WorldWideScience

Sample records for ablation pulsed laser

  1. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  2. Water spray assisted ultrashort laser pulse ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Kaakkunen, J.J.J.; Paivasaari, K.; Vahimaa, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We show the novel method to use multibeam processing with ultrashort pulses efficiently. ► Sprayed thin water layer on ablation zone enhances ablation rate and quality. ► In some cases this method also enables ablation of the deeper and straighter holes compared to ones made without the water layer. ► Method also makes possible to directly write features without the self-organizing structures. - Abstract: We have studied femtosecond ablation under sprayed thin water film and its influence and benefits compared with ablation in the air atmosphere. These have been studied in case of the hole and the groove ablation using IR femtosecond laser. Water enhances the ablation rate and in some situations it makes possible to ablate the holes with a higher aspect ratio. While ablating the grooves, the water spray allows using the high fluences without the generation of the self-organized structures.

  3. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO2 Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO 2 laser (wavelength: 10.6 μm; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  4. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  5. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of silicon in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimzadeh, R.; Anvari, J.Z.; Mansour, N. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran)

    2009-03-15

    Laser fluence and laser shot number are important parameters for pulse laser based micromachining of silicon in liquids. This paper presents laser-induced ablation of silicon in liquids of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and the water at different applied laser fluence levels and laser shot numbers. The experimental results are conducted using 15 ns pulsed laser irradiation at 532 nm. The silicon surface morphology of the irradiated spots has an appearance as one can see in porous formation. The surface morphology exhibits a large number of cavities which indicates as bubble nucleation sites. The observed surface morphology shows that the explosive melt expulsion could be a dominant process for the laser ablation of silicon in liquids using nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation at 532 nm. Silicon surface's ablated diameter growth was measured at different applied laser fluences and shot numbers in both liquid interfaces. A theoretical analysis suggested investigating silicon surface etching in liquid by intense multiple nanosecond laser pulses. It has been assumed that the nanosecond pulsed laser-induced silicon surface modification is due to the process of explosive melt expulsion under the action of the confined plasma-induced pressure or shock wave trapped between the silicon target and the overlying liquid. This analysis allows us to determine the effective lateral interaction zone of ablated solid target related to nanosecond pulsed laser illumination. The theoretical analysis is found in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements of silicon ablated diameter growth in the DMSO and the water interfaces. Multiple-shot laser ablation threshold of silicon is determined. Pulsed energy accumulation model is used to obtain the single-shot ablation threshold of silicon. The smaller ablation threshold value is found in the DMSO, and the incubation effect is also found to be absent. (orig.)

  6. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets

  7. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  8. Ablation mass features in multi-pulses femtosecond laser ablate molybdenum target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongye; Gierse, Niels; Wegner, Julian; Pretzler, Georg; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian; Ding, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the ablation mass features related to reflectivity of bulk Molybdenum (Mo) were investigated by a Ti: Sa 6 fs laser pulse at central wavelength 790 nm. The ablated mass removal was determined using Confocal Microscopy (CM) technique. The surface reflectivity was calibrated and measured by a Lambda 950 spectrophotometer as well as a CCD camera during laser ablation. The ablation mass loss per pulse increase with the increasing of laser shots, meanwhile the surface reflectivity decrease. The multi-pulses (100 shots) ablation threshold of Mo was determined to be 0.15 J/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated as 0.835. The reflectivity change of the Mo target surface following multi-pulses laser ablation were studied as a function of laser ablation shots at various laser fluences from 1.07 J/cm2 to 36.23 J/cm2. The results of measured reflectivity indicate that surface reflectivity of Mo target has a significant decline in the first 3-laser pulses at the various fluences. These results are important for developing a quantitative analysis model for laser induced ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnosis of EAST tokamak.

  9. Ablation of polymers by ultraviolet pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.; Benharrats, N.

    1993-08-01

    The surface modifications of different polymers treated by far UV-Excimer laser (λ = 193mn, 248, 308nm) are analysed by X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy. The main feature observed depends strongly on the absorption coefficients. For the high absorbing polymers such (PVC, PS, PI,...) the mechanism of the UV-Excimer Laser interaction appears to be governed by an ablative photodecomposition process (APD) with an APD threshold. In the other limit, i.e. low absorbing polymer the interaction leads to a photothermal process. (author). 51 refs, 24 figs, 7 tabs

  10. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  11. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to

  12. Growth of epitaxial thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    High-quality, high-temperature superconductor (HTSc) films can be grown by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process. This article provides a detailed introduction to the advantages and curent limitations of PLA for epitaxial film growth. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods and on exploitation of PLA to control epitaxial growth at either the unit cell or the atomic-layer level. Examples are taken from recent HTSc film growth. 33 figs, 127 refs

  13. Pulsed Laser Ablation and Deposition with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anne; Allmond, Chris; Shinn, Michelle

    2002-05-01

    We have been conducting some of the first experiments in pulsed laser ablation and deposition with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser (TJNAF-FEL). The wavelength tunability, high average power (up to 1.72 kW), very high repetition rate (cw rate up to 74 MHz) and ultrafast pulses ( 650 fs) of the TJNAF-FEL present a combination of parameters unmatched by any laser, which has marked benefits for ablation and deposition. We will be presenting results on ablation of metals (Co,NiFe,Ti,Nb). Comparison with thin films deposited with a standard nanosecond laser source and an ultrafast low-repetition rate laser system show the advantage of using the FEL to produce high quality films at high deposition rates. Preliminary optical spectroscopy studies of the ablation plume and electron/ion emission studies during ablation will also be presented.

  14. Pulsed CO2 laser tissue ablation: measurement of the ablation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J T; Deutsch, T F

    1988-01-01

    Ablation of guinea pig skin using a CO2 laser emitting 2-mu sec-long pulses has been quantified by measuring the mass of tissue removed as a function of incident fluence per pulse. The mass-loss curves show three distinct regimes in which water evaporation, explosive tissue removal, and laser-induced plasma formation dominate. The data are fit to two models that predict that the mass removed depends either linearly or logarithmically on fluence. Although the data are best fit by a linear dependence upon fluence, plasma formation at high fluences prohibited obtaining data over a wide enough fluence range to differentiate unambiguously between the two models. Ablation efficiency, ablation thresholds, and the optical penetration depth at 10.6 micron were obtained from the measurements.

  15. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  16. Comparison of soft and hard tissue ablation with sub-ps and ns pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Stuart, B.C.; Celliers, P.M.; Feit, M.D.; Glinsky, M.E.; Heredia, N.J.; Herman, S.; Lane, S.M.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Perry, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chang, T.D. [Veterans Administration Hospital, Martinez, CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst. and Medical Clinic, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses offers several unique advantages. The nonlinear energy deposition is insensitive to tissue type, allowing this tool to be used for soft and hard tissue ablation. The localized energy deposition lead to precise ablation depth and minimal collateral damage. This paper reports on efforts to study and demonstrate tissue ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser. Ablation efficiency and extent of collateral damage for 0.3 ps and 1000 ps duration laser pulses are compared. Temperature measurements of the rear surface of a tooth section is also presented.

  17. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxiang Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter, ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm2.

  18. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  19. Synthesis and Properties of Platinum Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Mendivil Palma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL technique in different liquids (acetone, ethanol, and methanol. Ablation was performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with output energy of 230 mJ/pulse for 532 nm wavelength. Ablation time and laser energy fluence were varied for all the liquids. Effects of laser energy fluence, ablation time, and nature of the liquid were reported. The mean size, size distributions, shape, elemental composition, and optical properties of Pt nanoparticles synthesized by PLAL were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy.

  20. Single and double long pulse laser ablation of aluminum induced in air and water ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh; Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mahdm@iust.ac.ir

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of aluminum target by single and double pulse (∼ 5 ns delay) in ambient air and distilled water • Comparing with air, in ambient water, plasma confinement results in higher crater depth. • In comparison with single pulse laser ablation, the absorption of the laser pulse energy is higher for double pulse regime. • As a result of ablated material expansion, the crater depth is decreased if the target is placed at lower depth. - Abstract: In this paper, single pulse and double pulse laser ablation of an aluminum target in two interaction ambient was investigated experimentally. The interaction was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in air and four depths (i.e. 9, 13, 17, and 21 mm) of distilled water ambient. The irradiation was carried out in single and collinear double pulse configurations in both air and liquid ambient. Crater geometry (depth and diameter) was measured by an optical microscope. The results indicated that the crater geometry strongly depends on both single pulse and double pulse configurations and interaction ambient. In single pulse regime, the crater diameter is higher for all water depths compared to that of air. However, the crater depth, depend on water depth, is higher or lower than the crater depth in air. In double pulse laser ablation, there are greater values for both crater diameters and crater depths in the water.

  1. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume

  2. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  3. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  4. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, and repetition rate of 20 Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4 J cm-2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4 J cm-2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence.

  5. Nonstoichiometric Titanium Oxides via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shuei-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Titanium oxide compounds TiO,Ti2O3, and TiO2 with a considerable extent of nonstoichiometry were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The titanium oxides were found to occur as nanoparticle aggregates with a predominant 3+ charge and amorphous microtubes when fabricated under an average power density of ca. 1 × 108W/cm2 and 1011W/cm2, respectively followed by dwelling in water. The crystalline colloidal particles have a relatively high content of Ti2+ and hence a lower minimum band gap of 3.4 eV in comparison with 5.2 eV for the amorphous state. The protonation on both crystalline and amorphous phase caused defects, mainly titanium rather than oxygen vacancies and charge and/or volume-compensating defects. The hydrophilic nature and presumably varied extent of undercoordination at the free surface of the amorphous lamellae accounts for their rolling as tubes at water/air and water/glass interfaces. The nonstoichiometric titania thus fabricated have potential optoelectronic and catalytic applications in UV–visible range and shed light on the Ti charge and phase behavior of titania-water binary in natural shock occurrence.

  6. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic...

  7. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Gold, David M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Marion, John E., II; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    1998-05-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using an ultrashort pulse laser. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so bone tissue is selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  8. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in ethanol: A pulsed photoacoustic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde-Alva, M.A.; García-Fernández, T.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; Esparza-Alegría, E.; Sánchez-Valdés, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulsed photoacoustic technique allowed to determine the production rate of NPs. • Pulsed photoacoustic technique allows to determine the Ag concentration in colloids. • The nanoparticles production rate drops quickly during the first laser pulses. • Nanoparticles production rate is almost constant after few hundreds of laser shots. • Photoacoustic signal amplitude was proportional to fluence on the target surface. - Abstract: The pulsed photoacoustic (PA) technique was used to study the synthesis by laser ablation of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in ethanol. PA technique allowed to determine the production rate per laser pulse and concentration of synthesized Ag-NPs. The samples were produced by using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 1064 nm of wavelength and 7 ns of pulse duration. The laser pulse energy varied from 10 to 100 mJ. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs demonstrated that the obtained nanoparticles were spherical with an average size close to 10 nm. The absorption spectra of the colloids showed a plasmon absorption peak around 400 nm. The PA analyses showed a significant reduction of the production rate of Ag-NPs during the first hundreds of laser pulses. For a higher number of pulses this rate was kept almost constant. Finally, we found that the root mean square (RMS) value of the PA signal was proportional to the laser pulse fluence on the target surface. Thus PA technique was useful to monitor the ablation process.

  9. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in ethanol: A pulsed photoacoustic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde-Alva, M.A., E-mail: azbmiguel@gmail.com [Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México D.F., C.P. 04510, México (Mexico); García-Fernández, T. [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México (UACM), Prolongación San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, México D.F., C.P. 09790, México (Mexico); Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R. [CCADET Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México D.F., C.P. 04510, México (Mexico); Esparza-Alegría, E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México D.F., C.P. 04510, México (Mexico); Sánchez-Valdés, C.F. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a sección, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P., C.P. 78216, México (Mexico); and others

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulsed photoacoustic technique allowed to determine the production rate of NPs. • Pulsed photoacoustic technique allows to determine the Ag concentration in colloids. • The nanoparticles production rate drops quickly during the first laser pulses. • Nanoparticles production rate is almost constant after few hundreds of laser shots. • Photoacoustic signal amplitude was proportional to fluence on the target surface. - Abstract: The pulsed photoacoustic (PA) technique was used to study the synthesis by laser ablation of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in ethanol. PA technique allowed to determine the production rate per laser pulse and concentration of synthesized Ag-NPs. The samples were produced by using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 1064 nm of wavelength and 7 ns of pulse duration. The laser pulse energy varied from 10 to 100 mJ. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs demonstrated that the obtained nanoparticles were spherical with an average size close to 10 nm. The absorption spectra of the colloids showed a plasmon absorption peak around 400 nm. The PA analyses showed a significant reduction of the production rate of Ag-NPs during the first hundreds of laser pulses. For a higher number of pulses this rate was kept almost constant. Finally, we found that the root mean square (RMS) value of the PA signal was proportional to the laser pulse fluence on the target surface. Thus PA technique was useful to monitor the ablation process.

  10. Laser ablation of lysozyme with UV, visible and infrared femto- and nanosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    Lysozyme is an interesting molecule for laser ablation of organic materials, because the ablation has been comprehensively studied, it is a medium heavy molecule with a mass of 14305 Da, which can be detected by standard techniques, and because it is used as a bactericidal protein in the food...... industry. Lysozyme molecules do not absorb energy for wavelengths above 310 nm, but nevertheless there is a strong mass loss by ablation for laser irradiation in the visible regime. The total ablation yield of lysozyme at 355 nm and at 2 J/cm2 is about 155 µg/pulse, possibly one of the highest ablation...... yields ever measured. The mass loss is mainly caused by fragmentation of the lysozyme into simple gases, such as H2S, H2O and CO2 , which are rapidly pumped away in the vacuum chamber. We have investigated the mass loss by ablation of lysozyme in all regimes to see whether a similar mechanism governs...

  11. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes

  12. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping, E-mail: ypchen@sjtu.edu.cn; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  13. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  14. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Sasaki, Takehiko; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm2; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO2 with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp3-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO2 during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO2 is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  15. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  16. Ablation characteristics of carbon-doped glycerol irradiated by a 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, QI; Siqi, ZHANG; Tian, LIANG; Ke, XIAO; Weichong, TANG; Zhiyuan, ZHENG

    2018-03-01

    The ablation characteristics of carbon-doped glycerol were investigated in laser plasma propulsion using a pulse laser with 10 ns pulse width and 1064 nm wavelength. The results showed that with the incident laser intensity increasing, the target momentum decreased. Results still indicated that the strong plasma shielded the consumption loss and resulted in a low coupling coefficient. Furthermore, the carbon-doping gave rise to variations in the laser focal position and laser intensity, which in turn reduced the glycerol splashing. Based on the glycerol viscosity and the carbon doping, a high specific impulse is anticipated.

  17. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  18. Identification of photoacoustic transients during pulsed laser ablation of the human temporal bone: an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, B J; Dickinson, M R; Berns, M W; Neev, J

    1996-12-01

    Laser ablation of hard tissues during neurotologic operations has been accomplished with continuous-wave (CW) lasers in the visible and midinfrared spectrum. The mechanism of ablation at these wavelengths is secondary to photothermal-induced tissue destruction. As a result, significant thermal damage to surrounding tissue may occur. Pulsed ultraviolet (UV) lasers have been suggested as an alternative to the argon, KTP-532, and CO2 lasers currently used in clinical practice. The pulse length of Excimer lasers are considerably shorter than the thermal diffusion time of bone tissue, and as a consequence thermal injury is minimal. This makes pulsed lasers an attractive tool for tissue ablation in the ear: in essence a "cold knife." However, the short pulse width of Excimer lasers (typically 10-150 ns) can create large thermoelastic stresses in the ablation specimen. This study identifies the presence of these photoacoustic waves during the Excimer laser treatment of the cadaveric human temporal bone. A XeCl (lambda = 308 nm, tau p = 12 ns) excimer laser was used to ablate hard tissue surrounding the oval window and facial ridge with energies of 75, 45, 25, and 12 mJ/pulse. Spot size was estimated to be 0.5 mm2. Custom high-frequency polyvinyldifluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric film transducers were fabricated and attached to the promontory, round window niche, and facial ridges. The signals were amplified using a low-noise preamplifier and recorded on a digitizing oscilloscope. Photoacoustic waves were clearly identified. Notably, large acoustic waves were measured on the promontory and on both sides of the facial ridge. The implications and clinical relevance of these findings is discussed and compared to findings obtained from a model system.

  19. Short-pulse laser ablation of solids: From phase explosion to fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorazo, Patrick; Lewis, Laurent J.; Meunier, Michel

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms of laser ablation in silicon are investigated close to the threshold energy for pulse durations of 500 fs and 50 ps. This is achieved using a unique model coupling carrier and atom dynamics within a unified Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics scheme. Under femtosecond laser irradiation, isochoric heating and rapid adiabatic expansion of the material provide a natural pathway to phase explosion. This is not observed under slower, nonadiabatic cooling with picosecond pulses where fragmentation of the hot metallic fluid is the only relevant ablation mechanism

  20. Spot size and pulse number dependence of femtosecond laser ablation thresholds of silicon and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Naghilou, Aida [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kitzler, Markus [TU Wien, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstraße 27-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Influence of laser spot size and pulse number on the ablation of solids. • An extended defect model describes the dependence of the threshold fluence on the basis of high and low density defects. • Successfully applied to silicon and stainless steel. - Abstract: Laser spot size and pulse number are two major parameters influencing the ablation of solids. The extended defect model describes the dependence of the threshold fluence on the basis of high and low density defects. This model was successfully applied to silicon and stainless steel. It is demonstrated that heat accumulation cannot describe the experimental results.

  1. KrF laser ablation of a polyethersulfone film: Effect of pulse duration on structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazokian, Hedieh; Selimis, Alexandros; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Mollabashi, Mahmoud; Barzin, Jalal; Jelvani, Saeid

    2011-01-01

    Polyethersulfone (PES) films were processed with KrF laser irradiation of different pulse durations (τ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed for the examination of the morphology and chemical composition of the irradiated surfaces, respectively. During ablation with 500 fs and 5 ps pulses, localized deformations (beads), micro-ripple and conical structures were observed on the surface depending on the irradiation fluence (F) and the number of pulses (N). In addition, the number density of the structures is affected by the irradiation parameters (τ, F, N). Furthermore, at longer pulse durations (τ = 30 ns), conical structures appear at lower laser fluence values, which are converted into columnar structures upon irradiation at higher fluences. The Raman spectra collected from the top of the structures following irradiation at different pulse durations revealed graphitization of the ns laser treated areas, in contrast to those processed with ultra-short laser pulses.

  2. XUV-laser induced ablation of PMMA with nano-, pico-, and femtosecond pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Chvostová, Dagmar; Létal, V.; Krása, Josef; Otčenášek, Zdeněk; Kozlová, Michaela; Polan, Jiří; Präg R., Ansgar; Rus, Bedřich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Pelka, J. B.; Sobierajski, R.; Ryc, L.; Feldhaus, J.; Boody, F. P.; Grisham, M. E.; Vaschenko, G. O.; Menoni, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.

    144-147, - (2005), s. 929-932 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04LA235; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : XUV lasers * soft x-ray lasers * ablation * pulse duration effects * wavelength effects * poly(methyl methacrylate) * PMMA Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.183, year: 2005

  3. Ultra-short laser pulse ablation using shear-force feedback: Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samek, Ota; Kurowski, Andre; Kittel, Silke; Kukhlevsky, Sergei; Hergenroeder, Roland

    2005-01-01

    This work reports on a feasibility study of proximity ablation using femtosecond pulses. Ultra-short pulses were launched to a bare tapered optical fiber and delivered to the sample. The tip-sample distance was controlled by means of shear-force feedback. Consequently, ablation craters with submicrometer dimensions were obtained. Potential analytical applications for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, such as e.g. inclusions in steel or bio cells, are suggested

  4. Dental hard tissue ablation using mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Taichen; Aoki, Akira; Saito, Norihito; Yumoto, Masaki; Nakajima, Sadahiro; Nagasaka, Keigo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Mizutani, Koji; Wada, Satoshi; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-12-01

    Mid-infrared erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers (2.94- and 2.78-μm, respectively) are utilized for effective dental hard tissue treatment because of their high absorption in water, hydroxide ion, or both. Recently, a mid-infrared tunable, nanosecond pulsed, all-solid-state chromium-doped: cadmium-selenide (Cr:CdSe) laser system was developed, which enables laser oscillation in the broad spectral range around 2.9 μm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ablation of dental hard tissue by the nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser at a wavelength range of 2.76-3.00 μm. Enamel, dentin, and cementum tissue were irradiated at a spot or line at a fluence of 0-11.20 J/cm 2 /pulse (energy output: 0-2.00 mJ/pulse) with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and beam diameter of ∼150 μm on the target (pulse width ∼250 ns). After irradiation, morphological changes, ablation threshold, depth, and efficiency, and thickness of the structurally and thermally affected layer of irradiated surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and light microscopy of non-decalcified histological sections. The nanosecond pulsed irradiation without water spray effectively ablated dental hard tissue with no visible thermal damage such as carbonization. The SEM analysis revealed characteristic micro-irregularities without major melting and cracks in the lased tissue. The ablation threshold of dentin was the lowest at 2.76 μm and the highest at 3.00 μm. The histological analysis revealed minimal thermal and structural changes ∼20 μm wide on the irradiated dentin surfaces with no significant differences between wavelengths. The efficiency of dentin ablation gradually increased from 3.00 to 2.76 μm, at which point the highest ablation efficiency was observed. The nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser demonstrated an effective ablation ability of hard dental tissues

  5. Influence of consecutive picosecond pulses at 532 nm wavelength on laser ablation of human teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirdan, Balsam M.; Antonelli, Luca; Batani, Dimitri; Jafer, Rashida; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Tarazi, Saad al; Villa, Anna Maria; Vodopivec, Bruno; Volpe, Luca

    2014-07-01

    The interaction of 40 ps pulse duration laser emitting at 532 nm wavelength with human dental tissue (enamel, dentin, and dentin-enamel junction) has been investigated. The crater profile and the surface morphology have been studied by using a confocal auto-fluorescence microscope (working in reflection mode) and a scanning electron microscope. Crater profile and crater morphology were studied after applying consecutive laser pulses and it was found that the ablation depth increases with the number of consecutive pulses, leaving the crater diameter unchanged. We found that the thermal damage is reduced by using short duration laser pulses, which implies an increased retention of restorative material. We observe carbonization of the irradiated samples, which does not imply changes in the chemical composition. Finally, the use of 40 ps pulse duration laser may become a state of art in conservative dentistry.

  6. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  7. Processing condition influence on the characteristics of gold nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikov, R.G.; Nikolov, A.S.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Atanasov, P.A.; Alexandrov, M.T.; Karashanova, D.B.

    2013-01-01

    A study is presented of Au nanoparticles (NPs) created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a solid target in double distilled water. The influence was examined of the laser wavelength on the size, shape and optical properties of the resulting NPs. Three different wavelengths: the fundamental (λ = 1064 nm), second (λ SHG = 532) and third (λ THG = 355) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at the same fluence were utilized to produce various colloids. Ablation at the wavelength of 532 nm was investigated in more detail to reveal the influence of self-absorption by the already created NPs on their characteristics. The colloid produced was irradiated by λ irrad = 532 nm (laser energy 40 mJ) at different times up to 25 min after the end of ablation. The initial structure of welded NPs forming wires was modified. Transmission electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements were used to evaluate the shape and size distribution of the NPs.

  8. Comprehensive studies of ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tin target at terawatt power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsied, Ahmed M.; Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental properties of ultrashort laser interactions with metals using up to terawatt power were comprehensively studied, i.e., specifically mass ablation, nanoparticle formation, and ion dynamics using multitude of diagnostic techniques. Results of this study can be useful in many fields of research including spectroscopy, micromachining, thin film fabrication, particle acceleration, physics of warm dense matter, and equation-of-state determination. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system (110 mJ maximum energy, 40 fs, 800 nm, P-polarized, single pulse mode) was used, which delivered up to 3 terawatt laser power to ablate 1 mm tin film in vacuum. The experimental analysis includes the effect of the incident laser fluence on the ablated mass, size of the ablated area, and depth of ablation using white light profilometer. Atomic force microscope was used to measure the emitted particles size distribution at different laser fluence. Faraday cup (FC) detector was used to analyze the emitted ions flux by measuring the velocity, and the total charge of the emitted ions. The study shows that the size of emitted particles follows log-normal distribution with peak shifts depending on incident laser fluence. The size of the ablated particles ranges from 20 to 80 nm. The nanoparticles deposited on the wafer tend to aggregate and to be denser as the incident laser fluence increases as shown by AFM images. Laser ablation depth was found to increase logarithmically with laser fluence then leveling off at laser fluence > 400 J/cm2. The total ablated mass tends to increase logarithmically with laser fluence up to 60 J/cm2 while, increases gradually at higher fluence due to the increase in the ablated area. The measured ion emitted flux shows a linear dependence on laser fluence with two distinct regimes. Strong dependence on laser fluence was observed at fluences < 350 J/cm2. Also, a slight enhancement in ion velocity was observed with increasing laser fluence up to 350 J

  9. Structure and Properties of Nanocrystalline Iron Oxide Powder Prepared by the Method of Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Shabalina, A. V.; Lapin, I. N.

    2017-04-01

    Colloidal solution of iron oxide nanoparticles is synthesized by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (Nd:YAG laser, 1064 nm, 7 ns, and 180 mJ) of a metallic iron target in water, and nanocrystalline powder is prepared from this solution by vacuum drying. A composition and structure of the material obtained are investigated by methods of electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and optical spectroscopy. It is established that oxide particles with average size of about 5 nm and Fe3O4 magnetite structure are mainly formed during ablation. Preliminary investigation of magnetic properties of the prepared nanoparticle powders shows that they can be in ferromagnetic and/or superparamagnetic states.

  10. Green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by excimer pulsed laser ablation in water

    OpenAIRE

    O. Van Overschelde; G. Guisbiers; R. Snyders

    2013-01-01

    Pure selenium nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Liquid Phase - Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA) in de-ionized water. Excimer laser (248 nm) operating at low fluence (F ∼ 1 J/cm2) was used to generate colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles. The obtained selenium nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We describe the multi-modal size distributions generated and use the cen...

  11. Impacts of ambient and ablation plasmas on short- and ultrashort-pulse laser processing of surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Panchenko, A.N.; Zhukov, V.P.; Kudryashov, S.I.; Pereira, A.; Marine, W.; Mocek, Tomáš; Bulgakov, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2014), s. 1344-1372 ISSN 2072-666X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : pulsed laser ablation * laser material processing * laser plasma * ambient gas breakdown * material redeposition * plasma pipe formation * microstructures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.269, year: 2014

  12. Ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of gold thin film targets: Theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoruso, S.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Wang, X.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Atanasov, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Laser ablation of a gold thin film irradiated by ultrashort pulses is studied using molecular-dynamics simulations, and compared with that of a bulk target. A film thickness comparable to the ballistic electron depth in gold (≈ 100 nm) is considered, evidencing a significant change of the temperature spatial profile inside the target material, which eventually influences the material decomposition. Particular emphasis is given to the process of nanoparticle generation. The simulations indicate a more uniform heating of the sample in the case of the thin film, which is accompanied by a more homogeneous size distribution of the nanoparticles produced in the ablation process. An experimental characterization of the ultrashort-pulse ablation process is also carried out. The produced nanoparticles are collected on suitable substrates, and atomic force microscopy analysis of less than one layer deposits is performed. An ≈ 2 × narrowing of the nanoparticles equivalent to spherical diameter size distribution is observed in the case of ablation of the gold thin film, in fairly good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Moreover, interesting changes of the nanoparticle shape are evidenced, which are correlated to the changes in the nanoparticle ablation plume dynamics, as studied by time-gated imaging of its self-emission. Our findings suggest ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of thin films as a viable route to achieve a more uniform nanoparticle size distribution. - Highlights: • Nanoparticle generation at fs laser ablation of Au bulk target and thin film is studied. • The spatial confinement in depth at thin film geometry results in homogeneous heating. • Narrower and more homogeneous particle size distribution is observed for thin film

  13. Optical properties of Germanium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikiran eVadavalli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germanium (Ge nanoparticles (NPs are synthesized by means of pulsed laser ablation of bulk germanium target immersed in acetone with ns laser pulses at different pulse energies. The fabricated NPs are characterized by employing different techniques such as UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The mean size of the Ge NPs is found to vary from few nm to 40 nm with the increase in laser pulse energy. Shift in the position of the absorption spectra is observed and also the photoluminescence peak shift is observed due to quantum confinement effects. High resolution TEM combined with micro-Raman spectroscopy confirms the crystalline nature of the generated germanium nanoparticles. The formation of various sizes of germanium NPs at different laser pulse energies is evident from the asymmetry in the Raman spectra and the shift in its peak position towards the lower wavenumber side. The FESEM micrographs confirm the formation of germanium micro/nanostructures at the laser ablated position of the bulk germanium. In particular, the measured NP sizes from the micro-Raman phonon quantum confinement model are found in good agreement with TEM measurements of Ge NPs.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy and ablation rates of hard dental tissue using 350-fs and 1-ns laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neev, Joseph; Huynh, Daniel S.; Dan, Claudiu C.; White, Joel M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Feit, Michael D.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    1996-04-01

    Lasers are currently limited in their ability to remove hard tissue. Furthermore, many laser systems, such as the long pulse infrared lasers used to ablate bone or hard dental tissue, also generate unacceptable heat levels and cause collateral tissue damage. Ultrashort pulse lasers, however, are highly efficient, quiet, and relatively free of charge. With recent developments now allowing operation at high pulse repetition rates, ultrashort pulse systems can yield significant material volume removal which can potentially match or even exceed conventional technology while still maintaining the minimal collateral damage characteristics. In this paper, the interaction characteristics of two pulse regimes with enamel and dentin: 350 fs pulse ablation of hard dental tissues is compared to the interaction with one nanosecond pulses. Ablation rates were characterized and surface morphology, and structure were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope.

  15. Surface microstructure and chemistry of polyimide by single pulse ablation of picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qifeng; Chen, Ting; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-03-01

    Polyimide (PI) surface was ablated by the single pulse of picosecond laser, and the effects of laser wavelength (λ= 355 nm and 1064 nm) and fluence on surface microstructure and chemistry were explored. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis found that different surface microstructures, i.e., the concave of concentric ring and the convex of porous circular disk, were generated by 355 nm and 1064 nm picosecond laser ablation, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicated that due to the high peak energy density of picosecond laser, oxygen and nitrogen from the ambient were incorporated into the PI surface mainly in the form of Cdbnd O and Csbnd Nsbnd C groups. Thus, both of the O/C and N/C atomic content ratios increased, but the increase caused by 1064 nm wavelength laser was larger. It inferred that the differences of PI surface microstructures and chemistry resulted from different laser parameters were related to different laser-matter interaction effects. For 355 nm picosecond laser, no obvious thermal features were observed and the probable ablation process of PI was mainly governed by photochemical effect; while for 1064 nm picosecond laser, obvious thermal feature appeared and photothermal effect was thought to be dominant.

  16. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  17. Studies on perovskite film ablation and scribing with ns-, ps- and fs-laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Lukas; Ye, Xinyuan; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites attract much attention due to their exceptional optoelectronic properties, in particular for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The accurate, high-speed and reliable patterning of the PV films is required for perovskite solar modules fabrication. Laser scribing provides these characteristics needed for industrial fabrication processes. In this work, the laser ablation and scribing of perovskite layers (CH3NH3PbI3: MAPbI3) with different laser sources (ns-, ps-, fs-laser pulses with wavelengths of 248 nm to 2.5 µm) were systematically investigated. The perovskite material was irradiated from both the film side and the substrate (rear side) side to study and compare the particular processes. The patterning results of the perovskite film can be classified into (1) regular laser ablation, (2) thin-film delamination lift-off process, and (3) lift-off with thermal modifications. A particular process, the localised lift-off of single grains from the perovskite film, has been observed and is discussed in relation to the thin-film lift-off process. Ablation and ablation-related mechanisms provide good conditions for laser scribing of the perovskite layer required for module interconnection via P2.

  18. Characterization of Ag and Au nanoparticles created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in double distilled water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, A.S., E-mail: anastas_nikolov@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Nedyalkov, N.N.; Nikov, R.G.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of Ag and Au targets, immersed in double-distilled water is used to synthesize metallic nanoparticles (NPs). The targets are irradiated for 20 min by laser pulses at different wavelengths-the fundamental and the second harmonic (SHG) ({lambda} = 1064 and 532 nm, respectively) of a Nd:YAG laser system. The ablation process is performed at a repetition rate of 10 Hz and with pulse duration of 15 ns. Two boundary values of the laser fluence for each wavelength under the experimental conditions chosen were used-it varied from several J/cm{sup 2} to tens of J/cm{sup 2}. Only as-prepared samples were measured not later than two hours after fabrication. The NPs shape and size distribution were evaluated from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The suspensions obtained were investigated by optical transmission spectroscopy in the near UV and in the visible region in order to get information about these parameters. Spherical shape of the NPs at the low laser fluence and appearance of aggregation and building of nanowires at the SHG and high laser fluence was seen. Dependence of the mean particle size at the SHG on the laser fluence was established. Comments on the results obtained have been also presented.

  19. Large volume ablation of Sapphire with ultra-short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamir, A., E-mail: shamirav@post.bgu.ac.il [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Electro-optics Unit, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Ishaaya, A.A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2013-04-01

    The superior optical and mechanical properties of Sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are highly desirable in various opto-electronics and micro-mechanical applications. However, Sapphire's intrinsic hardness and resistance to most chemicals result in significant processing difficulties. Laser micro-machining is emerging as a promising technology, in particular, the use of ultra-short pulses for material ablation. In this work we investigate and characterize experimentally large volume ablation of Sapphire with femtosecond pulses, and compare the results to previously reported drilling and cutting experiments. We manage to identify optimized parameters for overcoming deleterious thermal effects and debris scattering, and demonstrate high quality 180 μm-deep ablation of 1 mm × 15 mm area in Sapphire.

  20. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation to enhance drug delivery across the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie-Cook, Hazel; Stone, James M; Yu, Fei; Guy, Richard H; Gordeev, Sergey N

    2016-01-01

    Laser poration of the skin locally removes its outermost, barrier layer, and thereby provides a route for the diffusion of topically applied drugs. Ideally, no thermal damage would surround the pores created in the skin, as tissue coagulation would be expected to limit drug diffusion. Here, a femtosecond pulsed fiber laser is used to porate mammalian skin ex vivo. This first application of a hollow core negative curvature fiber (HC-NCF) to convey a femtosecond pulsed, visible laser beam results in reproducible skin poration. The effect of applying ink to the skin surface, prior to ultra-short pulsed ablation, has been examined and Raman spectroscopy reveals that the least, collateral thermal damage occurs in inked skin. Pre-application of ink reduces the laser power threshold for poration, an effect attributed to the initiation of plasma formation by thermionic electron emission from the dye in the ink. Poration under these conditions significantly increases the percutaneous permeation of caffeine in vitro. Dye-enhanced, plasma-mediated ablation of the skin is therefore a potentially advantageous approach to enhance topical/transdermal drug absorption. The combination of a fiber laser and a HC-NCF, capable of emitting and delivering femtosecond pulsed, visible light, may permit a compact poration device to be developed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Selective ablation of dental enamel and dentin using femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizarelli, R F Z; Costa, M M; Carvalho-Filho, E; Bagnato, V S; Nunes, F D

    2008-01-01

    The study of the interaction of intense laser light with matter, as well as transient response of atoms and molecules is very appropriated because of the laser energy concentration in a femtosecond optical pulses. The fundamental problem to be solved is to find tools and techniques which allow us to observe and manipulate on a femtosecond time scale the photonics events on and into the matter. Six third human extracted molars were exposed to a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire Q-switched and mode locked laser (Libra-S, Coherent, Palo Alto, CA, USA), emitting pulses with 70 fs width, radiation wavelength of 801 nm, at a constant pulse repetition rate of 1 KHz. The laser was operated at different power levels (70 to 400 mW) with constant exposition time of 10 seconds, at focused and defocused mode. Enamel and dentin surfaces were evaluated concerned ablation rate and morphological aspects under scanning electron microscopic. The results in this present experiment suggest that at the focused mode and under higher average power, enamel tissues present microcavities with higher depth and very precise edges, but, while dentin shows a larger melt-flushing, lower depth and melting and solidification aspect. In conclusion, it is possible to choose hard or soft ablation, under lower and higher average power, respectively, revealing different aspects of dental enamel and dentin, depending on the average power, fluence and distance from the focal point of the ultra-short pulse laser on the tooth surface

  2. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2} is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm{sup −2} and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm{sup −2}. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  3. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1–10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm −2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He–Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm −2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm −2 . The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on diamond like carbon films synthesized by pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Madhusmita; Krishnan, R., E-mail: krish@igcar.gov.in; Ravindran, T. R.; Das, Arindam; Mangamma, G.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K. [Material Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    Hydrogen free Diamond like Carbon (DLC) thin films enriched with C-C sp{sup 3} bonding were grown on Si (111) substrates at laser pulse energies varying from 100 to 400 mJ (DLC-100, DLC-200, DLC-300, DLC-400), by Pulsed Laser Ablation (PLA) utilizing an Nd:YAG laser operating at fundamental wavelength. Structural, optical and morphological evolutions as a function of laser pulse energy were studied by micro Raman, UV-Vis spectroscopic studies and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. Raman spectra analysis provided critical clues for the variation in sp{sup 3} content and optical energy gap. The sp{sup 3} content was estimated using the FWHM of the G peak and found to be in the range of 62-69%. The trend of evolution of sp{sup 3} content matches well with the evolution of I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio with pulse energy. UV-Vis absorption study of DLC films revealed the variation of optical energy gap with laser pulse energy (1.88 – 2.23 eV), which matches well with the evolution of G-Peak position of the Raman spectra. AFM study revealed that roughness, size and density of particulate in DLC films increase with laser pulse energy.

  5. Thin films of silver nanoparticles deposited in vacuum by pulsed laser ablation using a YAG:Nd laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.C.; Diamant, R.; Castillo, P.; Acosta-Garcia, M.C.; Batina, N.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the deposition of thin films of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in vacuum using the third line (355 nm) of a YAG:Nd laser. The nanostructure and/or morphology of the films was investigated as a function of the number of ablation pulses, by means of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results show that films deposited with a small number of ablation pulses (500 or less), are not continuous, but formed of isolated nearly spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameters in the range from 1 nm to 8 nm. The effect of increasing the number of pulses by one order of magnitude (5000) is to increase the mean diameter of the globular nanoparticles and also the Ag areal density. Further increase of the number of pulses, up to 10,000, produces the formation of larger and anisotropic nanoparticles, and for 15,000 pulses, quasi-percolated Ag films are obtained. The presence of Ag nanoparticles in the films was also evidenced from the appearance of a strong optical absorption band associated with surface plasmon resonance. This band was widened and its peak shifted from 425 nm to 700 nm as the number of laser pulses was increased from 500 to 15,000.

  6. Facile and fast synthesis of SnS2 nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, J.; Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Krishnan, B.; Avellaneda, D.; Shaji, S.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of tin disulfide (SnS2) were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) technique. Effects of different liquid media and ablation wavelengths on the morphology and optical properties of the nanoparticles were studied. Nd: YAG laser wavelengths of 532 nm and 1064 nm (frequency 10 Hz and pulse width 10 ns) were used to irradiate SnS2 target immersed in liquid for the synthesis of SnS2 nanoparticles. Here PLAL was a fast synthesis technique, the ablation was only for 30 s. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the SnS2 NPs. TEM images showed that the liquid medium and laser wavelength influence the morphology of the NPs. SAED patterns and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) images confirmed the crystallinity of the particles. XRD and XPS analyses confirmed that SnS2 NPs were having exact crystalline structure and chemical states as that of the target. Raman analysis also supported the results obtained by XRD and XPS. Optical band gaps of the nanocolloids evaluated from their UV-vis absorption spectra were 2.4-3.05 eV. SnS2 NPs were having luminescence spectra in the blue-green region irrespective of the liquid media and ablation wavelength.

  7. Growth and structural properties of pulsed laser-ablated CuInSe2 nanoparticles by pulsed-laser ablation and selenization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, A.R.; Jo, W.; Ko, C.; Han, M.; Kang, S.J.; Kim, M.; Park, D.Y.; Cheong, H.; Yun, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Pulsed laser ablated CuInSe 2 (CIS) nanoparticles show diverse structure for selenization. → Raman spectra show structural changes of CIS nanoparicles after selenization at different temperatures. → The A 1 mode 176 cm -1 indicates the chalcopyrite phase and coexistence with the CuAu-ordered phase. → Sphalerite structure with In 2 Se 3 is found at 182 cm -1 overlapped with the A 1 mode. → HR-TEM confirms the chalcopyrite structure in the nanoparticles. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of CuInSe 2 (CIS) were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation. The effect of the preparation conditions on the structural properties of the CIS nanoparticles was investigated. The CIS nanoparticles showed a more developed structural property after treatment in Se-evaporated atmosphere. By X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, increase of Se amounts in the CIS nanoparticles was confirmed. Enhancement of phonon modes in the CIS nanoparticles was observed in Raman scattering spectroscopy while secondary phases like In 2 Se 3 or CuAu structure-related peak were identified in the spectra. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicated that the individual nanoparticles were embedded in matrix of some amorphous layers and diffraction patterns representing the chalcopyrite structure were also scrutinized.

  8. Plasma characterization of cross-beam pulsed-laser ablation used for carbon thin film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of the interaction between two delayed plasmas induced by cross-beam pulsed-laser ablation was analyzed by fast photography using narrow interference filters. In this configuration, two perpendicular rotating carbon targets were ablated by two synchronized laser beams generating two interacting plasma plumes. A Nd: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (1064 nm) laser beam is focused onto a target generating a highly directed plume; subsequently an excimer laser (248 nm) produces a second perpendicular plasma, which expands through the plume region generated by the first laser. In the cross-beam configuration, collision processes cause a reduction in the C II ion kinetic energy from ∼ 110 to 35 eV; moreover, the species of the second plasma which travel on the normal direction to the target surface (toward the substrate) are mainly C II. Interaction between plasmas has been compared with laser-induced plume propagation through a background gas in terms to the drag model. Carbon thin films were deposited by the cross-beam technique for different delays between lasers. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the changes in the bonding carbon films as a function of the kinetic energy of ablated C ions

  9. Nickel Nanoparticles Production using Pulsed Laser Ablation under Pressurized CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Mardiansyah; Takada, Noriharu; Machmudah, Siti; Diono, Wahyu; Kanda, Hideki; Sasaki, Koichi; Goto, Motonobu

    2014-10-01

    We used nickel (Ni) plate as a target and irradiated pulse laser ablation with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm under pressurized CO2. The Ni plate was ablated at various pressure (5-15 MPa), temperature (15-80°), and irradiation time (3-30 min). The method successfully generated Ni nanoparticles in various shape and size. Generated Ni nanoparticles collected on a Si wafer and the ablated Ni plate were analyzed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). With changing pressure and temperature, the structures of Ni nanoparticles also changed. The shape of generated particles is sphere-like structure with diameter around 10--100 nm. Also it was observed that a network structure of smaller particles was fabricated. The mechanism of nanoparticles fabrication could be explained as follows. Ablated nickel plate melted during the ablation process and larger particles formed, then ejected smaller spherical nanoparticles, which formed nanoclusters attached on the large particles. This morphology of particles was also observed for gold and silver nanoparticles with same condition. Further, the optical emission intensity from ablation plasma and the volume of the ablated crater were also examined under pressurized CO2.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of brass in a dry and liquid-confined environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Vaheed, Hamza; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2013-02-01

    The effect of ambient environment (dry or wet) and overlapping laser pulses on the laser ablation performance of brass has been investigated. For this purpose, a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm, pulse energy of 150 mJ, pulse width of 6 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz is employed. In order to explore the effect of ambient environments, brass targets have been exposed in deionized water, methanol and air. The targets are exposed for 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 succeeding pulses in each atmosphere. The surface morphology and chemical composition of ablated targets have been characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) techniques. In case of liquid environment, various features like nano- and micro-scale laser-induced periodic surface structures with periodicity 500 nm-1 μm, cavities of size few micrometers with multiple ablative layers and phenomenon of thermal stress cracking are observed. These features are originated by various chemical and thermal phenomena induced by laser heating at the liquid-solid interfaces. The convective bubble motion, explosive boiling, pressure gradients, cluster and colloid formation due to confinement effects of liquids are possible cause for such kind of features. The metal oxides and alcohol formed on irradiated surface are also playing the significant role for the formation of these kinds of structure. In case of air one huge crater is formed along with the redeposition of sputtered material and is ascribed to laser-induced evaporation and oxide formation.

  11. Ablation spot area and impulse characteristics of polymers induced by burst irradiation of 1 μm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Hisashi; Dondelewski, Oskar; Katagiri, Yusuke; Wang, Bin; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2017-07-01

    The ablation spot area and impulse characteristics of various polymers were experimentally investigated against burst irradiation of Nd: YLF laser pulses with a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, wavelength of 1047 nm, temporal pulse width of 10 ns, and single-pulse fluence of 6.1 J/cm2 to 17.1 J/cm2. The dependences of ablation area on the pulse energy from 0.72 to 7.48 mJ and the number of pulses from 10 pulses to 1000 pulses were investigated. In order to characterize their impulse performance as a function of fluence, which should not depend on ablation material, an effective ablation spot area was defined as that obtained against aluminum, 1050 A, as the reference material. An impulse that resulted from a single burst of 200 pulses was measured with a torsion-type impulse stand. Various impulse dependences on the fluence, which were not readily predicted from the optical properties of the material without ablation, were obtained. By fitting the experimentally measured impulse performance to Phipps and Sinko's model in the vapor regime, the effective absorption coefficient with laser ablation was evaluated, thereby resulting in three to six orders of magnitude larger than that without ablation. Among the polymers examined using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the best volume absorbers, the highest momentum coupling coefficient of 66 μNs/J was obtained with an effective absorption coefficient more than six times smaller than that of the other polymers.

  12. Fabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles with pulsed laser ablation under pressurized CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machmudah, Siti; Wahyudiono; Takada, Noriharu; Kanda, Hideki; Sasaki, Koichi; Goto, Motonobu

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has become a promising method for the synthesis of nanoclusters for photonics, electronics and medicine. In this work PLA in pressurized CO2 has been applied for fabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures (0.1-20 MPa), temperatures (40-80 °C) of CO2 medium and ablation times (1500-9000 s). On the basis of the experimental result, it follows that structures of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles were significantly affected by the changes in CO2 density. The structures of gold and silver nanoparticles also changed with an increase of ablation time. From a field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the fabricated gold nano-structured particles on silicon wafer, it was seen that a network structure of smaller gold particles was fabricated. A similar morphology of particles fabricated from silver plate was observed. Silver particles contain nanoparticles with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The mechanism of nanoparticles fabrication could be observed as follows. Bigger gold/silver particles melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical nanoparticles, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten particles.

  13. CuInGaSe{sub 2} nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendivil, M.I.; García, L.V. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, 66455 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, 66455 (Mexico); CIIDIT—Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); Avellaneda, D. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, 66455 (Mexico); and others

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • CIGS nanocolloids were synthesized using PLAL technique. • Characterized their morphology, structure, composition and optical properties. • Morphologies were dependent on ablation wavelength and liquid medium. • Optical absorption and bandgap of these nanocolloids were tunable. - Abstract: Pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium (PLALM) is a nanofabrication technique to produce complex nanostructures. CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) is an alloy with applications in photovoltaic industry. In this work, we studied the effects of laser ablation wavelength, energy fluence and liquid medium on the properties of the CIGS nanoparticles synthesized by PLALM. The nanoparticles obtained were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. XPS results confirmed the chemical states and composition of the ablated products. TEM analysis showed different morphologies for the nanomaterials obtained in different liquid media and ablation wavelengths. The optical properties for these CIGS nanocolloids were analyzed using UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. The results demonstrated the use of PLALM as a useful synthesis technique for nanoparticles of quaternary photovoltaic materials.

  14. Fabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles with pulsed laser ablation under pressurized CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machmudah, Siti; Wahyudiono; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu; Takada, Noriharu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has become a promising method for the synthesis of nanoclusters for photonics, electronics and medicine. In this work PLA in pressurized CO 2 has been applied for fabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures (0.1–20 MPa), temperatures (40–80 °C) of CO 2 medium and ablation times (1500–9000 s). On the basis of the experimental result, it follows that structures of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles were significantly affected by the changes in CO 2 density. The structures of gold and silver nanoparticles also changed with an increase of ablation time. From a field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the fabricated gold nano-structured particles on silicon wafer, it was seen that a network structure of smaller gold particles was fabricated. A similar morphology of particles fabricated from silver plate was observed. Silver particles contain nanoparticles with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The mechanism of nanoparticles fabrication could be observed as follows. Bigger gold/silver particles melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical nanoparticles, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten particles. (paper)

  15. Green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by excimer pulsed laser ablation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Van Overschelde

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pure selenium nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Liquid Phase - Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA in de-ionized water. Excimer laser (248 nm operating at low fluence (F ∼ 1 J/cm2 was used to generate colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles. The obtained selenium nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We describe the multi-modal size distributions generated and use the centrifugation method to isolate the smallest nanoparticles (∼60 nm in diameter.

  16. Processing condition influence on the characteristics of gold nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikov, R.G., E-mail: rosen_nikov@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Nikolov, A.S.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, Building 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Karashanova, D.B. [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, Building 109, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2013-06-01

    A study is presented of Au nanoparticles (NPs) created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a solid target in double distilled water. The influence was examined of the laser wavelength on the size, shape and optical properties of the resulting NPs. Three different wavelengths: the fundamental (λ = 1064 nm), second (λ{sub SHG} = 532) and third (λ{sub THG} = 355) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at the same fluence were utilized to produce various colloids. Ablation at the wavelength of 532 nm was investigated in more detail to reveal the influence of self-absorption by the already created NPs on their characteristics. The colloid produced was irradiated by λ{sub irrad} = 532 nm (laser energy 40 mJ) at different times up to 25 min after the end of ablation. The initial structure of welded NPs forming wires was modified. Transmission electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements were used to evaluate the shape and size distribution of the NPs.

  17. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  18. Fluid simulation of plume head-on collision dynamics during pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, R; Doi, K; Yokoyama, Y; Sugimura, A; Tominaga, N; Susa, H; Umezu, I; Fukuoka, H

    2013-01-01

    Expansion dynamics of plume after irradiation of the target material is essential to prepare nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation and it can be modified by collision of two plumes. In the present paper, effect of head-on collision on the expansion dynamics is discussed by numerical simulation based on the fluid dynamics and compared with the experimental results of plume emission. Suppression of plumes by collision with counter plume observed by experiment is reproduced by numerical simulation. Results of the numerical calculation indicate that shockwave induced by the irradiation of the opposite target suppress vapor expansion. The vapors do not mix around the center of the targets when the two targets are irradiated simultaneously and unstable flow is seen when delay between laser pulses was applied for irradiation of two targets. The results of the numerical simulation suggest that formation of combined and alloy nanoparticles are expected for former and latter cases

  19. Investigation of Ag nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, A.S.; Nedyalkov, N.N.; Nikov, R.G.; Atanasov, P.A. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Electronics, Sofia (Bulgaria); Alexandrov, M.T. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Sofia (Bulgaria); Karashanova, D.B. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2012-11-15

    A study is presented of the properties of Ag nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in twice-distilled water. An Ag target was immersed in the liquid and irradiated by the fundamental, second, third and fourth harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser system to create different colloids. Two specific boundary values of the laser fluence were applied for each wavelength. The properties of the nanoparticles at different wavelengths of the laser radiation were examined. The characterization of the colloids was performed immediately after their fabrication. Spherical and spherical-like shapes of the nanoparticles created were established. The formation of nanowires was observed when the second and the third harmonics of the laser were used. It is connected with self-absorption of the incident laser light from the already-created nanoparticles and depends also on the laser fluence. The size distribution of the nanoparticles is estimated by transmission electron microscopy. Generally, their mean size and standard deviation decreased as the wavelength of the incident laser light was increased and increased with the increase of the laser fluence. The substantial discrepancy between the results already commented on for both characteristics considered and others, obtained by dynamic light scattering, is discussed. The structure of the nanoparticles was established to be single and polycrystalline, and the phase composition in both cases is identified as consisting of cubic silver. The nanoparticles are slightly oxidized. (orig.)

  20. Opacity and atomic analysis of double pulse laser ablated Li plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-09-01

    Opacity effects for neutral and ionic emission lines of lithium have been investigated by Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS). Line ratios and opacity corrected photon emissivity coefficients are calculated over a wide range of electron temperatures and densities. The experimentally measured temporal evolution of the line profiles of the over dense Li plasma formed in the double pulse laser ablation experiment have been explained using the ADAS analysis and the plasma parameters of the plasma plume under consideration have been estimated. These results could be projected as a diagnostic tool to estimate plasma parameters of an over dense lithium plasma.

  1. CO2-laser ablation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide by millisecond pulse lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskoob, M.; Honda, T.; Safari, A.; Wachtman, J. B.; Danforth, S.; Wilkens, B. J.

    1990-03-01

    We have achieved ablation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide from single targets of superconducting pellets by CO2-laser pulses of l ms length to grow superconducting thin films. Upon annealing, the 6000-Å thin films have a Tc (onset) of 90 K and zero resistance at 78 K. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate the growth of single-phase thin films. This technique allows growth of uniform single-phase superconducting thin films of lateral area greater than 1 cm2.

  2. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  3. Ablation of carious dental tissue using an ultrashort pulsed laser (USPL) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbach, Christoph; Dehn, Claudia; Bourauel, Christoph; Meister, Jörg; Frentzen, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficiency of caries removal employing an ultrashort pulsed laser (USPL) and to compare the results regarding to the ablation rate of sound enamel and dentin including surface texture. The study was performed with 59 freshly extracted carious human teeth. Two cavities with an edge length of 1 × 1 mm per tooth were created: one in the dental decay and one in sound hard tissue. For this purpose a 9-W Nd:YVO4 laser with a center wavelength of 1,064 nm and a pulse duration of 8 ps at a repetition rate of 500 kHz was used. A scanner system moved the laser beam across the surface with a scan speed of 2,000 mm/s. Ablated volume and roughness R z of the cavity ground were measured using an optical profilometer. Subsequently, the specimens were cut to undecalcified sections for histological investigations. The removal of dental decay (dentin, 14.9 mm(3)/min; enamel, 12.8 mm(3)/min) was significantly higher (p dental decay using the USPL system, caries removal seems to be much more efficient for cavity preparation.

  4. Laser ablation of lysozyme with UV, visible and infrared femto- and nanosecond pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea; Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Constantinescu, Catalin; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.; Dinescu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lysozyme is an interesting molecule for laser ablation of organic materials, because the ablation has been comprehensively studied, it is a medium heavy molecule with a mass of 14305 Da, which can be detected by standard techniques, and because it is used as a bactericidal protein in the food industry. Lysozyme molecules do not absorb energy for wavelengths above 310 nm, but nevertheless there is a strong mass loss by ablation for laser irradiation in the visible regime. The total ablation yi...

  5. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in microfluidics for synthesis of photoluminescent ZnSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao, E-mail: chaoyangscu@gmail.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Feng, Guoying, E-mail: guoing_feng@scu.edu.cn [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dai, Shenyu, E-mail: 232127079@qq.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wang, Shutong, E-mail: wangshutong.scu@gmail.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: 632524844@qq.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhang, Hua [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhou, Shouhuan, E-mail: zhoush@scu.edu.cn [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); North China Research Institute of Electro-Optics, 4 Jiuxianqiao Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100015 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • A novel method for synthesis and coating of quantum dots by ultrafast laser pulses. • Mild and “green” synthesis method without toxic chemicals. • Enhanced bright green light emission without doped transition metal ions. • Ultrafast laser and coating layer enhanced the emission originated from defects. - Abstract: A simple but new toxic chemical free method, Femtosecond Laser Ablation in Microfluidics (FLAM) was proposed for the first time. ZnSe quantum dots of 4–6 nm were synthesized and with the use of hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine (PEI) as both structural and functional coated layer. These aqueous nanosized micelles consisting of quantum dots exhibit deep defect states emission of bright green light centered at 500 nm. A possible mechanism for the enhanced board band emission was discussed. The properties of toxic matters free and enhanced photoluminescence without doped transition metal ions demonstrate an application potential for biomedical imaging.

  6. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in microfluidics for synthesis of photoluminescent ZnSe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chao; Feng, Guoying; Dai, Shenyu; Wang, Shutong; Li, Guang; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method for synthesis and coating of quantum dots by ultrafast laser pulses. • Mild and “green” synthesis method without toxic chemicals. • Enhanced bright green light emission without doped transition metal ions. • Ultrafast laser and coating layer enhanced the emission originated from defects. - Abstract: A simple but new toxic chemical free method, Femtosecond Laser Ablation in Microfluidics (FLAM) was proposed for the first time. ZnSe quantum dots of 4–6 nm were synthesized and with the use of hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine (PEI) as both structural and functional coated layer. These aqueous nanosized micelles consisting of quantum dots exhibit deep defect states emission of bright green light centered at 500 nm. A possible mechanism for the enhanced board band emission was discussed. The properties of toxic matters free and enhanced photoluminescence without doped transition metal ions demonstrate an application potential for biomedical imaging.

  7. Improving adhesion of copper/epoxy joints by pulsed laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez, Edwin

    2015-10-19

    The purpose of the present work is to analyze the effect of pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) deployed for adhesive bonding. Surface pre-treatment was carried using an Yb-fiber laser beam. Treated surfaces were probed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The mechanical performance of CuZn40/epoxy bonded joints was assessed using the T-peel test coupon. In order to resolve the mechanisms of failure and adhesive penetration within surface asperities induced by the laser treatment, fracture surfaces were surveyed using SEM. Finite element simulations, based on the use of the cohesive zone model of fracture, were carried out to evaluate the variation of bond toughness. Results indicated that the laser ablation process effectively modifies surface morphology and chemistry and enables enhanced mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy and bond toughness were observed with respect to control samples with sanded substrates.

  8. Influence of water layer thickness on hard tissue ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Liu, Haishan; Zhao, Haibin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2012-03-01

    The theory of hard tissue ablation reported for IR lasers is based on a process of thermomechanical interaction, which is explained by the absorption of the radiation in the water component of the tissue. The microexplosion of the water is the cause of tissue fragments being blasted from hard tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the interdependence of water layer thickness and incident radiant exposure on ablation performance. A total of 282 specimens of bovine shank bone were irradiated with a pulse CO2 laser. Irradiation was carried out in groups: without a water layer and with a static water layer of thickness ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups for different radiant exposures ranging from 18 to 84 J/cm2, respectively. The incision geometry, surface morphology, and microstructure of the cut walls as well as thermal injury were examined as a function of the water layer thickness at different radiant exposures. Our results demonstrate that the additional water layer is actually a mediator of laser-tissue interaction. There exists a critical thickness of water layer for a given radiant exposure, at which the additional water layer plays multiple roles, not only acting as a cleaner to produce a clean cut but also as a coolant to prevent bone heating and reduce thermal injury, but also helping to improve the regularity of the cut shape, smooth the cut surface, and enhance ablation rate and efficiency. The results suggest that desired ablation results depend on optimal selection of both water layer thickness and radiant exposure.

  9. SERS activity of silver and gold nanostructured thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, N. R.; Tommasini, M.; Fazio, E.; Neri, F.; Ponterio, R. C.; Trusso, S.; Ossi, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured Au and Ag thin films were obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. Keeping constant other deposition parameters such as target-to-substrate distance, incidence angle, laser wavelength and laser fluence, the film morphology, revealed by SEM, ranges from isolated NPs to island structures and sensibly depends on gas pressure (10-100 Pa) and on the laser pulse number (500-3 × 10). The control of these two parameters allows tailoring the morphology and correspondingly the optical properties of the films. The position and width of the surface plasmon resonance peak, in fact, can be varied with continuity. The films showed remarkable surface-enhanced Raman activity (SERS) that depends on the adopted deposition conditions. Raman maps were acquired on micrometer-sized areas of both silver and gold substrates selected among those with the strongest SERS activity. Organic dyes of interest in cultural heritage studies (alizarin, purpurin) have been also considered for bench marking the substrates produced in this work. Also the ability to detect the presence of biomolecules was tested using lysozyme in a label free configuration.

  10. [Delivery of megawatts high energy laser pulse with large core diameter silica fiber and its application in dual-wavelength laser-ablation laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Peng, Fei-Fei; Li, Run-Hua; Chen, Yu-Qi; Yang, Xue-Jiao

    2013-12-01

    To resolve the contradiction between spatial resolution and analysis sensitivity in single pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a study on dual-wavelength laser-ablation laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LA-LIBS) was carried out by using one Nd : YAG laser which was capable of two laser beam outputs with different wavelengths, where, the second harmonic output, 532 nm laser beam, was used as laser-ablation source, and the fundamental output, 1064 nm laser beam, was delivered with a large core diameter silica fiber to realize nanoseconds time-delay and then used to breakdown the ablated samples. Two laser beams were orthogonally arranged to realize element analysis with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Some key techniques on the coupling of 1064 nm laser beam into fiber, the collimation of laser at the fiber end and re-focusing of the laser beam were studied. The energy delivery capabilities of four fibers of different types were studied and the maximum values were determined experimentally. A Q-switched laser pulse with 15 mJ pulse energy was successfully delivered by selecting a 50 meter long silica fiber with 800 microm core diameter and 0. 39 numerical aperture. And 250 ns time-delay was realized. A copper alloy was analyzed by spectra with current established LA-LIBS system and the possibility of realizing dual-wavelength LA-LIBS analysis based on one Nd : YAG laser was demonstrated experimentally. In this technique, only one Nd: YAG laser was required to carry out spectral analysis. It has a few advantages, such as simple equipment structure, and being convenient to miniaturize the whole system etc. This dual-wavelength LA-LIBS technique was suitable for in-situ elements microanalysis for different samples with both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  11. Resonant ablation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, N R; Komlenok, M S; Kononenko, V V; Pashinin, V P; Pozharov, A S; Konov, V I; Obraztsova, E D

    2015-01-01

    The thin 50 nm film of bundled arc-discharge single-wall carbon nanotubes was irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths 675, 1350 and 1745 nm corresponding to the absorption band of metallic nanotubes E 11 M , to the background absorption and to the absorption band of semiconducting nanotubes E 11 S , respectively. The aim was to induce a selective removal of nanotubes of specific type from the bundled material. Similar to conducted thermal heating experiments, the effect of laser irradiation results in suppression of all radial breathing modes in the Raman spectra, with preferential destruction of the metallic nanotubes with diameters less than 1.26 nm and of the semiconducting nanotubes with diameters 1.36 nm. However, the etching rate of different nanotubes depends on the wavelength of the laser irradiation. It is demonstrated that the relative content of nanotubes of different chiralities can be tuned by a resonant laser ablation of undesired nanotube fraction. The preferential etching of the resonant nanotubes has been shown for laser wavelengths 675 nm (E 11 M ) and 1745 nm (E 11 S ). (paper)

  12. Structural and nonlinear optical characterizations of ZnS/ PVP nanocomposites synthesized by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divyasree, M. C.; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2017-05-01

    ZnS/Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone nanocomposites were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation at ambient conditions using an Nd: YAG laser at 532 nm wavelength and 7ns pulse width. Linear optical characterizations were done using UV-Vis spectrophotometer and fluorometer. Both absorption and emission peaks were found to be blue shifted, which could be due to quantum confinement effect. Spherical morphology and the purity in the elemental composition of the sample were confirmed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer respectively. Average particle size of the ZnS nanoparticles was found to be 13.45 nm from the Gaussian fitted histogram of transmission electron Microscopy image and the structure was confirmed as hexagonal wurtzite by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nonlinear optical parameters were figured out by z scan analysis with the same laser system. The nanocomposite showed good absorptive and refractive properties in the nonlinear optical regime. Detailed study of the nanocomposite revealed its potential applications in optoelectronics and nonlinear optical device fabrication.

  13. Production of meloxicam suspension using pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Béla; Nagy, Eszter; Peták, Franciska; Smausz, Tomi; Kopniczky, Judit; Tápai, Csaba; Budai, Judit; Papp, Ibolya Zita; Kukovecz, Ákos; Ambrus, Rita; Szabó-Révész, Piroska

    2018-04-01

    Organic particles in the micrometer/nanometer size range can find applications in various fields. Unfortunately their production is not a straightforward task for a number of materials. In the present work the production of meloxicam particles in the micrometer range was aimed with the help of pulsed laser ablation in liquid environment (PLAL). Targets pressed from crystalline meloxicam powder were placed in distilled water and irradiated with a focused beam of a frequency doubled (532 nm) nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 4.2–9.4 J cm‑2 fluence. Morphological investigation showed that the produced suspension contained particles in the ~100 nm to 10 µm size range (1.0–2.0 µm on average), which is about 10 times smaller than the size of the initial material. FTIR spectroscopic investigations demonstrated that the chemical composition was preserved, while x-ray diffraction and calorimetric measurements indicated partial amorphization of meloxicam during the process. The overall results suggest that the particles are mostly produced by the fragmentation of the pressed target by the recoil forces induced by the laser pulse. Long period sedimentation tests of the suspension combined with UV–vis spectroscopic analysis showed that by the method of PLAL a greater fraction of the poorly water soluble meloxicam could be dispersed and dissolved in water in a pharmaceutically preferred formation than by simple dissolution of it.

  14. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94  μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700  nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053  nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18  J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15  mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3  μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18  J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates. PMID:25200394

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of silver foil with single and double pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available /apsusc r ablation of silver foil with single and double pulses, Appl. Surf. D.E. Roberts et al. / Applied Surface Science xxx (2009) xxx–xxx2 G Model APSUSC-19322; No of Pages 9 pulses used for ablation. While there has been much overlap in the aims... value r ablation of silver foil with single and double pulses, Appl. Surf. ; lon D.E. Roberts et al. / Applied Surface Science xxx (2009) xxx–xxx 3 G Model APSUSC-19322; No of Pages 9 Fig. 1. Surface temperature versus time calculated for double...

  16. Polymerization of Monomers Initiated by Silyl Centers in SiO Deposits Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dřínek, Vladislav; Vacek, Karel; Juzhakov, Gleb; Brus, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 5 (2006), s. 4488-4492 ISSN 0021-8995 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : pulsed laser ablation * surface defect * polymerization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.306, year: 2006

  17. Processing conditions in pulsed laser ablation of gold in liquid for fabrication of nanowire networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, A.S., E-mail: anastas_nikolov@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Nedyalkov, N.N.; Nikov, R.G.; Dimitrov, I.G.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Maximova, K.; Delaporte, Ph.; Kabashin, A. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 Laboratory, Marseille 13288 (France); Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Karashanova, D.B. [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 109, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2014-05-01

    The experimental conditions were investigated enabling one to fabricate Au nanowire networks by pulsed laser ablation in water. The study revealed that it is possible to produce alternatively nanoparticles (or aggregates) or nanowire networks at certain wavelengths depending on the laser fluence. An Au disc immersed in double-distilled water was used as a target. The second (λ{sub SHG} = 532 nm) and the third (λ{sub THG} = 355 nm) harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser system were utilized to produce different Au colloids. The values of the laser fluence for both wavelengths under the experimental conditions chosen were varied from several J/cm{sup 2} to tens of J/cm{sup 2}. The optical extinction spectra of the colloids in the UV/vis region were obtained to evaluate the structure of the dispersed Au phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to visualize the size and morphology of the colloidal particles. Their structure and phase composition were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and used to make an assumption on how they had been formed.

  18. Synthesis and properties of palladium nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendivil, M.I. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); Castillo, G.A. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Pd nanoparticle colloids were synthesized using PLAL technique. • Characterized by TEM, XPS and UV–vis spectroscopy. • Average size distribution was affected by different liquid media. • Laser post-irradiation was effective to regain optical properties. • Ultrasonic treatment helped to regain the optical properties. - Abstract: Pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) as a prominent technique for nanofabrication was employed to synthesize palladium (Pd) nanoparticles in different liquids. The synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was developed using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with its fundamental wavelength output of 1064 nm (10 Hz, 10 ns) in a range of energy fluence (40.5–8 J/cm{sup 2}). Pure Pd metal target was immersed in distilled water, methanol–water mixture (1:1) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to study the effect of the nature of the liquid media. Laser post-irradiation and ultrasonic treatments were applied to the precipitated colloidal solution to investigate their effects on the re-dispersion and stability. The mean size, size distributions, shape, elemental composition, optical properties and stability of nanoparticles synthesized by PLAL were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. TEM characterizations showed smaller nanoparticles in methanol–water mixture in comparison with the other liquids. Spherical morphology was observed for Pd nanoparticles synthesized in distilled water and methanol–water mixture. In the case of SDS, spherical nanoparticles embedded on the surfactant were observed. The effect of energy fluence was different for each liquid media. Laser post-irradiation and ultrasonic agitation worked as efficient methods to re-disperse the precipitates of NPs and to recover their optical properties.

  19. Catalytic Activity of Silicon Nanowires Decorated with Gold and Copper Nanoparticles Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Casiello

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires (SiNWs decorated by pulsed laser ablation with gold or copper nanoparticles (labeled as AuNPs@SiNWs and CuNPs@SiNWs were investigated for their catalytic properties. Results demonstrated high catalytic performances in the Caryl–N couplings and subsequent carbonylations for gold and copper catalysts, respectively, that have no precedents in the literature. The excellent activity, attested by the very high turn over number (TON values, was due both to the uniform coverage along the NW length and to the absence of the chemical shell surrounding the metal nanoparticles (MeNPs. A high recyclability was also observed and can be ascribed to the strong covalent interaction at the Me–Si interface by virtue of metal “silicides” formation.

  20. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm by pure selenium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Lara, Humberto H; Mendoza-Cruz, Ruben; Naranjo, Guillermo; Vincent, Brandy A; Peralta, Xomalin G; Nash, Kelly L

    2017-04-01

    Selenoproteins play an important role in the human body by accomplishing essential biological functions like oxido-reductions, antioxidant defense, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune response; therefore, the possibility to synthesize selenium nanoparticles free of any contaminants is exciting for future nano-medical applications. This paper reports the first synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in de-ionized water. Those pure nanoparticles have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of Candida albicans biofilms. Advanced electron microscopy images showed that selenium nanoparticles easily adhere on the biofilm, then penetrate into the pathogen, and consequently damage the cell structure by substituting with sulfur. 50% inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm was obtained at only 25 ppm. Finally, the two physical parameters proved to affect strongly the viability of Candida albicans are the crystallinity and particle size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deposition of high Tc superconductor thin films by pulsed excimer laser ablation and their post-synthesis processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogale, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the use of pulsed excimer laser ablation technique for deposition of high quality superconductor thin films on different substrate materials such as Y stabilized ZrO 2 , SrTiO 3 , LiNbO 3 , Silicon and Stainless Steels, and dopant incorporation during the film depositions. Processing of deposited films using ion and laser beams for realisation of device features are presented. 28 refs., 16 figs

  2. Combination of Q-switched and quasi long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser, non-ablative 1450-nm diode laser, and ablative 10 600-nm carbon dioxide fractional laser for enlarged pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Bin; Noh, Seongmin; Lee, Sang Ju; Kang, Jin Moon; Kim, Young Koo; Lee, Ju Hee

    2010-07-01

    Currently, there is no gold standard for the treatment of enlarged facial pores. In this report, we describe a patient with enlarged nasal pores which were treated with a combination of a non-ablative 1450-nm diode laser, a Q-switched and quasi long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser, and an ablative 10 600-nm carbon dioxide fractional laser system. Four months after the final treatment, the condition of the patient's pores had markedly improved, and the patient was satisfied with the results.

  3. Zinc oxide nanocolloids prepared by picosecond pulsed laser ablation in water at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Luisa; Spadaro, Salvatore; Bonsignore, Martina; Santangelo, Saveria; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Neri, Fortunato; Fazio, Enza

    2018-01-01

    Zinc oxide with wide direct band gap and high exciton binding energy is one of the most promising materials for ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting devices. It further exhibits good performance in the degradation of non-biodegradable pollutants under UV irradiation. In this work, zinc oxide (ZnO) and zinc oxide/gold (ZnO/Au) nanocolloids are prepared by picosecond pulsed laser ablation (ps-PLA), using a Zn and Au metallic targets in water media at room temperature (RT) and 80°C. ZnO and Au nanoparticles (NPs) with size in the 10-50 nm range are obtained at RT, while ZnO nanorods (NRs) are formed when water is maintained at 80°C during the ps-PLA process. Au NPs, added to ZnO colloids after the ablation process, decorate ZnO NRs. The crystalline phase of all ZnO nanocolloids is wurtzite. Methylene blue dye is used to investigate the photo-catalytic activity of all the synthesised nanocolloids, under UV light irradiation.

  4. Thermodynamic pathways to melting, ablation, and solidification in absorbing solids under pulsed laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorazo, Patrick; Lewis, Laurent J.; Meunier, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathways involved in laser irradiation of absorbing solids are investigated in silicon for pulse durations of 500 fs and 100 ps. This is achieved by accounting for carrier and atom dynamics within a combined Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics scheme and simultaneously tracking the time evolution of the irradiated material in ρ-T-P space. Our simulations reveal thermal changes in long-range order and state of aggregation driven, in most cases, by nonequilibrium states of rapidly heated or promptly cooled matter. Under femtosecond irradiation near the ablation threshold, the system is originally pulled to a near-critical state following rapid ( -12 s) disordering of the mechanically unstable crystal and isochoric heating of the resulting metallic liquid. The latter is then adiabatically cooled to the liquid-vapor regime where phase explosion of the subcritical, superheated melt is initiated by a direct conversion of translational, mechanical energy into surface energy on a ∼10 -12 -10 -11 s time scale. At higher fluences, matter removal involves, instead, the fragmentation of an initially homogeneous fluid subjected to large strain rates upon rapid, supercritical expansion in vacuum. Under picosecond irradiation, homogeneous and, at later times, heterogeneous melting of the superheated solid are followed by nonisochoric heating of the molten metal. In this case, the subcritical liquid material is subsequently cooled onto the binodal by thermal conduction and explosive boiling does not take place; as a result, ablation is associated with a ''trivial'' fragmentation process, i.e., the relatively slow expansion and dissociation into liquid droplets of supercritical matter near thermodynamic equilibrium. This implies a liquid-vapor equilibration time of ∼10 -11 -10 -10 s and heating along the binodal under nanosecond irradiation. Solidification of the nonablated, supercooled molten material is eventually observed on a ∼10 -11 -10 -9 s time scale

  5. Ultrashort pulsed laser ablation for decollation of solid state lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hördemann, C.; Anand, H.; Gillner, A.

    2017-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries with liquid electrolytes are the main energy source for many electronic devices that we use in our everyday lives. However, one of the main drawbacks of this energy storage technology is the use of liquid electrolyte, which can be hazardous to the user as well as the environment. Moreover, lithium-ion batteries are limited in voltage, energy density and operating temperature range. One of the most novel and promising battery technologies available to overcome the above-mentioned drawbacks is the Solid-State Lithium-Ion Battery (SSLB). This battery type can be produced without limitations to the geometry and is also bendable, which is not possible with conventional batteries1 . Additionally, SSLBs are characterized by high volumetric and gravimetric energy density and are intrinsically safe since no liquid electrolyte is used2-4. Nevertheless, the manufacturing costs of these batteries are still high. The existing production-technologies are comparable to the processes used in the semiconductor industry and single cells are produced in batches with masked-deposition at low deposition rates. In order to decrease manufacturing costs and to move towards continuous production, Roll2Roll production methods are being proposed5, 6. These methods offer the possibility of producing large quantities of substrates with deposited SSLB-layers. From this coated substrate, single cells can be cut out. For the flexible decollation of SSLB-cells from the substrate, new manufacturing technologies have to be developed since blade-cutting, punching or conventional laser-cutting processes lead to short circuiting between the layers. Here, ultra-short pulsed laser ablation and cutting allows the flexible decollation of SSLBs. Through selective ablation of individual layers, an area for the cutting kerf is prepared to ensure a shortcut-free decollation.

  6. Two-phase zirconium boride thin film obtained by ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of a ZrB{sub 12} target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A., E-mail: angela.debonis@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 -85100 Potenza (Italy); Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, U.O.S. di Potenza, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, U.O.S. di Potenza, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, A. [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5 -00185 Rome (Italy); Mori, T. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) WPI Materials Nanoarchitectonics Center (MANA), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Medici, L. [Istituto di Metodologie per le Analisi Ambientali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, U.O.S. di Potenza, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Teghil, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 -85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Two-phase zirconium boride thin films have been obtained by ultra-short pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a zirconium dodecaboride (ZrB{sub 12}) target performed in vacuum. The ablation source was a frequency doubled (λ = 527 nm) Nd:glass laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs. Laser induced plasma has been studied by ICCD imaging and time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES), whereas the deposited films have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The film morphology and composition have been interpreted on the basis of the laser ablation mechanism.

  7. Morphology of ablation craters generated by ultra-short laser pulses in dentin surfaces: AFM and ESEM evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalova, A., E-mail: a_daskalova@code.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Bashir, S.; Husinsky, W. [IAP, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the surface morphology and structure of dentin after ablation by ultra-short pulses were evaluated using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The dentin specimens examined were irradiated by a chirped-pulse-amplification (CPA) Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm) and the optimal conditions for producing various nanostructures were determined. Based on the ESEM results, it was possible to identify an energy density range as the ablation threshold for dentin. The laser-induced damage was characterized over the fluence range 1.3-2.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrate that by selecting suitable parameters one can obtain efficient dentin surface preparation without evidence of thermal damage, i.e., with minimized heat affected zones and reduced collateral damage, the latter being normally characterized by formation of microcracks, grain growth and recrystallization in the heat affected zones.

  8. Structural and optical properties of surface-hydrogenated silicon nanocrystallites prepared by reactive pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Toshiharu; Inada, Mitsuru; Umezu, Ikurou; Sugimura, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in an inert background gas is a promising technique for preparing Si nanoparticles. Although an inert gas is appropriate for preparing pure material, a reactive background gas can be used to prepare compound nanoparticles. We performed PLA in hydrogen gas to prepare hydrogenated silicon nanoparticles. The mean diameter of the primary particles measured using transmission electron microscopy was approximately 5 nm. The hydrogen content in the deposits was very high and estimated to be about 20%. The infrared absorption corresponding to Si-H n (n = 1, 2, 3) bonds on the surface were observed at around 2100 cm -1 . The Raman scattering peak corresponding to crystalline Si was observed, and that corresponding to amorphous Si was negligibly small. These results indicate that the Si nanoparticles were not an alloy of Si and hydrogen but Si nanocrystallite (nc-Si) covered by hydrogen or hydrogenated amorphous silicon. This means that PLA in reactive H 2 gas is a promising technique for preparing surface passivated nc-Si. The deposition mechanism and optical properties of the surface passivated silicon nanocrystallites are discussed

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S. C.; Gopal, R.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects

  10. On the ex situ and in situ doping of refractory Ta by pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y.L.; Lin, S.S.; Shen, P. [National Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, S. [I-Shou University, Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-15

    Ex situ and in situ doping processes of refractory Ta were accomplished by pulsed laser ablation of bulk Ta in vacuum with C-O-H supply from C-coated collodion film and within tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), respectively. Analytical electron microscopic observations of the resultant particulates and condensates indicated that the former process involved interdiffusion in the condensed state to form two kinds of core-shell structures, i.e., C-O-H doped Ta with α-type (bcc) core and lamellar shell and O-H doped γ-TaC{sub 1-x} with amorphous Ta-C-O-H surrounding, respectively, for potential wear and lubrication applications at high temperatures. In situ TEOS mediation, however, enhanced solute trapping to form Si-C-O-H overdoped α-Ta with significant tetragonality (c/a ratio up to 1.27) and Si-O-H doped γ-TaC{sub 1-x} with {111}{sub γ} twin/fault and occasional epitaxial relationship [ anti 123]{sub α}//[ anti 112]{sub γ}; (121){sub α}//(anti 11 anti 1){sub γ} due to particle coalescence. Such Si-C-O-H mediated Ta particles may have potential optocatalytic applications. (orig.)

  11. Growth of anatase and rutile phase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Influence of surfactant addition and ablation time variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Amita, E-mail: amita-chaturvedi@rrcat.gov.in [Laser Material Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, MP (India); Joshi, M.P. [Laser Material Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, MP (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai – 400094 (India); Mondal, P.; Sinha, A.K.; Srivastava, A.K. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, MP (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Ablations of Ti metal target were carried out in DI water and in 0.001 M SDS solution for different times using PLAL process. • Different characterization studies have been carried out to confirm the growth of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in both the liquid mediums. • Anatase phase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained in DI water and rutile phase in 0.001 M SDS aqueous solution. • In surfactant solution, longer time ablation leads depletion of SDS molecules causes growth of anatase phase for 90 min. • Our studies confirmed the role of liquid ambience conditions variation over the different phase formations of nanoparticles. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were grown using nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ti target in DI water and in 0.001 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant aqueous solution. Growth was carried out with varying ablation times i. e. 30 min, 60 min and 90 min. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of variations in liquid ambience conditions on the growth of the nanoparticles in a pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) process. Size, composition and optical properties of the grown TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The obtained nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} were found almost spherical in shape and polycrystalline in nature in both the liquid mediums i.e. DI water and aqueous solution of surfactant. Nanoparticles number density was also found to increase with increasing ablation time in both the liquid mediums. However crystalline phase of the grown TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles differs with the change in liquid ambience conditions. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), PL and XRD studies suggest that DI water ambience is favorable for the growth of anatase phase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for all

  12. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  13. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Single 50 fs laser pulse ablation of an aluminium target in vacuum is investigated in our experiments. • Nanoparticles with large radii of several hundred nanometers are observed. • The nanoparticles are most likely from the mechanical tensile stress relaxation. - Abstract: Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm 2 to 0.63 J/cm 2 . The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium

  14. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  15. Physico-chemical properties of Pd nanoparticles produced by Pulsed Laser Ablation in different organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristoforetti, Gabriele; Pitzalis, Emanuela; Spiniello, Roberto; Ishak, Randa; Giammanco, Francesco; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Caporali, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles are arousing an increasing interest because of their strong activity in heterogeneous catalysis in a wide range of reactions. Driven by the interest of producing Pd nanoparticles to be deposited for catalysis over hydrophobic supports, we investigated their synthesis via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid in several organic solvents, as acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, toluene, n-hexane. The colloids were produced by using a Nd:YAG ns laser and without the addition of surfactant agents. The morphology, composition, stability and oxidation state of the obtained nanoparticles were investigated by TEM-EDS analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results evidence that the nature of the solvent influences both the yield and the physico-chemical properties of the produced nanoparticles. While in acetone and alcohols spheroidal, non aggregated and stable particles are obtained, in case of toluene and n-hexane few unstable particles surrounded by a gel-like material are produced. Raman/XPS measurements suggest the presence of amorphous or graphitic carbon onto crystalline Pd nanoparticles, which could have hindered their growth and determined the observed smaller sizes if compared to nanoparticles produced in water. The stability of Pd colloids obtained in acetone and alcohols was attributed to adsorbed anions like enolates or alcoholates; non polar solvents like toluene and n-hexane, unable to give rise to adsorbed anionic species, cannot provide any stabilization to the palladium nanoparticles. XPS analyses also evidenced a partial oxidation of particles surface, with a ratio Pd 2+ :Pd 0 of 1:2.5 and 1:4 in acetone and ethanol, respectively.

  16. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Effect of nonlinear light scattering in air on ablation of materials produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2002-05-01

    Nonlinear light scattering appearing upon air breakdown induced by high-power ultrashort pulses (110 — 5200 fs) from a Ti:Al2O3 laser is studied. As a result of forward scattering, the beam profile is severely deformed, which is accompanied by spectral conversion of the incident radiation to a series of shorter-wavelength peaks extending into the visible spectral range. Measurements are made of the thresholds and the scattered radiation energy, which amounts to 75% of the incident energy. The effect of scattering on the material ablation in air is investigated. The obtained data offer an explanation for the experimentally observed paradoxical morphology of the channels ablated by high-power femtosecond pulses.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of silver foil with single and double pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ¼ v2 2 ln E Eth � � (7) so that the waist v at the focus and hence the peak F = 2E/pv2 could be found from the slope of r20 versus ln(E). Absolute values of F were estimated to have an uncertainty of �15%. A Michelson interferometer, with one... was used to check the pulse separation for the Dazzler and the zero crossing of the pulse separation from the Michelson interferometer. 4. Results and discussion The average ablation depth per pulse to penetrate a 50 mm thick Ag foil as a function...

  18. Influence of Gas Sort on the Nucleation Region Width of Si Nanocrystal Grains Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zechao Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have calculated the nucleation region (NR location of Si nanocrystal grains prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA with fluence of 4 J/cm2 in 10 Pa gas at room temperature, and ambient gases were He, Ne, and Ar, respectively. Results of calculation indicated that NR width in Ne gas was narrowest, while it was widest in He gas. Maximum mean size of grains deposited on substrates under ablated spot, which were placed horizontally, was the smallest in Ne gas. It would be attribute to more effective energy transfer during the process of collision when atomic mass of Si and ambient gas Ne are more close to each other. In this work, an additional gas flow with the same element as ambient gas was introduced, which is vertical to the plume axis at different lateral positions above ablated spot.

  19. Influence of the shielding effect on the formation of a micro-texture on the cermet with nanosecond pulsed laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiandong; Liang, Liang; Jiang, Lelun; Liu, Xin

    2018-04-01

    The degree of laser pulse overlapping in a laser scanning path has a significant impact on the ablation regime in the laser machining of a micro-texture. In this Letter, a nanosecond pulsed laser is used to prepare the micro-scaled groove on WC-8Co cermet under different scanning speeds. It is observed that as the scanning speed increases, the ablated trace morphology in the first scanning pass transits from a succession of intermittent deep dimples to the consecutive overlapped shallow pits. The test result also indicates that ablated trace morphology with respect to the low scanning speed stems from a plume shielding effect. Moreover, the ablation regime considering the shielding effect in micro-groove formation process is clarified. The critical scanning speed that can circumvent the shielding effect is also summarized with respect to different laser powers.

  20. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  1. Preparation of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation: Ambient pressure dependence of crystallization

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubara, M; Yamaki, T; Itoh, H; Abe, H

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) with a KrF excimer laser was used to prepare fine particles of titanium dioxide (TiO sub 2). The ablation in an atmosphere of Ar and O sub 2 (5:5) at total pressures of >= 1 Torr led to the formation of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles composed of anatase and rutile structures without any suboxides. The weight fraction of the rutile/anatase crystalline phases was dependent on the pressure of the Ar/O sub 2 gas. The TiO sub 2 nanoparticles had a spherical shape and their size, ranging from 10 and 14 nm, also appeared to be dependent on the ambient pressure. (author)

  2. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  3. Keratin film ablation for the fabrication of brick and mortar skin structure using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Bibi Safia; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Dou, Yuehua; Alam, Khan; Attaullah, Shehnaz; Zari, Islam

    2015-09-01

    The patterning of thin keratin films has been explored to manufacture model skin surfaces based on the "bricks and mortar" view of the relationship between keratin and lipids. It has been demonstrated that laser light is capable of preparing keratin-based "bricks and mortar" wall structure as in epidermis, the outermost layer of the human skin. "Bricks and mortar" pattern in keratin films has been fabricated using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm wavelength) and femtosecond laser (800 and 400 nm wavelength). Due to the very low ablation threshold of keratin, femtosecond laser systems are practical for laser processing of proteins. These model skin structures are fabricated for the first time that will help to produce potentially effective moisturizing products for the protection of skin from dryness, diseases and wrinkles.

  4. Turnover rates in microorganisms by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and pulse-chase analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopka, Sylwia A.; Mansour, Tarek R.; Shrestha, Bindesh [Department of Chemistry, W.M. Keck Institute for Proteomics Technology and Applications, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Maréchal, Éric; Falconet, Denis [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale, UMR 5168, CEA-CNRS-INRA-Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France); Vertes, Akos, E-mail: vertes@gwu.edu [Department of Chemistry, W.M. Keck Institute for Proteomics Technology and Applications, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical processes rely on elaborate networks containing thousands of compounds participating in thousands of reaction. Rapid turnover of diverse metabolites and lipids in an organism is an essential part of homeostasis. It affects energy production and storage, two important processes utilized in bioengineering. Conventional approaches to simultaneously quantify a large number of turnover rates in biological systems are currently not feasible. Here we show that pulse-chase analysis followed by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) enable the simultaneous and rapid determination of metabolic turnover rates. The incorporation of ion mobility separation (IMS) allowed an additional dimension of analysis, i.e., the detection and identification of isotopologs based on their collision cross sections. We demonstrated these capabilities by determining metabolite, lipid, and peptide turnover in the photosynthetic green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in the presence of {sup 15}N-labeled ammonium chloride as the main nitrogen source. Following the reversal of isotope patterns in the chase phase by LAESI-IMS-MS revealed the turnover rates and half-lives for biochemical species with a wide range of natural concentrations, e.g., chlorophyll metabolites, lipids, and peptides. For example, the half-lives of lyso-DGTS(16:0) and DGTS(18:3/16:0), t{sub 1/2} = 43.6 ± 4.5 h and 47.6 ± 2.2 h, respectively, provided insight into lipid synthesis and degradation in this organism. Within the same experiment, half-lives for chlorophyll a, t{sub 1/2} = 24.1 ± 2.2 h, and a 2.8 kDa peptide, t{sub 1/2} = 10.4 ± 3.6 h, were also determined. - Highlights: • High-throughput pulse-chase analysis using direct sampling of biological cells. • Ion mobility separation for the elucidation of isotopologs. • Identification of isotopologs in difference heat plots of DT vs. m/z. • Simultaneous determination of turnover rates for lipids and

  5. Onset and evolution of laser induced periodic surface structures on indium tin oxide thin films for clean ablation using a repetitively pulsed picosecond laser at low fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, N.; Dasgupta, P.; O’Connor, G. M.

    2018-04-01

    The onset and evolution of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is of key importance to obtain clean ablated features on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films at low fluences. The evolution of subwavelength periodic nanostructures on a 175 nm thick ITO film, using 10 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1032 nm, operating at 400 kHz, is investigated. Initially nanoblisters are observed when a single pulse is applied below the damage threshold fluence (0.45 J cm‑2) the size and distribution of nanoblisters are found to depend on fluence. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations support the hypothesis that conductive nanoblisters can enhance the local intensity of the applied electromagnetic field. The LIPSS are observed to evolve from regions where the electric field enhancement has occurred; LIPSS has a perpendicular orientation relative to the laser polarization for a small number (pulses. The LIPSS periodicity depends on nanoblister size and distribution; a periodicity down to 100 nm is observed at the lower fluence periphery of the Gaussian irradiated area where nanoblisters are smallest and more closely arranged. Upon irradiation with successive (>5) pulses, the orientation of the periodic structures appears to rotate and evolve to become aligned in parallel with the laser polarization at approximately the same periodicity. These orientation effects are not observed at higher fluence—due to the absence of the nanoblister-like structures; this apparent rotation is interpreted to be due to stress-induced fragmentation of the LIPSS structure. The application of subsequent pulses leads to clean ablation. LIPSS are further modified into features of a shorter period when laser scanning is used. Results provide evidence that the formation of conductive nanoblisters leads to the enhancement of the applied electromagnetic field and thereby can be used to precisely control laser ablation on ITO thin films.

  6. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, S.; Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.

    2012-06-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  8. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... energies of 2.3-12.8 mJ/microbeam and total energy levels of 4.6-640 mJ/microchannel. Histological endpoints were ablation depth (AD), coagulation zone (CZ) and ablation width (AW). Data were logarithmically transformed if required prior to linear regression analyses. Results for histological endpoints...

  9. X-ray spectroscopic and stroboscopic analysis of pulsed-laser ablation of Zn and its oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Stefan; Göttlicher, Jörg; Letzel, Alexander; Gökce, Bilal; Barcikowski, Stephan; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Baumbach, Tilo; Plech, Anton

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) as an attractive process for ligand-free nanoparticle synthesis represents a multiscale problem to understand the mechanisms and achieve control. Atomic and nanoscale processes interacting with macroscale dynamics in the liquid demand for sensitive tools for in-situ and structural analysis. By adding X-ray methods, we enlarge the available information on millimeter-scale bubble formation down to atomic-scale nanoparticle reactions. X-ray spectroscopy (XAS) can resolve the chemical speciation of the ablated material during the ablation from a zinc wire target showing a first oxidation step from zinc to zinc oxide within some 10 min followed by a slower reaction to hydrozincite. X-ray imaging investigations also give additional information on the bubble dynamics as we demonstrate by comparing the microsecond radiography and optical stroboscopy. We show different features of the detachment of the ablation bubble from a free wire. The location of the first collapse occurs in front of the target. While a first rebound bubble possesses an homogeneous interior, the subsequent rebound consists merely of a cloud of microbubbles.

  10. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  11. Deposition of zinc oxide thin films by reactive pulsed laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bílková, Petra; Zemek, Josef; Mitu, B.; Marotta, V.; Orlando, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 252, - (2006), s. 4604-4609 ISSN 0169-4332 Grant - others:NATO-CNR Outreach Fellowships Programm 2001(XE) 219.34 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : reactive pulsed laser deposition * zinc oxide * thin films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2006

  12. Growth of GaAs “nano ice cream cones” by dual wavelength pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamp, C. T.; Jesser, W. A.; Shivaram, B. S.

    2007-05-01

    Harmonic generation crystals inherently offer the possibility of using multiple wavelengths of light in a single laser pulse. In the present experiment, the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelengths from an Nd:YAG laser are focused together on GaAs and GaSb targets for ablation. Incident energy densities up to about 45 J/cm 2 at 10 Hz with substrate temperatures between 25 and 600 °C for durations of about 60 s have been used in an ambient gas pressure of about 10 -6 Torr. The ablated material was collected on electron-transparent amorphous carbon films for TEM analysis. Apart from a high density of isolated nanocrystals, the most common morphology observed consists of a crystalline GaAs cone-like structure in contact with a sphere of liquid Ga, resembling an "ice cream cone", typically 50-100 nm in length. For all of the heterostuctures of this type, the liquid/solid/vacuum triple junction is found to correspond to the widest point on the cone. These heterostructures likely form by preferential evaporation of As from molten GaAs drops ablated from the target. The resulting morphology minimizes the interfacial and surface energies of the liquid Ga and solid GaAs.

  13. Pulpal effects of enamel ablation with a microsecond pulsed lambda = 9.3-microm CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L; Goodis, Harold E; Pierre, Daniel; Cox, Darren P; Fan, Kenneth; Larson, Michael; Parisi, Renaldo; Hsu, Dennis; Manesh, Saman K; Ho, Chi; Hosseini, Mehran; Fried, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    In vitro studies have shown that CO2 lasers operating at the highly absorbed 9.3 and 9.6-microm wavelengths with a pulse duration in the range of 10-20-microsecond are well suited for the efficient ablation of enamel and dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Even though these CO2 lasers are highly promising, they have yet to receive FDA approval. Clinical studies are necessary to determine if excessive heat deposition in the tooth may have any detrimental pulpal effects, particularly at higher ablative fluencies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pulpal safety of laser irradiation of tooth occlusal surfaces under the conditions required for small conservative preparations confined to enamel. Test subjects requiring removal of third molar teeth were recruited and teeth scheduled for extraction were irradiated using a pulsed CO2 laser at a wavelength of 9.3 microm operating at 25 or 50 Hz using a incident fluence of 20 J/cm(2) for a total of 3,000 laser pulses (36 J) for both rates with water cooling. Two control groups were used, one with no treatment and one with a small cut made with a conventional high-speed hand-piece. No anesthetic was used for any of the procedures and tooth vitality was evaluated prior to treatment by heat, cold and electrical testing. Short term effects were observed on teeth extracted within 72 hours after treatment and long term effects were observed on teeth extracted 90 days after treatment. The pulps of the teeth were fixed with formalin immediately after extraction and subjected to histological examination. Additionally, micro-thermocouple measurements were used to estimate the potential temperature rise in the pulp chamber of extracted teeth employing the same irradiation conditions used in vivo. Pulpal thermocouple measurements showed the internal temperature rise in the tooth was within safe limits, 3.3+/-1.4 degrees C without water cooling versus 1.7+/-1.6 degrees C with water-cooling, n = 25, PCO2 laser can

  14. Tellurite glass thin films on silica and polymer using UV (193 nm) pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhanxiang; Jose, Gin; Jha, Animesh; Steenson, Paul; Bamiedakis, Nikos; Penty, Richard V; White, Ian H

    2011-01-01

    Erbium-doped tellurite glass thin films were deposited using excimer (193 nm) laser ablation onto two different types of substrates: silica and polymer-coated silica for engineering optical integrated active-passive devices. The deposition conditions were optimized for both substrates in order to produce high-quality rare-earth (Er 3+ ) ion-doped glass thin films with low propagation loss. The optical and spectroscopic properties of the deposited films, namely transmittance, fluorescence, lifetime as well as refractive indices at 633 nm were measured and analysed in detail.

  15. Spectral and temporal characteristics of target current and electromagnetic pulse induced by nanosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krása, J.; De Marco, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Velyhan, A.; Klír, D.; Řezáč, K.; Limpouch, J.; Krouský, E.; Dostál, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudžák, R.

    2017-06-01

    The current balancing the target charging and the emission of transient electromagnetic pulses (EMP) driven by the interaction of a focused 1.315 μm iodine 300 ps PALS laser with metallic and plastic targets were measured with the use of inductive probes. It is experimentally proven that the duration of return target currents and EMPs is much longer than the duration of laser-target interaction. The laser-produced plasma is active after the laser-target interaction. During this phase, the target acts as a virtual cathode and the plasma-target interface expands. A double exponential function is used in order to obtain the temporal characteristics of EMP. The rise time of EMPs fluctuates in the range up to a few tens of nanoseconds. Frequency spectra of EMP and target currents are modified by resonant frequencies of the interaction chamber.

  16. Generation of ultra-small InN nanocrystals by pulsed laser ablation of suspension in organic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kursungoez, Canan; Uzcengiz Simsek, Elif; Ortac, Buelend; Tuzakli, Refik

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructures of InN have been extensively investigated since nano-size provides a number of advantages allowing applications in nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. It is quite important to obtain pure InN nanocrystals (InN-NCs) to reveal the characteristic features, which gain interest in the literature. Here, we proposed a new approach for the synthesis of ultra-small hexagonal InN-NCs by using suspension of micron-sized InN powder in ethanol with pulsed laser ablation method. The liquid environment, laser energy and ablation time were optimized and a post-synthesis treatment, centrifugation, was performed to achieve InN-NCs with the smallest size. Besides, the micron-sized InN powder suspension, as a starting material, enabled us to obtain InN-NCs having diameters smaller than 5 nm. We also presented a detailed characterization of InN-NCs and demonstrated that the formation mechanism mainly depends on the fragmentation due to laser irradiation of the suspension. (orig.)

  17. Generation of ultra-small InN nanocrystals by pulsed laser ablation of suspension in organic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kursungoez, Canan; Uzcengiz Simsek, Elif; Ortac, Buelend [Bilkent University, Materials Science and Nanotechnology Department, UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Ankara (Turkey); Bilkent University, Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Ankara (Turkey); Tuzakli, Refik [Bilkent University, Materials Science and Nanotechnology Department, UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-03-15

    Nanostructures of InN have been extensively investigated since nano-size provides a number of advantages allowing applications in nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. It is quite important to obtain pure InN nanocrystals (InN-NCs) to reveal the characteristic features, which gain interest in the literature. Here, we proposed a new approach for the synthesis of ultra-small hexagonal InN-NCs by using suspension of micron-sized InN powder in ethanol with pulsed laser ablation method. The liquid environment, laser energy and ablation time were optimized and a post-synthesis treatment, centrifugation, was performed to achieve InN-NCs with the smallest size. Besides, the micron-sized InN powder suspension, as a starting material, enabled us to obtain InN-NCs having diameters smaller than 5 nm. We also presented a detailed characterization of InN-NCs and demonstrated that the formation mechanism mainly depends on the fragmentation due to laser irradiation of the suspension. (orig.)

  18. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  19. New route for cadmium sulfide nanowires synthesis via pulsed laser ablation of cadmium in thiourea solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Hamoudi, Walid K.; Abbas, Hadeel F.

    2018-02-01

    The synthesis of cadmium sulfide CdS nanowires NWs by laser ablation of cadmium target in thiourea solution is demonstrated for the first time. The effect of laser fluence on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdS nanoparticles was investigated. The synthesized CdS nanowires were polycrystalline with pure hexagonal wurtzite phase; as confirmed by x-ray powder diffraction results. The 3.18–3.26 eV direct optical energy gap of CdS and the increase of CdS optical absorption were noticed to be function of laser fluence. The results revealed a blue shift of 0.86 eV in the absorption edge of CdS nanowires when prepared at 2.65 J cm‑2. The infrared absorption spectra revealed the presence of Cd-S stretching vibration peak located at (525–700) cm‑1. Raman spectra confirmed the presence of a sharp peak at 304 cm‑1 with intensity increased at higher values of laser fluence. Photoluminescence at room temperature indicated an emission peak of CdS at 471 nm. The scanning electron microscopy SEM investigation of the synthesized CdS showed a mixture of hexagonal nanoparticles and nanowires arrays. Transmission electron microscopy TEM investigation revealed the formation of well-dispersed single CdS nanowires with diameter in the range (18–27) and tens of micrometers long. The effect of laser fluence on the performance of n-CdS NWs/p-Si heterojunction was investigated.

  20. Transparent conducting AZO and ITO films produced by pulsed laser ablation at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Thin films of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and indium tin oxide (ITO) were deposited on glass substrates by laser ablation in an oxygen environment. The electrical and optical properties of films grown at various oxygen pressures were compared. With no substrate heating, highly transparent...... and conducting films were obtained with oxygen pressures between 15 and 23 mTorr for both materials. We obtained a specific resistivity of 1.8 x 10(-3) Omega cm for AZO and 1.1 x 10(-3) Omega cm for ITO. By heating the substrate to 160 degrees C or 200 degrees C, the resistivity was further reduced to 1.1 x 10......(-3) Omega cm for AZO and 3.9 x 10(-4) Omega cm for ITO. The average transmission of visible light (450-750 MI) was between 82% and 98% in most cases. The results suggest that AZO is a promising alternative to ITO....

  1. Effect of ablation parameters on infrared pulsed laser deposition of poly(ethylene glycol) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Daniel M.; Papantonakis, M. R.; Toftmann, B.; Horwitz, J. S.; McGill, R. A.; Chrisey, D. B.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2002-06-01

    Polymer thin films were deposited by laser ablation using infrared radiation both resonant (2.90, 3.40, 3.45, and 8.96 mum) and nonresonant (3.30, 3.92, and 4.17 mum) with vibrational modes in the starting material, polyethylene glycol. The chemical structure of the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the molecular weight distribution was investigated using gel permeation chromatography. The films deposited by resonant irradiation are superior to those deposited with nonresonant radiation with respect to both the chemical structure and the molecular weight distribution of the films. However, the molecular-weight distributions of films deposited at nonresonant infrared wavelengths show marked polymer fragmentation. Fluence and wavelength dependence studies show that the effects may be related to the degree of thermal confinement, and hence to the relative absorption strengths of the targeted vibrational modes.

  2. Effects of oxidizing medium on the composition, morphology and optical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Gondal, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) with 532 nm wavelength laser with 5 ns pulse duration is used to produce the nanostructure copper oxide and the effects of oxidizing media (deionized water and hydrogen peroxide) on the composition, morphology and optical properties of the product materials produced by PLAL were studied. XRD and TEM studies indicate that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, the product material is in two phases (Cu/Cu2O) with the spherical nanoparticle structure, whereas in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the liquid medium, the product material revealed other two phases (Cu/CuO) with nanorod-like structure. The optical studies revealed a considerable red shift (3.34-2.5 eV) in the band gap energy in the case of hydrogen peroxide in the liquid medium in PLAL synthesis compared to the one in the absence of it. Also the product material in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the liquid medium showed a reduced photoluminescence intensity indicating the reduced electron-hole recombination rate. The red shift in the band gap energy and the reduced electron-hole recombination rate make the product material an ideal photocatalyst to harvest solar radiation for various applications. The most relevant signals on the FTIR spectrum for the samples are the absorption bands in the region between 450 and 700 cm-1 which are the characteristics bands of copperoxygen bonds. The reported laser ablation approach for the synthesis of Cu2O and CuO nanoparticles has the advantages of being clean method with controlled particle properties. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation grown cinnamon nanomorphologies: Influence of different liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ali Aqeel; Bidin, Noriah

    2017-12-01

    Broad range of biomedical applications demands accurate synthesis and characterization of various nanoparticles. We report the characterization of cinnamon nanoparticles (CNPs) grown via simple pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL). The influence of different liquid media (olive oil, ethanol, and citric acid each of volume 4 ml) on the growth morphology, structure and optical properties of CNPs is determined. Q-switched 1064-Nd: YAG laser of 10 ns pulse duration, 1 Hz repetition rate, 532 nm s harmonic generation and laser fluence of 6.37 J/cm2 is used to irradiate the cinnamon targets immersed in those liquids. Samples are characterized using TEM, HRTEM, SAED, FTIR, UV-Vis and Photoluminescence measurements. TEM images revealed the nucleation of CNPs of average size 18.36 nm (in olive oil), 21.48 nm (in ethanol), and 29.56 nm (in citric acid). Morphology of CNPs is demonstrated to be sensitive to the liquid medium. Our simple and innovative method may constitute a basis to produce CNPs of desired size distribution potential for the development of nanobiomedicine.

  4. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on peripheral thermal and mechanical damage to dentin and alveolar bone during IR laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Ragadio, Jerome N.; Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the peripheral thermal damage produced during the laser ablation of alveolar bone and dentin for clinically relevant IR laser systems. Previous studies have demonstrated that a char layer produced around the laser incision site can inhibit the wound healing process. Moreover, in the case of dentin, a char layer is unsightly and is difficult to bond to with restorative materials. Thermal damage was assessed using polarized light microscopy for laser pulse widths from 500 ns to 300 microseconds at 2.94 micrometer and 9.6 micrometer. Water- cooling was not employed to alleviate thermal damage during the laser irradiation. At 9.6 micrometer, minimal thermal damage was observed for pulse widths on the order of the thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy in the tissue, 3 - 4 microseconds, and peripheral thermal damage increased with increasing pulse duration. At 2.94 micrometer, thermal damage was minimal for the Q-switched (500 ns) laser system. This study shows that 9.6 micrometer CO2 laser pulses with pulse widths of 5 - 10 microseconds are well suited for the efficient ablation of dentin and bone with minimal peripheral damage. This work was supported by NIH/NIDCR R29DE12091.

  5. Deposition of Y thin films by nanosecond UV pulsed laser ablation for photocathode application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorusso, A.; Anni, M.; Caricato, A.P.; Gontad, F.; Perulli, A.; Taurino, A.; Perrone, A.; Chiadroni, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Si (100) substrates by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Ex-situ morphological, structural and optical characterisations of such films have been performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. Polycrystalline films with a thickness of 1.2 μm, homogenous with a root mean square roughness of about 2 nm, were obtained by optimised laser irradiation conditions. Despite the relatively high thickness, the films resulted very adherent to the substrates. The high quality of such thin films is important to the synthesis of metallic photocathodes based on Y thin film, which could be used as electron sources of high photoemission performance in radio-frequency guns. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of Yttrium thin films is investigated. • 1.2 μm thick films were deposited with very low RMS roughness. • The Y thin films were very adherent to the Si substrate • Optical characterisation showed a very high absorption coefficient for the films.

  6. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in water: Influence of pulse energy and duration on the crystalline phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgetti, E., E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi (ISC) CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Muniz Miranda, M.; Caporali, S. [Dipartimento di Chimica “Ugo Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Canton, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari, Via Torino, 30170 Venezia-Mestre (Italy); Marsili, P. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi (ISC) CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Vergari, C.; Giammanco, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of Ti in water at 1064 nm and comparison of ns and ps temporal regimes. • Structural and spectroscopic characterization of the colloids: TiO{sub 2} is the predominant phase. • Determination of an energy window where ps ablation produces more anatase than rutile. • Modelling of the experimental dependence of anatase/rutile yield on pulse length and energy. - Abstract: We fabricated Ti oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation of a Ti target in doubly deionized water with ps or ns pulses at a laser wavelength of 1064 nm. Electron microscopy, Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that, while with ns pulses the dominant oxide phase is rutile, with ps pulses anatase is the most abundant form in an intermediate energy window centered around 25 mJ per pulse. This experimental behavior can be described by a theoretical model which calculates the pressure and temperature evolution of the ablated material and, from this, the rutile and anatase yield.

  7. Geometrical profile of material surface ablated with highpower, short-pulse lasers in ambient gas media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsya, S. R.; Nikumb, S. K.

    2007-04-01

    Finer and cleaner features are expected in micro-machining with high power, ultrashort pulse lasers as the melt and evaporation phases are considerably reduced. However, a high-intensity optical beam propagating through a gaseous medium can cause its breakdown generating plasma, which is enhanced further by the self focusing effect of the medium. Photon-plasma scattering compensates somewhat for the self-focusing, but it also distorts the beam profile with consequent impact on the fabricated surface. Plasma also continues to supply heat beyond the pulse duration, which may cause melting and thus distort the features further. In the present article, we show that suitable parameters can be determined to reduce the distortion to the beam profile and balance self-focusing and plasma defocusing resulting in plasma filamentation. Well-shaped beam and plasma filaments, both have favourable impact on the fabricated features. The calculated surface features are compared with the experimentally machined crater profiles with good agreement.

  8. Spectral and temporal characteristics of target current and electromagnetic pulse induced by nanosecond laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; De Marco, Massimo; Cikhardt, Jakub; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Velyhan, Andriy; Klír, Daniel; Řezáč, Karel; Limpouch, J.; Krouský, Eduard; Dostál, Jan; Ullschmied, Jiří; Dudžák, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2017), 1-8, č. článku 065007. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR GA16-07036S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 654148 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * target current * electromagnetic pulse Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016

  9. Structure and morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Effects of temperature and energy fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillén, G. García; Palma, M.I. Mendivil; Krishnan, B.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a zinc metal target at different water temperatures (room temperature, 50, 70 and 90 °C). Ablation was carried out using 532 nm output from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at three different laser fluence. Analysis of the morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical and luminescent properties were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. TEM analysis showed that a change in temperature resulted in ZnO and Zn(OH) 2 nanoparticles with different sizes and morphologies. XPS results confirmed the compositions and chemical states of these nanoparticles. These zinc nanomaterials showed emission in the ultraviolet (UV) and blue regions. The results of this work demonstrated that by varying the liquid medium temperature, the structure, composition, morphology and optical properties of the nanomaterials could be modified during pulsed laser ablation in liquid. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zinc nanomaterial colloids were synthesized by PLAL. • Effects of laser fluence and the distilled water temperature were analyzed. • The final structure varied with the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • The morphology was dependent on the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • Zinc nanocolloids showed emission in the UV and blue region

  10. Structure and morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Effects of temperature and energy fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillén, G. García; Palma, M.I. Mendivil [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León – Centro de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); and others

    2015-07-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a zinc metal target at different water temperatures (room temperature, 50, 70 and 90 °C). Ablation was carried out using 532 nm output from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at three different laser fluence. Analysis of the morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical and luminescent properties were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. TEM analysis showed that a change in temperature resulted in ZnO and Zn(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles with different sizes and morphologies. XPS results confirmed the compositions and chemical states of these nanoparticles. These zinc nanomaterials showed emission in the ultraviolet (UV) and blue regions. The results of this work demonstrated that by varying the liquid medium temperature, the structure, composition, morphology and optical properties of the nanomaterials could be modified during pulsed laser ablation in liquid. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zinc nanomaterial colloids were synthesized by PLAL. • Effects of laser fluence and the distilled water temperature were analyzed. • The final structure varied with the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • The morphology was dependent on the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • Zinc nanocolloids showed emission in the UV and blue region.

  11. Laser ablation of paint in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brygo, Francois; Semerok, Alexandre; Weulersse, Jean-Marc; Thro, Pierre-Yves; Oltra, Roland; Decobert, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear dismantling faces the challenge of paint removal on large surfaces of painted walls. The conventional methods for paint stripping on concrete walls are mainly based on mechanical grinder and lead to an important volume of aerosols and wastes. Laser ablation has been evaluated as a promising method for paint removal with a number of advantages. The method reduces considerably the waste volume as the removal of paint is selective. The ablated matter can be collected by aerosol aspiration/filtration. The automation of the process can provide a higher capacity of paint removal. Laser ablation of paint was under our extensive studies. Laser ablation with different nanosecond repetition rate lasers was comparatively studied to understand the ablation mechanisms, and to obtain the highest efficiency of paint removal. The investigations were made with three Q-Switched Nd:YAG lasers (λ = 532 nm and λ = 1.064 μm). The different pulse durations (5 ns and 100 ns) demonstrated the different ablation regimes. Ablation with long pulses (100 ns) provided the best removal efficiency while the short ones (5 ns) decreased the ablation threshold fluence. It was demonstrated that the pulse repetition rate increasing in the 20 Hz - 10 kHz range induced heat accumulation in the paint. It resulted in ablation efficiency increase with a large decrease in the ablation threshold fluence. Laser ablation in the 0 - 10 J / cm 2 fluence range was investigated. Various paints were under investigation to obtain the maximum efficiency of paint removal for each specific experimental case. The ejected matter recording with a high speed imaging system allows to analyse the laser-matter interaction. (authors)

  12. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H; Caicedo, J C; Cabrera, G; Yate, L

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  13. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  14. Continuous Synthesis of Ag/TiO2 Nanoparticles with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A facile and environmental friendly synthesis strategy based on pulsed laser ablation has been developed for potential mass production of Ag-loaded TiO2 (Ag/TiO2 nanoparticles. By sequentially irradiating titanium and silver target substrates, respectively, with the same 1064 nm 100 ns fiber laser, Ag/TiO2 particles can be fabricated. A postannealing process leads to the crystallization of TiO2 to anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity. The phase composition, microstructure, and surface state of the elaborated Ag/TiO2 are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS techniques. The results suggest that the presence of silver clusters deposited on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles. The nanostructure is formed through laser interaction with materials. Photocatalytic activity evaluation shows that silver clusters could significantly enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 in degradation of methylene blue (MB under UV light irradiation, which is attributed to the efficient electron traps by Ag clusters. Our developed Ag/TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized via a straightforward, continuous, and green pathway could have great potential applications in photocatalysis.

  15. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  16. Simulation of ablation and plume dynamics under femtosecond double-pulse laser irradiation of aluminum: Comparison of atomistic and continual approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, Vladimir B.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E., E-mail: povar@ihed.ras; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • We model double-pulse laser ablation of aluminum using microscopic and macroscopic approaches. • Both methods show decrease in depth of crater with increasing delay between pulses. • Both methods reveal the plume temperature growth with the increasing delay. • Good agreement between results is a step towards the development of combined model. - Abstract: We elaborated two numerical methods, two-temperature hydrodynamics and hybrid two-temperature molecular dynamics, which take into account basic mechanisms of a metal target response to ultrashort laser irradiation. The model used for the description of the electronic subsystem is identical for both approaches, while the ionic part is defined by an equation of state in hydrodynamics and by an interatomic potential in molecular dynamics. Since the phase diagram of the equation of state and corresponding potential match reasonably well, the dynamics of laser ablation obtained by both methods is quite similar. This correspondence can be considered as a first step towards the development of a self-consistent combined model. Two important processes are highlighted in simulations of double-pulse ablation: (1) the crater depth decrease as a result of recoil flux formation in the nascent plume when the delay between the pulses increases; (2) the plume reheating by the second pulse that gives rise to two- three-fold growth of the electron temperature with the delay varying from 0 to 200 ps.

  17. Photoluminescence of CdTe nanocrystals grown by pulsed laser ablation on a template of Si nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen-Cervantes, A.; Silva-Lopez, H.; Becerril-Silva, M.; Arias-Ceron, J.S.; Campos-Gonzalez, E.; Zelaya-Angel, O.; Medina-Torres, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals were grown on eroded Si (111) substrates at room temperature by pulsed laser ablation. Before growth, Si substrates were subjected to different erosion time in order to investigate the effect on the CdTe samples. The erosion process consists of exposition to a pulsed high-voltage electric arc. The surface consequence of the erosion process consists of Si nanoparticles which acted as a template for the growth of CdTe nanocrystals. CdTe samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), room temperature photoluminescence (RT PL) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). CdTe nanocrystals grew in the stable cubic phase, according to XRD spectra. A strong visible emission was detected in photoluminescence (PL) experiments. The PL signal was centered at 540 nm (∝2.34 eV). With the effective mass approximation, the size of the CdTe crystals was estimated around 3.5 nm. HRTEM images corroborated the physical characteristics of CdTe nanocrystals. These results could be useful for the development of CdTe optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  18. Photoluminescence of CdTe nanocrystals grown by pulsed laser ablation on a template of Si nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen-Cervantes, A.; Silva-Lopez, H.; Becerril-Silva, M.; Arias-Ceron, J.S.; Campos-Gonzalez, E.; Zelaya-Angel, O. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Physics Department, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico (Mexico); Medina-Torres, A.C. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-11-12

    CdTe nanocrystals were grown on eroded Si (111) substrates at room temperature by pulsed laser ablation. Before growth, Si substrates were subjected to different erosion time in order to investigate the effect on the CdTe samples. The erosion process consists of exposition to a pulsed high-voltage electric arc. The surface consequence of the erosion process consists of Si nanoparticles which acted as a template for the growth of CdTe nanocrystals. CdTe samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), room temperature photoluminescence (RT PL) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). CdTe nanocrystals grew in the stable cubic phase, according to XRD spectra. A strong visible emission was detected in photoluminescence (PL) experiments. The PL signal was centered at 540 nm (∝2.34 eV). With the effective mass approximation, the size of the CdTe crystals was estimated around 3.5 nm. HRTEM images corroborated the physical characteristics of CdTe nanocrystals. These results could be useful for the development of CdTe optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  19. Dual purpose laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for pulsed laser deposition and diagnostics of thin film fabrication: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azdejković, Mersida Janeva; van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Rozman, Kristina Zuzek; Jaćimović, Radojko; Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kobe, Spomenka; Cefalas, Alkiviadis Constantinos

    2009-08-15

    PLD (pulsed laser deposition) is an attractive technique to fabricate thin films with a stoichiometry reflecting that of the target material. Conventional PLD instruments are more or less black boxes in which PLD is performed virtually "blind", i.e. without having great control on the important PLD parameters. In this preliminary study, for the first time, a 213 nm Nd-YAG commercial laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICPMS) intended for microanalysis work was used for PLD under atmospheric pressure and in and ex situ ICPMS analysis for diagnostics of the thin film fabrication process. A PLD demonstration experiment in a He atmosphere was performed with a Sm(13.8)Fe(82.2)Ta(4.0) target-Ta-coated silicon wafer substrate (contraption with defined geometry in the laser ablation chamber) to transfer the permanent magnetic properties of the target to the film. Although this paper is not dealing with the magnetic properties of the film, elemental analysis was applied as a means of depicting the PLD process. It was shown that in situ ICPMS monitoring of the ablation plume as a function of the laser fluence, beam diameter and repetition rate may be used to ensure the absence of large particles (normally having a stoichiometry somewhat different from the target). Furthermore, ex situ microanalysis of the deposited particles on the substrate, using the LA-ICPMS as an elemental mapping tool, allowed for the investigation of PLD parameters critical in the fabrication of a thin film with appropriate density, homogeneity and stoichiometry.

  20. Study of pulsed laser ablated CaBi 2Ta 2O 9 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rasmi R.; Pérez, W.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2001-07-01

    Polycrystalline CaBi 2Ta 2O 9 thin films were grown on Pt/TiO 2/SiO 2/Si (100) substrates using a pulsed laser deposition technique. The influence of substrate temperature and oxygen pressure on crystallization and orientation of the films was studied. In-situ films deposited under a combination of higher substrate temperature and lower oxygen pressure exhibited a preferred c-axis orientation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used for complete understanding of phase evolution of CBT films. Thin films deposited at higher substrate temperatures showed larger grain size and higher surface roughness, observed by atomic force microscopy. The values of maximum polarization (2P m˜13.4 μC/cm 2), remanent polarization (2P r˜4.6 μC/cm 2) and the coercive field E c was about 112 kV/cm obtained for the film deposited at 650°C and annealed at 750°C. The room temperature, dielectric data revealed a dependence on the grain size.

  1. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  2. Laser ablative fabrication of nanocrowns and nanojets on the Cu supported film surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchmizhak, A.A., E-mail: ku4mijak@dvo.ru [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Pavlov, D.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Vitrik, O.B. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Kulchin, Yu. N. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Formation dynamics of the laser-induced nanojets and nanocrowns on the Cu film surface was studied. • The key role of subsurface boiling on the metal film–substrate interface was revealed. • Five-fold plasmon enhancement of the Rh6G photoluminescence signal was demonstrated. • Plasmonic nature of enhancement was proved by measuring of the emission spectra of the Rh6G near the nanocrowns. - Abstract: Formation dynamics of the nanojets and nanocrowns induced on the surface of the Cu supported films of different thickness under the impact of tightly focused femtosecond pulses was studied in detail. We show that the single-shot fs-pulse irradiation of the 120-nm-thick Cu film results in formation of a single nanojet, which splits at increased pulse energy into two and then into a plurality of periodically arranged nanospikes eventually acquiring the form of the so-called nanocrown. The number of nanospike in the nanocrown was found to be linearly dependent on the pulse energy and nanocrown radius. The key role of subsurface boiling occurring on the metal film–substrate interface in the formation process of crown-like nanostructures was revealed by comparing the obtained results with the formation dynamics studied for thinner 60-nm and 20-nm-thick Cu films. In addition, the applicability of the fabricated nanostructures as low-cost substrate for photoluminescence signal enhancement of the organic dyes is also discussed in this paper.

  3. The effect of liquid environment on size and aggregation of gold nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilaki, R. M.; Iraji, A. zad A.; Mahdavi, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of liquid environment on nucleation, growth and aggregation of gold nanoparticles were studied. Gold nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation in deionised water with various concentrations of ethanol and also in pure ethanol. UV/visible extinction and TEM observations were employed for characterization of optical properties and particle sizes respectively. Preparation in water results in smaller size, shorter wavelength of maximum extinction and stable solution with an average size of 6 nm. Nanoparticles in solution with low concentration ethanol up to 20 vol% are very similar to those prepared in water. In the mixture of deionised water and 40 up to 80 vol% ethanol, wavelength of maximum extinction shows a red shift and mean size of nanoparticles was increased to 8.2 nm. Meanwhile, in this case, nanoparticles cross-linked each other and formed string type structures. In ethanol, TEM experiments show a mean size of 18 nm and strong aggregation of nanoparticles. The data were discussed qualitatively by considering effects of polarity of surrounding molecules on growth mechanism and aggregation. This study provided a technique to control size, cross-linking and aggregation of gold nanoparticles via changing the nature of liquid carrier medium

  4. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablated sub-10 nm silicon nanoparticles for improving photovoltaic conversion efficiency of commercial solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, H. R.; Ghobadi, A.; Ulusoy Ghobadi, T. G.; Ates, H.; Topalli, K.; Okyay, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the enhancement of photovoltaic (PV) solar cell efficiency using luminescent silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs). Sub-10 nm Si-NPs are synthesized via pulsed laser ablation technique. These ultra-small Si nanoparticles exhibit photoluminescence (PL) character tics at 425 and 517 nm upon excitation by ultra-violet (UV) light. Therefore, they can act as secondary light sources that convert high energetic photons to ones at visible range. This down-shifting property can be a promising approach to enhance PV performance of the solar cell, regardless of its type. As proof-of-concept, polycrystalline commercial solar cells with an efficiency of ca 10% are coated with these luminescent Si-NPs. The nanoparticle-decorated solar cells exhibit up to 1.64% increase in the external quantum efficiency with respect to the uncoated reference cells. According to spectral photo-responsivity characterizations, the efficiency enhancement is stronger in wavelengths below 550 nm. As expected, this is attributed to down-shifting via Si-NPs, which is verified by their PL characteristics. The results presented here can serve as a beacon for future performance enhanced devices in a wide range of applications based on Si-NPs including PVs and LED applications.

  5. Production of Metal Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser-ablation in Liquids: A Tool for Studying the Antibacterial Properties of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Matthew; Naddeo, Joseph J; Griepenburg, Julianne C; O'Malley, Sean M; Bubb, Daniel M; Klein, Eric A

    2017-06-02

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a global clinical concern leading some to speculate about our return to a "pre-antibiotics" era of medicine. In addition to efforts to identify novel small-molecule antimicrobial drugs, there has been great interest in the use of metal nanoparticles as coatings for medical devices, wound dressings, and consumer packaging, due to their antimicrobial properties. The wide variety of methods available for nanoparticle synthesis results in a broad spectrum of chemical and physical properties which can affect antibacterial efficacy. This manuscript describes the pulsed laser-ablation in liquids (PLAL) method to create nanoparticles. This approach allows for the fine tuning of nanoparticle size, composition, and stability using post-irradiation methods as well as the addition of surfactants or volume excluders. By controlling particle size and composition, a large range of physical and chemical properties of metal nanoparticles can be explored which may contribute to their antimicrobial efficacy thereby opening new avenues for antibacterial development.

  6. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  7. Coatings synthesised by the pulsed laser ablation of a B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadadjeu Sokeng, I., E-mail: ifriky@tlabs.ac.za [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, French South African Institute of Technology/Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville campus, PO Box 1906, Bellville, 7530 (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Ngom, B.D. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanofrabrication, Groupes de physique du Solide et Sciences des Matriaux (GPSSM), Facult des sciences et Techniques Universit Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), B.P. 25114 Dakar, Fann Dakar (Senegal); Msimanga, M. [iThemba LABS Gauten, Private Bag 11, WITS 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y.; Kotsedi, L.; Maaza, M. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Van Zyl, R.R. [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, French South African Institute of Technology/Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville campus, PO Box 1906, Bellville, 7530 (South Africa)

    2015-10-30

    A pellet of B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} ceramic composite was characterised and subjected to pulsed laser ablation for the deposition of coatings on corning glass substrates. We reports an attempt to produce coatings from B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The thermal, electric and mechanical properties of B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} suggest that coatings synthesised from this composite can be used for space applications. The samples were characterised using X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The characterisation of the samples deposited on soda lime corning glass showed that the laser energy used in this PLD was enough to obtain non amorphous coatings formed by some alteration of the tungsten carbide crystal lattice at room temperature, and that there was no stoichiometry transfer as would be expected from PLD. The coating also showed space applicable features worth investigating. - Highlights: • B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} ceramic composite was ablated for deposition on corning glass subtrates. • Non-amorphous coating was obtained at room temperature. • There was no stoichiometry transfer as would be expected from Pulsed Laser Deposition.

  8. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A. [and others

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  9. Pulsed laser ablation of gold at 1064 nm and 532 nm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Piccotto, A.; Andó, L.; Gammino, S.; Margarone, D.; Láska, Leoš; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Krása, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, Suppl. C (2004), s. C421-C430 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21./. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : laser generated ions * laser plasma * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  10. Laser Plasmas: Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ...

  11. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dielectrics: thresholds, mechanisms, role of breakdown

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mirza, M. Inam; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Tomáštík, J.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, O.; Fekete, Ladislav; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Dec (2016), 1-11, č. článku 39133. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA MŠk LM2015086; GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser material processing * surfaces * interfaces * thin films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  12. Single-Step Fabrication of Gd2O3@SiO2 Nanoparticles for use as MRI Contrast Agents by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning-Qi; Huang, Zhan-Yun; Li, Li; Shao, Yuan-Zhi; Chen, Di-Hu

    2013-03-01

    Gd2O3@SiO2 nanoparticles with a core-shell structure are synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) in single steps. A Gd2O3 target immersed in tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) is ablated by a microsecond Nd:YAG laser, which induces the generation of a Gd2O3 plasma plume and pyrolysis of the TEOS. We propose that the moment Gd2O3 nanoparticles are formed they will be coated immediately by SiO2 and directly synthesized Gd2O3@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. These particles obtain high r1 relaxivity of 5.26s-1mM-1 and are used as T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. It is shown that the PLAL technique is promising for fabricating core-shell structure nanomaterial with potential medical applications.

  13. Ablation behaviors of carbon reinforced polymer composites by laser of different operation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation mechanism of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite is of critical meaning for the laser machining process. The ablation behaviors are investigated on the CFRP laminates subject to continuous wave, long duration pulsed wave and short duration pulsed wave lasers. Distinctive ablation phenomena have been observed and the effects of laser operation modes are discussed. The typical temperature patterns resulted from laser irradiation are computed by finite element analysis and thereby the different ablation mechanisms are interpreted.

  14. Mechanism of single-pulse ablative generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shugaev, M.V.; Gnilitskyi, I.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Zhigilei, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 20 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 205429. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA ČR GA16-12960S; GA MŠk LM2015086 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 739573 - HiLASE CoE Grant - others:OP VVV - HiLASE-CoE(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_006/0000674 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : molecular-dynamics simulations * metals * electron * spallation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  15. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  16. Optoelectronic study and annealing stability of room temperature pulsed laser ablated ZnSe polycrystalline thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Taj Muhammad, E-mail: tajakashne@gmail.com; Zakria, M.; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Shakoor, Rana I.

    2014-03-15

    increased from 2.65 eV to 2.7 eV for the annealed crystalline film at 350 °C which was further decreased to 2.56 eV for the annealed amorphous film at 400 °C. The observed results manifested that room temperature pulsed laser ablated ZnSe thin film showed excellent structural, optical and morphological stability up 350 °C for optoelectronic applications. -- Highlights: • Room temperature synthesis of ZnSe thin film by PLD. • Annealing effect on Raman scattering of the deposited material. • Optical properties. • Structural properties. • Semiconductor nanostructures.

  17. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion with TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V; Larson, C. W; Mead, Jr, Franklin B

    2005-01-01

    .... A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 micro-m, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels...

  18. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion With TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V; Larson, C. W; Mead, Jr., Franklin B

    2005-01-01

    .... A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 um, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels...

  19. Ablation of burned skin with ultra-short pulses laser to promote healing: evaluation by optical coherence tomography, histology, μATR-FTIR and Nonlinear Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Moises Oliveira dos

    2012-01-01

    Burns cause changes in the anatomical structure of the skin associated with trauma. The severity of the burn injury is divided into first, second and third-degree burns. The third-degree burns have been a major focus of research in search of more conservative treatments and faster results in repair for a functional and cosmetically acceptable. The conventional treatment is the use of topical natural or synthetic skin graft. An alternative therapy is the laser ablation process for burned tissue necrosis removal due to the no mechanical contact, fast application and access to difficult areas. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using high intensity femtosecond lasers as an adjunct treatment of burned patients. For this study, 65 Wistar rats were divided into groups of five animals: healthy skin, burned skin, two types of treatment (surgical debridement or femtosecond laser ablation) and four different times in the healing process monitoring. Three regions of the back of the animals were exposed to steam source causing third-degree burn. On the third day after the burn, one of the regions was ablated with high intensity ultrashort laser pulses (λ = 785 nm, 90 fs, 2 kHz and 10 μJ/ pulse), the other received surgical debridement, and the last was considered the burn control. The regions were analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform (μ-ATR-FTIR), two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and second harmonic generation technique (SHG) on days 3, 5, 7 and 14 pos-treatments. The results showed that with the laser irradiation conditions used it was possible to remove debris from third degree burn. The techniques used to characterize the tissue allowed to verify that all treatments promoted wound healing. On the fourteenth day, the regeneration curve showed that the attenuation coefficient of laser ablated tissue converges to the values of

  20. ZnO nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation and their composite with cotton fabric: Preparation and study of antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlichnyi, Valery; Shabalina, Anastasiia, E-mail: shabalinaav@gmail.com; Lapin, Ivan; Goncharova, Daria; Nemoykina, Anna

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation exhibit antibacterial activity. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Zn{sup 2+} are not responsible for antibacterial activity of obtained zinc oxide. • Nano-ZnO/cotton fabric composite is a promising material for antibacterial bandage. - Abstract: A simple deposition method was used to prepare a ZnO/cotton fabric composite from water and ethanol dispersions of ZnO nanoparticles obtained by the pulsed laser ablation method. The structure and composition of the nanoparticles from dispersions and as-prepared composites were studied using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and spectroscopy. The nanoparticles and composite obtained exhibited antibacterial activity to three different pathogenic microorganisms—Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. An attempt to understand a mechanism of bactericidal effect of ZnO nanoparticles was made. It was shown that zinc ions and hydrogen peroxide were not responsible for antibacterial activity of the particles and the composite, and surface properties of nanoparticles played an important role in antibacterial activity of zinc oxide. The proposed composite is a promising material for use as an antibacterial bandage.

  1. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  2. The influence of surface contamination on the ion emission from nanosecond-pulsed laser ablation of Al and Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, S.; Dogar, A. H.; Qayyum, H.; Rehman, Z. U.; Qayyum, A.

    2018-04-01

    Ions emitted from planar Al and Cu targets irradiated with a 1064 nm pulsed laser were investigated with the help of a time-resolving Langmuir probe. It was found that the intensity of the ions emitted from a target area rapidly decreases with the increasing number of laser shots, and seems to reach saturation after about 10 laser shots. The saturated intensity of Al and Cu ions was approximately 0.1 and 0.3 times the intensity of the respective ions measured at the first laser shot, respectively. The higher target ion intensity for the first few shots is thought to be due to the enhanced ionization of target atoms by vacuum-ultraviolet radiations emitted from the thermally excited/ionized surface contaminants. The reduction of target ion intensity with an increasing number of laser shots thus indicates the removal of contaminants from the irradiated surface area. Laser-cleaned Al and Cu surfaces were then allowed to be recontaminated with residual vacuum gases and the ion intensity was measured at various time delays. The prolonged exposure of the cleaned target to vacuum residual gases completely restores the ion intensity. Regarding surface contaminants removal, laser shots of higher intensities were found to be more effective than a higher number of laser shots having lower intensities.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of carbon reinforced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, P.; Mendez, C.; Garcia, A.; Arias, I.; Roso, L.

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses (120 fs at 795 nm) with polymer based composites has been investigated. We have found that carbon filled polymers exhibit different ultrafast ablation behaviour depending on whether the filling material is carbon black or carbon fiber and on the polymer matrix itself. The shape and dimensions of the filling material are responsible for some geometrical bad quality effects in the entrance and inner surfaces of drilled microholes. We give an explanation for these non-quality effects in terms of fundamentals of ultrafast ablation process, specifically threshold laser fluences and material removal paths. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymers seemed particularly concerned, this could prevent the use of ultrafast ablation for microprocessing purposes of some of these materials

  4. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore

    Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...... to a substrate as intact molecules by the violent laser impact ( up to 50 mJ/pulse) has not yet been understood. One issue is that up to 150 ng/pulse is removed by the laser, and much of the material is ejected from the target in relatively large chunks. We have explored as well the excitation mechanics by laser...... impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in ns-experiments have been irradiated at 527 nm with >>300-fs pulses and at a similar fluence as in ns ablation. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme from each shot...

  5. Liquid Atomization Induced by Pulse Laser Reflection underneath Liquid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2009-05-01

    We observed a novel effect of pulse laser reflection at the interface between transparent materials with different refractive indices. The electric field intensity doubles when a laser beam is completely reflected from a material with a higher refractive index to a material with a lower index. This effect appreciably reduces pulse laser ablation threshold of transparent materials. We performed experiments to observe the entire ablation process for laser incidence on the water-air interface using pulse laser shadowgraphy with high-resolution film; the minimum laser fluence for laser ablation at the water-air interface was approximately 12-16 J/cm2. We confirmed that this laser ablation occurs only when the laser beam is incident on the water-air interface from water. Many slender liquid ligaments extend like a milk crown and seem to be atomized at the tip. Their detailed structures can be resolved only by pulse laser photography using high-resolution film.

  6. Ultrasmall, Ligand-Free Ag Nanoparticles with High Antibacterial Activity Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Kőrösi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since ancient times, silver and its compounds have been known to have a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities for bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Due to the increasing bacterial resistance to classic antibiotics, the investigations of Ag NPs have increased. Herein, we present the preparation of ligand-free Ag NPs with 3 and 20 nm sizes by applying picosecond laser ablation in liquid at 355 and 1065 nm. Our laser processing system allows a high control on particle sizes. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The size effect on the antibacterial activity of Ag NPs was tested against E. coli and S. aureus. The growth curves of bacteria were monitored at 0–5 mg/L of Ag NPs by a multimode microplate reader. The size effects as well as the concentration of Ag NPs on their antibacterial activity are discussed.

  7. Amorphization of silicon by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Jimmy; Li Ming; Thompson, Carl V.

    2004-01-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to drill submicron holes in single crystal silicon films in silicon-on-insulator structures. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of material adjacent to the ablated holes indicates the formation of a layer of amorphous Si. This demonstrates that even when material is ablated using femtosecond pulses near the single pulse ablation threshold, sufficient heating of the surrounding material occurs to create a molten zone which solidifies so rapidly that crystallization is bypassed

  8. Development of double-pulse lasers ablation system and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for direct spectral analysis of manganese doped PVA polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A. A. I.; Morsy, M. A.; El-Deen, H. Z.

    2017-11-01

    Series of manganese-co-precipitated poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed using laser ablation system (LAS) based on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The collinear nanosecond laser beams of 266 and 1064 nm were optimized to focus on the surface of the PVA polymer target. Both laser beams were employed to estimate the natural properties of the excited Mn-PVA plasma, such as electron number density (Ne), electron temperature (Te), and Mn concentration. Individual transition lines of manganese (Mn), carbon (C), lithium (Li), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) atoms are identified based on the NIST spectral database. The results show better responses with DP-LIBS than the single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS). On the other hand, the EPR investigation shows characteristic broad peak of Mn-nano-particles (Mn-NPs) in the range of quantum dots of superparamagnetic materials. The line width (peak-to-peak, ΔHpp) and g-value of the observed Mn-EPR peak are ∼20 mT and 2.0046, respectively. The intensities of Mn-emission line at a wavelength 403.07 nm and the Mn-EPR absorption peak were used to accurate quantify the Mn-content in the polymer matrix. The results produce linear trends within the studied concentration range with regression coefficient (R2) value of ∼0.99, and limit of detection (LOD) of 0.026 mol.% and 0.016 mol.%, respectively. The LOD values are at a fold change of about -0.2 of the studied lowest mol.%. The proposed protocols of trace element detection are of significant advantage and can be applied to the other metal analysis.

  9. Preparation of MoSex>3/Mo-NPs catalytic films for enhanced hydrogen evolution by pulsed laser ablation of MoSe2 target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominski, V. Yu.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, D. V.; Shelyakov, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    The peculiarities of pulsed laser ablation of MoSe2 targets which caused the formation of a complex plume containing atoms (Mo and Se) and Mo nanoparticles (Mo-NPs) have been studied. Investigations of the composition, structure, and catalytic activity toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) for MoSex/Mo-NPs films prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in a vacuum and in a buffer He gas were carried out. For He pressure of 30 Pa, a shock wave could be the dominant mechanism of material transport, resulting in the deposition of an Se-enriched flux of chemically active atoms and leading to the growth of amorphous films with an increased Se content. Mo nanoparticles allowed for a larger surface area of the MoSex∼3.1/Mo-NPs catalyst deposited 5 cm from the target. However, for deposition in He at 10 cm, the amount of Mo NPs in the film appreciably decreased. Factors that could impact on the transport of nanoparticles through a buffer gas were considered. The amorphous MoSex∼3.1/Mo-NPs films prepared by PLD in He gas exhibited excellent HER performance. Quasicrystal MoSex<2/Mo-NPs films obtained by vacuum PLD were obviously inferior to amorphous films. Despite the formation of edge-oriented MoSe2 nanocrystals, the vacuum-deposited films had a large majority of metallic Mo and a deficiency of Se, which could adversely affect their HER performance.

  10. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  11. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  12. Inhibition of E. coli and S. aureus with selenium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in deionized water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guisbiers G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available G Guisbiers,1 Q Wang,2 E Khachatryan,1 LC Mimun,1 R Mendoza-Cruz,1 P Larese-Casanova,3 TJ Webster,2,4,5 KL Nash1 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 2Department of Bioengineering, 3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 5Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Nosocomial diseases are mainly caused by two common pathogens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, which are becoming more and more resistant to conventional antibiotics. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly necessary to find other alternative treatments than commonly utilized drugs. A promising strategy is to use nanomaterials such as selenium nanoparticles. However, the ability to produce nanoparticles free of any contamination is very challenging, especially for nano-medical applications. This paper reports the successful synthesis of pure selenium nanoparticles by laser ablation in water and determines the minimal concentration required for ~50% inhibition of either E. coli or S. aureus after 24 hours to be at least ~50 ppm. Total inhibition of E. coli and S. aureus is expected to occur at 107±12 and 79±4 ppm, respectively. In this manner, this study reports for the first time an easy synthesis process for creating pure selenium to inhibit bacterial growth. Keywords: nosocomial disease, bacteria, antibiotics resistant, cytotoxicity

  13. Generation of NiO nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation in deionised water and their antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashan, Khawla S.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Hamad, Abubaker H.; Abdulameer, Farah A.; Hadi, Assel

    2017-03-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesised by nanosecond laser ablation in deionised water. Spherical NiO nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 2 to 21 nm were produced. The optical absorption spectra of the nanoparticles were measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and their size distribution was characterised using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystalline material structures were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to obtain infrared spectra of the samples. The results show that crystalline NiO nanoparticles were produced. The antibacterial activity of the nanoparticles against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was then examined. It was found that the NiO nanoparticles have a synergistic effect on inhibiting E. coli and S. aureus growth; this effect was also tested using the well-diffusion method. In this method, NiO nanoparticles at a concentration of 1000 µg ml-1 along with amoxicillin yielded an inhibition zone against E. coli of 14.3 ± 1.15 mm; this zone was 12.6 ± 0.57 mm against S. aureus. Therefore, from the present findings, it can be concluded that the efficiency of inhibiting bacterial growth could be improved by the addition of metal-oxide nanoparticles to amoxicillin in comparison with either pure amoxicillin or pure metal-oxide nanoparticles.

  14. Proton-induced nanorod melting in a coating obtained from the pulsed laser ablation of W{sub 2}B{sub 5}/B{sub 4}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadadjeu Sokeng, I., E-mail: ifriky@tlabs.ac.za [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, French South African Institute of Technology/Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville Campus, PO Box 1906, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Electron Microscopy Unit, University of the Western Cape, Private bag x17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Ngom, B.D. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanofrabrication, Groupes de physique du Solide et Sciences des Matriaux (GPSSM), Facult des sciences et Techniques, Universit Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), B.P. 25114 Dakar-Fann, Dakar (Senegal); Cummings, F. [Electron Microscopy Unit, University of the Western Cape, Private bag x17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Kotsedi, L. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Msimanga, M. [iThemba LABS Gauten, Private Bag 11, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Maaza, M. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); and others

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Coatings from ablated B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} were irradiated with 900 keV protons. • Nanorod clusters were observed to melt and disperse. • Uniformly shaped nanorods were observed to grow. • Lateral diffusion of energy and lateral dispersion of matter were observed. - Abstract: Coatings obtained from pulsed laser ablated W{sub 2}B{sub 5}/B{sub 4}C were irradiated with 900keV protons at fluences ranging from about 1×10{sup 15}protons/cm{sup 2} to about 4×10{sup 15}protons/cm{sup 2}. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to study the resulting structural effects. Clusters of nanorods were observed to disperse and reduce in number with increase in proton fluence. The atomic percentage of constituent elements were observed to vary with proton fluence, both within the nanorods and the film floor. Our results show that the structural effect of proton irradiation on the coating is lateral dispersion of matter.

  15. Absorption Enhanced Liquid Ablation with TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sterling, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    ... that strongly absorbs radiation in the 8-11 m wavelength interval. A TEA CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 m), 300 ns pulse width and 8 J pulse energy, was used for ablation of water diluted NaBF4 contained in a conical aluminum nozzle...

  16. Thermal effect on CFRP ablation with a 100-W class pulse fiber laser using a PCF amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Abe, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study on CFRP processing is presented using a high-power pulsed fiber laser operated at a 1064-nm fundamental wavelength, a 100-W average power, a 1-MHz repetition rate, and a 10-ns pulse width under ambient air, a dry air jet, or a nitrogen gas jet. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are conducted to measure the heat-affected zone (HAZ) quantitatively. Here, the HAZ is defined as the sum of the matrix evaporation zone (MEZ) and the resin alteration zone (RAZ). The MEZ, RAZ, and HAZ in air exceed 600, 2550, and 3150 μm, respectively. In the case of N2 gas jet, the MEZ, RAZ, and HAZ are 30, 88, and 118 μm, respectively. The results show that a nitrogen gas jet most effectively suppresses the HAZ by suppressing oxidization of the carbon fiber and cooling of heat accumulation. Additionally, the cutting speed with a dry air jet or a nitrogen gas jet increases by about 10% compared to that in ambient air.

  17. Anti-bacterial selenium nanoparticles produced by UV/VIS/NIR pulsed nanosecond laser ablation in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guisbiers, G; Khachatryan, E; Arellano-Jimenez, M J; Nash, K L; Wang, Q; Webster, T J; Larese-Casanova, P

    2015-01-01

    The ability to produce nanoparticles free of any surface contamination is very challenging especially for bio-medical applications. Using a pulsed nanosecond Nd-YAG laser, pure selenium nanoparticles have been synthesized by irradiating selenium powder (99.999%) immerged in de-ionized water and ethanol. The wavelength of the laser beam has been varied from the UV to NIR (355, 532 and 1064 nm) and its effect on the particle size distribution has been studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), revealing then the production of selenium quantum dots (size < 4 nm) by photo-fragmentation. It has been found that the crystallinity of the nanoparticles depends on their size. The zeta-potential measurement reveals that the colloidal solutions produced in de-ionized water were stable while the ones synthesized in ethanol agglomerate. The concentration of selenium has been measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The anti-bacterial effect of selenium nanostructures has been analyzed on E. Coli bacteria. Finally, selenium quantum dots produced by this method can also be useful for quantum dot solar cells. (letter)

  18. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  19. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  20. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  1. Microstructure and Critical Current Density of YBa2Cu3O7-x + BaSnO3 Thick Films Grown with Pre-Mixed Pulsed Laser Ablation Target (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0149 MICROSTRUCTURE AND CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBa2Cu3O7-x + BaSnO3 THICK FILMS GROWN WITH PRE-MIXED PULSED LASER...CURRENT DENSITY OF YBa2Cu3O7-x + BaSnO3 THICK FILMS GROWN WITH PRE-MIXED PULSED LASER ABLATION TARGET (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b...YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) + BaSnO3 (BSO) thin films with BSO nanocolumns have been shown to have improved critical current density (Jc) in applied magnetic fields

  2. Facile synthesis of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide semiconducting nanocomposite using pulsed laser ablation technique and its performance in photovoltaic dye sensitized solar cell and photocatalytic water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, M. A.; Ilyas, A. M.; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Separation of photo-generated charge carriers (electron and holes) is a major approach to improve the photovoltaic and photocatalytic performance of metal oxide semiconductors. For harsh environment like high temperature applications, ceramic like silicon carbide is very prominent. In this work, 10%, 20% and 40% by weight of pre-oxidized silicon carbide was coupled with titanium dioxide (TiO2) to form nanocomposite semiconductor via elegant pulsed laser ablation in liquid technique using second harmonic 532 nm wavelength of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser. In addition, the effect of silicon carbide concentration on the performance of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as photo-anode in dye sensitized solar cell and as photocatalyst in photodegradation of methyl orange dye in water was also studied. The result obtained shows that photo-conversion efficiency of the dye sensitized solar cell was improved from 0.6% to 1.65% and the percentage of methyl orange dye removed was enhanced from 22% to 77% at 24 min under ultraviolet-visible solar spectrum in the nanocomposite with 10% weight of silicon carbide. This remarkable performance enhancement could be due to the improvement in electron transfer phenomenon by the presence of silicon carbide on titanium dioxide.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition: the road to hybrid nanocomposites coatings and novel pulsed laser adaptive technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbezov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The applications of Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for producing nanoparticles, nanostructures and nanocomposites coatings based on recently developed laser ablating techniques and their convergence are being reviewed. The problems of in situ synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposites coatings by these techniques are being discussed. The novel modification of PLD called Pulsed Laser Adaptive Deposition (PLAD) technique is presented. The in situ synthesized inorganic/organic nanocomposites coatings from Magnesium (Mg) alloy/Rhodamine B and Mg alloy/ Desoximetasone by PLAD are described. The trends, applications and future development of discussed patented methods based on the laser ablating technologies for producing hybrid nanocomposite coatings have also been discussed in this review.

  4. Laser pulse stacking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  5. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  6. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Amoruso, S.

    Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently....... This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation were analyzed by MALDI and a significant number of intact molecules in the films with fs-laser deposition was found as well....... impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in ns-experiments have been irradiated at 527 nm with 300-fs pulses and at at similar fluence as in ns ablation. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme from each shot...

  7. Dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with combinations of femtosecond and nanosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pender, Jack; Pearman, William; Goode, Scott R; Colston, Bill W; Carter, J Chance; Angel, S Michael

    2003-10-20

    Nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses were combined in an orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) configuration. Even without full optimization of interpulse alignment, ablation focus, large signal, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal-to-background ratio enhancements were observed for both copper and aluminum targets. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, these results have significant implications in the attempt to explain the sources of dual-pulse LIBS enhancements.

  8. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  9. Primary particle diameter differentiation and bimodality identification by five analytical methods using gold nanoparticle size distributions synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letzel, Alexander; Gökce, Bilal; Menzel, Andreas; Plech, Anton; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2018-03-01

    For a known material, the size distribution of a nanoparticle colloid is a crucial parameter that defines its properties. However, measured size distributions are not easy to interpret as one has to consider weighting (e.g. by light absorption, scattering intensity, volume, surface, number) and the way size information was gained. The radius of a suspended nanoparticle can be given as e.g. sphere equivalent, hydrodynamic, Feret or radius of gyration. In this study, gold nanoparticles in water are synthesized by pulsed-laser ablation (LAL) and fragmentation (LFL) in liquids and characterized by various techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), analytical disc centrifugation (ADC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectroscopy with Mie-Gans Theory) to study the comparability of different analytical techniques and determine the method that is preferable for a given task related to laser-generated nanoparticles. In particular, laser-generated colloids are known to be bimodal and/or polydisperse, but bimodality is sometimes not analytically resolved in literature. In addition, frequently reported small size shifts of the primary particle mode around 10 nm needs evaluation of its statistical significance related to the analytical method. Closely related to earlier studies on SAXS, different colloids in defined proportions are mixed and their size as a function of the nominal mixing ratio is analyzed. It is found that the derived particle size is independent of the nominal mixing ratio if the colloid size fractions do not overlap considerably. Conversely, the obtained size for colloids with overlapping size fractions strongly depends on the nominal mixing ratio since most methods cannot distinguish between such fractions. Overall, SAXS and ADC are very accurate methods for particle size analysis. Further, the ability of different methods to determine the nominal mixing ratio of sizes fractions is studied

  10. Potential of sub-ablative pulsed CO2 laser irradiation on inhibition of artificial caries-like lesion progress in bovine dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcella Esteves

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether sub-ablative pulsed C0 2 laser (1 0,6 μm) irradiation is capable of reducing the susceptibility of the dental enamel to demineralization, and thus achieving a potential caries-protective effect. The crowns of 51 bovine front teeth, embedded in acrylic resin and polished until exposure of flat enamel surface, were used. The samples were cut in cubes of 10x10 mm, and totally coated with acid-resistant nail varnish, except for an enamel exposed window of 16 mm square. Three groups (n=17) were obtained: control group (CG) not irradiated; group laser A (LA) and group laser B (LB) where the samples were irradiated. The conditions were 60 mJ, 100 Hz, 0,3 J/cm 2 for LA and 135 mJ, 10 Hz, 0,7 J/cm 2 for LB. Two samples of each group were submitted to SEM analysis and fifteen to demineralization in 3 ml acetate buffer solution (0,1 mol/L) with pH 4,5 for 24h at 37 deg C, with regular agitation. After the specimens were removed from the solution, the calcium and phosphorous content were measured with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and 2 more samples of each were submitted to SEM analysis. The obtained Ca and P means in μg/ml and the calculated Ca/P molar ratio were: CG (367,88 ± 33,47; 168,91 ± 14,55; 1,70 ± 0,07) ; LA (372,70 ± 41,70; 161,46 ± 15,26; 1,79 ± 0,07) and LB (328,87 ± 24,91; 145,02 ± 11,04; 1,77 ± 0,05). The ANOVA statistical test revealed statistically significant difference for [Ca], [P] e Ca/P content between the groups (p 2 pulsed CO 2 laser irradiation of bovine enamel was capable of reducing the enamel acid solubility without causing damage to the surface and therefore is a potential method of caries prevention. (author)

  11. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J [Niceville, NM; Tappan, Alexander S [Albuquerque, NM; Palmer, Jeremy A [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  12. Dynamics of pulsed laser ablation plasmas in high-density CO2 near the critical point investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Kato, Toru; Himeno, Shohei; Kato, Satoshi; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) plasmas generated in high-density gases and liquids are promising for the synthesis of nanomaterials. However, the characteristics of such plasmas are still not well understood. In order to improve the understandings of PLA plasmas in high-density fluids including gases, liquids, and supercritical fluids (SCFs), we have investigated the dynamics of PLA plasmas in high-density carbon dioxide (CO2) . We report on experimental results of time-resolved shadowgraph imaging, from the generation of plasma plume to the extinction of cavitation bubbles. Shadowgraph images revealed that the PLA plasma dynamics showed two distinct behaviors. These are divided by gas-liquid coexistence curve and the so-called Widom line, which separates gas-like and liquid-like SCF domains. Furthermore, cavitation bubble observed in liquid CO2 near the critical point showed peculiar characteristics, the formation of an inner bubble and an outer shell structure, which so far has never been reported. The experiments indicate that thermophysical properties of PLA plasmas can be tuned by controlling solvent temperature and pressure around the critical point, which may be useful for materials processing. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No. 21110002) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  13. Ag/Pd core-shell nanoparticles by a successive method: Pulsed laser ablation of Ag in water and reduction reaction of PdCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghi, N. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, M., E-mail: ranjbar@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farrokhpour, H. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshouei, M. [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Am Klopferspitz 18, Martinsried 82152 (Germany); Khoshouei, A.; Kameli, P.; Salamati, H. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizchi, M. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalilian-Nosrati, M. [Physics department, Central Azad University, Tehran 14676-86831 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    In this study Ag/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) have been fabricated by a successive method; first, colloids of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared in water by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) method. Then PdCl{sub 2} solution (up to 0.2 g/l) were added to the as-prepared or aged colloidal Ag NPs. Characterizations were done using UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmissions electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Spectroscopy data showed that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of as-prepared Ag NPs at about λ = 400 nm were completely extinguished after addition of PdCl{sub 2} solution while this effect was not observed when aged Ag NPs are used. XRD and XPS results revealed that by addition of the PdCl{sub 2} solution into the as-prepared Ag NPs, metallic palladium, and silver chloride composition products are generated. TEM images revealed that as a result of this reaction, single and core-shell nanoparticles are obtained and their average sizes are 2.4 nm (Ag) and 3.2 nm (Ag/Pd). The calculated d-spacing values form XRD data with observations on high magnification TEM images were able to explain the chemical nature of different parts of Ag/Pd NPs.

  14. Crystallographic shear of polymorphic TiO{sub 2} nanocondensates with enhanced Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} dissolution via pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Han; Huang, Chang-Ning [National Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shuei-Yuan [I-Shou University, Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Taiwan (China); Shen, Pouyan, E-mail: pshen@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [National Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-15

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with enhanced solid solution of Cr up to 16 wt% in polymorphs of rutile, anatase, brookite, {alpha}-PbO{sub 2}-type, and occasionally baddeleyite-type were synthesized via pulse laser ablation on ceramic TiO{sub 2} target dissolved with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or clamped Cr/Ti plates in air. Analytical electron microscopic observations indicated these nanocondensates have prevalent crystallographic shear (CS) along specific planes to form superstructures. The rutile type typically shows (100) and (010) CS besides the conventional ones rotating about the [111] zone axis as reported for ambient samples. The CS planes are parallel to (001) for anatase, (001) and (1-bar 10) for brookite, whereas (001) and {l_brace}1 3-bar 1{r_brace} for the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2}-type TiO{sub 2} with varied extent of Cr dissolution. Surface modification, as a result of Cr dissolution and/or internal stress, was observed for all the polymorphs.

  15. Synthesis of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance by pulsed laser ablation in water with CO2 absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, T.; Rey, N. A.; Rosado, T.; Landi, S.; Larrude, D. G.; Romani, E. C.; Freire Junior, F. L.; Quinteiro, S. M.; Cremona, M.; Aucelio, R. Q.; Margheri, G.; Pandoli, O.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a one-step procedure by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) at 532 nm of a solid gold target placed in aqueous solution containing CO2 absorbers, but without any stabilizing agent. Multi-wavelength surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows the identification of adsorbed amorphous carbon and graphite, Au-carbonyl, Au coordinated CO2-derived bicarbonates/carbonates and hydroxyl groups around the AuNPs core. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy highlight the organic shell structure around the crystalline metal core. The stability of the colloidal solution of nanocomposites (NCs) seems to be driven by solvation forces and is achieved only in neutral or basic pH using monovalent hydroxide counter-ions (NaOH, KOH). The NCs are characterized by a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band typical of metal-ligand stabilization by terminal π-back bonding, attributed to a core charging effect caused by Au-carbonyls. Total organic carbon measurements detect the final content of organic carbon in the colloidal solution of NCs that is about six times higher than the value of the water solution used to perform PLA. The colloidal dispersions of NCs are stable for months and are applied as analytical probes in amino glycoside antibiotic LSPR based sensing.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Hong, M.H.; Lu, Y.F.; Wu, D.J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences

  17. Aggregation effect on absorbance spectrum of laser ablated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni; Irmaniar; Herbani, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmon of gold nanoparticles is one of the hot topics nowadays due to various possible applications. The application is determined by plasmon peak in absorbance spectrum. We have fabricated gold nanoparticles using laser ablation technique and studied the influence of CTAB (Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) effect on the optical characterization of fabricated gold nanoparticles. We ablated a gold plate using NdYAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 10 Hz pulse frequency at low energy density. We found there are two distinctive plasmon peaks, i.e., primary and secondary peaks, where the secondary peak is the main interests of this work. Our simulation results have revealed that the secondary plasmon peak is affected by random aggregation of gold nanoparticles. Our research leads to good techniques on fabrication of colloidal gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution using laser ablation technique.

  18. Mid-infrared pulsed laser ablation of the arterial wall. Mechanical origin of "acoustic" wall damage and its effect on wall healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erven, L.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Post, M. J.; van der Veen, M. J.; Velema, E.; Borst, C.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed mid-infrared lasers are an alternative to excimer lasers for transluminal angioplasty. The mid-infrared lasers, however, were reported to produce "acoustic" wall damage that might impair the immediate and long-term results. To study the immediate and long-term effects on the arterial wall,

  19. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  20. Facile synthesis of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide semiconducting nanocomposite using pulsed laser ablation technique and its performance in photovoltaic dye sensitized solar cell and photocatalytic water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondal, M.A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa [Laser Research Group, Physics Department & Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Ilyas, A.M. [Laser Research Group, Physics Department & Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Baig, Umair [Laser Research Group, Physics Department & Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Scientific Research Collaboration with MIT, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • SiC–TiO{sub 2} semiconducting nanocomposites synthesized by nanosecond PLAL technique. • Synthesized nanocomposites were morphologically and optically characterized. • Nanocomposites were applied for the photocatalytic degradation of toxic organic dye. • Photovoltaic performance was investigated in dye sensitized solar cell. - Abstract: Separation of photo-generated charge carriers (electron and holes) is a major approach to improve the photovoltaic and photocatalytic performance of metal oxide semiconductors. For harsh environment like high temperature applications, ceramic like silicon carbide is very prominent. In this work, 10%, 20% and 40% by weight of pre-oxidized silicon carbide was coupled with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) to form nanocomposite semiconductor via elegant pulsed laser ablation in liquid technique using second harmonic 532 nm wavelength of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser. In addition, the effect of silicon carbide concentration on the performance of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as photo-anode in dye sensitized solar cell and as photocatalyst in photodegradation of methyl orange dye in water was also studied. The result obtained shows that photo-conversion efficiency of the dye sensitized solar cell was improved from 0.6% to 1.65% and the percentage of methyl orange dye removed was enhanced from 22% to 77% at 24 min under ultraviolet–visible solar spectrum in the nanocomposite with 10% weight of silicon carbide. This remarkable performance enhancement could be due to the improvement in electron transfer phenomenon by the presence of silicon carbide on titanium dioxide.

  1. Ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intense pulsed light for the treatment of photoaging skin in Chinese population: A split-face study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xue-Ling; Wang, Li

    2018-01-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) is effective for the treatment of lentigines, telangiectasia, and generalized erythema, but is less effective in the removal of skin wrinkles. Fractional laser is effective on skin wrinkles and textural irregularities, but can induce postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), especially in Asians. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of ablative fractional laser (AFL) in combination with IPL in the treatment of photoaging skin in Asians.This study included 28 Chinese women with Fitzpatrick skin type III and IV. The side of the face to be treated with IPL alone (3 times) or AFL in combination with IPL (2 IPL treatments and 1 AFL treatment) was randomly selected. Skin conditions including hydration, transepidermal water loss, elasticity, spots, ultraviolet spots, brown spots, wrinkle, texture, pore size and red areas, as well as adverse effects were evaluated before the treatment and at 30 days after the treatment.Compared with IPL treatment alone, AFL in combination with IPL significantly increased elasticity, decreased pore size, reduced skin wrinkles, and improved skin texture (P = .004, P = .039, P = .015, and P = .035, respectively). Both treatment protocols produced similar effects in relation to the improvement of photoaging-induced pigmentation. The combined therapy did not impair epidermal barrier function. No postoperative infection, hypopigmentation, or scarring occurred after IPL and AFL treatments. PIH occurred at 1 month after AFL treatment and disappeared at 30 days after completion of the combined therapy.AFL in combination with IPL is safe and effective for photoaging skin in Asians. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanopillar formation from two-shot femtosecond laser ablation of poly-methyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baset, F.; Popov, K.; Villafranca, A.; Alshehri, A.M.; Guay, J.-M.; Ramunno, L.; Bhardwaj, V.R., E-mail: ravi.bhardwaj@uottawa.ca

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We studied morphological evolution and dynamics of two-pulse laser ablation in PMMA. • Nanopillar and volcanic eruption like structures are formed within the ablation crater. • Reflection of shockwave induced by the second laser pulse creates the structures. • Shockwave reflects from the boundary created by the first pulses. • Reflected shockwave causes density pinching in the middle of the ablation region. - Abstract: We present experimental and numerical studies on the morphological evolution and dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of bulk poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) irradiated with a pair of pulses. We show that a nanopillar-like structure is formed in the middle of the ablation crater for pulse energies below single-shot ablation threshold. The nanopillar is ∼400 nm long, lies adjacent to a nanopore, and protrudes ∼150 nm above the sample surface. As the pulse energy is increased gradually, the nanopillar disappears and the nanopore inside the ablation crater becomes larger. At higher pulse energies, a volcanic eruption like structure appears in the middle of the crater whose size and height increases with energy. 2D molecular dynamics simulations reveal that a nanojet and other features observed at higher pulse energies can be formed when the reflection of a shockwave, induced by the second laser pulse, causes density pinching in the middle of the interaction region that rapidly pushes out molten material towards the surface. The shockwave is reflected from the cold boundaries of a modified region created by the first laser pulse.

  3. Influence of liquid environments on femtosecond laser ablation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hewei; Chen Feng; Wang Xianhua; Yang Qing; Bian Hao; Si Jinhai; Hou Xun

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-assisted ablation of solids by femtosecond laser pulses has proved to be an efficient tool for highly precise microfabrication, which evokes numerous research interests in recent years. In this paper, we systematically investigate the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with silicon wafer in water, alcohol, and as a comparison, in air. After producing a series of multiple-shot craters on a silicon wafer in the three types of environments, surface morphologies and femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures are comparatively studied via the scanning electron microscope investigations. Meanwhile, the influence of liquid mediums on ablation threshold fluence and ablation depth is also numerically analyzed. The experimental results indicate that the ablation threshold fluences of silicon are reduced by the presence of liquids (water/alcohol) and ablation depths of craters are deepened in ambient water. Furthermore, smoother surfaces tend to be obtained in alcohol-mediated ablation at smaller shot numbers. Finally, the evolution of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures in air, water and alcohol is also discussed.

  4. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from laser-solid experiments at PALS using an x-ray laser probe with a pulse length of 0.1 ns and a wavelength of 21.2 nm. A laser with a pulse length of 0.3 ns, a peak intensity of up to 5 × 1013 W cm-2 and a wavelength of 1.3 µm was focused to a 0.15 mm wide line on 3 mm long zinc and 1 mm long iron targets and the probe was passed along the length of the plasma formed. The results show plasma 'hairs', or filaments, appearing only below the critical density, 0.1 ns before the peak of the laser pulse. The plasma around the critical density was clearly imaged and remained uniform. Magneto-hydrodynamic modelling indicates that this is caused by a magnetic field that diffuses from the critical surface, where it is generated, leading to a magnetic pressure comparable to the plasma pressure below the critical density. A dispersion relation is derived for density perturbations perpendicular to a temperature gradient in the presence of an existing magnetic field, which shows that such perturbations always grow, with the growth rate being the greatest for small wavelength perturbations and at low densities. These results indicate that the hair-like structures should be a typical feature of laser ablated plasmas below the critical density following significant plasma expansion, in agreement with numerous experimental results. The implications for x-ray lasers and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  5. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  6. Optical emission spectroscopy of nitrogen species and plasma plume induced by laser ablation combined with pulse modulated radio-frequency discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Lančok, Ján; Tomov, R.; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2002), s. 1513-1521 ISSN 1386-1425 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * laser ablation * carbon nitride films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  7. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry. (paper)

  8. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  9. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  10. Ablative microstructuring with plasma-based XUV lasers and efficient processing of materials by dual action of XUV/NIR–VIS ultrashort pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mocek, Tomáš; Jakubczak, Krzysztof; Kozlová, Michaela; Polan, Jiří; Homer, Pavel; Hřebíček, J.; Sawicka, Magdalena; Kim, I. J.; Park, S.B.; Kim, C. M.; Lee, G.H.; Kim, T.K.; Nam, C. H.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Hájková, Věra; Juha, Libor; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš; Rus, Bedřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, 6-10 (2010), s. 551-558 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA ČR GC202/07/J008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : XUV lasers * ablation * microstructuring * laser-induced periodic surface structures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  11. Studies of ablated plasma and shocks produced in a planar target by a sub-nanosecond laser pulse of intensity relevant to shock ignition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badziak, J.; Antonelli, L.; Baffigi, F.; Batani, D.; Chodukowski, T.; Cristoforetti, G.; Dudžák, Roman; Gizzi, L.A.; Folpini, G.; Hall, F.; Kalinowska, Z.; Koester, P.; Krouský, Eduard; Kucharik, M.; Labate, L.; Liska, R.; Malka, G.; Maheut, Y.; Parys, P.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Pisarczyk, T.; Renner, Oldřich; Rosinski, M.; Ryć, L.; Skála, Jiří; Šmíd, Jiří; Spindloe, C.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 561-575 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser fusion * laser-produced plasma * plasma ablation * shock ignition Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  12. Calibration-free analysis of immersed brass alloys using long-ns-duration pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with and without correction for nonstoichiometric ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Tomoko; Thornton, Blair; Ohki, Koichi; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Long-ns-duration, single pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is known to be an effective method to observe well resolved spectra from samples immersed in water at high hydrostatic pressures. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the signals obtained using this method are suitable for quantitative analysis of chemical composition. Six certified brass alloys consisting of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) were measured underwater using a laser pulse of duration 250 ns...

  13. Power-law scaling of plasma pressure on laser-ablated tin microdroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurilovich, Dmitry; Basko, Mikhail M.; Kim, Dmitrii A.; Torretti, Francesco; Schupp, Ruben; Visschers, Jim C.; Scheers, Joris; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Ubachs, Wim; Versolato, Oscar O.

    The measurement of the propulsion of metallic microdroplets exposed to nanosecond laser pulses provides an elegant method for probing the ablation pressure in a dense laser-produced plasma. We present the measurements of the propulsion velocity over three decades in the driving Nd:YAG laser pulse

  14. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Tian Long, E-mail: tianlong.see@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Liu, Zhu [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhong, Xiang Li [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-28

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 0.087 J/cm{sup 2}) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 1.576 J/cm{sup 2}), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas

  15. Laser ablation dynamics and production of thin films of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bacteriocidal properties. The mass (14307 u) is in the range, in which it easily can be controlled by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation). We have recently......, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme from each shot. This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation will be analysed by MALDI in order to explore if there also is a significant amount of intact...... these experiments at CNR-SPIN, Napoli, to explore the excitation mechanics by laser impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in DTU have been irradiated at 523 nm with 300-fs pulses and a fluence of the same order of magnitude as in DYU. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller...

  16. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  17. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  18. Erosion of nanostructured tungsten by laser ablation, sputtering and arcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of nanostructured tungsten, which was formed by helium plasma irradiation, due to laser ablation, sputtering, and arcing was investigated. Below the helium sputtering energy threshold (200eV. Reduction in sputtering on nanostructured surface was observed. Arcing was initiated using laser pulses, and the erosion rate by arcing was measured. The erosion rate increased with arc current, while the erosion per Coulomb was not affected by arc current.

  19. In-situ microscopy of front and rear side ablation processes in alkali aluminosilicate glass using ultra short pulsed laser radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Großmann, D.; Reininghaus, M.; Kalupka, C.; Jenne, M.; Kumkar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The visualization of the nonlinear absorption, the subsequent relaxation of excited states and the formation of defects enables the investigation of fundamental laser-material-interaction as well as the identification of process windows for micromachining of transparent materials with ultra short pulsed laser radiation. In this work, time resolved pump probe microscopy is applied to analyze the laser-material-interaction and to reduce damage inside the material during front- and rear side abl...

  20. Assisted laser ablation: silver/gold nanostructures coated with silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, J. R.; Rodríguez-González, Eugenio; Jiménez-Villar, Ernesto; Cesar, Carlos Lenz; Andrade-Arvizu, Jacob Antonio

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis processes of metallic nanoparticles have seen a growing interest in recent years, mainly by the potential applications of the phenomenon of localized surface plasmon resonance associated with metallic nanoparticles. This paper shows a fast method to synthesize silver, gold and silver/gold alloy nanoparticles coated with a porous silica shell by the assisted laser ablation method in three steps. The method involves a redox chemical reaction where the reducing agent is supplied in nanometric form by laser ablation. In the first step, a silicon target immersed in water is ablated for several minutes. Later, AgNO3 and HAuCl4 aliquots are added to the solution. The redox reaction between the silver and gold ions and products resulting from ablation process can produce silver, gold or silver/gold alloy nanoparticles coated with a porous silica shell. The influence of the laser pulse energy, ablation time, Ag+ and Au3+ concentration, as well as the Ag+/Au3+ ratio, on optical and structural properties of the nanostructures was investigated. This work represents a step forward in the study of reaction mechanisms that take place during the synthesis of nanoscale materials by the assisted laser ablation technique.

  1. Effect of aging on copper nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    2009-06-23

    Jun 23, 2009 ... using 1064 nm wavelength of pulsed Nd : YAG laser. The present paper deals with synthesis of copper and copper oxide nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in water and effect of aging on these nanoparticles. 2. Experimental. To produce the copper nanoparticles, a piece of copper metal (99⋅99% ...

  2. Precision machining of pig intestine using ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer J.; Góra, Wojciech S.; Carter, Richard M.; Gunadi, Sonny; Jayne, David; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-01

    Endoluminal surgery for the treatment of early stage colorectal cancer is typically based on electrocautery tools which imply restrictions on precision and the risk of harm through collateral thermal damage to the healthy tissue. As a potential alternative to mitigate these drawbacks we present laser machining of pig intestine by means of picosecond laser pulses. The high intensities of an ultrafast laser enable nonlinear absorption processes and a predominantly nonthermal ablation regime. Laser ablation results of square cavities with comparable thickness to early stage colorectal cancers are presented for a wavelength of 1030 nm using an industrial picosecond laser. The corresponding histology sections exhibit only minimal collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. The depth of the ablation can be controlled precisely by means of the pulse energy. Overall, the application of ultrafast lasers to ablate pig intestine enables significantly improved precision and reduced thermal damage to the surrounding tissue compared to conventional techniques.

  3. Liquid-assisted pulsed laser cleaning with near-infrared and ultraviolet pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoropoulos, Constantine P.; Kim, Dongsik

    2002-02-01

    Liquid-assisted steam nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation is shown to be effective for cleaning contaminant particles as small as 0.3 micrometers in diameter from metallic substrates. The cleaning threshold and efficiency are investigated for the fundamental and frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser harmonics (wavelengths (lambda) equals1064 and 355 nm). The rapid phase- change and thin liquid film ablation processes are examined in order to elucidate the cleaning mechanism. The pressure enhancement accompanying the explosive-vaporization process and the momentum supplied by the ablation plume are the main sources of the augmented cleaning efficiency at moderate laser energy densities.

  4. Introduction to Laser Ablation Video Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gene H; Sloan, Andrew E; Tatsui, Claudio E

    2018-04-01

    Laser ablation (also known as laser interstitial thermal therapy [LITT]) has emerged as an important new technology for treating various disorders of the brain and spine. As with any new or emerging technology, there is a learning curve for its optimal use, and video tutorials can be important learning tools to help bridge gaps in knowledge for those who wish to become more familiar with laser ablation. In this special supplement to Neurosurgical Focus, videos illustrate laser ablation's use in the treatment of epilepsy and failed radiosurgery, as well as technical aspects of performing these procedures in eloquent brain and in the spine. We hope that these videos will enable you to enhance your understanding of the evolving use of laser ablation for disorders of the brain or spine. It is the editors' sincere hope that this will be helpful either in your own practice or in determining whether to refer to a neurosurgical colleague experienced in this field.

  5. UV solid state laser ablation of intraocular lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, A.; Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Commercially available intraocular lenses (IOLs) are manufactured from silicone and acrylic, both rigid (e.g. PMMA) and foldable (hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic biomaterials), behaving different mechanical and optical properties. Recently, the use of apodizing technology to design new diffractive-refractive multifocals improved the refractive outcome of these intraocular lenses, providing good distant and near vision. There is also a major ongoing effort to refine laser refractive surgery to correct other defects besides conventional refractive errors. Using phakic IOLs to treat high myopia potentially provides better predictability and optical quality than corneal-based refractive surgery. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on IOL surface shaping, by drilling circular arrays of holes, with a homemade motorized rotation stage, and scattered holes on the polymer surface. In material science, the most popular lasers used for polymer machining are the UV lasers, and, therefore, we tried in this work the 3rd and the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=355 nm and λ=213 nm respectively). The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variations in surface height and, finally, the ablation rates were also mathematically simulated for depicting the possible laser ablation mechanism(s). The experimental results and the theoretical modelling of UV laser interaction with polymeric IOLs are discussed in relation with the physical (optical, mechanical and thermal) properties of the material, in addition to laser radiation parameters (laser energy fluence, number of pulses). The qualitative aspects of laser ablation at λ=213 nm reveal a

  6. Development of the double-pulse technique to improve the analytical performance of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on solids: Nuclear and geological applications; Developpement de la technique de la double impulsion laser pour ameliorer les performances analytiques de l'Ablation Laser couplee a la Spectrometrie d'Emission Optique (AL/SEO) sur solides: Applications nucleaires et geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.

    2005-10-15

    The double-pulse technique has been developed to improve the analytical performance of Laser Ablation coupled to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA/OES). This approach relies on the addition of a second time-resolved laser pulse to the classical LA/OES system. It has been studied on aluminium alloys according to different geometries of the two laser beams (orthogonal and collinear geometries) before being applied to different materials (synthetic glass, rock, steel, sodium chloride). The increase in emission intensity depends on the temporal parameters, on the excitation energy level of the emission line, on the concentration of the studied element and on the analyzed matrix. The double-pulse LA/OES technique can be particularly interesting to improve the sensitivity towards vitreous matrices containing elements emitting lines with high excitation energy levels. (author)

  7. Automated ablation of dental composite using an IR pulsed laser coupled to a plume emission spectral feedback system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Andrew T.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Dental composites are used as restorative materials for filling cavities, shaping, and covering teeth for esthetic purposes, and as adhesives. Dentists spend more time replacing existing restorations that fail than they do placing new restorations. Tooth colored restorations are difficult to differentiate from the surrounding tooth structure making them challenging to remove without damaging healthy tooth structure. Previous studies have demonstrated that CO2 lasers in conjunction with spectral feedback can be used to selectively remove composite from tooth surfaces. The purpose of this study is to assemble a system that is feasible for clinical use incorporating a spectral feedback system, a scanning system, articulating arm and a clinical handpiece and then evaluate the performance of that system on extracted teeth. In addition, the selectivity of composite removal was analyzed using a high-speed optical coherence tomography system that is suitable for clinical use. The system was capable of rapidly removing composite from small preparations on tooth occlusal surfaces with a mean loss of enamel of less than 20-μm.

  8. Specifications of nanosecond laser ablation with solid targets, aluminum, silicon rubber, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedian, Nader

    2017-09-01

    The ablation parameters such as threshold fluence, etch depth, ablation rate and the effect of material targets were investigated under the interaction of laser pulse with low intensity. The parameters of the laser system are: laser pulse energy in the range of 110-140 mJ, wavelength 1064 nm and pulse duration 20 ns. By macroscopic estimation of the outward images of the ablation and data obtained, we can conclude that the photothermal and photoionization processes have more influence for aluminum ablation. In contrast, for polymer samples, from the macroscopic observation of the border pattern at the irradiated spot, and also the data obtained from the experiment results, we deduce that both chemical change due to heating and photochemical dissociation were effective mechanisms of ablation. However, concerning the two polymer samples, apart from considering the same theoretical ablation model, it is conceived that the photomehanical specifications of PMMA are involved in the ablation parameters. The threshold fluence for an ablation rate of 30 laser shots were obtained as 12.4, 24.64, and 11.71 J cm-2, for aluminum, silicon rubber and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) respectively. The ablation rate is exponentially decreased by the laser-shot number, especially for aluminum. Furthermore, the etch depth after 30 laser shots was measured as 180, 630 and 870 μm, for aluminum, silicon rubber and PMMA, respectively.

  9. Selective Laser Ablation and Melting, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project Advratech will develop a new additive manufacturing (AM) process called Selective Laser Ablation and Melting (SLAM). The key innovation in this...

  10. Effect of substrate temperature and oxygen pressure on the microstructure of thin YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ film deposited on MgO by pulsed-laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Norton, M.; Barry Carter, C.

    1991-10-01

    The microstructure of thin YBa 2Cu 2O 7-δ films, prepared by pulsed-laser ablation, at a range of oxygen pressures and substrate temperatures has been investigated. The thin films were deposited directly onto specially prepared, electron-transparent thin-foil substrates of (001)-oriented MgO. Independent variation of the two parameters was found to affect the microstructure of the thin film. For example, at low substrate temperatures (600°C), the film was found to consist of small (islands, while at higher substrate temperatures (750°C), the film consisted of much larger (> 100 nm diam.) isolated islands. These larger islands were faceted parallel to low index planes (e.g. {100} and {110}). The differences observed in the microstructure of films grown at the two temperatures was related to the degree of mobility of the ablated species on the substrate surface.

  11. Analysis of fabric materials cut using ultraviolet laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Andrew Yeh, J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ablation technology has widely been applied in the clothing industry in recent years. However, the laser mechanism would affect the quality of fabric contours and its components. Hence, this study examined carbonization and oxidation conditions and contour variation in nonwoven, cotton, and composite leather fabrics cut by using an ultraviolet laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. Processing parameters such as laser power, pulse frequency, scanning speed, and number of pulses per spot were adjusted to investigate component variation of the materials and to determine suitable cutting parameters for the fabrics. The experimental results showed that the weights of the component changed substantially by pulse frequency but slightly by laser power, so pulse frequency of 100 kHz and laser power of 14 W were the approximate parameters for three fabrics for the smaller carbonization and a sufficient energy for rapidly cutting, which the pulse duration of laser system was fixed at 300 μs and laser irradiance was 0.98 J/mm2 simultaneously. In addition, the etiolate phenomenon of nonwoven was reduced, and the component weight of cotton and composite leather was closed to the value of knife-cut fabric as the scanning speed increased. The approximate scanning speed for nonwoven and composite leather was 200 mm/s, and one for cotton was 150 mm/s, respectively. The sharper and firmer edge is obtained by laser ablation mechanism in comparison with traditional knife cutting. Experimental results can serve as the reference for laser cutting in the clothing industry, for rapidly providing smoother patterns with lower carbonization and oxidation edge in the fashion industry.

  12. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Dou, Hong-qiang [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan Engineering Technical College, Deyang 618000 (China); Liao, Wei, E-mail: liaowei@caep.cn [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The fs laser ablation of borosilicate glass (K9) were investigated under 35 and 500 fs pulses. • At high fluence regime, the ablation rate at 35 fs in air increased to a plateau, and 500 fs in air and vacuum decreased. • The mechanisms of multiple-photon ionization and impact ionization were included. • The ablation morphologies of smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures were presented and illustrated. • The ablation mechanisms of non-thermal and thermal ablation were included. - Abstract: Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm{sup 2} and 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and vacuum, which may due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air, and/or the shielding effects of conduction band electrons (CBEs) produced by multi-photon ionization and impact ionization in K9 glass surface. The typical ablation morphologies, e.g. smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were also presented and illustrated.

  13. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldatov, A. N., E-mail: general@tic.tsu.ru; Vasilieva, A. V., E-mail: anita-tomsk@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenin ave., 36, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  14. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  15. Ablation characteristics of aluminum oxide and nitride ceramics during femtosecond laser micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Jeong, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics was performed under normal atmospheric conditions (λ = 785 nm, τ p = 185 fs, repetition rate = 1 kHz), and threshold laser fluencies for single- and multi-pulse ablation were determined. The ablation characteristics of the two ceramics showed similar trends except for surface morphologies, which revealed virtually no melting in Al 2 O 3 but clear evidence of melting for AlN. Based on subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, the chemistry of these ceramics appeared to remain the same before and after femtosecond laser ablation.

  16. Chemically assisted laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi

    2003-01-15

    A new laser ablation technique combined with a chemical evaporation reaction has been developed for elemental ratio analysis of solid samples using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Using a chemically assisted laser ablation (CIA) technique developed in this study, analytical repeatability of the elemental ratio measurement was successively improved. To evaluate the reliability of the CLA-ICPMS technique, Pb/U isotopic ratios were determined for zircon samples that have previously been analyzed by other techniques. Conventional laser ablation for Pb/U shows a serious elemental fractionation during ablation mainly due to the large difference in elemental volatility between Pb and U. In the case of Pb/U ratio measurement, a Freon R-134a gas (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was introduced into the laser cell as a fluorination reactant. The Freon gas introduced into the laser cell reacts with the ablated sample U, and refractory U compounds are converted to a volatile U fluoride compound (UF6) under the high-temperature condition at the ablation site. This avoids the redeposition of U around the ablation pits. Although not all the U is reacted with Freon, formation of volatile UF compounds improves the transmission efficiency of U. Typical precision of the 206Pb/238U ratio measurement is 3-5% (2sigma) for NIST SRM 610 and Nancy 91500 zircon standard, and the U-Pb age data obtained here show good agreement within analytical uncertainties with the previously reported values. Since the observed Pb/U ratio for solid samples is relatively insensitive to laser power and ablation time, optimization of ablation conditions or acquisition parameters no longer needs to be performed on a sample-to-sample basis.

  17. Photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Van Phuc, Nguyen; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) over 20 years. Recently, application of high laser power up to 200 W was often reported to swiftly remove a large amount of prostatic tissue. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue vaporization with low laser power. Chicken breast tissue was selected as a target tissue due to minimal optical absorption at the visible wavelength. Four biocompatible photoactive dyes, including amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532 nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm(2) . Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-Vis spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2 ± 0.2 µm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. High aspect ratios up to 7.1 ± 0.4 entailed saturation behavior in the tissue ablation injected with AR and BD, possibly resulting from plume shielding and increased scattering due to coagulation. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33% reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. Due to

  18. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  19. Laser ablation of titanium in liquid in external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9 Institutskiy per., 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in liquid is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. • Applied cathodic bias leads to increase in average size of self-organized nanostructures formed upon ablation of titanium target. • Laser ablation of Ti target in external electric field results in generation of elongated titanium oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in water is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. It is demonstrated that both lateral size of nanostructures (NS) on Ti surface and their density depend on the electric field applied to the target. Scanning Electron Microscopy of NS reveals the shift of their size distribution function toward larger sizes with applied field (cathodic bias, 25 V DC). Density of mushroom-like NS with applied electric field amounts to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. X-ray diffraction of generated nanoparticles (NPs) shows difference in the crystallographic structure of NPs of non-stoichiometric Ti oxides generated with and without electric field. This conclusion is corroborated with the optical absorption spectroscopy of obtained colloids. Transmission Electron Microscopy of NPs also shows difference in morphology of particles produced with and without cathodic bias. The results are interpreted on the basis of instability of the melt on Ti surface in the electric field.

  20. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, S., E-mail: rapp@hm.edu [Faculty of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstraße 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Straße 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Heinrich, G. [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Straße 25., 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); Wollgarten, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Huber, H. P. [Faculty of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstraße 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Schmidt, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Lehrstuhl für Photonische Technologien, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 3-5, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  1. Physical mechanisms of SiNx layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, S.; Heinrich, G.; Wollgarten, M.; Huber, H. P.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN x ) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm 2 and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN x layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN x island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates

  2. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    isopropyl alcohol. Ablation in n-hexane also showed diffraction patterns correlating with carbides, and water showed oxygen incorporation. These results showed the ability to utilize the solvent in tailoring nanoparticles to achieve desired properties. Zirconium and nickel were ablated with the Nd:YAG at 532 nm. These studies utilized a stainless steel chamber designed and built to improve control over the experimental variables. The nickel study showcased the new chamber's ability for reproducibility in a size dependence study based upon laser fluence. The results of ablation with the Nd:YAG were compared to femtosecond ablation experiments performed with a titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system. The Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser operated at 10 Hz, produced femtosecond pulses centered at ˜795 nm. The pulse duration was varied from 100 fs to 390 fs, the nanoparticles created from each condition were characterized, and the results are presented in chapters 5 and 6. Aluminum nanoparticles were made using both nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation techniques. Aluminum nanoparticles have a great deal of potential for use as fuel additives as well as in paints and coatings. The nanosecond ablation process rendered large nanoparticles (over 200 nm) and the results are briefly shown in Appendix A. The femtosecond system produced a much smaller distribution of nanoparticles, with nanoparticles remaining in suspension for over a month's time, as evidenced by their unique UV-Vis absorbance. These nanoparticles were produced in isopropyl alcohol, and were stabilized by the solvent, as TEM analysis showed nanoparticles with very little oxygen incorporation. The solvent is bound to the nanoparticles as a result of the formation process and as a result forms a protective coating, which prevents further oxidation over time. The remarkable stability of these aluminum nanoparticles is a testament of employing the high energy scheme of the laser ablation process in a manner to

  3. A comparative study of pulsed Nd:YAG and CO2 laser effect on cardiovascular tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Yova, D.; Papadakis, E.; Kassis, K.; Agapitos, E.; Kavantzas, N.; Koutsouris, D.; Serafetinidis, A.

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous laser angioplasty is receiving increasing attention, as laser ablation of atheromatous plaque presents advantages to direct surgery or balloon angioplasty. One of the main prerequisites of using powerful pulsed lasers in angioplasty is the optimum choice of the irradiation parameters (the wavelength, the pulse shape and duration, the energy parameters e.t.c.). Infrared lasers have numerous applications in surgery. Among them the pulsed CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 µm and the pulsed...

  4. Surface wettability of silicon substrates enhanced by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Shih-Feng [National Applied Research Laboratories, Instrument Technology Research Center, Hsinchu (China); National Chiao Tung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hsinchu (China); Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Hsiao, Sheng-Yi [National Applied Research Laboratories, Instrument Technology Research Center, Hsinchu (China); Chen, Ming-Fei [National Changhua University of Education, Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Changhua (China); Lin, Yung-Sheng [Hungkuang University, Department of Applied Cosmetology and Graduate Institute of Cosmetic Science, Taichung (China); Chou, Chang-Pin [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hsinchu (China)

    2010-11-15

    Laser-ablation techniques have been widely applied for removing material from a solid surface using a laser-beam irradiating apparatus. This paper presents a surface-texturing technique to create rough patterns on a silicon substrate using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The different degrees of microstructure and surface roughness were adjusted by the laser fluence and laser pulse duration. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a 3D confocal laser-scanning microscope are used to measure the surface micrograph and roughness of the patterns, respectively. The contact angle variations between droplets on the textured surface were measured using an FTA 188 video contact angle analyzer. The results indicate that increasing the values of laser fluence and laser pulse duration pushes more molten slag piled around these patterns to create micro-sized craters and leads to an increase in the crater height and surface roughness. A typical example of a droplet on a laser-textured surface shows that the droplet spreads very quickly and almost disappears within 0.5167 s, compared to a contact angle of 47.9 on an untextured surface. This processing technique can also be applied to fabricating Si solar panels to increase the absorption efficiency of light. (orig.)

  5. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, J.; Maibohm, C.; Kostiucenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    enhancements on and around the gold nanostructures. At the positions of the enhancements, the ablation threshold of the polymer coating is significantly lowered creating subdiffractional topographic modifications on the surface which are quantified via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy......The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field....... The obtained experimental results for different polymer coating thicknesses and nanostructure geometries are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of the near field distribution for corresponding enhancement mechanisms. The developed method and its tunable experimental parameters show...

  6. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  7. Electrical and optical properties of thin indium tin oxide films produced by pulsed laser ablation in oxygen or rare gas atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Nordskov, A.

    1999-01-01

    Films of indium tin oxide (ITO) have been produced in different background gases by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Films deposited in rare gas atmospheres on room temperature substrates were metallic, electrically conductive, but had poor transmission of visible light. For substrate temperatu......Films of indium tin oxide (ITO) have been produced in different background gases by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Films deposited in rare gas atmospheres on room temperature substrates were metallic, electrically conductive, but had poor transmission of visible light. For substrate...... temperatures at 200 degrees C, the specific resistivity was reduced and the transmission of visible light enhanced for all background gases. Films produced in oxygen turned out to be superior to films deposited in other gases at the same temperature. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. Polymers designed for laser ablation-influence of photochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, T.; Dickinson, J.T.; Hauer, M.; Kopitkovas, G.; Langford, S.C.; Masuhara, H.; Nuyken, O.; Robert, J.; Salmio, H.; Tada, T.; Tomita, K.; Wokaun, A.

    2002-01-01

    The ablation characteristics of various polymers were studied at low and high fluences. The polymers can be divided into three groups, i.e. polymers containing triazene and ester groups, the same polymers without the triazene group, and polyimide as reference polymer. At high fluences similar ablation parameters, i.e. etch rates and effective absorption coefficients, were obtained for all polymers. The main difference is the absence of carbon deposits for the designed polymers. At low fluences (at 308 nm) very pronounced differences are detected. The polymers containing the photochemically most active group (triazene) exhibit the lowest threshold of ablation (as low as 25 mJ cm -2 ) and the highest etch rates (up to 3 μm/pulse), followed by the designed polyesters and then polyimide. The laser-induced decomposition of the designed polymers was studied by nanosecond-interferometry. Only the triazene-polymer reveals etching without any sign of surface swelling, which is observed for all other polymers. The etching of the triazene-polymer starts and ends with the laser pulse, clearly indicating photochemical etching. The triazene-polymer was also studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The intensities of the ablation fragments show pronounced differences between irradiation at the absorption band of the triazene group (308 nm) and irradiation at a shorter wavelength (248 nm)

  9. Laser ablation studies in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Edric; Forbes, A.; Turner, G. R.; Michaelis, Max M.

    2000-08-01

    With the launch of the South African National Laser Centre, new programs will need to be defined. Medical, environmental and industrial laser applications must obviously take top priority -- as opposed to the uranium isotope separation and military applications of the past. We argue however, that a small effort in laser ablation for space propulsion is justifiable, since a few very large CO2 lasers are available and since two tentative propulsion experiments have already been conducted in South Africa. We attempt to give LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) an equatorial and a Southern dimension.

  10. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  11. Laser ablation deposition measurements from silver and nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate for laser ablated metals has been studied in a standard geometry for fluences up to 20 J/cm(2). The rate for silver and nickel is a few percent of a monolayer per pulse at the laser wavelengths 532 nm and 355 nm. The rate for nickel is significantly higher than that for silver...... at 532 nm, whereas the rate for the two metals is similar at 355 nm. This behaviour disagrees with calculations based on the thermal properties at low intensities as well as predictions based on formation of an absorbing plasma at high intensities. The deposition rate falls strongly with increasing...

  12. Soft x-ray laser ablation of metals and dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.; Ishino, M.; Inogamov, N.; Zhakhovsky, V.; Skobelev, I.; Hasegawa, N.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Kodama, R.; Kawachi, T.

    2017-05-01

    We present an overview of our systematic studies of the surface modifications resulting from the interactions of both single and multiple picosecond soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses with materials, such as gold (Au), copper (Cu), aluminum (Al), and lithium fluoride (LiF). We show experimentally the possibility of the precise nanometer size structures ( 10-40 nm) formation on their surfaces by ultra-low ( 10-30 mJ/cm2 ) fluencies of single picosecond SXRL pulse. Comparison experimental results with the atomistic model of ablation, which was developed for the single SXRL shot interaction with dielectrics and metals, is provided. Theoretical description of surface nanostructures is considered and is shown that such structures are formed after laser illumination in a process of mechanical spallation of ultrathin surface layer of molten metal. Spallation is accompanied by a strong foaming of melt, breaking of foam, and freezing of foam remnants. Those remnants form chaotic nanostructures, which are observed in experiments. Our measurements show that electron temperature of matter under irradiation of SXRL was lower than 1 eV. The model calculation also predicts that the ablation induced by the SXRL can create the significant low electron temperature. Our results demonstrate that tensile stress created in LiF and metals by short SXRL pulse can produce spallative ablation of target even for drastically small fluencies, which open new opportunities for material nano processing.

  13. Laser surface and subsurface modification of sapphire using femtosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, G., E-mail: eberle@iwf.mavt.ethz.ch [Institute of Machine Tools and Manufacturing, ETH Zurich, Leonhardstrasse 21, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Schmidt, M. [Chair of Photonic Technologies, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 3-5, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Pude, F. [Inspire AG, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Zurich (Switzerland); Wegener, K. [Institute of Machine Tools and Manufacturing, ETH Zurich, Leonhardstrasse 21, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Inspire AG, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Single and multipulse ablation threshold of aluminium oxide is determined. • Laser ablation, and in-volume modification followed by wet etching are demonstrated. • Quality following laser processing and laser-material interactions are studied. - Abstract: Two methods to process sapphire using femtosecond laser pulses are demonstrated, namely ablation (surface), and in-volume laser modification followed by wet etching (subsurface). Firstly, the single and multipulse ablation threshold is determined and compared with previous literature results. A unique application of ablation is demonstrated by modifying the entrance aperture of water jet orifices. Laser ablation exhibits advantages in terms of geometric flexibility and resolution, however, defects in the form of edge outbreaks and poor surface quality are evident. Secondly, the role of material transformation, polarisation state and formation of multi-focus structures after in-volume laser modification is investigated in order to explain their influence during the wet etching process. Laser scanning and electron microscopy as well as electron backscatter diffraction measurements supported by ion beam polishing are used to better understand quality and laser-material interactions of the two demonstrated methods of processing.

  14. Laser ablation of silver and gold in liquid ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmejkal, Petr; Pfleger, Jiří; Vlčková, Blanka

    2010-10-01

    Laser ablation of a silver (Ag) and/or gold (Au) target was performed in liquid ammonia (l-NH3) at 233 K using nanosecond laser pulses of 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths. An “in situ” monitoring of the ablation process by UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy has shown the evolution of the surface plasmon extinction band of silver or gold nanoparticles and thus confirmed their formation. While sols of Au nanoparticles in l-NH3 are quite stable in air, those of Ag nanoparticles undergo oxidation to Ag(I) complexes with NH3 ligands. On the other hand, formation of solvated electrons, namely of the (e-)NH3 solvates, has not been unequivocally confirmed under the conditions of our laser ablation/nanoparticle fragmentation experiment, since only very weak vis/NIR spectral features of these solvates were observed with a low reproducibility. Reference experiments have shown that the well-known chemical production of these solvates is hindered by the presence of Ag and Au plates. Ag and Au targets can thus possibly act as electron scavengers in our ablation experiments.

  15. Double pulse laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Changbum [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chbkim@postech.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Cheol B. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kukhee [National Fusion Reserch Center, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, In Soo [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Hyyong [Center for Advanced Accelerators, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-22

    Two-dimensional simulation studies are performed for modified laser wakefield acceleration. After one laser pulse, another identical laser pulse is sent to the plasma to amplify the wake wave resonantly. The simulation results show that the number of injected electrons is bigger than that of the single pulse case and the beam energy is higher as well. In addition, increase of the transverse amplitude is noticed in the wake wave after the second laser pulse. This shows that the transverse motion of the wake wave enhances the wave breaking for strong injection and acceleration of electron beams.

  16. Effects of plasma confinement on the femtosecond laser ablation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyun; Yao, Jianwu; Lan, Sheng; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in a confined condition by covering the surface of a silicon wafer with a glass slide. The ablation was carried out by either irradiating the focused spot with different numbers of pulses or by scanning the laser beam on the surface of the silicon wafer. The morphology of the ablated surface was characterized by scanning electron microscope. For laser fluences much larger than the ablation threshold of silicon, cylindrical holes were generated in the confined ablation, in sharp contrast to the conical holes observed in the ablation performed in open air. Accordingly, grooves with U-shaped and V-shaped cross sections were achieved in the ablations carried out in the confined condition and in open air, respectively. For laser fluences close to the ablation threshold of silicon, the difference in the morphology of micro- and nanostructures obtained by these two ablation methods became not pronounced and two-dimensional nanohole arrays were created on the surface of silicon wafer. While the period of the nanohole arrays in the direction of the laser polarization was found to be close to the laser wavelength, the period in the direction perpendicular to the laser polarization was observed to be more than two times of the laser wavelength. In addition, the distribution of erupted nanoparticles was also found to be different in the two ablation processes. A ring-shaped distribution of nanoparticles was observed in the open air ablation while a monotonic decrease of nanoparticle density along the radial direction was found in the confined ablation.

  17. Advantages of dual-laser ablation in the growth of multicomponent thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Devajyoti; Hyde, Robert; Mukherjee, Pritish; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2012-07-01

    We report the use of a dual-laser deposition process to grow stoichiometric films of the piezoelectric material PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) and the thermoelectric material Ba8Ga16Ge30. High volatility of Pb and Ba in these materials leads to non-stoichiometric growth in conventional PLD processes. Dual-laser ablation process preserves the Pb and Ba stoichiometry while significantly reducing the thickness variation and particulate density on the deposited films. This lead to the growth of smooth uniform films with enhanced ferroelectric and electrical properties. The dual-laser ablation combines the pulses of a KrF excimer laser (248 nm wavelength, 30 ns pulse width) and a CO2 laser (10.6 μm wavelength, 250 ns pulse width) where the beams are spatially overlapped on the ablation target and temporally delayed. At an optimum delay that is dependent on the physical properties of the material, CO2 pulse energy is coupled into the plume, generating a high temperature plasma (>25,000K). Laser-target interaction studies have shown the evaporation to be stoichiometric. Emission spectroscopy studies have shown ten-fold increase in emission intensities in dual-laser ablation while time-gated 2D ICCD imaging studies revealed the plume expansion to be stoichiometric over a large cone-angle of the plume under these conditions. Time-of-flight investigations in concert with hydrodynamic modeling provided a clear understanding of the mechanism of dual-laser ablation. Furthermore, plasma generated in the process is highly ionized (>75%) leading to films with high density and crystallinity. This paper will show the enhancement in properties attainable by the dual-laser ablation process in comparison to the single laser ablation.

  18. Laser ablation synthesis of monodispersed magnetic alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Takafumi; Koga, Kenji; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Orii, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Monodispersed CoPt alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique coupled with a low-pressure operating differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The CoPt alloy nanoparticles were generated by laser ablating a solid Co-Pt target. In CoPt alloy nanoparticles synthesized from a target with a Co composition of 75 at%, the nanoparticle surfaces were covered by an oxide layer and exhibited a core-shell structure. In contrast, no shell was observed in particles generated from a target with a Co:Pt ratio of 50:50 at%. According to an EDX analysis, the compositions of the individual nanoparticles were almost the same as that of the target material. Finally, the magnetic hysteresis loops of the CoPt alloy nanoparticles exhibited ferromagnetism

  19. Laser Ablation Experiments on the Tamdakht H5 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Stern, Eric

    2017-01-01

    High-powered lasers were used to induce ablation and to form fusion crusts in the lab on Tamdakht H5 chondrites and basalt. These ground tests were undertaken to improve our understanding, and ultimately improve our abilty to model and predict, meteoroid ablation during atmospheric entry. The infrared fiber laser at the LHMEL facilty, operated in the continuous wave (i.e. non-pulsed) mode, provided radiation surface heat flux at levels similar to meteor entry for these tests. Results are presented from the first round of testing on samples of Tamdakht H5 ordinary chondrite which were ex-posed to entry-relevant heating rates between 2 and 10 kWcm2.

  20. Nanostructured films of metal particles obtained by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz-Miranda, M.; Gellini, C.; Giorgetti, E.; Margheri, G.; Marsili, P.; Lascialfari, L.; Becucci, L.; Trigari, S.; Giammanco, F.

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions of silver and gold nanoparticles were obtained in pure water by ablation with nanosecond pulsed laser. Then, by filtration of the metal particles on alumina, we fabricated nanostructured films, whose surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and related to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) after adsorption of adenine. - Highlights: • Ag and Au colloidal nanoparticles were obtained by laser ablation. • Nanostructured Ag and Au films were fabricated by filtration of metal nanoparticles. • Surface morphology of metal films was investigated by atomic force microscopy. • Surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of adenine on metal films were obtained. • SERS enhancements were related to the surface roughness of the metal films

  1. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, Luisa; Marsili, Paolo; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Margheri, Giancarlo; Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto; Giorgetti, Emilia; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids

  2. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  3. Particle size determination of silver nanoparticles generated by plasma laser ablation using a deconvolution method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, Daniele; Bellutti, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, 6-10 (2010), s. 706-712 ISSN 1042-0150. [International Workshop on Pulsed Plasma Laser Ablation (PPLA)/4./. Monte Pieta, Messina, 18.06.2009-20.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : nanoparticles * plasma * laser ablation * surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  4. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi-zhen; Yao, Cai-zhen; Dou, Hong-qiang; Liao, Wei; Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie; Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong; Zu, Xiao-tao

    2017-06-01

    Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm2 and 2.1 J/cm2 were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and vacuum, which may due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air, and/or the shielding effects of conduction band electrons (CBEs) produced by multi-photon ionization and impact ionization in K9 glass surface. The typical ablation morphologies, e.g. smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were also presented and illustrated.

  5. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm{sup 3}/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  6. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  7. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... with AFR incorporating our personal experience. AFR is still in the exploratory era, and systematic investigations of clinical outcomes related to various system settings are needed....

  8. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  9. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    emission spectroscopy. Second, deposition rate and fast ion probe measurements have been used to study the plume propagation dynamics during laser ablation of a silver target, over a large range of Ar background gas pressures (from high vacuum to approximate to 100 Pa). A comparative analysis...

  10. Laser ablation of dental materials using a microsecond Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniaeva, M. L.; Siniavsky, M. N.; Pashinin, V. P.; Mamedov, Ad. A.; Konov, V. I.; Kononenko, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The action of microsecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1064 nm on dental tissues (enamel and dentin) and various dental materials used for tooth replacement and filling (ceramics, metal alloys, and composites) is studied. It is demonstrated that the ablation thresholds of all of the dental materials are significantly lower than the threshold laser fluences for the dental tissue ( E thr = 200-300 J/cm2). At the laser fluences that do not allow ablation and damage of the dental tissues, the dental materials are effectively removed at a rate of no greater than 40 μm per pulse. It is shown that the laser ablation of the materials under study involves two processes (evaporation and volume explosion) depending on the optical density. The results obtained indicate that the laser radiation with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the microsecond pulse duration is promising for dental applications, since it allows effective cleaning of the tooth surface from various dental materials in the absence of the damages of dental tissues.

  11. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  12. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced

  13. Molybdenum oxide nanocolloids prepared by an external field-assisted laser ablation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadaro Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available he synthesis of extremely stable molybdenum oxide nanocolloids by pulsed laser ablation was studied. This green technique ensures the formation of contaminant-free nanostructures and the absence of by-products. A focused picosecond pulsed laser beam was used to ablate a solid molybdenum target immersed in deionized water. Molybdenum oxide nearly spherical nanoparticles with dimensions within few nanometers (20-100 nm are synthesized when the ablation processes were carried out, in water, at room temperature and 80°C. The application of an external electric field during the ablation process induces a nanostructures reorganization, as indicated by Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy images analysis. The ablation products were also characterized by some spectroscopic techniques: conventional UV-vis optical absorption, atomic absorption, dynamic light scattering, micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Finally, NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were used to evaluate cell viability by the sulforhodamine B assay

  14. Synthesis of green TiO2/ZnO/CdS hybrid nano-catalyst for efficient light harvesting using an elegant pulsed laser ablation in liquids method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondal, M.A.; Ilyas, A.M.; Fasasi, T.A.; Dastageer, M.A.; Seddigi, Z.S.; Qahtan, T.F.; Faiz, M.; Khattak, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile strategy for synthesis of green catalyst (TiO 2 /ZnO/CdS) was developed. • Clean synthesis of green catalyst was done using pulsed laser ablation in liquids. • Synthesized composite size ranges between 10 and 40 nm confirmed by HRTEM studies. • Enhanced improvement was noticed in the carriers transport in the visible region. • Visible region absorption opens door to many applications for solar energy harvesting. - Abstract: The main limitation on the applications of TiO 2 as a photocatalyst is its large band gap (3.2 eV) which limits its absorption only to the ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum. To overcome this problem, a facile strategy for clean synthesis of a nanocomposite green catalyst of zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) and cadmium sulphide (CdS) was developed using pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) technique for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The main aim of addition of ZnO is to reduce the electron–hole recombination in the TiO 2 while CdS is used to increase the light harvesting efficiency of TiO 2 in the visible spectral region. The absorption spectrum of the TiO 2 /ZnO/CdS composite obtained from the UV–vis spectrophotometer exhibits strong absorption in the visible region as compared to the pure TiO 2 whose absorption band lies around 380 nm which is in the UV-region. The morphology of the composite quantum dots was also investigated using high resolution TEM technique which shows that the synthesized composite size ranges between 10 and 40 nm. These nanocomposites have demosntarted noticible improvement in the carriers transport in the visible region which could enhance its efficiency for many applications in the visible region especially for energy harvesting using solar radiations.

  15. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-01-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  16. Pulsed laser processing of electronic materials in micro/nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David Jen

    2005-08-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe side-view imaging has been performed to investigate the energy coupling to the target specimen over a wide range of fluences. Plasmas generated during the laser ablation process are visualized and the decrease of the ablation efficiency in the high fluence regime (>10 J/cm2) is attributed to the strong interaction of the laser pulse with the laser-induced plasmas. The high intensity ultra-short laser pulses also trigger volumetric multi-photon absorption (MPA) processes that can be beneficial in applications such as three-dimensional bulk modification of transparent materials. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to fabricate straight and bent through-channels in the optical glass. Drilling was initiated from the rear surface to preserve consistent absorbing conditions of the laser pulse. Machining in the presence of a liquid solution assisted the debris ejection. Drilling process was further enhanced by introducing ultrasonic waves, thereby increasing the aspect ratio of drilled holes and improving the quality of the holes. In conventional lens focusing schemes, the minimum feature size is determined by the diffraction limit. Finer resolution is accomplished by combining pulsed laser radiation with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) probes. Short laser pulses are coupled to a fiber-based NSOM probes in order to ablate thin metal films. A detailed parametric study on the effects of probe aperture size, laser pulse energy, temporal width and environment gas is performed. The significance of lateral thermal diffusion is highlighted and the dependence of the ablation process on the imparted near-field distribution is revealed. As a promising application of laser ablation in nanoscale, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been built up based on NSOM ablation configuration. NSOM-LIBS is demonstrated with nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on Cr sample. Far-field collecting scheme by top objective lens was chosen as

  17. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Al-Hadeethi

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX. The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  18. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  19. Nanostructuring of ITO thin films through femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ramazan; Kabacelik, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    Due to reduced thermal effects, tightly focused femtosecond laser beams can yield submicron resolution with minimal side effects. In laser direct writing applications, diffraction-free nature of the Bessel beams relaxes alignment of the sample and shortens the production time. Micron-sized central spots and long depth of focused beams can be simultaneously produced. We apply fs Bessel beam single-pulse ablation method to transparent conductive oxide films. We use laser of 1030 nm wavelength and two different axicons (base angles are 25° and 40°). Fabricated structures are characterized by optical microscope, atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. Laser beam shaping and virtues of non-diffracted Bessel beams provide periodic structures for scribing in the solar cells or high-resolution displays and reduce the process time.

  20. Stress assisted selective ablation of ITO thin film by picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Nazar; Chan, Helios; Milne, David; Brunton, Adam; M. O'Connor, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    Fast selective pattering with high precession on 175 nm ITO thin film with IR ps lasers is investigated. Ablation parameters are optimized with detailed studies on the scribed depth, topography, and particle generation using AFM and SEM. A comparison of 10 and 150 ps laser revealed that the shorter pulse (10 ps) laser is more appropriate in selective and partial ablation; up to 20 nm resolution for controlled depth with multipulses having energy below the damage threshold is demonstrated. The experimental results are interpreted to involve stress assisted ablation mechanism for the 10 ps laser while thermal ablation along with intense melting occurs for 150 ps laser. The transition between these regimes is estimated to occur at approximately 30 ps.

  1. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos [Okemos, MI; Lozovoy, Vadim V [Okemos, MI; Comstock, Matthew [Milford, MI

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  2. Angular distributions of emitted particles by laser ablation of silver at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver in vacuum has been measured in situ with an array of quartz-crystal microbalances. The silver surface was irradiated by ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 355 nm for fluences ranging from 0.7 J/cm2 to 8 J/cm2. The distribution is strongly...

  3. Femtosecond-pulse laser-ablation-induced synthesis and improved emission properties of ultrafine Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles with reduced nonradiative relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Changbin, E-mail: zhengchangbin@ciomp.ac.cn; Yang, Guilong; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Chunrui; Wang, Hualong; Chen, Fei; He, Yang

    2015-11-05

    Nanomaterials with effective visible upconversion emission have received special attention due to the potential application in the fields including biological labeling, imaging, and photodynamic therapy. The main focus of this work is the improvement of the upconversion emission properties, which is enhanced emission intensity and prolonged decay time, by reducing nonradiative relaxation assisted by high energy phonon. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles (considerably < 50 nm) were directly prepared through femtosecond-pulse laser ablation conducted on the corresponding oxide mixture. It was observed that the number of carbonate and hydroxyl groups remaining in the nanoparticles was decreased. The upconversion and infrared emission properties of the particles were investigated using 976-nm continuous-wave laser radiation, and it was found that the relative red-to-green emission intensity decreased. The samples also exhibited higher integral intensity and reduced power dependence on the excitation intensity, which indicates a more effective upconversion process. The decay time for upconversion emission was lengthened, and for the first time (to the best of our knowledge), infrared emission at 1550 nm was almost suppressed. As a result of the elimination of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups, nonradiative relaxation assisted by high-energy phonons was reduced, thereby increasing the decay time and upconversion emission and decreasing the infrared emission. - Graphical abstract: Reduced nonradiative relaxation leads to higher upconversion emission intensity and decreased relative red-to-green emission intensity. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} nanoparticles are prepared by laser ablation on the oxide mixture. • Number of carbonate and hydroxyl groups in the nanoparticles is decreased. • These nanoparticles present improved emission properties. • For the first time, infrared emission at 1550 nm is almost suppressed.

  4. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates microscopic vertical ablated channels that are surrounded by a thin layer of coagulated tissue, constituting the microscopic treatment zones (MTZs). AFR induces epidermal and dermal remodeling, which raises new possibilities for the treatment...... of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...

  5. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...

  6. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  7. Comparative study on Pulsed Laser Deposition and Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation of urease thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smausz, Tomi; Megyeri, Gabor; Kekesi, Renata; Vass, Csaba; Gyoergy, Eniko; Sima, Felix; Mihailescu, Ion N.; Hopp, Bela

    2009-01-01

    Urease thin films were produced by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) and Pulsed Laser Deposition from two types of targets: frozen water solutions of urease with different concentrations (1-10% m/v) and pure urease pellets. The fluence of the ablating KrF excimer laser was varied between 300 and 2200 mJ/cm 2 . Fourier transform infrared spectra of the deposited films showed no difference as compared to the original urease. Morphologic studies proved that the films consist of a smooth 'base' layer with embedded micrometer-sized droplets. Absorption-coefficient measurements contradicted the traditional 'absorptive matrix' model for MAPLE deposition. The laser energy was absorbed by urease clusters leading to a local heating-up and evaporation of the frozen matrix from the uppermost layer accompanied by the release of dissolved urease molecules. Significant enzymatic activity of urease was preserved only during matrix assisted transfer.

  8. Numerical Response Surfaces of Volume of Ablation and Retropulsion Amplitude by Settings of Ho:YAG Laser Lithotripter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian J. Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis due to shorter operation time and a better stone-free rate, the optimal laser settings for URS (ureteroscopic lithotripsy for less operation time remain unclear. The aim of this study was to look for quantitative responses of calculus ablation and retropulsion by performing operator-independent experiments to determine the best fit versus the pulse energy, pulse width, and the number of pulses. Methods. A lab-built Ho:YAG laser was used as the laser pulse source, with a pulse energy from 0.2 J up to 3.0 J and a pulse width of 150 μs up to 1000 μs. The retropulsion was monitored using a high-speed camera, and the laser-induced craters were evaluated with a 3-D digital microscope. The best fit to the experimental data is done by a design of experiment software. Results. The numerical formulas for the response surfaces of ablation speed and retropulsion amplitude are generated. Conclusions. The longer the pulse, the less the ablation or retropulsion, while the longer pulse makes the ablation decrease faster than the retropulsion. The best quadratic fit of the response surface for the volume of ablation varied nonlinearly with pulse duration and pulse number.

  9. Numerical Response Surfaces of Volume of Ablation and Retropulsion Amplitude by Settings of Ho:YAG Laser Lithotripter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Jonathan; Solomon, Metasebya; Cheng, Brian; Xuan, Jason R.; Gong, Jason; Yu, Honggang; Xia, Michael L. D.; Yang, Xirong; Hasenberg, Thomas; Curran, Sean

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis due to shorter operation time and a better stone-free rate, the optimal laser settings for URS (ureteroscopic lithotripsy) for less operation time remain unclear. The aim of this study was to look for quantitative responses of calculus ablation and retropulsion by performing operator-independent experiments to determine the best fit versus the pulse energy, pulse width, and the number of pulses. Methods A lab-built Ho:YAG laser was used as the laser pulse source, with a pulse energy from 0.2 J up to 3.0 J and a pulse width of 150 μs up to 1000 μs. The retropulsion was monitored using a high-speed camera, and the laser-induced craters were evaluated with a 3-D digital microscope. The best fit to the experimental data is done by a design of experiment software. Results The numerical formulas for the response surfaces of ablation speed and retropulsion amplitude are generated. Conclusions The longer the pulse, the less the ablation or retropulsion, while the longer pulse makes the ablation decrease faster than the retropulsion. The best quadratic fit of the response surface for the volume of ablation varied nonlinearly with pulse duration and pulse number.

  10. [Mechanism of ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Chao; Chen, Xin-hua; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2015-11-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation has been widely applied in clinical cancer treatment, while its molecular mechanism is still unclear. Researchers have revealed that nanosecond pulsed electric field generates nanopores in plasma membrane, leading to a rapid influx of Ca²⁺; it has specific effect on intracellular organelle membranes, resulting in endoplasmic reticulum injuries and mitochondrial membrane potential changes. In addition, it may also change cellular morphology through damage of cytoskeleton. This article reviews the recent research advances on the molecular mechanism of cell membrane and organelle changes induced by nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation.

  11. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  12. Synthesis of high Al content AlxGa1−xN ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of GaAs and Al targets assisted by nitrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu; Hu, Zhigao; Guo, Shuang; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Al x Ga 1−x N films were synthesized by co-ablation of an Al target and a GaAs target. • Nitrogen plasma was used to assist the synthesis of Al x Ga 1−x N ternary films. • The Al x Ga 1−x N films are slightly rich in N with an Al content above 0.6. • The Al x Ga 1−x N films are hexagonal wurtzite in crystal structure. • The Al x Ga 1−x N films have an absorption edge of 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. - Abstract: We present the synthesis of Al x Ga 1−x N ternary films by pulsed laser co-ablation of a polycrystalline GaAs target and a metallic Al target in the environment of nitrogen plasma which provides nitrogen for the films and assists the formation of nitride films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy exposes the smooth surface appearance and dense film structure. X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy reveal the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Optical characterization shows high optical transmittance with an absorption edge of about 260 nm and a band gap of 4.7 eV. Compositional analysis gives the Al content of about 0.6. The structure and optical properties of the Al x Ga 1−x N films are compared with those of binary GaN and AlN films synthesized by ablating GaAs or Al target with the same nitrogen plasma assistance

  13. Equation of state of matter irradiated by short laser pulse and geometry of spalled cupola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Inogamov, N. A.; Ashitkov, S. I.; Khokhlov, V. A.; Upadhyay, A. K.; Agranat, M. B.; Anisimov, S. I.; Nishihara, K.; Rethfeld, B.; Urbassek, H. M.

    2008-05-01

    The motion of both Lennard-Jones solids and metals induced by ultrashort laser irradiation near the ablation threshold is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The universality of the ablation threshold fluence with respect to the cohesion energy of solids irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated for Lennard-Jones solid and metals simulated by many-body EAM potentials.

  14. Nanostructure formation upon femtosecond ablation from silicon: Effect of double pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Muth, Marco; Arguirov, Tzanimir

    2012-09-01

    To study the dynamics of laser-ablation induced structure formation (LIPPS), silicon was irradiated by (above-threshold) pulse pairs with a variable time-lag between 100 fs and a few picoseconds. With increasing pulse-to-pulse delay we find a significant change in ablated-area morphology: the central range of the irradiated spot becomes less and less depressed whereas a surrounding ring structure exhibits increasingly coarser modulation, typical for strong irradiation, where the ripples are characterized by an alternation between elevation above and depression below the unaffected surface level. At the spot center the ablation depth decreases with increasing pulse separation, showing only structures usually observed for weak irradiation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the modified areas indicates an unexpectedly high, almost mono-dispersed, abundance of confined nanostructures. The results clearly seem to rule out structure formation by any interference-induced modulated ablation. Instead, they support the model of self-organized structure formation upon the creation of a thermally unstable, "soft" state of the target after laser impact.

  15. Real time determination of the laser ablated mass by means of electric field-perturbation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, P.; Álvarez, J.; Sarmiento, R.; Bredice, F.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Palleschi, V.

    2018-04-01

    A Nd:YAG ns-pulsed laser was used to ablate Al, Cd and Zn targets, which were placed between the plates of a planar charged capacitor. The plasma generates a transient redistribution of the electrical charges on the plates that can be measured as a voltage drop across a resistor connected to the ground plate. This signal is proportional to the capacitor applied voltage, the distance between the plates and the total number of ions produced in the ablation process which in turn is related to the laser energy and the ablated mass. After a series of pulses, the targets were weighed on a thermogravimetric balance to measure the ablated mass. Our results show that the electrical signal measured on the resistor is univocally related to the ablated mass from the target. Therefore, after a proper calibration depending on the material and the experimental geometry, the electrical signal can be used for real time quantitative measurement of the ablated mass in pulsed laser generated plasma experiments. The experiments were repeated on an aluminum target, with and without the presence of the external electric field in order to determine the possible influence of the applied electric field on the ablated mass.

  16. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuščer, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed.

  17. Modeling CO2 Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO 2 laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO 2 laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  18. Patterning of silicon differences between nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingärtner, M.; Elschner, R.; Bostanjoglo, O.

    1999-01-01

    Si (100) surfaces were exposed to 8 ns and 100 fs laser pulses with fluences≤3 J/cm 2 and ≤0.5 J/cm 2, respectively. Transient stages and final patterns were investigated by pulsed photoelectron microscopy and scanning electron plus light interference microscopy. Though the pattern formation extends for both pulse lengths over the same time of some 10 ns, the patterns are different. Nanosecond pulses produce smooth craters and remove a covering oxide. Femtosecond pulses ablate an oxide-free Si surface and produce flat pits covered by nanodrops, whereas oxide-covered surfaces are converted to a foam, which solidifies to a blistered structure.

  19. Tuning Optical Nonlinearity of Laser-Ablation-Synthesized Silicon Nanoparticles via Doping Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianwei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanoparticles at different doping concentrations are investigated for tuning their optical nonlinear performance. The silicon nanoparticles are synthesized from doped silicon wafers by pulsed laser ablation. Their dispersions in water are studied for both nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction properties. It is found that the optical nonlinear performance can be modified by the doping concentration. Nanoparticles at a higher doping concentration exhibit better saturable absorption performance for femtosecond laser pulse, which is ascribed to the free carrier absorption mechanism.

  20. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunyi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  1. Study on high-speed deep etching of GaN film by UV laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Sugioka, K.; Wada, S.; Tashiro, H.; Midorikawa, K.

    1998-06-01

    High-speed deep etching of GaN thin films by UV (266 nm) laser ablation followed by a treatment in HCl solution, was achieved. The etch rate was as high as 50 nm/pulse. Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy measurement results indicate that the surface of the etched films was structurally well-defined and cleanly patterned. Micro-photoluminescence measurements of ablated samples revealed no severe damage to the optical properties or the crystal structure. In addition, coupling with VUV (133-184 nm) laser beams, the etch quality of GaN was markedly improved. The etch rate was 55 nm/pulse

  2. Laser-driven hydrothermal process studied with excimer laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Raymond; Rubenchik, Alexander; Fong, Erika; Norton, Mary; Hollingsworth, William; Clarkson, James; Johnsen, Howard; Osborn, David L.

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we discovered [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)] that modest-fluence/modest-intensity 351-nm laser pulses, with insufficient fluence/intensity to ablate rock, mineral, or concrete samples via surface vaporization, still removed the surface material from water-submerged target samples with confinement of the removed material, and then dispersed at least some of the removed material into the water as a long-lived suspension of nanoparticles. We called this new process, which appears to include the generation of larger colorless particles, "laser-driven hydrothermal processing" (LDHP) [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)]. We, now, report that we have studied this process using 248-nm and 193-nm laser light on submerged concrete, quartzite, and obsidian, and, even though light at these wavelengths is more strongly absorbed than at 351 nm, we found that the overall efficiency of LDHP, in terms of the mass of the target removed per Joule of laser-pulse energy, is lower with 248-nm and 193-nm laser pulses than with 351-nm laser pulses. Given that stronger absorption creates higher peak surface temperatures for comparable laser fluence and intensity, it was surprising to observe reduced efficiencies for material removal. We also measured the nascent particle-size distributions that LDHP creates in the submerging water and found that they do not display the long tail towards larger particle sizes that we had observed when there had been a multi-week delay between experiments and the date of measuring the size distributions. This is consistent with transient dissolution of the solid surface, followed by diffusion-limited kinetics of nucleation and growth of particles from the resulting thin layer of supersaturated solution at the sample surface.

  3. Non-monotonic variation of Au nanoparticle yield during femtosecond/picosecond laser ablation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, P. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-05-01

    Ablative multi-shot preparation of gold nanoparticle hydrosols was carried out by raster-scanning a gold plate in deionized water using focused 1030 nm laser pulses of variable pulse width (0.3-6 ps). The relative nanoparticle yield, correlated with the extinction coefficient of colloidal solutions, exhibited an extraordinary non-monotonic variation versus the laser pulse width, which is explained by the electronic dynamics in gold in the lower limit, and either film water boiling or sub-critical peak laser powers in the upper limit.

  4. Low density, non-ablative fractional CO2 laser rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Kaare; Bjerring, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Fractional skin rejuvenation has gained increased interest since its introduction in 2003. Both non-ablative and ablative lasers as well as different treatment techniques have been devised. Recent clinical studies indicate that a paradigm of low spot density combined with high fluences tend to produce better clinical results and less risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. The present study is focused on investigations of the clinical outcome by non-ablative fractional CO(2) treatments with a single pass with low spot density. A CO(2) laser was equipped with a scanner enabling it to perform fractional treatments with 36, 64 or 100 microthermal zones (MTZ)/cm(2). Twelve patients participated in the study. The perioral area was treated three times with 1-month intervals using a spot density of 64 MTZ/cm(2), a spot diameter of 0.5 mm, a micro-beam energy of 36-60 mJ, and a pulse duration of 3-5 milliseconds. Follow-up was performed 3 months after the last treatment. At the 3-month follow-up 72.7% of the volunteers had obtained improvement in ultrasonographically determined dermal density, and the average improvement was 40.2% (SD: 48.0%). This improvement was statistically significant (Plaser treatments.

  5. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser ablation plume dynamics in nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, V. V.; Platonov, V. V.; Lisenkov, V. V.

    2009-06-01

    The dynamics of the plume ejected from the surface of solid targets (YSZ, Nd:YAG and graphite) by a CO2 laser pulse with a duration of ~500 μs (at the 0.03 level), energy of 1.0-1.3 J and peak power of 6-7 kW have been studied using high-speed photography of the plume luminescence and shadow. The targets were used to produce nanopowders by laser evaporation. About 200 μs after termination of the pulse, shadowgraph images of the plumes above the YSZ and Nd:YAG targets showed dark straight tracks produced by large particles. The formation of large (~10 μm) particles is tentatively attributed to cracking of the solidified melt at the bottom of the ablation crater. This is supported by the fact that no large particles are ejected from graphite, which sublimes without melting. Further support to this hypothesis is provided by numerical 3D modelling of melt cooling in craters produced by laser pulses of different shapes.

  6. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  7. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses; Ablação seletiva de um filme de nitreto de titânio em substrato de carboneto de tungstênio utilizando laser de pulsos ultracurtos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-07-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  8. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silver, copper, zinc and tin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of different metals (Ag, Cu, Sn, Zn) has been studied in high vacuum at a laser wavelength of 355 nm and pulse length of 6 ns. The deposition rate is roughly similar for Sn, Cu and Ag, which have comparable cohesive energies, and much higher for the deposition...... of Zn which has a low cohesive energy. The deposition rate for all metals is strongly correlated with the total ablation yield, i.e., the total mass ablated per pulse, reported in the literature except for Sn, for which the deposition rate is low, but the total ablation yield is high. This may...... be explained by the continuous erosion by nanoparticles during deposition of the Sn films which appear to have a much rougher surface than those of the other metals studied in the present work....

  9. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canteli, D., E-mail: david.canteli@ciemat.es [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ctra. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Torres, I.; Gandia, J.J. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 Degree-Sign C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  10. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canteli, D.; Fernandez, S.; Molpeceres, C.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. ► The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. ► A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 °C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  11. A ns-Pulse Laser Microthruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, Claude R.; Luke, James R.; Helgeson, Wesley; Johnson, Richard

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a prototype device which demonstrates the feasibility of using ns-duration laser pulses in a laser microthruster. Relative to the ms-duration thrusters which we have demonstrated in the past, this change offers the use of any target material, the use of reflection-mode target illumination, and adjustable specific impulse. Specific impulse is adjusted by varying laser intensity on target. In this way, we were able to vary specific impulse from 200s to 3,200s on gold. We used a Concepts Research, Inc. microchip laser with 170mW average optical power, 8kHz repetition rate and 20μJ pulse energy for many of the measurements. Thrust was in the 100nN - 1μN range for all the work, requiring development of an extremely sensitive, low-noise thrust stand. We will discuss the design of metallic fuel delivery systems. Ablation efficiency near 100% was observed. Results obtained on metallic fuel systems agreed with simulations. We also report time-of-flight measurements on ejected metal ions, which gave velocities up to 80km/s

  12. Laser pulse shape design for laser-indirect-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Xueqing; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-02-01

    Laser pulse shape design is a key work in the design of indirect-laser-driven experiments, especially for long pulse laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments. A method for designing such a laser pulse shape is given here. What's more, application experiments were performed, and the results of a typical shot are presented. At last of this article, the details of the application of the method are discussed, such as the equation parameter choice, radiation ablation pressure expression, and approximations in the method. The application shows that the method can provide reliable descriptions of the energy distribution in a hohlraum target; thus, it can be used in the design of long-pulse laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments and even other indirect-laser-driven experiments.

  13. Modification of polyimide wetting properties by laser ablated conical microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Least, Brandon T.; Willis, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Laser texturing of Kapton ® HN polyimide was performed by low-fluence ablation using a pulsed, frequency tripled (349 nm) Nd:YLF laser. The laser was scanned in two dimensions in order to generate texture over a large area. The laser overlap percentage and fluence were varied and the resulting texture was studied. The texture features were inspected by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDS), while the static contact angle of de-ionized water was measured by a contact angle goniometer. Rounded bump features were formed at all fluences, which decreased in areal density with fluence and number of laser pulses. Conical microstructures or “cones” were also formed at most fluences. Cones were larger than the bumps and thus had lower areal density, which increased as a function of the number of laser pulses. The polyimide was hydrophilic before texturing, with a contact angle of approximately 76°. For most of the experimental conditions the contact angle increased as a result of texturing, with the contact angle exceeding 90° for some textured surfaces, and reaching values as high as 118°. In general, the surfaces with significant increases in contact angle had high density of texture features, either bumps or cones. The surfaces that experienced a decrease in contact angle generally had low density of texture features. The increase in contact angle from a wetting (θ 90°) cannot be explained by texturing alone. EDS measurements indicate that textured regions had higher carbon content than the untextured regions due to depletion of oxygen species. The increase in carbon content relative to the oxygen content increased the native contact angle of the surface, causing the transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic behavior. The contact angle of a textured surface increased as the relative spacing of features (diameter to spacing) decreased.

  14. Ablation of burned skin with ultra-short pulses laser to promote healing: evaluation by optical coherence tomography, histology, {mu}ATR-FTIR and Nonlinear Microscopy; Ablacao de pele queimada com laser de pulsos ultra-curtos para promocao da cicatrizacao: avaliacao por tomografia por coerencia optica, histologia, {mu}ATR-FTIR e microscopia nao-linear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Moises Oliveira dos

    2012-07-01

    Burns cause changes in the anatomical structure of the skin associated with trauma. The severity of the burn injury is divided into first, second and third-degree burns. The third-degree burns have been a major focus of research in search of more conservative treatments and faster results in repair for a functional and cosmetically acceptable. The conventional treatment is the use of topical natural or synthetic skin graft. An alternative therapy is the laser ablation process for burned tissue necrosis removal due to the no mechanical contact, fast application and access to difficult areas. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using high intensity femtosecond lasers as an adjunct treatment of burned patients. For this study, 65 Wistar rats were divided into groups of five animals: healthy skin, burned skin, two types of treatment (surgical debridement or femtosecond laser ablation) and four different times in the healing process monitoring. Three regions of the back of the animals were exposed to steam source causing third-degree burn. On the third day after the burn, one of the regions was ablated with high intensity ultrashort laser pulses ({lambda} = 785 nm, 90 fs, 2 kHz and 10 {mu}J/ pulse), the other received surgical debridement, and the last was considered the burn control. The regions were analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform ({mu}-ATR-FTIR), two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) and second harmonic generation technique (SHG) on days 3, 5, 7 and 14 pos-treatments. The results showed that with the laser irradiation conditions used it was possible to remove debris from third degree burn. The techniques used to characterize the tissue allowed to verify that all treatments promoted wound healing. On the fourteenth day, the regeneration curve showed that the attenuation coefficient of laser ablated tissue converges to the values

  15. Mass spectroscopic analysis of a plume induced by laser ablation of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Chae, H B; Lee, I H; Park, S M

    1998-01-01

    The laser ablation of a pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) target was investigated by time-of- flight quadrupole mass spectroscopy. According to the laser-correlated ion mass spectra, B sup + and B sub 2 sup + ions were produced, but neither N sup + , N sub 2 sup + , or BN sup + ions were observed at laser fluences below 1 J/cm sup 2. Instead, neutral N sub 2 molecules were found to be formed. The mean velocities and kinetic energies of the B sup + ions were obtained by time-of-flight analysis. Also, reactive laser ablation under a N sub 2 atmosphere was attempted by using a pulsed valve synchronized with the laser pulse.

  16. CT Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Kachare

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To present our experience of Computed Tomography (CT guided laser ablation of radiologically proven osteoid osteoma in the inter trochantric region of the femur. A19 year old female presented with severe pain in left upper thigh region since 6-7 months, which was exaggerated during nights and was relived on taking oral Non Steroid Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs. On CT scan hypodense lesion with surrounding dense sclerosis noted in intertrochanteric region in left femur. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed small focal predominantly cortical, oval lytic lesion in the intertrochanteric region which appeared hypointense on T1 Weighted Image (T1WI and hyperintense on T2 Weighted Image (T2WI and Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR image. Diffuse extensive sclerosis and hyperostosis of bone was noted surrounding the lesion appearing hypointense on T1W and T2W images. Under local anesthesia the laser fibre was inserted in the nidus under CT guidance through bone biopsy needle and 1800 joules energy delivered in the lesion continuous mode. Complete relief of pain noted after 24 hours after the treatment. CT guided LASER ablation is a safe, simple and effective method of treatment for osteoid osteoma.

  17. Noncontact Er:YAG laser ablation: clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálová, T; Jelínková, H; Kucerová, H; Krejsa, O; Hamal, K; Kubelka, J; Procházka, S

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of laser ablation in comparison with the classical drilling preparation. For the experiment, the Er:YAG laser drilling machine was used. The system had a laser head, water cooler, and power supply with automatic control. Spot size of 300-350 microns was used for the preparation. Repetition rate of 1-4 Hz, and pulse energies of 100-400 mJ with water spray were chosen. Cavity shape in comparison with classical drill, time of preparation, and influence of cavity shape on filling materials retention in accordance with the U.S. Public Health Service System were used. The evaluation criteria for noncontact Er:YAG ablation were done. The cavity shape is irregular, but spot surface has larger area and microretentive appearance. Caries of enamel and dentin were treated with a noncontact preparation. It was possible to remove the old insufficient fillings, except for amalgam or metal alloys. The average number of pulses was 111.22 (SE 67.57). Vibrations of microexplosions during preparation were felt by patients on 14 cavities; however, nobody felt unpleasant pain. The qualities of filling materials in laser cavities were very stable; however, cavo surface margin discoloration of 82-86% of Alfa rating could be a problem. Changes of the color and anatomic form of the tooth were observed in 4-8%. In comparison with the classical treatment, it could be said that the retention and quality of filling materials is the same or very similar.

  18. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken

  19. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz E, J.R.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Santiago, P.; Ascencio, J.

    2002-01-01

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  20. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  1. LIBS using dual- and ultra-short laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S M; Stratis, D N; Eland, K L; Lai, T; Berg, M A; Gold, D M

    2001-02-01

    Pre-ablation dual-pulse LIBS enhancement data for copper, brass and steel using ns laser excitation are reported. Although large enhancements are observed for all samples, the magnitude of the enhancement is matrix dependent. Whereas all of the dual-pulse studies used ns laser excitation we see interesting effects when using ps and fs laser excitation for single-pulse LIBS. LIBS spectra of copper using 1.3 ps and 140 fs laser pulses show much lower background signals compared to ns pulse excitation. Also, the atomic emission decays much more rapidly with time. Because of relatively low backgrounds when using ps and fs pulses, non-gated detection of LIBS is shown to be very effective. The plasma dissipates quickly enough using ps and fs laser pulses, that high pulse rates, up to 1,000 Hz, are effective for increasing the LIBS signal, for a given measurement time. Finally, a simple near-collinear dual-pulse fiber-optic LIBS probe is shown to be useful for enhanced LIBS measurements.

  2. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  3. Time-resolved analysis of thickness-dependent dewetting and ablation of silver films upon nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Dongfeng [Laser Thermal Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Eunpa; Wang, Letian; Grigoropoulos, Costas P., E-mail: cgrigoro@berkeley.edu [Laser Thermal Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Chen, Songyan [Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-05-23

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting and ablation of thin silver films is investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 5 ns temporal width are irradiated on silver films of different thicknesses (50 nm, 80 nm, and 350 nm). Below the ablation threshold, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 630 ns after the laser irradiation for all samples, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to the solidification of transported matter at about 700 ns following the laser pulse exposure. In addition to these features, droplet fingers are superposed upon irradiation of 350-nm thick silver films with higher intensity.

  4. High precision laser direct microstructuring system based on bursts of picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Jaka; Petelin, Jaka; Osterman, Natan; Petkovšek, Rok

    2017-08-01

    We have developed an efficient, high precision system for direct laser microstructuring using fiber laser generated bursts of picosecond pulses. An advanced opto-mechanical system for beam deflection and sample movement, precise pulse energy control, and a custom built fiber laser with the pulse duration of 65 ps have been combined in a compact setup. The setup allows structuring of single-micrometer sized objects with a nanometer resolution of the laser beam positioning due to a combination of acousto-optical laser beam deflection and tight focusing. The precise synchronization of the fiber laser with the pulse burst repetition frequency of up to 100 kHz allowed a wide range of working parameters, including a tuneable number of pulses in each burst with the intra-burst repetition frequency of 40 MHz and delivering exactly one burst of pulses to every chosen position. We have demonstrated that tightly focused bursts of pulses significantly increase the ablation efficiency during the microstructuring of a copper layer and shorten the typical processing time compared to the single pulse per spot regime. We have used a simple short-pulse ablation model to describe our single pulse ablation data and developed an upgrade to the model to describe the ablation with bursts. Bursts of pulses also contribute to a high quality definition of structure edges and sides. The increased ablation efficiency at lower pulse energies compared to the single pulse per spot regime opens a window to utilize compact fiber lasers designed to operate at lower pulse energies, reducing the overall system complexity and size.

  5. Characterization of SrTiO3 target doped with Co ions, SrCoxTi1-xO3-δ, and their thin films prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water for visible light response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Fumihiko; Murata, Yuma; Ono, Hiroshi; Choo, Cheow-keong; Tanaka, Katsumi

    2017-10-01

    SrTiO3 (STO) and Co-doped SrTiO3 (Co-STO) sintered targets were synthesized and were Ar+ sputtered to elucidate the charge compensation effect between Sr, Ti and Co cations following the reduction by oxygen desorption. Following exposure of the Ar+-sputtered target to the air, charge transfer reactions occurred among Co2+, Ti3+, O2- and Sr2+ species which were studied by their XPS spectra. Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of these targets was carried out in water to prepare the nanoparticles which could be supplied to the thin films with much higher surface reactivity expected for photocatalytic reactions. The roles of Co ions were studied for the stoichiometry and crystallinity of the nanoparticles which constituted the thin films. Photo-degradation of methylene blue was carried out on the PLA thin films under very weak visible light at 460 nm. The PLA thin films showed the photocatalytic activities, which were enhanced by the presence of Co ions. Such the effect of Co ions was considered from viewpoint of the d-d transition and the charge-transfer between Co ions and the ligand oxygen.

  6. Angle-resolved energy distributions of laser ablated silver ions in vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distributions of ions ablated from silver in vacuum have been measured in situ for pulsed laser irradiation at 355 nm. We have determined the energy spectra for directions ranging from 5 degrees to 75 degrees with respect to the normal in the intensity range from 100 to 400 MW/cm(2...

  7. Formation of carbon quantum dots and nanodiamonds in laser ablation of a carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, A. I.; Lebedev, V. F.; Kobranova, A. A.; Nashchekin, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    We have experimentally shown that nanosecond near-IR pulsed laser ablation of a thin amorphous carbon film produces carbon quantum dots with a graphite structure and nanodiamonds with a characteristic size of 20 - 500 nm on the substrate surface. The formation of these nanostructures is confirmed by electron microscopic images, luminescence spectra and Raman spectra. The mechanisms explaining the observed effects are proposed.

  8. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-01-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors

  9. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by ultra-short laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A., E-mail: angela.debonis@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 – 85100 Potenza (Italy); Lovaglio, T.; Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 – 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR-ISM, U.O.S di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito, 85050 Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Teghil, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10 – 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of a iron target in water and acetone performed by an ultra-short laser source has been reported. • The size distributions of the obtained nanoparticles have been related to the ablation dynamics. • The formation of a graphitic shell prevents the oxidation of the iron nanoparticles. - Abstract: Laser ablation of an iron target in water and acetone has been carried out using a frequency doubled Nd:glass laser source (pulse duration of 250 fs and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz). The observation of the nanostructures formed in the laser irradiated region of the metallic target and fast shadowgraphic analysis of the laser induced cavitation bubble have been performed in order to correlate the size distribution of the obtained nanoparticles to the dynamics of the ablation process. The composition, morphology and oxidation state of the synthesized nanoproducts have been investigated by XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and microRaman spectroscopy. The experimental data support a relationship between the nanoparticles size distribution and the femtosecond laser ablation mechanism, while the chemical and structural characteristics of the nanoparticles can be tuned by varying the liquid medium.

  10. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by ultra-short laser ablation in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bonis, A.; Lovaglio, T.; Galasso, A.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of a iron target in water and acetone performed by an ultra-short laser source has been reported. • The size distributions of the obtained nanoparticles have been related to the ablation dynamics. • The formation of a graphitic shell prevents the oxidation of the iron nanoparticles. - Abstract: Laser ablation of an iron target in water and acetone has been carried out using a frequency doubled Nd:glass laser source (pulse duration of 250 fs and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz). The observation of the nanostructures formed in the laser irradiated region of the metallic target and fast shadowgraphic analysis of the laser induced cavitation bubble have been performed in order to correlate the size distribution of the obtained nanoparticles to the dynamics of the ablation process. The composition, morphology and oxidation state of the synthesized nanoproducts have been investigated by XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and microRaman spectroscopy. The experimental data support a relationship between the nanoparticles size distribution and the femtosecond laser ablation mechanism, while the chemical and structural characteristics of the nanoparticles can be tuned by varying the liquid medium.

  11. Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Xinhua; Liu, Jie A; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma often evades effective therapy and recurrences are frequent. Recently, nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) ablation using pulse power technology has emerged as a local-regional, non-thermal, and non-drug therapy for skin cancers. In the studies reported here we use nsPEFs to ablate murine, rat and human HCCs in vitro and an ectopic murine Hepa 1-6 HCC in vivo. Using pulses with 60 or 300 ns and electric fields as high as 60 kV/cm, murine Hepa 1-6, rat N1S1 and human HepG2 HCC are readily eliminated with changes in caspase-3 activity. Interestingly caspase activities increase in the mouse and human model and decrease in the rat model as electric field strengths are increased. In vivo, while sham treated control mice survived an average of 15 days after injection and before humane euthanasia, Hepa 1-6 tumors were eliminated for longer than 50 days with 3 treatments using one hundred pulses with 100 ns at 55 kV/cm. Survival was 40% in mice treated with 30 ns pulses at 55 kV/cm. This study demonstrates that nsPEF ablation is not limited to effectively treating skin cancers and provides a rationale for treating orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical applications and ultimately in clinical trials.

  12. Infrared laser ablation and ionization of water clusters and biomolecules from ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltz-Knorr, M.L.; Schriver, K.E.; Haglund, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct desorption and ionization of angiotensin II from frozen water ice samples without supplementary matrix, using a pulse train of approximately 340 intense (∼10 9 W/cm 2 ) picosecond pulses from a tunable, mid-infrared free-electron laser, at a wavelength of 5.9 μm. The pulse train was delivered at equally spaced intervals over a total duration of 120 ns. Ions thus formed were detected using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Single-shot ablation at spatially separated locations on the ice surface produced parent ions as well as Na and K adducts. Multiple pulse impact at a single location on the ice generated the parent ion signal and also protonated water clusters of the form (H 2 O) n-1 H 3 O + . Investigations of clusters produced by infrared laser ablation of frozen trifluoroacetic acid solution support a mechanism involving electrostatic ejection of pre-formed ions

  13. Topography-guided treatment of decentered laser ablation using LaserSight's excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L; Zhou, X; Ouyang, Z; Weng, C; Chu, R

    2008-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of topography-guided laser ablation for correction of previously decentered laser ablation using LaserSight's excimer laser. Re-treatment was performed to correct decentered ablation using LaserSight's excimer laser for 18 patients who previously underwent LASIK surgery for myopia correction in both eyes. For each patient, only the decentered eye was re-treated while the other asymptomatic eye forms a control group for this study. Measurements were conducted on ablation center, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), contrast sensitivity and corneal aberrations pre- and post-operatively. For the retreated 18 eyes, the mean decentration was significantly reduced from 1.32+/-0.28mm to 0.61+/-0.23mm post-operatively (t=16.24, pTopography-guided ablation with LaserSight excimer laser is effective to correct decentered ablation. However, the re-treated eye is still inferior to the eye with originally centered ablation in corneal optical quality or visual performance.

  14. Efficacy of removal of cariogenic bacteria and carious dentin by ablation using different modes of Er:YAG lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baraba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficiency of removal of cariogenic bacteria and carious dentin by ablation using two lasers: fluorescence-feedback controlled (FFC Er:YAG laser and different pulses of Er:YAG laser based on variable square pulse technology (VSPt. The secondary objective was to measure the temperature during laser ablation of carious tissue. Seventy-two extracted human molars were used in this study. Sixty teeth with carious dentin were randomly divided into four experimental groups according to the treatment for caries removal: group 1: 400 µs (FFC group; group 2: super short pulse (SSP group, 50 µs pulse; group 3: medium short pulse (MSP group, 100 µs pulse; group 4: short pulse (SP group, 300 µs pulse and one positive control group with no treatment. Twelve teeth without carious lesion were used as a negative control group. After caries removal, swabs were taken with cotton pellets and real-time PCR analysis was performed. During caries ablation, a thermal infrared camera was used to measure the temperature changes. In all experimental groups, specimens were free of bacterial contamination after the treatment. In the SSP, MSP and SP groups, temperatures measured during caries ablation were significantly higher compared to temperatures in the FFC group (P<0.001. In this in vitro study, laser treatment for removal of carious dentin and cariogenic bacteria was an efficient treatment modality without causing excessive temperatures that might adversely affect pulp vitality.

  15. A comparison of the DPSS UV laser ablation characteristic of 1024 and H10F WC-Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Tian Long; Chantzis, Dimitrios; Royer, Raphael; Metsios, Ioannis; Antar, Mohammad; Marimuthu, Sundar

    2017-07-01

    An investigation on ablation characteristics of 1024 and H10F cobalt cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) with a DPSS nanosecond UV laser (50 ns pulse width, 355 nm wavelength, 90 W average power and 10 kHz repetition rate) is presented. The ablation characteristic parameters such as ablation threshold, incubation effect and optical penetration depth were evaluated based on the spot ablation diameter and depth. It was observed that the ablation threshold is significantly influenced by the number of pulses (NOP) and it decreases with increase NOP which is attributed to the incubation effect. Only one ablation region is observed at low laser fluence and an additional molten ablation region is observed at high laser fluence accompanied with cracks. The cracks formation is due to the thermal induced stress and changes in WC microstructure during laser beam irradiation. The crack depth is proportional to the thickness of the molten WC region. The ablation threshold of 1024 WC-Co and H10F WC-Co were found to be Fth1 =4.32 J/cm2 and Fth1 =4.26 J/cm2 respectively. The difference in chemical composition has insignificant effect on the ablation threshold value of the material. The incubation factor and optical penetration depth values of 1024 WC-Co and H10F WC-Co were found to be ξ=0.73, α-1 =411 nm and ξ=0.75, α-1 =397 nm respectively.

  16. Influence of external cooling on the femtosecond laser ablation of dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Q T; Vilar, R; Bertrand, C

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of external cooling on the temperature rise in the tooth pulpal chamber during femtosecond laser ablation was investigated. The influence of the cooling method on the morphology and constitution of the laser-treated surfaces was studied as well. The ablation experiments were performed on dentin specimens using an Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs, 1030 nm). Cavities were created by scanning the specimens at a velocity of 5 mm/s while pulsing the stationary laser beam at 1 kHz and with fluences in the range of 2-14 J/cm 2 . The experiments were performed in air and with surface cooling by a lateral air jet and by a combination of an air jet and water irrigation. The temperature in the pulpal chamber of the tooth was measured during the laser experiments. The ablation surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The temperature rise reached 17.5 °C for the treatments performed with 14 J/cm 2 and without cooling, which was reduced to 10.8 ± 1.0 and 6.6 ± 2.3 °C with forced air cooling and water cooling, respectively, without significant reduction of the ablation rate. The ablation surfaces were covered by ablation debris and resolidified droplets containing mainly amorphous calcium phosphate, but the amount of redeposited debris was much lower for the water-cooled specimens. The redeposited debris could be removed by ultrasonication, revealing that the structure and constitution of the tissue remained essentially unaltered. The present results show that water cooling is mandatory for the femtosecond laser treatment of dentin, in particular, when high fluences and high pulse repetition rates are used to achieve high material removal rates.

  17. Pulsed chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, T.V.; Kimbell, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A hydrogen fluoride laser capable of operating super radiantly and at atmospheric pressure is described. A transverse electrical discharge is utilized to energize the reaction of a hydrogen donor to provide hydrogen fluoride in a metastable energy state which reverts to a stable state by laser action. A large range of hydrogen and fluorine donors is disclosed. A preferred pair of donors is sulphur hexafluoride and propane. Helium is frequently added to the gas mix to act as a buffer. (U.S.)

  18. Ablation and transmission of thin solid targets irradiated by intense extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Aslanyan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV laser beam with a parylene foil was studied by experiments and simulation. A single EUV laser pulse of nanosecond duration focused to an intensity of 3 × 1010 W cm−2 perforated micrometer thick targets. The same laser pulse was simultaneously used to diagnose the interaction by a transmission measurement. A combination of 2-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic and diffraction calculations was used to model the ablation, leading to good agreement with experiment. This theoretical approach allows predictive modelling of the interaction with matter of intense EUV beams over a broad range of parameters.

  19. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyratou, E.; Asproudis, I.; Tsoutsi, D.; Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV (λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  20. Pulse laser machining and particulate separation from high impact polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Saira; Kautek, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at

    2014-01-01

    Opaque high impact polystyrene (HIPS) contaminated with graphite particles and poly(styrene-co-divinyl benzene) spheres can only be removed efficiently with nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation of 532 nm while the substrate is preserved. The destruction thresholds are 1–2 orders of magnitude lower than that of other common technical polymers. The inhomogeneously distributed polybutadiene composite component led to enhanced light scattering in the polystyrene matrix so that increased light absorption and energy density causes a comparatively low ablation threshold. Due to this fact there is advantageous potential for pulse laser machining at comparatively low fluences.

  1. Ultra short pulse laser generated surface textures for anti-ice applications in aviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.W.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Sipkema, R.C.J.; Groenendijk, M.N.W.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    By laser ablation with ultra short laser pulses in the pico- and femto-second range, well controlled dual scaled micro- and nano-scaled surface textures can be obtained. The micro-scale of the texture is mainly determined by the dimensions of the laser spot, whereas the superimposed nano-structure

  2. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications.

  3. Surface ablation of inorganic transparent materials using 70W femtosecond pulses at 1MHz (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchik, Konstantin; Gaudfrin, Kevin; Audouard, Eric F.; Mottay, Eric P.; Lopez, John

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays processing of transparent materials, such as glass, quartz, sapphire and others, is a subject of high interest for worldwide industry since these materials are widely used for mass markets such as consumer electronics, flat display panels manufacturing, optoelectronics or watchmaking industry. The key issue is to combine high throughput, low residual stress and good processing quality in order to avoid chipping and any post-processing step such as grinding or polishing. Complimentary to non-ablative techniques used for zero-kerf glass cutting, surface ablation of such materials is interesting for engraving, grooving as well as full ablation cutting. Indeed this technique enables to process complex parts including via or blind, open or closed, straight or small radius of curvature patterns. We report on surface ablation experiments on transparent materials using a high average power (70W) and high repetition rate (1 MHz) femtosecond laser. These experiments have been done at 1030nm and 515nm on different inorganic transparent materials, such as regular and strengthened glass, borosilicate glass or sapphire, in order to underline their different ablation behavior. Despite the heat accumulation that occurs above 100 kHz we have reached a good compromise between throughput and processing quality. The effects of fluence, pulse-to-pulse overlap and number of passes are discussed in terms of etch rate, ablation efficiency, optimum fluence, maximum achievable depth, micro cracks formation and residual stresses. These experimental results will be also compared with numerical calculations obtained owing to a simple engineering model based on the two-temperature description of the ultrafast ablation.

  4. Photonic Doppler velocimetry of laser-ablated ultrathin metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A R; Rodriguez, G; Clarke, S A; Thomas, K A

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining velocity information from the interaction of a laser pulse on a metal layer provides insight into the rapid dynamics of material removal and plasma plume physics during ablation. A traditional approach involves using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) on a reflective metal surface. However, when the target is a thin metal layer, the cohesion of the surface is quickly lost resulting in a large spread of particle velocities that cannot be easily resolved by VISAR. This is due to material ejection"confusing" the VISAR measurement surface, effectively washing out the spatial fringe visibility in the VISAR interferometer. A new heterodyne-based optical velocimeter method is the photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). Because PDV tracks motion in a frequency encoded temporal electro-optical signal, velocity information is preserved and allows for multiple velocity components to be recorded simultaneously. The challenge lies in extracting PDV velocity information at short (nanosecond) laser ablation time scales with rapidly varying heterodyne beats by using electronic, optical, and analytical techniques to recover the velocity information from a fleeting signal. Here we show how we have been able to obtain velocity information on the nanosecond time scale and are able to compare it to hydrodynamic simulations. Also, we examine refinements to our PDV system by increasing the bandwidth, utilizing different probes, and sampling different analysis techniques.

  5. Experimental and theoretical studies of picosecond laser interactions with electronic materials-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Samuel S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Lasers having picosecond and shorter pulse duration are receiving much attention due to their capabilities for direct-write micromachining on many materials with minimal substrate damage. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of laser ablation processes, particularly the creation of plasmas that often shield the target and reduce the material processing efficiency at nanosecond time scales. However, a considerable challenge that still remains is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms during picosecond laser interactions with electronic solids. In this work we first study picosecond laser-induced electron emission from semiconductor surfaces. A theoretical model was set up based on carrier transport inside the semiconductor material during picosecond laser-semiconductor interactions. We demonstrate that nonequilibrium carrier dynamics plays a significant role for picosecond, as well as short nanosecond, laser induced electron emission from semiconductors. Photoelectric effect is found to be responsible for electron emission at low incident laser fluences, whereas thermionic emission is dominant at higher fluences. We have also performed experimental and theoretical studies on the formation and subsequent evolution of plasmas during laser-metal interactions at the picosecond time scale. Using picosecond time-resolved shadowgrams ahd interferograms, a novel type of plasma is observed, which has an electron density on the order of 1020cm-3.The origin of this picosecond plasma is attributed to gas breakdown, which is caused by laser-induced electron emission fi-om the target surface. After the laser pulse is completed, the longitudinal expansion of the plasma is suppressed. This suppression is found to result from an electric field above the target that prevents, after laser irradiation, fbrther movement of the electrons inside the plasma. Measurements of lateral plasma expansion indicate that the picosecond plasma may absorb

  6. An x-ray probe of nickel nanoparticles generated by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Doumy, G.; Southworth, S. H.; March, A. M.; Dichiara, A. D.; Gao, Y.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Moonshiram, D.; Young, L.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    A plume of nickel atoms and nanoparticles can be generated by an intense laser pulse hitting a solid nickel surface. We set up a Ni ablation source in a vacuum chamber on an x-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source and used x-ray absorption, x-ray emission, and ion spectroscopies to probe the ablation plume at x-ray energies above the Ni K-edge at 8.33 keV. The laser and x-ray pulses were overlapped in time and space with variable delay to measure the time evolution of the ablation plume. Measurements of the charge states produced by x-ray absorption were not possible due to the intense prompt ions ejected in the ablation process. However, Ni K α x-ray emission was measured as functions of laser fluence and pump-probe delay. The fluorescence yield was also used to record the near-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of the nanoparticles in the plume. The nanoparticles were collected and their diameters were determined to be ~9 nm from x-ray scattering pair-distribution-function measurements. The experiments demonstrate the use of x-ray techniques to characterize laser ablation processes. Work supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Dept of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  8. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements

  9. Calculus removal on a root cement surface by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Johan F.; Vestentoft, Kasper; Christensen, Bjarke H.; Løvschall, Henrik; Balling, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse-laser ablation of dental calculus (tartar) and cement is performed on root surfaces. The investigation shows that the threshold fluence for ablation of calculus is a factor of two to three times smaller than that of a healthy root cement surface. This indicates that ultrashort laser pulses may provide an appropriate tool for selective removal of calculus with minimal damage to the underlying root cement. Future application of an in situ profiling technique allows convenient on-line monitoring of the ablation process.

  10. Laser ablation for analytical sampling: what can we learn from modeling?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Chen Zhaoyang; Gijbels, Renaat; Vertes, Akos

    2003-01-01

    The paper is built up in two parts. First, a rather comprehensive introduction is given, with a brief overview of the different application fields of laser ablation, focusing mainly on the analytical applications, and an overview of the different modeling approaches available for laser ablation. Further, a discussion is presented here about the laser evaporated plume expansion in vacuum or in a background gas, as well as about the different mechanisms for particle formation in the laser ablation process, which is most relevant for laser ablation as solid sampling technique for inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry. In the second part, a model is presented that describes the interaction of an ns-pulsed laser with a Cu target, as well as the resulting plume expansion and plasma formation. The results presented here, include the temperature distribution in the target, the melting and evaporation of the target, the vapor density, velocity and temperature distribution in the evaporated plume, the ionization degree and the density profiles of Cu 0 atoms, Cu + and Cu 2+ ions and electrons in the plume (plasma), as well as the resulting plasma shielding of the incoming laser beam. Results are presented as a function of time during and after the laser pulse, and as a function of position in the target or in the plume. The influence of the target reflection coefficient on the above calculation results is investigated. Finally, the effect of the laser pulse fluence on the target heating, melting and vaporization, and on the plume characteristics and plasma formation is studied. Our modeling results are in reasonable agreement with calculated and measured data from literature

  11. Negative ion production by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Tanabe, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sasao, Mamiko

    1997-02-01

    The status of the development of Li{sup -} production by generating a neutral Li flux with an intense radiation of a laser beam onto the surface of Li metal has been reported. The experimental apparatus was arranged to detect a mass separated Li{sup +} and Li{sup -} ion beams. A Li sputtering probe, immersed in the extraction region of a compact (6cm diam. 7cm long) magnetic multipole ion source was irradiated with a Nd-YAG laser of 0.4 J/pulse. The production of mass-separated positive ions of Li by laser irradiation has been confirmed, but the production of Li{sup -} has not been confirmed yet due to the noise caused by a temporal discharge. (author)

  12. Dynamic features of bubble induced by a nanosecond pulse laser in still and flowing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charee, Wisan; Tangwarodomnukun, Viboon

    2018-03-01

    Underwater laser ablation techniques have been developed and employed to synthesis nanoparticles, to texture workpiece surface and to assist the material removal in laser machining process. However, the understanding of laser-material-water interactions, bubble formation and effects of water flow on ablation performance has still been very limited. This paper thus aims at exploring the formation and collapse of bubbles during the laser ablation of silicon in water. The effects of water flow rate on bubble formation and its consequences to the laser disturbance and cut features obtained in silicon were observed by using a high speed camera. A nanosecond pulse laser emitting the laser pulse energy of 0.2-0.5 mJ was employed in the experiment. The results showed that the bubble size was found to increase with the laser pulse energy. The use of high water flow rate can importantly facilitate the ejection of ablated particles from the workpiece surface, hence resulting in less deposition to the work surface and minimizing any disturbance to the laser beam during the ablation in water. Furthermore, a clean micro-groove in silicon wafer can successfully be produced when the process was performed in the high water flow rate condition. The findings of this study could provide an essential guideline for process selection, control and improvement in the laser micro-/submicro-fabrication using the underwater technique.

  13. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    González-Castillo, JR; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redo...

  14. Laser machining micro-structures on diamond surface with a sub-nanosecond pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingtao; Guo, Bing; Zhao, Qingliang

    2018-02-01

    Micro-structure surface on diamond material is widely used in a series of industrial and scientific applications, such as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), microelectronics, textured or micro-structured diamond machining tools. The efficient machining of micro-structure on diamond surface is urgently demanded in engineering. In this paper, laser machining square micro-structure on diamond surface was studied with a sub-nanosecond pulsed laser. The influences of laser machining parameters, including the laser power, scanning speed, defocusing quantity and scanning pitch, were researched in view of the ablation depth, material removal rate and machined surface topography. Both the ablation depth and material removal rate increased with average laser power. A reduction of the growth rate of the two parameters was induced by the absorption of the laser plasma plume at high laser power. The ablation depth non-linearly decreased with the increasing of the scanning speed while the material removal rate showed an opposite tendency. The increasing of the defocusing quantity induced complex variation of the ablation depth and the material removal rate. The maximum ablation depth and material removal rate were achieved at a defocusing position. The ablation depth and material removal rate oppositely varied about the scanning pitch. A high overlap ratio was meaningful for achieving a smooth micro-structure surface topography. Laser machining with a large defocusing quantity, high laser power and small scanning pitch was helpful for acquiring the desired micro-structure which had a large depth and smooth micro-structure surface topography.

  15. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  16. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-01-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS

  17. Formation of nanoparticles from thin silver films irradiated by laser pulses in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastulyavichus, A. A.; Smirnov, N. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Ionin, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Busleev, N. I.; Rudenko, A. A.; Khmel'nitskii, R. A.; Zayarnyi, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    Some specific features of the transport of silver nanoparticles onto a SiO2 substrate under focused nanosecond IR laser pulses is experimentally investigated. A possibility of obtaining silver coatings is demonstrated. The formation of silver nanostructures as a result of pulsed laser ablation in air is studied. Nanoparticles are formed by exposing a silver film to radiation of an HTF MARK (Bulat) laser marker (λ = 1064 nm). The thus prepared nanoparticles are analysed using scanning electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy.

  18. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B., E-mail: baninshakery@gmail.com, E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute NSRT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afarideh, H., E-mail: baninshakery@gmail.com, E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute NSRT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghergherehchi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-07

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (λ = 193 nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193 nm) at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230 nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  19. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencič, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  20. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation

  1. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  2. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  3. Laser-ablation-based ion source characterization and manipulation for laser-driven ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, P.; Metzkes-Ng, J.; Brack, F.-E.; Cowan, T. E.; Kraft, S. D.; Obst, L.; Rehwald, M.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.

    2018-05-01

    For laser-driven ion acceleration from thin foils (∼10 μm–100 nm) in the target normal sheath acceleration regime, the hydro-carbon contaminant layer at the target surface generally serves as the ion source and hence determines the accelerated ion species, i.e. mainly protons, carbon and oxygen ions. The specific characteristics of the source layer—thickness and relevant lateral extent—as well as its manipulation have both been investigated since the first experiments on laser-driven ion acceleration using a variety of techniques from direct source imaging to knife-edge or mesh imaging. In this publication, we present an experimental study in which laser ablation in two fluence regimes (low: F ∼ 0.6 J cm‑2, high: F ∼ 4 J cm‑2) was applied to characterize and manipulate the hydro-carbon source layer. The high-fluence ablation in combination with a timed laser pulse for particle acceleration allowed for an estimation of the relevant source layer thickness for proton acceleration. Moreover, from these data and independently from the low-fluence regime, the lateral extent of the ion source layer became accessible.

  4. Initiation of an early-stage plasma during picosecond laser ablation of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Samuel S.; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    Picosecond time-resolved images of plasma initiation were recorded during pulsed-laser ablation of metal targets in an air atmosphere. An early-stage plasma was observed to form before the release of a material vapor plume. Close to the target surface, interferometry measurements indicate that the early-stage plasma has an electron number density on the order of 10 20 cm -3 . The longitudinal expansion of the ionization front for this plasma has a velocity 10 9 cm/s, during the laser pulse. In contrast, a material--vapor plume forms approximately 200 ps after the laser pulse, and it moves away from the target at 10 6 cm/s. The experimental observations of the early-stage plasma were simulated by using a theoretical model based on a two-fluids description of laser plasmas. The results indicate that the initiation of the plasma is due to air breakdown assisted by electron emission from the target

  5. In Situ Geochemical Analysis and Age Dating of Rocks Using Laser Ablation-Miniature Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hurowitz, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized instrument for performing chemical and isotopic analysis of rocks has been developed. The rock sample is ablated by a laser and the neutral species produced are analyzed using the JPL-invented miniature mass spectrometer. The direct sampling of neutral ablated material and the simultaneous measurement of all the elemental and isotopic species are the novelties of this method. In this laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) method, the ablated neutral atoms are led into the electron impact ionization source of the MMS, where they are ionized by a 70-eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 microsecond wide, compared to the original 5-10-nanosecond laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer and measured in parallel by a modified CCD (charge-coupled device) array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LAMMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect laser-ionized species produced directly in the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the laser beam, and the ionization energies of the elements. The measurement of high-precision isotopic ratios and elemental composition of different rock minerals by LAMMS method has been demonstrated. The LA-MMS can be applied for the absolute age determination of rocks. There is no such instrument available presently in a miniaturized version that can be used for NASA space missions. Work is in progress in the laboratory for geochronology of rocks using LA-MMS that is based on K-Ar radiogenic dating technique.

  6. Preparation of antibacterial textile using laser ablation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Sheila; Rashidian, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2018-02-01

    A facile in situ laser ablation synthesis of Copper nanoparticles on cotton fabric is reported in this paper. This synthetic method is a laser ablation based fabrication of Cu nanoparticles on cotton fabric for improved performance and antibacterial activity. The treated cotton fabric was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques and antibacterial counting test. Very good antibacterial behavior of treated fabrics achieved. This fabric can be used as medical and industrial textiles.

  7. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  8. Effects of Laser Energy Density on Silicon Nanoparticles Produced Using Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Chewchinda, Pattarin; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the morphology of silicon nanoparticles prepared using laser ablation in liquid through varying the energy density and laser irradiation time. Silicon nanoparticles were prepared using laser ablation in liquid. A silicon wafer was irradiated in ethanol using a laser beam (Nd: YAG/second harmonic generation, 532 nm). Crystalline silicon nanoparticles approximately 6 nm in size were observed by TEM observation. The quantity of silicon nanoparticles proportionally increased with an increase in energy density greater than the laser ablation threshold. This quantity also increased with an increase in laser irradiation time without saturation due to absorption of the nanoparticles in liquid in the light path.

  9. 3D transient model to predict temperature and ablated areas during laser processing of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak. B. Naghshine

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser processing is one of the most popular small-scale patterning methods and has many applications in semiconductor device fabrication and biomedical engineering. Numerical modelling of this process can be used for better understanding of the process, optimization, and predicting the quality of the final product. An accurate 3D model is presented here for short laser pulses that can predict the ablation depth and temperature distribution on any section of the material in a minimal amount of time. In this transient model, variations of thermal properties, plasma shielding, and phase change are considered. Ablation depth was measured using a 3D optical profiler. Calculated depths are in good agreement with measured values on laser treated titanium surfaces. The proposed model can be applied to a wide range of materials and laser systems.

  10. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Markus; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Sources of ultrashort laser pulses are nowadays commercially available and have entered many areas of research and development. This book gives an overview of biological and medical applications of these laser pulses. The briefness of these laser pulses permits the tracing of the fastest processes in photo-active bio-systems, which is one focus of the book. The other focus is applications that rely on the high peak intensity of ultrashort laser pulses. Examples covered span non-linear imaging techniques, optical tomography, and laser surgery.

  11. Residual heat deposition in dental enamel during IR laser ablation at 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, D; Ragadio, J; Champion, A

    2001-01-01

    The principal factor limiting the rate of laser ablation of dental hard tissue is the risk of excessive heat accumulation in the tooth. Excessive heat deposition or accumulation may result in unacceptable damage to the pulp. The objective of this study was to measure the residual heat deposition during the laser ablation of dental enamel at those IR laser wavelengths well suited for the removal of dental caries. Optimal laser ablation systems minimize the residual heat deposition in the tooth by efficiently transferring the deposited laser energy to kinetic and internal energy of ejected tissue components. The residual heat deposition in dental enamel was measured at laser wavelengths of 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 microm and pulse widths of 150 nsec -150 microsec using bovine block "calorimeters." Water droplets were applied to the surface before ablation with 150 microsec Er:YAG laser pulses to determine the influence of an optically thick water layer on reducing heat deposition. The residual heat was at a minimum for fluences well above the ablation threshold where measured values ranged from 25-70% depending on pulse duration and wavelength for the systems investigated. The lowest values of the residual heat were measured for short (Droplets of water applied to the surface before ablation significantly reduced the residual heat deposition during ablation with 150 microsec Er:YAG laser pulses. Residual heat deposition can be markedly reduced by using CO(2) laser pulses of less than 20 microsec duration and shorter Q-switched Er:YAG and Er:YSGG laser pulses for enamel ablation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Nanospallation induced by a femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agranat, M. B.; Anisimov, S. I.; Ashitkov, S. I.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Inogamov, N. A.; Nishihara, K.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work phenomena are considered related to the interaction of ultra-short laser pulses, τ L~0.1 ps, with metallic targets. The absorption of laser pulse results in formation of thin layer of hot electrons strongly superheated (T e>>T i) relative to the ion temperature, T i. Initial thickness of the layer d heat is small, d heat~δ, where δ~10 nm is the skin layer thickness. Subsequent developments include the following stages: (1) Propagation of electron thermal wave which expands the hot layer d heat; (2) Cooling of electrons due to energy transfer to cold ions; (3) Onset of hydrodynamic motion that constitutes the rarefaction wave with positive pressure; (4) Further expansion of target material leading to the appearance of negative pressure; and (5) Long separation process which begins with nucleation of voids and goes on to the total separation of spallation plate. The thickness of the plate is ~10 nm (we call it nanospallation). Theoretical model involves two-temperature hydrodynamic equations with semiempirical EOS for a metal, electron heat conduction and electron-ion energy exchange. The decay of metastable strongly stretched matter is described by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with extremely large number of atoms. The experimental setup includes femtosecond chromium-forsterite laser operating in the pump-probe regime. The experiments are performed with gold target. Measured ablation threshold for gold is 1.35 J/cm2 of incident pump light at inclination 45°, p-polarization. Calorimeter measurements give for the absorbed fluence F abs=0.3F inc, therefore the threshold value of F abs is 0.4 J/cm2.

  13. Laser ablation with applied magnetic field for electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishcheva, Alla; Batishchev, Oleg; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-10-01

    Using ultrafast lasers with tera-watt-level power allows efficient ablation and ionization of solid-density materials [1], creating dense and hot (˜100eV) plasma. We propose ablating small droplets in the magnetic nozzle configurations similar to mini-helicon plasma source [2]. Such approach may improve the momentum coupling compared to ablation of solid surfaces and facilitate plasma detachment. Results of 2D modeling of solid wire ablation in the applied magnetic field are presented and discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev et al, Ultrafast Laser Ablation for Space Propulsion, AIAA technical paper 2008-5294, -16p, 44th JPC, Hartford, 2008.[0pt] [2] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  14. Short pulse laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOKOLOWSKI-TINTEN,K.; VON DER LINDE,D.; SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-02-07

    Short pulse laser damage and ablation of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films is investigated. Material removal is due to fracture of the film and ejection of large fragments, which exhibit a broadband emission of microsecond duration.

  15. Energy distribution of ions produced by laser ablation of silver in vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela

    2013-01-01

    the ablation process. A silver target in vacuum was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355nm and detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution of plume ions were made. In contrast to earlier work, the beam spot was circular such that any flip-over effect of the plume is avoided......The ion energy in a silver ablation plume for fluence in the range of 0.6–2.4Jcm−2, typical for a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) experiment has been investigated. In this fluence range the ion fraction of the ablated particles becomes gradually dominant and can be utilized to characterize...

  16. Plasmonic angular tunability of gold nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, M.L.; Guarnaccio, A.; Ranù, F. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Trucchi, D. [CNR, ISM UOS Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, (RM) 00015 (Italy); Orlando, S., E-mail: stefano.orlando@ism.cnr.it [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Mollica, D.; Parisi, G.P. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Medici, L.; Lettino, A. [CNR, IMAA, Area della Ricerca di Potenza -Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo, (PZ) 85050 (Italy); De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R. [Dipart. di Scienze,Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, Potenza, 85100 (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • fs pulsed laser ablation as a technique to produce nanoparticles. • Nanoparticle distribution as an evidence for plasmonic tunable resonances. • Correlation between angular distribution of deposited nanoparticles and specific plasmonic resonances. - Abstract: With the aim to study the influence of deposition parameters on the plasmonic properties of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) deposited by ultra-short ablation, we have focused our attention in evaluating how their size distribution can be varied. In this work, the role played by the NPs’ angular distribution, agglomeration and growth is related to the resulting optical properties. UV–vis-NIR absorption spectra together with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction observations are presented in order to show how the angular distribution of fs laser ablation and deposition of Au NPs provides different plasmonic properties which can be beneficial for several aims, from optoelectronic to biosensor applications.

  17. Impact of pulse duration on Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy: treatment aspects on the single-pulse level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Scheib, Gabriel; Khoder, Wael; Stief, Christian G; Herrmann, Thomas; Nagele, Udo; Bader, Markus J

    2015-04-01

    Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotripsy is a multi-pulse treatment modality with stochastic effects on the fragmentation. In vitro investigation on the single-pulse-induced effects on fiber, repulsion as well as fragmentation was performed to identify potential impacts of different Ho:YAG laser pulse durations. A Ho:YAG laser system (Swiss LaserClast, EMS S.A., Nyon, Switzerland) with selectable long- or short-pulse mode was tested with regard to fiber burn back, the repulsion capacity using an underwater pendulum setup and single-pulse-induced fragmentation capacity using artificial (BEGO) stones. The laser parameters were chosen in accordance with clinical application modes (laser fiber: 365 and 200 µm; output power: 4, 6 and 10 W in different combinations of energy per pulse and repetition rate). Evaluation parameters were reduction in fiber length, pendulum deviation and topology of the crater. Using the long-pulse mode, the fiber burn back was nearly negligible, while in short-pulse mode, an increased burn back could be observed. The results of the pendulum test showed that the deviation induced by the momentum of short pulses was by factor 1.5-2 higher compared to longer pulses at identical energy per pulse settings. The ablation volumes induced by single pulses either in short-pulse or long-pulse mode did not differ significantly although different crater shapes appeared. Reduced stone repulsion and reduced laser fiber burn back with longer laser pulses may result in a more convenient handling during clinical application and thus in an improved clinical outcome of laser lithotripsy.

  18. Three-dimensional defects in CdTe films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagan, P; Virt, IS; Zawislak, J; Rudyj, IO; Kuzma, M

    2004-01-01

    The quality of Cd chalcodenides epitaxial films can be enhanced seriously by applying a pulsed (electron beam or laser beam) method for ablation of targets. The structure of laser deposited CdTe layers was investigated by transmission high energy electron diffraction. This method is very useful for

  19. Plasma Emission Spectra of Opuntia Nopalea Obtained with Microsecond Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, A.; Flores, A.

    2008-04-01

    Laser-induced Plasma Spectroscopy was performed during the spines ablation of Opuntia by using Nd:YAG microsecond laser pulses. The results show strong absorption in Glochids that causes the intense electronic noise on the spectra. This process is consider suitable for practical elimination of spines in alimentary products like opuntia.

  20. Preparation of CuO nanoparticles by laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulateef, Sinan A., E-mail: sinan1974@yahoo.com; MatJafri, M. Z.; Omar, A. F., E-mail: thinker-academy@yahoo.com; Ahmed, Naser M.; Azzez, Shrook A. [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Issam M. [Baghdad university, physics department (Iraq); Al-Jumaili, Batool E. B. [Department of Physics, (UPM), Serdang, Selangor 43400 (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    Colloidal Cu nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation in acetone. Cu NPs were converted into CuO. The size and optical properties of these NPs were characterized using an UV/Vis spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Cu NPs were spherical, and their mean diameter in acetone was 8 nm–10 nm. Optical extinction immediately after the ablation showed surface Plasmon resonance peaks at 602 nm. The color of Cu NPs in acetone was green and stable even after a long time.

  1. Optimization of silver nanoparticles production by laser ablation in water using a 150-ps laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stašić, J.; Živković, Lj.; Trtica, M.

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation in liquid (water) using a 150-ps Nd:YAG laser. Due to their extraordinary characteristics, especially when obtained by this method providing high purity and high stability of colloids, silver NPs are nowadays highly important in various applications. The objective of this study was to optimize the process parameters in order to achieve the highest possible yield while retaining small particle size. Yield/mass concentration of the obtained particles was measured depending on different parameters: time of irradiation, pulse energy, position regarding the focus, and number of irradiation locations. The conditions providing relatively high yield, small particle size, highest production rate, and highest efficiency are 7 mJ, 15-min irradiation time (9000 pulses), and target position ∼4 mm in front of the lens focus. The results are compared with the results obtained by the longer nanosecond as well as the ultrashort pulsed lasers. A possible physical explanation is given.

  2. Optimization of silver nanoparticles production by laser ablation in water using a 150-ps laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stašić, J.; Živković, Lj.; Trtica, M., E-mail: etrtica@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinča” (Serbia)

    2016-12-15

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation in liquid (water) using a 150-ps Nd:YAG laser. Due to their extraordinary characteristics, especially when obtained by this method providing high purity and high stability of colloids, silver NPs are nowadays highly important in various applications. The objective of this study was to optimize the process parameters in order to achieve the highest possible yield while retaining small particle size. Yield/mass concentration of the obtained particles was measured depending on different parameters: time of irradiation, pulse energy, position regarding the focus, and number of irradiation locations. The conditions providing relatively high yield, small particle size, highest production rate, and highest efficiency are 7 mJ, 15-min irradiation time (9000 pulses), and target position ∼4 mm in front of the lens focus. The results are compared with the results obtained by the longer nanosecond as well as the ultrashort pulsed lasers. A possible physical explanation is given.

  3. Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the spatial and temporal distributions of ionic, neutral, and molecular species generated by femtosecond laser produced plasma under varying ambient nitrogen gas pressures. Plasmas were generated by irradiating planar graphite targets using 40 fs pulses of 800 nm radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The results show that in the presence of an ambient gas, the molecular species spatial extension and lifetime are directly correlated to the evolution of excited ions. The present studies also provide valuable insights into the evolution history of various species and their excitation during ultrafast laser ablation.

  4. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  5. Corneal tissue ablation using 6.1 μm quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-03-01

    High absorption property of tissues in the IR range (λ> 2 μm) results in effective tissue ablation, especially near 3 μm. In the mid-infrared range, wavelengths of 6.1 μm and 6.45 μm fall into the absorption bands of the amide protein groups Amide-I and Amide-II, respectively. They also coincide with the deformation mode of water, which has an absorption peak at 6.1 μm. This coincidence makes 6.1 μm laser a better ablation tool that has promising effectiveness and minimum collateral damages than 3 μm lasers. In this work, we performed bovine corneal ablation test in-vitro using high-power 6.1μm quantum cascade laser (QCL) operated at pulse mode. Quantum cascade laser has the advantages of low cost, compact size and tunable wavelength, which makes it great alternative Mid-IR light source to conventional tunable free-electron lasers (FEL) for medical applications. Preliminary results show that effective corneal stroma craters were achieved with much less collateral damage in corneal tissue that contains less water. Future study will focus on optimizing the control parameters of QCL to attain neat and precise ablation of corneal tissue and development of high peak power QCL.

  6. Ultrafast pulse lasers jump to macro applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Martin; Lutze, Walter; Scheller, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast Lasers have been proven for several micro applications, e.g. stent cutting, for many years. Within its development of applications Jenoptik has started to use ultrafast lasers in macro applications in the automotive industry. The JenLas D2.fs-lasers with power output control via AOM is an ideal tool for closed loop controlled material processing. Jenoptik enhanced his well established sensor controlled laser weakening process for airbag covers to a new level. The patented process enables new materials using this kind of technology. One of the most sensitive cover materials is genuine leather. As a natural product it is extremely inhomogeneous and sensitive for any type of thermal load. The combination of femtosecond pulse ablation and closed loop control by multiple sensor array opens the door to a new quality level of defined weakening. Due to the fact, that the beam is directed by scanning equipment the process can be split in multiple cycles additionally reducing the local energy input. The development used the 5W model as well as the latest 10W release of JenLas D2.fs and achieved amazing processing speeds which directly fulfilled the requirements of the automotive industry. Having in mind that the average cycle time of automotive processes is about 60s, trials had been done of processing weakening lines in genuine leather of 1.2mm thickness. Parameters had been about 15 cycles with 300mm/s respectively resulting in an average speed of 20mm/s and a cycle time even below 60s. First samples had already given into functional and aging tests and passed successfully.

  7. SEM and Raman spectroscopy analyses of laser-induced periodic surface structures grown by ethanol-assisted femtosecond laser ablation of chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Ajami, Ali; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The effect of fluence and pulse duration on the growth of nanostructures on chromium (Cr) surfaces has been investigated upon irradiation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses in a liquid confined environment of ethanol. In order to explore the effect of fluence, targets were exposed to 1000 pulses at various peak fluences ranging from 4.7 to 11.8 J cm-2 for pulse duration of ∼25 fs. In order to explore the effect of pulse duration, targets were exposed to fs laser pulses of various pulse durations ranging from 25 to 100 fs, for a constant fluence of 11.8 J cm-2. Surface morphology and structural transformations have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. After laser irradiation, disordered sputtered surface with intense melting and cracking is obtained at the central ablated areas, which are augmented with increasing laser fluence due to enhanced thermal effects. At the peripheral ablated areas, where local fluence is approximately in the range of 1.4-4 mJ cm-2, very well-defined laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with periodicity ranging from 270 to 370 nm along with dot-like structures are formed. As far as the pulse duration is concerned, a significant effect on the surface modification of Cr has been revealed. In the central ablated areas, for the shortest pulse duration (25 fs), only melting has been observed. However, LIPSS with dot-like structures and droplets have been grown for longer pulse durations. The periodicity of LIPSS increases and density of dot-like structures decreases with increasing pulse duration. The chemical and structural modifications of irradiated Cr have been revealed by Raman spectroscopy. It confirms the formation of new bands of chromium oxides and enol complexes or Cr-carbonyl compounds. The peak intensities of identified bands are dependent upon laser fluence and pulse duration.

  8. Long-time feedback in self-organized nanostructures formation upon multipulse femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Arguirov, Tzanimir; Schade, Martin; Leipner, Hartmut S.

    2010-02-01

    Self-organized nanostructures (ripples) on the target surface after multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation exhibit, obviously, a positive multi-pulse feedback in the self-organization process. Experiments on different targets (CaF2, Si) investigate this feedback in more detail, in particular its dynamics. The influence of pulse number and time separation between successive pulses on both the size and the complexity of the nanostructures as well as the size of the modified surface area is studied. In addition to a dependence on the coupled dose, confirming incubation effects previously observed on ablation efficiency, both modified area as well as pattern feature size and complexity decrease with increasing pulse-to- pulse delay between 1 ms and 1 s, indicating an unexpectedly long lifetime of the feedback. Further, for silicon, a persisting modification of the crystalline structure is found well beyond the ablation spot, though no apparent change in surface morphology can be seen. Mapping the band-to-band photoluminescence displays a spatially modulated dramatic increase of non-radiative recombination compared to unaffected material.

  9. Hybrid micromachining using a nanosecond pulsed laser and micro EDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sanha; Chung, Do Kwan; Shin, Hong Shik; Chu, Chong Nam; Kim, Bo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Micro electrical discharge machining (micro EDM) is a well-known precise machining process that achieves micro structures of excellent quality for any conductive material. However, the slow machining speed and high tool wear are main drawbacks of this process. Though the use of deionized water instead of kerosene as a dielectric fluid can reduce the tool wear and increase the machine speed, the material removal rate (MRR) is still low. In contrast, laser ablation using a nanosecond pulsed laser is a fast and non-wear machining process but achieves micro figures of rather low quality. Therefore, the integration of these two processes can overcome the respective disadvantages. This paper reports a hybrid process of a nanosecond pulsed laser and micro EDM for micromachining. A novel hybrid micromachining system that combines the two discrete machining processes is introduced. Then, the feasibility and characteristics of the hybrid machining process are investigated compared to conventional EDM and laser ablation. It is verified experimentally that the machining time can be effectively reduced in both EDM drilling and milling by rapid laser pre-machining prior to micro EDM. Finally, some examples of complicated 3D micro structures fabricated by the hybrid process are shown

  10. Angular distributions and total yield of laser ablated silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Nordskov, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver has been measured in situ with a newly constructed setup with an array of microbalances. The distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction corresponding to cospθ, where p varies between 5 and 9 for laser fluences from 2 to 7 J/cm2 at 355...

  11. Novel endoscopic application of a new flexible-fiber CO2 laser for esophageal mucosal ablation in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandasabapathy, S; Maru, D; Klumpp, S; Uthamanthil, R; Borne, A; Bhutani, M S

    2009-02-01

    The CO (2) laser is a surgical tool that is widely used because of its predictable penetration depth and minimal collateral damage due to efficient absorption of CO (2) laser energy by tissue water. Until recently, endoscopic use was limited by lack of an efficient, flexible delivery system. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the performance, efficacy, and safety of a novel, photonic band-gap CO (2) laser configured for esophageal mucosal ablation. This was an endoscopic experimental study in a porcine survival model. Initial evaluation was done on ex vivo tissue followed by endoscopic studies at 7-, 10-, 15-, and 20-W power and at 0-, 1-, 2-, 5-, and 10-mm distances, using continuous and pulsed currents, to determine optimal performance settings. In an IACUC-approved protocol, six pigs underwent circumferential ablation of the distal 6 cm of the esophagus at 10W continuous current. The animals were monitored for 2 or 4 weeks to evaluate delayed effects. Prior to euthanasia, the proximal esophagus was ablated to evaluate the homogeneity of ablation and depth of injury immediately after single and repeat ablation. The animals resumed normal diets within 24 hours and experienced no dysphagia or weight loss. Pathology at 2 and 4 weeks revealed complete re-epithelialization with minimal histologic injury. A single application of the laser produced complete transepithelial ablation of a mean of 83.3 % of the surface area (range 55 % - 100 %); depth of injury was to the muscularis mucosa in five pigs and to the superficial submucosa in one pig. With ablation, sloughing, and re-ablation, a mean of 95 % transepithelial ablation was achieved (range 80 % -100 %) with similar depth of injury. Using a novel, flexible CO (2) laser, homogeneous ablation was achieved with predictable penetration and minimal deep tissue injury. These results warrant further evaluation of the laser in Barrett's esophagus, as it may overcome the limitations of current technologies

  12. Laser ablation/ionization studies in a glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, K.R.; Harrison, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The pin cathode glow discharge is used in the laboratory as an atomization/ionization source for a variety of applications, including solids mass spectrometry. Coupled with a tunable dye laser, the glow discharge may also serve as an atom reservoir for resonance ionization mass spectrometry in which the laser ionizes the discharge sputtered atoms. By tightly focusing the laser onto solid samples, various ablation effects may also be investigated. The laser may be used to generate an ionized plasma which may be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. Alternatively, the ablated neutral atoms may be used in post-ablation excitation/ionization processes, in this case the glow discharge. The results of these investigations are the basis of this paper

  13. Effect of liquid environment on the titanium surface modification by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Nisar, E-mail: chnisarali@gmail.com [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Faisalabad Campus, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Umm-i-Kalsoom [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Kala Shah Kaku Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Begum, Narjis [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Liquid assisted ablation effects on the titanium under varying number of laser pulses is investigated. • SEM analysis reveals the growth of various features like ripples, dendritic structures, pores, grains and craters. • Raman and XRD analyses shows the presence of TiO{sub 2} & TiH in both media whereas, TiC, TiCxOy are only identified in propanol. • Hardness of ablated Ti explored by Nano indentation is found to decrease with increasing number of pulses in both media. • Relationship between surface, structural and mechanical modifications is established. - Abstract: The effect of liquid environment (de-ionized water and propanol) on surface, structural and mechanical properties of femtosecond laser ablated titanium has been investigated. For this purpose, Ti: sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs, 1 kHz) has been employed, at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm{sup 2} in ambient environments of de-ionized water, and propanol for various number of laser pulses i.e. 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000. The surface features, chemical composition, structural analysis and mechanical properties of irradiated targets have been evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X -ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy and Nano-hardness tester. Various features like dendritic structures, globules, porous granular morphology, cones, crater, circular ripples and thermal stress cracking are observed at the ablated area after irradiation. These features are instigated by various thermal and chemical phenomena induced by laser heating at the solid–liquid interface. Decrease in nano-hardness observed in both ambient environments is attributable to the formation of hydrides after irradiation in both media.

  14. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  15. Reactive pulsed laser deposition with gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, R.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.

    2001-01-01

    Different metal (Sn, Al, steel, Cu, W) thin films were synthesized by reactive pulsed laser deposition on steel, copper and glass wafers. In our work pulsed Nd:glass (10 J, 800μs) laser system was used. Jet of gas was created by electromagnetic valve perpendicularly to the laser beam. Nitrogen, oxygen and argon were used. We used several to tens laser shots to obtain visible with the naked eye layers. Thin layers were observed under an optical microscope. (author)

  16. Investigation of early plasma evolution induced by ultrashort laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C; King, Galen B

    2012-07-02

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment(1-11). Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy(1-3) and interferometry(1,4-7). However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 10(14) W/cm(2). Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions(12). The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. (12) to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators.

  17. Estimation of Al2O3 critical temperature using a Langmuir probe in laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, K.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Messaoud Aberkane, S.; Kellou, A.

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has demonstrated its capacity in thin films growing under the moderate laser intensity. But when the laser intensity increases, the presence of droplets on the thin film limits the PLD efficiency such that the process needs an optimization study. In this way, an experimental study has been conducted in order to correlate between the appearance of those droplets and the laser fluence. The comprehension of the physical mechanism during ablation and the control of the deposition parameters allowed to get a safe process. Our experiment consists in measuring the amount of ejected matter from polycrystalline alumina target as a function of the laser fluence when irradiated by a KrF laser. According to laser fluence, several kinds of ablation regimes have been identified. Below a threshold value found as 12 J/cm2, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to normal evaporation, desorption and nonthermal processes. While above this threshold value, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to phase explosion phenomenon which is responsible of droplets formation when the surface temperature approaches the critical temperature T tc. A negative charge collector was used to collect the positive ions in the plume. Their times of flight (TOF) signal were used to estimate the appropriate T tc for alumina target. Ions yield, current as well as kinetic energy were deduced from the TOF signal. Their evolutions show the occurrence of an optical breakdown in the vapor plume which is well correlated with the onset of the phase explosion phenomenon. At 10 J/cm2, the ions velocities collected by the probe have been compared to those obtained from optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic and were discussed. To prove the occurrence of phase explosion by the appearance of droplets, several thin films were elaborated on Si (100) substrate at different laser fluence into vacuum. They have been characterized by scanning electron microscope. The results were well

  18. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  19. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 (micro)g L -1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 (micro)L injection in a physiological saline matrix

  20. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  1. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  2. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  3. Effect of laser pulse energies in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in double-pulse configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, P.A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of laser pulse energy on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal is studied. In particular, the energy of the first pulse has been changed, while the second pulse energy is held fixed. A systematic study of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal dependence on the interpulse delay is performed, and the results are compared with the ones obtained with a single laser pulse of energy corresponding to the sum of the two pulses. At the same time, the crater formed at the target surface is studied by video-confocal microscopy, and the variation in crater dimensions is correlated to the enhancement of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal. The results obtained are consistent with the interpretation of the double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement in terms of the changes in ambient gas pressure produced by the shock wave induced by the first laser pulse

  4. Ablation from metals induced by visible and UV laser irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate of laser-ablated silver has been determined for fluences between 0.5 and 15 J/cm2 at the wavelengths 532 and 355 nm for a beam spot area of around 0.01 cm2. The ablated metal was collected on a quartz crystal microbalance. The rate at 5 J/cm2 was about 4 × 1013 Ag/cm2 per puls...

  5. Harmonic generation by atomic and nanoparticle precursors in a ZnS laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Nalda, R. de; Castillejo, M., E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Plume species in infrared ns laser ablation of ZnS studied by low-order harmonic generation. • Different spatiotemporal properties of harmonics from atoms and nanoparticles. • Results compared with calculations of optical frequency up-conversion in perturbative regime. - Abstract: Harmonic generation of a driving laser propagating across a laser ablation plasma serves for the diagnosis of multicomponent plumes. Here we study the contribution of atomic and nanoparticle precursors to the generation of coherent ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet light as low-order harmonics of the fundamental emission (1064 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in a nanosecond infrared ZnS laser ablation plasma. Odd harmonics from the 3rd up to the 9th order (118.2 nm) have been observed with distinct temporal and spatial characteristics which were determined by varying the delay between the ablation and driving nanosecond pulses and by spatially scanning the plasma with the focused driving beam propagating parallel to the target. At short distances from the target surface (≤1 mm), the harmonic intensity displays two temporal components peaked at around 250 ns and 10 μs. While the early component dies off quickly with increasing harmonic order and vanishes for the 9th order, the late component is notably intense for the 7th harmonic and is still clearly visible for the 9th. Spectral analysis of spontaneous plume emissions help to assign the origin of the two components. While the early plasma component is mainly constituted by neutral Zn atoms, the late component is mostly due to nanoparticles, which upon interaction with the driving laser are subject to breakup and ionization. With the aid of calculations of the phase matching integrals within the perturbative model of optical harmonic generation, these results illustrate how atom and nanoparticle populations, with differing temporal and spatial distributions within the ablation plasma, contribute to the nonlinear

  6. Plasma dynamics during pulsed laser evaporation of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Narayan, J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors of this paper theoretically and experimentally investigated the dynamics of the evaporated material generated by nanosecond excimer laser irradiation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 targets in vacuum. The velocity distribution and the ionization of the plasma were determined by the ion time of flight measurements. The excimer laser ablated species possessed very high velocities (>120 6 cm/sec) which increased non-linearly with energy density. The ionization/volume of the evaporated material exhibited a weak dependency on energy density, thereby suggesting the role of non-thermal mechanisms in the ionization process. These experimental results have been correlated with the theoretical model analyzing the plasma dynamics during pulsed laser evaporation of materials. A new modification to the earlier theoretical model is developed which accurately predicts the terminal velocities and the effect of ionization on these velocities. Various factors including, evaporation rates, degree of ionization, and laser wavelength which affect the plasma velocities will also be discussed

  7. Optimal emission enhancement in orthogonal double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanginés, R.; Contreras, V.; Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Orthogonal double-pulse (DP) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was performed using reheating and pre-ablative configurations. The ablation pulse power density was varied by two orders of magnitude and the DP experiments were carried out for a wide range of interpulse delays. For both DP-LIBS schemes, the signal enhancement was evaluated with respect to the corresponding single-pulse (SP) LIBS as a function of the interpulse delay. The reheating scheme shows a sharp maximum signal enhancement of up to 200-fold for low ablative power densities (0.4 GW cm −2 ); however, for power densities larger than 10 GW cm −2 this configuration did not improve the SP outcome. On the other hand, a more uniform signal enhancement of about 4–6 was obtained for the pre-ablative scheme nearly independently of the used ablative power density. In terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) the pre-ablative scheme shows a monotonic increment with the ablative power density. Whereas the reheating configuration reaches a maximum at 2.2 GW cm −2 , its enhancement effect collapses markedly for fluencies above 10 GW cm −2 . - Highlights: • Comparison of reheating and pre-ablative double-pulse LIBS was done using a wide range of ablation power densities. • Experimental parameters that could achieve optimal signal-to-noise ratio were investigated. • A reheating scheme is better for low-ablation power densities. • A pre-ablative configuration is better for high-ablation power densities

  8. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  9. Ultrashort pulse laser technology laser sources and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schrempel, Frank; Dausinger, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses with durations in the femtosecond range up to a few picoseconds provide a unique method for precise materials processing or medical applications. Paired with the recent developments in ultrashort pulse lasers, this technology is finding its way into various application fields. The book gives a comprehensive overview of the principles and applications of ultrashort pulse lasers, especially applied to medicine and production technology. Recent advances in laser technology are discussed in detail. This covers the development of reliable and cheap low power laser sources as well as high average power ultrashort pulse lasers for large scale manufacturing. The fundamentals of laser-matter-interaction as well as processing strategies and the required system technology are discussed for these laser sources with respect to precise materials processing. Finally, different applications within medicine, measurement technology or materials processing are highlighted.

  10. Heat transfer modelling of pulsed laser-tissue interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzova, J.; Jelinek, M.

    2018-03-01

    Due to their attributes, the application of medical lasers is on the rise in numerous medical fields. From a biomedical point of view, the most interesting applications are the thermal interactions and the photoablative interactions, which effectively remove tissue without excessive heat damage to the remaining tissue. The objective of this work is to create a theoretical model for heat transfer in the tissue following its interaction with the laser beam to predict heat transfer during medical laser surgery procedures. The dimensions of the ablated crater (shape and ablation depth) were determined by computed tomography imaging. COMSOL Multiphysics software was used for temperature modelling. The parameters of tissue and blood, such as density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, were calculated from the chemical ratio. The parameters of laser-tissue interaction, such as absorption and reflection coefficients, were experimentally determined. The parameters of the laser beam were power density, repetition frequency, pulse length and spot dimensions. Heat spreading after laser interaction with tissue was captured using a Fluke thermal camera. The model was verified for adipose tissue, skeletal muscle tissue and heart muscle tissue.

  11. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Anterior two-thirds corpus callosotomy via stereotactic laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsy, Michael; Patel, Daxa M; Halvorson, Kyle; Mortimer, Vance; Bollo, Robert J

    2018-04-01

    Anterior two-thirds corpus callosotomy is a common palliative surgical intervention most commonly employed in patients with atonic or drop seizures. Recently, stereotactic laser ablation of the corpus callosum without a craniotomy has shown promise in achieving similar outcomes with fewer side effects and shorter hospitalizations. The authors demonstrate ablation of the anterior two-thirds corpus callosum in a patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and drug-resistant drop seizures. Technical nuances of laser ablation with 3 laser fibers are described. Postoperatively, the patient showed a significant reduction in seizure frequency and severity over a 9-month follow-up period. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/3-mMq5-PLiM .

  13. Pulsed Laser Annealing of Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Joseph P.

    This dissertation investigates laser heating of carbon materials. The carbon industry has been annealing carbon via traditional furnace heating since at least 1800, when Sir Humphry Davy produced an electric arc with carbon electrodes made from carbonized wood. Much knowledge has been accumulated about carbon since then and carbon materials have become instrumental both scientifically and technologically. However, to this day the kinetics of annealing are not known due to the slow heating and cooling rates of furnaces. Additionally, consensus has yet to be reached on the cause of nongraphitizability. Annealing trajectories with respect to time at temperature are observed from a commercial carbon black (R250), model graphitizable carbon (anthracene coke) and a model nongraphitizable carbon (sucrose char) via rapid laser heating. Materials were heated with 1064 nm and 10.6 im laser radiation from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a continuous wave CO2 laser, respectively. A pulse generator was used reduce the CO2 laser pulse width and provide high temporal control. Time-temperature-histories with nanosecond temporal resolution and temperature reproducibility within tens of degrees Celsius were determined by spectrally resolving the laser induced incandescence signal and applying multiwavelength pyrometry. The Nd:YAG laser fluences include: 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 550 mJ/cm2. The maximum observed temperature ranged from 2,400 °C to the C2 sublimation temperature of 4,180 °C. The CO2 laser was used to collect a series of isothermal (1,200 and 2,600 °C) heat treatments versus time (100 milliseconds to 30 seconds). Laser heated samples are compared to furnace annealing at 1,200 and 2,600 °C for 1 hour. The material transformation trajectory of Nd:YAG laser heated carbon is different than traditional furnace heating. The traditional furnace annealing pathway is followed for CO2 laser heating as based upon equivalent end structures. The nanostructure of sucrose char

  14. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  15. Influence of pulse width in laser assisted texturing on moly-chrome films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhilmaran, V.; Vijayaraghavan, L.; Vasa, N. J.; Krishnan, Sivarama

    2018-02-01

    Continuous micro-channels were formed on the surface of the automotive piston rings using two different lasers, namely nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser. Tribology measurements were conducted to compare the friction properties of the samples fabricated with the laser pulse width of nanosecond and femtosecond order. The femtosecond laser ablation comparatively minimized the re-deposition layer, heat affected zone around the micro-channel compared to the nanosecond laser ablation. Owing to the localized material ablation, the compressive residual stress was not altered with femtosecond laser processing. The friction test was conducted using reciprocating type friction measurement setup for the loads ranging from 10 to 130 N. The friction coefficients of all the textured samples were reduced compared to the non-textured samples. Furthermore, it is observed that the average friction coefficient was low with the femtosecond laser textured samples compared to that of the nanosecond laser textured samples of the same dimensions. The results show that the thermally induced defects while using the nanosecond laser ablation might have influenced the tribological properties.

  16. Study of ablation on surfaces of nuclear-use metals irradiated with Femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Alessandro F.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Rossi, Wagner de, E-mail: alessandro.nogueira@usp.br, E-mail: resamad@ipen.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Engenharia de Sorocaba (FACENS), Ipero, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The use of ultrashort pulsed lasers is an alternative for micro-machining in metal surfaces, with diverse applications in several industrial areas, such as aeronautics, aerospace, naval, nuclear, among others, where there is a growing concern with reliability in service. In this work, micro-machining were performed on titanium surfaces using femtosecond ultrashort pulses. Such a process resulted in minimal heat transfer to the material, thus avoiding and surface deformation of the titanium plate and the formation of resolidified material in the ablated region, which are drawbacks present in the use of the long pulsed keyed laser of the order of nanoseconds. Three types of micro-machining were performed, with variations in the distances between the machined lines. It was also verified that the wettability increases when there is an increase in the distance between machined lines. Finally, in order to change the surface with minimal removal of material, it has been found that the use of ultra-short pulse lasers provide great benefits for the integrity of the ablated material. This initial study is the starting point for the study of other metals, such as Maraging Steels and Zircaloy that will be the target of future work. (author)

  17. Study of ablation on surfaces of nuclear-use metals irradiated with Femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Alessandro F.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Rossi, Wagner de

    2017-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulsed lasers is an alternative for micro-machining in metal surfaces, with diverse applications in several industrial areas, such as aeronautics, aerospace, naval, nuclear, among others, where there is a growing concern with reliability in service. In this work, micro-machining were performed on titanium surfaces using femtosecond ultrashort pulses. Such a process resulted in minimal heat transfer to the material, thus avoiding and surface deformation of the titanium plate and the formation of resolidified material in the ablated region, which are drawbacks present in the use of the long pulsed keyed laser of the order of nanoseconds. Three types of micro-machining were performed, with variations in the distances between the machined lines. It was also verified that the wettability increases when there is an increase in the distance between machined lines. Finally, in order to change the surface with minimal removal of material, it has been found that the use of ultra-short pulse lasers provide great benefits for the integrity of the ablated material. This initial study is the starting point for the study of other metals, such as Maraging Steels and Zircaloy that will be the target of future work. (author)

  18. SYNTHESIS OF 2,6-DIAMINOPYRIDINE-4-NITROPHENOL (2,6DAP4N COCRYSTAL NANOPARTICLES BY LASER ABLATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Zulina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose findings for laser ablation of organic materials in liquids as one of the perspective methods of nanoparticles synthesis on their basis. We describe nanoparticles synthesis for 2,6-diaminopyridine-4-nitrophenol (2,6DAP4N cocrystal by the method of material laser ablation at nanoparticles condensation in liquid (dodecane and polyphenyleneoxide. Laser radiation with wavelength equal to 355 nm, pulse duration - 10 ns, pulse repetition rate - 3.8 kHz, and pulse power density equal to 170 kW/cm2 has been used in the study. Nanoparticles in the form of colloids have been obtained and studied by visible range spectroscopy and optical microscopy. Obtained particles size is around 0.5 μm.

  19. Femtosecond laser pulses principles and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This smooth introduction for advanced undergraduate students starts with the fundamentals of lasers and pulsed optics Thus prepared, the student learns how to generate short and ultrashort laser pulses, how to manipulate them, and how to measure them Finally, spectroscopic implications are discussed This rounded text gives the student an up-to-date introduction to one of the most exciting fields in laser physics

  20. Nonlinear scattering in hard tissue studied with ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, J.; Kim, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The back-scattered spectrum of ultrashort laser pulses (800 nm, 0.2 ps) was studied in human dental and other hard tissues in vitro below the ablation threshold. Frequency doubled radiation (SHG), frequency tripled radiation and two-photon fluorescence were detected. The relative yield for these processes was measured for various pulse energies. The dependence of the SHG signal on probe thickness was determined in forward and back scattering geometry. SHG is sensitive to linear polarization of the incident laser radiation. SHG in human teeth was studied in vitro showing larger signals in dentin than in cementum and enamel. In carious areas no SHG signal could be detected. Possible applications of higher harmonic radiation for diagnostics and microscopy are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Antibacterial effect of bismuth subsalicylate nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Castañeda, Mariela [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Vega-Jiménez, Alejandro L., E-mail: argelia.almaguer@mac.com; Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Facultad de Odontología, DEPeI, I (Mexico); Camps, Enrique; Pérez, Mario [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra [Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa (Mexico); Berea, Edgardo [FarmaQuimia SA de CV. (Mexico); Rodil, Sandra E. [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales (Mexico)

    2015-11-15

    The antimicrobial properties of bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) nanoparticles against four opportunistic pathogens; E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis were determined. BSS nanoparticles were synthesized by pulse laser ablation of a solid target in distilled water under different conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and absorption spectra and small angle X-ray scattering. The analysis shows that the colloids maintained the BSS structure and presented average particle size between 20 and 60 nm, while the concentration ranges from 95 to 195 mg/L. The antibacterial effect was reported as the inhibition ratio of the bacterial growth after 24 h and the cell viability was measured using the XTT assay. The results showed that the inhibition ratio of E. coli and S. epidermidis was dependant on the NPs size and/or concentration, meanwhile P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were more sensitive to the BSS nanoparticles independently of both the size and the concentration. In general, the BSS colloids with average particle size of 20 nm were the most effective, attaining inhibition ratios >80 %, similar or larger than those obtained with the antibiotic used as control. The results suggest that the BSS colloids could be used as effective antibacterial agents with potential applications in the medical area.

  2. Antibacterial effect of bismuth subsalicylate nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Castañeda, Mariela; Vega-Jiménez, Alejandro L.; Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Camps, Enrique; Pérez, Mario; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Berea, Edgardo; Rodil, Sandra E.

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial properties of bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) nanoparticles against four opportunistic pathogens; E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis were determined. BSS nanoparticles were synthesized by pulse laser ablation of a solid target in distilled water under different conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and absorption spectra and small angle X-ray scattering. The analysis shows that the colloids maintained the BSS structure and presented average particle size between 20 and 60 nm, while the concentration ranges from 95 to 195 mg/L. The antibacterial effect was reported as the inhibition ratio of the bacterial growth after 24 h and the cell viability was measured using the XTT assay. The results showed that the inhibition ratio of E. coli and S. epidermidis was dependant on the NPs size and/or concentration, meanwhile P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were more sensitive to the BSS nanoparticles independently of both the size and the concentration. In general, the BSS colloids with average particle size of 20 nm were the most effective, attaining inhibition ratios >80 %, similar or larger than those obtained with the antibiotic used as control. The results suggest that the BSS colloids could be used as effective antibacterial agents with potential applications in the medical area.

  3. Observation of the initial stage of the laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, Takasumi; Murakami, Kouichi.

    1994-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using Laser Plasma X-ray (LPX) as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20 J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibits several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak of 1s → 2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 is stronger as the probing position is closer to the sample surface and its intensity decreases rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speed of highly charged ions are faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions are emitted from the sample surface even after laser irradiation. The spatial distribution of the laser ablated particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume is depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  4. Short pulse laser systems for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kunal

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical information on the clinical applications of short pulse laser systems and the techniques for optimizing these applications in a manner that will be relevant to a broad audience, including engineering and medical students as well as researchers, clinicians, and technicians. Short pulse laser systems are useful for both subsurface tissue imaging and laser induced thermal therapy (LITT), which hold great promise in cancer diagnostics and treatment. Such laser systems may be used alone or in combination with optically active nanoparticles specifically administered to the tissues of interest for enhanced contrast in imaging and precise heating during LITT. Mathematical and computational models of short pulse laser-tissue interactions that consider the transient radiative transport equation coupled with a bio-heat equation considering the initial transients of laser heating were developed to analyze the laser-tissue interaction during imaging and therapy. Experiments were first performe...

  5. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  6. Generation of nanoclusters by ultrafast laser ablation of Al: Molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Phillips, Mark C.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Dressman, Phillip; Miloshevsky, Gennady

    2017-11-01

    The laser ablation of materials induced by an ultrashort femtosecond pulse is a complex phenomenon, which depends on both the material properties and the properties of the laser pulse. The unique capability of a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and Momentum Scaling Model (MSM) methods is developed and applied to a large atomic system for studying the process of ultrafast laser-material interactions, behavior of matter in a highly non-equilibrium state, material disintegration, and formation of nanoparticles (NPs). Laser pulses with several fluences in the range from 500 J/m2 to 5000 J/m2 interacting with a large system of aluminum atoms are simulated. The response of Al material to the laser energy deposition is investigated within the finite-size laser spot. It is found that the shape of the plasma plume is dynamically changing during an expansion process. At several tens of picoseconds it can be characterized as a long hollow ellipsoid surrounded by atomized and nano-clustered particles. The time evolution of NP clusters in the plume is investigated. The collisions between the single Al atoms and generated NPs and fragmentation of large NPs determine the fractions of different-size NP clusters in the plume. The MD-MSM simulations show that laser fluence greatly affects the size distribution of NPs, their polar angles, magnitude and direction vectors of NP velocities. These results and predictions are supported by the experimental data and previous MD simulations.

  7. Spin-offs from laser ablation in art conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, J.; Elford, J.; Parfenov, V.

    2013-05-01

    In 1973 The Center for Art Conservation Studies (CASS) was established at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). This was in response to demonstrations that were conducted during January-March 1972 in Venice for UNESCO, Venice in Peril, International Fund for Monuments, and the Italian Petroleum Institute (ENI). The feasibility investigation explored in-situ pulsed holography, holographic interferometry, and laser ablation divestment for applications in art conservation practice. During subsequent decades scores of UCSD graduate and undergraduate students as well as conservators, conservation scientists, academics, and engineers who resided in CASS as "Visiting Scholars" contributed to advancing the understanding and performance of radiation technologies in the arts. Several technologies in addition to those involving optical wavelengths were also investigated to aid in art conservation and conservation science. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were employed to detect and map moisture within masonry. Lead isotopic analyses revealed authenticity and provenance of Benin bronzes. Inside-out x-ray radiography facilitated the detection of defects in stone. Ultrasonic imaging was introduced for the mapping of fresco strata. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) was used to characterize varnish layers on paintings. Digital image processing was introduced in order to detect and visualize pentimenti within paintings as well as to perform virtual restoration and provide interactive museum displays. Holographic images were employed as imaginary theater sets. In the years that followed the graduation of students and the visits of professional collaborators, numerous other applications of radiation ablation began appearing in a wide variety of other fields such as aircraft maintenance, ship maintenance, toxic chemical remediation, biological sterilization, food processing, industrial fabrication, industrial maintenance, nuclear

  8. Silver jewelry microanalysis with dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: 266 + 1064 nm wavelength combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Junyu; Chen, Yuqi; Li, Runhua

    2014-11-01

    Orthogonal dual-wavelength dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ODWDP-LIBS) with 266+1064  nm wavelength combination was applied to realize silver jewelry microanalysis with enhanced sensitivity and minimal sample ablation. In this technique, the 266 nm laser with low pulse energy was selected as ablation laser and the time-delayed 1064 nm laser with moderate pulse energy was selected as reheating laser to enhance plasma emission. Significant signal enhancement was achieved under the excitation of the reheating laser without increasing mass ablation which was only determined by the ablation laser. Internal standard method was applied to realize quantitative analysis of copper impurity in silver jewelry samples. The calibration curve was built, and the limit of detection of copper in silver matrix was determined to be 37.4 ppm when the crater diameter was controlled at 6.5 μm. This technique is especially useful for microanalysis of precious samples due to the property of less sample ablation in comparison with single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) under the same analytical sensitivity.

  9. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Daniel; Peña, Jose I

    2013-11-19

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth, removed volume and ablation yields reached their maximum, placing the sample out of focus. It was shown that these characteristics do not depend on the processing conditions, the wavelength or the optical configuration, and that this is intrinsic behavior of the processing method. Furthermore, the existence of a close relation between material hardness and ablation yields was demonstrated.

  10. Synthesis of bimetallic nanostructures by nanosecond laser ablation of multicomponent thin films in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents results on nanosecond laser ablation of thin films immersed in a liquid. The thin films were prepared by consecutive deposition of layers of different metals by thermal evaporation (first layer) and classical on-axis pulsed laser deposition (second layer); Ni/Au, Ag/Au and Ni/Ag thin films were thus deposited on glass substrates. The as-prepared films were then placed at the bottom of a glass vessel filled with double distilled water and irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses delivered by a Nd:YAG laser system at λ = 355 nm. This resulted in the formation of colloids of the thin films’ material. We also compared the processes of ablation of a bulk target and a thin film in the liquid by irradiating a Au target and a Au thin film by the same laser wavelength and fluence (λ = 355 nm, F = 5 J/cm2). The optical properties of the colloids were evaluated by optical transmittance measurements in the UV– VIS spectral range. Transmission electron microscopy was employed to estimate the particles’ size distribution.

  11. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  12. Expansion phenomena of aerosols generated by laser ablation under helium and argon atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.; Waelle, M.; Schlamp, S.; Roesgen, T.; Guenther, D.

    2008-01-01

    Specific expansion phenomena of aerosols generated by near infrared femtosecond laser ablation (NIR-fs-LA) of brass under helium and argon atmosphere were studied. For this purpose, particles were visualized by light scattering using a pulsed laser source. Aerosols were found to be captured in symmetric vortices when striking a solid boundary during their kinetic stage of expansion. Furthermore, high-repetitive LA resulted in the formation of a complex, macroscopic flow pattern driven by a pressure gradient locally built up. Our data indicate that aerosols released under those conditions experience only minor losses of around 1% if they get in contact with the inner walls of ablation cells operated at atmospheric pressures

  13. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  14. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  15. Concentrating laser pulses in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2006-08-01

    Projecting high peak power laser pulses to a specific location in space and time can significantly improve laser weapons, secure optical communications, and remote spectroscopy. Current laser systems send a pulsed beam from laser to target causing collateral damage to objects in the path for a laser weapon system, opportunities for compromising security in communications, and averaging of measurements along the path for spectroscopy. We analyze and simulate a system that beamforms M mode-locked lasers, each having N modes, to achieve a peak power at a target in space and time that is NM times greater than that for M non-mode-locked non-beamformed lasers. In low atmospheric turbulence, a peak power of 10kW can be projected to a point in space and time by a 10 × 10 array of 2W laser diodes, each having 50 modes. Effects of atmospheric turbulence are discussed and were investigated in our previous papers.

  16. Online Monitoring of Nanoparticles Formed during Nanosecond Laser Ablation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, H.; Holá, M.; Vojtíšek-Lomb, M.; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, NOV 1 (2016), s. 52-60 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser ablation * fast mobility particle sizer * inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  17. Zinc nanoparticles in solution by laser ablation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Physical and chemical properties of these materi- als are highly size dependent. Therefore, it is important ... provided a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanomaterials in both solutions and gas matrices (Hodak et al ... 2006) and magnetic characterization of Co–Pt nanoparti- cles are reported by laser ablation of Co–Pt bulk ...

  18. Irreversible electroporation ablation area enhanced by synergistic high- and low-voltage pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguo Yao

    Full Text Available Irreversible electroporation (IRE produced by a pulsed electric field can ablate tissue. In this study, we achieved an enhancement in ablation area by using a combination of short high-voltage pulses (HVPs to create a large electroporated area and long low-voltage pulses (LVPs to ablate the electroporated area. The experiments were conducted in potato tuber slices. Slices were ablated with an array of four pairs of parallel steel electrodes using one of the following four electric pulse protocols: HVP, LVP, synergistic HVP+LVP (SHLVP or LVP+HVP. Our results showed that the SHLVPs more effectively necrotized tissue than either the HVPs or LVPs, even when the SHLVP dose was the same as or lower than the HVP or LVP doses. The HVP and LVP order mattered and only HVPs+LVPs (SHLVPs treatments increased the size of the ablation zone because the HVPs created a large electroporated area that was more susceptible to the subsequent LVPs. Real-time temperature change monitoring confirmed that the tissue was non-thermally ablated by the electric pulses. Theoretical calculations of the synergistic effects of the SHLVPs on tissue ablation were performed. Our proposed SHLVP protocol provides options for tissue ablation and may be applied to optimize the current clinical IRE protocols.

  19. Formation of plasmonic colloidal silver for flexible and printed electronics using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S., E-mail: skasa@physics.auth.gr [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kaziannis, S. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Pliatsikas, N. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A.; Karantzalis, A.E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidis, C. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Lidorikis, E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Patsalas, P. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Silver plasmonic colloidal in organic solvents by ps laser ablation process. • Ag NPs that meet size requirements of the printed organic electronics technology. • Ag NPs size refinement by secondary process using the 355 nm beam of a ns laser. - Abstract: Laser ablation (LA) in liquids has been used for the development of various nanoparticles (NPs); among them, Ag NPs in aqueous solutions (usually produced by nanosecond (ns) LA) have attracted exceptional interest due to its strong plasmonic response. In this work, we present a comprehensive study of the LA of Ag in water, chloroform and toluene, with and without PVP, using a picosecond (ps) Nd:YAG laser and we consider a wide range of LA parameters such as the laser wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), the pulse energy (0.3–17 mJ) and the number of pulses. In addition, we consider the use of a secondary nanosecond laser beam for the refinement of the NPs size distribution. The optical properties of the NPs were evaluated by in situ optical transmittance measurements in the UV–vis spectral ranges. The morphology of the NPs and the formation of aggregates were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The ps LA process resulted in the development of bigger Ag NPs, compared to the ns LA, compatible with the size requirements of the printed organic electronics technology. The optimum conditions for the ps LA of Ag in organic solvents include the use of the 355 nm beam at low pulse energy (<1 mJ); these conditions rendered isolated Ag nanoparticles manifesting strong and well defined surface plasmon resonance peak. The use of the secondary ns laser beam was proven to be able to refine the nanoparticles to intermediate size between those produced by the single ns or ps LA.

  20. Selective femtosecond laser structuring of dielectric thin films with different band gaps: a time-resolved study of ablation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have been increasingly gaining importance for the selective structuring of dielectric thin films in industrial applications. In a variety of works the ablation of thin SiO2 and SiNx films from Si substrates has been investigated with near infrared laser wavelengths with photon energies of about 1.2 eV where both dielectrics are transparent (E_{{gap,SiO2}}≈ 8 eV; E_{{gap,SiN}x}≈ 2.5 eV). In these works it was found that few 100 nm thick SiO2 films are selectively ablated with a "lift-off" initiated by confined laser ablation whereas the SiN_{{x}} films are ablated by a combination of confined and direct laser ablation. In the work at hand, ultrafast pump-probe imaging was applied to compare the laser ablation dynamics of the two thin film systems directly with the uncoated Si substrate—on the same setup and under identical parameters. On the SiO2 sample, results show the pulse absorption in the Si substrate, leading to the confined ablation of the SiO2 layer by the expansion of the substrate. On the SiN_{{x}} sample, direct absorption in the layer is observed leading to its removal by evaporation. The pump-probe measurements combined with reflectivity corrected threshold fluence investigations suggest that melting of the Si substrate is sufficient to initiate the lift-off of an overlaying transparent film—evaporation of the substrate seems not to be necessary.

  1. Short-pulse-laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Ziegler, Wolfgang; von der Linde, Dietrich; Siegal, Michael P.; Overmyer, D. L.

    2005-03-01

    Short-pulse-laser-induced damage and ablation of thin films of amorphous, diamond-like carbon have been investigated. Material removal and damage are caused by fracture of the film and ejection of large fragments. The fragments exhibit a delayed, intense and broadband emission of microsecond duration. Both fracture and emission are attributed to the laser-initiated relaxation of the high internal stresses of the pulse laser deposition-grown films.

  2. Study of Laser Ablation Efficiency for an Acrylic-Based Photopolymerizing Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from study of the effi ciency (ablated mass per unit energy, mechanical recoil momentum per unit energy) of laser ablation for a light-curable polymer. A substantial difference is seen between the thresholds and indicated criteria for laser ablation effi ciency in the liquid and cured phases. The highest energy effi ciency for laser ablation (~22.6 %) is achieved when the initially liquid polymer is exposed to radiation with the wavelength optimal for photopolymerization (365 ± 15 nm).

  3. Superluminous laser pulse in an active medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.L.; Tajima, T.

    1993-12-01

    Physical conditions are obtained to make the propagation velocity of a laser pulse and thus the phase velocity of the excited wake be at any desired value, including that equal to or greater than the speed of light. The provision of an active-plasma laser medium with an appropriately shaped pulse allows not only replenishment of laser energy loss to the wakefield but also acceleration of the group velocity of photons. A stationary solitary solution in the accelerated frame is obtained from the model equations and simulations thereof for the laser, plasma and atoms. This approach has applications in photonics and telecommunications as well as wakefield accelerators

  4. Pulsed Laser Cladding of Ni Based Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, A.; Stanciu, E. M.; Croitoru, C.; Roata, I. C.; Tierean, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the operational parameters and quality of one step Metco Inconel 718 atomized powder laser cladded tracks, deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrate by means of a 1064 nm high power pulsed laser, together with a Precitec cladding head manipulated by a CLOOS 7 axes robot. The optimization of parameters and cladding quality has been assessed through Taguchi interaction matrix and graphical output. The study demonstrates that very good cladded layers with low dilution and increased mechanical proprieties could be fabricated using low laser energy density by involving a pulsed laser.

  5. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Claudio M. [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)], E-mail: claudiomaurizio.pacella@fastwebnet.it; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival.

  6. Evaluation of plasma disruption simulating short pulse laser irradiation experiments on boronated graphites and CFCs [carbon fibre composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stad, R.C.L. van der; Klippel, H.T.; Kraaij, G.J.

    1992-12-01

    New experimental and numerical results from disruption heat flux simulations in the millisecond range with laser beams are discussed. For a number of graphites, boronated graphites and carbon fibre composites, the effective enthalpy of ablation is determined as 30 ± 3 MJ/kg, using laser pulses of about -.3 ms. The numerical results predict the experimental results rather well. No effect of boron doping on the ablation enthalpy is found. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Extending ultra-short pulse laser texturing over large area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincuzzi, G., E-mail: girolamo.mincuzzi@alphanov.com; Gemini, L.; Faucon, M.; Kling, R.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We carried out metal surface texturing (Ripples, micro grooves, Spikes) using a high power, high repetition rate, industrial, Ultra-short pulses laser. • Extremely Fast processing is shown (Laser Scan speed as high as 90 m/s) with a polygon scanner head. • Stainless steel surface blackening with Ultra-short pulses laser has been obtained with unprecedented scanspeed. • Full SEM surface characterization was carried out for all the different structures obtained. • Reflectance measurements were carried out to characterize surface reflectance. - Abstract: Surface texturing by Ultra-Short Pulses Laser (UPL) for industrial applications passes through the use of both fast beam scanning systems and high repetition rate, high average power P, UPL. Nevertheless unwanted thermal effects are expected when P exceeds some tens of W. An interesting strategy for a reliable heat management would consists in texturing with a low fluence values (slightly higher than the ablation threshold) and utilising a Polygon Scanner Heads delivering laser pulses with unrepeated speed. Here we show for the first time that with relatively low fluence it is possible over stainless steel, to obtain surface texturing by utilising a 2 MHz femtosecond laser jointly with a polygonal scanner head in a relatively low fluence regime (0.11 J cm{sup −2}). Different surface textures (Ripples, micro grooves and spikes) can be obtained varying the scan speed from 90 m s{sup −1} to 25 m s{sup −1}. In particular, spikes formation process has been shown and optimised at 25 m s{sup −1} and a full morphology characterization by SEM has been carried out. Reflectance measurements with integrating sphere are presented to compare reference surface with high scan rate textures. In the best case we show a black surface with reflectance value < 5%.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide with a high repetition rate picosecond fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, Turkka; Hahtala, Mikko; Seppaelae, Ilkka; Niemi, Tapio; Pessa, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a mode-locked fiber laser in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of yttria-stabilized zirconium oxide. The fiber laser produces picosecond pulses with megahertz repetition rates at the wavelength of 1060 nm. We have investigated the effects of the time delay and the physical overlapping of the consecutive pulses on the ablation thresholds and the properties of the deposited films. Our results show existence of two distinct evaporation modes: (1) a single pulse evaporation mode observed for low overlapping and long time delays between the pulses and (2) a high repetition rate evaporation mode for high overlapping with short delays. The first mode is characterized by evaporation of nanoparticles and clusters and yields structured films with high surface area. The second mode yields smooth films, with evaporation characteristics closer to those of thermal evaporation than traditional PLD. (orig.)

  9. Effect of ambient pressure on laser ablation and plume expansion dynamics: A numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhaoyang; Bleiner, Davide; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model is applied to the study of the effect of ambient pressure in laser ablation, more specifically on the copper target heating, melting and vaporization, and the resulting plume expansion in the helium gas, as well as on plasma formation in the plume. Under the laser pulse condition investigated [5 ns full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 10 9 W/cm 2 peak irradiance], the calculated results show that the characteristics of the surface temperature and the evaporation depth are very similar even when the ambient pressure varies greatly. The influence of the ambient pressure on the fraction of absorbed laser energy is also small. The maximum ablated material vapor density in the plume is influenced slightly by the different pressures. Before 40 ns, the maximum plume temperature for various ambient pressures is in the order of a few 10 4 K. However, the effect of ambient pressure on the plume length is quite large. A specific calculation for a Gaussian-shaped laser pulse with 6 ns FWHM and 2.76x10 9 W/cm 2 peak irradiance is made. The calculated evaporation depth agrees well with the experimental data. Therefore, the model can be useful to predict trends in target and plume (plasma) characteristics, which are difficult to obtain experimentally for various ambient pressures

  10. Experiment and Prediction of Ablation Depth in Excimer Laser Micromachining of Optical Polymer Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Tamrin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extending the data transfer rates through dense interconnections at inter- and intraboard levels is a well-established technique especially in consumer electronics at the expense of more cross talk, electromagnetic interference (EMI, and power dissipation. Optical transmission using optical fibre is practically immune to the aforementioned factors. Among the manufacturing methods, UV laser ablation using an excimer laser has been repeatedly demonstrated as a suitable technique to fabricate multimode polymer waveguides. However, the main challenge is to precisely control and predict the topology of the waveguides without the need for extensive characterisation which is both time consuming and costly. In this paper, the authors present experimental results of investigation to relate the fluence, scanning speed, number of shots, and passes at varying pulse repetition rate with the depth of ablation of an acrylate-based photopolymer. The depth of ablation essentially affects total internal reflection and insertion loss, and these must be kept at minimum for a successful optical interconnection on printed circuit boards. The results are then used to predict depth of ablation for this material by means of adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS modelling. The predicted results, with a correlation of 0.9993, show good agreement with the experimental values. This finding will be useful in better predictions along with resource optimisation and ultimately helps in reducing cost of polymer waveguide fabrication.

  11. Thermal Ablation of Colorectal Lung Metastases: Retrospective Comparison Among Laser-Induced Thermotherapy, Radiofrequency Ablation, and Microwave Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Eckert, Romina; Naguib, Nagy N N; Beeres, Martin; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate local tumor control, time to tumor progression, and survival rates among patients with lung metastatic colorectal cancer who have undergone ablation therapy performed using laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), or microwave ablation (MWA). Data for this retrospective study were collected from 231 CT-guided ablation sessions performed for 109 patients (71 men and 38 women; mean [± SD] age, 68.6 ± 11.2 years; range, 34-94 years) from May 2000 to May 2014. Twenty-one patients underwent LITT (31 ablations), 41 patients underwent RFA (75 ablations), and 47 patients underwent MWA (125 ablations). CT scans were acquired 24 hours after each therapy session and at follow-up visits occurring at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after ablation. Survival rates were calculated from the time of the first ablation session, with the use of Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Changes in the volume of the ablated lesions were measured using the Kruskal-Wallis method. Local tumor control was achieved in 17 of 25 lesions (68.0%) treated with LITT, 45 of 65 lesions (69.2%) treated with RFA, and 91 of 103 lesions (88.3%) treated with MWA. Statistically significant differences were noted w