CO2 laser operated at high laser pulse repetition rates can be used to rapidly and precisely remove dental decay. This study aims to determine whether these laser systems can safely ablate enamel and dentin without excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. Samples were derived from noncarious extracted molars. Pulpal temperatures were recorded using microthermocouples situated at the pulp chamber roof of samples (n=12), which were occlusally ablated using a rapid-scanning, water-cooled 300 Hz CO2 laser over a two minute time course. The mechanical strength of facially ablated dentin (n=10) was determined via four-point bend test and compared to control samples (n=10) prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Composite-to-enamel bond strength was measured via single-plane shear test for ablated/non-etched (n=10) and ablated/acid-etched (n=8) samples and compared to control samples (n=9) prepared by 320 grit wet sanding. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature at 19.0°C (s.d.=0.9) if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin and enamel, the treated surfaces were uniformly ablated and there were no cracks observable on the laser treated surfaces. Fourpoint bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d.=4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d.=2.7) for control (p>0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths of 31.2 MPa (s.d.=2.5, penamel without excessive heat accumulation and with minimal thermal damage. It is not clear whether the small (16%) but statistically significant reduction in the shear bond strength to enamel is clinically significant since the mean shear bond strength exceeded 30 MPa.

  12. Potassium titanyl phosphate laser tissue ablation: development and experimental validation of a new numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhalil, Hossam; Akkin, Taner; Pearce, John; Bischof, John

    2012-10-01

    The photoselective vaporization of prostate (PVP) green light (532 nm) laser is increasingly being used as an alternative to the transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in older patients and those who are poor surgical candidates. In order to achieve the goals of increased tissue removal volume (i.e., "ablation" in the engineering sense) and reduced collateral thermal damage during the PVP green light treatment, a two dimensional computational model for laser tissue ablation based on available parameters in the literature has been developed and compared to experiments. The model is based on the control volume finite difference and the enthalpy method with a mechanistically defined energy necessary to ablate (i.e., physically remove) a volume of tissue (i.e., energy of ablation E(ab)). The model was able to capture the general trends experimentally observed in terms of ablation and coagulation areas, their ratio (therapeutic index (TI)), and the ablation rate (AR) (mm(3)/s). The model and experiment were in good agreement at a smaller working distance (WD) (distance from the tissue in mm) and a larger scanning speed (SS) (laser scan speed in mm/s). However, the model and experiment deviated somewhat with a larger WD and a smaller SS; this is most likely due to optical shielding and heat diffusion in the laser scanning direction, which are neglected in the model. This model is a useful first step in the mechanistic prediction of PVP based BPH laser tissue ablation. Future modeling efforts should focus on optical shielding, heat diffusion in the laser scanning direction (i.e., including 3D effects), convective heat losses at the tissue boundary, and the dynamic optical, thermal, and coagulation properties of BPH tissue.

  13. Shielding practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauermann, P.F.

    1985-08-01

    The basis of shielding practice against external irradiation is shown in a simple way. For most sources of radiation (point sources) occurring in shielding practice, the basic data are given, mainly in the form of tables, which are required to solve the shielding problems. The application of these data is explained and discussed using practical examples. Thickness of shielding panes of glove boxes for α and β radiation; shielding of sealed γ-radiography sources; shielding of a Co-60 radiation source, and of the manipulator panels for hot cells; damping factors for γ radiation and neutrons; shielding of fast and thermal neutrons, and of bremsstrahlung (X-ray tubes, Kr-85 pressure gas cylinders, 42 MeV betatrons, 20 MeV linacs); two-fold shielding (lead glass windows for hot cells, 14 MeV neutron generators); shielding against scattered radiation. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Effect of laser absorption on picosecond laser ablation of Cr12MoV mold steel, 9Cr18 stainless steel and H13A cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xizhao; Zhang, Fei; Deng, Leimin; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-05-01

    Due to excellent properties, Cr12MoV mold steel, 9Cr18 stainless steel and H13A cemented carbide are widely used in industry. In this paper, the effect of absorption of laser light on ablation efficiency and roughness have been studied using a picosecond pulse Nd:YVO4 laser. The experimental results reveal that laser wavelength, original surface roughness and chemical composition play an important role in controlling ablation efficiency and roughness. Firstly, higher ablation efficiency with lower surface roughness is achieved on the ablation of 9Cr18 at 532, comparing with 1064 nm. Secondly, the ablation efficiency increases while the Ra of the ablated region decreases with the decrease of original surface roughness on ablation of Cr12MoV mold steel at 532 nm. Thirdly, the ablation efficiency of H13A cemented carbide is much higher than 9Cr18 stainless steel and Cr12MoV mold steel at 1064 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images reveals the formation of pores on the surface of 9Cr18 stainless steel and Cr12MoV mold steel at 532 nm while no pores are formed at 1064 nm. As to H13A cemented carbide, worm-like structure is formed at 1064 nm. The synergetic effects of the heat accumulation, plasma shielding and ablation threshold on laser ablation efficiency and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systematically in this paper.

  15. Thermal protection for hypervelocity flight in earth's atmosphere by use of radiation backscattering ablating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John T.; Yang, Lily

    1991-01-01

    A heat-shield-material response code predicting the transient performance of a material subject to the combined convective and radiative heating associated with the hypervelocity flight is developed. The code is dynamically interactive to the heating from a transient flow field, including the effects of material ablation on flow field behavior. It accomodates finite time variable material thickness, internal material phase change, wavelength-dependent radiative properties, and temperature-dependent thermal, physical, and radiative properties. The equations of radiative transfer are solved with the material and are coupled to the transfer energy equation containing the radiative flux divergence in addition to the usual energy terms.

  16. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  17. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm{sup 3}/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  18. The potential of high heat generating granites as EGS source to generate power and reduce CO2 emissions, western Arabian shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharam, D.; Lashin, A.; Al Arifi, N.; Al Bassam, A.; El Alfy, M.; Ranjith, P. G.; Varun, C.; Singh, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Saudi Arabia's dependence on oil and gas to generate electricity and to desalinate sea water is widely perceived to be economically and politically unsustainable. A recent business as usual simulation concluded that the Kingdom would become an oil importer by 2038. There is an opportunity for the country to over come this problem by using its geothermal energy resources. The heat flow and heat generation values of the granites spread over a cumulative area of 161,467 sq. km and the regional stress regime over the western Saudi Arabian shield strongly suggest that this entire area is potential source of energy to support 1) electricity generation, 2) fresh water generation through desalination and 3) extensive agricultural activity for the next two decades. The country can adopt a policy to harness this vast untapped enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to mitigate climate and fresh water related issues and increase the quantity of oil for export. The country has inherent expertise to develop this resource.

  19. Flow and pressure profiles for the primary heat transport system of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station for the operation with few isolated reactor channels near the end shield cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, A J; Chaki, S K; Sehgal, R L; Venkat Raj, V [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The RAPS (Rajasthan Atomic Power Station) unit-1 is now operating at reduced power due to the removal of fifteen fuel channels for repair of south end shield cracks. The power level is restricted to 50% of the full power capacity as a precautionary measure. The relative difference that operation at 50% power and higher power would make to the end shield structure is being currently analysed with a view to operate this reactor at higher power levels. As a prerequisite, a detailed thermal hydraulic analysis is essential to assess the effect of reactor operation with isolated channels on the primary heat transport (PHT) system pressure, flow, temperature. The adequacy of the existing trip set points for the plant operation under this mode is also required to be assessed. In the present study, analysis of the PHT system has been carried out to determine the flow and pressure profiles for the RAPS heat transport system for operation of the reactor with isolated channels. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Computational Modeling of Ablation on an Irradiated Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2017-11-01

    Computational modeling of pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with an irradiated metallic target is presented. The model formulation involves ablation of the metallic target irradiated by pulsed high intensity laser at normal atmospheric conditions. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented along with its relevance for the development of protective shields. In this context, the available results for a representative irradiation from 1064 nm laser pulse is used to analyze various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  1. Density-tunable lightweight polymer composites with dual-functional ability of efficient EMI shielding and heat dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Yu, Seunggun; Shahzad, Faisal; Kim, Woo Nyon; Park, Cheolmin; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2017-09-21

    Lightweight dual-functional materials with high EMI shielding performance and thermal conductivity are of great importance in modern cutting-edge applications, such as mobile electronics, automotive, aerospace, and military. Unfortunately, a clear material solution has not emerged yet. Herein, we demonstrate a simple and effective way to fabricate lightweight metal-based polymer composites with dual-functional ability of excellent EMI shielding effectiveness and thermal conductivity using expandable polymer bead-templated Cu hollow beads. The low-density Cu hollow beads (ρ ∼ 0.44 g cm -3 ) were fabricated through electroless plating of Cu on the expanded polymer beads with ultralow density (ρ ∼ 0.02 g cm -3 ). The resulting composites that formed a continuous 3D Cu network with a very small Cu content (∼9.8 vol%) exhibited excellent EMI shielding (110.7 dB at 7 GHz) and thermal conductivity (7.0 W m -1 K -1 ) with isotropic features. Moreover, the densities of the composites are tunable from 1.28 to 0.59 g cm -3 in accordance with the purpose of their applications. To the best of our knowledge, the resulting composites are the best lightweight dual-functional materials with exceptionally high EMI SE and thermal conductivity performance among synthetic polymer composites.

  2. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in human skin after in vitro ultraviolet-excimer laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, H.A.; Margolis, R.; Boll, J.; Kochevar, I.E.; Parrish, J.A.; Oseroff, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    DNA damage repaired by the excision repair system and measured as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was assessed in freshly excised human skin after 193 and 248 nm ultraviolet (UV)-excimer laser ablative incisions. Laser irradiation at 248 nm induced DNA damage throughout a zone of cells surrounding the ablated and heat-damaged area. In contrast, with 193 nm irradiation UDS was not detected in cells adjacent to the ablated area, even though DNA strongly absorbs this wavelength. Our results suggest that the lack of UDS after 193 nm irradiation is due to: ''shielding'' of DNA by the cellular interstitium, membrane, and cytoplasm, DNA damage that is not repaired by excision repair, or thermal effects that either temporarily or permanently inhibit the excision repair processes

  3. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in human skin after in vitro ultraviolet-excimer laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, H.A.; Margolis, R.; Boll, J.; Kochevar, I.E.; Parrish, J.A.; Oseroff, A.R.

    1987-08-01

    DNA damage repaired by the excision repair system and measured as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was assessed in freshly excised human skin after 193 and 248 nm ultraviolet (UV)-excimer laser ablative incisions. Laser irradiation at 248 nm induced DNA damage throughout a zone of cells surrounding the ablated and heat-damaged area. In contrast, with 193 nm irradiation UDS was not detected in cells adjacent to the ablated area, even though DNA strongly absorbs this wavelength. Our results suggest that the lack of UDS after 193 nm irradiation is due to: ''shielding'' of DNA by the cellular interstitium, membrane, and cytoplasm, DNA damage that is not repaired by excision repair, or thermal effects that either temporarily or permanently inhibit the excision repair processes.

  4. PENGARUH VARIASI SUHU POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT ANNEALING TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIS MATERIAL BAJA EMS-45 DENGAN METODE PENGELASAN SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusiyanto Rusiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan Untuk mengetahui nilai kekerasan Vickers material Baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan dan setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan tanpa post weld heat treatment annealing, Untuk mengetahui berapakah suhu optimal post weld heat treatment annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 dengan variasi suhu yang digunakan 350 o C, 550 o C, dan 750 C. Untuk mengetahui struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 akibat variasi suhu post weld heat treatment annealing pada proses pengelasan dengan menggunakan metode pengelasan shielded metal arc welding. Bahan atau material dasar yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Baja EMS-45 dengan ketebalan pelat 10 mm, lebar pelat 20 mm dan panjang 100 mm. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian nilai kekerasan tertinggi setelah proses pengelasan terletak pada daerah Logam Las. Pengelasan non PWHT memiliki nilai kekerasan paling tinggi setelah proses pengelasan yaitu sebesar 183,2 VHN. Suhu optimal Post Weld Heat Treatment Annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 adalah pada suhu 750 C. Karena pada PWHT pada suhu tersebut mengalami penurunan kekerasan yang besar yaitu sebesar 127,2 VHN, sehingga material baja EMS-45 dapat memperbaiki sifat mampu mesinnya. Struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan berupa grafit serpih, perlit dan ferit, setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan mempunyai struktur mikro berupa matrik ferit dan grafit pada daerah logam las, matrik perlit kasar dan grafit serpih pada daerah HAZ dan struktur perlit, grafit serpih dan ferit pada daerah logam induk o o

  5. Computer modeling of the combined effects of perfusion, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity on tissue heating patterns in radiofrequency tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Liu, Zhengjun; Humphries, Stanley; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2008-11-01

    To use an established computer simulation model of radiofrequency (RF) ablation to characterize the combined effects of varying perfusion, and electrical and thermal conductivity on RF heating. Two-compartment computer simulation of RF heating using 2-D and 3-D finite element analysis (ETherm) was performed in three phases (n = 88 matrices, 144 data points each). In each phase, RF application was systematically modeled on a clinically relevant template of application parameters (i.e., varying tumor and surrounding tissue perfusion: 0-5 kg/m(3)-s) for internally cooled 3 cm single and 2.5 cm cluster electrodes for tumor diameters ranging from 2-5 cm, and RF application times (6-20 min). In the first phase, outer thermal conductivity was changed to reflect three common clinical scenarios: soft tissue, fat, and ascites (0.5, 0.23, and 0.7 W/m- degrees C, respectively). In the second phase, electrical conductivity was changed to reflect different tumor electrical conductivities (0.5 and 4.0 S/m, representing soft tissue and adjuvant saline injection, respectively) and background electrical conductivity representing soft tissue, lung, and kidney (0.5, 0.1, and 3.3 S/m, respectively). In the third phase, the best and worst combinations of electrical and thermal conductivity characteristics were modeled in combination. Tissue heating patterns and the time required to heat the entire tumor +/-a 5 mm margin to >50 degrees C were assessed. Increasing background tissue thermal conductivity increases the time required to achieve a 50 degrees C isotherm for all tumor sizes and electrode types, but enabled ablation of a given tumor size at higher tissue perfusions. An inner thermal conductivity equivalent to soft tissue (0.5 W/m- degrees C) surrounded by fat (0.23 W/m- degrees C) permitted the greatest degree of tumor heating in the shortest time, while soft tissue surrounded by ascites (0.7 W/m- degrees C) took longer to achieve the 50 degrees C isotherm, and complete ablation

  6. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  7. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  8. Estimation of the heat generation in vitrified waste product and shield thickness of the cask for the transportation of vitrified waste product using Monte Carlo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, A.K.; Jakhete, A.P.; Mehta, D.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    High Level Liquid waste (HLW) generated during reprocessing of spent fuel contains most of the radioactivity present in the spent fuel resulting in the need for isolation and surveillance for extended period of time. Major components in HLW are the corrosion products, fission products such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 106 Ru, 144 Ce, 125 Sb etc, actinides and various chemicals used during reprocessing of spent fuel. Fresh HLW having an activity concentration of around 100Ci/l is to be vitrified into borosilicate glass and packed in canisters which are placed in S.S overpacks for better confinement. These overpacks contain around 0.7 Million Curies of activity. Characterisation of activity in HLW and activity profile of radionuclides for various cooling periods sets the base for the study. For transporting the vitrified waste product (VWP), two most important parameters is the shield thickness of the transportation cask and the heat generation in the waste product. This paper describes the methodology used in the estimation of lead thickness for the transportation cask using the Monte Carlo Technique. Heat generation due to decay of fission products results in the increase in temperature of the vitrified waste product during interim storage and disposal. Glass being the material, not having very high thermal conductivity, temperature difference between the canister and surrounding bears significance in view of the possibility of temperature based devitrification of VWP. The heat generation in the canister and the overpack containing vitrified glass is also estimated using MCNP. (author)

  9. Cardiac ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ratheal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy to destroy cells in the heart to terminate and/or prevent arrhythmias. The indications for cardiac catheter ablation include refractory, symptomatic arrhythmias, with more specific guidelines for atrial fibrillation in particular. The ablation procedure itself involves mapping the arrhythmia and destruction of the aberrant pathway in an effort to permanently prevent the arrhythmia. There are many types of arrhythmias, and they require individualized approaches to ablation based on their innately different electrical pathways. Ablation of arrhythmias, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, and atrial-fibrillation, is discussed in this review. Ablation has a high success rate overall and minimal complication rates, leading to improved quality of life in many patients.

  10. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Bhiken, E-mail: bin4n@virginia.edu [University of Virginia, Department of Anesthesiology (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H. [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  11. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  12. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Electromagnetic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic shield is described comprising: closed, electrically-conductive rings, each having an open center; and binder means for arranging the rings in a predetermined, fixed relationship relative to each other, the so-arranged rings and binder means defining an outer surface; wherein electromagnetic energy received by the shield from a source adjacent its outer surface induces an electrical current to flow in a predetermined direction adjacent and parallel to the outer surface, through the rings; and wherein each ring is configured to cause source-induced alternating current flowing through the portion of the ring closest to the outer surface to electromagnetically induce an oppositely-directed current in the portion of the ring furthest from the surface, such oppositely-directed current bucking any source-induced current in the latter ring portion and thus reducing the magnitude of current flowing through it, whereby the electromagnetic shielding effected by the shield is enhanced

  14. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  15. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  16. Lithospheric structure of southern Indian shield and adjoining oceans: integrated modelling of topography, gravity, geoid and heat flow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Zeyen, H.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, B.

    2013-07-01

    For the present 2-D lithospheric density modelling, we selected three geotransects of more than 1000 km in length each crossing the southern Indian shield, south of 16°N, in N-S and E-W directions. The model is based on the assumption of local isostatic equilibrium and is constrained by the topography, gravity and geoid anomalies, by geothermal data, and where available by seismic data. Our integrated modelling approach reveals a crustal configuration with the Moho depth varying from ˜40 km beneath the Dharwar Craton, and ˜39 km beneath the Southern Granulite Terrane to about 15-20 km beneath the adjoining oceans. The lithospheric thickness varies significantly along the three profiles from ˜70-100 km under the adjoining oceans to ˜130-135 km under the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka and increasing gradually to ˜165-180 km beneath the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrane and the Dharwar Craton. This step-like lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) structure indicates a normal lithospheric thickness beneath the adjoining oceans, the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrane and the Dharwar Craton. The thin lithosphere below the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka is, however, atypical considering its age. Our results suggest that the southern Indian shield as a whole cannot be supported isostatically only by thickened crust; a thin and hot lithosphere beneath the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka is required to explain the high topography, gravity, geoid and crustal temperatures. The widespread thermal perturbation during Pan-African (550 Ma) metamorphism and the breakup of Gondwana during late Cretaceous are proposed as twin cause mechanism for the stretching and/or convective removal of the lower part of lithospheric mantle and its replacement by hotter and lighter asthenosphere in the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka

  17. Continued Optimization of Low-Density Foam-Reinforced Ablatives for High-Velocity, High Heat Flux Earth Return Missions,, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In previous work for NASA, Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer...

  18. Characterization of laser ablation of copper in the irradiance regime of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, J., E-mail: jessica.picard@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Sirven, J.-B.; Lacour, J.-L. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Musset, O. [Université de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5209, F-21000 Dijon (France); Cardona, D.; Hubinois, J.-C. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Mauchien, P. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-11-01

    The LIBS signal depends both on the ablated mass and on the plasma excitation temperature. These fundamental parameters depend in a complex manner on laser ablation and on laser–plasma coupling. As several works in the literature suggest that laser ablation processes play a predominant role compared to plasma heating phenomena in the LIBS signal variations, this paper focuses on the study of laser ablation. The objective was to determine an interaction regime enabling to maximally control the laser ablation. Nanosecond laser ablation of copper at 266 nm was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry analysis, in air at 1 bar and in the vacuum. The laser beam spatial profile at the sample surface was characterized in order to give realistic values of the irradiance. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume was studied. Then, the ablation crater morphology, volume, depth and diameter were measured as a function of irradiance between 0.35 and 96 GW/cm². Results show that in the vacuum, a regular trend is observed over the whole irradiance range. In air at 1 bar, below a certain irradiance, laser ablation is very similar to the vacuum case, and the ablation efficiency of copper was estimated at 0.15 ± 0.03 atom/photon. Beyond this irradiance, the laser beam propagation is strongly disrupted by the expansion of the dense plasma, and plasma shielding appears. The fraction of laser energy used for laser ablation and for plasma heating is estimated in the different irradiance regimes. - Highlights: • The morphology of copper's craters was studied as a function of the pulse energy. • Correlation at low energy and two pressures between crater volume and pulse energy • The ablation efficiency of copper at 1 bar is equal to 0.15 atom/photon. • Ablation efficiency in the vacuum is not limited by laser–plasma interaction. • Physical mechanisms of laser ablation at both pressures are discussed.

  19. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigenori; Iimori, Hiroshi; Kobori, Junzo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a neutron shielding material which incorporates preferable shielding capacity, heat resistance, fire resistance and workability by employing a mixture of thermosetting resin, polyethylene and aluminium hydroxide in special range ratio and curing it. Constitution: A mixture containing 20 to 60% by weight of thermosetting resin having preferable heat resistance, 10 to 40% by weight of polyethylene powder having high hydrogen atom density and 1000 to 60000 of molecular weight, and 15 to 55% by weight of Al(OH) 3 for imparting fire resistance and self-fire extinguishing property thereto is cured. At this time approx. 0.5 to 5% of curing catalyst of the thermosetting resin is contained in 100 parts by weight of the mixture. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. Shielding Gas and Heat Input Effects on the Mechanical and Metallurgical Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding of Super Martensitic Stainless Steel (12Cr5Ni2Mo) Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, T.; Prabhakar, M.; Sathiya, P.

    This paper deals with the effects of shielding gas mixtures (100% CO2, 100% Ar and 80 % Ar + 20% CO2) and heat input (3.00, 3.65 and 4.33kJ/mm) on the mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of AISI 410S (American Iron and Steel Institute) super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) by gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. AISI 410S SMSS with 1.2mm diameter of a 410 filler wire was used in this study. A detailed microstructural analysis of the weld region as well as the mechanical properties (impact, microhardness and tensile tests at room temperature and 800∘C) was carried out. The tensile and impact fracture surfaces were further analyzed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). 100% Ar shielded welds have a higher amount of δ ferrite content and due to this fact the tensile strength of the joints is superior to the other two shielded welds.

  1. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.

    1979-01-01

    Shields for equipment in which ionising radiation is associated with high electrical gradients, for example X-ray tubes and particle accelerators, incorporate a radiation-absorbing metal, as such or as a compound, and are electrically non-conducting and can be placed in the high electrical gradient region of the equipment. Substances disclosed include dispersions of lead, tungsten, uranium or oxides of these in acrylics polyesters, PVC, ABS, polyamides, PTFE, epoxy resins, glass or ceramics. The material used may constitute an evacuable enclosure of the equipment or may be an external shield thereof. (U.K.)

  2. Design experience: CRBRP radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.; Chan, T.C.; Gallo, F.G.; Hedgecock, L.R.; McGinnis, C.A.; Wrights, G.N.

    1978-11-01

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is being designed as a fast breeder demonstration project in the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Radiation shielding design of the facility consists of a comprehensive design approach to assure compliance with design and government regulatory requirements. Studies conducted during the CRBRP design process involved the aspects of radiation shielding dealing with protection of components, systems, and personnel from radiation exposure. Achievement of feasible designs, while considering the mechanical, structural, nuclear, and thermal performance of the component or system, has required judicious trade-offs in radiation shielding performance. Specific design problems which have been addressed are in-vessel radial shielding to protect permanent core support structures, flux monitor system shielding to isolate flux monitoring systems for extraneous background sources, reactor vessel support shielding to allow personnel access to the closure head during full power operation, and primary heat transport system pipe chaseway shielding to limit intermediate heat transport system sodium system coolant activation. The shielding design solutions to these problems defined a need for prototypic or benchmark experiments to provide assurance of the predicted shielding performance of selected design solutions and the verification of design methodology. Design activities of CRBRP plant components an systems, which have the potential for radiation exposure of plant personnel during operation or maintenance, are controlled by a design review process related to radiation shielding. The program implements design objectives, design requirements, and cost/benefit guidelines to assure that radiation exposures will be ''as low as reasonably achievable''

  3. Gonadal shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, J A; Stiteler, R D; Glasgow, G P; Mill, W B

    1975-10-01

    A secondary gonadal shield for use in the pelvic irradiation of males was designed and built using material and apparatus available with the Cerrobend blocking system. The gonadal dose was reduced to approximately 1.5 to 2.5% of the given dose.

  4. F-doped VO2 nanoparticles for thermochromic energy-saving foils with modified color and enhanced solar-heat shielding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Chen, Shi; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2013-07-28

    F-doped VO2 (M1) nanoparticles were prepared via one-pot hydrothermal synthesis. The F-doping can minimise the size of the VO2 (M1) nanoparticles, induce a homogeneous size distribution and effectively decrease the phase transition temperature to 35 °C at 2.93% F in VO2. VO2 smart glass foils obtained by casting these nanoparticles exhibit excellent thermochromism in the near-infrared region, which suggests that these foils can be used for energy-efficient glass. Compared to a pure VO2 foil, the 2.93% F-doped VO2 foil exhibits an increased solar-heat shielding ability (35.1%) and a modified comfortable colour, while still retaining an excellent solar modulation ability (10.7%) and an appropriate visible transmittance (48.7%). The F-doped VO2 foils are the first to simultaneously meet the requirements of a reduced phase transition temperature, diluted colour and excellent thermochromic properties, and these properties make the further improved F-doped VO2 foils suitable for commercial applications in energy efficient glass.

  5. Plasma Wind Tunnel Investigation of European Ablators in Nitrogen/Methane Using Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda Wernitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For atmospheric reentries at high enthalpies ablative heat shield materials are used, such as those for probes entering the atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan, such as Cassini-Huygens in December, 2004. The characterization of such materials in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere is of interest. A European ablative material, AQ60, has been investigated in plasma wind tunnel tests at the IRS plasma wind tunnel PWK1 using the magnetoplasma dynamic generator RD5 as plasma source in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere. The dimensions of the samples are 45 mm in length with a diameter of 39 mm. The actual ablator has a thickness of 40 mm. The ablator is mounted on an aluminium substructure. The experiments were conducted at two different heat flux regimes, 1.4 MW/m2 and 0.3 MW/m2. In this paper, results of emission spectroscopy at these plasma conditions in terms of plasma species’ temperatures will be presented, including the investigation of the free-stream species, N2 and N2+, and the major erosion product C2, at a wavelength range around 500 nm–600 nm.

  6. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadori Amir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  7. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  8. Shielded container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    A shielded container for transportation of radioactive materials is disclosed in which leakage from the container is minimized due to constructional features including, inter alia, forming the container of a series of telescoping members having sliding fits between adjacent side walls and having at least two of the members including machine sealed lids and at least two of the elements including hand-tightenable caps

  9. On the boundary conditions and validity of the neutral shielding model of a refuelling pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.T.

    1982-02-01

    By comparing the ablation time of a hydrogen pellet in a tokamak discharge with the time required for the sublimation process, the vaporization of the pellet is shown to be a dynamic phase transition - i.e. the transport of heat is due to the propagation of an evaporation front. Based on this finding, an alternative boundary condition, consistent with the energy conservation law, is formulated. Computational results utilizing the new boundary condition indicate that the ablatant near the pellet surface is hotter and less dense compared with the results which make use of the previous condition of the vanishing flux. The discrepancy between the two solutions becomes less significant once the ablatant reaches the sonic radius. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate is unaffected by this change of boundary condition. The present analysis shows that the validity of the neutral shielding model is based mainly on the existence of a thin envelope around the pellet where strong energy absorption occurs and is insensitive to the actual vaporization process occuring at the pellet surface. (Auth.)

  10. Thermal design of top shield for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajapathy, R.; Jalaludeen, S.; Selvaraj, A.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    India's Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor programme started with the construction of loop type 13MW(e) Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) which attained criticality in October 1985. With the experience of FBTR, the design work on pool type 500 MW(e) Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which will be a forerunner for future commercial fast breeder reactors, has been started. The Top Shield forms the cover for the main vessel which contains the primary circuit. Argon cover gas separates the Top Shield from the free level of hot sodium pool (803K). The Top Shield which is of box type construction consists of control plug, two rotatable plugs and roof slab, assembled together, which provide biological shielding, thermal shielding and leak tight containment at the top of the main vessel. Heat is transferred from the sodium pool to the Top Shield through argon cover gas and through components supported by it and dipped in the sodium pool. The Top Shield should be maintained at the desired operating temperature by incorporating a cooling system inside it. Insulation may be provided below the bottom plate to reduce the heat load to the cooling system, if required. The thermal design of Top Shield consists of estimation of heat transfer to the Top Shield, selection of operating temperature, assessment of insulation requirement, design of cooling system and evaluation of transient temperature changes

  11. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm 2 ;. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach

  12. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  13. Case study on the dynamics of ultrafast laser heating and ablation of gold thin films by ultrafast pump-probe reflectometry and ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, T.; Wang, J.; Olbrich, M.; Frank, M.; Horn, A.

    2018-02-01

    To increase the comprehension of ultrafast laser ablation, the ablation process has to be portrayed with sufficient temporal resolution. For example, the temporal modification of the complex refractive index {\\tilde{n}} and the relative reflectance of a sample material after irradiation with ultrafast single-pulsed laser radiation can be measured with a pump-probe setup. This work describes the construction and validation of a pump-probe setup enabling spatially, temporally, and spectroscopically resolved Brewster angle microscopy, reflectometry, ellipsometry, and shadow photography. First pump-probe reflectometry and ellipsometry measurements are performed on gold at λ _{probe}= 440 nm and three fluences of the single-pulsed pump radiation at λ _{pump}= 800 nm generating no, gentle, and strong ablation. The relative reflectance overall increases at no and gentle ablation. At strong ablation, the relative reflectance locally decreases, presumable caused by emitted thermal electrons, ballistic electrons, and ablating material. The refractive index n is slightly decreasing after excitation, while the extinction coefficient k is increasing.

  14. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  15. Core test reactor shield cooling system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.M.; Elliott, R.D.

    1971-01-01

    System requirements for cooling the shield within the vacuum vessel for the core test reactor are analyzed. The total heat to be removed by the coolant system is less than 22,700 Btu/hr, with an additional 4600 Btu/hr to be removed by the 2-inch thick steel plate below the shield. The maximum temperature of the concrete in the shield can be kept below 200 0 F if the shield plug walls are kept below 160 0 F. The walls of the two ''donut'' shaped shield segments, which are cooled by the water from the shield and vessel cooling system, should operate below 95 0 F. The walls of the center plug, which are cooled with nitrogen, should operate below 100 0 F. (U.S.)

  16. The magnetic vapour shield effect at divertor plates during plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazza, G.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Wuerz, H.; Landman, I.

    1995-01-01

    Hard disruptions in a TOKAMAK cause a large thermal load on the divertor plates with an instantaneous ablation of a part of the heated material. The produced vapour cloud screens the plasma facing component from the direct interaction with the disrupting plasma (vapour shield effect). In order to quantify the damage to the divertor the magneto-hydrodynamic behaviour of the expanding vapour cloud has been investigated using an extended version of the 1-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code KATACO. Modelling of the magnetic field effects on the expanding plasma takes into account that the magnetic field is oblique to the divertor (1 1/2 dimensional model). The ''Radiation Heat Conduction Approximation'' has been used for describing the radiative energy transport. In this paper results are presented assuming graphite as divertor material, irradiated with a proton beam of an energy density of 12MJ/m 2 and a duration of 100μs. (orig.)

  17. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  18. An inverse method for non linear ablative thermics with experimentation of automatic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alestra, S [Simulation Information Technology and Systems Engineering, EADS IW Toulouse (France); Collinet, J [Re-entry Systems and Technologies, EADS ASTRIUM ST, Les Mureaux (France); Dubois, F [Professor of Applied Mathematics, Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers Paris (France)], E-mail: stephane.alestra@eads.net, E-mail: jean.collinet@astrium.eads.net, E-mail: fdubois@cnam.fr

    2008-11-01

    Thermal Protection System is a key element for atmospheric re-entry missions of aerospace vehicles. The high level of heat fluxes encountered in such missions has a direct effect on mass balance of the heat shield. Consequently, the identification of heat fluxes is of great industrial interest but is in flight only available by indirect methods based on temperature measurements. This paper is concerned with inverse analyses of highly evolutive heat fluxes. An inverse problem is used to estimate transient surface heat fluxes (convection coefficient), for degradable thermal material (ablation and pyrolysis), by using time domain temperature measurements on thermal protection. The inverse problem is formulated as a minimization problem involving an objective functional, through an optimization loop. An optimal control formulation (Lagrangian, adjoint and gradient steepest descent method combined with quasi-Newton method computations) is then developed and applied, using Monopyro, a transient one-dimensional thermal model with one moving boundary (ablative surface) that has been developed since many years by ASTRIUM-ST. To compute numerically the adjoint and gradient quantities, for the inverse problem in heat convection coefficient, we have used both an analytical manual differentiation and an Automatic Differentiation (AD) engine tool, Tapenade, developed at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis by the TROPICS team. Several validation test cases, using synthetic temperature measurements are carried out, by applying the results of the inverse method with minimization algorithm. Accurate results of identification on high fluxes test cases, and good agreement for temperatures restitutions, are obtained, without and with ablation and pyrolysis, using bad fluxes initial guesses. First encouraging results with an automatic differentiation procedure are also presented in this paper.

  19. ORNL neutral gas shielding model for pellet-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milora, S.L; Foster, C.A.

    1977-05-01

    A revised neutral molecule ablation model is derived to describe the evaporation of a solid hydrogen pellet in a tokamak plasma. The approach taken is based on the theory of Parks, Turnbull, and Foster who postulate that a cloud of molecular hydrogen surrounding the pellet shields the surface from incoming energetic electrons and, in so doing, regulates the evaporation rate. This treatment differs from an earlier model in that the hydrodynamic behavior of the molecular cloud is treated in a self-consistent manner. Numerical solutions of the fluid dynamic equations, which include the effects of strong electron heating locally in the gas, reveal that the flow of material away from the pellet is initially retarded by the heating and then rapidly accelerated and rarefied. This behavior is more pronounced for higher temperature plasmas and the net effect is that pellet lifetimes are prolonged slightly by including the heating effects. A comparison is made with the results of the recent pellet injection experiments on ORMAK and a simple injection depth scaling law is derived

  20. Effect of ablatant composition on the ablation of a fuelling pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.T.; Thomsen, K.; Piret, S.

    1988-01-01

    The single species neutral-shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the results of the frozen flow, (i.e. the single species molecular hydrogen gas model), results of the analysis showed that the presence of dissociation and ionization effects caused a marked difference of the ablatant state. The attenuations of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar irrespective of whether the ablated flow is in a frozen or an equilibrium state. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced by approximately 15%. To examine the possible existence of a spherical shell around the pellet where most of the incoming electron energy is absorbed, acodmparison is made between the local electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius. A critical field at the ionization radius is evaluated. An effective spherical energyabsorbing region exists when the local field strength is below the critical value. For a plasma state of low Te and ne, (where the ablatant is hardly ionized), and for one near the thermonuclear condition (where a highly dense ablatant exists near the pellet), the effective energy absorption region is nearly spherical. 20 refs. (author)

  1. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) / Microwave Ablation (MWA) of Lung Tumors ... and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? What are Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, ...

  3. Shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1978-09-01

    Shielding benchmark problems were prepared by the Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Comittee on Shielding Design of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and compiled by the Shielding Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Twenty-one kinds of shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm and the accuracy of computer codes based on the discrete ordinates method and the Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in the codes. (author)

  4. Development of neutron shielding material for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najima, K.; Ohta, H.; Ishihara, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd (MHI) has established transport and storage cask design 'MSF series' which makes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed neutron shielding material. This neutron shielding material has been developed for improving durability under high condition for long term. Since epoxy resin contains a lot of hydrogen and is comparatively resistant to heat, many casks employ epoxy base neutron shielding material. However, if the epoxy base neutron shielding material is used under high temperature condition for a long time, the material deteriorates and the moisture contained in it is released. The loss of moisture is in the range of several percents under more than 150 C. For this reason, our purpose was to develop a high durability epoxy base neutron shielding material which has the same self-fire-extinction property, high hydrogen content and so on as conventional. According to the long-time heating test, the weight loss of this new neutron shielding material after 5000 hours heating has been lower than 0.04% at 150 C and 0.35% at 170 C. A thermal test was also performed: a specimen of neutron shielding material covered with stainless steel was inserted in a furnace under condition of 800 C temperature for 30 minutes then was left to cool down in ambient conditions. The external view of the test piece shows that only a thin layer was carbonized

  5. Modeling of Interactions of Ablated Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Povitsky, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Heat transfer modulation between the gas flow and the Thermal Protection Shield (TPS) that occurs because of ejection of under-expanded pyrolysis gases through the cracks in the TPS is studied by numerical modeling...

  6. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  7. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs

  8. ITER shielding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strebkov, Yu [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avsjannikov, A [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baryshev, M [NIAT, Moscow (Russian Federation); Blinov, Yu [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shatalov, G [KIAE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, N [KIAE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinnikov, A [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chernjagin, A [DYNAMICA, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A reference non-breeding blanket is under development now for the ITER Basic Performance Phase for the purpose of high reliability during the first stage of ITER operation. More severe operation modes are expected in this stage with first wall (FW) local heat loads up to 100-300Wcm{sup -2}. Integration of a blanket design with protective and start limiters requires new solutions to achieve high reliability, and possible use of beryllium as a protective material leads to technologies. The rigid shielding blanket concept was developed in Russia to satisfy the above-mentioned requirements. The concept is based on a copper alloy FW, austenitic stainless steel blanket structure, water cooling. Beryllium protection is integrated in the FW design. Fabrication technology and assembly procedure are described in parallel with the equipment used. (orig.).

  9. Transient shielded liquid hydrogen containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, A.P.; Herring, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase has been limited in duration due to the thermal performance constraints of conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers available. Conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers lose hydrogen because of their relatively high heat leak and variations in usage pattern of hydrogen due to shutdowns. Local regulations also discourage venting of hydrogen. Long term storage of Liquid Hydrogen without product loss was usually accomplished using Liquid Nitrogen sacrificial shields. This paper reports on a new low heat leak container developed and patented that will extend the storage time of liquid hydrogen by five hundred percent. The principle of operation of the Transient Shields which makes the extraordinary performance of this container feasible is described in this paper. Also covered are the impact of this new container on present applications of hydrogen and the new opportunities afforded to Liquid hydrogen in the world hydrogen market

  10. Kinetic depletion model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, Boris V.

    2001-11-01

    A kinetic model for depletion effect, which determines pellet ablation when the pellet passes a rational magnetic surface, is formulated. The model predicts a moderate decrease of the ablation rate compared with the earlier considered monoenergy versions [1, 2]. For typical T-10 conditions the ablation rate reduces by a reactor of 2.5 when the 1-mm pellet penetrates through the plasma center. A substantial deceleration of pellets -about 15% per centimeter of low shire rational q region; is predicted. Penetration for Low Field Side and High Field Side injections is considered taking into account modification of the electron distribution function by toroidal magnetic field. It is shown that Shafranov shift and toroidal effects yield the penetration length for HFS injection higher by a factor of 1.5. This fact should be taken into account when plasma-shielding effects on penetration are considered. (author)

  11. Handout on shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.

    1991-01-01

    In order to avoid the difficulties of the radioprotection supervisors in the tasks related to shielding calculations, is presented in this paper the basic concepts of shielding theory. It also includes exercises and examples. (author)

  12. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa n . These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined

  13. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  15. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  16. Electromagnetically shielded building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, T; Nakamura, M; Yabana, Y; Ishikawa, T; Nagata, K

    1992-04-21

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs.

  17. Determination of Physical Properties of Carbon Materials by Results of Ablative Experiments Con-ducted in the Jets of Gas Dynamic Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gorsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of hypersonic vehicles’ movement in the dense layers of the atmosphere is accompanied by the considerable combustion of heat shield, which effects on the aerodynamic, mass-inertial and centering characteristics of the product.For correct calculation of model's movement parameters it is necessary:* Using the theoretical and computation methods for determining ablative characteristics of heat-protective materials;* Taking into account all the basic physical and chemical processes, involved in their ablation, using the above mentioned methods;* Testing these techniques in the wide range of experimental data. This physic-mathematical model of carbon materials (CM aerothermochemical destruction is based on using the following:* Arrhenius equations to calculate carbon kinetic oxidation;* Langmuir-Knudsen formula to calculate the velocity of non-equilibrium carbon’s sublimation;* Carbon erosion law represented as a unique dependence of this process velocity on the gas pressure on the wall.Mathematical description of all major processes included in this formulation of the problem, contains a number of "free" parameters that can be determined only on the basis of comparison of theoretical and experimental data according to total ablation characteristics of these materials.This comparison was performed in the article applicable to the tests conditions of modern CM in the stream of electric arc plant and in combustion products of liquid-propellant rocket engines.As the result, the data of kinetic of carbon oxidation by atomic oxygen at sublimation mode of material ablation were obtained for the first time. Carbon erosion law under high pressure was established for the first time.The new approach to processing of ablation experiments is enunciated. Using this approach allows to turn this experiments for CM from comparative tests into the tests to determine ablation properties of thermal protection. Moreover, it enables us also to use the

  18. Electromagnetic shielding formulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, E.

    1979-02-01

    This addendum to an earlier collection of electromagnetic shielding formulae (TRITA-EPP-75-27) contains simple transfer matrices suitable for calculating the quasistatic shielding efficiency for multiple transverse-field and axial-field cylindrical and spherical shields, as well as for estimating leakage fields from long coaxial cables and the normal-incidence transmission of a plane wave through a multiple plane shield. The differences and similarities between these cases are illustrated by means of equivalent circuits and transmission line analogies. The addendum also includes a discussion of a possible heuristic improvement of some shielding formulae. (author)

  19. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  20. The Active Muon Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Bezshyiko, Iaroslava

    2016-01-01

    In the SHiP beam-dump of the order of 1011 muons will be produced per second. An active muon-shield is used to magnetically deflect these muons out of the acceptance of the spectrom- eter. This note describes how this shield is modelled and optimized. The SHiP spectrometer is being re-optimized using a conical decay-vessel, and utilizing the possibility to magnetize part of the beam-dump shielding iron. A shield adapted to these new conditions is presented which is significantly shorter and lighter than the shield used in the Technical Proposal (TP), while showing a similar performance.

  1. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  2. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  3. CFD Analysis of Hypersonic Flowfields With Surface Thermochemistry and Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henline, W. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the past forty years much progress has been made in computational methods applied to the solution of problems in spacecraft hypervelocity flow and heat transfer. Although the basic thermochemical and physical modeling techniques have changed little in this time, several orders of magnitude increase in the speed of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes and associated energy equations have been achieved. The extent to which this computational power can be applied to the design of spacecraft heat shields is dependent on the proper coupling of the external flow equations to the boundary conditions and governing equations representing the thermal protection system in-depth conduction, pyrolysis and surface ablation phenomena. A discussion of the techniques used to do this in past problems as well as the current state-of-art is provided. Specific examples, including past missions such as Galileo, together with the more recent case studies of ESA/Rosetta Sample Comet Return, Mars Pathfinder and X-33 will be discussed. Modeling assumptions, design approach and computational methods and results are presented.

  4. Radiation shielding calculations for the vista spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Suemer; Sahin, Haci Mehmet; Acir, Adem

    2005-01-01

    The VISTA spacecraft design concept has been proposed for manned or heavy cargo deep space missions beyond earth orbit with inertial fusion energy propulsion. Rocket propulsion is provided by fusion power deposited in the inertial confined fuel pellet debris and with the help of a magnetic nozzle. The calculations for the radiation shielding have been revised under the fact that the highest jet efficiency of the vehicle could be attained only if the propelling plasma would have a narrow temperature distribution. The shield mass could be reduced from 600 tons in the original design to 62 tons. Natural and enriched lithium were the principle shielding materials. The allowable nuclear heating in the superconducting magnet coils (up to 5 mW/cm 3 ) is taken as the crucial criterion for dimensioning the radiation shielding structure of the spacecraft. The space craft mass is 6000 tons. Total peak nuclear power density in the coils is calculated as ∼5.0 mW/cm 3 for a fusion power output of 17 500 MW. The peak neutron heating density is ∼2.0 mW/cm 3 , and the peak γ-ray heating density is ∼3.0 mW/cm 3 (on different points) using natural lithium in the shielding. However, the volume averaged heat generation in the coils is much lower, namely 0.21, 0.71 and 0.92 mW/cm 3 for the neutron, γ-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. The coil heating will be slightly lower if highly enriched 6 Li (90%) is used instead of natural lithium. Peak values are then calculated as 2.05, 2.15 and 4.2 mW/cm 3 for the neutron, γ-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. The corresponding volume averaged heat generation in the coils became 0.19, 0.58 and 0.77 mW/cm 3

  5. ICRF antenna Faraday shield plasma sheath model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonlinear formulation that explicitly considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self-consistent manner is used in the modeling of the ion motion for a Faraday shield concept and model suggested by Perkins. Two models are considered that may provide significant insight into the generation of impurities for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas. In one of these models a significant sheath periodically forms next to the Faraday screen, with ion acoustic waves heating the ions in the plasma. (orig.)

  6. Estimation of temperature distribution in a reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.A.; Goverdhan, P.; Gupta, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Shielding is provided in a nuclear reactor to absorb the radiations emanating from the core. The energy of these radiations appear in the form of heat. Concrete which is commonly used as a shielding material in nuclear power plants must be able to withstand the temperatures and temperature gradients appearing in the shield due to this heat. High temperatures lead to dehydration of the concrete and in turn reduce the shielding effectiveness of the material. Adequate cooling needs to be provided in these shields in order to limit the maximum temperature. This paper describes a method to estimate steady state and transient temperature distribution in reactor shields. The results due to loss of coolant in the coolant tubes have been studied and presented in the paper. (author). 5 figs

  7. Shielding modefication and safety review on Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanai, Masao

    1978-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Commission requests strongly to repair the shielding and make general safety inspection on Mutsu after an accident of radiation leakage from the reactor. The content and procedure of this repair of shielding and general safety inspection are outlined. The neutron leakage location in the reactor proper, technical shielding investigation, conceptual design of relating shielding repair, the mock up test of the shielding on the neutron streaming, the final conceptual design of repair, the relating research and development experiment and the detailed basic design of repair are explained, comparing the original design and the modified one. The modified design depends on the experimental results of neutron streaming test between the reactor vessel and the primary shield. As for the general safety inspection, the functional test of control rod driving mechanism and other main components, the flaw detection for heat transfer tubes of the steam generator and primary cooling pipings are carried out in hardwares, and the integrity analysis of fuel assemblies, stress corrosion cracking of fuel claddings and primary cooling pipings, the natural circulation analysis of primary cooling system, and integrity check of the heat transfer tubes of steam generator are carried out in softwares. The burst test and the strength test after high temperature oxidation for fuel claddings made of stainless steel were carried out. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Degradation of carbon-based materials under ablative conditions produced by a high enthalpy plasma jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Petraconi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A stationary experiment was performed to study the degradation of carbon-based materials by immersion in a plasma jet. In the experiment, graphite and C/C composite were chosen as the target materials, and the reactive plasma jet was generated by an air plasma torch. For macroscopic study of the material degradation, the sample’s mass losses were measured as function of the exposure time under various temperatures on the sample surface. A microscopic analysis was then carried out for the study of microscopic aspects of the erosion of material surface. These experiments showed that the mass loss per unit area is approximately proportional to the exposure time and strongly depends on the temperature of the material surface. The mass erosion rate of graphite was appreciably higher than the C/C composite. The ablation rate in the carbon matrix region in C/C composite was also noticeably higher than that in the fiber region. In addition, the latter varied according to the orientation of fibers relatively to the flow direction. These tests indicated an excellent ablation resistance of the C/C composite, thus being a reliable material for rocket nozzles and heat shielding elements of the protection systems of hypersonic apparatuses from aerodynamic heating.

  9. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  10. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  11. Laser ablation for analytical sampling: what can we learn from modeling?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Chen Zhaoyang; Gijbels, Renaat; Vertes, Akos

    2003-01-01

    The paper is built up in two parts. First, a rather comprehensive introduction is given, with a brief overview of the different application fields of laser ablation, focusing mainly on the analytical applications, and an overview of the different modeling approaches available for laser ablation. Further, a discussion is presented here about the laser evaporated plume expansion in vacuum or in a background gas, as well as about the different mechanisms for particle formation in the laser ablation process, which is most relevant for laser ablation as solid sampling technique for inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry. In the second part, a model is presented that describes the interaction of an ns-pulsed laser with a Cu target, as well as the resulting plume expansion and plasma formation. The results presented here, include the temperature distribution in the target, the melting and evaporation of the target, the vapor density, velocity and temperature distribution in the evaporated plume, the ionization degree and the density profiles of Cu 0 atoms, Cu + and Cu 2+ ions and electrons in the plume (plasma), as well as the resulting plasma shielding of the incoming laser beam. Results are presented as a function of time during and after the laser pulse, and as a function of position in the target or in the plume. The influence of the target reflection coefficient on the above calculation results is investigated. Finally, the effect of the laser pulse fluence on the target heating, melting and vaporization, and on the plume characteristics and plasma formation is studied. Our modeling results are in reasonable agreement with calculated and measured data from literature

  12. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, F.J.; Steele, J.T.; Larsen, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling

  13. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  14. The Effects of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Smaw) Welding On The Mechanical Characteristics With Heating Treatment inn S45c Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar; Abbas, Hammada; Yusran Aminy, Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    Steel material has been used mainly for making tooling, automotive components, other household needs, power generators to frame buildings and bridges. This study aimed (1) to analyze the mechanical Characteristics of S45C steel with and without heating treatments, and (2) to analyze the temperature of heating treatment which could result in the maximal strength of S45C steel after the welding process. The research was conducted in the laboratory of mechanical engineering study program, Departement of mechanical Engineering, Christian university of indonesia paulus, makassar. The method used materials, instruments, and the dimensions determination of specimen based on the proposed testing standard, Next, was to determine the mechanical caracteristics of the S45C steel wich had been welded and heated.The tensile specimens, the hardness specimen, the impact specimen, and microstructures of which,each of the 3 specimens was the specimens was the specimen without treatment, the spesimen with the welding wthout heating and the specimen of 150°C, 250° C, 300° C. The research results indicated that the treatment process of 150°C, 250°C and 300°C produced the changes of mechanic charateristics with the tensile strength of 42 kgf/mm2 when the temperature had reached 300°C, but at the temperature 300°C, the its toughness would decrease to Hi = 0.836 j/m2 and its hardness would increase to 40.83 at the temperature of 300°C. The value of the maximum strengs was reached at the heating temperature of 300°C for the tensile strength and the hardness, while at the temperature of 300°C its impact value would decrease.

  15. Radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation shielding concretes comprise water, cement, fine aggregates consisting of serpentines and blown mist slags, coarse aggregates consisting of serpentines and kneading materials. Since serpentines containing a relatively great amount of water of crystallization in rocks as coarse aggregates and fine aggregates, the hydrogen content in the radiation shielding concretes is increased and the neutron shielding effect is improved. In addition, since serpentines are added as the fine aggregates and blown mists slags of a great specific gravity are used, the specific gravity of the shielding concretes is increased to improve the γ-ray shielding effect. Further, by the use of the kneading material having a water reducing effect and fluidizing effect, and by the bearing effect of the spherical blown mist slags used as the fine aggregates, concrete fluidity can be increased. Accordingly, workability of the radiation shielding concretes can be improved. (T.M.)

  16. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  17. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  18. Mechanical design of the TIBER breeding shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathke, J.; Deutsch, L. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Space Systems Div.)

    1989-04-01

    TIBER features a segmented shield assembly that provides the nuclear shielding for the superconducting toroidal field coils. In addition to its primary function, the shield also provides tritium breeding through the use of water coolant that contains 16 wt% dissolved lithium nitrate. Because the TIBER reactor need not provide electrical power, the coolant is maintained at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and low temperature (75/sup 0/C). The shield is made in several segments to facilitate assembly and allow for replacement of high heat flux components (divertor blades). The segments are designated as inboard, outboard, upper, lower, and divertor modules. In total, there are 96 separate modules in the machine, consisting of six different types. The design features of the different modules vary primarily depending on the thickness of the shield in a given location. The very thick outboard shield has a breeding zone in the inboard portion of the module, with a shielding zone behind it. The breeding zone consists of a stainless steel casing filled with beryllium spheres. The shielding zone consists of the same casing filled with steel spheres. Both of these zones have lithiated water circulated throughout to provide cooling and breeding. In zones with minimal thickness, tungsten alloys are used to achieve the required shielding. These alloys are incoprorated in subassemblies utilizing stainless steel casings surrounding blocks of tungsten heavy metal alloy. These are infiltrated with lead on final assembly to form a thermally continuous panel. Several of these panels are then assembled into an outer stainless steel case to form an inboard module. These modules also use the lithiated coolant. The details of the design are presented and discussed. (orig.).

  19. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  20. INTOR radiation shielding for personnel access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    The INTOR reactor shield system consists of the blanket, bulk shield, penetration shield, component shield, and biological shield. The bulk shield consists of two parts: (a) the inboard shield; and (b) the outboard shield. The distinction between the different components of the shield system is essential to satisfy the different design constraints and achieve various objectives

  1. Micro Sampling System for Highly Radioactive Specimen by Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sun Ho; Ha, Yeong Keong; Han, Ki Chul; Park, Yang Soon; Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, Won Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Shielded laser ablation system composed of laser system, image analyser, XYZ translator with motion controller, ablation chamber, manipulator and various optics was designed. Nd:YAG laser which can be tunable from 1064 nm to 266 nm was selected as light source. CCD camera(< x 200) was chosen to analyze a crater less than 50 un in diameter. XYZ translator was composed of three linear stage which can travel 50 w with a minimum movement of 1 {mu}m and motion controller. Before the performance test, each part of system was optically aligned. To perform the ablation test, the specimen was ablated by 50 {mu}m interval and observed by image analyser The shape of crater was almost round, indicating laser beam has homogeneous energy distribution. The resolution and magnification of image system were compatible with the design.

  2. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  3. Radiation shielding plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Torakichi; Sugawara, Takeo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the weight and stabilize the configuration of a radiation shielding plate which is used in close contact with an object to be irradiated with radiation rays. Constitution: The radiation shielding plate comprises a substrate made of lead glass and a metallic lead coating on the surface of the substrate by means of plating, vapor deposition or the like. Apertures for permeating radiation rays are formed to the radiation shielding plate. Since the shielding plate is based on a lead glass plate, a sufficient mechanical strength can be obtained with a thinner structure as compared with the conventional plate made of metallic lead. Accordingly, if the shielding plate is disposed on a soft object to be irradiated with radiation rays, the object and the plate itself less deform to obtain a radiation irradiation pattern with distinct edges. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM.

  5. Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation With Magnetically Directed Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy T; Tzou, Wendy S; Zheng, Lijun; Barham, Waseem; Schuller, Joseph L; Shillinglaw, Benjamin; Quaife, Robert A; Sauer, William H

    2016-05-01

    Remote heating of metal located near a radiofrequency ablation source has been previously demonstrated. Therefore, ablation of cardiac tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles may improve local radiofrequency heating and lead to larger ablation lesions. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tissue sensitivity to radiofrequency energy. Ablation was performed using an ablation catheter positioned with 10 g of force over prepared ex vivo specimens. Tissue temperatures were measured and lesion volumes were acquired. An in vivo porcine thigh model was used to study systemically delivered magnetically guided iron oxide (FeO) nanoparticles during radiofrequency application. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological staining of ablated tissue were subsequently performed as a part of ablation lesion analysis. Ablation of ex vivo myocardial tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles resulted in significantly larger lesions with greater impedance changes and evidence of increased thermal conductivity within the tissue. Magnet-guided localization of FeO nanoparticles within porcine thigh preps was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging and iron staining. Irrigated ablation in the regions with greater FeO, after FeO infusion and magnetic guidance, created larger lesions without a greater incidence of steam pops. Metal nanoparticle infiltration resulted in significantly larger ablation lesions with altered electric and thermal conductivity. In vivo magnetic guidance of FeO nanoparticles allowed for facilitated radiofrequency ablation without direct infiltration into the targeted tissue. Further research is needed to assess the clinical applicability of this ablation strategy using metallic nanoparticles for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HPGe detector shielding adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, L.; Rulik, P.

    2008-01-01

    Low-level background shielding of HPGe detectors is used mainly for environmental samples with very low content of radionuclides. National Radiation Protection Institute (SURO) in Prague is equipped with 14 HPGe detectors with relative efficiency up to 150%. The detectors are placed in a room built from materials with low content of natural radionuclides and equipped with a double isolation of the floor against radon. Detectors themselves are placed in lead or steel shielding. Steel shielding with one of these detectors with relative efficiency of 100% was chosen to be rebuilt to achieve lower minimum detectable activity (MDA). Additional lead and copper shielding was built up inside the original steel shielding to reduce the volume of the inner space and filled with nitrogen by means of evaporating liquid nitrogen. The additional lead and copper shielding, consequent reduction of the inner volume and supply of evaporated nitrogen, caused a decrease of the background count and accordingly MDA values as well. The effect of nitrogen evaporation on the net areas of peaks belonging to radon daughters is significant. The enhanced shielding adjustment has the biggest influence in low energy range, what can be seen in collected data. MDA values in energy range from 30 keV to 400 keV decreased to 0.65-0.85 of original value, in energy range from 400 keV to 2 MeV they fell to 0.70-0.97 of original value. (authors)

  8. Shielding in experimental areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.; Tarnopolsky, G.; Thorndike, A.; White, S.

    1979-01-01

    The amount of shielding necessary to protect experimental detectors from various sources of background radiation is discussed. As illustrated an experiment has line of sight to sources extending approx. 90 m upstream from the intersection point. Packing a significant fraction of this space with shielding blocks would in general be unacceptable because primary access to the ring tunnel is from the experimental halls. (1) From basic machine design considerations and the inherent necessity to protect superconducting magnets it is expected that experimental areas in general will be cleaner than at any existing accelerator. (2) Even so, it will likely be necessary to have some shielding blocks available to protect experimental apparatus, and it may well be necessary to have a large amount of shielding available in the WAH. (3) Scraping will likely have some influence on all halls, and retractable apparatus may sometimes be necessary. (4) If access to any tunnel is needed to replace a magnet, one has 96 h (4 days) available to move shielding away to permit access without additional downtime. This (the amount of shielding one can shuffle about in 96 h) is a reasonable upper limit to shielding necessary in a hall

  9. Fine scale monitoring of ice ablation following convective heat transfer: case study based on ice-wedge thermo-erosion on Bylot Island (Canadian High Arctic) and laboratory observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, E.; Fortier, D.

    2011-12-01

    Thermo-erosion gullies often develop in ice-wedge polygons terrace and contribute to the dynamic evolution of the periglacial landscape. When snowmelt surface run-off concentrated into streams and water tracks infiltrate frost cracks, advective heat flow and convective thermal transfer from water to the ice-wedge ice enable the rapid development of tunnels and gullies in the permafrost (Fortier et al. 2007). Fine scale monitoring of the physical interaction between flowing water and ice rich permafrost had already been studied in a context of thermal erosion of a large river banks in Russia (Costard et al. 2003). Ice wedge polygons thermo-erosion process leading to gullying remains to be physically modelled and quantified. The present paper focus on the fine scale monitoring of thermo-erosion physical parameters both in the field and in laboratory. The physical model in laboratory was elaborated using a fixed block of ice monitored by a linear voltage differential transducer (LVDT) and temperature sensors connected to a logger. A water container with controlled discharge and temperature provided the fluid which flowed over the ice through a hose. Water discharge (Q), water temperature (Tw), ice melting temperature (Ti) and ice ablation rate (Ar) were measured. In laboratory, water at 281 Kelvin (K) flowing on the ice (Ti 273 K) made the ice melt at a rate Ar of 0.002 m min-1, under a continuous discharge of ≈ 8 x 10-7 m3 s-1. In the field, a small channel was dug between a stream and an exposed ice-wedge in a pre-existing active gully, where in 2010 large quantities of near zero snowmelt run-off water contributed to several meters of ice wedge ablation and gully development. Screws were fastened into the ice and a ruler was used to measure the ablation rate every minute. The surface temperature of the ice wedge was monitored with thermocouples connected to a logger to obtain the condition of the ice boundary layer. Discharge and water temperature were measured in

  10. Shielding member for thermonuclear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Masanori

    1997-06-30

    In a thermonuclear device for shielding fast neutrons by shielding members disposed in a shielding vessel (vacuum vessel and structures such as a blanket disposed in the vacuum vessel), the shielding member comprises a large number of shielding wires formed fine and short so as to have elasticity. The shielding wires are sealed in a shielding vessel together with water, and when the width of the shielding vessel is changed, the shielding wires follow after the change of the width while elastically deforming in the shielding vessel, so that great stress and deformation are not formed thereby enabling to improve reliability. In addition, the length, the diameter and the shape of each of the shielding wires can be selected in accordance with the shielding space of the shielding vessel. Even if the shape of the shielding vessel is complicated, the shielding wires can be inserted easily. Accordingly, the filling rate of the shielding members can be changed easily. It can be produced more easily compared with a conventional spherical pebbles. It can be produced more easily than existent spherical shielding pebbles thereby enabling to reduce the production cost. (N.H.)

  11. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  12. Estimating ISABELLE shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.J.; Thorndike, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates were made of the shielding thicknesses required at various points around the ISABELLE ring. Both hadron and muon requirements are considered. Radiation levels at the outside of the shield and at the BNL site boundary are kept at or below 1000 mrem per year and 5 mrem/year respectively. Muon requirements are based on the Wang formula for pion spectra, and the hadron requirements on the hadron cascade program CYLKAZ of Ranft. A muon shield thickness of 77 meters of sand is indicated outside the ring in one area, and hadron shields equivalent to from 2.7 to 5.6 meters in thickness of sand above the ring. The suggested safety allowance would increase these values to 86 meters and 4.0 to 7.2 meters respectively. There are many uncertainties in such estimates, but these last figures are considered to be rather conservative

  13. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  14. Shields for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The patent concerns shields for nuclear reactors. The roof shield comprises a normally fixed radial outer portion, a radial inner portion rotatable about a vertical axis, and a connection between the inner and outer portions. In the event of hypothecal core disruption conditions, a cantilever system on the inner wall allows the upward movement of the inner wall, in order to prevent loss of containment. (UK)

  15. Radiation shielding curtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, N.T.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation shield is described in the form of a stranded curtain made up of bead-chains whose material and geometry are selected to produce a cross-sectional density that is the equivalent of 0.25 mm or more of lead and which curtain may be mounted on various radiological devices to shield against scattered radiation while offering a minimum of obstruction to the radiologist

  16. Shielded cells transfer automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures

  17. Analysis of internal ablation for the thermal control of aerospace vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberos, Jose A.; Roberts, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    A new method of thermal protection for transatmospheric vehicles is introduced. The method involves the combination of radiation, ablation and transpiration cooling. By placing an ablating material behind a fixed-shape, porous outer shield, the effectiveness of transpiration cooling is made possible while retaining the simplicity of a passive mechanism. A simplified one-dimensional approach is used to derive the governing equations. Reduction of these equations to non-dimensional form yields two parameters which characterize the thermal protection effectiveness of the shield and ablator combination for a given trajectory. The non-dimensional equations are solved numerically for a sample trajectory corresponding to glide re-entry. Four typical ablators are tested and compared with results obtained by using the thermal properties of water. For the present level of analysis, the numerical computations adequately support the analytical model.

  18. Pre-evaluation of fusion shielding benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Handa, H.; Konno, C.

    1994-01-01

    Shielding benchmark experiment is very useful to test the design code and nuclear data for fusion devices. There are many types of benchmark experiments that should be done in fusion shielding problems, but time and budget are limited. Therefore it will be important to select and determine the effective experimental configurations by precalculation before the experiment. The authors did three types of pre-evaluation to determine the experimental assembly configurations of shielding benchmark experiments planned in FNS, JAERI. (1) Void Effect Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure the local increase of dose and nuclear heating behind small void(s) in shield material. Dimension of the voids and its arrangements were decided as follows. Dose and nuclear heating were calculated both for with and without void(s). Minimum size of the void was determined so that the ratio of these two results may be larger than error of the measurement system. (2) Auxiliary Shield Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure shielding properties of B 4 C, Pb, W, and dose around superconducting magnet (SCM). Thickness of B 4 C, Pb, W and their arrangement including multilayer configuration were determined. (3) SCM Nuclear Heating Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure nuclear heating and dose distribution in SCM material. Because it is difficult to use liquid helium as a part of SCM mock up material, material composition of SCM mock up are surveyed to have similar nuclear heating property of real SCM composition

  19. Steady ablation on the surface of a two-layer composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Shan [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 90008-15-3, Lung-Tan, Tao-Yuan, 32526 Taiwan (China)

    2005-12-01

    Discovered is a quasi-steady ablation phenomenon on the surface of a two-layer composite which is formed by a layer of ablative material and another layer of non-ablative substrate. Theoretical exact solutions of quasi-steady ablation rate, the associated temperature distribution and end-of-ablation time of this two-layer composite are derived. A criterion for the occurrence of quasi-steady ablation is presented also. A one-dimensional transient numerical model is developed to perform a number of numerical experiments and hence to verify the correctness of the above theoretical solutions for the current quasi-steady ablation phenomenon. Based on the current results, a new method of measuring the ablation (or sublimation) heat is also proposed. (author)

  20. EBT-P gamma-ray-shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1983-01-01

    First, a one-dimensional scoping study was performed for the gamma-ray shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle device to define appropriate shielding material and determine the required shielding thickness. The dose-equivalent results are analyzed as a function of the radiation-shield thickness for different shielding options. A sensitivity analysis for the pessimistic case is given. The recommended shielding option based on the performance and cost is discussed. Next, a three-dimensional scoping study for the coil shield was performed for four different shielding options to define the heat load for each component and check the compliance with the design criterion of 10 watts maximum heat load per coil from the gamma-ray sources. Also, a detailed biological-dose survey was performed which included: (a) the dose equivalent inside and outside the building, (b) the dose equivalent from the two mazes of the building, and (c) the skyshine contribution to the dose equivalent

  1. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  2. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  3. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 25th ANNIVERSARY OF THE A.M. PROKHOROV GENERAL PHYSICS INSTITUTE: High-speed ablation of ultradeep channels by a phase-conjugate dynamically controlled passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiev, T. T.; Garnov, S. V.; Klimentov, S. M.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Smetanin, S. N.; Solokhin, S. A.; Fedin, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Parameters of high-speed ablation of ultradeep channels by controlled pulse trains from a single-mode phase-conjugate dynamic cavity Nd:YAG laser emitting 20-200-ns, 70-250-mJ pulses at a pulse repetition rate in a train of 40-250 kHz are studied. The optimal parameters of ablation are found, for which a long-lived region of a hot rarefied gas was maintained in the ultradeep channel, which suppressed the shielding action of the surface plasma. The control of the lasing process during ablation optimises not only the heating and plasma formation, but also the removal of the processed material in the pause between laser pulses. Adaptive regulation of lasing parameters during ablation made it possible to obtain ultradeep channels of length 8-27 mm and diameters 80-300 μm of the input and output holes in metals (aluminium, steel and Inconel 718 nickel superalloy) and ultrahard ceramics (Al2O3, AlN, SiC).

  4. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  5. Concrete radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear energy has given rise to a growth in the amount of artificially produced radiation and radioactive materials. The design and construction of shielding to protect people, equipment and structures from the effects of radiation has never been more important. Experience has shown that concrete is an effective, versatile and economical material for the construction of radiation shielding. This book provides information on the principles governing the interaction of radiation with matter and on relevant nuclear physics to give the engineer an understanding of the design and construction of concrete shielding. It covers the physical, mechanical and nuclear properties of concrete; the effects of elevated temperatures and possible damage to concrete due to radiation; basic procedures for the design of concrete radiation shields and finally the special problems associated with their construction and cost. Although written primarily for engineers concerned with the design and construction of concrete shielding, the book also reviews the widely scattered data and information available on this subject and should therefore be of interest to students and those wishing to research further in this field. (author)

  6. Method for dismantling shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Rokuro; Kondo, Nobuhiro; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Kawasato, Ken; Hiraga, Tomoaki.

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to enable operators to dismantle shieldings contaminated by radioactivity easily and in a short period of time without danger of radiation exposure. A plurality of introduction pipes are embedded previously to the shielding walls of shielding members which contain a reactor core in a state where both ends of the introduction pipes are in communication with the outside. A wire saw is inserted into the introduction pipes to cut the shieldings upon dismantling. Then, shieldings can be dismantled easily in a short period of time with no radiation exposure to operator's. Further, according to the present invention, since the wire saw can be set easily and a large area can be cut at once, operation efficiency is improved. Further, since remote control is possible, cutting can be conducted in water and complicated places of the reactor. Biting upon starting the wire saw in the introduction pipe is reduced to facilitate startup for the rotation. (I.S.)

  7. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  8. Thermal design of top shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghupathy, S.; Velusamy, K.; Parthasarathy, U.; Ghosh, D.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type fast reactor. The top shield forms the top cover for the main vessel (MV) and includes roof slab (RS), large rotatable plug (LRP), small rotatable plug (SRP) and control Plug (CP). RS, LRP and SRP are box type structures consisting of top and bottom plates stiffened by radial stiffeners and vertical penetration shells. TS is exposed to argon cover gas provided above sodium pool on the bottom side and reactor containment building air at the top. Heat transfer takes place through the argon cover gas to the bottom plate of TS. Annular gaps are formed between the components supported on TS and the component penetrations through which cellular convection takes place. A single thermal shield provided below TS reduces the heat flux to the bottom plate to 1.15 kW/m 2 . The MV (SS 316 LN) is welded to RS (carbon steel A48 P2) through a dissimilar metal weld. A step in RS and an anti convection barrier (ACB) outside RS are provided to limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction. The MV is surrounded by safety vessel (SV) and reactor vault made of concrete. Thermal insulation is provided outside SV to limit the heat transfer to the reactor vault. The design requirements of TS are to maintain the operating temperature at 383-393 K, limit the temperature difference (ΔT) across the height of TS to 20 / 100 K under normal operation/loss of cooling, provide minimum annular gap size at the component penetrations, provide a nearly linear temperature gradient in the CP portion within the height of TS, maintain the temperature of top plate of CP > 383 K, limit the ΔT across the top plate of CP to 2 K, limit the temperature near the inflatable / backup seal to 393 K, limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction and the heat flux to the reactor vault. The total heat transferred to TS is estimated to be 210 kW. A dedicated closed loop cooling system with a total flow rate of 10

  9. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  10. Shield support frame. Schildausbaugestell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, K.

    1981-09-17

    A powered shield support frame for coal sheds is described comprising of two bottom sliding shoes, a large area gob shield and a larg area roof assembly, all joined movable together. The sliding shoes and the gob shield are joined by a lemniscate guide. Two hydraulic props are arranged at the face-side at one third of the length of the sliding shoes and at the goaf-side at one third of the length of the roof assembly. A nearly horizontal lying pushing prop unit joins the bottom wall sliding shoes to the goaf-side lemniscate guide. This assembly can be applied to seams with a thickness down to 45 cm. (OGR).

  11. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. Hybrid Magnetic Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kevin; Crawford, Christopher; Mullins, Andrew; Porter, Greg; Blanton, Hunter; Johnstone, Connor; Kistler, Ben; Olivera, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    The search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron requires the ambient magnetic field to be on the pT scale which is accomplished with large magnetic shielding rooms. These rooms are fitted with large mu-metal sheets to allow for passive cancellation of background magnetic fields. Active shielding technology cannot uniformly cancel background magnetic fields. These issues can be remedied by combining the methods into a hybrid system. The design used is composed of panels that have an active layer of cancellation between two sheets of mu-metal. The panels form a cube and draw in magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface which can then be reduced using active shielding. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Contract DE-SC0008107.

  13. Reactor head shielding apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukei, G.E.; Roebelen, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor head shielding apparatus for mounting on spaced reactor head lifting members radially inwardly of the head bolts. It comprises a frame of sections for mounting on the lifting members and extending around the top central area of the head, mounting means for so mounting the frame sections, including downwardly projecting members on the frame sections and complementary upwardly open recessed members for fastening to the lifting members for receiving the downwardly projecting members when the frame sections are lowered thereto with lead shielding supported thereby on means for hanging lead shielding on the frame to minimize radiation exposure or personnel working with the head bolts or in the vicinity thereof

  14. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  15. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  16. Using the shield for thermal energy storage in pulsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.P.C.; Bathke, C.G.; Blanchard, J.P.; Brimer, C.; Cheng, E.T.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Hasan, M.Z.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.; Sviatoslavski, I.N.; Waganer, L.

    1995-01-01

    The PULSAR pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes the outboard shield for thermal energy storage to maintain full 1000MW(e) output during the dwell period of 200s. Thermal energy resulting from direct nuclear heating is accumulated in the shield during the 7200s fusion power production phase. The maximum shield temperature may be much higher than that for the blanket because radiation damage is significantly reduced. During the dwell period, thermal power discharged from the shield and coolant temperature are simultaneously regulated by controlling the coolant mass flow rate at the shield inlet. This is facilitated by throttled coolant bypass. Design concepts using helium and lithium coolant have been developed. Two-dimensional time-dependent thermal hydraulic calculations were performed to confirm performance capabilities required of the design concepts. The results indicate that the system design and performance can accommodate uncertainties in material limits or the length of the dwell period. (orig.)

  17. Shielding research in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafore, P

    1964-10-01

    Shielding research as an independent subject in France dates from 1956. The importance of these studies has been reflected in the contribution which they have made to power reactor design and in the resultant savings in expenditure for civil engineering and machinery for the removal of mobile shields. The Reactor Shielding Research Division numbers approximately 60 persons and uses several experimental facilities. These include: NAIADE I, installed near the ZOE reactor and operating with a natural uranium slab 2 cm thick (an effective diameter of 60 cm is the one most commonly used); the TRITON pool-type reactor, mainly used in shielding studies, includes an active-water loop, by means of which the secondary shields required for light-water reactors can be studied; core, NEREIDE, which is situated near a 2 m x 2 m aluminium window enables a large neutron source to be placed in a compartment without water in which large-scale mock-ups can be mounted for the study, in particular, of neutron diffusion in large cavities, and of reactor shielding of greater thickness than that in NAIADE I; SAMES 600 keV accelerator is used for monoenergetic neutron studies. Instrumentation studies are an important part of the work, mainly in the measurement of fast neutrons and their spectra by activation detectors. Of late, attention has been directed towards the use of (n, n') (rhodium) reactions and of heavy detectors for low-flux measurements. The simultaneous use of a large number of detectors poses automation problems. With our installation we can count 16 detectors simultaneously. Neutron spectrum studies are conducted with nuclear emulsions and a lithium-6 semiconductor spectrometer. As to the materials used, the research carried out in France involves chiefly graphite, iron and concrete at various temperatures up to 800 deg C. Different compounds, borated and non-borated and of densities up to between 1 and 9 are under consideration. Problems connected with applications are

  18. Radiation shielding bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, G.J.W.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation shielding brick for use in building dry walls to form radiation proof enclosures and other structures is described. It is square in shape and comprises a sandwich of an inner layer of lead or similar shielding material between outer layers of plastics material, for structural stability. The ability to mechanically interlock adjacent bricks is provided by shaping the edges as cooperating external and internal V-sections. Relatively leak-free joints are ensured by enlarging the width of the inner layer in the edge region. (author)

  19. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  1. Simulation of divertor targets shielding during transients in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestchanyi, Sergey, E-mail: serguei.pestchanyi@kit.edu [KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pitts, Richard; Lehnen, Michael [ITER Organization,Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We simulated plasma shielding effect during disruption in ITER using the TOKES code. • It has been found that vaporization is unavoidable under action of ITER transients, but plasma shielding drastically reduces the divertor target damage: the melt pool and the vaporization region widths reduced 10–15 times. • A simplified 1D model describing the melt pool depth and the shielded heat flux to the divertor targets have been developed. • The results of the TOKES simulations have been compared with the analytic model when the model is valid. - Abstract: Direct extrapolation of the disruptive heat flux on ITER conditions predicts severe melting and vaporization of the divertor targets causing their intolerable damage. However, tungsten vaporized from the target at initial stage of the disruption can create plasma shield in front of the target, which effectively protects the target surface from the rest of the heat flux. Estimation of this shielding efficiency has been performed using the TOKES code. The shielding effect under ITER conditions is found to be very strong: the maximal depth of the melt layer reduced 4 times, the melt layer width—more than 10 times and vaporization region shrinks 10–15 times due to shielding for unmitigated disruption of 350 MJ discharge. The simulation results show complex, 2D plasma dynamics of the shield under ITER conditions. However, a simplified analytic model, valid for rough estimation of the maximum value for the shielded flux to the target and for the melt depth at the target surface has been developed.

  2. Alternative High Performance Polymers for Ablative Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Mairead; Gonzales, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ablative thermal protection systems are commonly used as protection from the intense heat during re-entry of a space vehicle and have been used successfully on many missions including Stardust and Mars Science Laboratory both of which used PICA - a phenolic based ablator. Historically, phenolic resin has served as the ablative polymer for many TPS systems. However, it has limitations in both processing and properties such as char yield, glass transition temperature and char stability. Therefore alternative high performance polymers are being considered including cyanate ester resin, polyimide, and polybenzoxazine. Thermal and mechanical properties of these resin systems were characterized and compared with phenolic resin.

  3. Radiation shielding cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yasuo; Fujinuma, Tadashi; Tamura, Shoji.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation shielding cloth having radiation shielding layers comprising a composition of inorganic powder of high specific gravity and rubber are excellentin flexibility and comfortable to put on. However, since they are heavy in the weight, operators are tired upon putting them for a long time. In view of the above, the radiation ray shielding layers are prepared by calendering sheets obtained by preliminary molding of the composition to set the variation of the thickness within a range of +15% to -0% of prescribed thickness. Since the composition of inorganic powder at high specific gravity and rubber used for radiation ray shielding comprises a great amount of inorganic powder at high specific gravity blended therein, it is generally poor in fabricability. Therefor, it is difficult to attain fine control for the sheet thickness by merely molding a composition block at once. Then, the composition is at first preliminarily molded into a sheet-like shape which is somewhat thickener than the final thickness and then finished by calendering, by which the thickness can be reduced in average as compared with conventional products while keeping the prescribed thickness and reducing the weight reduce by so much. (N.H.)

  4. Electrostatic shielding of transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Francisco

    2017-11-28

    Toroidal transformers are currently used only in low-voltage applications. There is no published experience for toroidal transformer design at distribution-level voltages. Toroidal transformers are provided with electrostatic shielding to make possible high voltage applications and withstand the impulse test.

  5. Penetration portion shielding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Narita, Hitoshi; Handa, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Jun; Tozuka, Fumio.

    1994-01-01

    Openings of a plurality of shieldings for penetration members are aligned to each other, and penetration members are inserted from the openings. Then, the openings of the plurality of shielding members are slightly displaced with each other to make the penetration portions into a helical configuration, so that leakage of radiation is reduced. Upon removal of the members, reverse operation is conducted. When a flowable shielding material is used, the penetration portions are constituted with two plates having previously formed openings and pipes for connecting the openings with each other and a vessel covering the entire of them. After passing the penetration members such as a cable, the relative position of the two plates is changed by twisting, to form a helical configuration which reduces radiation leakage. Since they are bent into the helical configuration, shielding performance is extremely improved compared with a case that radiation leakage is caused from an opening of a straight pipe. In addition, since they can be returned to straight pipes, attachment, detachment and maintenance can be conducted easily. (N.H.)

  6. Dosimetry and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinelli, U.

    1977-01-01

    Today, reactor dosimetry and shielding have wide areas of overlap as concerns both problems and methods. Increased interchange of results and know-how would benefit both. The areas of common interest include calculational methods, sensitivity studies, theoretical and experimental benchmarks, cross sections and other nuclear data, multigroup libraries and procedures for their adjustment, experimental techniques and damage functions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art and the latest development in each of these areas as far as shielding is concerned, and suggests a number of interactions that could be profitable for reactor dosimetry. Among them, re-evaluation of the potentialities of calculational methods (in view of the recent developments) in predicting radiation environments of interest; the application of sensitivity analysis to dosimetry problems; a common effort in the field of theoretical benchmarks; the use of the shielding one-material propagation experiments as reference spectra for detector cross sections; common standardization of the detector nuclear data used in both fields; the setting up of a common (or compatible) multigroup structure and library applicable to shielding, dosimetry and core physics; the exchange of information and experience in the fields of cross section errors, correlations and adjustment; and the intercomparison of experimental techniques

  7. Radiation shielding glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Hajime.

    1997-01-01

    It was found that a glass composition comprising, as essential ingredients, SiO 2 , PbO, Gd 2 O 3 and alkali metal oxides can provide a shielding performance against electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons. The present invention provides radiation shielding glass containing at least from 16 to 46wt% of SiO 2 , from 47 to 75wt% of PbO, from 1 to 10wt% of Gd 2 O 3 , from 0 to 3wt% of Li 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of Na 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of K 2 O provided that Li 2 O + Na 2 O + K 2 O is from 1 to 10wt%, B 2 O 3 is from 0 to 10wt%, CeO 2 is from 0 to 3wt%, As 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt% and Sb 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt%. Since the glass can shield electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons simultaneously, radiation shielding windows can be designed and manufactured at a reduced thickness and by less constitutional numbers in a circumstance where they are present altogether. (T.M.)

  8. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. The types of gonad shields in use are discussed as are the types of diagnostic examinations that should include gonad shielding. It was found that when properly used, most shields provided substantial gonad dose reductions

  9. Ablative Flexible Aerogel TPS Materials for Mars Aerocapture and Entry, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Renewed interest in missions to explore other planets has created a need for new advanced heat shield systems that will protect spacecraft from the severe heating...

  10. Some open questions concerning the neutral-shielding model of a fuelling pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the implications and assumptions of the idealized neutral shielding model of Parks and Turnbull, the model is reformulated in a self consistent way. Due to the uncertainty of the actual ablation process occuring at the pellet surface, alternative boundary conditions are proposed. Their effect on the pellet ablation rate and the state of the ablated flow are examined by numerical analyses. The results show that the ablation rate is not sensitively affected but the ablatant state is markedly influenced by the boundary condition at the pellet surface. In particular, an increase of the energy flux received at the pellet surface by a factor of four hardly affect the ablation rate but changes the temperature and the density of the ablatant at the pellet surface by three orders of magnitude. Based on these obtained results, it is concluded that the idealized ablation model is adequate when pellet injection is used to fuel a plasma but requires modification when it is used to probe plasma properties and discharge conditions. (orig.)

  11. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  12. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  13. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  14. Developing the model of laser ablation by considering the interplay between emission and expansion of aluminum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, F.; Tavassoli, S. H. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, ShahidBeheshti University, 19396 4716, G. C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, the ablation behavior of aluminum target and its plasma radiation in noble ambient gases by a laser pulse with wavelength of 266 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns are numerically studied. A thermal model of laser ablation considering heat conduction, Euler equations, Saha-Eggert equations, Knudsen layer, mass and energy balance relations and optical shielding effects are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Effects of excitation energy on plasma expansion and its emissivity are investigated. Time and spatial-resolved plasma emission including bremsstrahlung, recombination and spectral emission at early delay times after laser irradiation is obtained. Effects of two ambient gases (He and Ar) as well as different gas pressures of 100, 300, 500, and 760 Torr on plasma expansion and its spectrum are studied. Results illustrate that at initial delay times, especially at high noble gas pressures, ionic lines have the maximum intensities, while at later times neutral lines dominate. When the pressure of ambient gas increases, a confinement of the plasma plume is predicted and the intensity of neutral lines decreases. Continuous emission increases with wavelength in both ambient gases. Spatially resolved analysis shows that an intense continuous emission is predicted next to the sample surface decreasing with distance from the latter.

  15. External dosimetry sources and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calisto, Washington

    1994-01-01

    A definition of external dosimetry r external sources dosimetry,physical and mathematical treatment of the interaction of gamma radiation with a minimal area in that direction. Concept of attenuation coefficient, cumulated effect by polyenergetic sources, exposition rate, units, cumulated dose,shielding, foton shielding, depth calculation, materials used for shielding.Beta shielding, consideration of range and maximum β energy , low stopping radiation by use of low Z shielding. Tables for β energy of β emitters, I (tau) factor, energy-range curves for β emitters in aqueous media, gamma attenuation factors for U, W and Pb. Y factor for bone tissue,muscle and air, build-up factors

  16. Radiation shielding calculation using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro

    2001-01-01

    To verify the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A as a tool to generate the reference data in the shielding designs and the safety evaluations, various shielding benchmark experiments were analyzed using this code. These experiments were categorized in three types of the shielding subjects; bulk shielding, streaming, and skyshine. For the variance reduction technique, which is indispensable to get meaningful results with the Monte Carlo shielding calculation, we mainly used the weight window, the energy dependent Russian roulette and spitting. As a whole, our analyses performed enough small statistical errors and showed good agreements with these experiments. (author)

  17. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  18. Radiation shielding wall structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka; Oka, Shinji; Kan, Toshihiko; Misato, Takeshi.

    1990-01-01

    A space between a pair of vertical steel plates laterally disposed in parallel at an optional distance has a structure of a plurality of vertically extending tranks partitioned laterally by vertically placed steel plates. Then, cements are grouted to the tranks. Strip-like steel plates each having a thickness greater than the gap between the each of the vertically placed steel plates and the cement are bonded each at the surface for each of the vertically placed steel plates opposing to the cements. A protrusion of a strip width having radiation shielding performance substantially identical with that by the thickness of the cement is disposed in the strip-like steel plates. With such a constitution, a safety radiation shielding wall structure with no worry of radiation intrusion to gaps, if formed, between the steel plates and the grouted cements due to shrinkage of the cements. (I.N.)

  19. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, Takamasa; Yamada, Fumiyuki; Nakazato, Kenjiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a material, which is used for printing a samples name and date on an X-ray photographic film at the same time an X-ray radiography. Constitution: A radiation shielding material of a large mass absorption coefficient such as lead oxide, barium oxide, barium sulfate, etc. is added to a solution of a radiation permeable substance capable of imparting cold plastic fluidity (such as microcrystalline wax, paraffin, low molecular polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, etc.). The resultant system is agitated and then cooled, and thereafter it is press fitted to or bonded to a base in the form of a film of a predetermined thickness. This radiation shielding layer is scraped off by using a writing tool to enter information to be printed in a photographic film, and then it is laid over the film and exposed to X-radiation to thereby print the information on the film. (Seki, T.)

  20. Multilayer radiation shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  1. Light shielding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  2. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  4. Ablation of liver metastases by radiofrequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baere, T. de

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency is a thermal ablative technique that is most often used percuteanously under image guidance. Thermal damage is obtained through frictional heating of a high frequency current. The maximal volume of destruction obtained in one radiofrequency delivery is around 4 cm and consequently, best indication for treatment are tumours below 3 cm. When compared, radiofrequency and surgical removal for tumours below 25 mm in diameter demonstrated a rate of incomplete resection/ablation of 6% and 7.3% respectively. Median survival after the first radiofrequency of a liver metastasis of CRC is reported to be 24 to 52 months with a 5 years overall survival of 18 to 44%. The median overall survival increases from 22 to 48 months depending on the use of radiofrequency ablation as rescue treatment after failure of others, or as a first line treatment. For patients with a single tumour, less than 4 cm, the survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years are respectively 97%, 84% and 40%, with a median survival of 50 months. Follow-up imaging requires to use contrast-enhanced CT or MRI, looking for local recurrences evidenced by local foci of enhancement at the periphery of the ablation zone. (author)

  5. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  6. Shielding calculations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Chiri; Tesch, K.; Dinter, H.

    1988-06-01

    The dose equivalent on the surface of concrete shielding has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA86 for incident proton energies from 10 to 800 GeV. The results have been compared with some simple equations. The value of the angular dependent parameter in Moyer's equation has been calculated from the locations where the values of the maximum dose equivalent occur. (author)

  7. Thermal shielding device in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the soundness and earthquake proofness of mounting structures to a reactor vessel in a thermal shielding device comprising a plurality of tightly closed casings evacuated or shield with heat insulation gases, by reducing the wall thickness and weight of the casing. Constitution: the thermal shielding body comprises tightly closed casings and compressing core materials for preventing the deformation of the casings. The tightly closed casing is in the shape of a hollow vessel, completely sealed in gastight manner, and evacuated or sealed with heat insulation gases at a low pressure of about less than 0.5 kg/cm 2 G, such that the inner pressure is lower than the outer pressure. Compressing core materials made of porous metals or porous ceramics are contained to the inside of the casing. In this way, the wall thickness of the tightly closed casing can be reduced significantly as compared with the conventional case, whereby the mounting work on the site to the reactor container on the field can remarkably be improved and high reliability can be maintained at the mounting portion. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  9. Muon shielding for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.M.; Thomas, R.H.

    1974-01-01

    The first stage of construction of PEP will consist of electron and positron storage rings. At a later date a 200 GeV proton storage ring may be added. It is judicious therefore, to ensure that the first and second phases of construction are compatible with each other. One of several factors determining the elevation at which the storage rings will be constructed is the necessity to provide adequate radiation shielding. The overhead shielding of PEP is determined by the reproduction of neutrons in the hadron cascade generated by primary protons lost from the storage ring. The minimum overburden planned for PEP is 5.5 meters of earth (1100 gm cm/sup /minus/2/). To obtain a rough estimate of the magnitude of the muon radiation problem this note presents some preliminary calculations. Their purpose is intended merely to show that the presently proposed design for PEP will present no major shielding problems should the protons storage ring be installed. More detailed calculations will be made using muon yield computer codes developed at CERN and NAL and muon transport codes developed at SLAC, when details of the proton storage ring become settled. 9 refs., 4 figs

  10. Shielding calculations for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, K.A.; Hogenbirk, A.

    1991-05-01

    In the European Fusion Technology Programme there is only a small activity on research and development for fusion neutronics. Never-the-less, looking further than blanket design now, as ECN is getting involved in design of radiation shields for the coils and biological shields, it becomes apparent that fusion neutronics as a whole still needs substantial development. Existing exact codes for calculation of complex geometries like MCNP and DORT/TORT are put over the limits of their numerical capabilities, whilst approximate codes for complex geometries like FURNACE and MERCURE4 are put over the limits of their modelling capabilities. The main objective of this study is just to find out how far we can get with existing codes in obtaining reliable values for the radiation levels inside and outside the cryostat/shield during operation and after shut-down. Starting with a 1D torus model for preliminary parametric studies, more dimensional approximation of the torus or parts of it including the main heterogeneities should follow. Regular contacts with the NET-Team are kept, to be aware of main changes in NET design that might affect our calculation models. Work on the contract started 1 July 1990. The technical description of the contract is given. (author). 14 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  12. New mitigation schemes of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azechi, H.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Sakaiya, T.; Tamari, Y.; Ohtani, K.; Watari, T.; Murakami, M.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishihara, K.; Miyanaga, N.; Izawa, Y.; Ohnishi, N.

    2005-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through the unstable interface is the key physics that determines success or failure of inertial fusion energy (IFE) generation, as the RT instability potentially quenches ignition and burn by disintegrating the IFE target. We present two suppression schemes of the RT growth without significant degradation of the target density. The first scheme is to generate double ablation structure in high-Z doped plastic targets. In addition to the electron ablation surface, a new ablation surface is created by x-ray radiation from the high-Z ions. Contrary to the previous thought, the electron ablation surface is almost completely stabilized by extremely high flow velocity. On the other hand, the RT instability on the radiative ablation surface is significantly moderated. The second is to enhance the nonlocal nature of the electron heat transport by illuminating the target with long wavelength laser light, whereas the high ablation pressure is generated by irradiating short wavelength laser light. The significant suppression of the RT instability may increase the possibility of impact ignition which uses a high velocity fuel colliding with a preformed main fuel. (author)

  13. Radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors (II): clinical application and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanagas, Tomas; Gulbinas, Antanas; Pundzius, Juozas; Barauskas, Giedrius

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is one of the alternatives in the management of liver tumors, especially in patients who are not candidates for surgery. The aim of this article is to review applicability of radiofrequency ablation achieving complete tumor destruction, utility of imaging techniques for patients' follow-up, indications for local ablative procedures, procedure-associated morbidity and mortality, and long-term results in patients with different tumors. The success of local thermal ablation consists in creating adequate volumes of tissue destruction with adequate "clear margin," depending on improved delivery of radiofrequency energy and modulated tissue biophysiology. Different volumes of coagulation necrosis are achieved applying different types of electrodes, pulsing energy sources, utilizing sophisticated ablation schemes. Some additional methods are used to increase the overall deposition of energy through alterations in tissue electrical conductivity, to improve heat retention within the tissue, and to modulate tolerance of tumor tissue to hyperthermia. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound or positron emission tomography are applied to control the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation. The long-term results of radiofrequency ablation are controversial.

  14. Upper shielding body in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Koichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: Preference is given to the strength and thermal insulation of a roof slab thereby ensuring axial size and improving the operationability upon inserting the control rod in the upper shielding body of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: In an upper shielding body in which a large rotational plug is rotatably mounted to a circular hole formed at an eccentric position of a roof slab, while a small rotational plug is rotatably mounted to a circular hole disposed at an eccentric position of the large rotational plug and the reactor core upper mechanisms are supported on the small rotational plug, heat insulation layers are attached to the inside of the inner circumferential wall of the roof slab and the outer circumferential wall of the large rotational plug. By attaching the heat insulation layers, the heat conduction between the roof slab and the large rotational plug can be suppressed remarkably, by which occurrence of specific heat pass or local generation of large thermal stresses can be avoided even if difference is resulted to the temperature distribution between them. In this way, functions taking advantage of respective features of the roof slab and the small rotational plug can be obtained to achieve the purpose. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  16. Pellet-plasma interaction: Local disturbances caused by pellet ablation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    The local disturbance amplitudes caused by ablating pellets in tokamaks are computed in the framework of a magnetohydrodynamic model supplemented by the neutral gas plasma shielding ablation model. The model computes, for a given number of pellet particles locally deposited, the time histories of the ablatant cloud parameters, such as cloud radius, cloud length, electron density, temperature and cloud beta, at a succession of magnetic flux surfaces. The cloud radius thus determined may be fed back into the ablation model, thus adjusting the effect of the shielding cloud on the ablation rate. The model is applied to typical plasma parameter ranges of existing and planned tokamaks. The results show that the ablating pellets may cause massive local disturbances in tokamaks, depending upon the number of particles locally deposited. The peaks of these disturbances are of a spike nature, lasting only a few microseconds (Alfven time-scale). The characteristic decay time of the 'quasi-steady' disturbance values that characterize the after-spike period is of the order of several milliseconds (hydrodynamic time-scale). The peak electron density values may be as high as 10 23 to 10 25 m -3 , with the associated beta peaks exceeding unity. The 'quasi-steady' values of the electron density and the ablatant beta may be of the order of 10 22 to 10 24 m -3 and unity, respectively. Furthermore, the results show the strong dependence of the ablation rate on the dynamic characteristics of the ablatant cloud surrounding the pellet. (author). 25 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung; Ahn, Mu Young

    2016-01-01

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model

  18. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu Young [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model.

  19. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  20. Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; King, Deirdre M; Edmonson, Heidi A; Felmlee, Joel P; Rossman, Phillip J; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J; Watson, Robert E; Gorny, Krzysztof R

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient's body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (∼1 dB) of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices.

  1. Photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Van Phuc, Nguyen; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) over 20 years. Recently, application of high laser power up to 200 W was often reported to swiftly remove a large amount of prostatic tissue. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue vaporization with low laser power. Chicken breast tissue was selected as a target tissue due to minimal optical absorption at the visible wavelength. Four biocompatible photoactive dyes, including amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532 nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm(2) . Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-Vis spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2 ± 0.2 µm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. High aspect ratios up to 7.1 ± 0.4 entailed saturation behavior in the tissue ablation injected with AR and BD, possibly resulting from plume shielding and increased scattering due to coagulation. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33% reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. Due to

  2. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  3. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-20

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  4. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  5. Light-refractory radiation shielding materials using diatomites and zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently shown that diatomites and zeolites have some useful characteristics for radiation shielding materials. In this study, the availability of these materials for unexpected accidents in the nuclear sites is examined. The diatomites and zeolites, compared to existing shielding materials, have superior characteristics; low density and light weight, low in radiation-induced problem, high-heat resistance, remain unaltered by the addition of an acid except hydrofluoric acid, porous and large specific surface area, and also excellent water-absorbing property. These porous materials could also expand the shielding energy range applied and be used for fast- and thermal-neutrons, and γ ray. In addition, these materials are easy to store for long periods of time against emergency because of their natural rocks. From the examinations, it is cleared that diatomites and zeolites have excellent properties as radiation shielding materials for emergency use. (author)

  6. Feasibility of a superconducting FED with 50 cm of magnet shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the suggestion that the cost of a Fusion Energy Device (FED) could be substantially reduced by operating with a reduced duty factor and only 50 cm of magnet shielding is evaluated here. This report examines the effect of light shielding on insulation life, matrix- and superconductor properties, refrigerator cost and steady-state heat removal. With very careful design, it appears feasible to build a device with only 50 cm of shielding

  7. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Dou, Hong-qiang [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan Engineering Technical College, Deyang 618000 (China); Liao, Wei, E-mail: liaowei@caep.cn [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The fs laser ablation of borosilicate glass (K9) were investigated under 35 and 500 fs pulses. • At high fluence regime, the ablation rate at 35 fs in air increased to a plateau, and 500 fs in air and vacuum decreased. • The mechanisms of multiple-photon ionization and impact ionization were included. • The ablation morphologies of smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures were presented and illustrated. • The ablation mechanisms of non-thermal and thermal ablation were included. - Abstract: Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm{sup 2} and 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and vacuum, which may due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air, and/or the shielding effects of conduction band electrons (CBEs) produced by multi-photon ionization and impact ionization in K9 glass surface. The typical ablation morphologies, e.g. smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were also presented and illustrated.

  8. Radiation shielding quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Dallsun

    For the radiation shielding quality assurance, the validity and reliability of the neutron transport code MCNP, which is now one of the most widely used radiation shielding analysis codes, were checked with lot of benchmark experiments. And also as a practical example, follows were performed in this thesis. One integral neutron transport experiment to measure the effect of neutron streaming in iron and void was performed with Dog-Legged Void Assembly in Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in 1991. Neutron flux was measured six different places with the methane detectors and a BF-3 detector. The main purpose of the measurements was to provide benchmark against which various neutron transport calculation tools could be compared. Those data were used in verification of Monte Carlo Neutron & Photon Transport Code, MCNP, with the modeling for that. Experimental results and calculation results were compared in both ways, as the total integrated value of neutron fluxes along neutron energy range from 10 KeV to 2 MeV and as the neutron spectrum along with neutron energy range. Both results are well matched with the statistical error +/-20%. MCNP results were also compared with those of TORT, a three dimensional discrete ordinates code which was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MCNP results are superior to the TORT results at all detector places except one. This means that MCNP is proved as a very powerful tool for the analysis of neutron transport through iron & air and further it could be used as a powerful tool for the radiation shielding analysis. For one application of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to neutron and gamma transport problems, uncertainties for the calculated values of critical K were evaluated as in the ANOVA on statistical data.

  9. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  10. A shield against distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Halin, N.; Marsh, J.E.; Hellman, A.; Hellstrom, I.; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the basic idea of a trade-off between the level of concentration and distractibility to test whether a manipulation of task difficulty can shield against distraction. Participants read, either in quiet or with a speech noise background, texts that were displayed either in an easy-to-read or a hard-to-read font. Background speech impaired prose recall, but only when the text was displayed in the easy-to-read font. Most importantly, recall was better in the background sp...

  11. Dynamics of tissue shrinkage during ablative temperature exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossmann, Christian; Haemmerich, Dieter; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rattay, Frank

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that examine the dynamics of heat-induced shrinkage of organ tissues. Clinical procedures such as radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation or high-intensity focused ultrasound, use heat to treat diseases such as cancer and cardiac arrhythmia. When heat is applied to tissues, shrinkage occurs due to protein denaturation, dehydration and contraction of collagen at temperatures greater 50 °C. This is particularly relevant for image-guided procedures such as tumor ablation, where pre- and post-treatment images are compared and any changes in dimensions must be considered to avoid misinterpretations of the treatment outcome. We present data from ex vivo, isothermal shrinkage tests in porcine liver tissue, where axial changes in tissue length were recorded during 15 min of heating to temperatures between 60 and 95 °C. A mathematical model was developed to accurately describe the time and temperature-dependent shrinkage behavior. The shrinkage dynamics had the same characteristics independent of temperature; the estimated relative shrinkage, adjusted for time since death, after 15 min heating to temperatures of 60, 65, 75, 85 and 95 °C, was 12.3, 13.8, 16.6, 19.2 and 21.7%, respectively. Our results demonstrate the shrinkage dynamics of organ tissues, and suggest the importance of considering tissue shrinkage for thermal ablative treatments. (paper)

  12. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  13. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  14. Tax Shield, Insolvenz und Zinsschranke

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Sven; Lahmann, Alexander; Schwetzler, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Dieser Beitrag analysiert den Wertbeitrag fremdfinanzierungsbedingter Steuervorteile (Tax Shield) unter realistischen Bedingungen (keine Negativsteuer; mögliche Insolvenz) für unterschiedliche Finanzierungspolitiken. Zusätzlich wird der Effekt der sogenannten Zinsschranke auf den Wert des Tax Shield ermittelt. Die Bewertung des Tax Shield mit und ohne Zinsschranke findet im einperiodigen Fall auf der Basis von Optionspreismodellen und im mehrperiodigen Fall auf der Basis von Monte Carlo Simul...

  15. SHIELD verification and validation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, C.

    1992-02-01

    This document outlines the verification and validation effort for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system code. Along with its predecessors, SHIELD has been in use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for more than ten years. During this time the code has been extensively tested and a variety of validation documents have been issued. The primary function of this report is to specify the features and capabilities for which SHIELD is to be considered validated, and to reference the documents that establish the validation

  16. Radiation shield for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenfluh, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    A shield for use with nuclear reactor systems to attenuate radiation resulting from reactor operation is described. The shield comprises a container preferably of a thin, flexible or elastic material, which may be in the form of a bag, a mattress, a toroidal segment or toroid or the like filled with radiation attenuating liuid. Means are provided in the container for filling and draining the container in place. Due to its flexibility, the shield readily conforms to irregularities in surfaces with which it may be in contact in a shielding position

  17. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  18. SHIELDS Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania Koleva [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. “space weather”, remains a big space physics challenge. A new capability was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. This framework simulates the dynamics of the Surface Charging Environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and micro-scale. In addition to using physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites were developed. An order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy in the simulation of the spacecraft surface charging environment was thus obtained. SHIELDS also includes a post-processing tool designed to calculate the surface charging for specific spacecraft geometry using the Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell (CPIC) code and to evaluate anomalies' relation to SCE dynamics. Such diagnostics is critically important when performing forensic analyses of space-system failures.

  19. Radiation shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, S.H.; Ha, C.W.; Kwon, S.K.; Lee, J.K.; Choi, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical bases of radiation streaming analysis in power reactors, such as ducts or reactor cavity, have been investigated. Discrete ordinates-Monte Carlo or Monte Carlo-Monte Carlo coupling techniques are suggested for the streaming analysis of ducts or reactor cavity. Single albedo scattering approximation code (SINALB) has been developed for simple and quick estimation of gamma-ray ceiling scattering, where the ceiling is assumed to be semi-infinite medium. This code has been employed to calculate the gamma-ray ceiling scattering effects in the laboratory containing a Co-60 source. The SINALB is applicable to gamma-ray scattering, only where the ceiling is thicker than Σsup(-1) and the height is at least twice higher than the shield wall. This code can be used for the purpose of preliminary radiation shield design. The MORSE code has been improved to analyze the gamma-ray scattering problem with on approximation method in respect to the random walk and estimation processes. This improved MORSE code has been employed to the gamma-ray ceiling scattering problem. The results of the improved MORSE calculation are in good agreement with the SINALB and standard MORSE. (Author)

  20. Optimization of thermal design for nitrogen shield of JET cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Obert, W.

    1991-11-01

    The reference design of JET cryopump nitrogen shield consists of an outer section made of copper chevrons fastened to two cooling tubes and an inner stainless steel section and backing plate with two cooling tubes. These tubes are fed in a parallel flow arrangement. The inlet flow is divided into two parallel paths so that both tubes on either section are always at the same temperature. This arrangement was selected due to concern about conduction between warm and cold parts of the shield during cooldown transients. If the heat loads are unequal, such a parallel flow arrangement can result in flow starvation in the path with higher heat load. This will cause large temperature differences and, ultimately, structural failure. Hence, an analysis was undertaken to investigate the conduction effects in the shield for other flow arrangements. 4 refs., 8 figs

  1. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  2. Shielding performance of the NET vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkuszewski, J.J.; Jaeger, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    To corroborate 1-D deterministic shielding calculations on the Next European Torus (NET) vacuum vessel/shield and shielding blanket, 3-D Monte Carlo calculations have been done with the MCNP code. This should provide information on the poloidal and the toroidal variations. Plasma source simulation and the geometrical model are described, as are other assumptions. The calculations are based on the extended plasma power of 714 MW. The results reported here are the heat deposition in various parts of the device, on the one hand, and the neutron and photon currents at the outer boundary of the vacuum vessel, on the other hand. The latter are needed for the detailed design of the super-conducting magnetic coils. A reasonable statistics has been obtained on the outboard side of the torus, though this cannot be said for the inboard side. The inboard is, however, much more toroidally symmetric than the outboard, so that other methods could be applied such as 2-D deterministic calculations, for instance. (author) 4 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs

  3. Topographic evidence for shield volcanism on Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.M.; Mcewen, A.S.; Albin, E.F.; Greeley, R.

    1986-01-01

    Similarities between terrestrial shield volcanoes and a volcano on Io observed in Voyager I imagery of the satellite at 30 0 S, 246 0 W are delineated. A photoclinometry model was used to numerically estimate the slope based on the Minnaert photometric function. The slope values are accurate to within 10 deg on the sun-facing slope and 1 deg on the shadow side. As found with shield volcanoes, the feature has a central edifice, 40-50 km in diameter, and a broad, elliptical base, 77 x 90 km across. The summit of the Io volcano is 2.2-2.8 km above the surrounding plane and contains a caldera about 5 km in diameter. The similarity in shape between basaltic terrestrial shield volcanoes and the Io volcano indicates that the Io feature may also be composed of basalt. The composition could be sulfur if the heat flow was under 0.05 W/sq m, as it might have been in later stages of formation. 9 references

  4. Ablative thermal protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed. 5 references

  5. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear data for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Shunichi; Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    The third shielding expert conference was convened in Paris in Oct. 1975 for exchanging informations about the sensitivity evaluation of nuclear data in shielding calculation and integral bench mark experiment. The requirements about nuclear data presented at present from the field of nuclear design do not reflect sufficiently the requirements of shielding design, therefore it was the object to gather the requirements about nuclear data from the field of shielding. The nuclides used for shielding are numerous, and the nuclear data on these isotopes are required. Some of them cannot be ignored as the source of secondary γ-ray or in view of the radioactivation of materials. The requirements for the nuclear data of neutrons in the field of shielding are those concerning the reaction cross sections producing secondary γ-ray, the reaction cross sections including the production of secondary neutrons, elastic scattering cross sections, and total cross sections. The topics in the Paris conference about neutron shielding data are described, such as the methodology of sensitivity evaluation, the standardization of group constant libraries, the bench mark experiment on iron and sodium, and the cross section of γ-ray production. In the shielding of nuclear fission reactors, the γ-ray production owing to nuclear fission reaction is also important. In (d, t) fusion reactors, high energy neutrons are generated, and high energy γ-ray is emitted through giant E1 resonance. (Kako, I.)

  7. Concrete shielding exterior to iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurista, P.; Cossairt, D.

    1983-08-01

    A rule of thumb at Fermilab has been to use 3 feet of concrete exterior to iron shielding. A recent design of a shield with a severe dimensional constraint has prompted a re-evaluation of this rule of thumb and has led to the following calculations of the concrete thickness required to nullify this problem. 4 references, 4 figures

  8. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. This pamphlet will provide physicians and radiologic technologists with information which will aid their appropriate use of gonad shielding

  9. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation was perfor......This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation...... was performed during two different flow-velocities in a tissue bath, while electrode contact pressure and position were unchanged. Target temperature was 80 degrees C. Obtained tip temperature, power consumption and lesion dimensions were measured. In vivo lesion volume, depth and width were found significantly.......61 in vitro). We conclude that during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation lesion size differs for septal and apical left ventricular applications. Differences in convective cooling might play an important role in this respect. This is supported by our in vitro experiments, where increased...

  10. The Imperial Shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Simon Valentin

    2006-01-01

      The title of this Ph.d. dissertation is "The Imperial Shield: Imperial Overstretch, Assured Destruction, and the ban on nationwide ABM-defense with particular emphasis on the Johnson and the Nixon Administration". The dissertation set out to explain the origins of the ABM Treaty's central meaning....... Domestic spending continued to increase by more in real terms than the GDP, and the Democratically controlled Congress also made some very expensive modifications in Nixon tax bill in the fall of 1969, once again plunging the budget into the red.The economic crisis was partly caused by, and partly...... the Administration debated the deployment of new ABM-sites in early 1970, Kissinger could not prevail against these forces, but had to settle for a compromise, which he regarded as less than a definite commitment to nationwide ABM-defense.The political developments were of even greater importance. A strong link has...

  11. Shielded Canister Transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB

  12. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  13. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  14. Penetration shielding applications of CYLSEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexheimer, D.T.; Hathaway, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of penetration and discontinuity shielding is necessary to meet 10CFR20 regulations for ensuring personnel exposures are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Historically, those shielding evaluations have been done to some degree on all projects. However, many early plants used conservative methods due to lack of an economical computer code, resulting in costly penetration shielding programs. With the increased industry interest in cost effectively reducing personnel exposures to meet ALARA regulations and with the development of the CYLSEC gamma transport computer code at Bechtel, a comprehensive effort was initiated to reduce penetration and discontinuity shielding but still provide a prudent degree of protection for plant personnel from radiation streaming. This effort was more comprehensive than previous programs due to advances in shielding analysis technology and increased interest in controlling project costs while maintaining personnel exposures ALARA. Methodology and resulting cost savings are discussed

  15. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h -1 , independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  16. Modular reactor head shielding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    An improved modular reactor head shielding system is provided that includes a frame which is removably assembled on a reactor head such that no structural or mechanical alteration of the head is required. The shielding system also includes hanging assemblies to mount flexible shielding pads on trolleys which can be moved along the frame. The assemblies allow individual pivoting movement of the pads. The pivoting movement along with the movement allowed by the trolleys provides ease of access to any point on the reactor head. The assemblies also facilitate safe and efficient mounting of the pads directly to and from storage containers such that workers have additional shielding throughout virtually the entire installation and removal process. The flexible shielding pads are designed to interleave with one another when assembled around the reactor head for substantially improved containment of radiation leakage

  17. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-02-01

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author) [pt

  18. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Bosie; Stewart, Eric T.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  1. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield

  2. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of solid tumors. Among these methods, radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RF ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options and is considered as a viable alternate to surgery for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer. Recently, RF ablation has been demonstrated to be a safe and valuable treatment option for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable lung malignancies. Resection should remain the standard therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but RF ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Initial favourable outcomes encourage combining radiotherapy and RF ablation, especially for treating larger tumors. In the setting of colorectal cancer lung metastases, survival rates provided by RF ablation in selected patients, are substantially higher than those obtained with any chemotherapy regimens and provide indirect evidence that RF ablation therapy improves survival in patients with limited lung metastatic disease.

  3. Transparent fast neutron shielding material and shielding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashimoto, Tetsuji; Katase, Haruhisa.

    1993-01-01

    Polyisobutylene having a viscosity average molecular weight of 20,000 to 80,000 and a hydrogen atom density of greater than 7.0 x 10 22 /cm 3 is used as a fast neutron shielding material. The shielding material is excellent in the shielding performance against fast neutrons, and there is no worry of leakage even when holes should be formed to a vessel. Further, it is excellent in fabricability, relatively safe even upon occurrence of fire and, in addition, it is transparent to enable to observe contents easily. (T.M.)

  4. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  5. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Chrul, Anna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-324 Krakow (Poland); Damianoglou, Dimitrios [NTUA National Technical University of Athens, Heeron Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Strychalski, Michał [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, Wroclaw, 50-370 (Poland); Wright, Loren [Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  6. News from the Library: Facilitating access to a program for radiation shielding - the Library can help

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2013-01-01

    MicroShield® is a comprehensive photon/gamma ray shielding and dose assessment programme. It is widely used for designing shields, estimating source strength from radiation measurements, minimising exposure to people, and teaching shielding principles.   Integrated tools allow the graphing of results, material and source file creation, source inference with decay (dose-to-Bq calculations accounting for decay and daughter buildup), the projection of exposure rate versus time as a result of decay, access to material and nuclide data, and decay heat calculations. The latest version is able to export results using Microsoft Office (formatted and colour-coded for readability). Sixteen geometries accommodate offset dose points and as many as ten standard shields plus source self-shielding and cylinder cladding are available. The library data (radionuclides, attenuation, build-up and dose conversion) reflect standard data from ICRP 38 and 107* as well as ANSI/ANS standards and RSICC publicat...

  7. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  8. Morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low-angle edifices built primarily by the accumulation of successive lava flows. This generic view of shield volcano morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galápagos). Here, the morphometry of 158 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes is analyzed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution SRTM DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 24 lava-dominated 'shield-like' volcanoes, considered so far as stratovolcanoes, are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes from 0.1 to > 1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width (H/WB) ratios mostly from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients (average slopes mostly from 1° to 15°), elongation and summit truncation. Although there is no clear-cut morphometric difference between shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes, an approximate threshold can be drawn at 12° average slope and 0.10 H/WB ratio. Principal component analysis of the obtained database enables to identify four key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Hierarchical cluster analysis of these descriptors results in 12 end-member shield types, with intermediate cases defining a continuum of morphologies. The shield types can be linked in terms of growth stages and shape evolution, related to (1) magma composition and rheology, effusion rate and lava/pyroclast ratio, which will condition edifice steepness; (2) spatial distribution of vents, in turn related to the magmatic feeding system and the tectonic framework, which will control edifice plan shape; and (3) caldera formation, which will condition edifice truncation.

  9. Influence of the Radiation Shield on the Temperature of Rails Rolled in the Reversing Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołdasz A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a mathematical model of heat transfer during cooling of hot-rolled rails in the reversing mill. The influence of the radiation shield on the temperature of rolled rails has been analyzed. The heat transfer model for cooling a strip covered by the thermal shield has been presented. The two types of shields build of steel and aluminum sheets separated with insulating layer have been studded. Calculations have been performed with self developed software which utilizes the finite element method.

  10. A study of gamma shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roogtanakait, N.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma rays have high penetration power and its attenuation depends upon the thickness and the attenuation coefficient of the shield, so it is necessary to use the high density shield to attenuate the gamma rays. Heavy concrete is considered to be used for high radiation laboratory and the testing of the shielding ability and compressibility of various types of heavy concrete composed of baryte, hematite, ilmenite and galena is carried out. The results of this study show that baryte-ilmenite concrete is the most suitable for high radiation laboratory in Thailand

  11. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  12. Careful treatment planning enables safe ablation of liver tumors adjacent to major blood vessels by percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kos Bor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Irreversible electroporation (IRE is a tissue ablation method, which relies on the phenomenon of electroporation. When cells are exposed to a sufficiently electric field, the plasma membrane is disrupted and cells undergo an apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Although heating effects are known IRE is considered as non-thermal ablation technique and is currently applied to treat tumors in locations where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated.

  13. Self-generated clouds of micron-sized particles as a promising way of a Solar Probe shielding from intense thermal radiation of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Reviznikov, Dmitry L.; Kryukov, Alexei P.; Levashov, Vladimir Yu

    2017-10-01

    An effect of shielding of an intense solar radiation towards a solar probe with the use of micron-sized SiC particles generated during ablation of a composite thermal protection material is estimated on a basis of numerical solution to a combined radiative and heat transfer problem. The radiative properties of particles are calculated using the Mie theory, and the spectral two-flux model is employed in radiative transfer calculations for non-uniform particle clouds. A computational model for generation and evolution of the cloud is based on a conjugated heat transfer problem taking into account heating and thermal destruction of the matrix of thermal protection material and sublimation of SiC particles in the generated cloud. The effect of light pressure, which is especially important for small particles, is also taken into account. The computational data for mass loss due to the particle cloud sublimation showed the low value about 1 kg/m2 per hour at the distance between the vehicle and the Sun surface of about four radii of the Sun. This indicates that embedding of silicon carbide or other particles into a thermal protection layer and the resulting generation of a particle cloud can be considered as a promising way to improve the possibilities of space missions due to a significant decrease in the vehicle working distance from the solar photosphere.

  14. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L. [Design and Accelerator Operations Consulting, 568 Wintergreen Ct Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Breitfeller, M. [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  15. Development of Low Density, Flexible Carbon Phenolic Ablators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Covington, Alan; Doxtad, Evan; Beck, Robin; Gasch, Matt; Arnold, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was the enabling TPS material for the Stardust mission where it was used as a single piece heatshield. PICA has the advantages of low density (approximately 0.27 grams per cubic centimeter) coupled with efficient ablative capability at high heat fluxes. Due to its brittle nature and low strain to failure recent efforts at NASA ARC have focused on alternative architectures to yield flexible and more conformal carbon phenolic materials with comparable densities to PICA. This presentation will discuss flexible alternatives to PICA and include preliminary mechanical and thermal properties as well as recent arc jet and LHMEL screening test results.

  16. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  17. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Akira; Omori, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A single body of a radiation shield comprises a bag prepared by welding or bonding a polyurethane sheet which is made flat while interposing metal plates at the upper and the lower portion of the bag. Eyelet fittings are disposed to the upper and the lower portions of the bag passing through the metal plates and the flat portion of the bag. Water supplying/draining ports are disposed to two upper and lower places of the bag at a height where the metal plates are disposed. Reinforcing walls welded or bonded to the inner wall surface of the bag are elongated in vertical direction to divide the inside of the bag to a plurality of cells. The bag is suspended and supported from a frame with S-shaped hooks inserted into the eyelet fittings as connecting means. A plurality of bags are suspended and supported from the frame at a required height by way of the eyelets at the lower portion of the suspended and supported bag and the eyelet fittings at the upper portion of the bag below the intermediate connection means. (I.N.)

  18. Self-shielding factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Throughout the last two decades many efforts have been made to estimate the effect of body self-shielding on organ doses from externally incident neutrons and gamma rays. These began with the use of simple geometry phantoms and have culminated in the use of detailed anthropomorphic phantoms. In a recent effort, adjoint Monte Carlo analysis techniques have been used to determine dose and dose equivalent to the active marrow as a function of energy and angle of neutron fluence externally incident on an anthropomorphic phantom. When combined with fluences from actual nuclear devices, these dose-to-fluence factors result in marrow dose values that demonstrate great sensitivity to variations in device type, range, and body orientation. Under a state-of-the-art radiation transport analysis demonstration program for the Japanese cities, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency at the request of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the marrow dose study referred to above is being repeated to obtain spectral distributions within the marrow for externally incident neutrons and gamma rays of arbitrary energy and angle. This is intended to allow radiobiologists and epidemiologists to select and to modify numbers of merit for correlation with health effects and to permit a greater understanding of the relationship between human and laboratory subject dosimetry

  19. Shielding plug device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orii, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Makishima, Kenji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To reduce the size of and extend the life of a revolving bearing and facilitate the laying of driving cables and duct lines, this being accomplished by providing plug raising means of a fast breeder on a stationary plug mounting base so as to prevent the shearing force of sodium from acting upon the revolving bearing. Structure: The shield plug means comprises a stationary plug secured to the open end of the reactor container, a rotary plug rotatable with respect to the stationary plug, an annular base formed on top of the stationary plug so as to cover the rotary plug, a bearing secured to the rotary plug edge lower face and upper and lower locking plates. At the time of the rotation of the rotary plug, the upper locking plate is withdrawn, the stationary plug is raised to release the seal structure, and the lower locking plate is inserted between the bearing and stationary plug. In this way, smooth rotation of the rotary plug can be obtained. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinsky, V A; Raitses, Y

    2015-01-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement. (paper)

  1. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322-6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  2. Non-coaxial-based microwave ablation antennas for creating symmetric and asymmetric coagulation zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtashami, Yahya; Luyen, Hung; Hagness, Susan C.; Behdad, Nader

    2018-06-01

    We present an investigation of a new class of microwave ablation (MWA) antennas capable of producing axially symmetric or asymmetric heating patterns. The antenna design is based on a dipole fed by a balanced parallel-wire transmission line. The angle and direction of the deployed dipole arms are used to control the heating pattern. We analyzed the specific absorption rate and temperature profiles using electromagnetic and thermal simulations. Two prototypes were fabricated and tested in ex vivo ablation experiments: one was designed to produce symmetric heating patterns and the other was designed to generate asymmetric heating patterns. Both fabricated prototypes exhibited good impedance matching and produced localized coagulation zones as predicted by the simulations. The prototype operating in porcine muscle created an ˜10 cm3 symmetric ablation zone after 10 min of ablation with a power level of 18 W. The prototype operating in egg white created an ˜4 cm3 asymmetric ablation zone with a directionality ratio of 40% after 5 min of ablation with a power level of 25 W. The proposed MWA antenna design shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of tumors in various clinical scenarios where, depending on the situation, a symmetric or an asymmetric heating pattern may be needed.

  3. Microwave ablation of renal tumors: state of the art and development trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floridi, Chiara; De Bernardi, Irene; Fontana, Federico; Muollo, Alessandra; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Agostini, Andrea; Fonio, Paolo; Squillaci, Ettore; Brunese, Luca; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    In the last decades an increased incidence of new renal tumor cases has been for clinically localized, small tumors elderly patients, with medical comorbidities whom the risk of surgical complications may pose a greater risk of death than that due to the tumor itself. In these patients, unsuitable for surgical approach, thermal ablation represents a valid alternative to traditional surgery. Thermal ablation is a less invasive, less morbid treatment option thanks to reduced blood loss, lower incidence of complications during the procedure and a less long convalescence. At present, the most widely used thermal ablative techniques are cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation (MWA). MWA offers many benefits of other ablation techniques and offers several other advantages: higher intratumoral temperatures, larger tumor ablation volumes, faster ablation times, the ability to use multiple applicators simultaneously, optimal heating of cystic masses and tumors close to the vessels and less procedural pain. This review aims to provide the reader with an overview about the state of the art of microwave ablation for renal tumors and to cast a glance on the new development trends of this technique.

  4. Effect of liquid properties on laser ablation of aluminum and titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Peixuan, E-mail: oypx12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center of Novel Materials for International Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Peijie [National Center of Novel Materials for International Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Leksina, E.G.; Michurin, S.V. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); He, Liangju [School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous surfaces are formed in Al alloy after wet ablation due to phase explosion. • A higher ablation rate is produced in glycerin than that in water and isopropanol. • Effect of liquid properties on mass-removal mechanisms was discussed. • Phase explosion and plasma-induced pressure contribute greatly to mass removal. • Density, heat conductivity and shock impendence of liquid affect ablation rates. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of liquid properties on laser ablation in liquids, aluminum 5A06 and titanium TB5 targets were irradiated by single-pulse infrared laser in isopropanol, distilled water, glycerin and as a comparison, in air, respectively. Craters induced by laser ablation were characterized using scanning electron and white-light interferometric microscopies. The results show that for liquid-mediated ablation, craters with porous surface structures were formed in aluminum target through phase explosion, while no micro-cavities were formed in titanium target owing to high critical temperature of titanium. In addition, ablation rates of aluminum and titanium targets vary with types of ambient media in accordance with such sequence: air < isopropanol < water < glycerin. Further, the influence of liquid properties on material-removal mechanisms for laser ablation in liquid is discussed. It is concluded that the density, thermal conductivity and acoustical impedance of liquid play a dominant role in laser ablation efficiency.

  5. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderschueren, Geert Maria Joris Michael

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of spinal and non-spinal osteoid osteomas. Furthermore, the technical requirements needed for safe radiofrequency ablation and the clinical outcome after radiofrequency

  6. Modeling of beam-target interaction during pulsed electron beam ablation of graphite: Case of melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Muddassir, E-mail: mx1_ali@laurentian.ca; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Modeling of ablation stage induced during pulsed electron beam ablation (PEBA). • Thermal model to describe heating, melting and vaporization of a graphite target. • Model results show good accordance with reported data in the literature. - Abstract: A one-dimensional thermal model based on a two-stage heat conduction equation is employed to investigate the ablation of graphite target during nanosecond pulsed electron beam ablation. This comprehensive model accounts for the complex physical phenomena comprised of target heating, melting and vaporization upon irradiation with a polyenergetic electron beam. Melting and vaporization effects induced during ablation are taken into account by introducing moving phase boundaries. Phase transition induced during ablation is considered through the temperature dependent thermodynamic properties of graphite. The effect of electron beam efficiency, power density, and accelerating voltage on ablation is analyzed. For an electron beam operating at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency of 0.6, the model findings show that the target surface temperature can reach up to 7500 K at the end of the pulse. The surface begins to melt within 25 ns from the pulse start. For the same process conditions, the estimated ablation depth and ablated mass per unit area are about 0.60 μm and 1.05 μg/mm{sup 2}, respectively. Model results indicate that ablation takes place primarily in the regime of normal vaporization from the surface. The results obtained at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency factor of 0.6 are satisfactorily in good accordance with available experimental data in the literature.

  7. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III.

    1996-01-01

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan

  8. Active Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DEC-Shield technology offers the means to generate electric power from cosmic radiation sources and fuse dissimilar systems and functionality into a structural...

  9. Gonad shielding in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockstroh, G.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of gonadal dose by shielding of the gonads was investigated for a Somatom 2 using an anthropomorphic phantom. For small distances from the slice examined the gonadal dose results from intracorporal secondary radiation and is only insignificantly reduced by shielding. For greater distances shielding is relatively more effective, the gonadal dose however is small because of the approximately exponential decay. Shielding of the gonads therefore does not seem adequate for the reduction of gonadal dose. From dose measurements in cylinder phantoms of several diameters it appears that no different results would be obtained for children and young adults. An effective reduction of gonadal dose is only possible with lead capsules for males. (author)

  10. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions. (authors)

  11. Shielding calculations. Optimization vs. Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina

    2005-01-01

    Many radiation shielding barriers in Cuba have been designed according to the criterion of Maxi-mum Projected Dose Rates. This fact has created the paradigm of low dose rates. Because of this, dose rate levels greater than units of Sv.h-1 would be considered unacceptable by many specialists, regardless of the real exposure times. Nowadays many shielding barriers are being designed using dose constraints in real exposure times. Behind the new barriers, dose rates could be notably greater than those behind the traditional ones, and it does not imply inadequate designs or constructive errors. In this work were obtained significant differences in dose rate levels and shield-ing thicknesses calculated by both methods for some typical installations. The work concludes that real exposure time approach is more adequate in order to optimise Radiation Protection, although this method should be carefully applied

  12. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions

  13. [Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Bale, Reto

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is well established in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Due to its curative potential, it is the method of choice for non resectable BCLC (Barcelona Liver Clinic) 0 and A. RFA challenges surgical resection for small HCC and is the method of choice in bridging for transplantation and recurrence after resection or transplantation. The technical feasibility of RFA depends on the size and location of the HCC and the availability of ablation techniques (one needle techniques, multi-needle techniques). More recently, stereotactic multi-needle techniques with 3D trajectory planning and guided needle placement substantially improve the spectrum of treatable lesions including large volume tumors. Treatment success depends on the realization of ablations with large intentional margins of tumor free tissue (A0 ablation in analogy to R0 resection), which has to be documented by fusion of post- with pre-ablation images, and confirmed during follow-up imaging.

  14. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: A study concerning electrode configuration, lesion size and potential complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar

    1999-01-01

    the delivery of RF current in the right atrial free wall. Lung lesions were particularly deep in unipolar 10 mm ablation, because lesion length and depth increased proportionately. Sudden impedance rise most frequently was observed with the bipolar two-catheter technique and was never observed in the dielectrode mode when the power limit was 50 W. 3) When choosing a set temperature for temperature controlled ablations it is important to consider both the location of the thermo sensor in the ablation electrode, the most probable catheter up-tissue orientation at the target of ablation and the estimated local flow (=convective heat loss). 4) In patients subjected to RF ablation, the procedure duration prior to heparin administration and not the delivery of RF current per se, determines activation of haemostasis and fibrinolysis. Some future perspectives are mentioned

  15. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: A study concerning electrode configuration, lesion size and potential complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar

    1999-07-01

    related to the delivery of RF current in the right atrial free wall. Lung lesions were particularly deep in unipolar 10 mm ablation, because lesion length and depth increased proportionately. Sudden impedance rise most frequently was observed with the bipolar two-catheter technique and was never observed in the dielectrode mode when the power limit was 50 W. 3) When choosing a set temperature for temperature controlled ablations it is important to consider both the location of the thermo sensor in the ablation electrode, the most probable catheter up-tissue orientation at the target of ablation and the estimated local flow (=convective heat loss). 4) In patients subjected to RF ablation, the procedure duration prior to heparin administration and not the delivery of RF current per se, determines activation of haemostasis and fibrinolysis. Some future perspectives are mentioned.

  16. A study of photothermal laser ablation of various polymers on microsecond time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Schönfeld, Friedhelm; Li, Chen; Golriz, Ali A; Nagel, Matthias; Lippert, Thomas; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the photothermal ablation of polymers, we designed a temperature measurement setup based on spectral pyrometry. The setup allows to acquire 2D temperature distributions with 1 μm size and 1 μs time resolution and therefore the determination of the center temperature of a laser heating process. Finite element simulations were used to verify and understand the heat conversion and heat flow in the process. With this setup, the photothermal ablation of polystyrene, poly(α-methylstyrene), a polyimide and a triazene polymer was investigated. The thermal stability, the glass transition temperature Tg and the viscosity above Tg were governing the ablation process. Thermal decomposition for the applied laser pulse of about 10 μs started at temperatures similar to the start of decomposition in thermogravimetry. Furthermore, for polystyrene and poly(α-methylstyrene), both with a Tg in the range between room and decomposition temperature, ablation already occurred at temperatures well below the decomposition temperature, only at 30-40 K above Tg. The mechanism was photomechanical, i.e. a stress due to the thermal expansion of the polymer was responsible for ablation. Low molecular weight polymers showed differences in photomechanical ablation, corresponding to their lower Tg and lower viscosity above the glass transition. However, the difference in ablated volume was only significant at higher temperatures in the temperature regime for thermal decomposition at quasi-equilibrium time scales.

  17. Thulium-170 heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Carl E.; Van Konynenburg, Richard; VanSant, James H.

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  18. Laboratory Simulations of Micrometeoroid Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan Williamson

    Each day, several tons of meteoric material enters Earth's atmosphere, the majority of which consist of small dust particles (micrometeoroids) that completely ablate at high altitudes. The dust input has been suggested to play a role in a variety of phenomena including: layers of metal atoms and ions, nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and ozone chemistry, and the fertilization of the ocean with bio-available iron. Furthermore, a correct understanding of the dust input to the Earth provides constraints on inner solar system dust models. Various methods are used to measure the dust input to the Earth including satellite detectors, radar, lidar, rocket-borne detectors, ice core and deep-sea sediment analysis. However, the best way to interpret each of these measurements is uncertain, which leads to large uncertainties in the total dust input. To better understand the ablation process, and thereby reduce uncertainties in micrometeoroid ablation measurements, a facility has been developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to accelerate iron particles to relevant meteoric velocities (10-70 km/s). The particles are then introduced into a chamber pressurized with a target gas, and they partially or completely ablate over a short distance. An array of diagnostics then measure, with timing and spatial resolution, the charge and light that is generated in the ablation process. In this thesis, we present results from the newly developed ablation facility. The ionization coefficient, an important parameter for interpreting meteor radar measurements, is measured for various target gases. Furthermore, experimental ablation measurements are compared to predictions from commonly used ablation models. In light of these measurements, implications to the broader context of meteor ablation are discussed.

  19. The optimum shielding for a power reactor using local components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHajali, S.; Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Naoom, B.; Al-Nassar, M.

    2009-07-01

    Some local concrete mixtures have been picked out (selected) to be studied as shielding concrete for prospective nuclear power reactor in Syria. This research has interested in the attenuation of gamma radiation and neutron fluxes by these local concretes in the ordinary conditions. In addition to the heat effect on the shielding and physical properties of local concrete. Furthermore the neutron activation of the elements of the local concrete mixtures have been studied that for selection the low-activation materials (low dose rate and short half life radioisotopes). In this way biological shielding for nuclear reactor can be safe during operation of nuclear power reactor, in addition to be low radioactive waste after decommissioning the reactor. (author)

  20. Ablation acceleration of macroparticle in spiral magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1981-05-01

    The rocket motion of macroparticles heated by energetic pulses in a spiral magnetic field was studied. The purpose of the present work is to study the ablation acceleration of a macroparticle in a spiral magnetic field with the help of the law of conservation of angular momentum. The basic equation of motion of ablatively accelerated projectile in a spiral magnetic field was derived. Any rocket which is ejecting fully ionized plasma in an intense magnetic field with rotational transform is able to have spin by the law of conservation of momentum. The effect of spiral magnetic field on macroparticle acceleration is discussed. The necessary mass ratio increase exponentially with respect to the field parameter. The spiral field should be employed with care to have only to stabilize the position of macroparticles. As conclusion, it can be said that the ablation acceleration of the projectile in a spiral field can give the accelerated body spin quite easily. (Kato, T.)

  1. Conceptual design for the thermal shield bridges and multilayer insulation in the interconnect region for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baritchi, D.; Nicol, T.; Boroski, W.

    1991-01-01

    The interconnect region serves as the connection area between magnets. In order to minimize radiant heat transfer in the interconnect area, the authors used shield bridges which span the 80K and 20K shield gap between adjacent magnets. A sliding joint between bridge sections on adjacent magnets accommodates contraction during cool-down. An investigation was done to determine which attachment schemes (riveted or bolted versus welded) are better for heat transfer. Each shield bridge is covered with the same multilayer insulation scheme used throughout the body of the magnet. These shield bridges also contain pressure reliefs for each shield in the event of an internal piping failure. The reliefs are located in the upper half of the shield section in order to prevent liquid spills from impinging directly onto the vacuum vessel wall

  2. Hydrogen pellet ablation and accelerator by current in high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen pellet ablation and acceleration by current in high temperature plasmas are analyzed. The present state of ablation theory and experiment is discussed and an ablation model is formulated. This model takes into account the energy distribution of the particles (both electrons and ions) participating in the ablation process, electrostatic effects of the cloud charging and changes of the pellet form during ablation. Without charging the pellet form tends to a shape resembling a lentil while it remains almost spherical if charged. A new algorithm for ablation rate calculations that can be used for an arbitrary initial form of the pellet is described. The results of this kinetic two dimensional approach differ from those of the Parks ablation scaling used in the ITER design by not more than 30%. Plasma shielding effects are not significant in the ablation if strong turbulence in the cloud is taken into account. Acceleration analysis is based on the Braginskii corrected electron distribution function. For the lentil mode of ablation, acceleration is higher than those for the charged mode by a factor of 1.76. The ablation models are compared with the experiments on T-10, JET, TFTR, Heliotron-E and Tore Supra. A sensitivity analysis shows that pellet size and electron temperature are the most significant factors for determination of the penetration length. The available database of penetration lengths is not sufficient for distinguishing between the models. Acceleration for the charged model correlates with experimental data better than that for the lentil mode. The effect of the hot ions is seen on the ablation. Finally, ablation at reactor relevant plasma and pellet parameters is considered. This range of the plasma parameters needs a correction of the ablation scaling as follows: dN/dt ∼ n 0.453 e T 1.72 e r 1.443 p M -0.283 i , where n e and T e are the electron density and temperature, respectively, and r p and M i are the pellet radius and atomic mass

  3. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, David I.; Ade, Brian J.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Leichliter, Katrina J.; Dixon, David D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

  4. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Dixon, David D.; Ade, Brian J.; Leichliter, Katrina J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density

  5. Jet Noise Shielding Provided by a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Michael J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Burley, Casey L.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Pope, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    One approach toward achieving NASA's aggressive N+2 noise goal of 42 EPNdB cumulative margin below Stage 4 is through the use of novel vehicle configurations like the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB). Jet noise measurements from an HWB acoustic test in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are described. Two dual-stream, heated Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units are mounted underneath the inverted HWB model on a traversable support to permit measurement of varying levels of shielding provided by the fuselage. Both an axisymmetric and low noise chevron nozzle set are investigated in the context of shielding. The unshielded chevron nozzle set shows 1 to 2 dB of source noise reduction (relative to the unshielded axisymmetric nozzle set) with some penalties at higher frequencies. Shielding of the axisymmetric nozzles shows up to 6.5 dB of reduction at high frequency. The combination of shielding and low noise chevrons shows benefits beyond the expected additive benefits of the two, up to 10 dB, due to the effective migration of the jet source peak noise location upstream for increased shielding effectiveness. Jet noise source maps from phased array results processed with the Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) algorithm reinforce these observations.

  6. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Hong, M.H.; Lu, Y.F.; Wu, D.J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences

  7. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  8. Nonlinear Analysis of Two-phase Circumferential Motion in the Ablation Circumstance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-liang, Xu; Hai-ming, Huang; Zi-mao, Zhang

    2010-05-01

    In aerospace craft reentry and solid rocket propellant nozzle, thermal chemistry ablation is a complex process coupling with convection, heat transfer, mass transfer and chemical reaction. Based on discrete vortex method (DVM), thermal chemical ablation model and particle kinetic model, a computational module dealing with the two-phase circumferential motion in ablation circumstance is designed, the ablation velocity and circumferential field can be thus calculated. The calculated nonlinear time series are analyzed in chaotic identification method: relative chaotic characters such as correlation dimension and the maximum Lyapunov exponent are calculated, fractal dimension of vortex bulbs and particles distributions are also obtained, thus the nonlinear ablation process can be judged as a spatiotemporal chaotic process.

  9. Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favazza CP

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher P Favazza, Deirdre M King, Heidi A Edmonson, Joel P Felmlee, Phillip J Rossman, Nicholas J Hangiandreou, Robert E Watson, Krzysztof R Gorny Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Radiofrequency (RF shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient's body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (~1 dB of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices. Keywords: radiofrequency shield, magnetic resonance imaging, radiofrequency attenuation

  10. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X.K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A.B.; Guo, X.L.

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  11. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-05-26

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the "all parallel" shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the "separated loop" shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same.

  12. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  13. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  14. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 μGy compared with 18 μGy (parallelling) and 31 μGy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 μGy per single intraoral exposure. (Authors)

  15. Shielding features of quarry stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez V, C.; Contreras S, H.; Hernandez A, L.; Baltazar R, A.; Escareno J, E.; Mares E, C. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2010-10-01

    Quarry stone lineal attenuation coefficient for gamma-rays has been obtained. In Zacatecas, quarry stone is widely utilized as a decorative item in buildings, however its shielding features against gamma-rays unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the shielding properties of quarry stone against γ-rays using Monte Carlo calculations where a detailed model of a good geometry experimental setup was carried out. In the calculations 10 pieces 10 X 10 cm 2 of different thickness were utilized to evaluate the photons transmission as the quarry stone thickness is increased. It was noticed that transmitted photons decay away as the shield thickness is increased, these results were fitted to an exponential function were the linear attenuation coefficient was estimated. Also, using XCOM code the linear attenuation coefficient from several keV up to 100 MeV was estimated. From the comparison between Monte Carlo results and XCOM calculations a good agreement was found. For 0.662 MeV γ-rays the attenuation coefficient of quarry stone, whose density is 2.413 g-cm -3 , is 0.1798 cm -1 , this mean a X 1/2 = 3.9 cm, X 1/4 = 7.7 cm, X 1/10 = 12.8 cm, and X 1/100 = 25.6 cm. Having the information of quarry stone performance as shielding give the chance to use this material to shield X and γ-ray facilities. (Author)

  16. Progress on establishing guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments to extend debris shield lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.; Eder, D.; Braun, D.; MacGowan, B.

    2002-01-01

    The survivability of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4-8 J/cm 2 laser fluences indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed suggested guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance suggests a target mass quantity that as particulate on the debris shields (300 mg) may be within current operating budgets. It also suggests the amount of material that should become shrapnel on a shot (10 mg). Finally, it suggests the level of non-volatile residue (NVR) that would threaten the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields (1 μg/cm 2 ). We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of X-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this X-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community

  17. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  18. Superconducting magnetic shields production. Realisation d'ecrans magnetiques supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lainee, F; Kormann, R [Thomson-CSF, Domaine de Corbeville, 91 - Orsay (FR); Lainee, F [Ecole des Mines de Paris, 91 - Evry (FR)

    1992-02-01

    Low fields and low frequency shielding properties of YBCO magnetic shields are measured at 77 K. They compare favourably with shielding properties of mumetal shields. Therefore high-T{sub c} superconducting magnetic shields can already be used to shield small volumes. The case of magnetic shields for large volumes is also discussed. 3 refs; 6 figs; 4 tabs.

  19. A study of photothermal laser ablation of various polymers on microsecond time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kappes, Ralf S; Schönfeld, Friedhelm; Li, Chen; Golriz, Ali A; Nagel, Matthias; Lippert, Thomas; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the photothermal ablation of polymers, we designed a temperature measurement setup based on spectral pyrometry. The setup allows to acquire 2D temperature distributions with 1 μm size and 1 μs time resolution and therefore the determination of the center temperature of a laser heating process. Finite element simulations were used to verify and understand the heat conversion and heat flow in the process. With this setup, the photothermal ablation of polystyrene, poly(α-methylstyrene...

  20. Intrinsically disordered proteins as molecular shields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortee, Sohini; Tripathi, Rashmi; Watson, Matthew; Schierle, Gabriele S Kaminski; Kurniawan, Davy P; Kaminski, Clemens F; Wise, Michael J; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The broad family of LEA proteins are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) with several potential roles in desiccation tolerance, or anhydrobiosis, one of which is to limit desiccation-induced aggregation of cellular proteins. We show here that this activity, termed molecular shield function, is distinct from that of a classical molecular chaperone, such as HSP70 - while HSP70 reduces aggregation of citrate synthase (CS) on heating, two LEA proteins, a nematode group 3 protein, AavLEA1, and a plant group 1 protein, Em, do not; conversely, the LEA proteins reduce CS aggregation on desiccation, while HSP70 lacks this ability. There are also differences in interaction with client proteins - HSP70 can be co-immunoprecipitated with a polyglutamine-containing client, consistent with tight complex formation, whereas the LEA proteins can not, although a loose interaction is observed by Förster resonance energy transfer. In a further exploration of molecular shield function, we demonstrate that synthetic polysaccharides, like LEA proteins, are able to reduce desiccation-induced aggregation of a water-soluble proteome, consistent with a steric interference model of anti-aggregation activity. If molecular shields operate by reducing intermolecular cohesion rates, they should not protect against intramolecular protein damage. This was tested using the monomeric red fluorescent protein, mCherry, which does not undergo aggregation on drying, but the absorbance and emission spectra of its intrinsic fluorophore are dramatically reduced, indicative of intramolecular conformational changes. As expected, these changes are not prevented by AavLEA1, except for a slight protection at high molar ratios, and an AavLEA1-mCherry fusion protein is damaged to the same extent as mCherry alone. A recent hypothesis proposed that proteomes from desiccation-tolerant species contain a higher degree of disorder than intolerant examples, and that this might provide greater intrinsic stability

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have had a surgical procedure in which the liver bile duct has been connected to a loop of bowel are at much greater risk of developing a liver abscess after ablation. Women should always inform their ...

  2. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G. Andrade, MD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1 the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2 selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3 predictors of efficacy, 4 advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5 strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy.

  3. Conceptual design of ITER shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Kurasawa, Toshimasa

    1995-03-01

    The present report summarizes the design activities of the ITER first wall and shielding blanket conducted by the JA Home Team during this year (1994) in close contact with the JCT, and reported during the four Technical Meetings held at Garching ITER Co-center. These activities are based on the Task Agreement between the JCT and the JA Home Team. In the present report, a layered configuration composed of separate first walls, modular-type blanket modules and separate back plates has been proposed to realize reliable assembly and maintenance schemes as well as to realize reliable component designs under high surface heat loads, high neutron wall loading and electromagnetic loads during disruptions. Outline of the structural design, consideration on fabricability and maintainability, and the results of thermal, mechanical and electromagnetic analyses are described. (author)

  4. Radiation shielding for fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation shielding aspects relating fission reactors have been reviewed. Domestic activities in the past five years have been mainly described concerning nuclear data, calculation methods, shielding and skyshine experiments, Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR), High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), Experimental and Prototype Fast Reactors (JOYO, MONJU), Demonstration FBR, core shroud replacement of BWR, and spent fuel transportation cask and vessel. These studies have valuable information in safety and cost reduction issues of fission reactor design for not only existing reactors but also new reactor concepts in the next century. It has been concluded that we should maintain existing shielding technologies and improve these data and methods for coming generations in the next millennium. (author)

  5. Shield cost minimization using SWAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.F.; Annese, C.E.; Greenspan, E.

    1993-01-01

    The common approach to the search for minimum cost shield designs is open-quotes trial-and-errorclose quotes; it proceeds as follows: 1. Based on prior experience and intuition, divide the shield into zones and assume their composition. 2. Solve the transport equation and calculate the relevant performance characteristics. 3. Change the composition or the geometry of one or a few of the zones and repeat step 2. 4. Repeat step 3 many times until the shield design appears to be optimal. 5. Select a different set of constituents and repeat steps 2,3, and 4. 6. Repeate step 5 a few or many times until the designer can point to the most cost-effective design

  6. Radiation shield for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenfluh, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A reusable radiation shield for use in a reactor installation comprises a thin-walled, flexible and resilient container, made of plastic or elastomeric material, containing a hydrogenous fluid with boron compounds in solution. The container can be filled and drained in position and the fluid can be recirculated if required. When not in use the container can be folded and stored in a small space. The invention relates to a shield to span the top of the annular space between a reactor vessel and the primary shield. For this purpose a continuous toroidal container or a series of discrete segments is used. Other forms can be employed for different purposes, e.g. mattress- or blanket-like forms can be draped over potential sources of radiation or suspended from a mobile carrier and placed between a worker and a radiation source. (author)

  7. Thermal-hydraulic analysis and design improvement for coolant channel of ITER shield block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ling; Li Huaqi; Zheng Jiantao; Yi Jingwei; Kang Weishan; Chen Jiming

    2013-01-01

    As an important part for ITER, shield block is used to shield the neutron heat. The structure design of shield block, especially the inner coolant channel design will influence its cooling effect and safety significantly. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis for shield block has been performed by the computational fluid dynamics software, some optimization suggestions have been proposed and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the improved model has been analyzed again. The analysis results for improved model show that pressure drop through flow path near the inlet and outlet region of the shield block has been reduced, and the total pressure drop in cooling path has been reduced too; the uniformity of the mass flowrate distribution and the velocity distribution have been improved in main cooling branches; the local highest temperature of solid domain reduced considerably, which could avoid thermal stress becoming too large because of coolant effect unevenly. (authors)

  8. Experimental and clinical studies with radiofrequency-induced thermal endometrial ablation for functional menorrhagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, J.H.; Lewis, B.V.; Prior, M.V.; Roberts, T. (Watford General Hospital, Herts (England))

    1990-11-01

    A method of ablating the endometrium has been introduced into clinical practice that uses radiofrequency electromagnetic energy to heat the endometrium, using a probe inserted through the cervix. Preliminary studies suggest that over 80% of patients treated will develop either amenorrhea or a significant reduction in flow. The advantages of radiofrequency endometrial ablation over laser ablation or resection are the avoidance of intravascular fluid absorption, simplicity (no special operative hysteroscopic skills are required), speed of operation, and reduced cost compared with the Nd:YAG laser. In this paper, we describe the experimental studies performed during development of this new technique.

  9. Thermistor guided radiofrequency ablation of atrial insertion sites in patients with accessory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, C M; Moore, H J; Solomon, A J; Rodak, D J; Fletcher, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has gained acceptance in the treatment of patients with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relation between temperature and other electroconductive parameters in patients undergoing atrial insertion accessory pathway ablation utilizing a thermistor equipped catheter. The mean temperature and power at sites of atrial insertion ablation are lower than has been previously associated with creation of radiofrequency lesions in the ventricle. While high cavitary blood flow in the atrium may result in cooling, the thinner atrial tissue may require less energy to achieve adequate heating than ventricular myocardium.

  10. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  11. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    Hot-cell shielding walls consist of building blocks made of lead according to DIN 25407 part 1, and of special elements according to DIN 25407 part 2. Alpha-gamma cells can be built using elements for protective contamination boxes according to DIN 25480 part 1. This standards document intends to provide planning engineers, manufacturers, future users and the competent authorities and experts with a basis for the design of hot cells with lead shielding walls and the design of hot-cell equipment. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Nuclear steam generator tubesheet shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.H.D.; Ruhe, A.

    1982-01-01

    The invention involves improvements to a nuclear steam generator of the type in which a plurality of U-shaped tubes are connected at opposite ends to a tubesheet and extend between inlet and outlet chambers, with the steam generator including an integral preheater zone adjacent to the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes. The improvement is a thermal shield disposed adjacent to an upper face of the tubesheet within the preheater zone, the shield including ductile cladding material applied directly to the upper face of the tubesheet, with the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes extending through the cladding into the tubesheet

  13. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  14. Laser Ablation Experiments on the Tamdakht H5 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Stern, Eric

    2017-01-01

    High-powered lasers were used to induce ablation and to form fusion crusts in the lab on Tamdakht H5 chondrites and basalt. These ground tests were undertaken to improve our understanding, and ultimately improve our abilty to model and predict, meteoroid ablation during atmospheric entry. The infrared fiber laser at the LHMEL facilty, operated in the continuous wave (i.e. non-pulsed) mode, provided radiation surface heat flux at levels similar to meteor entry for these tests. Results are presented from the first round of testing on samples of Tamdakht H5 ordinary chondrite which were ex-posed to entry-relevant heating rates between 2 and 10 kWcm2.

  15. Atrial fibrillation ablation using a closed irrigation radiofrequency ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Keith; Mounsey, John Paul; Chung, Eugene; Roomiani, Pahresah; Morse, Michael Andew; Patel, Ankit; Gehi, Anil

    2012-05-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective therapy for symptomatic, medically refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Open-irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheters produce transmural lesions at the cost of increased fluid delivery. In vivo models suggest closed-irrigated RF catheters create equivalent lesions, but clinical outcomes are limited. A cohort of 195 sequential patients with symptomatic AF underwent stepwise AF ablation (AFA) using a closed-irrigation ablation catheter. Recurrence of AF was monitored and outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models. Mean age was 59.0 years, 74.9% were male, 56.4% of patients were paroxysmal and mean duration of AF was 5.4 years. Patients had multiple comorbidities including hypertension (76.4%), tobacco abuse (42.1%), diabetes (17.4%), and obesity (mean body mass index 30.8). The median follow-up was 55.8 weeks. Overall event-free survival was 73.6% with one ablation and 77.4% after reablation (reablation rate was 8.7%). Median time to recurrence was 26.9 weeks. AF was more likely to recur in patients being treated with antiarrhythmic therapy at the time of last follow-up (recurrence rate 30.3% with antiarrhythmic drugs, 13.2% without antiarrhythmic drugs; hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.4, P = 0.024) and in those with a history of AF greater than 2 years duration (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9, P = 0.038). Our study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AFA with closed-irrigation ablation catheters. We demonstrate comparable outcomes to those previously reported in studies of open-irrigation ablation catheters. Given the theoretical benefits of a closed-irrigation system, a large head-to-head comparison using this catheter is warranted. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Water spray assisted ultrashort laser pulse ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Kaakkunen, J.J.J.; Paivasaari, K.; Vahimaa, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We show the novel method to use multibeam processing with ultrashort pulses efficiently. ► Sprayed thin water layer on ablation zone enhances ablation rate and quality. ► In some cases this method also enables ablation of the deeper and straighter holes compared to ones made without the water layer. ► Method also makes possible to directly write features without the self-organizing structures. - Abstract: We have studied femtosecond ablation under sprayed thin water film and its influence and benefits compared with ablation in the air atmosphere. These have been studied in case of the hole and the groove ablation using IR femtosecond laser. Water enhances the ablation rate and in some situations it makes possible to ablate the holes with a higher aspect ratio. While ablating the grooves, the water spray allows using the high fluences without the generation of the self-organized structures.

  17. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  18. Concrete shielding for nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Tetsuo; Saito, Tetsuo

    1983-01-01

    The repair works of the shielding for the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' were completed in August, 1982. For the primary shielding, serpentine concrete was adopted as it contains a large quantity of water required for neutron shielding, and in the secondary shielding at the upper part of the reactor containment vessel, the original shielding was abolished, and the heavy concrete (high water content, high density concrete) which is effective for neutron and gamma-ray shielding was newly adopted. In this report, the design and construction using these shielding concrete are outlined. In September, 1974, Mutsu caused radiation leak during the test, and the cause was found to be the fast neutrons streaming through a gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the primary shielding. The repair works were carried out in the Sasebo Shipyard. The outline of the repair works of the shielding is described. The design condition for the shielding, the design standard for the radiation dose outside and inside the ship, the method of shielding analysis and the performance required for shielding concrete are reported. The selection of materials, the method of construction and mixing ratio, the evaluation of the soundness and properties of concrete, and the works of placing the shielding concrete are outlined. (Kako, I.)

  19. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization

  20. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Langley, R.A.; Lewis, M.B.; Ryan, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with rf fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating (ICRH) operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility (RFTF), a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages (∼500 A, ∼20 kV at 25 kW) within 50% of those expected in tokamaks. The time varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with a Langmuir probe. Both probes were scanned in front of the antenna. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyzer located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurements show that the rf floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been correlated with the antenna current and used in s computational model of the plasma sheath to predict the amount of erosion expected from the Faraday shield elements exposed to plasma. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Langley, R.A.; Lewis, M.B.; Ryan, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with rf fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility, a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages within 50% of those expected in tokamaks. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with a Langmuir probe. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyser located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurements show that the rf floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been correlated with the antenna current and used in a computational model of the plasma sheath to predict the amount of erosion expected from the Faraday shield elements exposed to plasma. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented

  2. Protected isotope heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, R.K.; Shure, L.I.; Katzen, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive isotope capsule is disposed in a container (heat shield) which will have a single stable trim attitude when reentering the earth's atmosphere and while falling to earth. The center of gravity of the heat source is located forward of the midpoint between the front face and the rear face of the container. The capsule is insulated from the front face of the container but not from the rear surface of the container. (auth)

  3. Hyperecho in ultrasound images during high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for hepatocellular carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Numata, Kazushi; Nozaki, Akito; Kondo, Masaaki; Morimoto, Manabu; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Ishibashi, Yoshiharu; Oshima, Noriyoshi; Ito, Ayao; Zhu, Hui; Wang Zhibiao

    2011-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive method that can cause complete coagulation necrosis without requiring the insertion of any instruments. The hyperechoic grayscale change (hyperechoic region) is used as a sign that the treated lesion has been completely coagulated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the first hyperechoic region during treatment using HIFU ablation according to various conditions, such as the sonication power, the depth of the tumor from the surface of the skin, and the shield rate. HIFU treatment was performed in 20 patients. The HIFU system (Chongqing Haifu Tech, Chongqing, China) was used under ultrasound guidance. Complete coagulation was achieved in 17 cases. Hyperechoic region were detected after HIFU ablation in 17 patients. The size of the hyperechoic region at a depth of >50 mm was significantly smaller than that at a depth of ≤50 mm. The number and power of the sonications for areas at a depth of >50 mm were significantly larger than those for areas at a depth of ≤50 mm. The number and power in cases with a shield rate of 31–60% were significantly larger than those in cases with a shield rate of 0–30%. When the shield rate was 0%, a hyperechoic region occurred, even when a maximum sonication power was not used. In all three cases with tumors located at a depth of greater than 70 mm and a shield rate of larger than 60%, a hyperechoic region was not seen. In conclusion, hyperechoic regions are easy to visualize in cases with tumors located at a depth of ≤50 mm or shield rates of 0–30%.

  4. A study on the characteristics of modified and novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Hong, Sun Seok; Oh, Seung Chul; Do, Jae Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. In this study, we developed modified and novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, prolonged time heat resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimently. (author). 31 refs., 27 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. TORE-SUPRA: design of thermal radiation shield at 80 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Cordier, J.J.; Deschamps, P.; Gauthier, A.; Perin, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    The TORE-SUPRA superconducting toroidal magnet operating at liquid helium temperature, must be protected against thermal radiation from the vessels. For this purpose, stainless steel heat shields, cooled at 80 K, are positioned between coil casings at 4.5 K and the vessels, and constitute a double stiff toroid which completely surrounds the magnet. Mockups have been manufactured to study their design and operating problems. Calculations have also been made to analyse the mechanical behaviour of these shields

  6. Method of constructing shielding wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya.

    1990-01-01

    For instance, surfaces of lead particles each formed into a sphere of about 0.5 to 0.3 mm grain size are coated with a coating material of a synthetic resin comprising a polymeric material such as teflon. Subsequently, the floated lead particle are kneaded with concrete materials and then poured into a molding die by way of a hose. After coagulation, the molding die is removed to complete shielding walls in which lead particles are scattered substantially at an equal distance. In this way, since the lead particles are mixed into the shielding walls, shielding effects can be improved by so much as the lead particles are mixed, thereby enabling to reduce the thickness of the shielding walls. Further, since the lead particles are coated with the coating material, the lead particles are insulated from the concrete materials, thereby enabling to prevent the corrosion of the lead particles. Furthermore, since the lead particles and the concrete materials can be transported with ease, operation labors can be reduced. (T.M.)

  7. Shielding Effectiveness of a Thin Film Window

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Eric

    1998-01-01

    .... The predicted shielding effectiveness was 29 dB based on theoretical calculations. The error analysis of the shielding effectiveness showed that this predicted value was within the measurement error...

  8. Gonadal Shielding in Radiography: A Best Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauber, Terri L

    2016-11-01

    To investigate radiation dose to phantom testes with and without shielding. A male anthropomorphic pelvis phantom was imaged with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed in the right and left detector holes corresponding to the testes. Ten exposures were made of the pelvis with and without shielding. The exposed TLDs were packaged securely and mailed to the University of Wisconsin Calibration Laboratory for reading and analysis. A t test was calculated for the 2 exposure groups (no shield and shielded) and found to be significant, F = 8.306, P shield was used during pelvic imaging. Using a flat contact shield during imaging of the adult male pelvis significantly reduces radiation dose to the testes. Regardless of the contradictions in the literature on gonadal shielding, the routine practice of shielding adult male gonads during radiographic imaging of the pelvis is a best practice. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  9. Infinite slab-shield dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    I calculated neutron and gamma-ray equivalent doses leaking through a variety of infinite (laminate) slab-shields. In the shield computations, I used, as the incident neutron spectrum, the leakage spectrum (<20 MeV) calculated for the LANSCE tungsten production target at 90 degree to the target axis. The shield thickness was fixed at 60 cm. The results of the shield calculations show a minimum in the total leakage equivalent dose if the shield is 40-45 cm of iron followed by 20-15 cm of borated (5% B) polyethylene. High-performance shields can be attained by using multiple laminations. The calculated dose at the shield surface is very dependent on shield material. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Using glass as a shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, S.

    2002-04-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  11. Using glass as a shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, S.

    2003-01-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  12. Design, fabrication, and properties of a continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide gamma ray/neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Tang, Xiaobin; Chai, Hao; Chen, Da; Qiu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sm_2O_3 is used for neutron absorber instead of B_4C, and Sm_2O_3 has a good photon-shielding effect. • Carbon-fiber cloth and polyimide were used to enhance shielding materials’ mechanical behavior and thermal behavior. • Both Monte Carlo method and shielding test were used to evaluate shielding performance of the novel shielding material. - Abstract: The design and fabrication of shielding materials with good heat-resistance and mechanical properties is a major problem in the radiation shielding field. In this paper, based on gamma ray and neutron shielding theory, a continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide gamma ray/neutron shielding material was fabricated by hot-pressing method. The material's application behavior was subsequently evaluated using neutron shielding, photon shielding, mechanical tensile, and thermogravimetric analysis–differential scanning calorimetry tests. The results show that the tensile strength of the novel shielding material exceeds 200 MPa, which makes it of similar strength to aluminum alloy. The material does not undergo crosslinking and decomposition reactions at 300 °C and it can be used in such environments for long periods of time. The continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide material has a good shielding performance with respect to gamma rays and neutrons. The material thus has good prospects for use in fusion reactor system and nuclear waste disposal applications.

  13. Manufacture and testing of the CTB&SBB thermal shield for the ITER magnet feeder system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Kun; Liu, Chen; Song, Yuntao; Feng, Hansheng; Ding, Kaizhong, E-mail: kzding@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, Tanbin; Ji, Hui

    2015-10-15

    The system of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) feeders is responsible for the power, helium cooling, and instrumentation of the magnets of the coil terminal box and S-bend box (CTB&SBB) thermal shield outside the cryostat. An 80-K rectangular Al thermal shield is hung inside the CTB&SBB to reduce the thermal radiation heat loads of 4.5-K helium. The American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) will supply all the 31 sets of feeders for ITER. A manufactured prototype of CTB&SBB thermal shield is first quality-tested before the commencement of the series production. First, a detailed configuration of the rectangular Al thermal shield is presented in this article. The paper also presents more information on the manufacturing process of the thermal shield, especially the welding process, the procedure for ensuring good weld quality, and the use of a specially designed tool to ensure <5-mm deformation on such a 7.3-m-long thermal shield during welding. In addition, the cold test and results, including the cooling process with 13-bar and 17.5-g/s 80-K He gas, and the temperature distribution on different panels of the thermal shield are presented. The whole process of manufacture and testing lays a good foundation for the series production of the thermal shield.

  14. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of NET/ITER shielding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.; Gruppelaar, H.; Verschuur, K.A.

    1990-09-01

    Results are presented of sensitivity and uncertainty calculations based upon the European fusion file (EFF-1). The effect of uncertainties in Fe, Cr and Ni cross sections on the nuclear heating in the coils of a NET/ITER shielding blanket has been studied. The analysis has been performed for the total cross section as well as partial cross sections. The correct expression for the sensitivity profile was used, including the gain term. The resulting uncertainty in the nuclear heating lies between 10 and 20 per cent. (author). 18 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ''noise pickup,'' is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed

  16. Pretinning Nickel-Plated Wire Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-plated copper shielding for wires pretinned for subsequent soldering with help of activated rosin flux. Shield cut at point 0.25 to 0.375 in. (6 to 10 mm) from cut end of outer jacket. Loosened end of shield straightened and pulled toward cut end. Insulation of inner wires kept intact during pretinning.

  17. Computed tomography shielding methods: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica Ryann

    2010-01-01

    To investigate available shielding methods in an effort to further awareness and understanding of existing preventive measures related to patient exposure in computed tomography (CT) scanning. Searches were conducted to locate literature discussing the effectiveness of commercially available shields. Literature containing information regarding breast, gonad, eye and thyroid shielding was identified. Because of rapidly advancing technology, the selection of articles was limited to those published within the past 5 years. The selected studies were examined using the following topics as guidelines: the effectiveness of the shield (percentage of dose reduction), the shield's effect on image quality, arguments for or against its use (including practicality) and overall recommendation for its use in clinical practice. Only a limited number of studies have been performed on the use of shields for the eyes, thyroid and gonads, but the evidence shows an overall benefit to their use. Breast shielding has been the most studied shielding method, with consistent agreement throughout the literature on its effectiveness at reducing radiation dose. The effect of shielding on image quality was not remarkable in a majority of studies. Although it is noted that more studies need to be conducted regarding the impact on image quality, the currently published literature stresses the importance of shielding in reducing dose. Commercially available shields for the breast, thyroid, eyes and gonads should be implemented in clinical practice. Further research is needed to ascertain the prevalence of shielding in the clinical setting.

  18. BRH Gonad Shielding Program: where it has led

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcarese, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Some topics discussed are: Bureau of Radiological Health guidelines; types of gonad shields; specific area shielding; gonad shielding guidelines; and publication of pamphlet on types of shields and circumstances under which they should be used

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  20. Radiological shielding of low power compact reactor: calculation and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The development of compact reactors becoming a technology that offers great projection and innumerable use possibilities, both in electricity generation and in propulsion.One of the requirements for the operation of this type of reactor is that it must include a radiological shield that will allow for different types of configurations and that, may be moved with the reactor if it needs to be transported.The nucleus of a reactor emits radiation, mainly neutrons and gamma rays in the heat of power, and gamma radiation during the radioactive decay of fission products.This radiation must be restrained in both conditions of operation to avoid it affecting workers or the public.The combination of different materials and properties in layers results in better performance in the form of a decrease in radiation, hence causing the dosage outside the reactor, whether in operation or shut down, to fall within the allowed limits.The calculations and design of radiological shields is therefore of paramount importance in reactor design.The choice of material and the design of the shield have a strong impact on the cost and the load capacity, the latter being one of the characteristics to optimize.The imposed condition of design is that the reactor can be transported together with the decay shield in a standard container of 40 foot [es

  1. The status of shielding research at Tajoura research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakkoush, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a description to the shielding research activities which have been carried-out at the radiation shielding group ,Tajoura Research Center. This includes the design of different types of concrete shields made from local aggregates which have suitable radiation attenuation properties. These include, Ordinary Concrete(with density p = 2.3 ton/m3) heavy weight concrete (with density p =3.6 ton/m3) and heat resistant concrete with aggregates having bound- in water. Investigation have been carried -out by measuring the neutron and gamma-rays spectra which have been transmitted through barriers having different thickness. These were performed using a collimated beam of reactor neutrons and gamma-ray transmitted from the horizontal channel no 1 of Tajoura-Research reactor with 10 MW Max ape rating power. The transmitted fast neutron and gamma spectra were measured by neutron-gamma spectrometer employing NE-213 liquid organic scintillater. Discrimination of against undesired pulses of neutrons or gamma-ray was achieved by a pulse shape discrimination method based on differences in the shape of the decay part of the emitted pulses. The obtained results are presented in the form of displayed neutron and gamma spectra measured behind different thickness of the investigated concrete shield. These spectra were used to derive the macroscopic cross section for at different energy for material under investigation

  2. Radiation shield analysis for a manned Mars rover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, N.J.; ElGenk, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation shielding for unmanned space missions has been extensively studied; however, designs of man-rated shields are minimal. Engle et al.'s analysis of a man-rated, multilayered shield composed of two and three cycles (a cycle consists of a tungsten and a lithium hydride layer) is the basis for the work reported in this paper. The authors present the results of a recent study of shield designs for a manned Mars rover powered by a 500-kW(thermal) nuclear reactor. A train-type rover vehicle was developed, which consists of four cars and is powered by an SP-100-type nuclear reactor heat source. The maximum permissible dose rate (MPD) from all sources is given by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements as 500 mSv/yr (50 rem/yr) A 3-yr Mars mission (2-yr round trip and 1-yr stay) will deliver a 1-Sv natural radiation dose without a solar particle event, 450 mSv/yr in flight, and an additional 100 mSv on the planet surface. An anomalously large solar particle event could increase the natural radiation dose for unshielded astronauts on the Martian surface to 200 mSv. This limits the MPD to crew members from the nuclear reactor to 300 mSv

  3. Analysis of ferromagnetic shielding of the ITER NBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Lucca, F.; Roccella, R.; Cocilovo, V.; Ramogida, G.; Portone, A.; Tanga, A.; Formisano, A.; Martone, R.

    2006-01-01

    In ITER two heating and one diagnostic Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) are foreseen [P. L. Mondino et al., ''ITER neutral beam system '', Nucl. Fus., vol. 40, p. 501 (2000)]. Inside these components there are very stringent limits on the magnetic field (the flux density must be below some Gauss (G) along the ion path and below 20 G in the neutralizing region). To achieve these performances in an environment with high stray field due to the plasma and the poloidal field coils, both passive and active shielding systems are foreseen. The present design of the Magnetic Field Reduction System (MFRS) is made of seven active coils and of a box surrounding the NBI region, consisting of ferromagnetic plates 15 cm thick. The electromagnetic analysis of the effectiveness of these shields has been performed by a full 3D FEM model using the ANSYS code. To perform the FEM modeling of the component special care has been used to face the particular geometrical features of the component (a box of about 15 x 5 x 5 m vs. a ferromagnetic layer of only 15 cm thick). To insert an adequate number of FEM elements (at least 5) in the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, without a prohibitive increase in the total FEM elements number, a particular modeling approach (a sort of '' Chinese boxes '' technique) has been developed. Due to this technique the FEM model enclosing the ferromagnetic box results completely independent on the fine FEM structure inside the shielding layer. It has been even possible, using this technique, introducing a thin (below 1 cm thick) slot all through the shielding plates, without perturbing the rest of the model. This slot has been used to analyze the effects of possible manufacturing lacks on the residual magnetic field inside the component. This technique has allowed the use of only structured meshes made by brick elements, much more accurate than the tetra elements, needed in the usual free meshing techniques. To have the possibility of changing the shielding

  4. Survivor shielding. Part A. Nagasaki factory worker shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Robert T.; Barnes, John M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.; Kerr, George D.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations based on conventional chromosome aberration data by the RERF suggest that the DS86 doses received by many Nagasaki factory workers may have been overestimated by as much as 40% relative to those for other survivors in Japanese-type houses and other shielding configurations (Kodama et al. 2001). Since the factory workers represent about 25% of the Nagasaki survivors with DS86 doses in excess of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), systematic errors in their dose estimates can have a major impact on the risk coefficients from RERF studies. The factory worker doses may have been overestimated for a number of reasons. The calculation techniques, including the factory building modeling, weapon source spectra and cross-section data used in the DS86 shielding calculations were not detailed enough to replicate actual conditions. The models used did not take into account local shielding provided by machinery, tools, and the internal structure in the buildings. In addition, changes in the disposition of shielding following collapse of the building by the blast wave were not considered. The location of large factory complexes may be uncertain, causing large numbers of factory survivors, correctly located relative to each other, to be uniformly too close to the hypocenter. Any or all of these reasons are sufficient to result in an overestimate of the factory worker doses. During the DS02 studies, factory worker doses have been reassessed by more carefully modeling the factory buildings, incorporating improved radiation transport methods and cross-section data and using the most recent bomb leakage spectra (Chapter 2). Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations were carried out initially to estimate the effects of workbenches and tools on worker doses to determine if the inclusion of these components would, in fact, reduce the dose by amounts consistent with the RERF observations (Kodama et al. 2001). (author)

  5. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  6. Ablation characteristics of boding liver according to cool-tip temperature of RFA equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Jae [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    This study confirmed the correlation between the change of the cooling water in internal cooling system and the size of the ablation site of bovine liver in RF heat treatment equipment. The bovine liver was resection with 4 x 4 x 4 cm{sup 3} in 2 cm cool-tip and with 6 x 6 x 6 cm{sup 3} in 3 cm cool-tip for the experiments. Area and perimeter of the ablation site for bovine liver were measured by Freehand techniques of MRI. It showed area and perimeter decreased during cool-tip temperature rises 6 and 12 minutes ablation using a 2 cm and 3 cm cool-tip. The correlation of cool-tip temperature and area and perimeter was statistically significant the result are shown (p=.000). The measurements of area and perimeter were more accurate with MRI in actual measurements and MRI for ablation range. The statistical results using Paired sample T-test was also significant (p=.038). The ablation range of bovine liver decreased according as cooling water temperature increases in RF heat treatment equipment for reason of carbonization occurred due to does not accurately pass the RF energy. Therefore, it is considered the effect of RF heat treatment would be increased if the temperature of the cooling water consistently maintain the low temperature in order to reduce the generation of carbide at RF heat treatment and RF energy is delivered accurately.

  7. Ablation characteristics of boding liver according to cool-tip temperature of RFA equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Jeong Koo

    2015-01-01

    This study confirmed the correlation between the change of the cooling water in internal cooling system and the size of the ablation site of bovine liver in RF heat treatment equipment. The bovine liver was resection with 4 x 4 x 4 cm"3 in 2 cm cool-tip and with 6 x 6 x 6 cm"3 in 3 cm cool-tip for the experiments. Area and perimeter of the ablation site for bovine liver were measured by Freehand techniques of MRI. It showed area and perimeter decreased during cool-tip temperature rises 6 and 12 minutes ablation using a 2 cm and 3 cm cool-tip. The correlation of cool-tip temperature and area and perimeter was statistically significant the result are shown (p=.000). The measurements of area and perimeter were more accurate with MRI in actual measurements and MRI for ablation range. The statistical results using Paired sample T-test was also significant (p=.038). The ablation range of bovine liver decreased according as cooling water temperature increases in RF heat treatment equipment for reason of carbonization occurred due to does not accurately pass the RF energy. Therefore, it is considered the effect of RF heat treatment would be increased if the temperature of the cooling water consistently maintain the low temperature in order to reduce the generation of carbide at RF heat treatment and RF energy is delivered accurately

  8. Modelling of pulsed electron beam induced graphite ablation: Sublimation versus melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muddassir; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-12-01

    Pulsed electron beam ablation (PEBA) has recently emerged as a very promising technique for the deposition of thin films with superior properties. Interaction of the pulsed electron beam with the target material is a complex process, which consists of heating, phase transition, and erosion of a small portion from the target surface. Ablation can be significantly affected by the nature of thermal phenomena taking place at the target surface, with subsequent bearing on the properties, stoichiometry and structure of deposited thin films. A two stage, one-dimensional heat conduction model is presented to describe two different thermal phenomena accounting for interaction of a graphite target with a polyenergetic electron beam. In the first instance, the thermal phenomena are comprised of heating, melting and vaporization of the target surface, while in the second instance the thermal phenomena are described in terms of heating and sublimation of the graphite surface. In this work, the electron beam delivers intense electron pulses of ∼100 ns with energies up to 16 keV and an electric current of ∼400 A to a graphite target. The temperature distribution, surface recession velocity, ablated mass per unit area, and ablation depth for the graphite target are numerically simulated by the finite element method for each case. Based on calculation findings and available experimental data, ablation appears to occur mainly in the regime of melting and vaporization from the surface.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K

    2010-09-01

    Among locoregional treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been accepted as the most popular alternative to curative transplantation or resection, and it shows an excellent local tumor control rate and acceptable morbidity. The benefits of RFA have been universally validated by the practice guidelines of international societies of hepatology. The main advantages of RFA include 1) it is minimally invasive with acceptable morbidity, 2) it enables excellent local tumor control, 3) it has promising long-term survival, and 4) it is a multimodal approach. Based on these pros, RFA will play an important role in managing the patient with early HCC (smaller than 3 cm with fewer than four tumors). The main limitations of current RFA technology in hepatic ablation include 1) limitation of ablation volume, 2) technically infeasible in some tumors due to conspicuity and dangerous location, and 3) the heat-sink effect. Many technical approaches have been introduced to overcome those limitations, including a novel guiding modality, use of artificial fluid or air, and combined treatment strategies. RFA will continue to play a role as a representative ablative modality in the management of HCC, even in the era of targeted agents.

  10. Infrared laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Vertes, Akos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-02-07

    In this paper we introduce laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass spectrometry. In LAAPPI the analytes are ablated from water-rich solid samples or from aqueous solutions with an infrared (IR) laser running at 2.94 μm wavelength. Approximately 12 mm above the sample surface, the ablation plume is intercepted with an orthogonal hot solvent (e.g., toluene or anisole) jet, which is generated by a heated nebulizer microchip and directed toward the mass spectrometer inlet. The ablated analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 eV vacuum ultraviolet krypton discharge lamp. The effect of operational parameters and spray solvent on the performance of LAAPPI is studied. LAAPPI offers ~300 μm lateral resolution comparable to, e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. In addition to polar compounds, LAAPPI efficiently ionizes neutral and nonpolar compounds. The bioanalytical application of the method is demonstrated by the direct LAAPPI analysis of rat brain tissue sections and sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaves. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  13. New facility shield design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources

  14. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  15. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  16. Shielding calculational system for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, M.G.; Thomsen, D.H.

    1975-08-01

    A computer calculational system has been developed and assembled specifically for calculating dose rates in AEC plutonium fabrication facilities. The system consists of two computer codes and all nuclear data necessary for calculation of neutron and gamma dose rates from plutonium. The codes include the multigroup version of the Battelle Monte Carlo code for solution of general neutron and gamma shielding problems and the PUSHLD code for solution of shielding problems where low energy gamma and x-rays are important. The nuclear data consists of built in neutron and gamma yields and spectra for various plutonium compounds, an automatic calculation of age effects and all cross-sections commonly used. Experimental correlations have been performed to verify portions of the calculational system. (23 tables, 7 figs, 16 refs) (U.S.)

  17. Radiation-shielding transparent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumeki, Asao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To obtain radiation-shielding transparent material having a high resistivity to the radioactive rays or light irradiation which is greater at least by two digits as compared with lead glass. Constitution : The shielding material is composed of a saturated aqueous solution zinc iodide. Zinc iodide (specific gravity of 4.2) is dissolved by 430 g into 100 cc of water at a temperature of 20 0 C and forms a heavy liquid with a specific gravity of 2.80. The radiation length of the heavy liquid is 3.8 cm which is 1.5 times as large as lead glass. The light transmission is greater than 95% in average. Furthermore, by adding hypophosphorous acid as a reducing agent to the aqueous solution of the lead iodide, the material is stabilized against the irradiation of light or radioactive rays and causes no discoloration for a long time. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Uei

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  19. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  20. Radiation shield vest and skirt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maine, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-piece garment is described which provides shielding for female workers exposed to radiation. The upper part is a vest, overlapping and secured in the front by adjustable closures. The bottom part is a wraparound skirt, also secured by adjustable closures. The two parts overlap, thus providing continuous protection from shoulder to knee and ensuring that the back part of the body is protected as well as the front

  1. Handbook of radiation shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1976-07-01

    This handbook is a compilation of data on units, conversion factors, geometric considerations, sources of radiation, and the attenuation of photons, neutrons, and charged particles. It also includes related topics in health physics. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form with sufficient narrative for a least first-approximation solutions to a variety of problems in nuclear radiation protection. Members of the radiation shielding community contributed the information in this document from unclassified and uncopyrighted sources, as referenced

  2. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  3. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...

  4. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  5. Design of ITER shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Sato, Satoshi; Hatano, Toshihisa; Tokami, Ikuhide; Kitamura, Kazunori; Miura, Hidenori; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1997-05-01

    A mechanical configuration of ITER integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module were developed focusing on the welded attachment of its support leg to the back plate. A 100 mm x 150 mm space between the legs of adjacent modules was incorporated for the working space of welding/cutting tools. A concept of coolant branch pipe connection to accommodate deformation due to the leg welding and differential displacement of the module and the manifold/back plate during operation was introduced. Two-dimensional FEM analyses showed that thermal stresses in Cu-alloy (first wall) and stainless steel (first wall coolant tube and shield block) satisfied the stress criteria following ASME code for ITER BPP operation. On the other hand, three-dimensional FEM analyses for overall in-vessel structures exhibited excessive primary stresses in the back plate and its support structure to the vacuum vessel under VDE disruption load and marginal stresses in the support leg of module No.4. Fabrication procedure of the integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module was developed based on single step solid HIP for the joining of Cu-alloy/Cu-alloy, Cu-alloy/stainless steel, and stainless steel/stainless steel. (author)

  6. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  7. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs

  8. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  9. Shield or not to Shield: Effects of Solar Radiation on Water Temperature Sensor Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Wilby

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperature sensors are potentially susceptible to errors due to heating by solar radiation. Although this is well known for air temperature (Ta, significance to continuous water temperature (Tw monitoring is relatively untested. This paper assesses radiative errors by comparing measurements of exposed and shielded Tinytag sensors under indirect and direct solar radiation, and in laboratory experiments under controlled, artificial light. In shallow, still-water and under direct solar radiation, measurement discrepancies between exposed and shielded sensors averaged 0.4 °C but can reach 1.6 °C. Around 0.3 °C of this inconsistency is explained by variance in measurement accuracy between sensors; the remainder is attributed to solar radiation. Discrepancies were found to increase with light intensity, but to attain Tw differences in excess of 0.5 °C requires direct, bright solar radiation (>400 W m−2 in the total spectrum. Under laboratory conditions, radiative errors are an order of magnitude lower when thermistors are placed in flowing water (even at velocities as low as 0.1 m s−1. Radiative errors were also modest relative to the discrepancy between different thermistor manufacturers. Based on these controlled experiments, a set of guidelines are recommended for deploying thermistor arrays in water bodies.

  10. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at ...

  11. Shielding modification and safety review on the nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanai, Masao

    1978-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) called on the Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency (JNSDA) for shielding modification and safety review on the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'', and JNSDA has conducted the research and development (R and D) to meet the request of JAEC for the above two items. Concerning the shield modification, the following matters are described: the study on the cause of radiation leakage which was concluded to the fast neutron streaming, the conceptual design for this modification, the mock up experiment for shielding utilizing JRR-4, the basic design following on the conceptual design, including the detailed drawings of the modified construction and the shielding analysis using RADHEAT-V3 code, and the relating experiments such as the heat transfer test of the primary shielding structure and the test of strength in stranding. As for the safety review, the survey of the troubles and the technical problems having been experienced in the light water reactor plants of land use, for example, fuel integrity, stress corrosion cracking and the leakage of steam generator tubes, the revision of the design so as to adapt to current safety standards and regulations, for example, in-service inspection, the setting of additional leak detectors in the primary cooling system, the modification of emergeney filters, etc., and the review of the design and construction corresponding to recent R and D works, such as re-evaluation of the core design, cooling capability of natural circulation, thermal stress analysis of main pipings, and the evaluation of ECCS performance are presented . (Nakai, Y.)

  12. Preparation of a basic data base for shielding design. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Makoto; Takemura, Morio

    1999-03-01

    With use of a standard groupwise shielding design library JSSTDL produced from the latest evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.2, experimental analyses for the JASPER experiments were performed. In order to verify the new version of JSSTDL, whose cross sections of thermal energy region was updated, the polyethylene transmission experiments of the Special Materials Experiment was analysed again, and also zirconium transmission experiment of the Experiment was newly analysed. JSSTDL was applied to the analysis of neutron multiplicative region of the in-vessel fuel storage mockup configurations in the IVS Experiment. Also it was applied to the analyses of neutron streaming effect through the mockup of sodium window in B 4 C shield in the Flux Monitor Experiment and also the mockup of narrow gaps in thick concrete shield in the Gap streaming Experiment. The results were compared with those obtained by the same analysis method and input data using the JSDJ2 library that had been applied consistently to the JASPER experiment analyses. Although the analysis with the new version of JSSTDL resulted in a little reduction of overestimation in the polyethylene transmission configuration, the results obtained with JSSTDL are, in general, higher than those with JSDJ2 as had been found in analyses in preceding years for the Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment, the Axial Shield Experiment, the Intermediate Heat Exchanger Experiment and so on. Compilation of the input data necessary for future reanalyses of important configurations in JASPER experiments, that were selected at the first stage of this study, were continued and new data were added into the computer disk holding previously accumulated data. (author)

  13. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Langley, R.A.; Lewis, M.B.; Ryan, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with rf fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility, a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages within 50% of those expected in tokamaks. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with Langmuir probe. Both probes were scanned in front of the antenna. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyzer located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurement show that the rf floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Electron temperatures increase with rf power and can reach values ≥60 eV for an rf power of ∼25 kW. Incident ion energies ≥300 eV have been measured for the same power level. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs

  15. Electromagnetic Shielding Characteristics of Eco-Friendly Foamed Concrete Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Sil Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic shielding characteristics according to the material composition of foamed concrete, which was manufactured to reduce environmental pollution and to economically apply it in actual building walls, were researched herein. Industrial by-products such as ladle furnace slag (LFS, gypsum, and blast furnace slag (BFS were added to manufacture foamed concrete with enhanced functionalities such as lightweight, heat insulation, and sound insulation. The electrical characteristics such as permittivity and loss tangent according to the foam and BFS content were calculated and measured. Free space measurement was used to measure the electromagnetic shielding characteristics of the actually manufactured foamed concrete. It was confirmed that electromagnetic signals were better blocked when the foam content was low and the BFS content was high in the measured frequency bands (1–8 GHz and that approximately 90% of the electromagnetic signals were blocked over 4 GHz.

  16. Development of ITER shielding blanket prototype mockup by HIP bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Hatano, Toshihisa; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Takatsu, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Office of ITER Project Promotion, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    A prototype ({approx}900{sup H} x 1700{sup W} x 350{sup T} mm) of the ITER shielding blanket module has been fabricated following the previous successful fabrication of a small-scale ({approx}500{sup H} x 400{sup W} x 150{sup T} mm) and mid-scale ({approx}800{sup H} x 500{sup W} x 350{sup T} mm) mock-ups. This prototype incorporates most of key design features essential to the fabrication of the ITER shielding blanket module such as 1) the first wall heat sink made of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion strengthened Cu (DSCu) with built-in SS316L coolant tubes bonded to a massive SS316LN shield block, 2) toroidally curved first wall with a radius of 5106 mm while straight in poloidal direction, 3) coolant channels oriented in poloidal direction in the first wall and in toroidal direction in the shield block, 4) the first wall coolant channel routing to avoid the interference with the front access holes, 5) coolant channels drilled through the forged SS316LN-IG shield block, and 6) four front access holes of 30 mm in diameter penetrated through the first wall and the shield block. For the joining method, especially for the first wall/side wall parts and the shield block, the solid HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) process was applied. It is difficult to apply conventional joining methods such as field welding, brazing, explosion bonding and mechanical one-axial diffusion bonding to a wide area bonding because sufficient mechanical strengths can not be obtained and excessive deformations occurs. In order to solve these fabrication issues, HIP bonding was applied. The first wall stainless steel (SS) coolant tubes of 10 mm in inner diameter and l mm in thickness were sandwiched by semi-circular grooved DSCu plates at the first wall and the front region of the side wall, and by semi-circular grooved SS plates at the back region of the side wall. After assembling of these first wall/side wall parts with the shield block, they were simultaneously bonded by single step HIP in order to

  17. Heat Transfer in Metal Foam Heat Exchangers at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Pakeeza

    Heat transfer though open-cell metal foam is experimentally studied for heat exchanger and heat shield applications at high temperatures (˜750°C). Nickel foam sheets with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per linear inch (PPI), have been used to make the heat exchangers and heat shields by using thermal spray coating to deposit an Inconel skin on a foam core. Heat transfer measurements were performed on a test rig capable of generating hot gas up to 1000°C. The heat exchangers were tested by exposing their outer surface to combustion gases at a temperature of 550°C and 750°C while being cooled by air flowing through them at room temperature at velocities up to 5 m/s. The temperature rise of the air, the surface temperature of the heat exchangers and the air temperature inside the heat exchanger were measured. The volumetric heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number were calculated for different velocities. The heat transfer performance of the 40PPI sample brazed with the foil is found to be the most efficient. Pressure drop measurements were also performed for 10 and 40PPI metal foam. Thermographic measurements were done on 40PPI foam heat exchangers using a high temperature infrared camera. A high power electric heater was used to produce hot air at 300°C that passed over the foam heat exchanger while the cooling air was blown through it. Heat shields were made by depositing porous skins on metal foam and it was observed that a small amount of coolant leaking through the pores notably reduces the heat transfer from the hot gases. An analytical model was developed based assuming local thermal non-equilibrium that accounts for the temperature difference between solid and fluid phase. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the predicted values of the model.

  18. Endometrial ablation with paracervical block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninx, Josien P. M.; Mol, Ben Willem; Bongers, Marlies Y.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of endometrial ablation under local anesthesia. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was performed at the gynecology department of a large teaching hospital. Women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were included to undergo NovaSure

  19. Mucosal ablation in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S J; Selvasekar, C R; Birbeck, N

    2002-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a prevalent, premalignant condition affecting the gastroesophageal junction and distal esophagus. Ablation plus antireflux therapy has recently been advocated to prevent the development of adenocarcinoma or to treat those unfit or unwilling to undergo esophagectomy. The present article, based on a search of Medline/ISI databases and cross-referencing of relevant articles, reviews the literature on this subject. A number of techniques have been used to remove the affected mucosa, including laser, electrocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation and photodynamic therapy but, as yet, none has been shown to be superior. Depending on the method used, ablation results in complete removal of Barrett's esophagus in approximately one third of patients and a partial response in nearly two-thirds. The resultant squamous mucosa is apparently 'normal' but may regress. To promote and maintain regeneration, antireflux therapy must be sufficient to reduce repetitive injury to the esophageal mucosa. Whether ablation reduces the cancer risk or delays its occurrence is unknown, though recent data suggests benefit. Complications are infrequent and usually mild. Regular follow-up endoscopy and deep biopsies continue to be necessary. Careful data from much larger populations with long-term follow-up is required before ablation reaches the stage of broad clinical application.

  20. Hydrodynamic instabilities in an ablation front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F

    2004-01-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of an ablation front is studied for situations in which the wavelength of the perturbations is larger than the distance to the critical surface where the driving radiation is absorbed. An analytical model is presented, and it shows that under conditions in which the thermal flux is limited within the supercritical region of the ablative corona, the front may behave like a flame or like an ablation front, depending on the perturbation wavelength. For relatively long wavelengths the critical and ablation surfaces practically lump together into a unique surface and the front behaves like a flame, whereas for the shortest wavelengths the ablation front substructure is resolved

  1. Hydrodynamic instabilities in an ablation front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of an ablation front is studied for situations in which the wavelength of the perturbations is larger than the distance to the critical surface where the driving radiation is absorbed. An analytical model is presented, and it shows that under conditions in which the thermal flux is limited within the supercritical region of the ablative corona, the front may behave like a flame or like an ablation front, depending on the perturbation wavelength. For relatively long wavelengths the critical and ablation surfaces practically lump together into a unique surface and the front behaves like a flame, whereas for the shortest wavelengths the ablation front substructure is resolved.

  2. Comparison of wet radiofrequency ablation with dry radiofrequency ablation and radiofrequency ablation using hypertonic saline preinjection: ex vivo bovine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Hee Sun; Hur, Hurn; Choi, Byung Ihn; Shin, Kyung Sook

    2004-01-01

    We wished to compare the in-vitro efficiency of wet radiofrequency (RF) ablation with the efficiency of dry RF ablation and RF ablation with preinjection of NaCl solutions using excised bovine liver. Radiofrequency was applied to excised bovine livers in a monopolar mode for 10 minutes using a 200 W generator and a perfused-cooled electrode with or without injection or slow infusion of NaCl solutions. After placing the perfused-cooled electrode in the explanted liver, 50 ablation zones were created with five different regimens: group A; standard dry RF ablation, group B; RF ablation with 11 mL of 5% NaCl solution preinjection, group C; RF ablation with infusion of 11 mL of 5% NaCl solution at a rate of 1 mL/min, group D; RFA with 6 mL of 36% NaCl solution preinjection, group E; RF ablation with infusion of 6 mL of 36% NaCl solution at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. In groups C and E, infusion of the NaCl solutions was started 1 min before RF ablation and then maintained during RF ablation (wet RF ablation). During RF ablation, we measured the tissue temperature at 15 mm from the electrode. The dimensions of the ablation zones and changes in impedance, current and liver temperature during RF ablation were then compared between the groups. With injection or infusion of NaCl solutions, the mean initial tissue impedance prior to RF ablation was significantly less in groups B, C, D, and E (43-75 Ω) than for group A (80 Ω) (ρ 3 in group A; 12.4 ± 3.8 cm 3 in group B; 80.9 ± 9.9 cm 3 in group C; 45.3 ± 11.3 cm 3 in group D and 81.6 ± 8.6 cm 3 in group E. The tissue temperature measured at 15 mm from the electrode was higher in groups C, D and E than other groups (ρ < 0.05): 53 ± 12 .deg. C in group A, 42 ± 2 .deg. C in group B, 93 ± 8 .deg. C in group C; 79 ± 12 .deg. C in group D and 83 ± 8 .deg.C in group E. Wet RF ablation with 5% or 36% NaCl solutions shows better efficiency in creating a large ablation zone than does dry RF ablation or RF ablation with

  3. High performance inboard shield design for the compact TIBER-II test reactor: Appendix A-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The compactness of the TIBER-II reactor has placed a premium on the design of a high performance inboard shield to protect the inner legs of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The available space for shield is constrained to 48 cm and the use of tungsten is mandatory to protect the magnet against the 1.53 MW/m 2 neutron wall loading. The primary requirement for the shield is to limit the fast neutron fluence to 10 19 n/cm 2 . In an optimization study, the performance of various candidate materials for protecting the magnet was examined. The optimum shield consists of a 40 cm thick W layer, followed by an 8 cm thick H 2 O/LiNO 3 layer. The mechanical design of the shield calls for tungsten blocks within SS stiffened panels. All the coolant channels are vertical with more of them in the front where there is a high heat load. The coolant pressure is 0.2 MPa and the maximum structural surface temperature is 0 C. The effects of the detailed mechanical design of the shield and the assembly gaps between the shield sectors on the damage in the magnet were analyzed and peaking factors of ∼2 were found at the hot spots. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Concrete shielding for nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Tadao; Okumura, Tadahiko; Saito, Tetsuo

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' was constructed in 1970 as the fourth in the world. On September 1, 1974, during the power raising test in the Pacific Ocean, radiation leak was detected. As the result of investigation, it was found that the cause was the fast neutrons streaming through the gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the primary shield. In order to repair the shielding facility, the Japan Nuclear Ship Research Development Agency carried out research and development and shielding design. It was decided to adopt serpentine concrete for the primary shield, which is the excellent moderator of fast neutrons even at high temperature, and heavy concrete for the secondary shield, which is effective for shielding both gamma ray and neutron beam. The repair of shielding was carried out in the Sasebo Shipyard, and completed in August, 1982. The outline of the repair work is reported. The weight increase was about 300 t. The conditions of the shielding design, the method of shielding analysis, the performance required for the shielding concrete, the preliminary experiment on heavy concrete and the construction works of serpentine concrete and heavy concrete are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Counterintuitive Constraints on Chaos Formation Set by Heat Flux through Europa's Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Models for the formation of disruptive chaos features on the icy surface of Europa fall into two broad categories: either chaos is formed when basal heating causes localized melting and thinning of the ice shell, or basal heating drives diapiric convection within the ice shell. We argue that in both of these cases, heating of the ice shell from below does not lead to chaos formation at the location of heating. If chaos is formed when a localized oceanic heat source, such as a hydrothermal plume, "melts through" the ice crust, we must consider what happens to the melted liquid. If Europa's ocean is salty, the melt will form a buoyant pool inside the melted cavity, leading to a stable interface between cold fresh meltwater and warm salty seawater. This stable interface acts like an ablative heat shield, protecting the ice from further damage. Some heat can be transferred across the stable layer by double diffusion, but this transfer is very inefficient. We calculate that local ocean heating cannot be balanced by local flux through the stable layer: instead, the warm ocean water must spread laterally until it is delivering heat to the ice base on a regional or global scale (a heating zone hundreds or thousands of km across, for conservative parameters.) If chaos is formed by diapiric solid-state convection within the ice shell, many investigators have assumed that diapirism and chaos should be most prevalent where the basal heat flux is strongest. We argue that this is not the case. In Rayleigh-Benard convection, increasing the heat flux will make convection more vigorous --- if and only if the convecting layer thickness does not change. We argue that increased basal heat flux will thin the ice shell, reducing its Rayleigh number and making convection less likely, not more. This insight allows us to reverse the logic of recent discussions of the relationship between ocean circulation and chaos (for instance, Soderlund et al, 2013 LPSC). We argue that global oceanic

  6. Magnetic field shielding system in a tokamak experimental power reactor (EPR): concept and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Marcus, F.B.; Dory, R.A.; Moore, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A poloidal magnetic field shielding system is proposed for a tokamak EPR. This coil system minimizes the pulsed poloidal field that intersects the TF (toroidal field) coils and hence reduces the risk of superconductor quenching and structural failure of the coils. Based on an idealized shielding model, we have determined the configurations for the OH (ohmic heating), the S-VF (shield-vertical field), and the T-VF (trimming-vertical field) coils in a typical tokamak EPR. It is found that the pulsed poloidal field strength is greatly reduced in the TF coil region. The overall requirement in stored plasma and vertical field energy is also substantially reduced when compared with conventional EPR designs. Use of this field shielding system is expected to enhance reliability of the superconducting TF coils in a tokamak EPR

  7. Evaluation of ilmenite serpentine concrete and ordinary concrete as nuclear reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present study involves adapting a formal decision methodology to the selection of alternative nuclear reactor concrete shielding. Multiattribute utility theory is selected to accommodate decision maker's preferences. Multiattribute utility theory (MAU) is here employed to evaluate two appropriate nuclear reactor shielding concretes in terms of effectiveness to determine the optimal choice in order to meet the radiation protection regulations. These concretes are Ordinary concrete (O.C.) and Illmenite Serpentile concrete (I.S.C.). These are normal weight concrete and heavy weight heat resistive concrete, respectively. The effectiveness objective of the nuclear reactor shielding is defined and structured into definite attributes and subattributes to evaluate the best alternative. Factors affecting the decision are dose received by reactor's workers, the material properties as well as cost of concrete shield. A computer program is employed to assist in performing utility analysis. Based upon data, the result shows the superiority of Ordinary concrete over Illmenite Serpentine concrete. (Author)

  8. MR thermometry for monitoring tumor ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, Baudouin D. de; Quesson, Bruno; Dragonu, Iulius; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Mougenot, Charles; Grenier, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Local thermal therapies are increasingly used in the clinic for tissue ablation. During energy deposition, the actual tissue temperature is difficult to estimate since physiological processes may modify local heat conduction and energy absorption. Blood flow may increase during temperature increase and thus change heat conduction. In order to improve the therapeutic efficiency and the safety of the intervention, mapping of temperature and thermal dose appear to offer the best strategy to optimize such interventions and to provide therapy endpoints. MRI can be used to monitor local temperature changes during thermal therapies. On-line availability of dynamic temperature mapping allows prediction of tissue death during the intervention based on semi-empirical thermal dose calculations. Much progress has been made recently in MR thermometry research, and some applications are appearing in the clinic. In this paper, the principles of MRI temperature mapping are described with special emphasis on methods employing the temperature dependency of the water proton resonance frequency. Then, the prospects and requirements for widespread applications of MR thermometry in the clinic are evaluated. (orig.)

  9. Shielded room measurements, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, J.S.

    1949-02-22

    The attenuation of electro-statically and electro-magnetically shielded rooms in the ``E,`` ``R,`` ``I,`` and ``T`` Buildings was measured so that corrective measure could be taken if the attenuation was found to be low. If remedial measures could not be taken, the shortcomings of the rooms would be known. Also, the men making the measurements should oversee construction and correct errors at the time. The work was performed by measuring the attenuation at spot frequencies over the range of from 150 kilocycles to 1280 megacycles with suitable equipment mounted in small rubber-tried trucks. The attenuation was determined by ``before and after`` shielding and/or ``door open and door closed`` measurements after installation of copper shielding. In general, attenuation in the frequency range of approximately 10 to 150 mc. was good and was of the order expected. At frequencies in the range of 150 mc. to 1280 mc., the attenuation curve was more erratic; that is, at certain frequencies a severe loss of attenuation was noted, while at others, the attenuation was very good. This was mainly due to poor or faulty seals around doors and pass windows. These poor seals existed in the ``T,`` ``E,`` and ``I`` Buildings because the doors were fitted improperly and somewhat inferior material was used. By experience from these difficulties, both causes were corrected in the ``R`` Building, which resulted in the improvement of the very high frequency (v.h.f.) range in this building. In some specific cases, however, the results were about the same. For the range of frequencies below approximately 10 mc., the attenuation, in almost all cases, gradually decreased as the frequency decreased and reached a minimum at .3 to 1.0 mc. This loss of attenuation was attributed to multiple grounding caused by moisture in the insulating timbers and will gradually decrease as the wood dries out.

  10. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora, E-mail: cesar.hueso@idom.com [IDOM, Consulting, Engineering and Architecture, S.A.U, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  11. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora

    2017-01-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  12. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias; Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 ± 0.14, 1.45 ± 0.13, and 1.74 ± 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 ± 0.09 and 1.26 ± 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 ± 0.65, 2.85 ± 0.72, and 4.45 ± 0.47 cm 3 for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 ± 0.30 and 2.29 ± 0.55 cm 3 got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  13. Shielding design of ITER pressure suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Michinori; Sato, Satoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu

    2006-01-01

    The duct shield from streaming D-T neutrons has been designed for the ITER pressure suppression system. Streaming calculations are performed with the DUCT-III code for the region from the inlet of the pressure relief line to the rupture disk. Next, the neutron permeation through the shield is studied by Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNP code. It is found that 0.15 m thick iron shield is enough to suppress the permeating component from the outside. In addition, it is suggested that the volume of the shield can be reduced by about 30% if the optimized iron shield structure having localized thickness across intense permeation paths is employed to shield the pressure suppression line. (T.I.)

  14. Irrigoscopy - irrigography method, dosimetry and radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubanov, Z.; Kolarevic, G.

    1999-01-01

    Use of patient's radiation shielding during radiology diagnostic procedures in our country is insufficiently represent, so patients needlessly receive very high entrance skin doses in body areas which are not in direct x-ray beam. During irrigoscopy, patient's radiation shielding is very complex problem, because of the organs position. In the future that problem must be solved. We hope that some of our suggestions about patient's radiation shielding during irrigoscopy, can be a small step in that way. (author)

  15. Cage for shield-type support. Schildausbaugestell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harryers, W; Blumenthal, G; Irresberger, H

    1981-08-13

    A cage for shield-type support containing a fracture shield supported by a hydraulic stamp and a projecting roof bar was constructed in such a way that no cellular shirt is needed to timber the caved room. The roof bar which is linked at a joint axis at the face-side end of the fracture shield is formed at the face side as a multiply foldable bar. (HGOE).

  16. Nanoparticle mediated ablation of breast cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Christopher

    In the past, both nanomaterials and various heating modalities have been researched as means for treating cancers. However, many of the current methodologies have the flaws of inconsistent tumor ablation and significant destruction of healthy cells. Based on research performed using constant radiofrequency electric fields and metallic nanoparticles (where cell necrosis is induced by the heating of these nanoparticles) we have developed a modality that simlarly uses functionalized metallic nanoparticles, specific for the T47D breast cancer cell line, and nanosecond pulsed electric fields as the hyperthermic inducer. Using both iron oxide and gold nanoparticles the results of our pilot studies indicated that up to 90% of the cancer cells were ablated given the optimal treatment parameters. These quantities of ablated cells were achieved using a cumulative exposure time 6 orders of magnitude less than most in vitro radiofrequency electric field studies.

  17. Shielded scanning electron microscope for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, R.S.; Parsley, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A small commercial SEM had been successfully shielded for examining radioactive materials transferred directly from a remote handling facility. Relatively minor mechanical modifications were required to achieve excellent operation. Two inches of steel provide adequate shielding for most samples encountered. However, samples reading 75 rad/hr γ have been examined by adding extra shielding in the form of tungsten sample holders and external lead shadow shields. Some degradation of secondary electron imaging was seen but was adequately compensated for by changing operating conditions

  18. Neutron shielding for a 252 Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Eduardo Gallego, Alfredo Lorente

    2006-01-01

    To determine the neutron shielding features of water-extended polyester a Monte Carlo study was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through inelastic collisions and absorption reactions. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide production induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a 252 Cf isotopic neutron source. During calculations a detailed model for the 252 Cf and the shield was utilized. To compare the shielding features of water extended polyester, the calculations were also made for the bare 252 Cf in vacuum, air and the shield filled with water. For all cases the calculated neutron spectra was utilized to determine the ambient equivalent neutron dose at four sites around the shielding. In the case of water extended polyester and water shielding the calculations were extended to include the prompt gamma rays produced during neutron interactions, with this information the Kerma in air was calculated at the same locations where the ambient equivalent neutron dose was determined. (Author)

  19. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Chad L.; Scates, Wade W.; Taylor, J. Todd

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  20. Radiation shielding application of lead glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathuram, R.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine and radiotherapy centers equipped with high intensity X-ray or teletherapy sources use lead glasses as viewing windows to protect personal from radiation exposure. Lead is the main component of glass which is responsible for shielding against photons. It is therefore essential to check the shielding efficiency before they are put in use. This can be done by studying photon transmission through the lead glasses. The study of photon transmission in shielding materials has been an important subject in medical physics and is potential useful in the development of radiation shielding materials

  1. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  2. Fiber-delivered mid-infrared (6-7) laser ablation of retinal tissue under perfluorodecalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Joos, Karen M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2003-07-01

    The Er:YAG laser (l=2.94mm) is an effective tool in vitreo-retinal surgery. Pulsed mid-infrared (l=6.45 mm) radiation from the Free Electron Laser has been touted as a potentially superior cutting tool. To date, use of this laser has been limited to applications in an air environment. The goal of this study was: 1) determine feasibility of fiberoptic delivery of 6.45mm using silverhalide fibers (d=700mm); 2) use infrared transparent vitreous substitute (perfluorodecalin) to allow non-contact ablation of the retina at 6.45mm. Fiber damage threshold=7.8J/cm2 (0.54GW/cm2) while transmission loss=0.54dB/m, allowing supra-ablative radiant exposures to the target. FTIR measurements of perfluorodecalin at 6.45mm yielded ma=3mm-1. Pump-probe imaging of ablation of a tissue-phantom through perfluorodecalin showed feasibility of non-contact ablation at l=6.45mm. Ablation of the retinal membranes of enucleated pig eyes was carried out under perfluorodecalin (5 Hz, 1.3 J/cm2). Each eye was cut along its equator to expose the retina. Vitreous was replaced by perfluorodecalin and laser radiation was delivered to the retina via the silverhalide fiber. The eye was rotated (at 2 rpm) using a stepper motor (0.9o/step) to create an ablation circle around the central axis of the retina (50% spot-to-spot overlap). Histological analysis of ablation yield and collateral damage will be presented. We have shown that using l=6.45mm delivered via silver halide fibers through perfluorodecalin allowed non-contact laser ablation. Remote structures are shielded, as the radiant exposure falls below the ablation threshold owing non-negligible absorption of perfluorodecalin at 6.45mm. This may optimize efficacy and safety of laser-based vitreoretinal surgery.

  3. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4±0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA

  4. Experimental screening of carbon-base materials for impact members in isotopic heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, G.K.; Duckworth, W.H.

    1976-11-01

    Fourteen C/C composites and three reentry-grade bulk graphites were evaluated experimentally to determine their applicability for impact member use in radioisotope heat sources. The composites included the following generic types: (1) 2-D cloth lay-ups; (2) 2-D and 3-D felts; (3) 3-D weaves; (4) 3-D pierced fabrics; (5) 7-D weave; and (6) coarse polar weave. Also included was the 2-D randomly wound, resin-impregnated C/C material presently used as the impact member in the MHW RTG and commonly designated ''GIS'' (an acronym for graphite impact shell). The various materials were evaluated as energy absorbing materials. None of the materials in these tests performed appreciably better than the GIS impact member material now used in the MHW heat source, HITCO Pyro Carb 814. Two cloth lay-up composites, HITCO's Pyro Carb 903 and Carborundum's Carbitex 700, were somewhat superior in performance, while the bulk graphites and felt-base composites ranked least effective as energy absorbers. All experimental data and other factors considered to date suggest that Pyro Carb 903 is the best prospect for a bifunctional heat shield and impact member. Its high density (1.80 g/cm 3 ) indicates potentially good ablation resistance to accompany its indicated good performance as an energy absorber

  5. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  6. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  7. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  8. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  9. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  10. Continuous electrodeionization through electrostatic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermentzis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    We report a new continuous electrodeionization cell with electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments or electrochemical Faraday cages formed by porous electronically and ionically conductive media, instead of permselective ion exchange membranes. Due to local elimination of the applied electric field within the compartments, they electrostatically retain the incoming ions and act as 'electrostatic ion pumps' or 'ion traps' and therefore concentrate compartments. The porous media are chemically and thermally stable. Electrodeionization or electrodialysis cells containing such concentrate compartments in place of ion exchange membranes can be used to regenerate ion exchange resins and produce deionized water, to purify industrial effluents and desalinate brackish or seawater. The cells can work by polarity reversal without any negative impact to the deionization process. Because the electronically and ionically active media constituting the electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments are not permselective and coions are not repelled but can be swept by the migrating counterions, the cells are not affected by the known membrane associated limitations, such as concentration polarization or scaling and show an increased current efficiency

  11. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  12. The thermal and mechanical properties of a low-density glass-fiber-reinforced elastomeric ablation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, W. T.; Robertson, R. W.; Bush, A. L.; Pears, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the thermal and mechanical properties was performed on a molded low-density elastomeric ablation material designated as Material B. Both the virgin and charred states were examined to provide meaningful inputs to the design of a thermal protection system. Chars representative of the flight chars formed during ablation were prepared in a laboratory furnace from 600 K to 1700 K and properties of effective thermal conductivity, heat capacity, porosity and permeability were determined on the furnace chars formed at various temperature levels within the range. This provided a boxing of the data which will enable the prediction of the transient response of the material during flight ablation.

  13. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the second part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. In this part, some of the important properties of heavy density concrete are discussed. They include density, water retentivity, air content, permeability with special reference to concrete mixes used in India's nuclear power reactors. All these properties are affected to various extents by heating. Indian shield concrete is rarely subjected to temperatures above 60degC during its life, because of thermal shield protection. During placement, the maximum anticipated rise in temperature due to heat of hydration is restricted to around 45degC by chilling, if necessary to reduce shrinkage stresses and cracks. (M.G.B.)

  14. Comparison of the CATHENA model of Gentilly-2 end shield cooling system predictions to station data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagre, G.; Sabourin, G. [Candu Energy Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chapados, S. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Gentilly-2 Refurbishment Project, Hydro-Quebec has elected to perform the End Shield Cooling Safety Analysis. A CATHENA model of Gentilly-2 End Shield Cooling System was developed for this purpose. This model includes new elements compared to other CANDU6 End Shield Cooling models such as a detailed heat exchanger and control logic model. In order to test the model robustness and accuracy, the model predictions were compared with plant measurements.This paper summarizes this comparison between the model predictions and the station measurements. It is shown that the CATHENA model is flexible and accurate enough to predict station measurements for critical parameters, and the detailed heat exchanger model allows reproducing station transients. (author)

  15. Shielding behavior of multi-transformation phase change materials (MTPCM) against nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Goplani, Deepak; Kumar, Rohitash; Das, Mrinal Kumar; Kumar, Pramod; Jodha, Ajay Singh; Misra, Manoj; Khatri, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    In nuclear hardened structures and AFV's, special shielding materials are being used to provide protection from radiations generated in nuclear blast. However, in blast an intense heat pulse is also generated along with radiation. Currently used shield does not take care of this heat pulse. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur has developed multi transformation phase change materials (MTPCM) based cool panels for passive moderation of temperature in severe desert heat. The MTPCM contains light nuclei of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen, and thus can absorb good amount of neutrons. MTPCM can also absorb intense heat pulse along with heat generated by secondary fires during blast as its latent heat (160-170 J/g) without significant rise in temperature (melting point 36-38 deg. C). Thus MTPCM can provide protection against both radiation as well as heat pulse generated in a nuclear blast along with its designed regular function of passively moderating temperature below 40 deg C during severe desert summer. A study has been undertaken to explore multiple applications of MTPCM panel. Protection factor provided by standard MTPCM panels against neutron and gamma radiations (both initial and fall out) were measured and results compared with PF provided by special lining pad currently being used in AFV's and field structures for nuclear protection. It is observed that MTPCM provides good PF (2.17) against neutron which is better than currently used shield pads (PFP%1.8). Present paper discusses results of this study. (author)

  16. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Kopechek, Jonathan A; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I; McDannold, Nathan J; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acous...

  17. 3D transient model to predict temperature and ablated areas during laser processing of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak. B. Naghshine

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser processing is one of the most popular small-scale patterning methods and has many applications in semiconductor device fabrication and biomedical engineering. Numerical modelling of this process can be used for better understanding of the process, optimization, and predicting the quality of the final product. An accurate 3D model is presented here for short laser pulses that can predict the ablation depth and temperature distribution on any section of the material in a minimal amount of time. In this transient model, variations of thermal properties, plasma shielding, and phase change are considered. Ablation depth was measured using a 3D optical profiler. Calculated depths are in good agreement with measured values on laser treated titanium surfaces. The proposed model can be applied to a wide range of materials and laser systems.

  18. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System for Planetary and Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Arnold, J.; Gasch, M.; Stackpole, M.; Wercinski, R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Fan, W.; Thornton, J; Szalai, C.

    2012-01-01

    interest. The entry environment is not always guaranteed with a direct entry, and improving the entry systems robustness to a variety of environmental conditions could aid in reaching more varied landing sites. The National Research Council (NRC) Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities report highlights six challenges and they are: 1) Mass to Surface, 2) Surface Access, 3) Precision Landing, 4) Surface Hazard Detection and Avoidance, 5) Safety and Mission Assurance, and 6) Affordability. In order for NASA to meet these challenges, the report recommends immediate focus on Rigid and Flexible Thermal Protection Systems. Rigid TPS systems such as Avcoat or SLA are honeycomb based and PICA is in the form of tiles. The honeycomb systems is manufactured using techniques that require filling of each (3/8 cell) by hand and within a limited amount of time once the ablative compound is mixed, all of the cells have to be filled and the entire heat-shield has to be cured. The tile systems such as PICA pose a different challenge as the mechanical strength characteristic and the manufacturing limitations require large number of small tiles with gap-fillers between the tiles. Recent investments in flexible ablative systems have given rise to the potential for conformal ablative TPS> A conformal TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials.

  19. Preparation of a basic data base for shielding design. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, Morio

    1998-03-01

    With use of a standard groupwise shielding design library JSSTDL produced from the latest evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.2, experimental analyses for the In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVS) Experiment and the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Experiment were performed. The results were compared with those obtained by the same analysis method and input data using the JSDJ2 library that had been applied consistently to the JASPER experiment analyses. In general, the results obtained with JSSTDL are higher than those with JSDJ2 as were found in analyses in last two years for the Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment and the Special Materials Experiment and also the Axial Shield Experiment. The calculation-to-experiment ratios of the fast neutron flux just behind deep penetration in sodium were obtained first by these IVS and IHX experimental analyses with the JSSTDL library. However, it was confirmed not to be easy to evaluate the accuracy of sodium cross section because of its dependency on how to model the swelled sodium slabs and tanks. The analyses with JSSTDL library were verified by comparison with other analyses with another library based on JENDL-3.2. Compilation of the input data necessary for future reanalyses of important configurations in JASPER experiments, that were selected at the first stage of this study, were continued and new data were added into the computer disk holding previously accumulated data. (author)

  20. Piping structural design for the ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho, E-mail: whchung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo; Kang, Kyoung-O. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do; Cha, Jong Kook [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 606-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 660-843 (Korea, Republic of); Hamlyn-Harris, Craig; Hicks, Robby; Her, Namil; Jun, Chang-Hoon [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We finalized piping design of ITER thermal shield manifold for procurement. • Support span is determined by stress and deflection limitation. • SQP, which is design optimization method, is used for the pipe design. • Benchmark analysis is performed to verify the analysis software. • Pipe design is verified by structural analyses. - Abstract: The thermal shield (TS) provides the thermal barrier in the ITER tokamak to minimize heat load transferred by thermal radiation from the hot components to the superconducting magnets operating at 4.2 K. The TS is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas which flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the manifold piping design and analysis for the ITER thermal shield. First, maximum allowable span for the manifold support is calculated based on the simple beam theory. In order to accommodate the thermal contraction in the manifold feeder, a contraction loop is designed and applied. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is used to determine the optimized dimensions of the contraction loop to ensure adequate flexibility of manifold pipe. Global structural behavior of the manifold is investigated when the thermal movement of the redundant (un-cooled) pipe is large.