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Sample records for abiotic constraints response

  1. Abiotic stressors and stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulmon, Cecile; Van Baaren, Joan; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organisms are regularly subjected to abiotic stressors related to increasing anthropogenic activities, including chemicals and climatic changes that induce major stresses. Based on various key taxa involved in ecosystem functioning (photosynthetic microorganisms, plants, invertebrates), ...

  2. Molecular mechanisms in plant abiotic stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poltronieri Palmiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved crop varieties are needed to sustain the food supply, to fight climate changes, water scarcity, temperature increase and a high variability of rainfalls. Variability of drought and increase in soil salinity have negative effects on plant growth and abiotic stresses seriously threaten sustainable agricultural production. To overcome the influence of abiotic stresses, new tolerant plant varieties and breeding techniques using assisted selection are sought. A deep understanding of the mechanisms that respond to stress and sustain stress resistance is required. Here is presented an overview of several mechanisms that interact in the stress response. Localised synthesis of plant hormones, second messengers and local effectors of abiotic stress response and survival, the signaling pathways regulated by plant hormones are today better understood. Metabolic networks in drought stress responses, long distance signaling, cross-talk between plant organs finalised to tissue-specific expression of abiotic stress relieving genes have been at the centre of most recent studies.

  3. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

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    Cláudia Regina Batista de Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops.

  4. Research Progress in Tomato Responses to Abiotic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianing XU; Gang LIU; Liyun ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    Tomato is a kind of vegetable with high economic benefits in protected farmland.Accounting for 30% of vegetable planting area in the entire protected farmland,tomato plays an essential role in cultivation of protected vegetable.Different abiotic stresses have different degrees of influence on growth and development,yield,and fruit quality of tomatoes.Therefore,finding out life activity rules of tomatoes under different abiotic stresses will be of great significance to breeding for stress tolerance and increasing tomato yield and income.This paper made an overview of research progress in tomato responses to abiotic stress in growth and development,physiology and biochemistry,and gene regulation.

  5. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Plant Responses to Abiotic Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Qiao; LiuMin Fan

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in diverse physiological processes In plants. NO can provoke both beneficial and harmful effects, which depend on the concentration and location of NO in plant cells. This review is focused on NO synthesis and the functions of NO in plant responses to abiotic environmental stresses. Abiotic stresses mostly induce NO production in plants. NO alleviates the harmfulness of reactive oxygen species, and reacts with other target molecules, and regulates the expression of stress responsive genes under various stress conditions.

  6. Genetic mapping of abiotic stress responses in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to rich genetic diversity for tolerance to various abiotic stress conditions, sorghum is an ideal system for genetic mapping and elucidation of genome regions that confer such response among cereal crops. Coupled with the development of DNA marker technologies and most recently the sequencing o...

  7. Involvement of Histone Modifications in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianyu Yuan; Xuncheng Liu; Ming Luo; Songguang Yang; Keqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants encounter various environmental stimuli including abiotic stresses during their lifecycle. To survive under adverse conditions, plants have evolved intricate mechanisms to perceive external signals and respond accordingly. Responses to various stresses largely depend on the plant capacity to modulate the transcriptome rapidly and specifically. A number of studies have shown that the molecular mechanisms driving the responses of plants to environmental stresses often depend on nucleosome histone post-translational modifications including histone acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. The combined effects of these modifications play an essential role in the regulation of stress responsive gene expression. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms of histone modifications and their roles in plant abiotic stress response.

  8. Understanding the Posttranscriptional Regulation of Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    KAUST Repository

    AlShareef, Sahar A.

    2017-06-01

    Constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs from multiexonic genes controls the diversity of the proteome; these precisely regulated processes also fine-tune responses to cues related to growth, development, and biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent work showed that AS is pervasive across plant species, with more than 60% of intron-containing genes producing different isoforms. Mammalian cell-based assays have discovered various AS small-molecule inhibitors that perturb splicing and thereby provide invaluable tools for use as chemical probes to uncover the molecular underpinnings of splicing regulation and as potential anticancer compounds. Here, I show that the macrolide Pladienolide B (PB) and herboxidiene (GEX1A) inhibits both constitutive and alternative splicing, mimics an abiotic stress signal, and activates the abscisic acid (ABA) pathway in plants. Moreover, PB and GEX1A activate genome-wide transcriptional patterns involved in abiotic stress responses in plants. PB and GEX1A treatment triggered the ABA signaling pathway, activated ABA-inducible promoters, and led to stomatal closure. Interestingly, PB and GEX1A elicited similar cellular changes, including alterations in the patterns of transcription and splicing, suggesting that these compounds might target the same spliceosome complex in plant cells. This work establishes PB and GEX1A as potent splicing inhibitors in plants that can be used to probe the assembly, dynamics, and molecular functions of the spliceosome and to study the interplay between splicing stress and abiotic stresses, as well as having potential biotechnological applications.

  9. Genes Acting on Transcriptional Control during Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glacy Jaqueline da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses are the major cause of yield loss in crops around the world. Greater genetic gains are possible by combining the classical genetic improvement with advanced molecular biology techniques. The understanding of mechanisms triggered by plants to meet conditions of stress is of fundamental importance for the elucidation of these processes. Current genetically modified crops help to mitigate the effects of these stresses, increasing genetic gains in order to supply the agricultural market and the demand for better quality food throughout the world. To obtain safe genetic modified organisms for planting and consumption, a thorough grasp of the routes and genes that act in response to these stresses is necessary. This work was developed in order to collect important information about essential TF gene families for transcriptional control under abiotic stress responses.

  10. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

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    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  11. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights into ...... through ubiquitination. The wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses that affect crop plants limits agricultural production.......Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights...

  12. Predicting mechanisms across scales: amplified effects of abiotic constraints on the recruitment of yew Taxus baccata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Rubén; Pulido, Fernando; Nogues, David Bravo

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to disentangle the mechanisms underlying large-scale spatial patterns need to rely on multi-scale approaches. We illustrate this key issue by analyzing the spatial consistency across scales of the effects of abiotic constraints on the regeneration of English yew Taxus baccata in Europe. W...

  13. Herboxidiene triggers splicing repression and abiotic stress responses in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Sahar

    2017-03-27

    Background Constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs from multiexonic genes controls the diversity of the proteome; these precisely regulated processes also fine-tune responses to cues related to growth, development, and stresses. Small-molecule inhibitors that perturb splicing provide invaluable tools for use as chemical probes to uncover the molecular underpinnings of splicing regulation and as potential anticancer compounds. Results Here, we show that herboxidiene (GEX1A) inhibits both constitutive and alternative splicing. Moreover, GEX1A activates genome-wide transcriptional patterns involved in abiotic stress responses in plants. GEX1A treatment -activated ABA-inducible promoters, and led to stomatal closure. Interestingly, GEX1A and pladienolide B (PB) elicited similar cellular changes, including alterations in the patterns of transcription and splicing, suggesting that these compounds might target the same spliceosome complex in plant cells. Conclusions Our study establishes GEX1A as a potent splicing inhibitor in plants that can be used to probe the assembly, dynamics, and molecular functions of the spliceosome and to study the interplay between splicing stress and abiotic stresses, as well as having potential biotechnological applications.

  14. THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF SOYBEAN CULTIVARS TO ABIOTIC STRESS

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    Marija Špoljarević

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought, temperature and salt stress are the most prominent among different types of abiotic stress in soybean production. This PhD dissertation aimed to investigate the physiological mechanisms of soybean response to the above mentioned stresses. The research was performed with 6 cultivars in the germination - emergence stage and two cultivars in the flowering stage. In the first experiment, soybean seed was germinated in paper towels soaked in water or the solution with given osmotic pressure. Two levels of drought (5% and 10% PEG solutions, salt (50 and 100 mM NaCl solutions and temperature stress (10°C and 30°C, as well as a control treatment (20°C, water were applied through a 7 day germination period. Seed germinability (% and morphological traits were analysed, as well as enzymatic and non-enzymatic parameters in hypocotyls. The most effective were higher level of drought stress and low temperature. High temperature stimulated seedling development and mild drought stress had a priming effect and increased germination rate. In the second experiment, two cultivars were grown in pots filled with soil and kept in the open until flowering, and afterwards exposed to different temperature degrees (30°C, 10°C and 20°C as control during 3 days in a climate chamber. The photosynthesis efficiency parameters and, like in first experiment, physiological indicators of plant stress response were determined in the leaf tissue. Highly significant treatment influence on the analysed parameters in the both growth stages, confirms that the applied treatments invoked the oxidative stress and defence reactions in soybean.

  15. Restoring macrophyte diversity in shallow temperate lakes: biotic versus abiotic constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.S.; Sarneel, J.M.; Gulati, R.D.; Liu, Z.; Van Donk, E.

    2013-01-01

    Although many lake restoration projects have led to decreased nutrient loads and increased water transparency, the establishment or expansion of macrophytes does not immediately follow the improved abiotic conditions and it is often unclear whether vegetation with high macrophyte diversity will retu

  16. The role of receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) in abiotic stress response in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yaoyao; Ding, Yanfei; Jiang, Qiong; Wang, Feijuan; Sun, Junwei; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    We review and introduce recent studies on RLK s involved in the abiotic stress response and provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms for alleviating abiotic stress. Abiotic stresses are important factors affecting plant growth and development, resulting in crop production reduction and even plant death. To survive, plants utilize different mechanisms to respond and adapt to continuously changing environmental factors. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant response to various stresses will aid in improving tolerance of plants to abiotic stress through genetic engineering, which would greatly promote the development of modern agriculture. RLKs, the largest gene family in plants, play critical roles in the regulation of plant developmental processes, signaling networks and disease resistance. Many RLKs have been shown to be involved in abiotic stress responses, including the abscisic acid response, calcium signaling and antioxidant defense. This review summarizes recent studies on RLKs involved in plant responses to abiotic stress, including drought, salt, cold, toxic metals/metalloids and other stresses, and emphasizes the upstream and downstream factors in RLK signal transduction pathways under abiotic stress.

  17. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  18. The plant heat stress transcription factors (HSFs: structure, regulation and function in response to abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eGuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity and drought adversely affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs, including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs. HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps. In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  19. The role of transcriptional coactivator ADA2b in Arabidopsis abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E; Kaldis, Athanasios; Nikoloudi, Adriana; Tsementzi, Despoina

    2011-10-01

    Plant growth and crop production can be greatly affected by common environmental stresses such as drought, high salinity and low temperatures. Gene expression is affected by several abiotic stresses. Stress-inducible genes are regulated by transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms such as histone modifications. In this Mini-Review, we have explored the role of transcriptional adaptor ADA2b in Arabidopsis responses to abiotic stress. ADA2b is required for the expression of genes involved in abiotic stress either by controlling H3 and H4 acetylation in the case of salt stress or affecting nucleosome occupancy in low temperatures response.

  20. Structure, function and networks of transcription factors involved in abiotic stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2013-01-01

    and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based...... on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic...

  1. Structure, Function and Networks of Transcription Factors Involved in Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Skriver

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based on TFs and their direct targets genes are presented. These revealed components shared between ABA-dependent and independent signaling as well as abiotic and biotic stress signaling. Protein structure analysis suggested that TFs hubs of large interactomes have extended regions with protein intrinsic disorder (ID, referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners such as E3 ubiquitin ligases and TF regions with ID represent future targets for engineering improved abiotic stress tolerance in crops.

  2. Spatial variability of biotic and abiotic tree establishment constraints across a treeline ecotone in the Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueve, K.M.; Isaacs, R.E.; Tyrrell, L.E.; Densmore, R.V.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout interior Alaska (USA), a gradual warming trend in mean monthly temperatures occurred over the last few decades (;2-48C). The accompanying increases in woody vegetation at many alpine treeline (hereafter treeline) locations provided an opportunity to examine how biotic and abiotic local site conditions interact to control tree establishment patterns during warming. We devised a landscape ecological approach to investigate these relationships at an undisturbed treeline in the Alaska Range. We identified treeline changes between 1953 (aerial photography) and 2005 (satellite imagery) in a geographic information system (GIS) and linked them with corresponding local site conditions derived from digital terrain data, ancillary climate data, and distance to 1953 trees. Logistic regressions enabled us to rank the importance of local site conditions in controlling tree establishment. We discovered a spatial transition in the importance of tree establishment controls. The biotic variable (proximity to 1953 trees) was the most important tree establishment predictor below the upper tree limit, providing evidence of response lags with the abiotic setting and suggesting that tree establishment is rarely in equilibrium with the physical environment or responding directly to warming. Elevation and winter sun exposure were important predictors of tree establishment at the upper tree limit, but proximity to trees persisted as an important tertiary predictor, indicating that tree establishment may achieve equilibrium with the physical environment. However, even here, influences from the biotic variable may obscure unequivocal correlations with the abiotic setting (including temperature). Future treeline expansion will likely be patchy and challenging to predict without considering the spatial variability of influences from biotic and abiotic local site conditions. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. Spatial variability of biotic and abiotic tree establishment constraints across a treeline ecotone in the Alaska range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueve, Kirk M; Isaacs, Rachel E; Tyrrell, Lucy E; Densmore, Roseann V

    2011-02-01

    Throughout interior Alaska (U.S.A.), a gradual warming trend in mean monthly temperatures occurred over the last few decades (approximatlely 2-4 degrees C). The accompanying increases in woody vegetation at many alpine treeline (hereafter treeline) locations provided an opportunity to examine how biotic and abiotic local site conditions interact to control tree establishment patterns during warming. We devised a landscape ecological approach to investigate these relationships at an undisturbed treeline in the Alaska Range. We identified treeline changes between 1953 (aerial photography) and 2005 (satellite imagery) in a geographic information system (GIS) and linked them with corresponding local site conditions derived from digital terrain data, ancillary climate data, and distance to 1953 trees. Logistic regressions enabled us to rank the importance of local site conditions in controlling tree establishment. We discovered a spatial transition in the importance of tree establishment controls. The biotic variable (proximity to 1953 trees) was the most important tree establishment predictor below the upper tree limit, providing evidence of response lags with the abiotic setting and suggesting that tree establishment is rarely in equilibrium with the physical environment or responding directly to warming. Elevation and winter sun exposure were important predictors of tree establishment at the upper tree limit, but proximity to trees persisted as an important tertiary predictor, indicating that tree establishment may achieve equilibrium with the physical environment. However, even here, influences from the biotic variable may obscure unequivocal correlations with the abiotic setting (including temperature). Future treeline expansion will likely be patchy and challenging to predict without considering the spatial variability of influences from biotic and abiotic local site conditions.

  4. Identification of Abiotic Stress Responsive Genes from Indian High Altitude Lepidium latifolium L. (Short Communication

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    Sanjay Mohan Gupta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses are major environmental factors that periodically account for significant loss in crop productivity. In order to improve the abiotic stress tolerance in vegetable crops through transgenic approaches, authors isolated and cloned six up-regulated, LlaDREB1b (JN214345, LlaGPAT (JN398166, LlaNAC (FJ423495, LlaCIPK (FJ423496, LlaPR5 (GQ853409 and LlaIPK (FJ487575 and two down-regulated LlaRan (JN214347 and LlaDRT (JN214346 abiotic stress responsive genes from Indian high altitude Lepidium latifolium L. plant that that may be used for abiotic stress-tolerance engineering upon functional validation.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(5, pp.315-318, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.62.1495

  5. APUM5, encoding a Pumilio RNA binding protein, negatively regulates abiotic stress responsive gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A mutant screening was carried out previously to look for new genes related to the Cucumber mosaic virus infection response in Arabidopsis. A Pumilio RNA binding protein-coding gene, Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 (APUM5), was obtained from this screening. Results APUM5 transcriptional profiling was carried out using a bioinformatics tool. We found that APUM5 was associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, bacterial and fungal pathogen infection susceptibility was not changed in APUM5 transgenic plants compared to that in wild type plants although APUM5 expression was induced upon pathogen infection. In contrast, APUM5 was involved in the abiotic stress response. 35S-APUM5 transgenic plants showed hypersensitive phenotypes under salt and drought stresses during germination, primary root elongation at the seedling stage, and at the vegetative stage in soil. We also showed that some abiotic stress-responsive genes were negatively regulated in 35S-APUM5 transgenic plants. The APUM5-Pumilio homology domain (PHD) protein bound to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the abiotic stress-responsive genes which contained putative Pumilio RNA binding motifs at the 3′ UTR. Conclusions These results suggest that APUM5 may be a new post-transcriptional regulator of the abiotic stress response by direct binding of target genes 3′ UTRs. PMID:24666827

  6. Effects of biotic and abiotic constraints on the symbiosis between rhizobia and the tropical leguminous trees Acacia and Prosopis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Leena A; Lindström, Kristina

    2003-10-01

    N2-fixing, drought tolerant and multipurpose Acacia and Prosopis species are appropriate trees for reforestation of degraded areas in arid and semiarid regions of the tropics and subtropics. Acacia and Prosopis trees form N2-fixing nodules with a wide range of rhizobia, for example African acacias mainly with Sinorhizobium sp. and Mesorhizobium sp., and Australian acacias with Bradyrhizobium sp. Although dry and hot seasons restrict formation of N2-fixing nodules on Acacia and Prosopis spp., fully grown trees and their symbiotic partners are well adapted to survive in harsh growth conditions. This review on one hand deals with major constraints of arid and semiarid soils, i.e. drought, salinity and high soil temperature, which affect growth of trees and rhizobia, and on the other hand with adaptation mechanisms by which both organisms survive through unfavourable periods. In addition, defects in infection and nodulation processes due to various abiotic and biotic constraints are reviewed. This knowledge is important when Acacia and Prosopis seedlings are used for forestation of degraded areas in arid and semiarid tropics.

  7. Prerequisites, performance and profits of transcriptional profiling the abiotic stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Joachim; Peschke, Florian; Berendzen, Kenneth W; Harter, Klaus; Wanke, Dierk

    2012-02-01

    During the last decade, microarrays became a routine tool for the analysis of transcripts in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the crop plant species rice, poplar or barley. The overwhelming amount of data generated by gene expression studies is a valuable resource for every scientist. Here, we summarize the most important findings about the abiotic stress responses in plants. Interestingly, conserved patterns of gene expression responses have been found that are common between different abiotic stresses or that are conserved between different plant species. However, the individual histories of each plant affect the inter-comparability between experiments already before the onset of the actual stress treatment. This review outlines multiple aspects of microarray technology and highlights some of the benefits, limitations and also pitfalls of the technique. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  8. Identification of Arabidopsis candidate genes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses using comparative microarrays.

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    Arjun Sham

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved with intricate mechanisms to cope with multiple environmental stresses. To adapt with biotic and abiotic stresses, plant responses involve changes at the cellular and molecular levels. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of combinations of different environmental stresses on the transcriptome level of Arabidopsis genome using public microarray databases. We investigated the role of cyclopentenones in mediating plant responses to environmental stress through TGA (TGACG motif-binding factor transcription factor, independently from jasmonic acid. Candidate genes were identified by comparing plants inoculated with Botrytis cinerea or treated with heat, salt or osmotic stress with non-inoculated or non-treated tissues. About 2.5% heat-, 19% salinity- and 41% osmotic stress-induced genes were commonly upregulated by B. cinerea-treatment; and 7.6%, 19% and 48% of genes were commonly downregulated by B. cinerea-treatment, respectively. Our results indicate that plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are mediated by several common regulatory genes. Comparisons between transcriptome data from Arabidopsis stressed-plants support our hypothesis that some molecular and biological processes involved in biotic and abiotic stress response are conserved. Thirteen of the common regulated genes to abiotic and biotic stresses were studied in detail to determine their role in plant resistance to B. cinerea. Moreover, a T-DNA insertion mutant of the Responsive to Dehydration gene (rd20, encoding for a member of the caleosin (lipid surface protein family, showed an enhanced sensitivity to B. cinerea infection and drought. Overall, the overlapping of plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses, coupled with the sensitivity of the rd20 mutant, may provide new interesting programs for increased plant resistance to multiple environmental stresses, and ultimately increases its chances to survive. Future research

  9. Arabidopsis microRNA expression regulation in a wide range of abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Milanowska, Kaja; Knop, Katarzyna; Bielewicz, Dawid; Nuc, Przemyslaw; Plewka, Patrycja; Pacak, Andrzej M; Vazquez, Franck; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis microRNA expression regulation was studied in a wide array of abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, salinity, copper excess/deficiency, cadmium excess, and sulfur deficiency. A home-built RT-qPCR mirEX platform for the amplification of 289 Arabidopsis microRNA transcripts was used to study their response to abiotic stresses. Small RNA sequencing, Northern hybridization, and TaqMan® microRNA assays were performed to study the abundance of mature microRNAs. A broad response on the level of primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) was observed. However, stress response at the level of mature microRNAs was rather confined. The data presented show that in most instances, the level of a particular mature miRNA could not be predicted based on the level of its pri-miRNA. This points to an essential role of posttranscriptional regulation of microRNA expression. New Arabidopsis microRNAs responsive to abiotic stresses were discovered. Four microRNAs: miR319a/b, miR319b.2, and miR400 have been found to be responsive to several abiotic stresses and thus can be regarded as general stress-responsive microRNA species.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis Suggests Overlapping Expression of Rice ONAC Transcription Factors in Abiotic and Biotic Stress Responses

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    Lijun Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC transcription factors comprise a large plant-specific gene family that contains more than 149 members in rice. Extensive studies have revealed that NAC transcription factors not only play important roles in plant growth and development, but also have functions in regulation of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, biological functions for most of the members in the NAC family remain unknown. In this study, microarray data analyses revealed that a total of 63 ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression patterns in rice under various abiotic (salt, drought, and cold and biotic (infection by fungal, bacterial, viral pathogens, and parasitic plants stresses. Thirty-eight ONAC genes exhibited overlapping expression in response to any two abiotic stresses, among which 16 of 30 selected ONAC genes were upregulated in response to exogenous ABA. Sixty-five ONAC genes showed overlapping expression patterns in response to any two biotic stresses. Results from the present study suggested that members of the ONAC genes with overlapping expression pattern may have pleiotropic biological functions in regulation of defense response against different abiotic and biotic stresses, which provide clues for further functional analysis of the ONAC genes in stress tolerance and pathogen resistance.

  11. Molecular and physiological responses to abiotic stress in forest trees and their relevance to tree improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfouche, Antoine; Meilan, Richard; Altman, Arie

    2014-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and cold, are the major environmental stresses that adversely affect tree growth and, thus, forest productivity, and play a major role in determining the geographic distribution of tree species. Tree responses and tolerance to abiotic stress are complex biological processes that are best analyzed at a systems level using genetic, genomic, metabolomic and phenomic approaches. This will expedite the dissection of stress-sensing and signaling networks to further support efficient genetic improvement programs. Enormous genetic diversity for stress tolerance exists within some forest-tree species, and due to advances in sequencing technologies the molecular genetic basis for this diversity has been rapidly unfolding in recent years. In addition, the use of emerging phenotyping technologies extends the suite of traits that can be measured and will provide us with a better understanding of stress tolerance. The elucidation of abiotic stress-tolerance mechanisms will allow for effective pyramiding of multiple tolerances in a single tree through genetic engineering. Here we review recent progress in the dissection of the molecular basis of abiotic stress tolerance in forest trees, with special emphasis on Populus, Pinus, Picea, Eucalyptus and Quercus spp. We also outline practices that will enable the deployment of trees engineered for abiotic stress tolerance to land owners. Finally, recommendations for future work are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Natural variation in abiotic stress responsive gene expression and local adaptation to climate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Jesse R; Des Marais, David L; Lowry, David B; Povolotskaya, Inna; McKay, John K; Richards, James H; Keitt, Timothy H; Juenger, Thomas E

    2014-09-01

    Gene expression varies widely in natural populations, yet the proximate and ultimate causes of this variation are poorly known. Understanding how variation in gene expression affects abiotic stress tolerance, fitness, and adaptation is central to the field of evolutionary genetics. We tested the hypothesis that genes with natural genetic variation in their expression responses to abiotic stress are likely to be involved in local adaptation to climate in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we compared genes with consistent expression responses to environmental stress (expression stress responsive, "eSR") to genes with genetically variable responses to abiotic stress (expression genotype-by-environment interaction, "eGEI"). We found that on average genes that exhibited eGEI in response to drought or cold had greater polymorphism in promoter regions and stronger associations with climate than those of eSR genes or genomic controls. We also found that transcription factor binding sites known to respond to environmental stressors, especially abscisic acid responsive elements, showed significantly higher polymorphism in drought eGEI genes in comparison to eSR genes. By contrast, eSR genes tended to exhibit relatively greater pairwise haplotype sharing, lower promoter diversity, and fewer nonsynonymous polymorphisms, suggesting purifying selection or selective sweeps. Our results indicate that cis-regulatory evolution and genetic variation in stress responsive gene expression may be important mechanisms of local adaptation to climatic selective gradients.

  13. Natural variation for gene expression responses to abiotic stress in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Amanda J; Makarevitch, Irina; Noshay, Jaclyn; Burghardt, Liana T; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Cory D; Springer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stress through a variety of physiological, biochemical, and transcriptional mechanisms. Many genes exhibit altered levels of expression in response to abiotic stress, which requires concerted action of both cis- and trans-regulatory features. In order to study the variability in transcriptome response to abiotic stress, RNA sequencing was performed using 14-day-old maize seedlings of inbreds B73, Mo17, Oh43, PH207 and B37 under control, cold and heat conditions. Large numbers of genes that responded differentially to stress between parental inbred lines were identified. RNA sequencing was also performed on similar tissues of the F1 hybrids produced by crossing B73 and each of the three other inbred lines. By evaluating allele-specific transcript abundance in the F1 hybrids, we were able to measure the abundance of cis- and trans-regulatory variation between genotypes for both steady-state and stress-responsive expression differences. Although examples of trans-regulatory variation were observed, cis-regulatory variation was more common for both steady-state and stress-responsive expression differences. The genes with cis-allelic variation for response to cold or heat stress provided an opportunity to study the basis for regulatory diversity.

  14. Understanding Abiotic Stress Tolerance Mechanisms: Recent Studies on Stress Response in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Ping Gao; Dai-Yin Chao; Hong-Xuan Lin

    2007-01-01

    Abiotic stress is the main factor negatively affecting crop growth and productivity worldwide. The advances in physiology, genetics, and molecular biology have greatly improved our understanding of plant responses to stresses. Rice plants are sensitive to various abiotic stresses. In this short review, we present recent progresses in adaptation of rice to salinity, water deficit and submergence. Many studies show that salt tolerance is tightly associated with the ability to maintain ion homeostasis under salinity. Na+ transporter SKC1 unloads NaMrom xylem, plasma membrane NaVHTantiporter SOS1 excludes sodium out of cytosol and tonoplast Na+/H+antiporter NHX1 sequesters Na+ into the vacuole. Silicon deposition in exodermis and endodermis of rice root reduces sodium transport through the apoplastic pathway. A number of transcription factors regulate stress-inducible gene expression that leads to initiating stress responses and establishing plant stress tolerance. Overexpression of some transcription factors, including DREB/CBF and MAC, enhances salt, drought, and cold tolerance in rice. A variant of one of ERF family genes, Sub1A-1, confers immersion tolerance to lowland rice. These findings and their exploitation will hold promise for engineering breeding to protect crop plants from certain abiotic stresses.

  15. Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) gibberellin 2-oxidase genes in stem elongation and abiotic stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchan; Underhill, Steven J R

    2016-01-01

    Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) is a traditional staple tree crop in the Oceania. Susceptibility to windstorm damage is a primary constraint on breadfruit cultivation. Significant tree loss due to intense tropical windstorm in the past decades has driven a widespread interest in developing breadfruit with dwarf stature. Gibberellin (GA) is one of the most important determinants of plant height. GA 2-oxidase is a key enzyme regulating the flux of GA through deactivating biologically active GAs in plants. As a first step toward understanding the molecular mechanism of growth regulation in the species, we isolated a cohort of four full-length GA2-oxidase cDNAs, AaGA2ox1- AaGA2ox4 from breadfruit. Sequence analysis indicated the deduced proteins encoded by these AaGA2oxs clustered together under the C19 GA2ox group. Transcripts of AaGA2ox1, AaGA2ox2 and AaGA2ox3 were detected in all plant organs, but exhibited highest level in source leaves and stems. In contrast, transcript of AaGA2ox4 was predominantly expressed in roots and flowers, and displayed very low expression in leaves and stems. AaGA2ox1, AaGA2ox2 and AaGA2ox3, but not AaGA2ox4 were subjected to GA feedback regulation where application of exogenous GA3 or gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor, paclobutrazol was shown to manipulate the first internode elongation of breadfruit. Treatments of drought or high salinity increased the expression of AaGA2ox1, AaGA2ox2 and AaGA2ox4. But AaGA2ox3 was down-regulated under salt stress. The function of AaGA2oxs is discussed with particular reference to their role in stem elongation and involvement in abiotic stress response in breadfruit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Abiotic Stress Responses and Microbe-Mediated Mitigation in Plants: The Omics Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Kamlesh K.; Sorty, Ajay M.; Bitla, Utkarsh M.; Choudhary, Khushboo; Gupta, Priyanka; Pareek, Ashwani; Singh, Dhananjaya P.; Prabha, Ratna; Sahu, Pramod K.; Gupta, Vijai K.; Singh, Harikesh B.; Krishanani, Kishor K.; Minhas, Paramjit S.

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are the foremost limiting factors for agricultural productivity. Crop plants need to cope up adverse external pressure created by environmental and edaphic conditions with their intrinsic biological mechanisms, failing which their growth, development, and productivity suffer. Microorganisms, the most natural inhabitants of diverse environments exhibit enormous metabolic capabilities to mitigate abiotic stresses. Since microbial interactions with plants are an integral part of the living ecosystem, they are believed to be the natural partners that modulate local and systemic mechanisms in plants to offer defense under adverse external conditions. Plant-microbe interactions comprise complex mechanisms within the plant cellular system. Biochemical, molecular and physiological studies are paving the way in understanding the complex but integrated cellular processes. Under the continuous pressure of increasing climatic alterations, it now becomes more imperative to define and interpret plant-microbe relationships in terms of protection against abiotic stresses. At the same time, it also becomes essential to generate deeper insights into the stress-mitigating mechanisms in crop plants for their translation in higher productivity. Multi-omics approaches comprising genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics integrate studies on the interaction of plants with microbes and their external environment and generate multi-layered information that can answer what is happening in real-time within the cells. Integration, analysis and decipherization of the big-data can lead to a massive outcome that has significant chance for implementation in the fields. This review summarizes abiotic stresses responses in plants in-terms of biochemical and molecular mechanisms followed by the microbe-mediated stress mitigation phenomenon. We describe the role of multi-omics approaches in generating multi-pronged information to provide a better understanding

  17. Abiotic Stress Responses and Microbe-Mediated Mitigation in Plants: The Omics Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Kamlesh K; Sorty, Ajay M; Bitla, Utkarsh M; Choudhary, Khushboo; Gupta, Priyanka; Pareek, Ashwani; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Prabha, Ratna; Sahu, Pramod K; Gupta, Vijai K; Singh, Harikesh B; Krishanani, Kishor K; Minhas, Paramjit S

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are the foremost limiting factors for agricultural productivity. Crop plants need to cope up adverse external pressure created by environmental and edaphic conditions with their intrinsic biological mechanisms, failing which their growth, development, and productivity suffer. Microorganisms, the most natural inhabitants of diverse environments exhibit enormous metabolic capabilities to mitigate abiotic stresses. Since microbial interactions with plants are an integral part of the living ecosystem, they are believed to be the natural partners that modulate local and systemic mechanisms in plants to offer defense under adverse external conditions. Plant-microbe interactions comprise complex mechanisms within the plant cellular system. Biochemical, molecular and physiological studies are paving the way in understanding the complex but integrated cellular processes. Under the continuous pressure of increasing climatic alterations, it now becomes more imperative to define and interpret plant-microbe relationships in terms of protection against abiotic stresses. At the same time, it also becomes essential to generate deeper insights into the stress-mitigating mechanisms in crop plants for their translation in higher productivity. Multi-omics approaches comprising genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics integrate studies on the interaction of plants with microbes and their external environment and generate multi-layered information that can answer what is happening in real-time within the cells. Integration, analysis and decipherization of the big-data can lead to a massive outcome that has significant chance for implementation in the fields. This review summarizes abiotic stresses responses in plants in-terms of biochemical and molecular mechanisms followed by the microbe-mediated stress mitigation phenomenon. We describe the role of multi-omics approaches in generating multi-pronged information to provide a better understanding

  18. Mechanical stress induces biotic and abiotic stress responses via a novel cis-element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants are continuously exposed to a myriad of abiotic and biotic stresses. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these stress signals are perceived and transduced are poorly understood. To begin to identify primary stress signal transduction components, we have focused on genes that respond rapidly (within 5 min to stress signals. Because it has been hypothesized that detection of physical stress is a mechanism common to mounting a response against a broad range of environmental stresses, we have utilized mechanical wounding as the stress stimulus and performed whole genome microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue. This led to the identification of a number of rapid wound responsive (RWR genes. Comparison of RWR genes with published abiotic and biotic stress microarray datasets demonstrates a large overlap across a wide range of environmental stresses. Interestingly, RWR genes also exhibit a striking level and pattern of circadian regulation, with induced and repressed genes displaying antiphasic rhythms. Using bioinformatic analysis, we identified a novel motif overrepresented in the promoters of RWR genes, herein designated as the Rapid Stress Response Element (RSRE. We demonstrate in transgenic plants that multimerized RSREs are sufficient to confer a rapid response to both biotic and abiotic stresses in vivo, thereby establishing the functional involvement of this motif in primary transcriptional stress responses. Collectively, our data provide evidence for a novel cis-element that is distributed across the promoters of an array of diverse stress-responsive genes, poised to respond immediately and coordinately to stress signals. This structure suggests that plants may have a transcriptional network resembling the general stress signaling pathway in yeast and that the RSRE element may provide the key to this coordinate regulation.

  19. The Calcium Sensor CBL-CIPK Is Involved in Plant’s Response to Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Nuruzzaman Manik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress halts the physiological and developmental process of plant. During stress condition, CBL-CIPK complex is identified as a primary element of calcium sensor to perceive environmental signals. Recent studies established that this complex regulates downstream targets like ion channels and transporters in adverse stages conditions. Crosstalks between the CBL-CIPK complex and different abiotic stresses can extend our research area, which can improve and increase the production of genetically modified crops in response to abiotic stresses. How this complex links with environmental signals and creates adjustable circumstances under unfavorable conditions is now one of the burning issues. Diverse studies are already underway to delineate this signalling mechanism underlying different interactions. Therefore, up to date experimental results should be concisely published, thus paving the way for further research. The present review will concisely recapitulate the recent and ongoing research progress of positive ions (Mg2+, Na+, and K+, negative ions (NO3-, PO4-, and hormonal signalling, which are evolving from accumulating results of analyses of CBL and CIPK loss- or gain-of-function experiments in different species along with some progress and perspectives of our works. In a word, this review will give one step forward direction for more functional studies in this area.

  20. Identification and Expression Profiling of the Auxin Response Factors in Dendrobium officinale under Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhehao; Yuan, Ye; Fu, Di; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun

    2017-05-04

    Auxin response factor (ARF) proteins play roles in plant responses to diverse environmental stresses by binding specifically to the auxin response element in the promoters of target genes. Using our latest public Dendrobium transcriptomes, a comprehensive characterization and analysis of 14 DnARF genes were performed. Three selected DnARFs, including DnARF1, DnARF4, and DnARF6, were confirmed to be nuclear proteins according to their transient expression in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Furthermore, the transcription activation abilities of DnARF1, DnARF4, and DnARF6 were tested in a yeast system. Our data showed that DnARF6 is a transcriptional activator in Dendrobium officinale. To uncover the basic information of DnARF gene responses to abiotic stresses, we analyzed their expression patterns under various hormones and abiotic treatments. Based on our data, several hormones and significant stress responsive DnARF genes have been identified. Since auxin and ARF genes have been identified in many plant species, our data is imperative to reveal the function of ARF mediated auxin signaling in the adaptation to the challenging Dendrobium environment.

  1. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Tahsina S.; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses. PMID:27679640

  2. The 6-phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Genes Are Responsive to Abiotic Stresses in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Yun Hou; Ji Huang; Shan-Lin Yu; Hong-Sheng Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, E.C. 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH, EC 1.1.1.44) are both key enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). The OsG6PDH1 and Os6PGDH1 genes encoding cytosolic G6PDH and cytosolic 6PGDH were isoiated from rice (Oryza satlva L.). We have shown that Os6PGDH1 gene was up-regulated by salt stress. Here we reported the isolation and characterization of Os6PGDH2 from rice, which encode the plastidic counterpart of 6PGDH. Genomic organization analysis indicated that OsG6PDH1 and OsG6PDH2 genes contain multiple introns, whereas two Os6PGDH1 and Os6PGDH2 genes have no introns in their translated regions. In a step towards understanding the functions of the pentose phosphate pathway in plants in response to various abiotic stresses, the expressions of four genes in the rice seedlings treated by drought, cold, high salinity and abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated. The results show that OsG6PDH1 and OsG6PDH2 are not markedly regulated by the abiotic stresses detected. However, the transcript levels of both Os6PGDH1 and Os6PGDH2 are up-regulated in rice seedlings under drought, cold, high salinity and ABA treatments. Meanwhile,the enzyme activities of G6PDH and 6PGDH in the rice seedlings treated by various ablotlc stresses were investigated.Like the mRNA expression patterns, G6PDH activity remains constant but the 6PGDH increases steadily during the treatments. Taken together, we suggest that the pentose phosphate pathway may play an important role in rice responses to abiotlc stresses and the second key enzyme of PPP, 6PGDH, may function as a regulator controlling the efficiency of the pathway under abiotic stresses.

  3. Cross-family translational genomics of abiotic stress-responsive genes between Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daejin Hyung

    Full Text Available Cross-species translation of genomic information may play a pivotal role in applying biological knowledge gained from relatively simple model system to other less studied, but related, genomes. The information of abiotic stress (ABS-responsive genes in Arabidopsis was identified and translated into the legume model system, Medicago truncatula. Various data resources, such as TAIR/AtGI DB, expression profiles and literatures, were used to build a genome-wide list of ABS genes. tBlastX/BlastP similarity search tools and manual inspection of alignments were used to identify orthologous genes between the two genomes. A total of 1,377 genes were finally collected and classified into 18 functional criteria of gene ontology (GO. The data analysis according to the expression cues showed that there was substantial level of interaction among three major types (i.e., drought, salinity and cold stress of abiotic stresses. In an attempt to translate the ABS genes between these two species, genomic locations for each gene were mapped using an in-house-developed comparative analysis platform. The comparative analysis revealed that fragmental colinearity, represented by only 37 synteny blocks, existed between Arabidopsis and M. truncatula. Based on the combination of E-value and alignment remarks, estimated translation rate was 60.2% for this cross-family translation. As a prelude of the functional comparative genomic approaches, in-silico gene network/interactome analyses were conducted to predict key components in the ABS responses, and one of the sub-networks was integrated with corresponding comparative map. The results demonstrated that core members of the sub-network were well aligned with previously reported ABS regulatory networks. Taken together, the results indicate that network-based integrative approaches of comparative and functional genomics are important to interpret and translate genomic information for complex traits such as abiotic stresses.

  4. Identification of genes involved in the response of Arabidopsis to simultaneous biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nicky J; Lilley, Catherine J; Urwin, Peter E

    2013-08-01

    In field conditions, plants may experience numerous environmental stresses at any one time. Research suggests that the plant response to multiple stresses is different from that for individual stresses, producing nonadditive effects. In particular, the molecular signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact and antagonize one another. The transcriptome response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to concurrent water deficit (abiotic stress) and infection with the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii (biotic stress) was analyzed by microarray. A unique program of gene expression was activated in response to a combination of water deficit and nematode stress, with 50 specifically multiple-stress-regulated genes. Candidate genes with potential roles in controlling the response to multiple stresses were selected and functionally characterized. RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR-LIKE8 (AtRALFL8) was induced in roots by joint stresses but conferred susceptibility to drought stress and nematode infection when overexpressed. Constitutively expressing plants had stunted root systems and extended root hairs. Plants may produce signal peptides such as AtRALFL8 to induce cell wall remodeling in response to multiple stresses. The methionine homeostasis gene METHIONINE GAMMA LYASE (AtMGL) was up-regulated by dual stress in leaves, conferring resistance to nematodes when overexpressed. It may regulate methionine metabolism under conditions of multiple stresses. AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 (AZI1), involved in defense priming in systemic plant immunity, was down-regulated in leaves by joint stress and conferred drought susceptibility when overexpressed, potentially as part of abscisic acid-induced repression of pathogen response genes. The results highlight the complex nature of multiple stress responses and confirm the importance of studying plant stress factors in combination.

  5. Molecular Analysis of Rice CIPKs Involved in Both Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-feng; Gu Zhi-min; LIU Feng; MA Bo-jun; ZHANG Hong-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Plant calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins have been proposed as important Ca2+ sensors and specifically interact with CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) in plant-specific calcium signaling.Here,we identified and isolated 15 CIPK genes in a japonica rice variety Nipponbare based on the predicted sequences of rice CIPK gene family.Gene structure analysis showed that these 15 genes were divided into intron-less and intron-rich groups,and OsCIPK3 and OsCIPK24 exhibited alternative splicing in their mature process.The phylogenetic analyses indicated that rice CIPKs shared an ancestor with Arabidopsis and poplar CIPKs.Analyses of gene expression showed that these OsCIPK genes were differentially induced by biotic stresses such as bacterial blight and abiotic stresses (heavy metal such as Hg2+,high salinity,cold and ABA).Interestingly,five OsCIPK genes,OsCIPK1,2,10,11 and 12,were transcriptionally up-regulated after bacterial blight infection whereas four OsCIPK genes,OsCIPK2,10,11 and 14,were induced by all treatments,indicating that some of OsCIPK genes are involved in multiple stress response pathways in plants.Our finding suggests that CIPKs play a key role in both biotic and abiotic stress responses.

  6. Supplementary Material for: Herboxidiene triggers splicing repression and abiotic stress responses in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs from multiexonic genes controls the diversity of the proteome; these precisely regulated processes also fine-tune responses to cues related to growth, development, and stresses. Small-molecule inhibitors that perturb splicing provide invaluable tools for use as chemical probes to uncover the molecular underpinnings of splicing regulation and as potential anticancer compounds. Results Here, we show that herboxidiene (GEX1A) inhibits both constitutive and alternative splicing. Moreover, GEX1A activates genome-wide transcriptional patterns involved in abiotic stress responses in plants. GEX1A treatment -activated ABA-inducible promoters, and led to stomatal closure. Interestingly, GEX1A and pladienolide B (PB) elicited similar cellular changes, including alterations in the patterns of transcription and splicing, suggesting that these compounds might target the same spliceosome complex in plant cells. Conclusions Our study establishes GEX1A as a potent splicing inhibitor in plants that can be used to probe the assembly, dynamics, and molecular functions of the spliceosome and to study the interplay between splicing stress and abiotic stresses, as well as having potential biotechnological applications.

  7. Protein Tyrosine Nitration during Development and Abiotic Stress Response in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Chaki, Mounira; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of nitric oxide (NO) in plant systems has attracted the attention of many researchers. A growing number of investigations have shown the significance of NO as a signal molecule or as a molecule involved in the response against (a)biotic processes. NO can be responsible of the post-translational modifications (NO-PTM) of target proteins by mechanisms such as the nitration of tyrosine residues. The study of protein tyrosine nitration during development and under biotic and adverse environmental conditions has increased in the last decade; nevertheless, there is also an endogenous nitration which seems to have regulatory functions. Moreover, the advance in proteome techniques has enabled the identification of new nitrated proteins, showing the high variability among plant organs, development stage and species. Finally, it may be important to discern between a widespread protein nitration because of greater RNS content, and the specific nitration of key targets which could affect cell-signaling processes. In view of the above point, we present a mini-review that offers an update about the endogenous protein tyrosine nitration, during plant development and under several abiotic stress conditions.

  8. Hypothesis/review: contribution of putrescine to 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) production in response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelp, Barry J; Bozzo, Gale G; Trobacher, Christopher P; Zarei, Adel; Deyman, Kristen L; Brikis, Carolyne J

    2012-09-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in various plant parts, including bulky fruits such as apples, in response to abiotic stress. It is generally believed that the GABA is derived from glutamate, although a contribution from polyamines is possible. Putrescine, but not spermidine and spermine, generally accumulates in response to the genetic manipulation of polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and abiotic stress. However, the GABA levels in stressed plants are influenced by processes other than putrescine availability. It is hypothesized that the catabolism of putrescine to GABA is regulated by a combination of gene-dependent and -independent processes. The expression of several putative diamine oxidase genes is weak, but highly stress-inducible in certain tissues of Arabidopsis. In contrast, candidate genes that encode 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase are highly constitutive, but not stress inducible. Changes in O(2) availability and cellular redox balance due to stress may directly influence the activities of diamine oxidase and 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, thereby restricting GABA formation. Apple fruit is known to accumulate GABA under controlled atmosphere storage and therefore could serve as a model system for investigating the relative contribution of putrescine and glutamate to GABA production.

  9. Connecting RNA Processing to Abiotic Environmental Response in Arabidopsis: the role of a polyadenylation factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q. Q.; Xu, R.; Hunt, A. G.; Falcone, D. L.

    Plants are constantly challenged by numerous environmental stresses both biotic and abiotic It is clear that plants have evolved to counter these stresses using all but limited means We recently discovered the potential role of a messenger RNA processing factor namely the Arabidopsis cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 kDa subunit AtCPSF30 when a mutant deficient in this factor displayed altered responses to an array of abiotic stresses This AtCPSF30 mutant named oxt6 exhibited an elevated tolerance to oxidative stress Microarray experiments of oxt6 and its complemented lines revealed an altered gene expression profile among which were antioxidative defense genes Interestingly the same gene encoding AtCPSF30 can also be transcribed into a large transcript that codes for a potential splicing factor Both protein products have a domain for RNA binding and a calmodulin binding domain activities of which have been confirmed by biochemical assays Surprisingly binding of AtCPSF30 to calmodulin inhibits the RNA-binding activity of the protein Mutational analysis shows that a small part of the protein is responsible for calmodulin binding and point mutations in this region abolished both RNA binding activity and the inhibition of this activity by calmodulin Analyses of the potential splicing factor are on going and the results will be presented The interesting possibilities for both the interplay between splicing and polyadenylation and the regulation of these processes by stimuli that act through

  10. Crosstalk between biotic and abiotic stress responses in tomato is mediated by the AIM1 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuqamar, Synan; Luo, Hongli; Laluk, Kristin; Mickelbart, Michael V; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2009-04-01

    Plants deploy diverse molecular and cellular mechanisms to survive in stressful environments. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) abscisic acid-induced myb1 (SlAIM1) gene encoding an R2R3MYB transcription factor is induced by pathogens, plant hormones, salinity and oxidative stress, suggesting a function in pathogen and abiotic stress responses. Tomato SlAIM1 RNA interference (RNAi) plants with reduced SlAIM1 gene expression show an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, and increased sensitivity to salt and oxidative stress. Ectopic expression of SlAIM1 is sufficient for tolerance to high salinity and oxidative stress. These responses correlate with reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in the SlAIM1 RNAi, but increased sensitivity in the overexpression plants, suggesting SlAIM1-mediated ABA responses are required to integrate tomato responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Interestingly, when exposed to high root-zone salinity levels, SlAIM1 RNAi plants accumulate more Na(+), whereas the overexpression lines accumulate less Na(+) relative to wild-type plants, suggesting that SlAIM1 regulates ion fluxes. Transmembrane ion flux is a hallmark of early responses to abiotic stress and pathogen infection preceding hypersensitive cell death and necrosis. Misregulation of ion fluxes can result in impaired plant tolerance to necrotrophic infection or abiotic stress. Our data reveal a previously uncharacterized connection between ABA, Na(+) homeostasis, oxidative stress and pathogen response, and shed light on the genetic control of crosstalk between plant responses to pathogens and abiotic stress. Together, our data suggest SlAIM1 integrates plant responses to pathogens and abiotic stresses by modulating responses to ABA.

  11. Using Phenomic Analysis of Photosynthetic Function for Abiotic Stress Response Gene Discovery

    KAUST Repository

    Rungrat, Tepsuda

    2016-09-09

    Monitoring the photosynthetic performance of plants is a major key to understanding how plants adapt to their growth conditions. Stress tolerance traits have a high genetic complexity as plants are constantly, and unavoidably, exposed to numerous stress factors, which limits their growth rates in the natural environment. Arabidopsis thaliana, with its broad genetic diversity and wide climatic range, has been shown to successfully adapt to stressful conditions to ensure the completion of its life cycle. As a result, A. thaliana has become a robust and renowned plant model system for studying natural variation and conducting gene discovery studies. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) in restructured populations combining natural and recombinant lines is a particularly effective way to identify the genetic basis of complex traits. As most abiotic stresses affect photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are a potential phenotyping technique for monitoring plant performance under stress conditions. This review focuses on the use of chlorophyll fluorescence as a tool to study genetic variation underlying the stress tolerance responses to abiotic stress in A. thaliana.

  12. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp.) genotypes response to multiple abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shardendu K; Kakani, Vijaya Gopal; Surabhi, Giridara-Kumar; Reddy, K Raja

    2010-09-02

    The carbon dioxide concentration [CO(2)], temperature and ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) are concomitant factors projected to change in the future environment, and their possible interactions are of significant interest to agriculture. The objectives of this study were to evaluate interactive effects of atmospheric [CO(2)], temperature, and UVB radiation on growth, physiology and reproduction of cowpea genotypes and to identify genotypic tolerance to multiple stressors. Six cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp.) genotypes differing in their sites of origin were grown in sunlit, controlled environment chambers. The treatments consisted of two levels each of atmospheric [CO(2)] (360 and 720 micromol mol(-1)), UVB [0 and 10 kJ m(-2)d(-1)) and temperatures [30/22 and 38/30 degrees C] from 8 days after emergence to maturity. The ameliorative effects of elevated [CO(2)] on increased UVB radiation and temperature effects were observed for most of the vegetative and photosynthetic traits but not for pollen production, pollen viability and yield attributes. The combined stress response index (C-TSRI) derived from vegetative (V-TSRI) and reproductive (R-TSRI) parameters revealed that the genotypes responded negatively with varying magnitude of responses to the stressors. Additionally, in response to multiple abiotic stresses, the vegetative traits diverged from that of reproductive traits, as deduced from the positive V-TSRI and negative R-TSRI observed in most of the genotypes and poor correlation between these two processes. The UVB in combination with increased temperature caused the greatest damage to cowpea vegetative growth and reproductive potential. The damaging effects of high temperature on seed yield was not ameliorated by elevated [CO(2)]. The identified tolerant genotypes and groups of plant attributes could be used to develop genotypes with multiple abiotic stress tolerance.

  13. Differential responses of three sweetpotato metallothionein genes to abiotic stress and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Ha; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Ahn, Young Ock; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich, low molecular weight, metal-binding proteins that are widely distributed in living organisms. Plants produce metal-chelating proteins such as MTs to overcome the toxic effects of heavy metals. We cloned three MT genes from sweetpotato leaves [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.]. The three IbMT genes were classified according to their cysteine residue alignment into type 1 (IbMT1), type 2 (IbMT2), and type 3 (IbMT3). IbMT1 was the most abundantly transcribed MT. It was predominantly expressed in leaves, roots, and callus. IbMT2 transcript was detected only in stems and fibrous roots, whereas IbMT3 was strongly expressed in leaves and stems. The IbMT expression profiles were investigated in plants exposed to heavy metals and abiotic stresses. The levels of IbMT1 expression were strongly elevated in response to Cd and Fe, and moderately higher in response to Cu. The IbMT3 expression pattern in response to heavy metals was similar to that of IbMT1. Exposure to abiotic stresses such as methyl viologen (MV; paraquat), NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and H2O2 up-regulated IbMT expression; IbMT1 responded strongly to MV and NaCl, whereas IbMT3 was induced by low temperature and PEG. Transgenic Escherichia coli overexpressing IbMT1 protein exhibited results suggest that IbMT could be a useful tool for engineering plants with enhanced tolerance to environmental stresses and heavy metals.

  14. Systematic Identification of Rice ABC1 Gene Family and Its Response to Abiotic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qing-song; ZHANG Dan; Xu Liang; XU Chen-wu

    2011-01-01

    Members of the activity of bc1 complex (ABC1) family are protein kinases that are widely found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.Previous studies showed that several plant ABC1 genes participated in the abiotic stress response.Here,we present the systematic identification of rice and Arabidopsis ABC1 genes and the expression analysis of rice ABC1 genes.A total of 15 and 17 ABC1 genes from the rice and Arabidopsis genomes,respectively,were identified using a bioinformatics approach.Phylogenetic analyses of these proteins suggested that the divergence of this family had occurred and their main characteristics were established before the monocot-dicot split.Indeed,species-specific expansion contributed to the evolution of this family in rice and Arabidopsis after the monocot-dicot split.Intron/exon structure analysis indicated that most of the orthologous genes had similar exon sizes,but diverse intron sizes,and the rice genes contained larger introns,moreover,intron gain was an important event accompanying the recent evolution of the rice ABC1 family.Multiple sequence alignment revealed one conserved amino acid segment and four conserved amino acids in the ABC1 domain.Online subcellular localization predicted that nine rice ABC1 proteins were localized in chloroplasts.Real-time RT-PCR established that the rice ABC1 genes were primarily expressed in leaves and the expression could be modulated by a broad range of abiotic factors such as H2O2,abscisic acid,low temperature,drought,darkness and high salinity.These results reveal that the rice ABC1 gene family plays roles in the environmental stress response and specific biological processes of rice.

  15. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  16. Vascular plant one-zinc-finger protein 1/2 transcription factors regulate abiotic and biotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yusuke; Nakahira, Yoichi; Sumida, Hiroki; Takebayashi, Kosuke; Nagasawa, Yumiko; Yamasaki, Kanako; Akiyama, Masako; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fujiwara, Sumire; Shiina, Takashi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Sato, Masa H

    2013-03-01

    Plants adapt to abiotic and biotic stresses by activating abscisic acid-mediated (ABA) abiotic stress-responsive and salicylic acid-(SA) or jasmonic acid-mediated (JA) biotic stress-responsive pathways, respectively. Although the abiotic stress-responsive pathway interacts antagonistically with the biotic stress-responsive pathways, the mechanisms that regulate these pathways remain largely unknown. In this study, we provide insight into the function of vascular plant one-zinc-finger proteins (VOZs) that modulate various stress responses in Arabidopsis. The expression of many stress-responsive genes was changed in the voz1voz2 double mutant under normal growth conditions. Consistent with altered stress-responsive gene expression, freezing- and drought-stress tolerances were increased in the voz1voz2 double mutant. In contrast, resistance to a fungal pathogen, Colletotrichum higginsianum, and to a bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, was severely impaired. Thus, impairing VOZ function simultaneously conferred increased abiotic tolerance and biotic stress susceptibility. In a chilling stress condition, both the VOZ1 and VOZ2 mRNA expression levels and the VOZ2 protein level gradually decreased. VOZ2 degradation during cold exposure was completely inhibited by the addition of the 26S proteasome inhibitor, MG132, a finding that suggested that VOZ2 degradation is dependent on the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. In voz1voz2, ABA-inducible transcription factor CBF4 expression was enhanced significantly even under normal growth conditions, despite an unchanged endogenous ABA content. A finding that suggested that VOZs negatively affect CBF4 expression in an ABA-independent manner. These results suggest that VOZs function as both negative and positive regulators of the abiotic and biotic stress-responsive pathways, and control Arabidopsis adaptation to various stress conditions. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Abiotic and biotic factors responsible for antimonite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-03-01

    Antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing bacteria can transform the toxic Sb(III) into the less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. Recently, the cytoplasmic Sb(III)-oxidase AnoA and the periplasmic arsenite [As(III)] oxidase AioAB were shown to responsible for bacterial Sb(III) oxidation, however, disruption of each gene only partially decreased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. This study showed that in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4, Sb(III) induced cellular H2O2 content and H2O2 degradation gene katA. Gene knock-out/complementation of katA, anoA, aioA and anoA/aioA and Sb(III) oxidation and growth experiments showed that katA, anoA and aioA were essential for Sb(III) oxidation and resistance and katA was also essential for H2O2 resistance. Furthermore, linear correlations were observed between cellular H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vivo and chemical H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vitro (R2 = 0.93 and 0.94, respectively). These results indicate that besides the biotic factors, the cellular H2O2 induced by Sb(III) also catalyzes bacterial Sb(III) oxidation as an abiotic oxidant. The data reveal a novel mechanism that bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is associated with abiotic (cellular H2O2) and biotic (AnoA and AioAB) factors and Sb(III) oxidation process consumes cellular H2O2 which contributes to microbial detoxification of both Sb(III) and cellular H2O2.

  18. Abiotic and biotic factors responsible for antimonite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing bacteria can transform the toxic Sb(III) into the less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. Recently, the cytoplasmic Sb(III)-oxidase AnoA and the periplasmic arsenite [As(III)] oxidase AioAB were shown to responsible for bacterial Sb(III) oxidation, however, disruption of each gene only partially decreased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. This study showed that in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4, Sb(III) induced cellular H2O2 content and H2O2 degradation gene katA. Gene knock-out/complementation of katA, anoA, aioA and anoA/aioA and Sb(III) oxidation and growth experiments showed that katA, anoA and aioA were essential for Sb(III) oxidation and resistance and katA was also essential for H2O2 resistance. Furthermore, linear correlations were observed between cellular H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vivo and chemical H2O2 and Sb(V) content in vitro (R2 = 0.93 and 0.94, respectively). These results indicate that besides the biotic factors, the cellular H2O2 induced by Sb(III) also catalyzes bacterial Sb(III) oxidation as an abiotic oxidant. The data reveal a novel mechanism that bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is associated with abiotic (cellular H2O2) and biotic (AnoA and AioAB) factors and Sb(III) oxidation process consumes cellular H2O2 which contributes to microbial detoxification of both Sb(III) and cellular H2O2. PMID:28252030

  19. Coordinating metabolite changes with our perception of plant abiotic stress responses: emerging views revealed by integrative-omic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomiljac, Jordan D; Whelan, James; van der Merwe, Margaretha

    2013-09-06

    Metabolic configuration and adaptation under a range of abiotic stresses, including drought, heat, salinity, cold, and nutrient deprivation, are subjected to an intricate span of molecular pathways that work in parallel in order to enhance plant fitness and increase stress tolerance. In recent years, unprecedented advances have been made in identifying and linking different abiotic stresses, and the current challenge in plant molecular biology is deciphering how the signaling responses are integrated and transduced throughout metabolism. Metabolomics have often played a fundamental role in elucidating the distinct and overlapping biochemical changes that occur in plants. However, a far greater understanding and appreciation of the complexity in plant metabolism under specific stress conditions have become apparent when combining metabolomics with other-omic platforms. This review focuses on recent advances made in understanding the global changes occurring in plant metabolism under abiotic stress conditions using metabolite profiling as an integrated discovery platform.

  20. Responses to combined abiotic and biotic stress in tomato are governed by stress intensity and resistance mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, Christos; Sri Sunarti, Sri; De Wiel, Van Clemens; Visser, Richard G.F.; Linden, van der Gerard; Bai, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Stress conditions in agricultural ecosystems can occur at variable intensities. Different resistance mechanisms against abiotic stress and pathogens are deployed by plants. Thus, it is important to examine plant responses to stress combinations under different scenarios. Here, we evaluated the effec

  1. Supplementary data: Responses to combined abiotic and biotic stress in tomato are governed by stress intensity and mechanism of resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, C.; Sri Sunarti, Sri; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Linden, van der C.G.; Bai, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Stress conditions in agricultural ecosystems can occur in variable intensities. Different resistance mechanisms to abiotic stress and pathogens are deployed by plants. Thus, it is important to examine plant responses to stress combinations under different scenarios. Here, we evaluated the effect of

  2. Global Expressions Landscape of NAC Transcription Factor Family and Their Responses to Abiotic Stresses in Citrullus lanatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaolong; Lan, Shanrong; Guy, Kateta Malangisha; Yang, Jinghua; Zhang, Mingfang; Hu, Zhongyuan

    2016-08-05

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is one xerophyte that has relative higher tolerance to drought and salt stresses as well as more sensitivity to cold stress, compared with most model plants. These characteristics facilitate it a potential model crop for researches on salt, drought or cold tolerance. In this study, a genome-wide comprehensive analysis of the ClNAC transcription factor (TF) family was carried out for the first time, to investigate their transcriptional profiles and potential functions in response to these abiotic stresses. The expression profiling analysis reveals that several NAC TFs are highly responsive to abiotic stresses and development, for instance, subfamily IV NACs may play roles in maintaining water status under drought or salt conditions, as well as water and metabolites conduction and translocation toward fruit. In contrast, rapid and negative responses of most of the ClNACs to low-temperature adversity may be related to the sensitivity to cold stress. Crosstalks among these abiotic stresses and hormone (abscisic acid and jasmonic acid) pathways were also discussed based on the expression of ClNAC genes. Our results will provide useful insights for the functional mining of NAC family in watermelon, as well as into the mechanisms underlying abiotic tolerance in other cash crops.

  3. Mass spectrometry-based plant metabolomics: Metabolite responses to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Tiago F; Rodrigues, João A; Caldana, Camila; Schmidt, Romy; van Dongen, Joost T; Thomas-Oates, Jane; António, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Metabolomics is one omics approach that can be used to acquire comprehensive information on the composition of a metabolite pool to provide a functional screen of the cellular state. Studies of the plant metabolome include analysis of a wide range of chemical species with diverse physical properties, from ionic inorganic compounds to biochemically derived hydrophilic carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, and a range of hydrophobic lipid-related compounds. This complexitiy brings huge challenges to the analytical technologies employed in current plant metabolomics programs, and powerful analytical tools are required for the separation and characterization of this extremely high compound diversity present in biological sample matrices. The use of mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical platforms to profile stress-responsive metabolites that allow some plants to adapt to adverse environmental conditions is fundamental in current plant biotechnology research programs for the understanding and development of stress-tolerant plants. In this review, we describe recent applications of metabolomics and emphasize its increasing application to study plant responses to environmental (stress-) factors, including drought, salt, low oxygen caused by waterlogging or flooding of the soil, temperature, light and oxidative stress (or a combination of them). Advances in understanding the global changes occurring in plant metabolism under specific abiotic stress conditions are fundamental to enhance plant fitness and increase stress tolerance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:620-649, 2016.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide and polyamines act as double edged swords in plant abiotic stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific genetic changes through which plants adapt to the multitude of environmental stresses are possible because of the molecular regulations in the system. These intricate regulatory mechanisms once unveiled will surely raise interesting questions. Polyamines and hydrogen peroxide have been suggested to be important signalling molecules during biotic and abiotic stresses. Hydrogen peroxide plays a versatile role from orchestrating physiological processes to stress response. It helps to achieve acclimatization and tolerance to stress by coordinating intra-cellular and systemic signalling systems. Polyamines, on the other hand, are low molecular weight polycationic aliphatic amines, which have been implicated in various stress responses. It is quite interesting to note that both hydrogen peroxide and polyamines have a fine line of inter-relation between them since the catabolic pathways of the latter releases hydrogen peroxide. In this review we have tried to illustrate the roles and their multifaceted functions of these two important signalling molecules based on current literature. This review also highlights the fact that over accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and polyamines can be detrimental for plant cells leading to toxicity and pre-mature cell death.

  5. The transcriptional regulatory network in the drought response and its crosstalk in abiotic stress responses including drought, cold and heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eNakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought negatively impacts plant growth and the productivity of crops around the world. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in the drought response is important for improvement of drought tolerance using molecular techniques. In plants, abscisic acid (ABA is accumulated under osmotic stress conditions caused by drought, and has a key role in stress responses and tolerance. Comprehensive molecular analyses have shown that ABA regulates the expression of many genes under osmotic stress conditions, and the ABA-responsive element (ABRE is the major cis-element for ABA-responsive gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs are master regulators of gene expression. ABRE-binding protein (AREB and ABRE-binding factor (ABF TFs control gene expression in an ABA-dependent manner. SNF1-related protein kinases 2, group A 2C-type protein phosphatases, and ABA receptors were shown to control the ABA signaling pathway. ABA-independent signaling pathways such as dehydration-responsive element-binding protein (DREB TFs and NAC TFs are also involved in stress responses including drought, heat and cold. Recent studies have suggested that there are interactions between the major ABA signaling pathway and other signaling factors in stress responses. The important roles of these transcription factors in crosstalk among abiotic stress responses will be discussed. Control of ABA or stress signaling factor expression can improve tolerance to environmental stresses. Recent studies using crops have shown that stress-specific overexpression of TFs improves drought tolerance and grain yield compared with controls in the field.

  6. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish eRoorkiwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 accessions of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among ten candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34 was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while PIC values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter. Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding.

  7. Analysis of global gene expression in Brachypodium distachyon reveals extensive network plasticity in response to abiotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry D Priest

    Full Text Available Brachypodium distachyon is a close relative of many important cereal crops. Abiotic stress tolerance has a significant impact on productivity of agriculturally important food and feedstock crops. Analysis of the transcriptome of Brachypodium after chilling, high-salinity, drought, and heat stresses revealed diverse differential expression of many transcripts. Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis revealed 22 distinct gene modules with specific profiles of expression under each stress. Promoter analysis implicated short DNA sequences directly upstream of module members in the regulation of 21 of 22 modules. Functional analysis of module members revealed enrichment in functional terms for 10 of 22 network modules. Analysis of condition-specific correlations between differentially expressed gene pairs revealed extensive plasticity in the expression relationships of gene pairs. Photosynthesis, cell cycle, and cell wall expression modules were down-regulated by all abiotic stresses. Modules which were up-regulated by each abiotic stress fell into diverse and unique gene ontology GO categories. This study provides genomics resources and improves our understanding of abiotic stress responses of Brachypodium.

  8. ATHB17 enhances stress tolerance by coordinating photosynthesis associated nuclear gene and ATSIG5 expression in response to abiotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Cui, Rong; Xu, Ping; Wu, Jie; Mao, Jie-Li; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Yu, Lin-Hui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis is sensitive to environmental stress and must be efficiently modulated in response to abiotic stress. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report that ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 17 (ATHB17), an Arabidopsis HD-Zip transcription factor, regulated the expression of a number of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) involved in the light reaction and ATSIG5 in response to abiotic stress. ATHB17 was responsive to ABA and multiple stress treatments. ATHB17-overexpressing plants displayed enhanced stress tolerance, whereas its knockout mutant was more sensitive compared to the wild type. Through RNA-seq and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, we found that ATHB17 did not affect the expression of many known stress-responsive marker genes. Interestingly, we found that ATHB17 down-regulated many PhANGs and could directly modulate the expression of several PhANGs by binding to their promoters. Moreover, we identified ATSIG5, encoding a plastid sigma factor, as one of the target genes of ATHB17. Loss of ATSIG5 reduced salt tolerance while overexpression of ATSIG5 enhanced salt tolerance, similar to that of ATHB17. ATHB17 can positively modulate the expression of many plastid encoded genes (PEGs) through regulation of ATSIG5. Taken together, our results suggest that ATHB17 may play an important role in protecting plants by adjusting expression of PhANGs and PEGs in response to abiotic stresses. PMID:28358040

  9. Rice Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Gene Family and Its Role in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jai S. Rohila; Yinong Yang

    2007-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MARK) cascade is an important signaling module that transduces extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. An increasing body of evidence has shown that the MAPK-mediated cellular signaling is crucial to plant growth and development, as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. To date, a total of 17 MARK genes have been identified from the rice genome. Expression profiling, biochemical characterization and/or functional analysis were carried out with many members of the rice MARK gene family, especially those associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this review, the phylogenetic relationship and classification of rice MARK genes are discussed to facilitate a simple nomenclature and standard annotation of the rice MARK gene family. Functional data relating to biotic and abiotic stress responses are reviewed for each MARK group and show that despite overlapping in functionality, there is a certain level of functional specificity among different rice MAP kinases. The future challenges are to functionally characterize each MARK, to identify their downstream substrates and upstream kinases, and to genetically manipulate the MARK signaling pathway in rice crops for the improvement of agronomically important traits.

  10. Differential Expression of Two Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidases and Two Superoxide Dismutase Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto MORITA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD and ascorbate peroxidase (APX play central roles in the pathway for scavenging reactive oxygen species in plants, thereby contributing to the tolerance against abiotic stress. Here we report the responses of cytosolic SOD (cSOD; sodCc1 and sodCc2 and cytosolic APX (cAPX; OsAPX1 and OsAPX2 genes to oxidative and abiotic stress in rice. RNA blot analyses revealed that methyl viologen treatment caused a more prominent induction of cAPXs compared with cSODs, and hydrogen peroxide treatment induced the expression of cAPXs whereas cSODs were not affected. These results suggest that cAPXs play more important roles in defense against oxidative stress compared with cSODs. It is noted that cSODs and cAPXs showed coordinate response to abscisic acid treatment which induced both sodCc1 and OsAPX2. However, cSODs and cAPXs responded differentially to drought, salt and chilling stress, which indicates that cSOD and cAPX genes are expressed differentially in response to oxidative and abiotic stress in rice.

  11. Response requirements as constraints on output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, M D; Buchman, I B

    1979-07-01

    Two experiments studied how added response requirements affected fixed-interval schedule performance. Experiment 1 involved tandem fixed-interval fixed-ratio schedules, and Experiment 2 studied conjunctive fixed-interval fixed-ratio schedules. In both, pigeons' output, defined as overall response rate or as responses during the interval, first increased and then decreased as the ratio was raised. With small ratio requirements, the frequency of reinforcement in time either did not change or decreased slightly. With progressively larger ratios, reinforcement frequency decreased consistently. Alternative explanations were discussed. The first, a reinforcement theory account, was that response strength is an increasing monotonic function of both the response requirement and reinforcement frequency, and the bitonic output function represents interacting effects. Increases in the response requirement accompanied by small changes in reinforcement frequency enhance output, but further increases result in large enough decrements in reinforcement frequency so that output is lowered. The second explanation does not view reinforcement as a basic process but, instead, derives from concepts of economics and conservation. Organisms allocate their behavior among alternatives so as to maximize value, where value is a function of the responses that can occur in a given situation under the set of restrictions imposed by particular schedules. One form of this theory explicitly predicts that output is a bitonic function of ratio requirements in simple ratio schedules. However, it was not clear that this model could explain the present effects involving joint ratio and interval schedule restrictions.

  12. Modeling regeneration responses of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) to abiotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems dominated by big sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata Nuttall (Asteraceae), which are the most widespread ecosystems in semiarid western North America, have been affected by land use practices and invasive species. Loss of big sagebrush and the decline of associated species, such as greater sage-grouse, are a concern to land managers and conservationists. However, big sagebrush regeneration remains difficult to achieve by restoration and reclamation efforts and there is no regeneration simulation model available. We present here the first process-based, daily time-step, simulation model to predict yearly big sagebrush regeneration including relevant germination and seedling responses to abiotic factors. We estimated values, uncertainty, and importance of 27 model parameters using a total of 1435 site-years of observation. Our model explained 74% of variability of number of years with successful regeneration at 46 sites. It also achieved 60% overall accuracy predicting yearly regeneration success/failure. Our results identify specific future research needed to improve our understanding of big sagebrush regeneration, including data at the subspecies level and improved parameter estimates for start of seed dispersal, modified wet thermal-time model of germination, and soil water potential influences. We found that relationships between big sagebrush regeneration and climate conditions were site specific, varying across the distribution of big sagebrush. This indicates that statistical models based on climate are unsuitable for understanding range-wide regeneration patterns or for assessing the potential consequences of changing climate on sagebrush regeneration and underscores the value of this process-based model. We used our model to predict potential regeneration across the range of sagebrush ecosystems in the western United States, which confirmed that seedling survival is a limiting factor, whereas germination is not. Our results also suggested that modeled

  13. Functional ecological genomics to demonstrate general and specific responses to abiotic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, D.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Schat, H.; Straalen, van N.M.

    2008-01-01

    1. Stress is a major component of natural selection in soil ecosystems. The most prominent abiotic stress factors in the field are temperature extremes (heat, cold), dehydration (drought), high salinity and specific toxic compounds such as heavy metals. Organisms are able to deal with these stresses

  14. Roots Withstanding their Environment : Exploiting Root System Architecture Responses to Abiotic Stress to Improve Crop Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koevoets, Iko T; Venema, Jan Henk; Elzenga, J Theo M; Testerink, Christa

    2016-01-01

    To face future challenges in crop production dictated by global climate changes, breeders and plant researchers collaborate to develop productive crops that are able to withstand a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. However, crop selection is often focused on shoot performance alone, as obse

  15. Importance of abiotic stress as a range-limit determinant for European plants: insights from species responses to climatic gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normand, Signe; Treier, Urs; Randin, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Aim We examined whether species occurrences are primarily limited by physiological tolerance in the abiotically more stressful end of climatic gradients (the asymmetric abiotic stress limitation (AASL) hypothesis) and the geographical predictions of this hypothesis: abiotic stress mainly determin...... upper-latitudinal and upper-altitudinal species range limits, and the importance of abiotic stress for these range limits increases the further northwards and upwards a species occurs......Aim We examined whether species occurrences are primarily limited by physiological tolerance in the abiotically more stressful end of climatic gradients (the asymmetric abiotic stress limitation (AASL) hypothesis) and the geographical predictions of this hypothesis: abiotic stress mainly determines...

  16. G-protein signalling components GCR1 and GPA1 mediate responses to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjyoti eChakraborty

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available G-protein signalling components have been implicated in some individual stress responses in Arabidopsis, but have not been comprehensively evaluated at the genetic and biochemical level. Stress emerged as the largest functional category in our whole transcriptome analyses of knock-out mutants of GCR1 and/or GPA1 in Arabidopsis (Chakraborty et al., 2015a, PloS one 10, e0117819 and Chakraborty et al., 2015b, Plant Mol. Biol., doi: 10.1007/s11103-015-0374-2. This led us to ask whether G-protein signalling components offer converging points in the plant’s response to multiple abiotic stresses. In order to test this hypothesis, we carried out detailed analysis of the stress category in the present study, which revealed 144 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, spanning a wide range of abiotic stresses, including heat, cold, salt, light stress etc. Only 10 of these DEGs are shared by all the three mutants, while the single mutants (GCR1/GPA1 shared more DEGs between themselves than with the double mutant (GCR1-GPA1. RT-qPCR validation of 28 of these genes spanning different stresses revealed identical regulation of the DEGs shared between the mutants. We also validated the effects of cold, heat and salt stresses in all the 3 mutants and WT on % germination, root and shoot length, relative water content, proline content, lipid peroxidation and activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. All the 3 mutants showed evidence of stress tolerance, especially to cold, followed by heat and salt, in terms of all the above parameters. This clearly shows the role of GCR1 and GPA1 in mediating the plant’s response to multiple abiotic stresses for the first time, especially cold, heat and salt stresses. This also implies a role for classical G-protein signalling pathways in stress sensitivity in the normal plants of Arabidopsis. This is also the first genetic and biochemical evidence of abiotic stress tolerance rendered by knock

  17. Ethylene Response Factor Sl-ERF.B.3 Is Responsive to Abiotic Stresses and Mediates Salt and Cold Stress Response Regulation in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Klay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sl-ERF.B.3 (Solanum lycopersicum ethylene response factor B.3 gene encodes for a tomato transcription factor of the ERF (ethylene responsive factor family. Our results of real-time RT-PCR showed that Sl-ERF.B.3 is an abiotic stress responsive gene, which is induced by cold, heat, and flooding, but downregulated by salinity and drought. To get more insight into the role of Sl-ERF.B.3 in plant response to separate salinity and cold, a comparative study between wild type and two Sl-ERF.B.3 antisense transgenic tomato lines was achieved. Compared with wild type, Sl-ERF.B.3 antisense transgenic plants exhibited a salt stress dependent growth inhibition. This inhibition was significantly enhanced in shoots but reduced in roots, leading to an increased root to shoot ratio. Furthermore, the cold stress essay clearly revealed that introducing antisense Sl-ERF.B.3 in transgenic tomato plants reduces their cell injury and enhances their tolerance against 14 d of cold stress. All these results suggest that Sl-ERF.B.3 gene is involved in plant response to abiotic stresses and may play a role in the layout of stress symptoms under cold stress and in growth regulation under salinity.

  18. Proteomics: a tool for the study of plant response to abiotic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos Roveda, Gabriel; Fonseca Moreno, Liz Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Due in part to human activity, changes in global climate behavior have manifested in an increase in extreme temperature related events such as drought, salinization, contamination and flooding of vast areas of the planet. Regarding agricultural activity, these uncertain climatic scenarios are likely to cause biotic and abiotic stress increases, which must be dealt with through science and technology. Holistic approaches, also known as “omics”: proteomics, genomics, transcriptomics, and metabo...

  19. Bureaucratic Dilemmas: Civil Servants between Political Responsiveness and Normative Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opstrup, Niels; Christensen, Jørgen Grønnegård

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between political executives and civil servants rests on a delicate balance between political responsiveness and the duty of civil servants and ministers to respect legal and other normative constraints on executive authority. In Danish central government, this balance is stressed...... by norms that define the correct behavior when the civil service provides ministers with political advice and assistance. Organizational factors strongly influence civil servants’ behavior when they have to balance responsiveness against constraints on their role as political advisers. Moreover, civil...... servants working closely with ministers pay more attention to legal constraints than their peers among agency officials and specialists. Agency officials and specialists are much more prone to prioritize professional standards. We argue that this pattern can be generalized West European systems....

  20. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Confers Tolerance to Various Abiotic Stresses and Modulates Plant Response to Phytohormones through Osmoprotection and Gene Expression Regulation in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Tiwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Being sessile in nature, plants have to withstand various adverse environmental stress conditions including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Comparatively, abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, high temperature, and cold pose major threat to agriculture by negatively impacting plant growth and yield worldwide. Rice is one of the most widely consumed staple cereals across the globe, the production and productivity of which is also severely affected by different abiotic stresses. Therefore, several crop improvement programs are directed toward developing stress tolerant rice cultivars either through marker assisted breeding or transgenic technology. Alternatively, some known rhizospheric competent bacteria are also known to improve plant growth during abiotic stresses. A plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRI-SN13 (SN13 was previously reported by our lab to confer salt stress tolerance to rice seedlings. However, the present study investigates the role of SN13 in ameliorating various abiotic stresses such as salt, drought, desiccation, heat, cold, and freezing on a popular rice cv. Saryu-52 under hydroponic growth conditions. Apart from this, seedlings were also exogenously supplied with abscisic acid (ABA, salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and ethephon (ET to study the role of SN13 in phytohormone-induced stress tolerance as well as its role in abiotic and biotic stress cross-talk. All abiotic stresses and phytohormone treatments significantly affected various physiological and biochemical parameters like membrane integrity and osmolyte accumulation. SN13 also positively modulated stress-responsive gene expressions under various abiotic stresses and phytohormone treatments suggesting its multifaceted role in cross-talk among stresses and phytohormones in response to PGPR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on detailed analysis of plant growth promotion and stress alleviation by a

  1. Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2012-02-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved through a series of pathways. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences, resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNAs. siRNAs have a similar structure, function, and biogenesis as miRNAs but are derived from long double-stranded RNAs and can often direct DNA methylation at target sequences. Besides their roles in growth and development and maintenance of genome integrity, small RNAs are also important components in plant stress responses. One way in which plants respond to environmental stress is by modifying their gene expression through the activity of small RNAs. Thus, understanding how small RNAs regulate gene expression will enable researchers to explore the role of small RNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of plant small RNAs in the adaptive response to stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Evidence for a role of gibberellins in salicylic acid-modulated early plant responses to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Ramírez, Ana; Rodríguez, Dolores; Reyes, David; Jiménez, Jesús Angel; Nicolás, Gregorio; López-Climent, María; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Nicolás, Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Exogenous application of gibberellic acid (GA(3)) was able to reverse the inhibitory effect of salt, oxidative, and heat stresses in the germination and seedling establishment of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), this effect being accompanied by an increase in salicylic acid (SA) levels, a hormone that in recent years has been implicated in plant responses to abiotic stress. Furthermore, this treatment induced an increase in the expression levels of the isochorismate synthase1 and nonexpressor of PR1 genes, involved in SA biosynthesis and action, respectively. In addition, we proved that transgenic plants overexpressing a gibberellin (GA)-responsive gene from beechnut (Fagus sylvatica), coding for a member of the GA(3) stimulated in Arabidopsis (GASA) family (FsGASA4), showed a reduced GA dependence for growth and improved responses to salt, oxidative, and heat stress at the level of seed germination and seedling establishment. In 35S:FsGASA4 seeds, the improved behavior under abiotic stress was accompanied by an increase in SA endogenous levels. All these data taken together suggest that this GA-responsive gene and exogenous addition of GAs are able to counteract the inhibitory effects of these adverse environmental conditions in seed germination and seedling growth through modulation of SA biosynthesis. Furthermore, this hypothesis is supported by the fact that sid2 mutants, impaired in SA biosynthesis, are more sensitive to salt stress than wild type and are not affected by exogenous application of GA(3).

  3. Abiotic stress growth conditions induce different responses in kernel iron concentration across genotypically distinct maize inbred varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandianis, Catherine B; Michenfelder, Abigail S; Simmons, Susan J; Grusak, Michael A; Stapleton, Ann E

    2013-01-01

    The improvement of grain nutrient profiles for essential minerals and vitamins through breeding strategies is a target important for agricultural regions where nutrient poor crops like maize contribute a large proportion of the daily caloric intake. Kernel iron concentration in maize exhibits a broad range. However, the magnitude of genotype by environment (GxE) effects on this trait reduces the efficacy and predictability of selection programs, particularly when challenged with abiotic stress such as water and nitrogen limitations. Selection has also been limited by an inverse correlation between kernel iron concentration and the yield component of kernel size in target environments. Using 25 maize inbred lines for which extensive genome sequence data is publicly available, we evaluated the response of kernel iron density and kernel mass to water and nitrogen limitation in a managed field stress experiment using a factorial design. To further understand GxE interactions we used partition analysis to characterize response of kernel iron and weight to abiotic stressors among all genotypes, and observed two patterns: one characterized by higher kernel iron concentrations in control over stress conditions, and another with higher kernel iron concentration under drought and combined stress conditions. Breeding efforts for this nutritional trait could exploit these complementary responses through combinations of favorable allelic variation from these already well-characterized genetic stocks.

  4. Microarray meta-analysis focused on the response of genes involved in redox homeostasis to diverse abiotic stresses in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao eBraga De Abreu Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to a wide range of abiotic stresses, which often occur in combination. Because physiological investigations typically focus on one stress, our understanding of unspecific stress responses remains limited. The plant redox homeostasis, i.e. the production and removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS, may be involved in many environmental stress conditions. Therefore, this study intended to identify genes, which are activated in diverse abiotic stresses, focusing on ROS–related pathways. We conducted a meta-analysis (MA of microarray experiments, focusing on rice. Transcriptome data were mined from public databases and fellow researchers, which represented 36 different experiments and investigated diverse abiotic stresses, including ozone stress, drought, heat, cold, salinity, and mineral deficiencies/toxicities. To overcome the inherent artefacts of different MA methods, data were processed using Fisher, rOP, REM and product of rank (GeneSelector, and genes identified by most approaches were considered as shared differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Two MA strategies were adopted: first, datasets were separated into shoot, root and seedling experiments, and these tissues were analyzed separately to identify shared DEGs. Second, shoot and seedling experiments were classed into oxidative stress (OS, i.e. ozone and hydrogen peroxide treatments directly producing ROS in plant tissue, and other abiotic stresses (AS, in which ROS production is indirect. In all tissues and stress conditions, genes a priori considered as ROS-related were overrepresented among the DEGs, as they represented 4% of all expressed genes but 7-10% of the DEGs. The combined MA approach was substantially more conservative than individual MA methods and identified 1001 shared DEGs in shoots, 837 shared DEGs in root, and 1172 shared DEGs in seedlings. Within the OS and AS groups, 990 and 1727 shared DEGs were identified, respectively. In total, 311 genes were

  5. [Characterization and subcellular localization of two SBP genes and their response to abiotic stress in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Wang, Shuang; Huang, Liyan; Ma, Hongyu; Shu, Yingjie; He, Xiaoling; Ma, Hao

    2014-11-01

    High temperature and humidity stress during seed growth and development of spring soybean can result in seed deterioration in South China. We isolated two genes (GmSBP and GmSBPL) encoding putative SBP proteins from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) to study their biological functions and response to abiotic stress,. The two SBP proteins are hydrophilic and incomplete membrane ones. Real-time quantitative (RT-PCR) analysis reveals that the expression of the two genes in the developing seeds of the seed deterioration resistant cultivar Xiangdou No. 3 and sensitive cultivar Ningzhen No. 1 was significantly affected by high temperature and humidity treatment. Meanwhile, the levels of sucrose and soluble sugar in the developing seeds of both cultivars were also affected under high temperature and humidity stress. During seed growth and development, the expression of the two genes as well as the levels of sucrose and soluble sugar reached the highest at 30 days after flower. GmSBP2 and GmSBPL were found to be differentially expressed in different soybean tissues. Sub-cellular localization indicated that two genes were located in cytoplasm and cell membrane. Our results indicate that GmSBP2 and GmSBPL might be involved in the response to abiotic stress, which will enrich our understanding of pre-harvest seed deterioration and resistance in soybean from one side.

  6. Four potato (Solanum tuberosum) ABCG transporters and their expression in response to abiotic factors and Phytophthora infestans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Michelina; Ambrosino, Patrizia; Lanzuise, Stefania; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Lorito, Matteo; Scala, Felice

    2011-12-15

    Pleiotropic drug resistant (PDR/ABCG) genes are involved in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, we cloned, from Solanum tuberosum, four PDR/ABCG transporter genes named StPDR1, StPDR2, StPDR3 and StPDR4, which were differentially expressed in plant tissues and cell cultures. A number of different chemically unrelated compounds were found to regulate the transcript levels of the four genes in cultured cells. In particular, StPDR2 was highly up-regulated in the presence of Botrytis cinerea cell walls, NaCl, 2,4-dichlorophenol, sclareol and α-solanin and biological compounds. The expression of the genes was also investigated by real time RT-PCR during infection by Phytophthora infestans. StPDR1 and StPDR2 were up-regulated about 13- and 37-fold at 48 h post-infection (hpi), StPDR3 was expressed (4-5-fold) at 24 and 48 hpi and then rapidly decreased, while StPDR4 RNA accumulation was stimulated (about 4-fold) at 12 and 24 hpi, decreased at 48 hpi and increased again at 96 hpi. We discuss the role of StPDR1-4 genes in response to pathogens and abiotic stresses.

  7. Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase 45 functions in the responses to abscisic acid and abiotic stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiujuan

    2013-06-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed germination, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses such as drought and salt stresses. Receptor-like kinases are well known signaling components that mediate plant responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Here, we characterized the biological function of an ABA and stress-inducible cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK45, in ABA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The crk45 mutant was less sensitive to ABA than the wild type during seed germination and early seedling development, whereas CRK45 overexpression plants were more sensitive to ABA compared to the wild type. Furthermore, overexpression of CRK45 led to hypersensitivity to salt and glucose inhibition of seed germination, whereas the crk45 mutant showed the opposite phenotypes. In addition, CRK45 overexpression plants had enhanced tolerance to drought. Gene expression analyses revealed that the expression of representative stress-responsive genes was significantly enhanced in CRK45 overexpression plants in response to salt stress. ABA biosynthetic genes such as NCED3,. 22NCED3, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 3.NCED5,. 33NCED5, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 5.ABA2,. 44ABA2, Abscisic Acid Deficient 2. and AAO355AAO3, Abscisic Aldehyde Oxidase 3. were also constitutively elevated in the CRK45 overexpression plants. We concluded that CRK45 plays an important role in ABA signaling that regulates Arabidopsis seeds germination, early seedling development and abiotic stresses response, by positively regulating ABA responses in these processes. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Common bean-Rhizobium symbiosis: functional genomics of legume response to abiotic stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the world's most important grain legume for direct human consumption and a main source of proteins in Latin America and Africa. Environmental factors such as nutrient deficiency, soil acidity, and metal toxicity are important constraints for bean symbiotic nitroge...

  9. Identification and expression of the WRKY transcription factors of Carica papaya in response to abiotic and biotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lin-Jie; Jiang, Ling

    2014-03-01

    The WRKY transcription factor (TF) plays a very important role in the response of plants to various abiotic and biotic stresses. A local papaya database was built according to the GenBank expressed sequence tag database using the BioEdit software. Fifty-two coding sequences of Carica papaya WRKY TFs were predicted using the tBLASTn tool. The phylogenetic tree of the WRKY proteins was classified. The expression profiles of 13 selected C. papaya WRKY TF genes under stress induction were constructed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression levels of these WRKY genes in response to 3 abiotic and 2 biotic stresses were evaluated. TF807.3 and TF72.14 are upregulated by low temperature; TF807.3, TF43.76, TF12.199 and TF12.62 are involved in the response to drought stress; TF9.35, TF18.51, TF72.14 and TF12.199 is involved in response to wound; TF12.199, TF807.3, TF21.156 and TF18.51 was induced by PRSV pathogen; TF72.14 and TF43.76 are upregulated by SA. The regulated expression levels of above eight genes normalized against housekeeping gene actin were significant at probability of 0.01 levels. These WRKY TFs could be related to corresponding stress resistance and selected as the candidate genes, especially, the two genes TF807.3 and TF12.199, which were regulated notably by four stresses respectively. This study may provide useful information and candidate genes for the development of transgenic stress tolerant papaya varieties.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF superfamily genes and their responses to abiotic stress in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun eShu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF superfamily is a large, plant-specific transcription factor family that is involved in many important processes, including plant growth, development and stress responses. Using Medicago truncatula genome information, we identified and characterized 123 putative AP2/ERF genes, which were named as MtERF1–123. These genes were classified into four families based on phylogenetic analysis, which is consistent with the results of other plant species. MtERF genes are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem and segmental duplication. Using transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing data and qRT-PCR analysis, we assessed the expression patterns of the MtERF genes in tissues during development and under abiotic stresses. In total, 87 MtERF genes were expressed in plant tissues, most of which were expressed in specific tissues during development or under specific abiotic stress treatments. These results support the notion that MtERF genes are involved in developmental regulation and environmental responses in M. truncatula. Furthermore, a cluster of DREB subfamily members on chromosome 6 was induced by both cold and freezing stress, representing a positive gene regulatory response under low temperature stress, which suggests that these genes might contribute to freezing tolerance to M. truncatula. In summary, our genome-wide characterization, evolutionary analysis and expression pattern analysis of MtERF genes in M. truncatula provides valuable information for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes and utilizing them to improve stress tolerance in plants.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Superfamily Genes and their Responses to Abiotic Stress in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yongjun; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily is a large, plant-specific transcription factor family that is involved in many important processes, including plant growth, development, and stress responses. Using Medicago truncatula genome information, we identified and characterized 123 putative AP2/ERF genes, which were named as MtERF1–123. These genes were classified into four families based on phylogenetic analysis, which is consistent with the results of other plant species. MtERF genes are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem and segmental duplication. Using transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing data, and qRT-PCR analysis, we assessed the expression patterns of the MtERF genes in tissues during development and under abiotic stresses. In total, 87 MtERF genes were expressed in plant tissues, most of which were expressed in specific tissues during development or under specific abiotic stress treatments. These results support the notion that MtERF genes are involved in developmental regulation and environmental responses in M. truncatula. Furthermore, a cluster of DREB subfamily members on chromosome 6 was induced by both cold and freezing stress, representing a positive gene regulatory response under low temperature stress, which suggests that these genes might contribute to freezing tolerance to M. truncatula. In summary, our genome-wide characterization, evolutionary analysis, and expression pattern analysis of MtERF genes in M. truncatula provides valuable information for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes and utilizing them to improve stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26834762

  12. Responses of grafted tomato (Solanum lycopersiocon L. to abiotic stresses in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Al-Harbi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantity and quality of irrigation water are considered the most imperative limiting factors for plant production in arid environment. Adoptions of strategies can minimize crop water consumption while nonexistent yield reduction is considered challenge for scholars especially in arid environment. Grafting is regarded as a promising tool to avoid or reduce yield loss caused by abiotic stresses. Tomato (Solanum lycopersium Mill., commercial cultivar Faridah was grafted on Unifort rootstock and grown under regulated deficit irrigation (RDI (100%, 80% and 60% ETc, using two types of irrigation water, fresh (EC = 0.86 dS/m and brackish (EC = 3.52 dS/m. The effects of grafting and RDI on water use efficiency, vegetative growth, yield, fruit quality were investigated. Plant vegetative growth was reduced under water and salinity stresses. Grafting the plant significantly improves the vegetative growth under both conditions. The results showed that crop yield, Ca+2 and K+ were considerably increased in grafted tomato compared to non-grafted plants under water and salinity stresses. Grafted tomato plants accumulated less Na+ and Cl−, especially under high levels of salinity compared to non-grafted plants. Grafting tomato plants showed a slight decrease on the fruit quality traits such as vitamin C, titratable acidity (TA and total soluble solids (TSS. This study confirmed that grafted tomato plants can mitigate undesirable impact of salt stress on growth and fruit quality.

  13. The transcriptional network of WRKY53 in cereals links oxidative responses to biotic and abiotic stress inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, Leon; Davidson, Rebecca M; Wu, Shuchi; Zhao, Bingyu Y; Botha, Anna-Maria; Leach, Jan E; Lapitan, Nora L V

    2014-06-01

    The transcription factor WRKY53 is expressed during biotic and abiotic stress responses in cereals, but little is currently known about its regulation, structure and downstream targets. We sequenced the wheat ortholog TaWRKY53 and its promoter region, which revealed extensive similarity in gene architecture and cis-acting regulatory elements to the rice ortholog OsWRKY53, including the presence of stress-responsive abscisic acid-responsive elements (ABRE) motifs and GCC-boxes. Four proteins interacted with the WRKY53 promoter in yeast one-hybrid assays, suggesting that this gene can receive inputs from diverse stress-related pathways such as calcium signalling and senescence, and environmental cues such as drought and ultraviolet radiation. The Ser/Thr receptor kinase ORK10/LRK10 and the apoplastic peroxidase POC1 are two downstream targets for regulation by the WRKY53 transcription factor, predicted based on the presence of W-box motifs in their promoters and coregulation with WRKY53, and verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Both ORK10/LRK10 and POC1 are upregulated during cereal responses to pathogens and aphids and important components of the oxidative burst during the hypersensitive response. Taken with our yeast two-hybrid assay which identified a strong protein-protein interaction between microsomal glutathione S-transferase 3 and WRKY53, this implies that the WRKY53 transcriptional network regulates oxidative responses to a wide array of stresses.

  14. Responses to combined abiotic and biotic stress in tomato are governed by stress intensity and resistance mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoudis, Christos; Sunarti, Sri; van de Wiel, Clemens; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, C Gerard; Bai, Yuling

    2016-09-01

    Stress conditions in agricultural ecosystems can occur at variable intensities. Different resistance mechanisms against abiotic stress and pathogens are deployed by plants. Thus, it is important to examine plant responses to stress combinations under different scenarios. Here, we evaluated the effect of different levels of salt stress ranging from mild to severe (50, 100, and 150mM NaCl) on powdery mildew resistance and overall performance of tomato introgression lines with contrasting levels of partial resistance, as well as near-isogenic lines (NILs) carrying the resistance gene Ol-1 (associated with a slow hypersensitivity response; HR), ol-2 (an mlo mutant associated with papilla formation), and Ol-4 (an R gene associated with a fast HR). Powdery mildew resistance was affected by salt stress in a genotype- and stress intensity-dependent manner. In susceptible and partial resistant lines, increased susceptibility was observed under mild salt stress (50mM) which was accompanied by accelerated cell death-like senescence. In contrast, severe salt stress (150mM) reduced disease symptoms. Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulation in the leaves was linearly related to the decreased pathogen symptoms under severe stress. In contrast, complete resistance mediated by ol-2 and Ol-4 was unaffected under all treatment combinations, and was associated with a decreased growth penalty. Increased susceptibility and senescence under combined stress in NIL-Ol-1 was associated with the induction of ethylene and jasmonic acid pathway genes and the cell wall invertase gene LIN6. These results highlight the significance of stress severity and resistance type on the plant's performance under the combination of abiotic and biotic stress.

  15. Genome-wide identification, expression analysis of auxin-responsive GH3 family genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangguo; Yue, Runqing; Tao, Sun; Yang, Yanjun; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Mingfeng; Wang, Huizhong; Shen, Chenjia

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is involved in different aspects of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of auxin-responsive family genes. As one of the three major auxin-responsive families, GH3 (Gretchen Hagen3) genes participate in auxin homeostasis by catalyzing auxin conjugation and bounding free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids. However, how GH3 genes function in responses to abiotic stresses and various hormones in maize is largely unknown. Here, the latest updated maize (Zea mays L.) reference genome sequence was used to characterize and analyze the ZmGH3 family genes from maize. The results showed that 13 ZmGH3 genes were mapped on five maize chromosomes (total 10 chromosomes). Highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns suggested the possibility of function diversification for these genes in response to environmental stresses and hormone stimuli. The expression patterns of ZmGH3 genes are responsive to several abiotic stresses (salt, drought and cadmium) and major stress-related hormones (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid). Various environmental factors suppress auxin free IAA contents in maize roots suggesting that these abiotic stresses and hormones might alter GH3-mediated auxin levels. The responsiveness of ZmGH3 genes to a wide range of abiotic stresses and stress-related hormones suggested that ZmGH3s are involved in maize tolerance to environmental stresses.

  16. Genome-wide identification, expression analysis of auxin-responsive GH3 family genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shangguo Feng; Runqing Yue; Sun Tao Yanjun Yang; Lei Zhang; Mingfeng Xu; Huizhong Wang; Chenjia Shen

    2015-01-01

    Auxin is involved in different aspects of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of auxin-responsive family genes. As one of the three major auxin-responsive families, GH3 (Gretchen Hagen3) genes participate in auxin homeostasis by catalyzing auxin conjugation and bounding free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids. However, how GH3 genes function in responses to abiotic stresses and various hormones in maize is largely unknown. Here, the latest updated maize (Zea mays L.) reference genome sequence was used to characterize and analyze the ZmGH3 family genes from maize. The results showed that 13 ZmGH3 genes were mapped on five maize chromosomes (total 10 chromosomes). Highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns suggested the possibility of function diversification for these genes in response to environmental stresses and hormone stimuli. The expression patterns of ZmGH3 genes are responsive to several abiotic stresses (salt, drought and cadmium) and major stress-related hormones (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid). Various environmental factors suppress auxin free IAA contents in maize roots suggesting that these abiotic stresses and hormones might alter GH3-mediated auxin levels. The respon-siveness of ZmGH3 genes to a wide range of abiotic stresses and stress-related hormones suggested that ZmGH3s are involved in maize tolerance to environmental stresses.

  17. A special member of the rice SRO family, OsSRO1c, mediates responses to multiple abiotic stresses through interaction with various transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jun; Zong, Wei; Du, Hao; Hu, Honghong; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-04-01

    SIMILAR TO RCD ONE (SRO) is a plant-specific gene family involved in development and abiotic stress responses. SRO proteins are characterized by containing poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase catalytic (PARP) and C-terminal RCD1-SRO-TAF4 domains, and can be classified into two groups and five subgroups on the basis of their PARP domain. Expression analysis of rice SRO genes in response to various abiotic stresses showed that OsSRO1c, a rice SRO gene which functions downstream of the stress-responsive transcription factor SNAC1, is the major stress-responsive gene in the rice SRO family. The ossro1c-1 mutant showed resistance not only to chloroplastic oxidative stress, but also to apoplastic oxidative stress. However, the ossro1c-1 mutant and artificial microRNA-OsSRO1c transgenic rice were significantly impaired in cold tolerance. When compared with the well-characterized Arabidopsis SRO protein radical-induced cell death 1 (RCD1), OsSRO1c has considerable variation in the protein sequence, and the two genes exhibit different expression profiles under abiotic stresses. Furthermore, ossro1c-1 and rcd1 showed different responses to multiple abiotic stresses. By screening an Arabidopsis transcription factor library, 29 transcription factors interacted with OsSRO1c in yeast, but only two of these transcription factors were reported to interact with RCD1, which may partly explain the different responses of the two mutants under various stresses. The data presented in this report provide important clues for further elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of OsSRO1c in mediating responses to multiple abiotic stresses.

  18. The evolution of sex and recombination in response to abiotic or coevolutionary fluctuations in epistasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandon, Sylvain; Otto, Sarah P

    2007-04-01

    Evolutionary biologists have identified several factors that could explain the widespread phenomena of sex and recombination. One hypothesis is that host-parasite interactions favor sex and recombination because they favor the production of rare genotypes. A problem with many of the early models of this so-called Red Queen hypothesis is that several factors are acting together: directional selection, fluctuating epistasis, and drift. It is thus difficult to identify what exactly is selecting for sex in these models. Is one factor more important than the others or is it the synergistic action of these different factors that really matters? Here we focus on the analysis of a simple model with a single mechanism that might select for sex: fluctuating epistasis. We first analyze the evolution of sex and recombination when the temporal fluctuations are driven by the abiotic environment. We then analyze the evolution of sex and recombination in a two-species coevolutionary model, where directional selection is absent (allele frequencies remain fixed) and temporal variation in epistasis is induced by coevolution with the antagonist species. In both cases we contrast situations with weak and strong selection and derive the evolutionarily stable (ES) recombination rate. The ES recombination rate is most sensitive to the period of the cycles, which in turn depends on the strength of epistasis. In particular, more virulent parasites cause more rapid cycles and consequently increase the ES recombination rate of the host. Although the ES strategy is maximized at an intermediate period, some recombination is favored even when fluctuations are very slow. By contrast, the amplitude of the cycles has no effect on the ES level of sex and recombination, unless sex and recombination are costly, in which case higher-amplitude cycles allow the evolution of higher rates of sex and recombination. In the coevolutionary model, the amount of recombination in the interacting species also has

  19. Expression analysis of argonaute, Dicer-like, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in response to abiotic stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEFANG GAN; MENGDAN ZHAN; FENG YANG; QIQI ZHANG; KELING HU; WENJUAN XU; QINGHUI LU; LING ZHANG; DANDI LIANG

    2017-06-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression can be achieved through RNA interference when the activities of Dicer-like (DCL), argonaute (AGO) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) proteins are significant. In this study, we analysed the expression of seven AGO, five DCL and eight RDR genes in cucumber under cold, heat, hormone, salinity and dehydration treatments using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). All CsAGO, CsDCL and CsRDR genes were differentially expressed under abiotic stress treatment. In response to abiotic stress treatment, most genes were expressed at higher levels in flowers or stems than in other organs, whereas some CsAGOs (CsAGO1c, CsAGO6 and CsAGO7) and CsRDRs (CsRDR1d andCsRDR2) were highly expressed in roots during dehydration treatment. The expression patterns indicate that most CsDCLs, CsAGOs and CsRDRs respond to abiotic stress, and stems or flowers are the most sensitive organs, followed by roots. This is the first report of expression analysis of all CsDCL, CsAGO and CsRDR family genes in cucumber under abiotic stress, whichprovides basic information and insights into the putative roles of these genes in abiotic stress. The results of this study should serve as a basis for further functional characterization of these gene families in cucumber and related Cucurbitaceae species.

  20. Tomato NAC transcription factor SlSRN1 positively regulates defense response against biotic stress but negatively regulates abiotic stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available Biotic and abiotic stresses are major unfavorable factors that affect crop productivity worldwide. NAC proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth and development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a virus-induced gene silencing-based screening to identify genes that are involved in defense response against Botrytis cinerea, we identified a tomato NAC gene SlSRN1 (Solanum lycopersicum Stress-related NAC1. SlSRN1 is a plasma membrane-localized protein with transactivation activity in yeast. Expression of SlSRN1 was significantly induced by infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000, leading to 6-8 folds higher than that in the mock-inoculated plants. Expression of SlSRN1 was also induced by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and by drought stress. Silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased severity of diseases caused by B. cinerea and Pst DC3000. However, silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses. Furthermore, silencing of SlSRN1 accelerated accumulation of reactive oxygen species but attenuated expression of defense genes after infection by B. cinerea. Our results demonstrate that SlSRN1 is a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 but is a negative regulator for oxidative and drought stress response in tomato.

  1. Jasmonic acid distribution and action in plants: regulation during development and response to biotic and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1995-05-09

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is a naturally occurring growth regulator found in higher plants. Several physiological roles have been described for this compound (or a related compound, methyl jasmonate) during plant development and in response to biotic and abiotic stress. To accurately determine JA levels in plant tissue, we have synthesized JA containing 13C for use as an internal standard with an isotopic composition of [225]:[224] 0.98:0.02 compared with [225]:[224] 0.15:0.85 for natural material. GC analysis (flame ionization detection and MS) indicate that the internal standard is composed of 92% 2-(+/-)-[13C]JA and 8% 2-(+/-)-7-iso-[13C]JA. In soybean plants, JA levels were highest in young leaves, flowers, and fruit (highest in the pericarp). In soybean seeds and seedlings, JA levels were highest in the youngest organs including the hypocotyl hook, plumule, and 12-h axis. In soybean leaves that had been dehydrated to cause a 15% decrease in fresh weight, JA levels increased approximately 5-fold within 2 h and declined to approximately control levels by 4 h. In contrast, a lag time of 1-2 h occurred before abscisic acid accumulation reached a maximum. These results will be discussed in the context of multiple pathways for JA biosynthesis and the role of JA in plant development and responses to environmental signals.

  2. Adherence to abiotic surface induces SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12 strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Suelen B; Campos, Ana Carolina C; Pereira, Ana Claudia M; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Júnior, Raphael Hirata; Rosa, Ana Cláudia P; Asad, Lídia M B O

    2014-09-01

    During the colonization of surfaces, Escherichia coli bacteria often encounter DNA-damaging agents and these agents can induce several defence mechanisms. Base excision repair (BER) is dedicated to the repair of oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chemical and physical agents or by metabolism. In this work, we have evaluated whether the interaction with an abiotic surface by mutants derived from E. coli K-12 deficient in some enzymes that are part of BER causes DNA damage and associated filamentation. Moreover, we studied the role of endonuclease V (nfi gene; 1506 mutant strain) in biofilm formation. Endonuclease V is an enzyme that is involved in DNA repair of nitrosative lesions. We verified that endonuclease V is involved in biofilm formation. Our results showed more filamentation in the xthA mutant (BW9091) and triple xthA nfo nth mutant (BW535) than in the wild-type strain (AB1157). By contrast, the mutant nfi did not present filamentation in biofilm, although its wild-type strain (1466) showed rare filaments in biofilm. The filamentation of bacterial cells attaching to a surface was a consequence of SOS induction measured by the SOS chromotest. However, biofilm formation depended on the ability of the bacteria to induce the SOS response since the mutant lexA Ind(-) did not induce the SOS response and did not form any biofilm. Oxygen tension was an important factor for the interaction of the BER mutants, since these mutants exhibited decreased quantitative adherence under anaerobic conditions. However, our results showed that the presence or absence of oxygen did not affect the viability of BW9091 and BW535 strains. The nfi mutant and its wild-type did not exhibit decreased biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy was also performed on the E. coli K-12 strains that had adhered to the glass, and we observed the presence of a structure similar to an extracellular matrix that depended on the

  3. Glutaredoxins in plant development, abiotic stress response, and iron homeostasis: From model organisms to crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth, development, and response to environmental stress require the judicious balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are a group of oxidoreductases that participate in the control of ROS and are traditionally defined as redox regulators. New studies suggest the member...

  4. Expression Analysis of MYC Genes from Tamarix hispida in Response to Different Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifeng Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The MYC genes are a group of transcription factors containing both bHLH and ZIP motifs that play important roles in the regulation of abscisic acid (ABA-responsive genes. In the present study, to investigate the roles of MYC genes under NaCl, osmotic and ABA stress conditions, nine MYC genes were cloned from Tamarix hispida. Real-time reverse-transcriptase (RT-PCR showed that all nine MYC genes were expressed in root, stem and leaf tissues, but that the levels of the transcripts of these genes in the various tissues differed notably. The MYC genes were highly induced in the roots in response to ABA, NaCl and osmotic stresses after 3 h; however, in the stem and leaf tissues, MYC genes were highly induced only when exposed to these stresses for 6 h. In addition, most of these MYC genes were highly expressed in roots in comparison with stems and leaves. Furthermore, the MYC genes were more highly induced in roots than in stem and leaf tissues, indicating that these genes may play roles in stress responses mainly in the roots rather than the stems and leaves. The results of this present study suggest that MYCs are involved in salt and osmotic stress tolerances and are controlled by the ABA signal transduction pathway.

  5. Diurnal and Seasonal Responses of High Frequency Chlorophyll Fluorescence and PRI Measurements to Abiotic Stress in Almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambach-Ortiz, N. E.; Paw U, K. T.

    2016-12-01

    Plants have evolved to efficiently utilize light to synthesize energy-rich carbon compounds, and at the same time, dissipate absorbed but excessive photon that would otherwise transfer excitation energy to potentially toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nevertheless, even the most rapidly growing plants with the highest rates of photosynthesis only utilize about half of the light their leaves absorb during the hours of peak irradiance in sun-exposed habitats. Usually, that daily peak of irradiance coincides with high temperature and a high vapor pressure deficit, which are conditions related to plant stomata closure. Consequently, specially in water stressed environments, plants need to have mechanisms to dissipate most of absorbed photons. Plants avoid photo-oxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus due to the formation of ROS under excess light using different mechanisms in order to either lower the amount of ROS formation or detoxify already formed ROS. Photoinhibition is defined as a reduction in photosynthetic activity due largely to a sustained reduction in the photochemical efficiency of Photosystem II (PSII), which can be assessed by monitoring Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF). Alternatively, monitoring abiotic stress effects upon photosynthetic activity and photoinhibition may be possible using high frequency spectral reflectance sensors. We aim to find the potential relationships between high frequency PRI and ChlF as indicators of photoinhibition and permanent photodamage at a seasonal scale. Preliminary results show that PRI responses are sensitive to photoinhibition, but provide a poor representation of permanent photodamage observed at a seasonal scale.

  6. Identification of 14-3-3 Family in Common Bean and Their Response to Abiotic Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihua Li

    Full Text Available 14-3-3s are a class of conserved regulatory proteins ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, which play important roles in a variety of cellular processes including response to diverse stresses. Although much has been learned about 14-3-3s in several plant species, it remains unknown in common bean. In this study, 9 common bean 14-3-3s (PvGF14s were identified by exhaustive data mining against the publicly available common bean genomic database. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that each predicted PvGF14 was clustered with two GmSGF14 paralogs from soybean. Both epsilon-like and non-epsilon classes of PvGF14s were found in common bean, and the PvGF14s belonging to each class exhibited similar gene structure. Among 9 PvGF14s, only 8 are transcribed in common bean. Expression patterns of PvGF14s varied depending on tissue type, developmental stage and exposure of plants to stress. A protein-protein interaction study revealed that PvGF14a forms dimer with itself and with other PvGF14 isoforms. This study provides a first comprehensive look at common bean 14-3-3 proteins, a family of proteins with diverse functions in many cellular processes, especially in response to stresses.

  7. Emerging concept for the role of photorespiration as an important part of abiotic stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, I; Sunil, B; Scheibe, R; Raghavendra, A S

    2013-07-01

    When plants are exposed to stress, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is often one of the first responses. In order to survive, cells attempt to down-regulate the production of ROS, while at the same time scavenging ROS. Photorespiration is now appreciated as an important part of stress responses in green tissues for preventing ROS accumulation. Photorespiratory reactions can dissipate excess reducing equivalents and energy either directly (using ATP, NAD(P)H and reduced ferredoxin) or indirectly (e.g., via alternative oxidase (AOX) and providing an internal CO2 pool). Photorespiration, however, is also a source of H2 O2 that is possibly involved in signal transduction, resulting in modulation of gene expression. We propose that photorespiration can assume a major role in the readjustment of redox homeostasis. Protection of photosynthesis from photoinhibition through photorespiration is well known. Photorespiration can mitigate oxidative stress under conditions of drought/water stress, salinity, low CO2 and chilling. Adjustments to even mild disturbances in redox status, caused by a deficiency in ascorbate, AOX or chloroplastic NADP-malate dehydrogenase, comprise increases in photorespiratory components such as catalase, P-protein of glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) and glycine content. The accumulation of excess reducing equivalents or ROS in plant cells also affects mitochondria. Therefore, a strong interaction between the chloroplast redox status and photorespiration is not surprising, but highlights interesting properties evident in plant cells. We draw attention to the fact that a complex network of multiple and dynamic systems, including photorespiration, prevents oxidative damage while optimising photosynthesis. Further experiments are necessary to identify and validate the direct targets of redox signals among photorespiratory components.

  8. The E-subgroup Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein family in Arabidopsis thaliana and confirmation of the responsiveness PPR96 to abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR proteins are extensive in all eukaryotes. Their functions remain as yet largely unknown. Mining potential stress responsive PPRs, and checking whether known PPR editing factors are affected in the stress treatments. It is beneficial to elucidate the regulation mechanism of PPRs involved in biotic and abiotic stress. Here, we explored the characteristics and origin of the 105 E subgroup PPRs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Phylogenetic analysis categorized the E subgroup PPRs into five discrete groups (Cluster I to V, and they may have a common origin in both A. thaliana and rice. An in silico expression analysis of the 105 E subgroup PPRs in A. thaliana was performed using available microarray data. 34 PPRs were differentially expressed during A. thaliana seed imbibition, seed development stage(s, and flowers development processes. To explore potential stress responsive PPRs, differential expression of 92 PPRs was observed in A. thaliana seedlings subjected to different abiotic stresses. qPCR data of E subgroup PPRs under stress conditions revealed that the expression of 5 PPRs was responsive to abiotic stresses. In addition, PPR96 is involved in plant responses to salt, abscisic acid (ABA, and oxidative stress. The T-DNA insertion mutation inactivating PPR96 expression results in plant insensitivity to salt, ABA, and oxidative stress. The PPR96 protein is localized in the mitochondria, and altered transcription levels of several stress-responsive genes under abiotic stress treatments. Our results suggest that PPR96 may important function in a role connecting the regulation of oxidative respiration and environmental responses in A. thaliana.

  9. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  10. Photosynthetic response to fluctuating environments and photoprotective strategies under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru

    2016-05-01

    Plants in natural environments must cope with diverse, highly dynamic, and unpredictable conditions. They have mechanisms to enhance the capture of light energy when light intensity is low, but they can also slow down photosynthetic electron transport to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and consequent damage to the photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Plants need a highly responsive regulatory system to balance the photosynthetic light reactions with downstream metabolism. Various mechanisms of regulation of photosynthetic electron transport under stress have been proposed, however the data have been obtained mainly under environmentally stable and controlled conditions. Thus, our understanding of dynamic modulation of photosynthesis under dramatically fluctuating natural environments remains limited. In this review, first I describe the magnitude of environmental fluctuations under natural conditions. Next, I examine the effects of fluctuations in light intensity, CO2 concentration, leaf temperature, and relative humidity on dynamic photosynthesis. Finally, I summarize photoprotective strategies that allow plants to maintain the photosynthesis under stressful fluctuating environments. The present work clearly showed that fluctuation in various environmental factors resulted in reductions in photosynthetic rate in a stepwise manner at every environmental fluctuation, leading to the conclusion that fluctuating environments would have a large impact on photosynthesis.

  11. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-05-26

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems.

  12. Metabolite profiling and transcript analysis reveal specificities in the response of a berry derived cell culture to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayenew, Biruk; Degu, Asfaw; Manela, Neta; Perl, Avichai; Shamir, Michal O; Fait, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    As climate changes, there is a need to understand the expected effects on viticulture. In nature, stresses exist in a combined manner, hampering the elucidation of the effect of individual cues on grape berry metabolism. Cell suspension culture originated from pea-size Gamy Red grape berry was used to harness metabolic response to high light (HL; 2500 μmol m(-2)s(-1)), high temperature (HT; 40°C) and their combination in comparison to 25°C and 100 μmol m(-2)s(-1) under controlled condition. When LC-MS and GC-MS based metabolite profiling was implemented and integrated with targeted RT-qPCR transcript analysis specific responses were observed to the different cues. HL enhanced polyphenol metabolism while HT and its combination with HL induced amino acid and organic acid metabolism with additional effect on polyphenols. The trend of increment in TCA cycle genes like ATCs, ACo1, and IDH in the combined treatment might support the observed increment in organic acids, GABA shunt, and their derivatives. The apparent phenylalanine reduction with polyphenol increment under HL suggests enhanced fueling of the precursor toward the downstream phenylpropanoid pathway. In the polyphenol metabolism, a differential pattern of expression of flavonoid 3',5' hydroxylase and flavonoid 3' hydroxylase was observed under high light (HL) and combined cues which were accompanied by characteristic metabolite profiles. HT decreased glycosylated cyanidin and peonidin forms while the combined cues increased acetylated and coumarylated peonidin forms. Transcription factors regulating anthocyanin metabolism and their methylation, MYB, OMT, UFGT, and DFR, were expressed differentially among the treatments, overall in agreement with the metabolite profiles. Taken together these data provide insights into the coordination of central and secondary metabolism in relation to multiple abiotic stresses.

  13. Metabolite Profiling and Transcript Analysis Reveal Specificities in the Response of a Berry Derived Cell Culture to Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biruk eAyenew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As climate changes, there is a need to understand the expected effects on viticulture. In nature, stresses exist in a combined manner, hampering the elucidation of the effect of individual cues on grape berry metabolism. Cell suspension culture originated from pea-size Gamy Red grape berry was used to harness metabolic response to high light (2500 µmol m-2s-1, high temperature (40 0C and their combination in comparison to 25 0C and 100 µmol m-2s-1 under controlled condition. When LC-MS and GC-MS based metabolite profiling was implemented and integrated with targeted RT-qPCR transcript analysis specific responses were observed to the different cues. High light enhanced polyphenol metabolism while high temperature and its combination with high light induced amino acid and organic acid metabolism with additional effect on polyphenols. The trend of increment in TCA cycle genes like ATCs, ACo1 and IDH in the combined treatment might support the observed increment in organic acids, GABA shunt, and their derivatives. The apparent phenylalanine reduction with polyphenol increment under high light suggests enhanced fueling of the precursor towards the downstream phenylpropanoid pathway. In the polyphenol metabolism, a differential pattern of expression of flavonoid 3’,5’ hydroxylase and flavonoid 3’ hydroxylase was observed under high light and combined cues which were accompanied by characteristic metabolite profiles. High temperature decreased glycosylated cyanidin and peonidin forms while the combined cues increased acetylated and coumarylated peonidin forms. Transcription factors regulating anthocyanin metabolism and their methylation, MYB, OMT, UFGT and DFR, were expressed differentially among the treatments, overall in agreement with the metabolite profiles. Taken together these data provide insights into the coordination of central and secondary metabolism in relation to multiple abiotic stresses.

  14. Overexpression of the NDR1/HIN1-Like Gene NHL6 Modifies Seed Germination in Response to Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yan; Song, Wei-Meng; Pan, Jing; Jiang, Chun-Mei; Srivastava, Renu; Li, Bei; Zhu, Lu-Ying; Su, Hong-Yan; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Liu, Hua; Yu, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Cheng, Xian-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    NHL (NDR1/HIN1-like) genes play crucial roles in pathogen induced plant responses to biotic stress. Here, we report the possible function of NHL6 in plant response to abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stress. NHL6 was highly expressed in non-germinated seeds, and its expression was strongly induced by ABA and multiple abiotic stress signals. Loss-of-function of NHL6 decreased sensitivity to ABA in the early developmental stages including seed germination and post-germination seedling growth of the nhl6 mutants. However, overexpression of NHL6 increased sensitivity to ABA, salt and osmotic stress of the transgenic plants. Further studies indicated that the increased sensitivity in the 35S::NHL6 overexpressing plants could be a result of both ABA hypersensitivity and increased endogenous ABA accumulation under the stress conditions. It was also seen that the ABA-responsive element binding factors AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 could regulate NHL6 expression at transcriptional level. Our results indicate that NHL6 plays an important role in the abiotic stresses-induced ABA signaling and biosynthesis, particularly during seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  15. Identiifcation of the Regulator of G-Protein Signaling Protein Responsive to Plant Hormones and Abiotic Stresses in Brassica napus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun; ZHU Xia; ZHU Xiao-bin; YU Yi-fan; GE Hui-min; GAO Yong; LIANG Jian-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling proteins (RGS) accelerate the rate of GTP hydrolysis by Gαproteins, thus acting as negative regulators of G-protein signaling. Studies on Arabidopsis and soybean have proven that RGS proteins are physiologically important in plants and contribute to the signaling pathways regulated by different stimuli. Brassica napus is an important agriculturally relevant plant, the wildly planted oilseed rape in the world, which possesses an identiifed Gα, Gβand Gγsubunits. In the present study, we identiifed and characterized a Brassica napus RGS gene, BnRGS1, which contained an open reading frame of 1 380 bp encoding a putative 52.6 kDa polypeptide of 459 amino acids, within seven putative transmembrane domains in the N-terminal and RGS box in the C-terminal. BnRGS1 is located on the membrane in onion epidermal cells and tobacco leaves, and interacts with BnGA1 in the mating-based split-ubiquitin system. The expression levels of BnRGS1 were quite different in different tissues and developmental stages, and induced by abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The effects of gibberellin (GA3) and brassinolide (BR) on the expression of BnRGS1 were irregular under the concentrations tested. Moreover, the transcript level of BnRGS1 was also induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG), whereas remained little changed by 200 mmol L-1 NaCl. These results suggested that the BnRGS1 may be involved in B. napus response to plant hormone signaling and abiotic stresses.

  16. Isolation of a novel peroxisomal catalase gene from sugarcane, which is responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachun Su

    Full Text Available Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05-179 resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03-182, suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183, was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA treatments, oxidative (H2O2 stress, heavy metal (CuCl2 and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli.

  17. Mineral supply constraints necessitate a global policy response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickless, Edmund

    2016-04-01

    Adoption on 12 December 2015 of The Paris Agreement, the first universal climate agreement, suggests that nations will invest in infrastructures for renewable energy sources paving the way to a global low-carbon society. These large-scale changes will require vast amounts of metals and minerals. Regardless of whether known supplies are enough to meet demand in the near future, efforts must be made now to forestall unpredictable yet inevitable supply shortages in the decades to come, shortages that would dramatically impact the building of additional generation and distribution capacity, and deployment of low-carbon technology. But in response to the current downturn in commodity prices, the global mining industry is downsizing and reducing investment in the new exploration, putting at risk future security of supply. Mining and climate change are inextricably linked; the new adaptive technologies needed to tackle climate change depend on extraction of minerals and metals. An interdisciplinary group supported by the International Union of Geological Sciences, the International Council for Science Unions and UNESCO proposes measures to avert the looming minerals crisis that is developing in the context of current recycling capacity and exploration trends. Our immediate goal is to stimulate discussion of supply constraints using available data on mineral reserves. We build on recent discussions of supply risk and criticality with a focus on the source of primary resources over the next two to three decades when the availability of metals for recycling will remain low. Current massive production of iron ore and other such commodities despite record low prices indicates a failure of the traditional supply and demand constraints. Broader discussions of metal and mineral supply beyond current criticality are needed given the pace of technological and demographic change as well as rapid development spurts. Furthermore, accessible mineral deposits are irregularly distributed

  18. Responses to abiotic environmental stresses among phylloplane and soil isolates of Beauveria bassiana from two holm oak ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bravo, María; Garrido-Jurado, Inmaculada; Valverde-García, Pablo; Enkerli, Jürg; Quesada-Moraga, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    The response of entomopathogenic mitosporic ascomycete (EMAs) to abiotic stresses might be adapted to the microhabitats in which they inhabit. In phylloplane, these organisms are more exposed to such stresses than they are in soil, which may have led to adaptation to this environment. In the present work, we investigate whether Beauveria bassiana genotype or isolation habitat, i.e., soil or phylloplane, within the same geographic area influences their responses to key environmental stresses, such as temperature, moisture and ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which can affect their successful use in microbial control. Twenty isolates of B. bassiana obtained from the soil and phylloplane in two ecosystems from southern Spain (holm oak dehesa and a reforested area) were selected to study the population distribution of these isolates and evaluate their thermal, humidity and UV-B requirements. Molecular characterization was conducted by using elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), the intergenic nuclear region Bloc and 15 microsatellite primers. The cluster analysis based on concatenated EF-1α and Bloc sequences grouped the 20 isolates into five clades within B. basiana, with Clades a, b, d and e containing both soil and phylloplane isolates and Clade c including three phylloplane isolates. The dendrogram and the minimal spanning network generated from the genetic distances among multilocus genotypes showed four divergent groups corresponding to the five clades obtained based on the sequence data (Clades b and d were represented in the same group), with a high degree of shared alleles within groups and few alleles shared among groups. Although no relationship was found between MLG and the habitat (soil or phylloplane) of isolation, isolates grouped into Clade c, all of which were collected from phylloplane, formed a separate group of MLGs. To investigate our hypothesis, the responses to temperature (germination and colony growth evaluated in the range 15-35°C), water activity

  19. Differences in competitive ability between plants from nonnative and native populations of a tropical invader relates to adaptive responses in abiotic and biotic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Liao

    Full Text Available The evolution of competitive ability of invasive plant species is generally studied in the context of adaptive responses to novel biotic environments (enemy release in introduced ranges. However, invasive plants may also respond to novel abiotic environments. Here we studied differences in competitive ability between Chromolaena odorata plants of populations from nonnative versus native ranges, considering biogeographical differences in both biotic and abiotic environments. An intraspecific competition experiment was conducted at two nutrient levels in a common garden. In both low and high nutrient treatments, C. odorata plants from nonnative ranges showed consistently lower root to shoot ratios than did plants from native ranges grown in both monoculture and competition. In the low nutrient treatment, C. odorata plants from nonnative ranges showed significantly lower competitive ability (competition-driven decreases in plant height and biomass were more, which was associated with their lower root to shoot ratios and higher total leaf phenolic content (defense trait. In the high nutrient treatment, C. odorata plants from nonnative ranges showed lower leaf toughness and cellulosic contents (defense traits but similar competitive ability compared with plants from native ranges, which was also associated with their lower root to shoot ratios. Our results indicate that genetically based shifts in biomass allocation (responses to abiotic environments also influence competitive abilities of invasive plants, and provide a first potential mechanism for the interaction between range and environment (environment-dependent difference between ranges.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Tomato Hsp20 Gene Family in Response to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Feng, Kun; Ruan, Meiying; Ye, Qingjing; Wang, Rongqing; Li, Zhimiao; Zhou, Guozhi; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    genes could be induced profusely by abiotic and biotic stresses such as heat, drought, salt, Botrytis cinerea, and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV), indicating their potential roles in mediating the response of tomato plants to environment stresses. In conclusion, these results provide valuable information for elucidating the evolutionary relationship of Hsp20 gene family and functional characterization of the SlHsp20 gene family in the future. PMID:27582749

  1. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of tomato Hsp20 gene family in response to biotic and abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jiahong yu

    2016-08-01

    levels of SlHsp20 genes could be induced profusely by abiotic and biotic stresses such as heat, drought, salt, Botrytis cinerea and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus, indicating their potential roles in mediating the response of tomato plants to environment stresses. In conclusion, these results provide valuable information for elucidating the evolutionary relationship of Hsp20 gene family and functional characterization of the SlHsp20 gene family in the future.

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Tomato Hsp20 Gene Family in Response to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Feng, Kun; Ruan, Meiying; Ye, Qingjing; Wang, Rongqing; Li, Zhimiao; Zhou, Guozhi; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    genes could be induced profusely by abiotic and biotic stresses such as heat, drought, salt, Botrytis cinerea, and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV), indicating their potential roles in mediating the response of tomato plants to environment stresses. In conclusion, these results provide valuable information for elucidating the evolutionary relationship of Hsp20 gene family and functional characterization of the SlHsp20 gene family in the future.

  3. When bad guys become good ones: the key role of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in the plant responses to abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Dos Santos Farnese

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The natural environment of plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and their ability to respond to these stresses is highly flexible and finely balanced through the interaction between signaling molecules. In this review, we highlight the integrated action between reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, particularly nitric oxide (NO, involved in the acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Under stressful conditions, the biosynthesis transport and the metabolism of ROS and NO influence plant response mechanisms. The enzymes involved in ROS and NO synthesis and scavenging can be found in different cells compartments and their temporal and spatial locations are determinant for signaling mechanisms. Both ROS and NO are involved in long distances signaling (ROS wave and GSNO transport, promoting an acquired systemic acclimation to abiotic stresses. The mechanisms of abiotic stresses response triggered by ROS and NO involve some general steps, as the enhancement of antioxidant systems, but also stress-specific mechanisms, according to the stress type (drought, hypoxia, heavy metals, etc, and demand the interaction with other signaling molecules, such as MAPK, plant hormones and calcium. The transduction of ROS and NO bioactivity involves post-translational modifications of proteins, particularly S-glutathionylation for ROS, and S-nitrosylation for NO. These changes may alter the activity, stability, and interaction with other molecules or subcellular location of proteins, changing the entire cell dynamics and contributing to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, despite the recent advances about the roles of ROS and NO in signaling cascades, many challenges remain, and future studies focusing on the signaling of these molecules in planta are still necessary.

  4. Cloning and analysis of expression patterns and transcriptional regulation of RghBNG in response to plant growth regulators and abiotic stresses in Rehmannia glutinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanqing; Zhang, Yonghua; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Wanshen; Duan, Hongying; Chen, Juanjuan

    2015-01-01

    RghBNG, a gene of unknown function, was cloned from Rehmannia glutinosa by reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA of RghBNG was 548 bp with a282-bp open reading frame. It encoded a polypeptide of 93 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 10.5 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 9.25. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RghBNG had no homology to any known plant genes, whereas the RghBNG polypeptide was highly similar to other plant proteins and possessed one conserved B12D protein family functional domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RghBNG encoded for a dicot protein. RghBNG spatial and temporal expression patterns and responses to abiotic stresses and plant growth regulators were investigated by qRT-PCR. RghBNG transcripts were detected in roots, stems, leaves, petals, receptacles, stamens and pistils with the highest and lowest levels respectively observed in petals and leaves of mature plants. Additionally, RghBNG transcripts were detected at three developmental stages of roots, stems and leaves; the highest levels were observed in roots at seedling stage; Transcript levels changed to varying degrees in different tissues and stages; We also studied the effects of abiotic stress and plant growth regulators in roots and leaves. RghBNG expression was significantly increased (p plant growth regulators and abiotic stresses.

  5. The role of the HvNAC6 transcription factor in response to biotic and abiotic stress in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yan-Jun

    The thesis is organized in six chapters: Chapter I provides an introduction to NAC transcription factors (TFs), including the regulation of NAC TFs and their functions in abiotic and biotic stresses. Recently, several reports have highlighted the NAC TF family for their potential to improve plant...... and abiotic stress. Chapter II is also part of the introduction for the thesis, and represents a review chapter discusses the challenges and the prospects for genetically engineering for disease resistance. My contribution comprised reviewing the progress in understanding the regulatory mechanisms of hormones...... and transcription factors in plant immunity, which provides an essential foundation before new strategies for developing transgenic resistance can be designed. The following chapters describe the experimental work and results achieved during the PhD study. Chapters III and IV are two manuscripts presenting...

  6. Transcriptome-Based Analysis of Dof Family Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Abiotic Stress in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze is affected by abiotic stress during its growth and development. DNA-binding with one finger (Dof transcription factors (TFs play important roles in abiotic stress tolerance of plants. In this study, a total of 29 putative Dof TFs were identified based on transcriptome of tea plant, and the conserved domains and common motifs of these CsDof TFs were predicted and analyzed. The 29 CsDof proteins were divided into 7 groups (A, B1, B2, C1, C2.1, C2.2, and D2, and the interaction networks of Dof proteins in C. sinensis were established according to the data in Arabidopsis. Gene expression was analyzed in “Yingshuang” and “Huangjinya” under four experimental stresses by qRT-PCR. CsDof genes were expressed differentially and related to different abiotic stress conditions. In total, our results might suggest that there is a potential relationship between CsDof factors and tea plant stress resistance.

  7. Transcriptome Profiling of the Green Alga Spirogyra pratensis (Charophyta) Suggests an Ancestral Role for Ethylene in Cell Wall Metabolism, Photosynthesis, and Abiotic Stress Responses1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that ethylene regulates a diverse set of developmental and stress-related processes in angiosperms, yet its roles in early-diverging embryophytes and algae are poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that ethylene functions as a hormone in the charophyte green alga Spirogyra pratensis. Since land plants evolved from charophytes, this implies conservation of ethylene as a hormone in green plants for at least 450 million years. However, the physiological role of ethylene in charophyte algae has remained unknown. To gain insight into ethylene responses in Spirogyra, we used mRNA sequencing to measure changes in gene expression over time in Spirogyra filaments in response to an ethylene treatment. Our analyses show that at the transcriptional level, ethylene predominantly regulates three processes in Spirogyra: (1) modification of the cell wall matrix by expansins and xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases, (2) down-regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis, and (3) activation of abiotic stress responses. We confirmed that the photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content were reduced by an ethylene treatment and that several abiotic stress conditions could stimulate cell elongation in an ethylene-dependent manner. We also found that the Spirogyra transcriptome harbors only 10 ethylene-responsive transcription factor (ERF) homologs, several of which are regulated by ethylene. These results provide an initial understanding of the hormonal responses induced by ethylene in Spirogyra and help to reconstruct the role of ethylene in ancestral charophytes prior to the origin of land plants. PMID:27489312

  8. Overexpression of a cytosolic abiotic stress responsive universal stress protein (SbUSP mitigates salt and osmotic stress in transgenic tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpika eUdawat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Stress Protein (USP is a ubiquitous protein and plays an indispensable role in plant abiotic stress tolerance. The genome of Salicornia brachiata contains two homologues of intron less SbUSP gene which encodes for salt and osmotic responsive universal stress protein. In vivo localization reveals that SbUSP is a membrane bound cytosolic protein. The role of the gene was functionally validated by developing transgenic tobacco and compared with control (wild type and vector control plants under different abiotic stress condition. Transgenic lines (T1 exhibited higher chlorophyll, relative water, proline, total sugar, reducing sugar, free amino acids, polyphenol contents, osmotic potential, membrane stability and lower electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde content under stress treatments than control (WT and VC plants. Lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2- radicals was also detected in transgenic lines compared to control plants under stress conditions. Present study confers that overexpression of the SbUSP gene enhances plant growth, alleviates ROS buildup, maintains ion homeostasis and improves the physiological status of the plant under salt and osmotic stresses. Principal component analysis (PCA exhibited a statistical distinction of plant response to salinity stress, and a significant response was observed for transgenic lines under stress, which provides stress endurance to the plant. A possible signaling role is proposed that some downstream genes may get activated by abiotic stress responsive cytosolic SbUSP, which leads to the protection of cell from oxidative damages. The study unveils that ectopic expression of the gene mitigates salt or osmotic stress by scavenging ROS and modulating the physiological process of the plant.

  9. An Intelligent Response Surface Methodology for Modeling of Domain Level Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An effective modeling method of domain level constraints in the constraint network for concurrent engineering (CE) was developed. The domain level constraints were analyzed and the framework of modeling of domain level constraints based on simulation and approximate technology was given. An intelligent response surface methodology (IRSM) was proposed, in which artificial intelligence technologies are introduced into the optimization process. The design of crank and connecting rod in the V6 engine as example was given to show the validity of the modeling method.

  10. Spermidine exodus and oxidation in the apoplast induced by abiotic stress is responsible for H2O2 signatures that direct tolerance responses in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Panagiotis N; Paschalidis, Konstantinos A; Delis, Ioannis D; Andriopoulou, Athina H; Lagiotis, George D; Yakoumakis, Dimitrios I; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2008-06-01

    Polyamines (PAs) exert a protective effect against stress challenges, but their molecular role in this remains speculative. In order to detect the signaling role of apoplastic PA-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under abiotic stress, we developed a series of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) transgenic plants overexpressing or downregulating apoplastic polyamine oxidase (PAO; S-pao and A-pao plants, respectively) or downregulating S-adenosyl-l-methionine decarboxylase (samdc plants). Upon salt stress, plants secreted spermidine (Spd) into the apoplast, where it was oxidized by the apoplastic PAO, generating H2O2. A-pao plants accumulated less H2O2 and exhibited less programmed cell death (PCD) than did wild-type plants, in contrast with S-pao and samdc downregulating plants. Induction of either stress-responsive genes or PCD was dependent on the level of Spd-derived apoplastic H2O2. Thus, in wild-type and A-pao plants, stress-responsive genes were efficiently induced, although in the latter at a lower rate, while S-pao plants, with higher H2O2 levels, failed to accumulate stress-responsive mRNAs, inducing PCD instead. Furthermore, decreasing intracellular PAs, while keeping normal apoplastic Spd oxidation, as in samdc downregulating transgenic plants, caused enhanced salinity-induced PCD. These results reveal that salinity induces the exodus of Spd into the apoplast, where it is catabolized by PAO, producing H2O2. The accumulated H2O2 results in the induction of either tolerance responses or PCD, depending also on the levels of intracellular PAs.

  11. A novel F-box protein CaF-box is involved in responses to plant hormones and abiotic stress in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rugang; Guo, Weili; Yin, Yanxu; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2014-02-10

    The F-box protein family is characterized by an F-box motif that has been shown to play an important role in regulating various developmental processes and stress responses. In this study, a novel F-box-containing gene was isolated from leaves of pepper cultivar P70 (Capsicum annuum L.) and designated CaF-box. The full-length cDNA is 2088 bp and contains an open reading frame of 1914 bp encoding a putative polypeptide of 638 amino acids with a mass of 67.8 kDa. CaF-box was expressed predominantly in stems and seeds, and the transcript was markedly upregulated in response to cold stress, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) treatment, and downregulated under osmotic and heavy metal stress. CaF-box expression was dramatically affected by salt stress, and was rapidly increased for the first hour, then sharply decreased thereafter. In order to further assess the role of CaF-box in the defense response to abiotic stress, a loss-of-function experiment in pepper plants was performed using a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique. Measurement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage revealed stronger lipid peroxidation and cell death in the CaF-box-silenced plants than in control plants, suggesting CaF-box plays an important role in regulating the defense response to abiotic stress resistance in pepper plants.

  12. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants.

  13. Physiological and Molecular Aspects of Tolerance to Environmental Constraints in Grain and Forage Legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane Bargaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the agronomical and environmental advantages of the cultivation of legumes, their production is limited by various environmental constraints such as water or nutrient limitation, frost or heat stress and soil salinity, which may be the result of pedoclimatic conditions, intensive use of agricultural lands, decline in soil fertility and environmental degradation. The development of more sustainable agroecosystems that are resilient to environmental constraints will therefore require better understanding of the key mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to abiotic constraints. This review provides highlights of legume tolerance to abiotic constraints with a focus on soil nutrient deficiencies, drought, and salinity. More specifically, recent advances in the physiological and molecular levels of the adaptation of grain and forage legumes to abiotic constraints are discussed. Such adaptation involves complex multigene controlled-traits which also involve multiple sub-traits that are likely regulated under the control of a number of candidate genes. This multi-genetic control of tolerance traits might also be multifunctional, with extended action in response to a number of abiotic constraints. Thus, concrete efforts are required to breed for multifunctional candidate genes in order to boost plant stability under various abiotic constraints.

  14. Physiological and Molecular Aspects of Tolerance to Environmental Constraints in Grain and Forage Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnane, Bargaz; Mainassara, Zaman-Allah; Mohamed, Farissi; Mohamed, Lazali; Jean-Jacques, Drevon; Rim, Maougal T; Georg, Carlsson

    2015-08-13

    Despite the agronomical and environmental advantages of the cultivation of legumes, their production is limited by various environmental constraints such as water or nutrient limitation, frost or heat stress and soil salinity, which may be the result of pedoclimatic conditions, intensive use of agricultural lands, decline in soil fertility and environmental degradation. The development of more sustainable agroecosystems that are resilient to environmental constraints will therefore require better understanding of the key mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to abiotic constraints. This review provides highlights of legume tolerance to abiotic constraints with a focus on soil nutrient deficiencies, drought, and salinity. More specifically, recent advances in the physiological and molecular levels of the adaptation of grain and forage legumes to abiotic constraints are discussed. Such adaptation involves complex multigene controlled-traits which also involve multiple sub-traits that are likely regulated under the control of a number of candidate genes. This multi-genetic control of tolerance traits might also be multifunctional, with extended action in response to a number of abiotic constraints. Thus, concrete efforts are required to breed for multifunctional candidate genes in order to boost plant stability under various abiotic constraints.

  15. Ethylene is involved in brassinosteroids induced alternative respiratory pathway in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. seedlings response to abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie eWei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of brassinosteroids (BRs on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. abiotic stresses resistance to salt, polyethylene glycol (PEG, cold and the potential mechanisms were investigated in this work. Previous reports have indicated that BRs can induce ethylene production and enhance alternative oxidase (AOX pathway. The mechanisms whether ethylene is involved as a signal molecule which connected BR with AOX in regulating stress tolerance are still unknown. Here, we found that pretreatment with 1 µM brassinolide (BL, the most active BRs relieved stress-caused oxidative damage in cucumber seedlings and clearly enhanced the capacity of AOX and the ethylene biosynthesis. Furthermore, transcription level of ethylene signaling biosynthesis genes including ripening-related ACC synthase1 (CSACS1, ripening-related ACC synthase2 (CSACS2, ripening-related ACC synthase3 (CSACS3, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase1 (CSACO1, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase2 (CSACO2 and CSAOX were increased after BL treatment. Importantly, the application of the salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, AOX inhibitor and ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOA decreased plant resistance to environmental stress by blocking BRs-induced alternative respiration. Taken together, our results demonstrated that ethylene was involved in BRs-induced AOX activity which played important roles in abiotic stresses tolerance in cucumber seedlings.

  16. Increased growth in sunflower correlates with reduced defences and altered gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrose, Maya; Kane, Nolan C; Mayrose, Itay; Dlugosch, Katrina M; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2011-11-01

    Cultivated plants have been selected by humans for increased yield in a relatively benign environment, where nutrient and water resources are often supplemented, and biotic enemy loads are kept artificially low. Agricultural weeds have adapted to this same benign environment as crops and often have high growth and reproductive rates, even though they have not been specifically selected for yield. Considering the competing demands for resources in any plant, a key question is whether adaptation to agricultural environments has been accompanied by life history trade-offs, in which resistance to (largely absent) stress has been lost in favour of growth and reproduction. The experiments reported here were designed to test for growth-defence trade-offs in agricultural weeds, crops and native varieties of common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) by comparing their performance in the presence or absence of abiotic (drought and crowding) or biotic (simulated herbivory, insect herbivory and fungal) stress. We found that growth, as well as viability of crops and weeds, was reduced by abiotic drought stress. The weakened defence in the agricultural genotypes was further evident as increased susceptibility to fungal infection and higher level of insect palatability. To uncover molecular mechanisms underlying these trade-offs, we monitored gene expression kinetics in drought-stressed plants. By correlating phenotypic observations with molecular analyses, we report the identification of several genes, including a protein phosphatase 2C and the HD-Zip transcription factor Athb-8, whose expression is associated with the observed phenotypic variation in common sunflower.

  17. Review of Microbial Responses to Abiotic Environmental Factors in the Context of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    2000-08-01

    A workshop on Microbial Activities at Yucca Mountain (May 1995, Lafayette, CA) was held with the intention to compile information on all pertinent aspects of microbial activity for application to a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The findings of this workshop set off a number of efforts intended to eventually incorporate the impacts of microbial behavior into performance assessment models. One effort was to expand an existing modeling approach to include the distinctive characteristics of a repository at Yucca Mountain (e.g., unsaturated conditions and a significant thermal load). At the same time, a number of experimental studies were initiated as well as a compilation of relevant literature to more thoroughly study the physical, chemical and biological parameters that would affect microbial activity under Yucca Mountain-like conditions. This literature search (completed in 1996) is the subject of the present document. The collected literature can be divided into four categories: (1) abiotic factors, (2) community dynamics and in-situ considerations, (3) nutrient considerations and (4) transport of radionuclides. The complete bibliography represents a considerable resource, but is too large to be discussed in one document. Therefore, the present report focuses on the first category, abiotic factors, and a discussion of these factors in order to facilitate the development of a model for Yucca Mountain.

  18. Quantifying components of soil respiration and their response to abiotic factors in two typical subtropical forest stands, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Wang, Yujie; Wang, Yunqi; Sun, Suqi; Liu, Liziyuan

    2015-01-01

    Separating the components of soil respiration and understanding the roles of abiotic factors at a temporal scale among different forest types are critical issues in forest ecosystem carbon cycling. This study quantified the proportions of autotrophic (RA) and heterotrophic (RH) in total soil (RT) respiration using trenching and litter removal. Field studies were conducted in two typical subtropical forest stands (broadleaf and needle leaf mixed forest; bamboo forest) at Jinyun Mountain, near the Three Georges Reservoir in southwest China, during the growing season (Apr.-Sep.) from 2010 to 2012. The effects of air temperature (AT), soil temperature (ST) and soil moisture (SM) at 6 cm depth, solar radiation (SR), pH on components of soil respiration were analyzed. Results show that: 1) SR, AT, and ST exhibited a similar temporal trend. The observed abiotic factors showed slight interannual variability for the two forest stands. 2) The contributions of RH and RA to RT for broadleaf and needle leaf mixed forest were 73.25% and 26.75%, respectively, while those for bamboo forest were 89.02% and 10.98%, respectively; soil respiration peaked from June to July. In both stands, CO2 released from the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM), the strongest contributor to RT, accounted for over 63% of RH. 3) AT and ST were significantly positively correlated with RT and its components (psoil respiration. 4) Components of soil respiration were significantly different between two forest stands (psoil respiration and its components.

  19. Genome-wide identification, phylogeny, and expression analyses of the 14-3-3 family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    meiying li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant 14-3-3 proteins act as critical components of various cellular signaling processes and play an important role in regulating multiple physiological processes. However, less information is known about the 14-3-3 gene family in banana. In this study, 25 14-3-3 genes were identified from the banana genome. Based on the evolutionary analysis, banana 14-3-3 proteins were clustered into ε and non-ε groups. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified banana 14-3-3 genes had the typical 14-3-3 motif. The gene structure of banana 14-3-3 genes showed distinct class-specific divergence between the ε group and the non-ε group. Most banana 14-3-3 genes showed strong transcript accumulation changes during fruit development and postharvest ripening in two banana varieties, indicating that they might be involved in regulating fruit development and ripening. Moreover, some 14-3-3 genes also showed great changes after osmotic, cold, and salt treatments in two banana varieties, suggested their potential role in regulating banana response to abiotic stress. Taken together, this systemic analysis reveals the involvement of banana 14-3-3 genes in fruit development, postharvest ripening, and response to abiotic stress and provides useful information for understanding the functions of 14-3-3 genes in banana.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification, Phylogeny, and Expression Analyses of the 14-3-3 Family Reveal Their Involvement in the Development, Ripening, and Abiotic Stress Response in Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meiying; Ren, Licheng; Xu, Biyu; Yang, Xiaoliang; Xia, Qiyu; He, Pingping; Xiao, Susheng; Guo, Anping; Hu, Wei; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Plant 14-3-3 proteins act as critical components of various cellular signaling processes and play an important role in regulating multiple physiological processes. However, less information is known about the 14-3-3 gene family in banana. In this study, 25 14-3-3 genes were identified from the banana genome. Based on the evolutionary analysis, banana 14-3-3 proteins were clustered into ε and non-ε groups. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified banana 14-3-3 genes had the typical 14-3-3 motif. The gene structure of banana 14-3-3 genes showed distinct class-specific divergence between the ε group and the non-ε group. Most banana 14-3-3 genes showed strong transcript accumulation changes during fruit development and postharvest ripening in two banana varieties, indicating that they might be involved in regulating fruit development and ripening. Moreover, some 14-3-3 genes also showed great changes after osmotic, cold, and salt treatments in two banana varieties, suggested their potential role in regulating banana response to abiotic stress. Taken together, this systemic analysis reveals the involvement of banana 14-3-3 genes in fruit development, postharvest ripening, and response to abiotic stress and provides useful information for understanding the functions of 14-3-3 genes in banana. PMID:27713761

  1. Analysis of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Organs of Medicago sativa L. under Different Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Marc; Legay, Sylvain; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Guerriero, Gea

    2015-07-16

    Abiotic constraints are a source of concern in agriculture, because they can have a strong impact on plant growth and development, thereby affecting crop yield. The response of plants to abiotic constraints varies depending on the type of stress, on the species and on the organs. Although many studies have addressed different aspects of the plant response to abiotic stresses, only a handful has focused on the role of the cell wall. A targeted approach has been used here to study the expression of cell wall-related genes in different organs of alfalfa plants subjected for four days to three different abiotic stress treatments, namely salt, cold and heat stress. Genes involved in different steps of cell wall formation (cellulose biosynthesis, monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization) have been analyzed in different organs of Medicago sativa L. Prior to this analysis, an in silico classification of dirigent/dirigent-like proteins and class III peroxidases has been performed in Medicago truncatula and M. sativa. The final goal of this study is to infer and compare the expression patterns of cell wall-related genes in response to different abiotic stressors in the organs of an important legume crop.

  2. Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Proteome Implicate cAMP in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses and Changes in Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Alqurashi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is increasingly recognized as having many different roles in plant responses to environmental stimuli. To gain further insights into these roles, Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was treated with 100 nM of cell permeant 8-bromo-cAMP for 5 or 10 min. Here, applying mass spectrometry and comparative proteomics, 20 proteins were identified as differentially expressed and we noted a specific bias in proteins with a role in abiotic stress, particularly cold and salinity, biotic stress as well as proteins with a role in glycolysis. These findings suggest that cAMP is sufficient to elicit specific stress responses that may in turn induce complex changes to cellular energy homeostasis.

  3. Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Proteome Implicate cAMP in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses and Changes in Energy Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Alquraishi, May Majed

    2016-06-01

    The second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is increasingly recognized as having many different roles in plant responses to environmental stimuli. To gain further insights into these roles, Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was treated with 100 nM of cell permeant 8-bromo-cAMP for 5 or 10 min. Here, applying mass spectrometry and comparative proteomics, 20 proteins were identified as differentially expressed and we noted a specific bias in proteins with a role in abiotic stress, particularly cold and salinity, biotic stress as well as proteins with a role in glycolysis. These findings suggest that cAMP is sufficient to elicit specific stress responses that may in turn induce complex changes to cellular energy homeostasis.

  4. Cucumis sativus L. WAX2 Plays a Pivotal Role in Wax Biosynthesis, Influencing Pollen Fertility and Plant Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjiao; Liu, Xingwang; Gai, Xinshuang; Ren, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xiaofeng; Cai, Yanling; Wang, Qian; Ren, Huazhong

    2015-07-01

    Cuticular waxes play an important part in protecting plant aerial organs from biotic and abiotic stresses. In previous studies, the biosynthetic pathway of cuticular waxes and relative functional genes has been researched and understood; however, little is known in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). In this study, we cloned and characterized an AtWAX2 homolog, CsWAX2, in cucumber and found that it is highly expressed in the epidermis, where waxes are synthesized, while subcellular localization showed that CsWAX2 protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The transcriptional expression of CsWAX2 was found to be induced by low temperature, drought, salt stress and ABA, while the ectopic expression of CsWAX2 in an Arabidopsis wax2 mutant could partially complement the glossy stem phenotype. Abnormal expression of CsWAX2 in transgenic cucumbers specifically affected both very long chain (VLC) alkanes and cutin biosynthesis. Furthermore, transgenic cucumber plants of CsWAX2 showed significant changes in pollen viability and fruit resistance to water loss and pathogens compared with the wild type. Collectively, these results indicated that CsWAX2 plays a pivotal role in wax biosynthesis, influencing pollen fertility and the plant's response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  5. Chloroplast- or Mitochondria-Targeted DEAD-Box RNA Helicases Play Essential Roles in Organellar RNA Metabolism and Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Nawaz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The yields and productivity of crops are greatly diminished by various abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, heat, and high salinity. Chloroplasts and mitochondria are cellular organelles that can sense diverse environmental stimuli and alter gene expression to cope with adverse environmental stresses. Organellar gene expression is mainly regulated at posttranscriptional levels, including RNA processing, intron splicing, RNA editing, RNA turnover, and translational control, during which a variety of nucleus-encoded RNA-binding proteins (RBPs are targeted to chloroplasts or mitochondria where they play essential roles in organellar RNA metabolism. DEAD-box RNA helicases (RHs are enzymes that can alter RNA structures and affect RNA metabolism in all living organisms. Although a number of DEAD-box RHs have been found to play important roles in RNA metabolism in the nucleus and cytoplasm, our understanding on the roles of DEAD-box RHs in the regulation of RNA metabolism in chloroplasts and mitochondria is only at the beginning. Considering that organellar RNA metabolism and gene expression are tightly regulated by anterograde signaling from the nucleus, it is imperative to determine the functions of nucleus-encoded organellar RBPs. In this review, we summarize the emerging roles of nucleus-encoded chloroplast- or mitochondria-targeted DEAD-box RHs in organellar RNA metabolism and plant response to diverse abiotic stresses.

  6. EgRBP42 encoding an hnRNP-like RNA-binding protein from Elaeis guineensis Jacq. is responsive to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Wan-Chin; Ooi, Tony Eng Keong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2012-10-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have been implicated as regulatory proteins involved in the post-transcriptional processes of gene expression in plants under various stress conditions. In this study, we report the cloning and characterization of a gene, designated as EgRBP42, encoding a member of the plant heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)-like RBP family from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). EgRBP42 consists of two N-terminal RNA recognition motifs and a glycine-rich domain at the C-terminus. The upstream region of EgRBP42 has multiple light-responsive, stress-responsive regulatory elements and regulatory elements associated with flower development. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of EgRBP42 showed that EgRBP42 was expressed in oil palm tissues tested, including leaf, shoot apical meristem, root, female inflorescence, male inflorescence and mesocarp with the lowest transcript level in the roots. EgRBP42 protein interacted with transcripts associated with transcription, translation and stress responses using pull-down assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The accumulation of EgRBP42 and its interacting transcripts were induced by abiotic stresses, including salinity, drought, submergence, cold and heat stresses in leaf discs. Collectively, the data suggested that EgRBP42 is a RBP, which responds to various abiotic stresses and could be advantageous for oil palm under stress conditions. Key message EgRBP42 may be involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of stress-related genes important for plant stress response and adaptation.

  7. TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION OF TRUSS STRUCTURE WITH FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN DYNAMIC RESPONSE CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jin; Wang De-yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is applied to topology optimization of truss structure with frequency domain excitations. The optimization constraints include fundamental frequency, displacement responses under force excitations and acceleration responses under foundation acceleration excitations. The roulette wheel selection operator, adaptive crossover and mutation operators are used as genetic operators. Some heuristic strategies are put forward to direct the deletion of the extra bars and nodes on truss structures. Three examples demonstrate that the proposed method can yield the optimum structure form and the lightest weight of the given ground structure while satisfying dynamic response constraints.

  8. Review of microbial responses to abiotic environmental factors in the context of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Stroes-Gascoyne, S

    2000-10-01

    A workshop on Microbial Activities at Yucca Mountain (May 1995, Lafayette, CA) was held with the intention to compile information on all pertinent aspects of microbial activity for application to a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The findings of this workshop set off a number of efforts intended to eventually incorporate the impacts of microbial behaviour into performance assessment models. One effort was to expand an existing modelling approach to include the distinctive characteristics of a repository at Yucca Mountain (e.g., unsaturated conditions and a significant thermal load). At the same time, a number of experimental studies were initiated as well as a compilation of relevant literature to more thoroughly study the physical, chemical and biological parameters that would affect microbial activity under Yucca Mountain-like conditions. This literature search (completed in 1996) is the subject of the present document. The collected literature can be divided into four categories, 1) abiotic factors, 2) community dynamics and in-situ considerations, 3) nutrient considerations and 4) transport of radionuclides. The complete bibliography (included in Appendix A) represents a considerable resource, but is too large to be discussed in one document. Therefore, the present report focuses on the first category, abiotic factors, and a discussion of these factors in order to facilitate the development of a model for Yucca Mountain. The first part of the report (Chapters 1-3) is a review of general microbial states, phases and requirements for growth, conditions for 'normal growth' and other types of growth, survival strategies and cell death. It contains primarily well-established ideas in microbiology. Microbial capabilities for survival and adaptation to environmental changes are examined because a repository placed at Yucca Mountain would have two effects. First, the natural environment would be perturbed by the excavation and construction of the

  9. Expression Profiling of Abiotic Stress-Inducible Genes in response to Multiple Stresses in Rice (Oryza sativa L. Varieties with Contrasting Level of Stress Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supratim Basu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study considered transcriptional profiles and protein expression analyses from shoot and/or root tissues under three abiotic stress conditions, namely, salinity, dehydration, and cold, as well as following exogenous abscisic acid treatment, at different time points of stress exposure in three indica rice varieties, IR-29 (salt sensitive, Pokkali, and Nonabokra (both salt tolerant. The candidate genes chosen for expression studies were HKT-1, SOS-3, NHX-1, SAPK5, SAPK7, NAC-1, Rab16A, OSBZ8, DREBP2, CRT/DREBP, WRKY24, and WRKY71, along with the candidate proteins OSBZ8, SAMDC, and GST. Gene expression profile revealed considerable differences between the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice varieties, as the expression in the latter was higher even at the constitutive level, whereas it was inducible only by corresponding stress signals in IR-29. Whether in roots or shoots, the transcriptional responses to different stressors peaked following 24 h of stress/ABA exposure, and the transcript levels enhanced gradually with the period of exposure. The generality of stress responses at the transcriptional level was therefore time dependent. Heat map data also showed differential transcript abundance in the three varieties, correlating the observation with transcript profiling. In silico analysis of the upstream regions of all the genes represented the existence of conserved sequence motifs in single or multiple copies that are indispensable to abiotic stress response. Overall, the transcriptome and proteome analysis undertaken in the present study indicated that genes/proteins conferring tolerance, belonging to different functional classes, were overrepresented, thus providing novel insight into the functional basis of multiple stress tolerance in indica rice varieties. The present work will pave the way in future to select gene(s for overexpression, so as to generate broad spectrum resistance to multiple stresses simultaneously.

  10. Sea Ice Microorganisms: Environmental Constraints and Extracellular Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody W. Deming

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherent to sea ice, like other high latitude environments, is the strong seasonality driven by changes in insolation throughout the year. Sea-ice organisms are exposed to shifting, sometimes limiting, conditions of temperature and salinity. An array of adaptations to survive these and other challenges has been acquired by those organisms that inhabit the ice. One key adaptive response is the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, which play multiple roles in the entrapment, retention and survival of microorganisms in sea ice. In this concept paper we consider two main areas of sea-ice microbiology: the physico-chemical properties that define sea ice as a microbial habitat, imparting particular advantages and limits; and extracellular responses elicited in microbial inhabitants as they exploit or survive these conditions. Emphasis is placed on protective strategies used in the face of fluctuating and extreme environmental conditions in sea ice. Gaps in knowledge and testable hypotheses are identified for future research.

  11. The α-Crystallin Domain Containing Genes: Identification, Phylogeny and Expression Profiling in Abiotic Stress, Phytohormone Response and Development in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asosii ePaul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The α-crystallin domain (ACD is an ancient domain conserved among all kingdoms. Plant ACD proteins have roles in abiotic stresses, transcriptional regulation, inhibiting virus movement and DNA demethylation. An exhaustive in-silico analysis using Hidden Markof Model-based conserved motif search of the tomato proteome yielded a total of 50 ACD proteins that belonged to 4 groups, sub-divided further into18 classes. One of these groups belongs to the small heat shock protein (sHSP class of proteins, molecular chaperones implicated in heat tolerance. Both tandem and segmental duplication events appear to have shaped the expansion of this gene family with purifying selection being the primary driving force for evolution. The expression profiling of the Acd genes in two different heat stress regimes suggested that their transcripts are differentially regulated with roles in acclimation and adaptive response during recovery. The co-expression of various genes in response to different abiotic stresses (heat, low temperature, dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress and phytohormones (abscisic acid and salicylic acid suggested possible cross-talk between various members to combat a myriad of stresses. Further, several genes were highly expressed in fruit, root and flower tissues as compared to leaf signifying their importance in plant development too. Evaluation of the expression of this gene family in field grown tissues highlighted the prominent role they have in providing thermo-tolerance during daily temperature variations. The function of three putative sHSPs was established as holdase chaperones as evidenced by protection to malate-dehydrogenase against heat induced protein-aggregation. This study provides insights into the characterization of the Acd genes in tomato and forms the basis for further functional validation in-planta.

  12. The CarERF genes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and the identification of CarERF116 as abiotic stress responsive transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deokar, Amit A; Kondawar, Vishwajith; Kohli, Deshika; Aslam, Mohammad; Jain, Pradeep K; Karuppayil, S Mohan; Varshney, Rajeev K; Srinivasan, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    The AP2/ERF family is one of the largest transcription factor gene families that are involved in various plant processes, especially in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Complete genome sequences of one of the world's most important pulse crops chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), has provided an important opportunity to identify and characterize genome-wide ERF genes. In this study, we identified 120 putative ERF genes from chickpea. The genomic organization of the chickpea ERF genes suggested that the gene family might have been expanded through the segmental duplications. The 120 member ERF family was classified into eleven distinct groups (I-X and VI-L). Transcriptional factor CarERF116, which is differentially expressed between drought tolerant and susceptible chickpea cultivar under terminal drought stress has been identified and functionally characterized. The CarERF116 encodes a putative protein of 241 amino acids and classified into group IX of ERF family. An in vitro CarERF116 protein-DNA binding assay demonstrated that CarERF116 protein specifically interacts with GCC box. We demonstrate that CarERF116 is capable of transactivation activity of and show that the functional transcriptional domain lies at the C-terminal region of the CarERF116. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CarERF116, significant up-regulation of several stress related genes were observed. These plants also exhibit resistance to osmotic stress and reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination. Based on these findings, we conclude that CarERF116 is an abiotic stress responsive gene, which plays an important role in stress tolerance. In addition, the present study leads to genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of chickpea ERF gene family, which will facilitate further research on this important group of genes and provides valuable resources for comparative genomics among the grain legumes.

  13. Identification of multiple small heat-shock protein genes in Plutella xylostella (L.) and their expression profiles in response to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi'en; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    We identify and characterize 14 small heat-shock protein (sHSP) genes from the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), a destructive pest. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that, except for sHSP18.8 and sHSP19.22, the other 12 DBM sHSPs belong to five known insect sHSP groups. Developmental expression analysis revealed that most sHSPs peaked in the pupal and adult stages. The transcripts of sHSPs display tissue specificity with two exhibiting constitutive expression in four tested tissues. Expression of sHSP18.8 in fourth instar larvae is not induced by the tested abiotic stressors, and unless sHSP21.8 is not sensitive to thermal stress, 12 sHSPs are significantly up-regulated. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of all sHSPs are reduced under oxidative stress. Food deprivation leads to significant down-regulation of three sHSPs. The majority of sHSPs show expression variation to various heavy metals, whereas mRNA abundances of sHSP22.1 and sHSP 28.9 are reduced by four heavy metals. The responses of sHSPs to indoxacarb and cantharidin are varied. Beta-cypermethrin and chlorfenapyr exposure results in an increase of 13 sHSP transcripts and a reduction of 12 sHSP transcripts, respectively. These results show that different sHSPs might play distinct roles in the development and regulation of physiological activities, as well as in response to various abiotic stresses of DBM.

  14. Cloning and functional characterization of two abiotic stress-responsive Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) fructan 1-exohydrolases (1-FEHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanhuan; Liang, Mingxiang; Xu, Li; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xi; Kang, Jian; Zhao, Qingxin; Zhao, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Two fructan hydrolases were previously reported to exist in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) and one native fructan-β-fructosidase (1-FEH) was purified to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE, but no corresponding cDNA was cloned. Here, we cloned two full-length 1-FEH cDNA sequences from Jerusalem artichoke, named Ht1-FEH I and Ht1-FEH II, which showed high levels of identity with chicory 1-FEH I and 1-FEH II. Functional characterization of the corresponding recombinant proteins in Pichia pastoris X-33 demonstrated that both Ht1-FEHs had high levels of hydrolase activity towards β(2,1)-linked fructans, but low or no activity towards β(2,6)-linked levan and sucrose. Like other plant FEHs, the activities of the recombinant Ht1-FEHs were greatly inhibited by sucrose. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that Ht1-FEH I transcripts accumulated to high levels in the developing leaves and stems of artichoke, whereas the expression levels of Ht1-FEH II increased in tubers during tuber sprouting, which implies that the two Ht1-FEHs play different roles. The levels of both Ht1-FEH I and II transcript were significantly increased in the stems of NaCl-treated plants. NaCl treatment also induced transcription of both Ht1-FEHs in the tubers, while PEG treatments slightly inhibited the expression of Ht1-FEH II in tubers. Analysis of sugar-metabolizing enzyme activities and carbohydrate concentration via HPLC showed that the enzyme activities of 1-FEHs were increased but the fructose content was decreased under NaCl and PEG treatments. Given that FEH hydrolyzes fructan to yield Fru, we discuss possible explanations for the inconsistency between 1-FEH activity and fructan dynamics in artichokes subjected to abiotic stress.

  15. Experience Report: Constraint-Based Modelling and Simulation of Railway Emergency Response Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sandberg, Lene

    2016-01-01

    We report on experiences from a case study applying a constraint-based process-modelling and -simulation tool, dcrgraphs.net, to the modelling and rehearsal of railway emergency response plans with domain experts. The case study confirmed the approach as a viable means for domain experts to analyse...... and security processes in the danish public transport sector and their dependency on ICT....

  16. Oscillatory brain responses in spoken word production reflect lexical frequency and sentential constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Maris, E.G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Two fundamental factors affecting the speed of spoken word production are lexical frequency and sentential constraint, but little is known about their timing and electrophysiological basis. In the present study, we investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory brain responses induced

  17. Genome-wide characterisation and expression profile of the grapevine ATL ubiquitin ligase family reveal biotic and abiotic stress-responsive and development-related members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Pietro; Regaiolo, Alice; Lovato, Arianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Porceddu, Andrea; Camiolo, Salvatore; Wong, Darren; Castellarin, Simone; Vandelle, Elodie; Polverari, Annalisa

    2016-12-02

    The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) protein family is a class of E3 ubiquitin ligases with a characteristic RING-H2 Zn-finger structure that mediates diverse physiological processes and stress responses in plants. We carried out a genome-wide survey of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) ATL genes and retrieved 96 sequences containing the canonical ATL RING-H2 domain. We analysed their genomic organisation, gene structure and evolution, protein domains and phylogenetic relationships. Clustering revealed several clades, as already reported in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), with an expanded subgroup of grapevine-specific genes. Most of the grapevine ATL genes lacked introns and were scattered among the 19 chromosomes, with a high level of duplication retention. Expression profiling revealed that some ATL genes are expressed specifically during early or late development and may participate in the juvenile to mature plant transition, whereas others may play a role in pathogen and/or abiotic stress responses, making them key candidates for further functional analysis. Our data offer the first genome-wide overview and annotation of the grapevine ATL family, and provide a basis for investigating the roles of specific family members in grapevine physiology and stress responses, as well as potential biotechnological applications.

  18. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L. based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramer Grant R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. Results A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression

  19. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, Richard L; Ergül, Ali; Albion, Rebecca L; Schlauch, Karen A; Cramer, Grant R; Cushman, John C

    2011-05-18

    Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression patterns, previously unrecognized stress-induced genes, and

  20. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. Results A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression patterns, previously

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus using 454 pyrosequencing: comparison with A. tuberculatus, expression profiling in stems and in response to biotic and abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Ortiz Erandi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amaranthus hypochondriacus, a grain amaranth, is a C4 plant noted by its ability to tolerate stressful conditions and produce highly nutritious seeds. These possess an optimal amino acid balance and constitute a rich source of health-promoting peptides. Although several recent studies, mostly involving subtractive hybridization strategies, have contributed to increase the relatively low number of grain amaranth expressed sequence tags (ESTs, transcriptomic information of this species remains limited, particularly regarding tissue-specific and biotic stress-related genes. Thus, a large scale transcriptome analysis was performed to generate stem- and (abiotic stress-responsive gene expression profiles in grain amaranth. Results A total of 2,700,168 raw reads were obtained from six 454 pyrosequencing runs, which were assembled into 21,207 high quality sequences (20,408 isotigs + 799 contigs. The average sequence length was 1,064 bp and 930 bp for isotigs and contigs, respectively. Only 5,113 singletons were recovered after quality control. Contigs/isotigs were further incorporated into 15,667 isogroups. All unique sequences were queried against the nr, TAIR, UniRef100, UniRef50 and Amaranthaceae EST databases for annotation. Functional GO annotation was performed with all contigs/isotigs that produced significant hits with the TAIR database. Only 8,260 sequences were found to be homologous when the transcriptomes of A. tuberculatus and A. hypochondriacus were compared, most of which were associated with basic house-keeping processes. Digital expression analysis identified 1,971 differentially expressed genes in response to at least one of four stress treatments tested. These included several multiple-stress-inducible genes that could represent potential candidates for use in the engineering of stress-resistant plants. The transcriptomic data generated from pigmented stems shared similarity with findings reported in developing

  2. Overexpression of soybean ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene GmUBC2 confers enhanced drought and salt tolerance through modulating abiotic stress-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guo-An; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that ubiquitination plays important roles in plant abiotic stress responses. In the present study, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene GmUBC2, a homologue of yeast RAD6, was cloned from soybean and functionally characterized. GmUBC2 was expressed in all tissues in soybean and was up-regulated by drought and salt stress. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmUBC2 were more tolerant to salinity and drought stresses compared with the control plants. Through expression analyses of putative downstream genes in the transgenic plants, we found that the expression levels of two ion antiporter genes AtNHX1 and AtCLCa, a key gene involved in the biosynthesis of proline, AtP5CS, and the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase gene AtCCS, were all increased significantly in the transgenic plants. These results suggest that GmUBC2 is involved in the regulation of ion homeostasis, osmolyte synthesis, and oxidative stress responses. Our results also suggest that modulation of the ubiquitination pathway could be an effective means of improving salt and drought tolerance in plants through genetic engineering.

  3. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Three Novel Genes Related to Fatty Acid Degradation and Their Responses to Abiotic Stresses in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jia; WEI Li-bin; HU Yan; GUO Wang-zhen

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is responsible not only for oilseed metabolism but also for plant responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, three novel genes related to fatty acid degradation designated GhACX, Gh4CL, and GhMFP, respectively, were isolated from Gossypium hirsutum acc. TM-1. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that amino acid sequences of GhACX and GhMFP have the highest homology with those from Vitis vinifera, and Gh4CL has a closer genetic relationship with that from Camellia sinensis. Tissue-and organ-specific analysis showed that the three genes expressed widely in all the tested tissues, including ovules and fiber at different developing stages, with expressed preferentially in some organs. Among them, GhACX showed the most abundant transcripts in seeds at 25 d post anthesis (DPA), however, GhMFP and Gh4CL have the strongest expression level in ovules on the day of anthesis. Based on real-time quantitative RT-PCR, the three genes were differentially regulated when induced under wounding, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), cold, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The characterization and expression pattern of three novel fatty acid degradation related genes will aid both to understand the roles of fatty acid degradation related genes as precursor in stress stimuli and to elucidate the physiological function in cotton oilseed metabolism.

  4. The role of the HvNAC6 transcription factor in response to biotic and abiotic stress in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yan-Jun

    -mediated transformation methods could be used to study stress responses at the whole-plant level. The abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) levels were measured during Bgh infection to investigate the involvement of these hormones and TF in the basal resistance. HvNAC6 RNAi plants were also subjected to dehydration...

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM1 promotes wax very-long-chain alkane biosynthesis and influences plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdenx, Brice; Bernard, Amélie; Domergue, Frédéric; Pascal, Stéphanie; Léger, Amandine; Roby, Dominique; Pervent, Marjorie; Vile, Denis; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Lessire, René; Joubès, Jérôme

    2011-05-01

    Land plant aerial organs are covered by a hydrophobic layer called the cuticle that serves as a waterproof barrier protecting plants against desiccation, ultraviolet radiation, and pathogens. Cuticle consists of a cutin matrix as well as cuticular waxes in which very-long-chain (VLC) alkanes are the major components, representing up to 70% of the total wax content in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. However, despite its major involvement in cuticle formation, the alkane-forming pathway is still largely unknown. To address this deficiency, we report here the characterization of the Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM1 (CER1) gene predicted to encode an enzyme involved in alkane biosynthesis. Analysis of CER1 expression showed that CER1 is specifically expressed in the epidermis of aerial organs and coexpressed with other genes of the alkane-forming pathway. Modification of CER1 expression in transgenic plants specifically affects VLC alkane biosynthesis: waxes of TDNA insertional mutant alleles are devoid of VLC alkanes and derivatives, whereas CER1 overexpression dramatically increases the production of the odd-carbon-numbered alkanes together with a substantial accumulation of iso-branched alkanes. We also showed that CER1 expression is induced by osmotic stresses and regulated by abscisic acid. Furthermore, CER1-overexpressing plants showed reduced cuticle permeability together with reduced soil water deficit susceptibility. However, CER1 overexpression increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal pathogens. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CER1 controls alkane biosynthesis and is highly linked to responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  6. High-quality reference genes for quantifying the transcriptional responses of Oryza sativa L.(ssp.indica and japonica) to abiotic stress conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAKSUP Sarunyaporn; SUPAIBULWATANA Kanyaratt; SELVARAJ Gopalan

    2013-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is important to food security and is also an excellent model plant for numerous cereal crops.A functional genomics study in rice includes characterization of the expression dynamics of genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis; this is a significant key for developing rice varieties that perform well in the face of adverse climate change.The qPCR analysis requires the use of appropriate reference genes in order to make any quantitative interpretations meaningful.Here,the new potential reference genes were selected from a huge public database of rice microarray experiments.The expression stability of 14 candidates and 4 conventional reference genes was validated by geNormPLUs and NormFinder software.Seven candidates are superior to the conventionally used reference genes in qPCR and three genes can be used reliably for quantitating the expression of genes involved in abiotic stress responses.These high-quality references EP (LOC_Os05g08980),HNR (LOC_Os01g71770),and TBC (LOC_Os09g34040) worked very well in three indica genotypes and one japonica genotype.One of indica genotypes including the Jasmine rice,KDML105 developed in Thailand for which no reference genes have been reported until now.

  7. Characterization of the Nrt2.6 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana: a link with plant response to biotic and abiotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dechorgnat

    Full Text Available The high affinity nitrate transport system in Arabidopsis thaliana involves one gene and potentially seven genes from the NRT1 and NRT2 family, respectively. Among them, NRT2.1, NRT2.2, NRT2.4 and NRT2.7 proteins have been shown to transport nitrate and are localized on the plasmalemma or the tonoplast membranes. NRT2.1, NRT2.2 and NRT2.4 play a role in nitrate uptake from soil solution by root cells while NRT2.7 is responsible for nitrate loading in the seed vacuole. We have undertaken the functional characterization of a third member of the family, the NRT2.6 gene. NRT2.6 was weakly expressed in most plant organs and its expression was higher in vegetative organs than in reproductive organs. Contrary to other NRT2 members, NRT2.6 expression was not induced by limiting but rather by high nitrogen levels, and no nitrate-related phenotype was found in the nrt2.6-1 mutant. Consistently, the over-expression of the gene failed to complement the nitrate uptake defect of an nrt2.1-nrt2.2 double mutant. The NRT2.6 expression is induced after inoculation of Arabidopsis thaliana by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. Interestingly, plants with a decreased NRT2.6 expression showed a lower tolerance to pathogen attack. A correlation was found between NRT2.6 expression and ROS species accumulation in response to infection by E. amylovora and treatment with the redox-active herbicide methyl viologen, suggesting a probable link between NRT2.6 activity and the production of ROS in response to biotic and abiotic stress.

  8. Metabolite Profiling and Transcript Analysis Reveal Specificities in the Response of a Berry Derived Cell Culture to Abiotic Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Biruk eAyenew; Asfaw eDegu; Neta eManela; Avichai ePerl; Michal eOren-Shamir; Aaron eFait

    2015-01-01

    As climate changes, there is a need to understand the expected effects on viticulture. In nature, stresses exist in a combined manner, hampering the elucidation of the effect of individual cues on grape berry metabolism. Cell suspension culture originated from pea-size Gamy Red grape berry was used to harness metabolic response to high light (2500 µmol m-2s-1), high temperature (40 0C) and their combination in comparison to 25 0C and 100 µmol m-2s-1 under controlled condition. When LC-MS and ...

  9. Metabolite profiling and transcript analysis reveal specificities in the response of a berry derived cell culture to abiotic stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Ayenew, Biruk; Degu, Asfaw; Manela, Neta; Perl, Avichai; Shamir, Michal O.; Fait, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    As climate changes, there is a need to understand the expected effects on viticulture. In nature, stresses exist in a combined manner, hampering the elucidation of the effect of individual cues on grape berry metabolism. Cell suspension culture originated from pea-size Gamy Red grape berry was used to harness metabolic response to high light (HL; 2500 μmol m-2s-1), high temperature (HT; 40°C) and their combination in comparison to 25°C and 100 μmol m-2s-1 under controlled condition. When LC–M...

  10. GmNAC5, a NAC Transcription Factor, Is a Transient Response Regulator Induced by Abiotic Stress in Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    GmNAC5 is a member of NAM subfamily belonging to NAC transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Studies on NAC transcription factors have shown that this family functioned in the regulation of shoot apical meristem (SAM), hormone signalling, and stress responses. In this study, we examined the expression levels of GmNAC5. GmNAC5 was highly expressed in the roots and immature seeds, especially strongly in immature seeds of 40 days after flowering. In addition, we found that Gm...

  11. A Study on Response Strategy to Cope with International and Domestic Constraints on the Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chung in; Park, Hahn Kyu; Kim, Tak Won; Lee, Dong Yoon; Lee, Yong Hwan [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze international and domestic constraints on the development of nuclear fuel cycle technology in Korea and to develop response strategies to deal with these constraints. This study proceeded as follows: Chapter 2 examined multilateral international constrains including IAEA safeguards system and NPT, bilateral international constraints such as the U.S.-Korea Nuclear Energy Cooperation Agreement and the U.S. nonproliferation policy, and domestic constraints like residents' anti nuclear movement and environmental protest movement. In Chapter 3, this study conducted a case study on Japan's nuclear fuel cycle programs as a basic research for the establishment of relevant response strategies vis-a-vis the international and domestic constraints. In this chapter, the focus of analysis was on Japan's strategies to deal with multilateral and bilateral pressures and domestic constraints. In Chapters 4 and 5, this study sought to elaborate Korea's strategies to cope with multilateral international constraints and U.S. constraints on the development of a domestic nuclear fuel cycle in Korea, respectively. The response strategies to domestic constraints were also illuminated in Chapter 6. 44 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs. (author)

  12. Expression Profiles of 12 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Genes from Tamarix hispida in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqiu Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA genes (named ThLEA-1 to -12 were cloned from Tamarix hispida. The expression profiles of these genes in response to NaCl, PEG, and abscisic acid (ABA in roots, stems, and leaves of T. hispida were assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. These ThLEAs all showed tissue-specific expression patterns in roots, stems, and leaves under normal growth conditions. However, they shared a high similar expression patterns in the roots, stems, and leaves when exposed to NaCl and PEG stress. Furthermore, ThLEA-1, -2, -3, -4, and -11 were induced by NaCl and PEG, but ThLEA-5, -6, -8, -10, and -12 were downregulated by salt and drought stresses. Under ABA treatment, some ThLEA genes, such as ThLEA-1, -2, and -3, were only slightly differentially expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, indicating that they may be involved in the ABA-independent signaling pathway. These findings provide a basis for the elucidation of the function of LEA genes in future work.

  13. Molecular cloning and expression profile of an abiotic stress and hormone responsive MYB transcription factor gene from Panax ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Sadia; Zhu, Jie; Cao, Hongzhe; Huang, Jingjia; Xiu, Hao; Luo, Tiao; Luo, Zhiyong

    2015-04-01

    The v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) family constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors and plays vital roles in developmental processes and defense responses in plants. A ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) MYB gene was cloned and designated as PgMYB1. The cDNA of PgMYB1 is 762 base pairs long and encodes the R2R3-type protein consisting 238 amino acids. Subcellular localization showed that PgMYB1-mGFP5 fusion protein was specifically localized in the nucleus. To understand the functional roles of PgMYB1, we investigated the expression patterns of PgMYB1 in different tissues and under various conditions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed that PgMYB1 was expressed at higher level in roots, leaves, and lateral roots than in stems and seeds. The expression of PgMYB1 was up-regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid, NaCl, and cold (chilling), and down-regulated by methyl jasmonate. These results suggest that PgMYB1 might be involved in responding to environmental stresses and hormones. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. HOS3, an ELO-Like Gene, Inhibits Effects of ABA and Implicates a S-1-P/Ceramide Control System for Abiotic Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanya M. Quist; Irina Sokolchik; Huazhong Shi; Robert J. Joly; Ray A. Bressan; Albino Maggio; Meena Narsimhan; Xia Li

    2009-01-01

    A hyper-osmotically sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, designated hos3-1 (high expression of osmotically responsive genes), was identified based on its hyper-luminescence of RD29A:LUC promoter fusion plants upon treatment with NaCI and ABA. These responses implicate the disrupted gene as a direct or indirect negative regulator of the RD29A stress-responsive pathway. By sequencing the flanking regions of the T-DNA borders, it was determined that the disrupted gene is at locus At4g36830, annotated as encoding a putative protein with high homology to CIG30 (ELO2/FEN1).CIG30 has been implicated in synthesis of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), which are essential precursors for sphingolipids and ceramides. Altered stress responses characteristic of ABA-hypersensitivity, including reduced root growth inhibition and reduced germination with ABA treatment and reduced water loss from leaves, were exhibited by allelic hos3-1 and hos3-2 mutants. The hos3-2 mutant is partially suppressed in its transcript abundance and is inherited as a recessive trait. Further, the HOS30RF under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter restored wild-type NaCI- and ABA-root growth sensitivity as well as RD29A:LUC luminescence in mutant plants. We also show here that the HOS3 wild-type gene functionally complements the sensitivity of elo2 and elo3 yeast mutants to monensin. Furthermore, both hos3-1 and hos3-2 alleles shared increased sensitivity to the herbicide Metolachlor, which inhibits acyl chain elongation in synthesis of VLCFA, and HOS3 functionally complemented both elo2 and elo3 and restored levels of VLCFA. Together, these data establish that HOS3 inhibits ABA-mediated stress responses and implicate the VLCFA pathway and products as control points for several aspects of abiotic stress signaling and responses. The results also provide support for a role of ceramide in the control of stomatal behavior.

  15. An expressed sequence tag analysis of the intertidal brown seaweeds Fucus serratus (L.) and F. vesiculosus (L.) (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae) in response to abiotic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Gareth A; Hoarau, Galice; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Coyer, James A; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Henckel, Kolja; Serrão, Ester T A; Corre, Erwan; Olsen, Jeanine L

    2010-04-01

    In order to aid gene discovery and uncover genes responding to abiotic stressors in stress-tolerant brown algae of the genus Fucus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were studied in two species, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Clustering of over 12,000 ESTs from three libraries for heat shock/recovery and desiccation/rehydration resulted in identification of 2,503, 1,290, and 2,409 unigenes from heat-shocked F. serratus, desiccated F. serratus, and desiccated F. vesiculosus, respectively. Low overall annotation rates (18-31%) were strongly associated with the presence of long 3' untranslated regions in Fucus transcripts, as shown by analyses of predicted protein-coding sequence in annotated and nonannotated tentative consensus sequences. Posttranslational modification genes were overrepresented in the heat shock/recovery library, including many chaperones, the most abundant of which were a family of small heat shock protein transcripts, Hsp90 and Hsp70 members. Transcripts of LI818-like light-harvesting genes implicated in photoprotection were also expressed during heat shock in high light. The expression of several heat-shock-responsive genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. However, candidate genes were notably absent from both desiccation/rehydration libraries, while the responses of the two species to desiccation were divergent, perhaps reflecting the species-specific physiological differences in stress tolerance previously established. Desiccation-tolerant F. vesiculosus overexpressed at least 17 ribosomal protein genes and two ubiquitin-ribosomal protein fusion genes, suggesting that ribosome function and/or biogenesis are important during cycles of rapid desiccation and rehydration in the intertidal zone and possibly indicate parallels with other poikilohydric organisms such as desiccation-tolerant bryophytes.

  16. ATP binding by the P-loop NTPase OsYchF1 (an unconventional G protein) contributes to biotic but not abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Li, Xiaorong; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yung, Yuk-Lin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Wong, Kam-Bo; Chen, Zhongzhou; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-03-01

    G proteins are involved in almost all aspects of the cellular regulatory pathways through their ability to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The YchF subfamily, interestingly, possesses the unique ability to bind both ATP and GTP, and is possibly an ancestral form of G proteins based on phylogenetic studies and is present in all kingdoms of life. However, the biological significance of such a relaxed ligand specificity has long eluded researchers. Here, we have elucidated the different conformational changes caused by the binding of a YchF homolog in rice (OsYchF1) to ATP versus GTP by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, by comparing the 3D relationships of the ligand position and the various amino acid residues at the binding sites in the crystal structures of the apo-bound and ligand-bound versions, a mechanism for the protein's ability to bind both ligands is revealed. Mutation of the noncanonical G4 motif of the OsYchF1 to the canonical sequence for GTP specificity precludes the binding/hydrolysis of ATP and prevents OsYchF1 from functioning as a negative regulator of plant-defense responses, while retaining its ability to bind/hydrolyze GTP and its function as a negative regulator of abiotic stress responses, demonstrating the specific role of ATP-binding/hydrolysis in disease resistance. This discovery will have a significant impact on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the YchF subfamily of G proteins in all kingdoms of life.

  17. Expression Analysis of Four Peroxiredoxin Genes from Tamarix hispida in Response to Different Abiotic Stresses and Exogenous Abscisic Acid (ABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyan Yang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prxs are a recently discovered family of antioxidant enzymes that catalyze the reduction of peroxides and alkyl peroxides. In this study, four Prx genes (named as ThPrxII, ThPrxIIE, ThPrxIIF, and Th2CysPrx were cloned from Tamarix hispida. Their expression profiles in response to stimulus of NaCl, NaHCO3, PEG, CdCl2 and abscisic acid (ABA in roots, stems and leaves of T. hispida were investigated using real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that the four ThPrxs were all expressed in roots, stems and leaves. Furthermore, the transcript levels of ThPrxIIE and ThPrxII were the lowest and the highest, respectively, in all tissue types. All the ThPrx genes were induced by both NaCl and NaHCO3 and reached their highest expression levels at the onset of stress in roots. Under PEG and CdCl2 stress, the expression patterns of these ThPrxs showed temporal and spatial specificity. The expressions of the ThPrxs were all differentially regulated by ABA, indicating that they are all involved in the ABA signaling pathway. These findings reveal a complex regulation of Prxs that is dependent on the type of Prx, tissue, and the signaling molecule. The divergence of the stress-dependent transcriptional regulation of the ThPrx gene family in T. hispida may provide an essential basis for the elucidation of Prx function in future work.

  18. A Novel Energy Saving Algorithm with Frame Response Delay Constraint in IEEE 802.16e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Dinh Thi Thuy; Kim, Mingon; Kang, Minho

    Sleep-mode operation of a Mobile Subscriber Station (MSS) in IEEE 802.16e effectively saves energy consumption; however, it induces frame response delay. In this letter, we propose an algorithm to quickly find the optimal value of the final sleep interval in sleep-mode in order to minimize energy consumption with respect to a given frame response delay constraint. The validations of our proposed algorithm through analytical results and simulation results suggest that our algorithm provide a potential guidance to energy saving.

  19. The tomato DWD motif-containing protein DDI1 interacts with the CUL4–DDB1-based ubiquitin ligase and plays a pivotal role in abiotic stress responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Min [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio-resource and Eco-environment, College of Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Department of Plant, Soil and Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339 (United States); Zhu, Yunye [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Qiao, Maiju [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio-resource and Eco-environment, College of Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Tang, Xiaofeng [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio-resource and Eco-environment, College of Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Zhao, Wei [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Xiao, Fangming [Department of Plant, Soil and Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339 (United States); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: liuyongsheng1122@hfut.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio-resource and Eco-environment, College of Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We identify DDI1 as a DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1)-interacting protein. • DDI1 interacts with the CUL4–DDB1-based ubiquitin ligase in the nucleus. • DDI1 plays a positive role in regulating abiotic stress response in tomato. - Abstract: CULLIN4(CUL4)–DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1)-based ubiquitin ligase plays significant roles in multiple physiological processes via ubiquitination-mediated degradation of relevant target proteins. The DDB1–CUL4-associated factor (DCAF) acts as substrate receptor in the CUL4–DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex and determines substrate specificity. In this study, we identified a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) DDB1-interacting (DDI1) protein as a DCAF protein involved in response to abiotic stresses, including UV radiation, high salinity and osmotic stress. Co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay indicated that DDI1 associates with CUL4–DDB1 in the nucleus. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated the DDI1 gene is induced by salt, mannitol and UV-C treatment. Moreover, transgenic tomato plants with overexpression or knockdown of the DDI1 gene exhibited enhanced or attenuated tolerance to salt/mannitol/UV-C, respectively. Thus, our data suggest that DDI1 functions as a substrate receptor of the CUL4–DDB1 ubiquitin ligase, positively regulating abiotic stress response in tomato.

  20. Functional analysis of the durum wheat gene TdPIP2;1 and its promoter region in response to abiotic stress in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Malika; Mieulet, Delphine; Fabre, Denis; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Vernet, Aurore; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Masmoudi, Khaled

    2014-06-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that expression of TdPIP2;1 in Xenopus oocytes resulted in an increase in Pf compared to water injected oocytes. Phenotypic analyses of transgenic tobacco plants expressing TdPIP2;1 generated a tolerance phenotype towards drought and salinity stresses. To elucidate its stress tolerance mechanism at the transcriptional level, we isolated and characterized the promoter region of the TdPIP2;1 gene. A 1060-bp genomic fragment upstream of the TdPIP2;1 translated sequence has been isolated, cloned, and designated as the proTdPIP2;1 promoter. Sequence analysis of proTdPIP2;1 revealed the presence of cis regulatory elements which could be required for abiotic stress responsiveness, for tissue-specific and vascular expression. The proTdPIP2;1 promoter was fused to the β-glucuronidase (gusA) gene and the resulting construct was transferred into rice (cv. Nipponbare). Histochemical analysis of proTdPIP2;1::Gus in rice plants revealed that the GUS activity was observed in leaves, stems and roots of stably transformed rice T3 plants. Histological sections prepared revealed accumulation of GUS products in phloem, xylem and in some cells adjacent to xylem. The transcripts were up-regulated by dehydration. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing proTdPIP2;1 in fusion with TdPIP2;1, showed enhanced drought tolerance, while wild type plants were more sensitive and exhibited symptoms of wilting and chlorosis. These findings suggest that expression of the TdPIP2;1 gene regulated by its own promoter achieves enhanced drought tolerance in rice.

  1. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of glyoxalase gene families in soybean (Glycine max) indicate their development and abiotic stress specific response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ajit; Islam, Tahmina

    2016-04-16

    Glyoxalase pathway consists of two enzymes, glyoxalase I (GLYI) and glyoxalase II (GLYII) which detoxifies a highly cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MG) to its non-toxic form. MG may form advanced glycation end products with various cellular macro-molecules such as proteins, DNA and RNA; that ultimately lead to their inactivation. Role of glyoxalase enzymes has been extensively investigated in various plant species which showed their crucial role in salinity, drought and heavy metal stress tolerance. Previously genome-wide analysis of glyoxalase genes has been conducted in model plants Arabidopsis and rice, but no such study was performed in any legume species. In the present study, a comprehensive genome database analysis of soybean was performed and identified a total of putative 41 GLYI and 23 GLYII proteins encoded by 24 and 12 genes, respectively. Detailed analysis of these identified members was conducted including their nomenclature and classification, chromosomal distribution and duplication, exon-intron organization, and protein domain(s) and motifs identification. Expression profiling of these genes has been performed in different tissues and developmental stages as well as under salinity and drought stresses using publicly available RNAseq and microarray data. The study revealed that GmGLYI-7 and GmGLYII-8 have been expressed intensively in all the developmental stages and tissues; while GmGLYI-6, GmGLYI-9, GmGLYI-20, GmGLYII-5 and GmGLYII-10 were highly abiotic stress responsive members. The present study identifies the largest family of glyoxalase proteins to date with 41 GmGLYI and 23 GmGLYII members in soybean. Detailed analysis of GmGLYI and GmGLYII genes strongly indicates the genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication of the glyoxalase members. Moreover, this study provides a strong basis about the biological role and function of GmGLYI and GmGLYII members in soybean growth, development and stress physiology.

  2. Abiotic origin of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of methods have been investigated in different laboratories for the polymerization of amino acids and nucleotides under abiotic conditions. They include (1) thermal polymerization; (2) direct polymerization of certain amino acid nitriles, amides, or esters; (3) polymerization using polyphosphate esters; (4) polymerization under aqueous or drying conditions at moderate temperatures using a variety of simple catalysts or condensing agents like cyanamide, dicyandiamide, or imidazole; and (5) polymerization under similar mild conditions but employing activated monomers or abiotically synthesized high-energy compounds such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The role and significance of these methods for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides under possible primitive-earth conditions is evaluated. It is concluded that the more recent approach involving chemical processes similar to those used by contemporary living organisms appears to offer a reasonable solution to the prebiotic synthesis of these biopolymers.

  3. An Expressed Sequence Tag Analysis of the Intertidal Brown Seaweeds Fucus serratus (L.) and F. vesiculosus (L.) (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae) in Response to Abiotic Stressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, Gareth A.; Hoarau, Galice; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Coyer, James A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Henckel, Kolja; Serrao, Ester T. A.; Corre, Erwan; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to aid gene discovery and uncover genes responding to abiotic stressors in stress-tolerant brown algae of the genus Fucus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were studied in two species, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Clustering of over 12,000 ESTs from three libraries for heat shock/rec

  4. An Expressed Sequence Tag Analysis of the Intertidal Brown Seaweeds Fucus serratus (L.) and F. vesiculosus (L.) (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae) in Response to Abiotic Stressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, Gareth A.; Hoarau, Galice; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Coyer, James A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Henckel, Kolja; Serrao, Ester T. A.; Corre, Erwan; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    In order to aid gene discovery and uncover genes responding to abiotic stressors in stress-tolerant brown algae of the genus Fucus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were studied in two species, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Clustering of over 12,000 ESTs from three libraries for heat

  5. Financial Constraints and the Response of Business Investment to Monetary Policy Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haase Timothy J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study I investigate what impact monetary policy shocks have on firms’ fixed investment, the less liquid portion of gross investment that requires more planning. I account for firms facing financial constraints firms by utilizing a common measure of asset size, which is used in previous literature. I use two exogenous, continuous series of monetary policy shocks to show that constrained firms have statistically different responses to policy than unconstrained firms. Specifically, I find that constrained firms’ fixed investment significantly responds more to monetary policy shocks than unconstrained firms.

  6. Global expression profiling of rice microRNAs by one-tube stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative PCR revealed important roles of microRNAs in abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianqiang; Xie, Kabin; Xiong, Lizhong

    2010-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous small RNA molecules (20-24 nucleotides) that have pivotal roles in regulating gene expression mostly at posttranscriptional levels in plants. Plant microRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes including growth and stress responses. However, the information about microRNAs in regulating abiotic stress responses in rice is limited. We optimized a one-tube stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative PCR (ST-RT qPCR) for high-throughput expression profiling analysis of microRNAs in rice under normal and stress conditions. The optimized ST-RT qPCR method was as accurate as small RNA gel blotting and was more convenient and time-saving than other methods in quantifying microRNAs. With this method, 41 rice microRNAs were quantified for their relative expression levels after drought, salt, cold, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. Thirty-two microRNAs showed induced or suppressed expression after stress or ABA treatment. Further analysis suggested that stress-responsive cis-elements were enriched in the promoters of stress-responsive microRNA genes. The expressions of five and seven microRNAs were significantly affected in the rice plant with defects in stress tolerance regulatory genes OsSKIPa and OsbZIP23, respectively. Some of the predicted target genes of these microRNAs were also related to abiotic stresses. We conclude that ST-RT qPCR is an efficient and reliable method for expression profiling of microRNAs and a significant portion of rice microRNAs participate in abiotic stress response and regulation.

  7. Poaceae vs. Abiotic Stress: Focus on Drought and Salt Stress, Recent Insights and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Landi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Poaceae represent the most important group of crops susceptible to abiotic stress. This large family of monocotyledonous plants, commonly known as grasses, counts several important cultivated species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum, rice (Oryza sativa, maize (Zea mays, and barley (Hordeum vulgare. These crops, notably, show different behaviors under abiotic stress conditions: wheat and rice are considered sensitive, showing serious yield reduction upon water scarcity and soil salinity, while barley presents a natural drought and salt tolerance. During the green revolution (1940–1960, cereal breeding was very successful in developing high-yield crops varieties; however, these cultivars were maximized for highest yield under optimal conditions, and did not present suitable traits for tolerance under unfavorable conditions. The improvement of crop abiotic stress tolerance requires a deep knowledge of the phenomena underlying tolerance, to devise novel approaches and decipher the key components of agricultural production systems. Approaches to improve food production combining both enhanced water use efficiency (WUE and acceptable yields are critical to create a sustainable agriculture in the future. This paper analyzes the latest results on abiotic stress tolerance in Poaceae. In particular, the focus will be directed toward various aspects of water deprivation and salinity response efficiency in Poaceae. Aspects related to cell wall metabolism will be covered, given the importance of the plant cell wall in sensing environmental constraints and in mediating a response; the role of silicon (Si, an important element for monocots' normal growth and development, will also be discussed, since it activates a broad-spectrum response to different exogenous stresses. Perspectives valorizing studies on landraces conclude the survey, as they help identify key traits for breeding purposes.

  8. Poaceae vs. Abiotic Stress: Focus on Drought and Salt Stress, Recent Insights and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Simone; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Guerriero, Gea; Esposito, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Poaceae represent the most important group of crops susceptible to abiotic stress. This large family of monocotyledonous plants, commonly known as grasses, counts several important cultivated species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). These crops, notably, show different behaviors under abiotic stress conditions: wheat and rice are considered sensitive, showing serious yield reduction upon water scarcity and soil salinity, while barley presents a natural drought and salt tolerance. During the green revolution (1940-1960), cereal breeding was very successful in developing high-yield crops varieties; however, these cultivars were maximized for highest yield under optimal conditions, and did not present suitable traits for tolerance under unfavorable conditions. The improvement of crop abiotic stress tolerance requires a deep knowledge of the phenomena underlying tolerance, to devise novel approaches and decipher the key components of agricultural production systems. Approaches to improve food production combining both enhanced water use efficiency (WUE) and acceptable yields are critical to create a sustainable agriculture in the future. This paper analyzes the latest results on abiotic stress tolerance in Poaceae. In particular, the focus will be directed toward various aspects of water deprivation and salinity response efficiency in Poaceae. Aspects related to cell wall metabolism will be covered, given the importance of the plant cell wall in sensing environmental constraints and in mediating a response; the role of silicon (Si), an important element for monocots' normal growth and development, will also be discussed, since it activates a broad-spectrum response to different exogenous stresses. Perspectives valorizing studies on landraces conclude the survey, as they help identify key traits for breeding purposes.

  9. Circadian regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Jack; Stoker, Claire; Carré, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    Extremes of temperatures, drought and salinity cause widespread crop losses throughout the world and impose severe limitations on the amount of land that can be used for agricultural purposes. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop crops that perform better under such abiotic stress conditions. Here, we discuss intriguing, recent evidence that circadian clock contributes to plants' ability to tolerate different types of environmental stress, and to acclimate to them. The clock controls expression of a large fraction of abiotic stress-responsive genes, as well as biosynthesis and signaling downstream of stress response hormones. Conversely, abiotic stress results in altered expression and differential splicing of the clock genes, leading to altered oscillations of downstream stress-response pathways. We propose a range of mechanisms by which this intimate coupling between the circadian clock and environmental stress-response pathways may contribute to plant growth and survival under abiotic stress.

  10. Identification of Cassava MicroRNAs under Abiotic Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballén-Taborda, Carolina; Plata, Germán; Ayling, Sarah; Rodríguez-Zapata, Fausto; Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, Luis Augusto; Duitama, Jorge; Tohme, Joe

    2013-01-01

      The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) in plants has gained significant attention in recent years due to their regulatory role during development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although cassava...

  11. Characterization of reference genes for RT-qPCR in the desert moss Syntrichia caninervis in response to abiotic stress and desiccation/rehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshuang eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Syntrichia caninervis is the dominant bryophyte of the biological soil crusts found in the Gurbantunggut desert. The extreme desert environment is characterized by prolonged drought, temperature extremes, high radiation and frequent cycles of hydration and dehydration. S. caninervis is an ideal organism for the identification and characterization of genes related to abiotic stress tolerance. RT-qPCR expression analysis is a powerful analytical technique that requires the use of stable reference genes. Using available S. caninervis transcriptome data, we selected 15 candidate reference genes and analyzed their relative expression stabilities in S. caninervis gametophores exposed to a range of abiotic stresses or a hydration-desiccation-rehydration cycle. The programs geNorm, NormFinder, and RefFinder were used to assess and rank the expression stability of the 15 candidate genes. The stability ranking results of reference genes under each specific experimental condition showed high consistency using different algorithms. For abiotic stress treatments, the combination of two genes (α-TUB2 and CDPK were sufficient for accurate normalization. For the hydration-desiccation-rehydration process, the combination of two genes (α-TUB1 and CDPK were sufficient for accurate normalization. 18S was among the least stable genes in all of the experimental sets and was unsuitable as reference gene in S. caninervis. This is the first systematic investigation and comparison of reference gene selection for RT-qPCR work in S. caninervis. This research will facilitate gene expression studies in S. caninervis, related moss species from the Syntrichia complex and other mosses.

  12. A qualitative study of hospital pharmacists and antibiotic governance: negotiating interprofessional responsibilities, expertise and resource constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Plage, Stefanie; Broom, Jennifer; Kirby, Emma; Adams, Jon

    2016-02-06

    Antibiotic treatment options for common infections are diminishing due to the proliferation of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The impact of Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) programs seeking to preserve viable antibiotic drugs by governing their use in hospitals has hitherto been limited. Pharmacists have been delegated a critical role in antibiotic governance in AMS teams within hospitals but the experience of pharmacists in influencing antibiotic use has received limited attention. In this study we explore the experiences of pharmacists in antibiotic decision-making in two Australian hospitals. We conducted 19 semi-structured interviews to explore hospital-based pharmacists' perceptions and experiences of antibiotic use and governance. The analysis was conducted with NVivo10 software, utilising the framework approach. Three major themes emerged in the pharmacist interviews including (1) the responsibilities of pharmacy in optimising antibiotic use and the interprofessional challenges therein; (2) the importance of antibiotic streamlining and the constraints placed on pharmacists in achieving this; and (3) the potential, but often under-utilised expertise, pharmacists bring to antibiotic optimisation. Pharmacists have a critical role in AMS teams but their capacity to enact change is limited by entrenched interprofessional dynamics. Identifying how hospital pharmacy's antibiotic gatekeeping is embedded in the interprofessional nature of clinical decision-making and limited by organisational environment has important implications for the implementation of hospital policies seeking to streamline antibiotic use. Resource constraints (i.e. time limitation and task prioritisation) in particular limit the capacity of pharmacists to overcome the interprofessional barriers through development of stronger collaborative relationships. The results of this study suggest that to enact change in antibiotic use in hospitals, pharmacists must be supported in their negotiations

  13. Thermal ecology of the fiddler crab Uca panacea: Thermal constraints and organismal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, M Zachary; Nicholson, Haley S; Munguia, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    Temperature is one of the primary environmental variables limiting organismal performance, fitness, and species distributions. Yet, understanding temperature effects requires thorough exploration of thermal constraints and organismal responses that can translate to fitness and non-lethal long-term consequences under both constant and changing thermal regimes. We examined the thermal ecology of the fiddler crab Uca panacea, including critical thermal limits, thermal sensitivity of locomotion, operative environmental temperatures, preferred body temperatures, and acclimation ability. Operative environmental temperatures frequently reached the critical thermal maximum (41.8±0.8°C, mean ± s.e.m.), especially in unvegetated microhabitats, indicating the need for behavioral thermoregulation to maintain diurnal activity patterns. Preferred body temperatures (21.1-28.6°C) were substantially below the thermal optimum (30-40°C), although further research is needed to determine the driver of this mismatch. Critical thermal limits shifted 2-4°C in response to exposure to low (20°C) or high (35°C) temperatures, with full acclimation occurring in approximately 9d. This capacity for rapid acclimation, combined with the capacity for behavioral thermoregulation, is a strong candidate mechanism that explains the broad habitat use and could help explain the successful pantropical distribution of fiddler crabs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conceptual Design Optimization of an Augmented Stability Aircraft Incorporating Dynamic Response and Actuator Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welstead, Jason; Crouse, Gilbert L., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical sizing guidelines such as tail volume coefficients have long been used in the early aircraft design phases for sizing stabilizers, resulting in conservatively stable aircraft. While successful, this results in increased empty weight, reduced performance, and greater procurement and operational cost relative to an aircraft with optimally sized surfaces. Including flight dynamics in the conceptual design process allows the design to move away from empirical methods while implementing modern control techniques. A challenge of flight dynamics and control is the numerous design variables, which are changing fluidly throughout the conceptual design process, required to evaluate the system response to some disturbance. This research focuses on addressing that challenge not by implementing higher order tools, such as computational fluid dynamics, but instead by linking the lower order tools typically used within the conceptual design process so each discipline feeds into the other. In thisresearch, flight dynamics and control was incorporated into the conceptual design process along with the traditional disciplines of vehicle sizing, weight estimation, aerodynamics, and performance. For the controller, a linear quadratic regulator structure with constant gains has been specified to reduce the user input. Coupling all the disciplines in the conceptual design phase allows the aircraft designer to explore larger design spaces where stabilizers are sized according to dynamic response constraints rather than historical static margin and volume coefficient guidelines.

  15. Constraint and flow: Poiseuille shear response of a surfactant sponge phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W A Hamilton; L Porcar; G G Warr; P D Butler

    2008-11-01

    To minimize their free energy in aqueous solution, surfactant molecules self-assemble to form some basic morphologies – globular micelles, highly extended theadlike micelles and membrane bilayers – which themselves order to display a rich variety of mesophase symmetries and properties. In membrane systems one of the more striking distinctions is that between the free flowing L3 `sponge' phase and the adjacent highly birefringent viscous L phase. Their different macroscopic properties reflect their mesophase membrane ordering – highly anisotropic stacking in the L phase, and an isotropic labyrinth of interconnecting passages in L3 sponges spanning solution space, but without long range order. Our group has spent a number of years investigating the shear flow responses of L3 phases as well as their accommodation to the constraint of a proximate surface – in both these situations over appropriate ranges the higher symmetry of the stacked membrane phases is established. These phases exhibit a strong dynamical scaling due to their entropic stabilization by hydrodynamic fluctuations, and a narrowing of this fluctuation spectrum in the proximity of a solid surface must also to some extent frustrate these membranes dynamically as well as geometrically. In recent experiments, we have begun measurements of the Poiseuille surface shear response of sponge phases a situation in which one might expect effects from an interplay between these dynamic and geometric effects.

  16. The LysM receptor-like kinase LysM RLK1 is required to activate defense and abiotic-stress responses induced by overexpression of fungal chitinases in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Yariv; Landau, Udi; Pnini, Smadar; Lisec, Jan; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Zilberstein, Aviah; Willmitzer, Lothar; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada

    2012-09-01

    Application of crab shell chitin or pentamer chitin oligosaccharide to Arabidopsis seedlings increased tolerance to salinity in wild-type but not in knockout mutants of the LysM Receptor-Like Kinase1 (CERK1/LysM RLK1) gene, known to play a critical role in signaling defense responses induced by exogenous chitin. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the endochitinase chit36 and hexoaminidase excy1 genes from the fungus Trichoderma asperelleoides T203 showed increased tolerance to salinity, heavy-metal stresses, and Botrytis cinerea infection. Resistant lines, overexpressing fungal chitinases at different levels, were outcrossed to lysm rlk1 mutants. Independent homozygous hybrids lost resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, despite enhanced chitinase activity. Expression analysis of 270 stress-related genes, including those induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and chitin, revealed constant up-regulation (at least twofold) of 10 genes in the chitinase-overexpressing line and an additional 76 salt-induced genes whose expression was not elevated in the lysm rlk1 knockout mutant or the hybrids harboring the mutation. These findings elucidate that chitin-induced signaling mediated by LysM RLK1 receptor is not limited to biotic stress response but also encompasses abiotic-stress signaling and can be conveyed by ectopic expression of chitinases in plants.

  17. 逆境条件下烟草维生素B6存在形态的变化%Changes of the Existing Forms of Vitamin B6 in Tobacco in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王灵红; 黄龙全; 张剑韵

    2013-01-01

    维生素B6(VB6)是一类吡啶化合物的总称.以组培烟草为材料,采用高效液相色谱结合荧光检测技术,分析紫外线、低温、盐和弱光胁迫对烟草体内VB6各存在形态含量的影响.结果表明:逆境条件下,VB6各存在形态含量发生变化,其中以磷酸吡哆醛和吡哆醇含量升高最明显.%Vitamin B6(VB6)is the general term for a kind of pyridine compounds.The paper aims to study the changes of the existing forms of vitamin B6 in response to abiotic stress.In this experiment,the influence of UV-B,chilling,salt and weak light stress on the content of the existing forms of VB6 in tobacco plants was determined using HPLC with fluorescence detector.The results showed that in response to abiotic stress,the content of the existing forms of VB6 changed with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and pyridoxine increased most obviously.

  18. The LysM Receptor-Like Kinase LysM RLK1 Is Required to Activate Defense and Abiotic-Stress Responses Induced by Overexpression of Fungal Chitinases in Arabidopsis Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yariv Brotman; Ada Viterbo; Udi Landau; Smadar Pnini; Jan Lisec; Salma Balazadeh; Bernd Mueller-Roeber; Aviah Zilberstein; Lothar Willmitzer; Ilan Chet

    2012-01-01

    Application of crab shell chitin or pentamer chitin oligosaccharide to Arabidopsis seedlings increased tolerance to salinity in wild-type but not in knockout mutants of the LysM Receptor-Like Kinase1 (CERK1/LysM RLK1) gene,known to play a critical role in signaling defense responses induced by exogenous chitin.Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the endochitinase chit36 and hexoaminidase excy1 genes from the fungus Trichoderma asperelleoides T203 showed increased tolerance to salinity,heavy-metal stresses,and Botrytis cinerea infection.Resistant lines,overexpressing fungal chitinases at different levels,were outcrossed to lysm rlk1 mutants.Independent homozygous hybrids lost resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses,despite enhanced chitinase activity.Expression analysis of 270 stress-related genes,including those induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and chitin,revealed constant up-regulation (at least twofold) of 10 genes in the chitinase-overexpressing line and an additional 76 salt-induced genes whose expression was not elevated in the lysm rlk1 knockout mutant or the hybrids harboring the mutation.These findings elucidate that chitin-induced signaling mediated by LysM RLK1 receptor is not limited to biotic stress response but also encompasses abiotic-stress signaling and can be conveyed by ectopic expression of chitinases in plants.

  19. Balancing Healthy Meals and Busy Lives: Associations between Work, School, and Family Responsibilities and Perceived Time Constraints among Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize associations between perceived time constraints for healthy eating and work, school, and family responsibilities among young adults. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: A large, Midwestern metropolitan region. Participants: A diverse sample of community college (n = 598) and public university (n = 603) students.…

  20. Contemporary Water Governance: Navigating Crisis Response and Institutional Constraints through Pragmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Baird

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Water has often been the source of crises and their frequency will intensify due to climate change impacts. The Niagara River Watershed provides an ideal case to study water crises as it is an international transboundary system (Canada-United States and has both historical and current challenges associated with water quantity and quality, which resonates broadly in water basins throughout the world. The aim of this study was to understand how stakeholders perceive ecosystems and the relationship with preferences for governance approaches in the context of water governance. An online survey instrument was employed to assess perceptions of the system in terms of resilience (engineering, ecological, social-ecological, or epistemic, preferences for governance approaches (state, citizen, market, and hybrid forms, and the most pressing issues in the watershed. Responses showed that, despite demographic differences and adherence to different resilience perspectives, support was strongest for governance approaches that focused on state or state-citizen hybrid forms. The validity of the resilience typology as a grouping variable is discussed. The roles of institutional constraints, pragmatism in governance approach preferences, and the influence of multiple crises are explored in relation to the context of the study site, as well as to water governance scholarship more broadly.

  1. Parameter constraints of grazing response functions. Implications for phytoplankton bloom initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Solé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are events of production and accumulation of phytoplankton biomass that influence ecosystem dynamics and may also have effects on socio-economic activities. Among the biological factors that affect bloom dynamics, prey selection by zooplankton may play an important role. Here we consider the initial state of development of an algal bloom and analyse how a reduced grazing pressure can allow an algal species with a lower intrinsic growth rate than a competitor to become dominant. We use a simple model with two microalgal species and one zooplankton grazer to derive general relationships between phytoplankton growth and zooplankton grazing. These relationships are applied to two common grazing response functions in order to deduce the mathematical constraints that the parameters of these functions must obey to allow the dominance of the lower growth rate competitor. To assess the usefulness of the deduced relationships in a more general framework, the results are applied in the context of a multispecies ecosystem model (ERSEM.

  2. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  3. 植物DNA甲基化变异对生物和非生物胁迫的响应机制%DNA Methylation Variation of Biological and Abiotic Stress Response Mechanism in Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓凤; 曾凡锁; 詹亚光

    2011-01-01

    高等植物具有复杂的机制使其对环境的变化做出响应,这种机制是通过长期进化建立起来的.它们能够对出现的生物和非生物胁迫产生响应.在分子水平上,植物对各种胁迫的响应是受多基因表达变化调控的,包括植物激素水杨酸、脱落酸等信号途径在整合、协调植物胁迫过程中起关键作用.近年来的研究表明,在植物响应胁迫这一过程中还进行着表观遗传调控这一进程.我们简要综述了生物胁迫和非生物胁迫对表观遗传的影响以及胁迫印记的产生,并讨论了植物响应胁迫的表观遗传调控机制.%Plants have complex mechanisms to respond to environmental changes, such a mechanism is established through long-term evolution. They can response to biological and abiotic stress. At the molecular level, plants of various stress response are regulated by multiple gene expression, including the plant hormone salicylic acid, ABA signaling pathways in the integration, coordination of plant stress play a key role in the process. Recent studies showed that plant responses to stress are also engaged in the process of epigenetic regulation in this process. In this paper we reviewed the biological stress and abiotic stress on the impact of epigenetic imprint stress generation,and discussed the plant response to stress epigenetic mechanisms.

  4. Balancing healthy meals and busy lives: associations between work, school, and family responsibilities and perceived time constraints among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E; Laska, Melissa N

    2012-01-01

    To characterize associations between perceived time constraints for healthy eating and work, school, and family responsibilities among young adults. Cross-sectional survey. A large, Midwestern metropolitan region. A diverse sample of community college (n = 598) and public university (n = 603) students. Time constraints in general, as well as those specific to meal preparation/structure, and perceptions of a healthy life balance. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression (α = .005). Women, 4-year students, and students with lower socioeconomic status perceived more time constraints (P students with lower socioeconomic status were less likely to have a healthy balance (P ≤ .003). Having a heavy course load and working longer hours were important predictors of time constraints among men (P nutrition-related messaging to achieve healthy diets on a low time budget may be more successful if tailored to the factors that contribute to time constraints separately among men and women. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An A20/AN1-zinc-finger domain containing protein gene in tea is differentially expressed during winter dormancy and in response to abiotic stress and plant growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asosii Paul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present manuscript describes cloning and expression characterization of A20/AN1-zinc-finger domain containing protein (CsZfp gene in an evergreen tree tea [Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze] in response to winter dormancy (WD, abiotic stresses (polyethylene glycol, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium chloride and plant growth regulators [abscisic acid (ABA, and gibberellic acid (GA3]. CsZfp encoded a putative protein of 173 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 18.44 kDa, an isoelectric point (pI of 6.50 and grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY value of −0.334. The gene did not have an intron, and belonged to a multi-gene family. During the period of active growth (PAG, CsZfp showed maximum expression in root and fruit as compared to leaf, floral bud and stem. Interaction studies between temperature and plant growth regulators on the expression of CsZfp showed that ABA upregulated CsZfp expression at growth temperature (GT; 25 °C but had no effect at low temperature (LT; 4 °C. In response to GA3, upregulation was observed at LT but not at GT. Further, the expression was not modulated by LT either in the tissue harvested during PAG or during WD. It was interesting to record that the expression of CsZfp was upregulated by hydrogen peroxide and sodium chloride, whereas it was non-responsive to polyethylene glycol. The possible role of CsZfp in playing key but differential roles in tea to various abiotic stresses is discussed.

  6. Abiotic self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    functions (including the replication of nucleic acids) to more competent protein enzymes would complete the journey from an abiotic world to the molecular biology we see today.

  7. Introduction of Pea DNA Helicase 45 Into Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid) Enhances Cell Membrane Thermostability And Upregulation Of Stress-responsive Genes Leads To Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Ashwin Narayan, J; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Appunu, C; Chakravarthi, M; Ravichandran, V; Tuteja, Narendra; Subramonian, N

    2015-05-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play an essential role in nucleic acid metabolism, by providing a duplex-unwinding function. To improve the drought and salinity tolerance of sugarcane, a DEAD-box helicase gene isolated from pea with a constitutive promoter, Port Ubi 2.3 was transformed into the commercial sugarcane variety Co 86032 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the transgenics were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and salinity. The transgene integration was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction, and the V 0 transgenic events showed significantly higher cell membrane thermostability under normal irrigated conditions. The V 1 transgenic events were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and exhibited significantly higher cell membrane thermostability, transgene expression, relative water content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic efficiency under soil moisture stress compared to wild-type (WT). The overexpression of PDH45 transgenic sugarcane also led to the upregulation of DREB2-induced downstream stress-related genes. The transgenic events demonstrated higher germination ability and better chlorophyll retention than WT under salinity stress. Our results suggest the possibility for development of increased abiotic stress tolerant sugarcane cultivars through overexpression of PDH45 gene. Perhaps this is the first report, which provides evidence for increased drought and salinity tolerance in sugarcane through overexpression of PDH45.

  8. Simultaneous expression of abiotic stress responsive transcription factors, AtDREB2A, AtHB7 and AtABF3 improves salinity and drought tolerance in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittal Pruthvi

    Full Text Available Drought, salinity and extreme temperatures are the most common abiotic stresses, adversely affecting plant growth and productivity. Exposure of plants to stress activates stress signalling pathways that induce biochemical and physiological changes essential for stress acclimation. Stress tolerance is governed by multiple traits, and importance of a few traits in imparting tolerance has been demonstrated. Under drought, traits linked to water mining and water conservation, water use efficiency and cellular tolerance (CT to desiccation are considered to be relevant. In this study, an attempt has been made to improve CT in drought hardy crop, peanut (Arachis hypogaea L., cv. TMV2 by co-expressing stress-responsive transcription factors (TFs, AtDREB2A, AtHB7 and AtABF3, associated with downstream gene expression. Transgenic plants simultaneously expressing these TFs showed increased tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stresses compared to wild type, with an increase in total plant biomass. The transgenic plants exhibited improved membrane and chlorophyll stability due to enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging and osmotic adjustment by proline synthesis under stress. The improvement in stress tolerance in transgenic lines were associated with induced expression of various CT related genes like AhGlutaredoxin, AhAldehyde reductase, AhSerine threonine kinase like protein, AhRbx1, AhProline amino peptidase, AhHSP70, AhDIP and AhLea4. Taken together the results indicate that co-expression of stress responsive TFs can activate multiple CT pathways, and this strategy can be employed to improve abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  9. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the phosphomannomutase (PMM) gene from Dendrobium officinale and evidence for the involvement of an abiotic stress response during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunmei; Zeng, Songjun; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Yu, Zhenming; Tan, Jianwen; Duan, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Phosphomannomutase (PMM, EC 5.4.2.8) catalyzes the interconversion of mannose-6-phosphate to mannose-1-phosphate, the precursor for the synthesis of GDP-mannose. In this study, the complementary DNA (cDNA) of the Phosphomannomutase (PMM) gene was initially cloned from Dendrobium officinale by RACE method. Transient transform result showed that the DoPMM protein was localized in the cytoplasm. The DoPMM gene was highly expressed in the stems of D. officinale both in vegetative and reproductive developmental stages. The putative promoter was cloned by TAIL-PCR and used for searched cis-elements. Stress-related cis-elements like ABRE, TCA-element, and MBS were found in the promoter regions. The DoPMM gene was up-regulated after treatment with abscisic acid, salicylic acid, cold, polyethylene glycol, and NaCl. The total ascorbic acid (AsA) and polysaccharide content in all of the 35S::DoPMM Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines #1, #2, and #5 showed a 40, 39, and 31% increase in AsA and a 77, 22, and 39% increase in polysaccharides, respectively more than wild-type (WT) levels. All three 35S::DoPMM transgenic lines exhibited a higher germination percentage than WT plants when seeded on half-strength MS medium supplemented with 150 mM NaCl or 300 mM mannitol. These results provide genetic evidence for the involvement of PMM genes in the biosynthesis of AsA and polysaccharides and the mediation of PMM genes in abiotic stress tolerance during seed germination in A. thaliana.

  10. Stressed out symbiotes: hypotheses for the influence of abiotic stress on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Niall S; Bennett, Alison E

    2016-11-01

    Abiotic stress is a widespread threat to both plant and soil communities. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can alleviate effects of abiotic stress by improving host plant stress tolerance, but the direct effects of abiotic stress on AM fungi are less well understood. We propose two hypotheses predicting how AM fungi will respond to abiotic stress. The stress exclusion hypothesis predicts that AM fungal abundance and diversity will decrease with persistent abiotic stress. The mycorrhizal stress adaptation hypothesis predicts that AM fungi will evolve in response to abiotic stress to maintain their fitness. We conclude that abiotic stress can have effects on AM fungi independent of the effects on the host plant. AM fungal communities will change in composition in response to abiotic stress, which may mean the loss of important individual species. This could alter feedbacks to the plant community and beyond. AM fungi will adapt to abiotic stress independent of their host plant. The adaptation of AM fungi to abiotic stress should allow the maintenance of the plant-AM fungal mutualism in the face of changing climates.

  11. Impact of optimal load response to real-time electricity price on power system constraints in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    and may represent the future of electricity markets in some ways, is chosen as the studied power system in this paper. A distribution system where wind power capacity is 126% of maximum loads is chosen as the study case. This paper presents a nonlinear load optimization method to real-time power price...... for demand side management in order to save the energy costs as much as possible. Simulation results show that the optimal load response to a real-time electricity price has some good impacts on power system constraints in a distribution system with high wind power penetrations....... for demand side management generates different load profiles and may have some impacts on power system constraints, such as voltage limits and capacity limits. The western Danish power system, which is currently the grid area in the world that has the largest share of wind power in its generation profiles...

  12. Differential expression profiles of poplar MAP kinase kinases in response to abiotic stresses and plant hormones, and overexpression of PtMKK4 improves the drought tolerance of poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Su, Hongyan; Han, Liya; Wang, Chuanqi; Sun, Yanlin; Liu, Fenghong

    2014-07-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal signal transduction modules that play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress response. MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), which link MAPKs and MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), are integral in mediating various stress responses in plants. However, to date few data about the roles of poplar MAPKKs in stress signal transduction are available. In this study, we performed a systemic analysis of poplar MAPKK gene family expression profiles in response to several abiotic stresses and stress-associated hormones. Furthermore, Populus trichocarpa MAPKK4 (PtMKK4) was chosen for functional characterization. Transgenic analysis showed that overexpression of the PtMKK4 gene remarkably enhanced drought stress tolerance in the transgenic poplar plants. The PtMKK4-overexpressing plants also exhibited much lower levels of H2O2 and higher antioxidant enzyme activity after exposure to drought stress compared to the wide type lines. Besides, some drought marker genes including PtP5CS, PtSUS3, PtLTP3 and PtDREB8 exhibited higher expression levels in the transgenic lines than in the wide type under drought conditions. This study provided valuable information for understanding the putative functions of poplar MAPKKs involved in important signaling pathways under different stress conditions.

  13. Ecophysiological response of Adelie penguins facing an experimental increase in breeding constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, M; Spée, M; Lazin, D; Ropert-Coudert, Y; le Maho, Y; Ancel, A; Raclot, T

    2010-01-01

    Foraging strategies play a key role in breeding effort. Little is known, however, about their connection with hormonal and nutritional states, especially when breeding constraints vary. Here, we experimentally increased foraging costs and thus breeding constraints by handicapping Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) with dummy devices representing 3-4% of the penguins' cross-sectional area. We examined food-related stress (via plasma corticosterone concentration) and nutritional state (via metabolite levels). Concurrently, we investigated the use of ecological niches via the isotopic signature of red blood cells indicating the trophic position (delta(15)N) and the spatial distribution (delta(13)C) of penguins. Handicapped birds performed approximately 70% longer foraging trips and lost approximately 60% more body mass than controls and their partners. However, corticosterone levels and the nutritional state were unchanged. The isotopic signature revealed that males and females differed in their foraging behaviour: upper trophic levels contributed more in the males' diet, who foraged in more pelagic areas. Handicapped and partner birds adopted the same strategy at sea: a shift towards higher delta(13)C values suggested that they foraged in more coastal areas than controls. This change in foraging decisions may optimize feeding time by decreasing travelling time. This may partly compensate for the presumed lower foraging efficiency of handicapped birds and for the energetic debt of their partners who had to fast approximately 70% longer on the nest. We propose that this flexible use of ecological niches may allow birds facing increased breeding constraints to avoid chronic stress and to minimize the impact on their body condition.

  14. Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

  15. DNA chip-based expression profile analysis indicates involvement of the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in multiple plant responses to hormone and abiotic treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Hui LIN; Rui YE; Hui MA; Zhi Hong XU; Hong Wei XUE

    2004-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol (PI) metabolic pathway is considered critical in plant responses to many environmental factors,and previous studies have indicated the involvement of multiple PI-related gene families during cellular responses.Through a detailed analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome,82 polypeptides were identified as being involved in PI signaling. These could be grouped into different families including PI synthases (PIS),PI-phosphate kinases (PIPK),phospholipases (PL),inositol polyphosphate phosphatases (IPPase),inositol polyphosphate kinases (IPK),PI transfer proteins and putative inositol polyphosphate receptors. The presence of more than 10 isoforms of PIPK,PLC,PLD and IPPase suggested that these genes might be differentially expressed during plant cellular responses or growth and development. Accordingly,DNA chip technology was employed to study the expression patterns of various isoforms.In total,79 mRNA clones were amplified and used for DNA chip generation. Expression profile analysis was performed using samples that represented multiple tissues or cellular responses. Tested samples included normal leaf,stem and flower tissues,and leaves from plants treated with various hormones (auxin,cytokinin,gibberellin,abscisic acid and brassinosteroid) or environmental factors (temperature,calcium,sodium,drought,salicylic acid and jasmonic acid).Results showed that many PI pathway-related genes were differentially expressed under these experimental conditions.In particular,the different isoforms of each family were specifically expressed in many cases,suggesting their involvement in tissue specificity and cellular responses to environmental conditions. This work provides a starting point for functional studies of the relevant PI-related proteins and may help shed light onto the role of PI pathways in development and cellular responses.

  16. Sensory Constraints on Birdsong Syntax: Neural Responses to Swamp Sparrow Songs with Accelerated Trill Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Jf; Peters, S; Mooney, R; Nowicki, S

    2012-06-01

    Both sensory and motor mechanisms can constrain behavioral performance. Sensory mechanisms may be especially important for constraining behaviors that depend on experience, such as learned birdsongs. Swamp sparrows learn to sing by imitating the song of a tutor, but sparrows fail to accurately imitate artificial tutor songs with abnormally accelerated trills, instead singing brief and rapid trills interrupted by silent gaps. This "broken syntax" has been proposed to arise from vocal-motor limitations. Here we consider whether sensory limitations exist that could also contribute to broken syntax. We tested this idea by recording auditory-evoked activity of sensorimotor neurons in the swamp sparrow's brain that are known to be important for the learning, performance and perception of song. In freely behaving adult sparrows that sang songs with normal syntax, neurons were detected that exhibited precisely time-locked activity to each repetition of the syllable in a trill when presented at a natural rate. Those cells failed to faithfully follow syllables presented at an accelerated rate, however, and their failure to respond to consecutive syllables increased as a function of trill rate. This "flickering" auditory representation in animals performing normal syntax reveals a central constraint on the sensory processing of rapid trills. Furthermore, because these neurons are implicated in both song learning and perception, and because auditory flickering began to occur at accelerated trill rates previously associated with the emergence of broken song syntax, these sensory constraints may contribute to the emergence of broken syntax.

  17. Bacterial motility on abiotic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gibiansky, Maxsim

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are structured microbial communities which are widespread both in nature and in clinical settings. When organized into a biofilm, bacteria are extremely resistant to many forms of stress, including a greatly heightened antibiotic resistance. In the early stages of biofilm formation on an abiotic surface, many bacteria make use of their motility to explore the surface, finding areas of high nutrition or other bacteria to form microcolonies. They use motility appendages, incl...

  18. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tillett, Richard L; Ergül, Ali; Albion, Rebecca L; Schlauch, Karen A; Cramer, Grant R; Cushman, John C

    2011-01-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L...

  19. Prickles, latex, and tolerance in the endemic Hawaiian prickly poppy (Argemone glauca): variation between populations, across ontogeny, and in response to abiotic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kasey E

    2014-04-01

    Covariance among plant defense traits is predicted to occur both within and among plant species, potentially leading to characteristic defense syndromes. I examined patterns of variation in prickle density, latex exudation, and tolerance in order to assess whether traits varied between populations, across plant ontogeny, and as phenotypic plasticity in response to water and light limitation and physical damage using the endemic Hawaiian prickly poppy, Argemone glauca, as a model system. Plants produced copious latex, had extremely variable prickle densities, and were generally tolerant of 50% defoliation. However, expression patterns differed among defense traits. Prickle density was consistent across ontogeny and was not induced by either water limitation or mechanical damage, but was significantly induced under high light conditions. In contrast, latex exudation increased significantly across ontogeny and was reduced by water limitation, but had no response to mechanical damage or light. Prickles, latex, and tolerance differed considerably between populations, suggesting different evolutionary histories for these populations. These disparate patterns indicate that latex and prickles are unlinked within A. glauca, potentially as a result of differences in their function, and providing little evidence that they jointly function as a defense syndrome. Moreover, this study provides the first description patterns of variation for multiple defense traits in an island endemic, and high levels of prickles, latex, and tolerance suggest that A. glauca is well defended against herbivores. Future research in the field will provide additional insights into the functional ecology of these traits in A. glauca.

  20. Promoter Analysis and Transcriptional Profiling of Ginkgo biloba 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (GbHMGR gene in Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongling LIAO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The terpene trilactones (TTLs are believed to be important for the pharmacological properties of Ginkgo biloba leaves extract. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR is a critical enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of TTLs. In this study, an 1.2-kb fragment of 5’ flanking region of the HMGR gene (GbHMGR, was isolated from G. biloba by genome walking. Extensive sequence analysis revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved and over-represented putative cis-acting elements in light-regulated transcription,  hormone signaling (gibberellic acid, jasmonate and salicylic acid, elicitor and stress responses (cold/dehydration responses, and plant defense signaling (W-box/WRKY that are common to the promoter region of GbHMGR. EMSA analysis suggested possible functionality of W-box in GbHMGR promoter region. The behavior of gene transcripts in ginkgo callus upon light, low temperature, MeJA and SA treatments further verified the regulatory function of GbHMGR promoter. A significant positive relationship between gene expression level and total TTL contents suggested that GbHMGR might be one of key genes involved in TTL biosynthesis in G. biloba.

  1. Differentially expressed seed aging responsive heat shock protein OsHSP18.2 implicates in seed vigor, longevity and improves germination and seedling establishment under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harmeet; Petla, Bhanu P; Kamble, Nitin U; Singh, Ajeet; Rao, Venkateswara; Salvi, Prafull; Ghosh, Shraboni; Majee, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are a diverse group of proteins and are highly abundant in plant species. Although majority of these sHSPs were shown to express specifically in seed, their potential function in seed physiology remains to be fully explored. Our proteomic analysis revealed that OsHSP18.2, a class II cytosolic HSP is an aging responsive protein as its abundance significantly increased after artificial aging in rice seeds. OsHSP18.2 transcript was found to markedly increase at the late maturation stage being highly abundant in dry seeds and sharply decreased after germination. Our biochemical study clearly demonstrated that OsHSP18.2 forms homooligomeric complex and is dodecameric in nature and functions as a molecular chaperone. OsHSP18.2 displayed chaperone activity as it was effective in preventing thermal inactivation of Citrate Synthase. Further, to analyze the function of this protein in seed physiology, seed specific Arabidopsis overexpression lines for OsHSP18.2 were generated. Our subsequent functional analysis clearly demonstrated that OsHSP18.2 has ability to improve seed vigor and longevity by reducing deleterious ROS accumulation in seeds. In addition, transformed Arabidopsis seeds also displayed better performance in germination and cotyledon emergence under adverse conditions. Collectively, our work demonstrates that OsHSP18.2 is an aging responsive protein which functions as a molecular chaperone and possibly protect and stabilize the cellular proteins from irreversible damage particularly during maturation drying, desiccation and aging in seeds by restricting ROS accumulation and thereby improves seed vigor, longevity and seedling establishment.

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Expression of the Maize Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 7 Gene (ZmALDH7B6) in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Ri-liang

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) represent a large protein family, which includes several members that catalyze the oxidation of an aldehyde to its corresponding carboxylic acid in plants. Genes encoding members of theALDH7 subfamily have been suggested to play important roles in various stress adaptations in plants. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that a maizeALDH7 subfamily member (ZmALDH7B6) was constitutively expressed in various organs, including roots, leaves, immature ears, tassels, and developing seeds. The abundance ofZmALDH7B6 mRNA transcripts in maize roots was increased by ammonium, NaCl, and mannitol treatments. To further analyze tissue-speciifc and stress-induced expression patterns, the 1.5-kb 5´-lfankingZmALDH7B6 promoter region was fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and introduced into maize plants. In roots of independent transgenic lines, there was signiifcant induction of GUS activity in response to ammonium supply, conifrming ammonium-dependent expression ofZmALDH7B6 at the transcript level. Histochemical staining showed that GUS activity driven by theZmALDH7B6 promoter was mainly localized in the vascular tissues of maize roots. These results suggested thatZmALDH7B6 is induced by multiple environmental stresses in maize roots, and may play a role in detoxifying aldehydes, particularly in vascular tissue.

  3. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresa Muniz Pedrosa

    Full Text Available Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb., the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72 of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs. Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further

  4. Host control of malaria infections: constraints on immune and erythropoeitic response kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip G McQueen

    Full Text Available The two main agents of human malaria, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, can induce severe anemia and provoke strong, complex immune reactions. Which dynamical behaviors of host immune and erythropoietic responses would foster control of infection, and which would lead to runaway parasitemia and/or severe anemia? To answer these questions, we developed differential equation models of interacting parasite and red blood cell (RBC populations modulated by host immune and erythropoietic responses. The model immune responses incorporate both a rapidly responding innate component and a slower-responding, long-term antibody component, with several parasite developmental stages considered as targets for each type of immune response. We found that simulated infections with the highest parasitemia tended to be those with ineffective innate immunity even if antibodies were present. We also compared infections with dyserythropoiesis (reduced RBC production during infection to those with compensatory erythropoiesis (boosted RBC production or a fixed basal RBC production rate. Dyserythropoiesis tended to reduce parasitemia slightly but at a cost to the host of aggravating anemia. On the other hand, compensatory erythropoiesis tended to reduce the severity of anemia but with enhanced parasitemia if the innate response was ineffective. For both parasite species, sharp transitions between the schizont and the merozoite stages of development (i.e., with standard deviation in intra-RBC development time response, though P. vivax attacks a much smaller subset of RBCs. Since most P. vivax infections are nonlethal (if debilitating clinically, this suggests that P

  5. Seagrass responses to interacting abiotic stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Nafie, Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Seagrasses are coastal and marine flowering plants that inhabit thetropical and temperate coastal and marine areas around the globe. They havemany important functions and values, physically, ecologically andeconomically. Physically, seagrass contribute to coastal protection as theyattenuate wave

  6. Recent Advances in Polyamine Metabolism and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimalan Rangan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is an alarming problem in agriculture and its effect on yield loss has been estimated to be five per cent for every degree centigrade rise in temperature. Plants exhibit multiple mechanisms like optimizing signaling pathway, involvement of secondary messengers, production of biomolecules specifically in response to stress, modulation of various metabolic networks in accordance with stress, and so forth, in order to overcome abiotic stress factors. Many structural genes and networks of pathway were identified and reported in plant systems for abiotic stress tolerance. One such crucial metabolic pathway that is involved in normal physiological function and also gets modulated during stress to impart tolerance is polyamine metabolic pathway. Besides the role of structural genes, it is also important to know the mechanism by which these structural genes are regulated during stress. Present review highlights polyamine biosynthesis, catabolism, and its role in abiotic stress tolerance with special reference to plant systems. Additionally, a system based approach is discussed as a potential strategy to dissect the existing variation in crop species in unraveling the interacting regulatory components/genetic determinants related to PAs mediated abiotic stress tolerance.

  7. Impulse-response function of splanchnic circulation with model-independent constraints: theory and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    Modeling physiological processes using tracer kinetic methods requires knowledge of the time course of the tracer concentration in blood supplying the organ. For liver studies, however, inaccessibility of the portal vein makes direct measurement of the hepatic dual-input function impossible...... sampling in aorta and portal vein were made in 13 anesthetized pigs following inhalation of intravascular [15O]CO or injections of diffusible 3-O-[11C]methylglucose (MG). The parameters of the impulse-response function have a physiological interpretation in terms of the distribution of washout constants...... and are mathematically equivalent to the mean transit time (T) and standard deviation of transit times. The results include estimates of mean transit times from the aorta to the portal vein in pigs: T = 0.35 +/- 0.05 min for CO and 1.7 +/- 0.1 min for MG. The prediction of the portal venous time-activity curve benefits...

  8. Credit Constraints in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  9. Electricity for groundwater use: constraints and opportunities for adaptive response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher A.

    2013-09-01

    Globally, groundwater use is intensifying to meet demands for irrigation, urban supply, industrialization, and, in some instances, electrical power generation. In response to hydroclimatic variability, surface water is being substituted with groundwater, which must be viewed as a strategic resource for climate adaptation. In this sense, the supply of electricity for pumping is an adaptation policy tool. Additionally, planning for climate-change mitigation must consider CO2 emissions resulting from pumping. This paper examines the influence of electricity supply and pricing on groundwater irrigation and resulting emissions, with specific reference to Mexico—a climate-water-energy ‘perfect storm’. Night-time power supply at tariffs below the already-subsidized rates for agricultural groundwater use has caused Mexican farmers to increase pumping, reversing important water and electricity conservation gains achieved. Indiscriminate groundwater pumping, including for virtual water exports of agricultural produce, threatens the long-term sustainability of aquifers, non-agricultural water uses, and stream-aquifer interactions that sustain riparian ecosystems. Emissions resulting from agricultural groundwater pumping in Mexico are estimated to be 3.6% of total national emissions and are equivalent to emissions from transporting the same agricultural produce to market. The paper concludes with an assessment of energy, water, and climate trends coupled with policy futures to address these challenges.

  10. Mechanisms driving carbon allocation in tropical rainforests: allometric constraints and environmental responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofhansl, Florian; Schnecker, Jörg; Singer, Gabriel; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Tropical forest ecosystems play a major role in global water and carbon cycles. However, mechanisms of C allocation in tropical forests and their response to environmental variation are largely unresolved as, due to the scarcity of data, they are underrepresented in global syntheses of forest C allocation. Allocation of gross primary production to wood production exerts a key control on forest C residence time and biomass C turnover, and therefore is of special interest for terrestrial ecosystem research and earth system science. Here, we synthesize pantropical data from 105 old-growth rainforests to investigate relationships between climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, dry season length and cloud cover), soil nutrient relations (soil N:P) and the partitioning of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) to wood production (WPart) using structural equation modelling. Our results show a strong increase of WPart with ANPP, pointing towards allometric scaling controls on WPart, with increasing light competition in more productive forests triggering greater ANPP allocation to wood production. ANPP itself was positively affected by mean annual temperature and soil N:P. Beyond these allometric controls on WPart we found direct environmental controls. WPart increased with dry season length in tropical montane rainforests and with mean annual precipitation in lowland tropical rainforests. We discuss different trade-offs between plant traits, such as community-wide changes along the wood economics spectrum, the leaf economics spectrum and the plant resource economics spectrum, as underlying mechanisms for direct climatic controls on WPart. We thereby provide new insights into mechanisms driving carbon allocation to WPart in tropical rainforests and show that low and high productive tropical rainforests may respond differently to projected global changes.

  11. Molecular approaches to improve rice abiotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoi, Junya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major factor limiting productivity of rice crops in large areas of the world. Because plants cannot avoid abiotic stress by moving, they have acquired various mechanisms for stress tolerance in the course of their evolution. Enhancing or introducing such mechanisms in rice is one effective way to develop stress-tolerant cultivars. Based on physiological studies on stress responses, recent progress in plant molecular biology has enabled discovery of many genes involved in stress tolerance. These genes include regulatory genes, which regulate stress response (e.g., transcription factors and protein kinases), and functional genes, which protect the cell (e.g., enzymes for generating protective metabolites and proteins). Both kinds of genes are used to increase stress tolerance in rice. In addition, several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with higher stress tolerance have been cloned, contributing to the discovery of significantly important genes for stress tolerance.

  12. Changes in motor synergies for tracking movement and responses to perturbations depend on task-irrelevant dimension constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Shunta; Kagawa, Takahiro; Uno, Yoji

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the changes in the motor synergies of target-tracking movements of hands and the responses to perturbation when the dimensionalities of target positions were changed. We used uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analyses to quantify the motor synergies. The target was changed from one to two dimensions, and the direction orthogonal to the movement direction was switched from task-irrelevant directions to task-relevant directions. The movement direction was task-relevant in both task conditions. Hence, we evaluated the effects of constraints on the redundant dimensions on movement tracking. Moreover, we could compare the two types of responses to the same directional perturbations in one- and two-dimensional target tasks. In the one-dimensional target task, the perturbation along the movement direction and the orthogonal direction were task-relevant and -irrelevant perturbations, respectively. In the two-dimensional target task, the both perturbations were task-relevant perturbations. The results of the experiments showed that the variabilities of the hand positions in the two-dimensional target-tracking task decreased, but the variances of the joint angles did not significantly change. For the task-irrelevant perturbations, the variances of the joint angles within the UCM that did not affect hand position (UCM component) increased. For the task-relevant perturbations, the UCM component tended to increase when the available UCM was large. These results suggest that humans discriminate whether the perturbations were task-relevant or -irrelevant and then adjust the responses of the joints by utilizing the available UCM.

  13. Reverse engineering: a key component of systems biology to unravel global abiotic stress cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Swetlana; Usadel, Björn; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the global abiotic stress response is an important stepping stone for the development of universal stress tolerance in plants in the era of climate change. Although co-occurrence of several stress factors (abiotic and biotic) in nature is found to be frequent, current attempts are poor to understand the complex physiological processes impacting plant growth under combinatory factors. In this review article, we discuss the recent advances of reverse engineering approaches that led to seminal discoveries of key candidate regulatory genes involved in cross-talk of abiotic stress responses and summarized the available tools of reverse engineering and its relevant application. Among the universally induced regulators involved in various abiotic stress responses, we highlight the importance of (i) abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) hormonal cross-talks and (ii) the central role of WRKY transcription factors (TF), potentially mediating both abiotic and biotic stress responses. Such interactome networks help not only to derive hypotheses but also play a vital role in identifying key regulatory targets and interconnected hormonal responses. To explore the full potential of gene network inference in the area of abiotic stress tolerance, we need to validate hypotheses by implementing time-dependent gene expression data from genetically engineered plants with modulated expression of target genes. We further propose to combine information on gene-by-gene interactions with data from physical interaction platforms such as protein-protein or TF-gene networks.

  14. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    , under the assumption that the original constraint-based approach has these properties. Practically, as a concrete case study, we have integrated this technique into OFMC, a state-of-the-art model-checker for security protocol analysis, and demonstrated its effectiveness by extensive experimentation. Our......We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...

  15. The position of a standard optical computer mouse affects cardiorespiratory responses during the operation of a computer under time constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Sako

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the association between task-induced stress and fatigue by examining the cardiovascular responses of subjects using different mouse positions while operating a computer under time constraints. Material and Methods: The study was participated by 16 young, healthy men and examined the use of optical mouse devices affixed to laptop computers. Two mouse positions were investigated: (1 the distal position (DP, in which the subjects place their forearms on the desk accompanied by the abduction and flexion of their shoulder joints, and (2 the proximal position (PP, in which the subjects place only their wrists on the desk without using an armrest. The subjects continued each task for 16 min. We assessed differences in several characteristics according to mouse position, including expired gas values, autonomic nerve activities (based on cardiorespiratory responses, operating efficiencies (based on word counts, and fatigue levels (based on the visual analog scale – VAS. Results: Oxygen consumption (VO2, the ratio of inspiration time to respiration time (Ti/Ttotal, respiratory rate (RR, minute ventilation (VE, and the ratio of expiration to inspiration (Te/Ti were significantly lower when the participants were performing the task in the DP than those obtained in the PP. Tidal volume (VT, carbon dioxide output rates (VCO2/VE, and oxygen extraction fractions (VO2/VE were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. No significant difference in VAS was observed between the positions; however, as the task progressed, autonomic nerve activities were lower and operating efficiencies were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the DP has fewer effects on cardiorespiratory functions, causes lower levels of sympathetic nerve activity and mental stress, and produces a higher total workload than the PP. This suggests that the DP is preferable to the PP when

  16. Abiotic Stress Monitoring, Forecasting and Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Gutam, Sridhar; Jain, Rajni; Rao, DVKN; Pannikkar, Preetha; Sarangi, A; Narula, Sapna

    2010-01-01

    The ill effects of abiotic factors like excess or deficient water availability, increase in temperature, climatic aberrations, soil salinity, sodicity, acidity, deficiency or toxicity of soil nutrients, pollution of water and soil are causing severe stress on the living organisms on the earth. Since long famers and soil scientists including plant breeders are aware that it is often the simultaneous occurrence of several abiotic stresses, rather than a particular stress condition, that is most...

  17. Predicting the type, location and magnitude of geomorphic responses to dam removal: Role of hydrologic and geomorphic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, John D.; Magilligan, Francis J.; Renshaw, Carl E.

    2015-12-01

    Using a dam removal on the Ashuelot River in southern New Hampshire, we test how a sudden, spatially non-uniform increase in river slope alters sediment transport dynamics and riparian sediment connectivity. Site conditions were characterized by detailed pre- and post-removal field surveys and high-resolution aerial lidar data, and locations of erosion and deposition were predicted through one-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling. The Homestead Dam was a ~ 200 year old, 4 m high, 50 m wide crib dam that created a 9.5 km long, relatively narrow reservoir. Following removal, an exhumed resistant bed feature of glaciofluvial boulders located 400 m upstream and ~ 2.5 m lower than the crest of the dam imposed a new boundary condition in the drained reservoir, acting as a grade control that maintained a backwater effect upstream. During the 15 months following removal, non-uniform erosion in the former reservoir totaled ~ 60,000 m3 (equivalent to ~ 9.3 cm when averaged across the reservoir). Net deposition of ~ 10,700 m3 was measured downstream of the dam, indicating most sediment from the reservoir was carried more than 8 km downstream beyond the study area. The most pronounced bed erosion occurred where modeled sediment transport increased in the downstream direction, and deposition occurred both within and downstream of the former reservoir where modeled sediment transport decreased in the downstream direction. We thus demonstrate that spatial gradients in sediment transport can be used to predict locations of erosion and deposition on the stream bed. We further observed that bed incision was not a necessary condition for bank erosion in the former reservoir. In this characteristically narrow and shallow reservoir lacking abundant dam-induced sedimentation, the variable resistance of the bed and banks acted as geomorphic constraints. Overall, the response deviated from the common conceptual model of knickpoint erosion and channel widening due to dam removal. With

  18. 3个水稻类病变基因的逆境胁迫及激素响应特征%Abiotic Stresses and Hormones Responses in Expression of Three LMM Genes in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖桂青; 卢向阳; 黄荣峰; 张海文

    2015-01-01

    A few candidate lesion mimic mutant (LMM) genes had been isolated from rice. Among them, OsSP-L7, OsSPL11 and OsSPL28 encode different functional proteins, respectively. There are multiple cis-acting elements in promoter sequences of these three LMM genes in response to various stresses and hormone signaling. The expression patterns analyses using real time PCR showed that these LMM genes had no tissue specialty in expression. However, they exhibited different expression characterizations under low temperature, salt, drought, ABA, ACC, JA and SA treatments. For examples, the expression of OsSPL7 was suppressed by cold, drought , ACC and JA and induced by ABA and SA;the transcripts of OsSPL11 was inhibited by low temperature, drought and JA and enhanced significantly by SA;while the expression of OsSPL28 was strongly suppressed by JA and insensitive to low temperature. These results could provide clues for further investigating the functional mechanism of lesion mimic under hormone and abiotic stress.%水稻中已克隆出十几个控制类病变(lesion mimic, LM)性状的基因,其中以SPL (spotted leaf)命名的基因如OsSPL7、OsSPL11、OsSPL28分别编码不同功能的蛋白质。本研究首先分析OsSPL7、OsSPL11和OsSPL28启动子序列,发现均含有大量应答激素和逆境的顺式作用元件,并采用实时定量PCR检测这3个Os SPL基因在水稻不同部位的表达情况,以及逆境和激素等不同处理对它们在转录水平表达的影响。结果表明:OsSPL7、OsSPL11和OsSPL28在不同时期水稻组织中没有明显的时空差异表达;低温、盐、干旱胁迫和ABA、ACC、JA、SA四种激素在转录水平调控OsSPL7、OsSPL11和OsSPL28表达,其中OsSPL7表达受低温、干旱、ACC和JA抑制而受ABA、SA诱导,Os SPL 11表达受低温、干旱和JA抑制而受SA显著诱导,Os SPL 28表达受到JA强烈抑制而对低温不敏感。研究结果可为进一步研究激素和非生物胁迫调控植

  19. A conceptual framework for understanding thermal constraints on ectotherm activity with implications for predicting responses to global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Alex R; Leal, Manuel

    2015-12-09

    Activity budgets influence the expression of life history traits as well as population dynamics. For ectotherms, a major constraint on activity is environmental temperature. Nonetheless, we currently lack a comprehensive conceptual framework for understanding thermal constraints on activity, which hinders our ability to rigorously apply activity data to answer ecological and evolutionary questions. Here, we integrate multiple aspects of temperature-dependent activity into a single unified framework that has general applicability. We also provide examples of the implementation of this framework to address fundamental questions in ecology relating to climate change vulnerability and species' distributions using empirical data from a tropical lizard.

  20. Improving abiotic stress tolerance of quinoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Aizheng

    that quinoa has the potential to grow under a range of abiotic stresses, tolerating levels regarded as stresses in other crop species. Therefore cultivation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) could be an alternative option in such regions. Even though quinoa is more tolerant to abiotic stress than most...... growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and priming seed (such as with saponin) were involved to improve drought and salinity stress and climate adaptability in quinoa. During PhD research, the effect of theses strategies on physiological and agronomic characteristics of quinoa were studied in detail....

  1. Cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants: a focus on resistance to aphid infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Rasool, Brwa; Davey, Jack W; Hancock, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    Plants co-evolved with an enormous variety of microbial pathogens and insect herbivores under daily and seasonal variations in abiotic environmental conditions. Hence, plant cells display a high capacity to respond to diverse stresses through a flexible and finely balanced response network that involves components such as reduction-oxidation (redox) signalling pathways, stress hormones and growth regulators, as well as calcium and protein kinase cascades. Biotic and abiotic stress responses use common signals, pathways and triggers leading to cross-tolerance phenomena, whereby exposure to one type of stress can activate plant responses that facilitate tolerance to several different types of stress. While the acclimation mechanisms and adaptive responses that facilitate responses to single biotic and abiotic stresses have been extensively characterized, relatively little information is available on the dynamic aspects of combined biotic/abiotic stress response. In this review, we consider how the abiotic environment influences plant responses to attack by phloem-feeding aphids. Unravelling the signalling cascades that underpin cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses will allow the identification of new targets for increasing environmental resilience in crops.

  2. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  3. Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2016-09-24

    Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor RNAs enhances transcriptome plasticity and proteome diversity in response to diverse growth and stress cues. Recent work has shown that AS is pervasive across plant species, with more than 60% of intron-containing genes producing different isoforms. Mammalian cell-based assays have discovered various inhibitors of AS. Here, we show that the macrolide pladienolide B (PB) inhibits constitutive splicing and AS in plants. Also, our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that PB mimics abiotic stress signals including salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). PB activates the abiotic stress- and ABA-responsive reporters RD29A

  4. Safety aspects of genetically modified crops with abiotic stress tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, C.; Prins, T.W.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Kok, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress, such as drought, salinity, and temperature extremes, significantly reduce crop yields. Hence, development of abiotic stress-tolerant crops by modern biotechnology may contribute to global food security. Prior to introducing genetically modified crops with abiotic stress tolerance to

  5. Safety aspects of genetically modified crops with abiotic stress tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, C.; Prins, T.W.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Kok, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress, such as drought, salinity, and temperature extremes, significantly reduce crop yields. Hence, development of abiotic stress-tolerant crops by modern biotechnology may contribute to global food security. Prior to introducing genetically modified crops with abiotic stress tolerance to

  6. ABIOTIC STRESS RESISTANCE IN YOUNG APPLE TREES IS ENHANCED BY OVEREXPRESSION OF A CYTOSOLIC SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced during both biotic and abiotic stress, either as signaling molecules or as a response to stress injury. ROS are highly destructive to cell components and the injury resulting from these compounds is referred to as oxidative stress. Antioxidant enzymes, suc...

  7. Brassinosteroid Mediated Cell Wall Remodeling in Grasses under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, plants, being sessile, cannot escape from exposure to severe abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature and water deficit. The dynamic structure of plant cell wall enables them to undergo compensatory changes, as well as maintain physical strength, with changing environments. Plant hormones known as brassinosteroids (BRs play a key role in determining cell wall expansion during stress responses. Cell wall deposition differs between grasses (Poaceae and dicots. Grass species include many important food, fiber, and biofuel crops. In this article, we focus on recent advances in BR-regulated cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling in response to stresses, comparing our understanding of the mechanisms in grass species with those in the more studied dicots. A more comprehensive understanding of BR-mediated changes in cell wall integrity in grass species will benefit the development of genetic tools to improve crop productivity, fiber quality and plant biomass recalcitrance.

  8. Regulation of Translation Initiation under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Castro-Sanz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed versatile strategies to deal with the great variety of challenging conditions they are exposed to. Among them, the regulation of translation is a common target to finely modulate gene expression both under biotic and abiotic stress situations. Upon environmental challenges, translation is regulated to reduce the consumption of energy and to selectively synthesize proteins involved in the proper establishment of the tolerance response. In the case of viral infections, the situation is more complex, as viruses have evolved unconventional mechanisms to regulate translation in order to ensure the production of the viral encoded proteins using the plant machinery. Although the final purpose is different, in some cases, both plants and viruses share common mechanisms to modulate translation. In others, the mechanisms leading to the control of translation are viral- or stress-specific. In this paper, we review the different mechanisms involved in the regulation of translation initiation under virus infection and under environmental stress in plants. In addition, we describe the main features within the viral RNAs and the cellular mRNAs that promote their selective translation in plants undergoing biotic and abiotic stress situations.

  9. Adaptations to "Thermal Time" Constraints in Papilio: Latitudinal and Local Size Clines Differ in Response to Regional Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriber, J Mark; Elliot, Ben; Maher, Emily; McGuire, Molly; Niblack, Marjie

    2014-01-21

    Adaptations to "thermal time" (=Degree-day) constraints on developmental rates and voltinism for North American tiger swallowtail butterflies involve most life stages, and at higher latitudes include: smaller pupae/adults; larger eggs; oviposition on most nutritious larval host plants; earlier spring adult emergences; faster larval growth and shorter molting durations at lower temperatures. Here we report on forewing sizes through 30 years for both the northern univoltine P. canadensis (with obligate diapause) from the Great Lakes historical hybrid zone northward to central Alaska (65° N latitude), and the multivoltine, P. glaucus from this hybrid zone southward to central Florida (27° N latitude). Despite recent climate warming, no increases in mean forewing lengths of P. glaucus were observed at any major collection location (FL to MI) from the 1980s to 2013 across this long latitudinal transect (which reflects the "converse of Bergmann's size Rule", with smaller females at higher latitudes). Unlike lower latitudes, the Alaska, Ontonogon, and Chippewa/Mackinac locations (for P. canadensis) showed no significant increases in D-day accumulations, which could explain lack of size change in these northernmost locations. As a result of 3-4 decades of empirical data from major collection sites across these latitudinal clines of North America, a general "voltinism/size/D-day" model is presented, which more closely predicts female size based on D-day accumulations, than does latitude. However, local "climatic cold pockets" in northern Michigan and Wisconsin historically appeared to exert especially strong size constraints on female forewing lengths, but forewing lengths quickly increased with local summer warming during the recent decade, especially near the warming edges of the cold pockets. Results of fine-scale analyses of these "cold pockets" are in contrast to non-significant changes for other Papilio populations seen across the latitudinal transect for P. glaucus

  10. Regulatory roles of serotonin and melatonin in abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harmeet; Mukherjee, Soumya; Baluska, Frantisek; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiological and biochemical basis of abiotic stress tolerance in plants has always been one of the major aspects of research aiming to enhance plant productivity in arid and semi-arid cultivated lands all over the world. Growth of stress-tolerant transgenic crops and associated agricultural benefits through increased productivity, and related ethical issues, are also the major concerns of current research in various laboratories. Interesting data on the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants by serotonin and melatonin has accumulated in the recent past. These two indoleamines possess antioxidative and growth-inducing properties, thus proving beneficial for stress acclimatization. Present review shall focus on the modes of serotonin and melatonin-induced regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Complex molecular interactions of serotonin and auxin-responsive genes have suggested their antagonistic nature. Data from genomic and metabolomic analyses of melatonin-induced abiotic stress signaling have lead to an understanding of the regulation of stress tolerance through the modulation of transcription factors, enzymes and various signaling molecules. Melatonin, nitric oxide (NO) and calmodulin interactions have provided new avenues for research on the molecular aspects of stress physiology in plants. Investigations on the characterization of receptors associated with serotonin and melatonin responses, are yet to be undertaken in plants. Patenting of biotechnological inventions pertaining to serotonin and melatonin formulations (through soil application or foliar spray) are expected to be some of the possible ways to regulate abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The present review, thus, summarizes the regulatory roles of serotonin and melatonin in modulating the signaling events accompanying abiotic stress in plants.

  11. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Daniel J.; Matson, Nance; Sohn, Michael D.; Rose, Cody; Dudley, Junqiao; Goli, Sasank; Kiliccote, Sila; Hummon, Marissa; Palchak, David; Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2013-09-09

    Demand response (DR) has the potential to improve electric grid reliability and reduce system operation costs. However, including DR in grid modeling can be difficult due to its variable and non-traditional response characteristics, compared to traditional generation. Therefore, efforts to value the participation of DR in procurement of grid services have been limited. In this report, we present methods and tools for predicting demand response availability profiles, representing their capability to participate in capacity, energy, and ancillary services. With the addition of response characteristics mimicking those of generation, the resulting profiles will help in the valuation of the participation of demand response through production cost modeling, which informs infrastructure and investment planning.

  12. Endogenous auxin and jasmonic acid levels are differentially modulated by abiotic stresses in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eDu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and adverse temperatures are major limiting factors for plant growth and reproduction. Plant responses to these stresses are coordinated by arrays of regulatory networks including the induction of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA, a well documented phytohormone for stress responses. However, whether or how these abiotic stresses affect the endogenous biosynthesis or metabolism of other phytohormones remains largely unknown. Here, we report the changes of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and jasmonic acid (JA levels and expression of genes related to the biosynthesis or signalling of these hormones in rice under various abiotic stress conditions. The IAA content was decreased after drought stress, but it was significantly increased under cold and heat stresses. And the auxin-regulated gravitropism of root tip was inhibited by cold stress. Many genes involved in the IAA biosynthesis and signalling were changed in transcript level under these stresses, and the changes were essentially in agreement with the change of endogenous IAA level. Interestingly, the endogenous JA content was increased markedly under drought and cold stresses, but it was reduced by heat stress. Accordingly, many genes involved in JA biosynthesis and signalling were induced by drought and cold treatment but these genes were significantly suppressed by heat stress. We concluded that endogenous levels of IAA and JA were differentially regulated by abiotic stresses in rice, implying diverse roles of these hormones in stress responses.

  13. The effect of inter-granular constraints on the response of polycrystalline piezoelectric ceramics at the surface and in the bulk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Wang, Zhiyang; Khansur, Neamul H.

    2016-01-01

    The electro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials, including a soft PbZrxTi1−xO3 (PZT) and lead-free 0.9375(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-0.0625BaTiO3 (BNT-6.25BT), have been studied using a surface sensitive low-energy (12.4 keV) and bulk sensitive high-energy (73 ke...... methods demonstrates that the intergranular constraints have a significant influence on the electric-field-induced electro-mechanical responses in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. These results have implications for the design of higher performance polycrystalline piezoelectrics....

  14. The effect of inter-granular constraints on the response of polycrystalline piezoelectric ceramics at the surface and in the bulk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Wang, Zhiyang; Khansur, Neamul H.;

    2016-01-01

    The electro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials, including a soft PbZrxTi1−xO3 (PZT) and lead-free 0.9375(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-0.0625BaTiO3 (BNT-6.25BT), have been studied using a surface sensitive low-energy (12.4 keV) and bulk sensitive high-energy (73 keV) sync...... methods demonstrates that the intergranular constraints have a significant influence on the electric-field-induced electro-mechanical responses in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. These results have implications for the design of higher performance polycrystalline piezoelectrics....

  15. Spectral induced polarization signatures of abiotic FeS precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, geophysical methods have been shown to be sensitive to microbial induced mineralization processes. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method appears to be very promising for monitoring mineralization and microbial processes. With this work, we study the links of mineralization and SIP signals, in the absence of microbial activity. We recorded the SIP response during abiotic FeS precipitation. We show that the SIP signals are diagnostic of FeS mineralization and can be differentiated from SIP signals from bio-mineralization processes. More specifically the imaginary conductivity shows almost linear dependence on the amount of FeS precipitating out of solution, above the threshold value 0.006 gr under our experimental conditions. This research has direct implications for the use of the SIP method as a monitoring, and decision making, tool for sustainable remediation of metals in contaminated soils and groundwater.

  16. Deep Carbon Cycling in the Deep Hydrosphere: Abiotic Organic Synthesis and Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; Ballentine, C. J.; Warr, O.; Li, L.; Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Research into the deep carbon cycle has expanded our understanding of the depth and extent of abiotic organic synthesis in the deep Earth beyond the hydrothermal vents of the deep ocean floor, and of the role of reduced gases in supporting deep subsurface microbial communities. Most recently, this research has expanded our understanding not only of the deep biosphere but the deep hydrosphere - identifying for the first time the extreme antiquity (millions to billions of years residence time) of deep saline fracture waters in the world's oldest rocks. Energy-rich saline fracture waters in the Precambrian crust that makes up more than 70% of the Earth's continental lithosphereprovide important constraints on our understanding of the extent of the crust that is habitable, on the time scales of hydrogeologic isolation (and conversely mixing) of fluids relevant to the deep carbon cycle, and on the geochemistry of substrates that sustain both abiotic organic synthesis and biogeochemical cycles driven by microbial communities. Ultimately the chemistry and hydrogeology of the deep hydrosphere will help define the limits for life in the subsurface and the boundary between the biotic-abiotic fringe. Using a variety of novel techniques including noble gas analysis, clumped isotopologues of methane, and compound specific isotope analysis of CHNOS, this research is addressing questions about the distribution of deep saline fluids in Precambrian rocks worldwide, the degree of interconnectedness of these potential biomes, the habitability of these fluids, and the biogeographic diversity of this new realm of the deep hydrosphere.

  17. Evaluation of Abiotic Resource LCIA Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. F. Alvarenga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a life cycle assessment (LCA, the impacts on resources are evaluated at the area of protection (AoP with the same name, through life cycle impact assessment (LCIA methods. There are different LCIA methods available in literature that assesses abiotic resources, and the goal of this study was to propose recommendations for that impact category. We evaluated 19 different LCIA methods, through two criteria (scientific robustness and scope, divided into three assessment levels, i.e., resource accounting methods (RAM, midpoint, and endpoint. In order to support the assessment, we applied some LCIA methods to a case study of ethylene production. For RAM, the most suitable LCIA method was CEENE (Cumulative Exergy Extraction from the Natural Environment (but SED (Solar Energy Demand and ICEC (Industrial Cumulative Exergy Consumption/ECEC (Ecological Cumulative Exergy Consumption may also be recommended, while the midpoint level was ADP (Abiotic Depletion Potential, and the endpoint level was both the Recipe Endpoint and EPS2000 (Environmental Priority Strategies. We could notice that the assessment for the AoP Resources is not yet well established in the LCA community, since new LCIA methods (with different approaches and assessment frameworks are showing up, and this trend may continue in the future.

  18. Time constraints and flexibility of growth strategies: geographic variation in catch-up growth responses in amphibian larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Emma; Orizaola, Germán; Nicieza, Alfredo G; Laurila, Anssi; Meiri, Shai

    2012-11-01

    1. As size is tightly associated with fitness, compensatory strategies for growth loss can be vital for restoring individual fitness. However, immediate and delayed costs of compensatory responses may prevent their generalization, and the optimal strategy may depend on environmental conditions. Compensatory responses may be particularly important in high-latitude habitats with short growing seasons, and thus, high-latitude organisms might be more efficient at compensating after periods of unfavourable growth conditions than low-latitude organisms. 2. We investigated geographical differences in catch-up growth strategies of populations of the common frog (Rana temporaria) from southern and northern Sweden in two factorial common garden experiments involving predation risk and two different causes of growth arrest (nutritional stress and low temperatures) to evaluate how the compensatory strategies can be affected by context-dependent costs of compensation. Larval and metamorphic traits, and post-metamorphic performance were used as response variables. 3. Only northern tadpoles exposed to low food completely caught up in terms of metamorphic size, mainly by extending the larval period. Low food decreased survival and post-metamorphic jumping performance in southern, but not in northern tadpoles, suggesting that northern tadpoles have a better ability to compensate after periods of restricted food. 4. Both northern and southern tadpoles were able to metamorphose at the same size as control tadpoles after being exposed to low temperatures, indicating that consequences of variation in temperature and food availability differed for tadpoles. However, the combination of low temperatures and predation risk reduced survival in both southern and northern tadpoles. Also, predation risk decreased energy storage in both experiments. 5. Our results highlight the influence of climatic variation and the type of stressor as selective factors shaping compensatory strategies.

  19. Impact responses of the cervical spine: A computational study of the effects of muscle activity, torso constraint, and pre-flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Roger W; Sganga, Jake; Cutcliffe, Hattie; Bass, Cameron R 'Dale'

    2016-02-29

    Cervical spine injuries continue to be a costly societal problem. Future advancements in injury prevention depend on improved physical and computational models, which are predicated on a better understanding of the neck response during dynamic loading. Previous studies have shown that the tolerance of the neck is dependent on its initial position and its buckling behavior. This study uses a computational model to examine three important factors hypothesized to influence the loads experienced by vertebrae in the neck under compressive impact: muscle activation, torso constraints, and pre-flexion angle of the cervical spine. Since cadaver testing is not practical for large scale parametric analyses, these factors were studied using a previously validated computational model. On average, simulations with active muscles had 32% larger compressive forces and 25% larger shear forces-well in excess of what was expected from the muscle forces alone. In the short period of time required for neck injury, constraints on torso motion increased the average neck compression by less than 250N. The pre-flexion hypothesis was tested by examining pre-flexion angles from neutral (0°) to 64°. Increases in pre-flexion resulted in the largest increases in peak loads and the expression of higher-order buckling modes. Peak force and buckling modality were both very sensitive to pre-flexion angle. These results validate the relevance of prior cadaver models for neck injury and help explain the wide variety of cervical spine fractures that can result from ostensibly similar compressive loadings. They also give insight into the mechanistic differences between burst fractures and lower cervical spine dislocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The abiotic litter decomposition in the drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Throop, H.; Rahn, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    The decomposition of litter is an important ecosystem function that controls carbon and nutrient cycling, which is well understood from the relationship between temperature and moisture. However, the decomposition in the arid and semiarid environments (hereafter drylands) is relatively poorly predicted due to several abiotic factors such as the effect of ultraviolet radiation and physical mixing of fallen litter with soil. The relative magnitude of these abiotic factors to ecosystem scale litter decomposition is still in debate. Here, we examine the effect of two major abiotic factors in the drylands litter decomposition by conducting a controlled laboratory study using plant litter and soil collected from Sonoran and Chihuahuan desert areas. The first part of the experiment focused on the effect of soil-litter mixing. We established a complete block design of three levels of soil and litter mixing (no mixing, light soil-litter mixing, and complete soil-litter mixing) in combination with three levels of soil moisture (1%, 2%, and 6% volumetric water content) using 2g of two most dominant species litter, grass and mesquite, and 50g of air-dried soils in 500ml mason jar and incubated them under 25C. We measured CO2 fluxes from these soil-litter incubations and harvested the soil and litter at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks and analyzed them of carbon and nitrogen content as well as the actual mass loss in the litter. The second part of the experiment focused on the effect of ultraviolet radiation. We established short-term litter incubation on a quartz chamber and used different temperature, moisture, and minerals to find the mechanism of photodegradation of litter. We measured CO2 fluxes from the litter incubation under ultraviolet radiation and also measured 13CO2 from these emissions. We were able to detect changes in the rate of carbon mineralization as a result of our treatments in the first week of soil-litter mixing experiment. The carbon mineralization rate was

  1. Abiotic Methane Synthesis: Caveats and New Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, R.; Sharma, A.

    2005-12-01

    The role of mineral interaction with geochemical fluids under hydrothermal conditions has invoked models of geochemical synthesis of organic molecules at deep crustal conditions. Since Thomas Gold's (1992) hypothesis of the possibility of an abiotic organic synthesis, there have been several reports of hydrocarbon formation under high pressure and temperature conditions. Several previous experimental studies have recognized that small amounts of methane (and other light HC compounds) can be synthesized via catalysis by transition metals: Fe, Ni (Horita and Berndt, 1999 Science) and Cr (Foustavous and Seyfried, 2004 Science). In light of these pioneering experiments, an investigation of the feasibility of abiotic methane synthesis at higher pressure conditions in deep geological setting and the possible role of catalysis warrants a closer look. We conducted three sets of experiments in hydrothermal diamond anvil cell using FeO nanopowder, CaCO 3 and water at 300° - 600° C and 0.5 - 5 GPa : (a) with stainless steel gasket, (b) gold-lined gasket, and (c) gold-lined gasket with added Fe and Ni nanopowder. The reactions were monitored in-situ using micro-Raman spectroscopy with 532nm and 632nm lasers. The solids phases were characterized in-situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction at CHESS-Cornell and quenched products with an electron microprobe. Interestingly, a variable amount of hydrocarbon was observed only in runs with stainless steel gasket and with Fe, Ni nanoparticles. Experiments with gold-lined reactors did not show any hydrocarbon formation. Added high resolution microscopy of the products and their textural relationship within the diamond cell with Raman spectroscopy data show that the hydrocarbon (methane and other light fractions) synthesis is a direct result of transition metal catalysis, rather than wustite - calcium carbonate reaction as recently reported by Scott et al (2004, PNAS). The author will further present new results highlighting abiotic

  2. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  3. Constraints upon the response of fish and crayfish to environmental flow releases in a regulated headwater stream network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Edwin T; Matthews, Ty G; Howson, Travis J; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Mackie, Jonathon K; Strachan, Scott R; Robson, Belinda J

    2014-01-01

    In dry climate zones, headwater streams are often regulated for water extraction causing intermittency in perennial streams and prolonged drying in intermittent streams. Regulation thereby reduces aquatic habitat downstream of weirs that also form barriers to migration by stream fauna. Environmental flow releases may restore streamflow in rivers, but are rarely applied to headwaters. We sampled fish and crayfish in four regulated headwater streams before and after the release of summer-autumn environmental flows, and in four nearby unregulated streams, to determine whether their abundances increased in response to flow releases. Historical data of fish and crayfish occurrence spanning a 30 year period was compared with contemporary data (electrofishing surveys, Victoria Range, Australia; summer 2008 to summer 2010) to assess the longer-term effects of regulation and drought. Although fish were recorded in regulated streams before 1996, they were not recorded in the present study upstream or downstream of weirs despite recent flow releases. Crayfish (Geocharax sp. nov. 1) remained in the regulated streams throughout the study, but did not become more abundant in response to flow releases. In contrast, native fish (Gadopsis marmoratus, Galaxias oliros, Galaxias maculatus) and crayfish remained present in unregulated streams, despite prolonged drought conditions during 2006-2010, and the assemblages of each of these streams remained essentially unchanged over the 30 year period. Flow release volumes may have been too small or have operated for an insufficient time to allow fish to recolonise regulated streams. Barriers to dispersal may also be preventing recolonisation. Indefinite continuation of annual flow releases, that prevent the unnatural cessation of flow caused by weirs, may eventually facilitate upstream movement of fish and crayfish in regulated channels; but other human-made dispersal barriers downstream need to be identified and ameliorated, to allow

  4. Constraints upon the response of fish and crayfish to environmental flow releases in a regulated headwater stream network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin T Chester

    Full Text Available In dry climate zones, headwater streams are often regulated for water extraction causing intermittency in perennial streams and prolonged drying in intermittent streams. Regulation thereby reduces aquatic habitat downstream of weirs that also form barriers to migration by stream fauna. Environmental flow releases may restore streamflow in rivers, but are rarely applied to headwaters. We sampled fish and crayfish in four regulated headwater streams before and after the release of summer-autumn environmental flows, and in four nearby unregulated streams, to determine whether their abundances increased in response to flow releases. Historical data of fish and crayfish occurrence spanning a 30 year period was compared with contemporary data (electrofishing surveys, Victoria Range, Australia; summer 2008 to summer 2010 to assess the longer-term effects of regulation and drought. Although fish were recorded in regulated streams before 1996, they were not recorded in the present study upstream or downstream of weirs despite recent flow releases. Crayfish (Geocharax sp. nov. 1 remained in the regulated streams throughout the study, but did not become more abundant in response to flow releases. In contrast, native fish (Gadopsis marmoratus, Galaxias oliros, Galaxias maculatus and crayfish remained present in unregulated streams, despite prolonged drought conditions during 2006-2010, and the assemblages of each of these streams remained essentially unchanged over the 30 year period. Flow release volumes may have been too small or have operated for an insufficient time to allow fish to recolonise regulated streams. Barriers to dispersal may also be preventing recolonisation. Indefinite continuation of annual flow releases, that prevent the unnatural cessation of flow caused by weirs, may eventually facilitate upstream movement of fish and crayfish in regulated channels; but other human-made dispersal barriers downstream need to be identified and

  5. Influence of combined biotic and abiotic stress on nutritional quality parameters in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nicky J; Dew, Tristan P; Orfila, Caroline; Urwin, Peter E

    2011-09-14

    Induction of abiotic stress in tomato plants has been proposed as a mechanism for improving the nutritional quality of fruits. However, the occurrence of biotic stress can interfere with normal abiotic stress responses. In this study, the combined effect of water stress and infection with plant-parasitic nematodes on the nutritional quality of tomato was investigated. Plants were exposed to one or both stresses, and the levels of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and sugars in fruits were analyzed as well as physiological responses. Levels of carotenoids lycopene and β-carotene were lower in water-stressed tomatoes but exhibited a different response pattern under combined stress. Nematode stress was associated with increased flavonoid levels, albeit with reduced yields, while chlorogenic acid was increased by nematodes, water stress, and the combined stress. Sugar levels were higher only in tomatoes exposed to both stresses. These results emphasize the importance of studying plant stress factors in combination.

  6. Strategic responses to fiscal constraints: a health policy analysis of hospital-based ambulatory physical therapy services in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Verrier, Molly C; Williams, A Paul; Zakus, David; Deber, Raisa B

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory physical therapy (PT) services in Canada are required to be insured under the Canada Health Act, but only if delivered within hospitals. The present study analyzed strategic responses used by hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) to deliver PT services in an environment of fiscal constraint. Key informant interviews (n = 47) were conducted with participants from all hospitals located within the GTA. Two primary strategic responses were identified: (1) "load shedding" through the elimination or reduction of services, and (2) "privatization" through contracting out or creating internal for-profit subsidiary clinics. All hospitals reported reductions in service delivery between 1996 and 2003, and 15.0% (7/47 hospitals) fully eliminated ambulatory services. Although only one of 47 hospitals contracted out services, another 15.0% (7/47) reported that for-profit subsidiary clinics were created within the hospital in order to access other more profitable forms of quasi-public and private funding. Strategic restructuring of services, aimed primarily at cost containment, may have yielded short-term financial savings but has also created a ripple effect across the continuum of care. Moreover, the rise of for-profit subsidiary clinics operating within not-for-profit hospitals has emerged without much public debate and with little research to evaluate its impact.

  7. Influences of granular constraints and surface effects on the heterogeneity of elastic, superelastic, and plastic responses of polycrystalline shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Harshad M.; Paul, Partha P.; Sharma, Hemant; Kenesei, Peter; Park, Jun-Sang; Duerig, T. W.; Brinson, L. Catherine; Stebner, Aaron P.

    2017-05-01

    Deformation heterogeneities at the microstructural length-scale developed in polycrystalline shape memory alloys (SMAs) during superelastic loading are studied using both experiments and simulations. In situ X-ray diffraction, specifically the far-field high energy diffraction microscopy (ff-HEDM) technique, was used to non-destructively measure the grain-averaged statistics of position, crystal orientation, elastic strain tensor, and volume for hundreds of austenite grains in a superelastically loaded nickel-titanium (NiTi) SMA. These experimental data were also used to create a synthetic microstructure within a finite element model. The development of intragranular stresses were then simulated during tensile loading of the model using anisotropic elasticity. Driving forces for phase transformation and slip were calculated from these stresses. The grain-average responses of individual austenite crystals examined before and after multiple stress-induced transformation events showed that grains in the specimen interior carry more axial stress than the surface grains as the superelastic response ;shakes down;. Examination of the heterogeneity within individual grains showed that regions near grain boundaries exhibit larger stress variation compared to the grain interiors. This intragranular heterogeneity is more strongly driven by the constraints of neighboring grains than the initial stress state and orientation of the individual grains.

  8. The Importance of Biotic vs. Abiotic Drivers of Local Plant Community Composition Along Regional Bioclimatic Gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Klanderud

    Full Text Available We assessed if the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors for plant community composition differs along environmental gradients and between functional groups, and asked which implications this may have in a warmer and wetter future. The study location is a unique grid of sites spanning regional-scale temperature and precipitation gradients in boreal and alpine grasslands in southern Norway. Within each site we sampled vegetation and associated biotic and abiotic factors, and combined broad- and fine-scale ordination analyses to assess the relative explanatory power of these factors for species composition. Although the community responses to biotic and abiotic factors did not consistently change as predicted along the bioclimatic gradients, abiotic variables tended to explain a larger proportion of the variation in species composition towards colder sites, whereas biotic variables explained more towards warmer sites, supporting the stress gradient hypothesis. Significant interactions with precipitation suggest that biotic variables explained more towards wetter climates in the sub alpine and boreal sites, but more towards drier climates in the colder alpine. Thus, we predict that biotic interactions may become more important in alpine and boreal grasslands in a warmer future, although more winter precipitation may counteract this trend in oceanic alpine climates. Our results show that both local and regional scales analyses are needed to disentangle the local vegetation-environment relationships and their regional-scale drivers, and biotic interactions and precipitation must be included when predicting future species assemblages.

  9. The Importance of Biotic vs. Abiotic Drivers of Local Plant Community Composition Along Regional Bioclimatic Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanderud, Kari; Vandvik, Vigdis; Goldberg, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    We assessed if the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors for plant community composition differs along environmental gradients and between functional groups, and asked which implications this may have in a warmer and wetter future. The study location is a unique grid of sites spanning regional-scale temperature and precipitation gradients in boreal and alpine grasslands in southern Norway. Within each site we sampled vegetation and associated biotic and abiotic factors, and combined broad- and fine-scale ordination analyses to assess the relative explanatory power of these factors for species composition. Although the community responses to biotic and abiotic factors did not consistently change as predicted along the bioclimatic gradients, abiotic variables tended to explain a larger proportion of the variation in species composition towards colder sites, whereas biotic variables explained more towards warmer sites, supporting the stress gradient hypothesis. Significant interactions with precipitation suggest that biotic variables explained more towards wetter climates in the sub alpine and boreal sites, but more towards drier climates in the colder alpine. Thus, we predict that biotic interactions may become more important in alpine and boreal grasslands in a warmer future, although more winter precipitation may counteract this trend in oceanic alpine climates. Our results show that both local and regional scales analyses are needed to disentangle the local vegetation-environment relationships and their regional-scale drivers, and biotic interactions and precipitation must be included when predicting future species assemblages.

  10. Unraveling the role of fungal symbionts in plant abiotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lamabam Peter; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Tuteja, Narendra

    2011-02-01

    Fungal symbionts have been found associated with every plant studied in natural ecosystem, where they colonize and reside entirely in the internal tissues of their host plant or partially. Fungal endophytes can express/form a range of different lifestyle/relationships with different host including symbiotic, mutualistic, commensalistic and parasitic in response to host genotype and environmental factors. In mutualistic association fungal endophyte can enhance growth, increase reproductive success and confer biotic and abiotic stress tolerance to its host plant. Since abiotic stress such as, drought, high soil salinity, heat, cold, oxidative stress, heavy metal toxicity is the common adverse environmental conditions that affect and limit crop productivity worldwide. It may be a promising alternative strategy to exploit fungal endophytes to overcome the limitations to crop production brought by abiotic stress. There is increasing interest in developing the potential biotechnological applications of fungal endophytes for improving plant stress tolerance and sustainable production of food crops. Here we have described the fungal symbioses, fungal symbionts and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. A putative mechanism of stress tolerance by symbionts has also been covered.

  11. Abiotic stress tolerance and competition-related traits underlie phylogenetic clustering in soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberna, Marta; Navarro-Cano, Jose A; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; García, Carlos; Verdú, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    Soil bacteria typically coexist with close relatives generating widespread phylogenetic clustering. This has been ascribed to the abiotic filtering of organisms with shared ecological tolerances. Recent theoretical developments suggest that competition can also explain the phylogenetic similarity of coexisting organisms by excluding large low-competitive clades. We propose that combining the environmental patterns of traits associated with abiotic stress tolerances or competitive abilities with phylogeny and abundance data, can help discern between abiotic and biotic mechanisms underlying the coexistence of phylogenetically related bacteria. We applied this framework in a model system composed of interspersed habitats of highly contrasted productivity and comparatively dominated by biotic and abiotic processes, i.e. the plant patch-gap mosaic typical of drylands. We examined the distribution of 15 traits and 3290 bacterial taxa in 28 plots. Communities showed a marked functional response to the environment. Conserved traits related to environmental stress tolerance (e.g. desiccation, formation of resistant structures) were differentially selected in either habitat, while competition related traits (e.g. organic C consumption, formation of nutrient-scavenging structures) prevailed under high resource availability. Phylogenetic clustering was stronger in habitats dominated by biotic filtering, suggesting that competitive exclusion of large clades might underlie the ecological similarity of co-occurring soil bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  12. Combined biotic and abiotic stress resistance in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, C.; Chowdhury, R.; Heusden, van A.W.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Finkers, H.J.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bai, Y.; Linden, van der C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stress factors are the major constrains for the realization of crop yield potential. As climate change progresses, the spread and intensity of abiotic as well as biotic stressors is expected to increase, with increased probability of crops being exposed to both types of stress.

  13. Genetic Dissection of Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum, the fifth most important cereal crop in the world is a highly versatile crop and an excellent model species due to its overall tolerance to a number of abiotic stress conditions. To gain a better understanding of the physiological and genetic basis of abiotic stress tolerance in sorghum w...

  14. DREB1/CBF transcription factors: their structure, function and role in abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Akhtar; A. Jaiswal; G. Taj; J. P. Jaiswal; M. I. Qureshi; N. K. Singh

    2012-12-01

    Drought, high salinity and low temperature are major abiotic stresses that influence survival, productivity and geographical distribution of many important crops across the globe. Plants respond to these environmental challenges via physiological, cellular and molecular processes, which results in adjusted metabolic and structural alterations. The dehydration-responsive-element-binding (DREB) protein / C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) belong to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that bind to DRE/CRT cis-element and regulate the expression of stress-responsive genes. DREB1/CBF genes, therefore, play an important role in increasing stress tolerance in plants and their deployment using transgenic technology seems to be a potential alternative in management of abiotic stresses in crop plants. This review is mainly focussed on the structural characteristics as well as transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to various abiotic stresses, with particular emphasis on the role of DREB1/CBF regulon in stress-responsive gene expression. The recent progress related to genetic engineering of DREB1/CBF transcription factors in various crops and model plants is also summarized.

  15. Recent advances in utilizing transcription factors to improve plant abiotic stress tolerance by transgenic technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural production and quality are adversely affected by various abiotic stresses worldwide and this will be exacerbated by the deterioration of global climate. To feed a growing world population, it is very urgent to breed stress-tolerant crops with higher yields and improved qualities against multiple environmental stresses. Since conventional breeding approaches had marginal success due to the complexity of stress tolerance traits, the transgenic approach is now being popularly used to breed stress-tolerant crops. So identifying and characterizing the the critical genes involved in plant stress responses is an essential prerequisite for engineering stress-tolerant crops. Far beyond the manipulation of single functional gene, engineering certain regulatory genes has emerged as an effective strategy now for controlling the expression of many stress-responsive genes. Transcription factors (TFs are good candidates for genetic engineering to breed stress-tolerant crop because of their role as master regulators of many stress-responsive genes. Many TFs belonging to families AP2/EREBP, MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP have been found to be involved in various abiotic stresses and some TF genes have also been engineered to improve stress tolerance in model and crop plants. In this review, we take five large families of TFs as examples and review the recent progress of TFs involved in plant abiotic stress responses and their potential utilization to improve multiple stress tolerance of crops in the field conditions.

  16. Transcriptome-Based Identification of the Desiccation Response Genes in Marine Red Algae Pyropia tenera (Rhodophyta) and Enhancement of Abiotic Stress Tolerance by PtDRG2 in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sungoh; Lee, Ha-Nul; Jung, Hyun Shin; Yang, Sunghwan; Park, Eun-Jeong; Hwang, Mi Sook; Jeong, Won-Joong; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2017-06-01

    Pyropia tenera (Kjellman) are marine red algae that grow in the intertidal zone and lose more than 90% of water during hibernal low tides every day. In order to identify the desiccation response gene (DRG) in P. tenera, we generated 1,444,210 transcriptome sequences using the 454-FLX platform from the gametophyte under control and desiccation conditions. De novo assembly of the transcriptome reads generated 13,170 contigs, covering about 12 Mbp. We selected 1160 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to desiccation stress based on reads per kilobase per million reads (RPKM) expression values. As shown in green higher plants, DEGs under desiccation are composed of two groups of genes for gene regulation networks and functional proteins for carbohydrate metabolism, membrane perturbation, compatible solutes, and specific proteins similar to higher plants. DEGs that show no significant homology with known sequences in public databases were selected as DRGs in P. tenera. PtDRG2 encodes a novel polypeptide of 159 amino acid residues locating chloroplast. When PtDRG2 was overexpressed in Chlamydomonas, the PtDRG2 confer mannitol and salt tolerance in transgenic cells. These results suggest that Pyropia may possess novel genes that differ from green plants, although the desiccation tolerance mechanism in red algae is similar to those of higher green plants. These transcriptome sequences will facilitate future studies to understand the common processes and novel mechanisms involved in desiccation stress tolerance in red algae.

  17. Novel perspectives for the engineering of abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Julieta V; Lodeyro, Anabella F; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2014-04-01

    Adverse environmental conditions pose serious limitations to agricultural production. Classical biotechnological approaches towards increasing abiotic stress tolerance focus on boosting plant endogenous defence mechanisms. However, overexpression of regulatory elements or effectors is usually accompanied by growth handicap and yield penalties due to crosstalk between developmental and stress-response networks. Herein we offer an overview on novel strategies with the potential to overcome these limitations based on the engineering of regulatory systems involved in the fine-tuning of the plant response to environmental hardships, including post-translational modifications, small RNAs, epigenetic control of gene expression and hormonal networks. The development and application of plant synthetic biology tools and approaches will add new functionalities and perspectives to genetic engineering programs for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Expression Analysis of Two-Component System Members in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama eSingh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two component system (TCS is one of the key signal sensing machinery which enables species to sense environmental stimuli. It essentially comprises of three major components, sensory histidine kinase proteins (HKs, histidine phosphotransfer proteins (Hpts and response regulator proteins (RRs. The members of the TCS family have already been identified in Arabidopsis and rice but the knowledge about their functional indulgence during various abiotic stress conditions remains meagre. Current study is an attempt to carry out comprehensive analysis of the expression of TCS members in response to various abiotic stress conditions and in various plant tissues in Arabidopsis and rice using MPSS and publicly available microarray data. The analysis suggests that despite having almost similar number of genes, rice expresses higher number of TCS members during various abiotic stress conditions than Arabidopsis. We found that the TCS machinery is regulated by not only various abiotic stresses, but also by the tissue specificity. Analysis of expression of some representative members of TCS gene family showed their regulation by the diurnal cycle in rice seedlings, thus bringing-in another level of their transcriptional control. Thus, we report a highly complex and tight regulatory network of TCS members, as influenced by the tissue, abiotic stress signal and diurnal rhythm. The insights on the comparative expression analysis presented in this study may provide crucial leads towards dissection of diverse role(s of the various TCS family members in Arabidopsis and rice.

  19. Magmatism as a response to exhumation of the Priest River complex, northern Idaho: Constraints from zircon U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L. M.; Baldwin, J. A.; Crowley, J. L.; Fisher, C. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    Zircon and monazite U-Pb geochronology and zircon Hf isotopes place constraints on the temporal and source relationships between crustal anatexis, magmatism, and exhumation of the Priest River metamorphic core complex, northern Idaho. Granitoids that intruded the migmatitic, pelitic Hauser Lake gneiss include the pluton emplacement in the Priest River complex indicates that it was primarily a response to decompression rather than a cause. The mylonitized Silver Point and undeformed Wrencoe plutons bracket the end of a rapid phase of exhumation to c. 50-48 Ma. Zircon εHf(i) values and Lu-Hf isotope evolution indicate that the Silver Point and Wrencoe plutons crystallized from homogeneous magmas sourced from Archean-Proterozoic basement orthogneisses, whereas the Spokane granite and two leucocratic units appear to have been produced by partial melting of the Hauser Lake gneiss. Comparison of the Priest River complex with other deeply exhumed northern Cordilleran complexes indicates variability in the timing and, therefore, relative influences of partial melting and magmatism on the initiation of exhumation, which must be accounted for in numerical models of metamorphic core complex formation and evolution.

  20. Constraints on Relaxion Windows

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Kiwoon

    2016-01-01

    We examine low energy phenomenology of the relaxion solution to the weak scale hierarchy problem. Assuming that the Hubble friction is responsible for the dissipation of relaxion energy, we identify the cosmological relaxion window which corresponds to the parameter region compatible with a given value of the acceptable number of inflationary $e$-foldings. We then discuss a variety of observational constraints on the relaxion window, while focusing on the case that the barrier potential to stabilize the relaxion is induced by new physics, rather than by low energy QCD dynamics. We find that majority of the parameter space with a relaxion mass $m_\\phi\\gtrsim 100$ eV or a relaxion decay constant $f\\lesssim 10^7$ GeV is excluded by existing constraints. There is an interesting small parameter region with $m_\\phi\\sim \\,0.2-1$ GeV and $f\\sim\\, {\\rm few}-10$ TeV, which is allowed by existing constraints, but can be probed soon by future beam dump experiment such as the SHiP experiment, or by improved EDM experiment...

  1. The Role of MAPK Modules and ABA during Abiotic Stress Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Zélicourt, Axel de

    2016-05-01

    To respond to abiotic stresses, plants have developed specific mechanisms that allow them to rapidly perceive and respond to environmental changes. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) was shown to be a pivotal regulator of abiotic stress responses in plants, triggering major changes in plant physiology. The ABA core signaling pathway largely relies on the activation of SnRK2 kinases to mediate several rapid responses, including gene regulation, stomatal closure, and plant growth modulation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have also been implicated in ABA signaling, but an entire ABA-activated MAPK module was uncovered only recently. In this review, we discuss the evidence for a role of MAPK modules in the context of different plant ABA signaling pathways. Abiotic stresses impact average yield in agriculture by more than 50% globally.Since ABA is a key regulator of abiotic stress responses, an understanding of its functioning at the molecular level is essential for plant breeding. Although the ABA core signaling pathway has been unraveled, several downstream events are still unclear.MAPKs are involved in most plant developmental stages and in response to stresses. Several members of the MAPK family were shown to be directly or indirectly activated by the ABA core signaling pathway.Recent evidence shows that the complete MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14 module is under the control of ABA, whose members are under the transcriptional and post-translational control of the ABA core signaling pathway. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. (non) Emergent Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. S.; Hattab, M. W.; Huerta, G.

    2014-12-01

    Emergent constraints are observable quantities that provide some physical basis for testing or predicting how a climate model will respond to greenhouse gas forcing. Very few such constraints have been identified for the multi-model CMIP archive. Here we explore the question of whether constraints that apply to a single model, a perturbed parameter ensemble (PPE) of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.1), can be applied to predicting the climate sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. In particular we construct our predictive patterns from multivariate EOFs of the CAM3.1 ensemble control climate. Multiple regressive statistical models were created that do an excellent job of predicting CAM3.1 sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing. However, these same patterns fail spectacularly to predict sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. We attribute this failure to several factors. First, and perhaps the most important, is that the structures affecting climate sensitivity in CAM3.1 have a unique signature in the space of our multivariate EOF patterns that are unlike any other climate model. That is to say, we should not expect CAM3.1 to represent the way another models within CMIP archive respond to greenhouse gas forcing. The second, perhaps related, reason is that the CAM3.1 PPE does a poor job of spanning the range of climates and responses found within the CMIP archive. We shall discuss the implications of these results for the prospect of finding emergent constraints within the CMIP archive. We will also discuss what this may mean for establishing uncertainties in climate projections.

  3. Chemical Priming of Plants Against Multiple Abiotic Stresses: Mission Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvides, Andreas; Ali, Shawkat; Tester, Mark; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-04-01

    Crop plants are subjected to multiple abiotic stresses during their lifespan that greatly reduce productivity and threaten global food security. Recent research suggests that plants can be primed by chemical compounds to better tolerate different abiotic stresses. Chemical priming is a promising field in plant stress physiology and crop stress management. We review here promising chemical agents such as sodium nitroprusside, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydrosulfide, melatonin, and polyamines that can potentially confer enhanced tolerance when plants are exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. The challenges and opportunities of chemical priming are addressed, with the aim to boost future research towards effective application in crop stress management.

  4. Chemical Priming of Plants Against Multiple Abiotic Stresses: Mission Possible?

    KAUST Repository

    Savvides, Andreas

    2015-12-15

    Crop plants are subjected to multiple abiotic stresses during their lifespan that greatly reduce productivity and threaten global food security. Recent research suggests that plants can be primed by chemical compounds to better tolerate different abiotic stresses. Chemical priming is a promising field in plant stress physiology and crop stress management. We review here promising chemical agents such as sodium nitroprusside, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydrosulfide, melatonin, and polyamines that can potentially confer enhanced tolerance when plants are exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. The challenges and opportunities of chemical priming are addressed, with the aim to boost future research towards effective application in crop stress management.

  5. Phenotyping for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benhilda Masuka; Jose Luis Araus; Biswanath Das; Kai Sonder; Jill E. Cairns

    2012-01-01

    The ability to quickly develop germplasm having tolerance to several complex polygenic inherited abiotic and biotic stresses combined is critical to the resilience of cropping systems in the face of climate change.Molecular breeding offers the tools to accelerate cereal breeding; however,suitable phenotyping protocols are essential to ensure that the much-anticipated benefits of molecular breeding can be realized.To facilitate the full potential of molecular tools,greater emphasis needs to be given to reducing the within-experimental site variability,application of stress and characterization of the environment and appropriate phenotyping tools.Yield is a function of many processes throughout the plant cycle,and thus integrative traits that encompass crop performance over time or organization level (i.e.canopy level) will provide a better alternative to instantaneous measurements which provide only a snapshot of a given plant process.Many new phenotyping tools based on remote sensing are now available including non-destructive measurements of growth-related parameters based on spectral reflectance and infrared thermometry to estimate plant water status.Here we describe key field phenotyping protocols for maize with emphasis on tolerance to drought and low nitrogen.

  6. Stochastic Constraint Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Toby

    2009-01-01

    To model combinatorial decision problems involving uncertainty and probability, we introduce stochastic constraint programming. Stochastic constraint programs contain both decision variables (which we can set) and stochastic variables (which follow a probability distribution). They combine together the best features of traditional constraint satisfaction, stochastic integer programming, and stochastic satisfiability. We give a semantics for stochastic constraint programs, and propose a number...

  7. Enhancing crop resilience to combined abiotic and biotic stress through the dissection of physiological and molecular crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos eKissoudis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants growing in their natural habitats are often challenged simultaneously by multiple stress factors, both abiotic and biotic. Research has so far been limited to responses to individual stresses, and understanding of adaptation to combinatorial stress is limited, but indicative of non-additive interactions. Omics data analysis and functional characterization of individual genes has revealed a convergence of signalling pathways for abiotic and biotic stress adaptation. Taking into account that most data originate from imposition of individual stress factors, this review summarizes these findings in a physiological context, following the pathogenesis timeline and highlighting potential differential interactions occurring between abiotic and biotic stress signalling across the different cellular compartments and at the whole plant level. Potential effects of abiotic stress on resistance components such as extracellular receptor proteins, R-genes and systemic acquired resistance will be elaborated, as well as crosstalk at the levels of hormone, ROS and redox signalling. Breeding targets and strategies are proposed focusing on either manipulation and deployment of individual common regulators such as transcription factors or pyramiding of non- (negatively interacting components such as R-genes with abiotic stress resistance genes. We propose that dissection of broad spectrum stress tolerance conferred by priming chemicals may provide an insight on stress cross regulation and additional candidate genes for improving crop performance under combined stress. Validation of the proposed strategies in lab and field experiments is a first step towards the goal of achieving tolerance to combinatorial stress in crops.

  8. Enhancing crop resilience to combined abiotic and biotic stress through the dissection of physiological and molecular crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoudis, Christos; van de Wiel, Clemens; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Plants growing in their natural habitats are often challenged simultaneously by multiple stress factors, both abiotic and biotic. Research has so far been limited to responses to individual stresses, and understanding of adaptation to combinatorial stress is limited, but indicative of non-additive interactions. Omics data analysis and functional characterization of individual genes has revealed a convergence of signaling pathways for abiotic and biotic stress adaptation. Taking into account that most data originate from imposition of individual stress factors, this review summarizes these findings in a physiological context, following the pathogenesis timeline and highlighting potential differential interactions occurring between abiotic and biotic stress signaling across the different cellular compartments and at the whole plant level. Potential effects of abiotic stress on resistance components such as extracellular receptor proteins, R-genes and systemic acquired resistance will be elaborated, as well as crosstalk at the levels of hormone, reactive oxygen species, and redox signaling. Breeding targets and strategies are proposed focusing on either manipulation and deployment of individual common regulators such as transcription factors or pyramiding of non- (negatively) interacting components such as R-genes with abiotic stress resistance genes. We propose that dissection of broad spectrum stress tolerance conferred by priming chemicals may provide an insight on stress cross regulation and additional candidate genes for improving crop performance under combined stress. Validation of the proposed strategies in lab and field experiments is a first step toward the goal of achieving tolerance to combinatorial stress in crops.

  9. Baseline inventory data users guide to abiotic GIS layers

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Baseline Inventory Team was chartered by the Fulfilling the Promises Implementation Team to recommend minimum abiotic and biotic inventories for the National...

  10. The Abiotic Depletion Potential: Background, Updates, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauran van Oers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Depletion of abiotic resources is a much disputed impact category in life cycle assessment (LCA. The reason is that the problem can be defined in different ways. Furthermore, within a specified problem definition, many choices can still be made regarding which parameters to include in the characterization model and which data to use. This article gives an overview of the problem definition and the choices that have been made when defining the abiotic depletion potentials (ADPs for a characterization model for abiotic resource depletion in LCA. Updates of the ADPs since 2002 are also briefly discussed. Finally, some possible new developments of the impact category of abiotic resource depletion are suggested, such as redefining the depletion problem as a dilution problem. This means taking the reserves in the environment and the economy into account in the reserve parameter and using leakage from the economy, instead of extraction rate, as a dilution parameter.

  11. An Arabidopsis mutant impaired in intracellular calcium elevation is sensitive to biotic and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal Johnson, Joy; Reichelt, Michael; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-06-11

    Ca2+, a versatile intracellular second messenger in various signaling pathways, initiates many responses involved in growth, defense and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress. Endogenous and exogenous signals induce cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) elevation, which are responsible for the appropriate downstream responses. Here we report on an ethyl-methane sulfonate-mediated Arabidopsis mutant that fails to induce [Ca2+]cyt elevation in response to exudate preparations from the pathogenic mibrobes Alternaria brassicae, Rhizoctonia solani, Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The cytoplasmic Ca2+elevation mutant1 (cycam1) is susceptible to infections by A. brassicae, its toxin preparation and sensitive to abiotic stress such as drought and salt. It accumulates high levels of reactive oxygen species and contains elevated salicylic acid, abscisic acid and bioactive jasmonic acid iso-leucine levels. Reactive oxygen species- and phytohormone-related genes are higher in A. brassicae-treated wild-type and mutant seedlings. Depending on the analysed response, the elevated levels of defense-related compounds are either caused by the cycam mutation and are promoted by the pathogen, or they are mainly due to the pathogen infection or application of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Furthermore, cycam1 shows altered responses to abscisic acid treatments: the hormone inhibits germination and growth of the mutant. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant which fails to induce [Ca2+]cyt elevation in response to exudate preparations from various microbes. The higher susceptibility of the mutant to pathogen infections correlates with the higher accumulation of defense-related compounds, such as phytohormones, reactive oxygen-species, defense-related mRNA levels and secondary metabolites. Therefore, CYCAM1 couples [Ca2+]cyt elevation to biotic, abiotic and oxidative stress responses.

  12. Evolution and Adaptation of Wild Emmer Wheat Populations to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Raats, Dina; Sela, Hanan; Klymiuk, Valentina; Lidzbarsky, Gabriel; Feng, Lihua; Krugman, Tamar; Fahima, Tzion

    2016-08-04

    The genetic bottlenecks associated with plant domestication and subsequent selection in man-made agroecosystems have limited the genetic diversity of modern crops and increased their vulnerability to environmental stresses. Wild emmer wheat, the tetraploid progenitor of domesticated wheat, distributed along a wide range of ecogeographical conditions in the Fertile Crescent, has valuable "left behind" adaptive diversity to multiple diseases and environmental stresses. The biotic and abiotic stress responses are conferred by series of genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control complex resistance pathways. The study of genetic diversity, genomic organization, expression profiles, protein structure and function of biotic and abiotic stress-resistance genes, and QTLs could shed light on the evolutionary history and adaptation mechanisms of wild emmer populations for their natural habitats. The continuous evolution and adaptation of wild emmer to the changing environment provide novel solutions that can contribute to safeguarding food for the rapidly growing human population.

  13. Increasing ascorbate levels in crops to enhance human nutrition and plant abiotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macknight, Richard C; Laing, William A; Bulley, Sean M; Broad, Ronan C; Johnson, Alexander At; Hellens, Roger P

    2017-02-20

    Ascorbate (or vitamin C) is an essential human micronutrient predominantly obtained from plants. In addition to preventing scurvy, it is now known to have broader roles in human health, for example as a cofactor for enzymes involved in epigenetic programming and as regulator of cellular iron uptake. Furthermore, ascorbate is the major antioxidant in plants and underpins many environmentally induced abiotic stress responses. Biotechnological approaches to enhance the ascorbate content of crops therefore have potential to improve both human health and abiotic stress tolerance of crops. Identifying the genetic basis of ascorbate variation between plant varieties and discovering how some 'super fruits' accumulate extremely high levels of ascorbate should reveal new ways to more effectively manipulate the production of ascorbate in crops.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide regulates abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Han, Ning; Bian, Hongwu; Liu, Xiaodong; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous molecule in various plant developmental processes and plant stress responses. In this study, the transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with modulated expressions of two cysteine desulfhydrases, and exogenous H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) and H2S scavenger (hypotaurine, HT) pre-treated plants were used to dissect the involvement of H2S in plant stress responses. The cysteine desulfhydrases overexpressing plants and NaHS pre-treated plants exhibited higher endogenous H2S level and improved abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, while cysteine desulfhydrases knockdown plants and HT pre-treated plants displayed lower endogenous H2S level and decreased stress resistance. Moreover, H2S upregulated the transcripts of multiple abiotic and biotic stress-related genes, and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Interestingly, MIR393-mediated auxin signaling including MIR393a/b and their target genes (TIR1, AFB1, AFB2, and AFB3) was transcriptionally regulated by H2S, and was related with H2S-induced antibacterial resistance. Moreover, H2S regulated 50 carbon metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, and aromatic amines. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine desulfhydrase and H2S conferred abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, via affecting the stress-related gene expressions, ROS metabolism, metabolic homeostasis, and MIR393-targeted auxin receptors.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide regulates abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Shi; Tiantian Ye; Ning Han; Hongwu Bian; Xiaodong Liu; Zhulong Chan

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous molecule in various plant developmental processes and plant stress responses. In this study, the transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with modulated expressions of two cysteine desulfhydrases, and exogenous H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) and H2S scavenger (hypotaurine, HT) pre-treated plants were used to dissect the involvement of H2S in plant stress responses. The cysteine desulfhydrases overexpressing plants and NaHS pre-treated plants exhibited higher endogenous H2S level and improved abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, while cysteine desulfhydrases knockdown plants and HT pre-treated plants displayed lower endogenous H2S level and decreased stress resistance. Moreover, H2S upregulated the transcripts of multiple abiotic and biotic stress-related genes, and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Interest-ingly, MIR393-mediated auxin signaling including MIR393a/b and their target genes (TIR1, AFB1, AFB2, and AFB3) was transcrip-tional y regulated by H2S, and was related with H2S-induced antibacterial resistance. Moreover, H2S regulated 50 carbon metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, and aromatic amines. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine desulfhydrase and H2S conferred abiotic stress tolerance and biotic stress resistance, via affecting the stress-related gene expressions, ROS metabolism, metabolic homeostasis, and MIR393-targeted auxin receptors.

  16. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Zaman Nouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C3 or C4, type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress.

  17. A Central Role for Thiols in Plant Tolerance to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyuben Zagorchev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress poses major problems to agriculture and increasing efforts are being made to understand plant stress response and tolerance mechanisms and to develop new tools that underpin successful agriculture. However, the molecular mechanisms of plant stress tolerance are not fully understood, and the data available is incomplete and sometimes contradictory. Here, we review the significance of protein and non-protein thiol compounds in relation to plant tolerance of abiotic stress. First, the roles of the amino acids cysteine and methionine, are discussed, followed by an extensive discussion of the low-molecular-weight tripeptide, thiol glutathione, which plays a central part in plant stress response and oxidative signalling and of glutathione-related enzymes, including those involved in the biosynthesis of non-protein thiol compounds. Special attention is given to the glutathione redox state, to phytochelatins and to the role of glutathione in the regulation of the cell cycle. The protein thiol section focuses on glutaredoxins and thioredoxins, proteins with oxidoreductase activity, which are involved in protein glutathionylation. The review concludes with a brief overview of and future perspectives for the involvement of plant thiols in abiotic stress tolerance.

  18. Metabolomics as a Tool to Investigate Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio Gómez-Cadenas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites reflect the integration of gene expression, protein interaction and other different regulatory processes and are therefore closer to the phenotype than mRNA transcripts or proteins alone. Amongst all –omics technologies, metabolomics is the most transversal and can be applied to different organisms with little or no modifications. It has been successfully applied to the study of molecular phenotypes of plants in response to abiotic stress in order to find particular patterns associated to stress tolerance. These studies have highlighted the essential involvement of primary metabolites: sugars, amino acids and Krebs cycle intermediates as direct markers of photosynthetic dysfunction as well as effectors of osmotic readjustment. On the contrary, secondary metabolites are more specific of genera and species and respond to particular stress conditions as antioxidants, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS scavengers, coenzymes, UV and excess radiation screen and also as regulatory molecules. In addition, the induction of secondary metabolites by several abiotic stress conditions could also be an effective mechanism of cross-protection against biotic threats, providing a link between abiotic and biotic stress responses. Moreover, the presence/absence and relative accumulation of certain metabolites along with gene expression data provides accurate markers (mQTL or MWAS for tolerant crop selection in breeding programs.

  19. Patterns of Fusarium community structure and abundance in relation to spatial, abiotic and biotic factors in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Labour, K.; Hamel, C.; Vujanovic, V.; Nakano-Hylander, A.; Jeannotte, R.; St-Arnaud, M.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the Fusarium genus are important components of many plant-soil systems worldwide and are responsible for many crop diseases. Knowledge of the relative influence of biotic and abiotic factors on this genus is therefore of broad economic and ecological importance. In order to address this i

  20. Enhancing crop resilience to combined abiotic and biotic stress through the dissection of physiological and molecular crosstalk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, C.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Linden, van der C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants growing in their natural habitats are often challenged simultaneously by multiple stress factors, both abiotic and biotic. Research has so far been limited to responses to individual stresses, and understanding of adaptation to combinatorial stress is limited, but indicative of non-additive i

  1. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  2. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  3. Evaluating reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis at elevated temperatures and pressures using carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the role of environmental factors on reaction pathways and corresponding carbon isotope fractionations during abiotic hydrothermal synthesis of organic compounds using piston cylinder apparatus at 750 °C and 5.5 kbars. Chemical compositions of experimental products and corresponding carbon isotopic values were obtained by a Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS system. Alkanes (methane and ethane), straight-chain saturated alcohols (ethanol and n-butanol) and monocarboxylic acids (formic and acetic acids) were generated with ethanol being the only organic compound with higher δ13C than CO2. CO was not detected in experimental products owing to the favorable water-gas shift reaction under high water pressure conditions. The pattern of δ13C values of CO2, carboxylic acids and alkanes are consistent with their equilibrium isotope relationships: CO2 > carboxylic acids > alkanes, but the magnitude of the fractionation among them is higher than predicted isotope equilibrium values. In particular, the isotopic fractionation between CO2 and CH4 remained constant at ∼31‰, indicating a kinetic effect during CO2 reduction processes. No "isotope reversal" of δ13C values for alkanes or carboxylic acids was observed, which indicates a different reaction pathway than what is typically observed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under gas phase conditions. Under constraints imposed in experiments, the anomalous 13C isotope enrichment in ethanol suggests that hydroxymethylene is the organic intermediate, and that the generation of other organic compounds enriched in 12C were facilitated by subsequent Rayleigh fractionation of hydroxymethylene reacting with H2 and/or H2O. Carbon isotope fractionation data obtained in this study are instrumental in assessing the controlling factors on abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems. Knowledge on how environmental conditions affect reaction pathways of abiotic synthesis of organic

  4. Alfalfa Cellulose synthase gene expression under abiotic stress: a Hitchhiker's guide to RT-qPCR normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress represents a serious threat affecting both plant fitness and productivity. One of the promptest responses that plants trigger following abiotic stress is the differential expression of key genes, which enable to face the adverse conditions. It is accepted and shown that the cell wall senses and broadcasts the stress signal to the interior of the cell, by triggering a cascade of reactions leading to resistance. Therefore the study of wall-related genes is particularly relevant to understand the metabolic remodeling triggered by plants in response to exogenous stresses. Despite the agricultural and economical relevance of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., no study, to our knowledge, has addressed specifically the wall-related gene expression changes in response to exogenous stresses in this important crop, by monitoring the dynamics of wall biosynthetic gene expression. We here identify and analyze the expression profiles of nine cellulose synthases, together with other wall-related genes, in stems of alfalfa plants subjected to different abiotic stresses (cold, heat, salt stress at various time points (e.g. 0, 24, 72 and 96 h. We identify 2 main responses for specific groups of genes, i.e. a salt/heat-induced and a cold/heat-repressed group of genes. Prior to this analysis we identified appropriate reference genes for expression analyses in alfalfa, by evaluating the stability of 10 candidates across different tissues (namely leaves, stems, roots, under the different abiotic stresses and time points chosen. The results obtained confirm an active role played by the cell wall in response to exogenous stimuli and constitute a step forward in delineating the complex pathways regulating the response of plants to abiotic stresses.

  5. Potential Abiotic Functions of Root Exudates in Rhizosphere Cycling of Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Keiluweit, M.; Bougoure, J.; Kleber, M.; Nico, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon cycling in the rhizosphere is a nexus of biophysical interactions between plant roots, microorganisms and the soil organo-mineral matrix. Plant roots are the primary source of C in mineral horizons and can significantly accelerate the rate of soil organic matter mineralization in rhizosphere soils. While a portion of this acceleration results from stimulation of microbial enzymatic capacities (the 'priming effect') - abiotic responses also play a significant role in rhizosphere cycling of soil organic matter (SOM). For example, exudate-stimulated mobilization and dissolution of metal species may release previously complexed SOM, or could affect Fe mobility via redox changes associated with microbially-driven O2 depletion. We have investigated the abiotic response of rhizosphere microenvironments, using additions of several 13C-enriched low molecular weight (LMW) root exudates and 13C-plant detritus to controlled microcosms. We hypothesized that certain abiotic effects are triggered by specific exudate compounds and that the magnitude of the effect depends on the soil physiochemical properties. Using a combination of microsensor measurements, solid-phase extractions, X-ray and IR spectroscopy, we measured how root exudates differ in their potential to create reducing microenvironments, alter metal chemisty and mineralogy, and influence the availability of SOM in the rhizosphere. High resolution X-ray microscopy (STXM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses illustrate the physical fate of the added isotope tracers in both pore water and on mineral surfaces. Our results suggest that certain root exudates facilitate abiotic reactions that increase the pool of bioavailable SOM and stimulate its microbial decomposition in the rhizosphere. In particular, the contrasting ecological functions of LMW organic acids and simple sugars in facilitating SOM breakdown in the rhizosphere will be discussed.

  6. Biotic and abiotic stress can induce cystatin expression in chestnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernas, M; Sánchez-Monge, R; Salcedo, G

    2000-02-11

    A cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) from chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, designated CsC, has been previously characterized. Its antifungal, acaricide and inhibitory activities have allowed to involve CsC in defence mechanisms. The CsC transcription levels decreased during seed maturation and increased throughout germination, an opposite behavior to that shown by most phytocystatins. No inhibition of endogenous proteinase activity by purified CsC was found during the seed maturation or germination processes. CsC message accumulation was induced in chestnut leaves after fungal infection, as well as by wounding and jasmonic acid treatment. Induction in roots was also observed by the last two treatments. Furthermore, CsC transcript levels strongly raised, both in roots and leaves, when chestnut plantlets were subjected to cold- and saline-shocks, and also in roots by heat stress. All together, these data suggest that chestnut cystatin is not only involved in defence responses to pests and pathogen invasion, but also in those related to abiotic stress.

  7. Identification of Cassava MicroRNAs under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ballén-Taborda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of microRNAs (miRNAs in plants has gained significant attention in recent years due to their regulatory role during development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is tolerant to drought and other adverse conditions, most cassava miRNAs have been predicted using bioinformatics alone or through sequencing of plants challenged by biotic stress. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing and different bioinformatics methods to identify potential cassava miRNAs expressed in different tissues subject to heat and drought conditions. We identified 60 miRNAs conserved in other plant species and 821 potential cassava-specific miRNAs. We also predicted 134 and 1002 potential target genes for these two sets of sequences. Using real time PCR, we verified the condition-specific expression of 5 cassava small RNAs relative to a non-stress control. We also found, using publicly available expression data, a significantly lower expression of the predicted target genes of conserved and nonconserved miRNAs under drought stress compared to other cassava genes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis along with condition specific expression of predicted miRNA targets, allowed us to identify several interesting miRNAs which may play a role in stress-induced posttranscriptional regulation in cassava and other plants.

  8. INDIVIDUAL AND POPULATION RESPONSES TO ABIOTIC STRESSES IN ITALIAN RYEGRASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expected changes in environmental factors will alter productivity of agroecosystems and influence the distribution of agricultural pests. In addition to the natural factors that cause stress, humans introduce chemical pesticides into the agricultural environment. Weeds persist in...

  9. Transcriptomic and proteomic response of fruit trees to abiotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Together, temperature and water availability are the primary determinants of the global distribution of major vegetation biomes and as such, have a major impact on the cultivation of temperate fruit trees. The regulation of both low temperature and water deficit stress has been widely studied in he...

  10. Polyamines and abiotic stress in plants: A complex relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh eMinocha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relationship between abiotic stress in plants and polyamines was reported more than 40 years ago. Ever since there has been a debate as to whether increased polyamines protect plants against abiotic stress (e.g. due to their ability to deal with oxidative radicals or cause damage to them (perhaps due to hydrogen peroxide produced by their catabolism. The observation that cellular polyamines are typically elevated in plants under both short-term as well as long-term abiotic stress conditions is consistent with the possibility of their dual effects, i.e. being a protector as well as a perpetrator of stress damage to the cells. The observed increase in tolerance of plants to abiotic stress when their cellular contents are elevated by either exogenous treatment with polyamines or through genetic engineering with genes encoding polyamine biosynthetic enzymes is indicative of a protective role for them. However, through their catabolic production of hydrogen peroxide and acrolein, both strong oxidizers, they can potentially be the cause of cellular harm during stress. In fact, somewhat enigmatic but strong positive relationship between abiotic stress and foliar polyamines has been proposed as a potential biochemical marker of persistent environmental stress in forest trees in which phenotypic symptoms of stress are not yet visible. Such markers may help forewarn forest managers to undertake amelioration strategies before the appearance of visual symptoms of stress and damage at which stage it is often too late for implementing strategies for stress remediation and reversal of damage. This review provides a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the published literature on interactions between abiotic stress and polyamines in plants, and examines the experimental strategies used to understand the functional significance of this relationship with the aim of improving plant productivity, especially under conditions of abiotic stress.

  11. ROS-mediated abiotic stress-induced programmed cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselin ePetrov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their ontogenesis, plants are continuously exposed to a large variety of abiotic stress factors which can damage tissues and jeopardize the survival of the organism unless properly countered. While animals can simply escape and thus evade stressors, plants as sessile organisms have developed complex strategies to withstand them. When the intensity of a detrimental factor is high, one of the defense programs employed by plants is the induction of programmed cell death (PCD. This is an active, genetically controlled process which is initiated to isolate and remove damaged tissues thereby ensuring the survival of the organism. The mechanism of PCD induction usually includes an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS which are utilized as mediators of the stress signal. Abiotic stress-induced PCD is not only a process of fundamental biological importance, but also of considerable interest to agricultural practice as it has the potential to significantly influence crop yield. Therefore, numerous scientific enterprises have focused on elucidating the mechanisms leading to and controlling PCD in response to adverse conditions in plants. This knowledge may help to develop novel strategies to obtain more resilient crop varieties with improved tolerance and enhanced productivity. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent advances in research on ROS-induced PCD related to abiotic stress and the role of the organelles in the process.

  12. Signal transduction pathways in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z X; Li, H C; Wei, Y P; Chu, W Y; Chong, Y L; Long, X H; Liu, Z P; Qin, S; Shao, H B

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacteria have developed various response mechanisms in long evolution to sense and adapt to external or internal changes under abiotic stresses. The signal transduction system of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 includes mainly two-component signal transduction systems of eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinases (STKs), on which most have been investigated at present. These two-component systems play a major role in regulating cell activities in cyanobacteria. More and more co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among signal transduction systems had been discovered due to increasing experimental data, and they are of great importance in corresponding to abiotic stresses. However, mechanisms of their functions remain unknown. Nevertheless, the two signal transduction systems function as an integral network for adaption in different abiotic stresses. This review summarizes available knowledge on the signal transduction network in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under various stresses, with focuses on the co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among various stress-responding signal transduction systems.

  13. Chemical Reactivity Probes for Assessing Abiotic Natural Attenuation by Reducing Iron Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dimin; Bradley, Miranda J; Hinkle, Adrian W; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-02-16

    Increasing recognition that abiotic natural attenuation (NA) of chlorinated solvents can be important has created demand for improved methods to characterize the redox properties of the aquifer materials that are responsible for abiotic NA. This study explores one promising approach: using chemical reactivity probes (CRPs) to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of contaminant reduction by reducing iron minerals. Assays of thermodynamic CRPs were developed to determine the reduction potentials (ECRP) of suspended minerals by spectrophotometric determination of equilibrium CRP speciation and calculations using the Nernst equation. ECRP varied as expected with mineral type, mineral loading, and Fe(II) concentration. Comparison of ECRP with reduction potentials measured potentiometrically using a Pt electrode (EPt) showed that ECRP was 100-150 mV more negative than EPt. When EPt was measured with small additions of CRPs, the systematic difference between EPt and ECRP was eliminated, suggesting that these CRPs are effective mediators of electron transfer between mineral and electrode surfaces. Model contaminants (4-chloronitrobenzene, 2-chloroacetophenone, and carbon tetrachloride) were used as kinetic CRPs. The reduction rate constants of kinetic CRPs correlated well with the ECRP for mineral suspensions. Using the rate constants compiled from literature for contaminants and relative mineral reduction potentials based on ECRP measurements, qualitatively consistent trends were obtained, suggesting that CRP-based assays may be useful for estimating abiotic NA rates of contaminants in groundwater.

  14. The effect of inter-granular constraints on the response of polycrystalline piezoelectric ceramics at the surface and in the bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Wang, Zhiyang; Khansur, Neamul H.; Kimpton, Justin A.; Oddershede, Jette; Daniels, John E.

    2016-08-01

    The electro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials, including a soft PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) and lead-free 0.9375(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-0.0625BaTiO3 (BNT-6.25BT), have been studied using a surface sensitive low-energy (12.4 keV) and bulk sensitive high-energy (73 keV) synchrotron X-ray diffraction with in situ electric fields. The results show that for tetragonal PZT at a maximum electric field of 2.8 kV/mm, the electric-field-induced lattice strain (ɛ111) is 20% higher at the surface than in the bulk, and non-180° ferroelectric domain texture (as indicated by the intensity ratio I002/I200) is 16% higher at the surface. In the case of BNT-6.25BT, which is pseudo-cubic up to fields of 2 kV/mm, lattice strains, ɛ111 and ɛ200, are 15% and 20% higher at the surface, while in the mixed tetragonal and rhombohedral phases at 5 kV/mm, the domain texture indicated by the intensity ratio, I 111 / I 11 1 ¯ and I002/I200, are 12% and 10% higher at the surface than in the bulk, respectively. The observed difference in the strain contributions between the surface and bulk is suggested to result from the fact that surface grains are not constrained in three dimensions, and consequently, domain reorientation and lattice expansion in surface grains are promoted. It is suggested that the magnitude of property difference between the surface and bulk is higher for the PZT than for BNT-6.25BT due to the level of anisotropy in the strain mechanism. The comparison of the results from different methods demonstrates that the intergranular constraints have a significant influence on the electric-field-induced electro-mechanical responses in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. These results have implications for the design of higher performance polycrystalline piezoelectrics.

  15. The Soft Cumulative Constraint

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This research report presents an extension of Cumulative of Choco constraint solver, which is useful to encode over-constrained cumulative problems. This new global constraint uses sweep and task interval violation-based algorithms.

  16. Composing constraint solvers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoeteweij, P.

    2005-01-01

    Composing constraint solvers based on tree search and constraint propagation through generic iteration leads to efficient and flexible constraint solvers. This was demonstrated using OpenSolver, an abstract branch-and-propagate tree search engine that supports a wide range of relevant solver configu

  17. Cloning of a Plasma Membrane Protein Gene TaPM19-1 and Its Response to Abiotic Stresses in Wheat%小麦质膜蛋白基因TaPM19-1的克隆及其对非生物胁迫的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永春; 张春艳; 张宁; 孟凡荣; 任江萍; 牛洪斌; 王翔; 尹钧

    2012-01-01

    [目的]分析小麦质膜蛋白基因TaPM19-1的特征及其对非生物胁迫的响应,并探讨其在小麦抗逆调控过程中的生物学功能.[方法]利用RACE技术克隆了该基因cDNA全长,采用生物信息学方法分析克隆基因编码蛋白的特性,并通过半定量RT-PCR分析该基因在非生物胁迫条件下的表达特性.[结果]TaPM19-1的cDNA全长1090 bp,无内含子,编码蛋白包含182个氨基酸,分子量为19.02 kD,包含有典型的AWPM19保守域;依据氨基酸序列将来源于不同植物的16个AWPM19类蛋白分为3组,TaPM19-1与2个来源于大麦及1个二穗短柄草的AWPM19类蛋白亲源关系最近,同属于第三组.高级结构分析显示,TaPM19-1可形成4个由α-螺旋组成的跨膜域,N端位于膜内,包含由27个氨基酸组成的信号肽,C端近40个氨基酸位于膜内.表达分析显示,TaPM19-1除在发育后期的种子中有较高水平表达外,其它组织中未检测到表达;在所检测的2个小麦品种根系中,TaPM19-1的表达受ABA诱导,但在叶片中的表达量极低;水分胁迫条件下,该基因在根系和叶片中均呈现较强的诱导表达特性;在高盐和高温胁迫条件下,该基因在洛旱2号小麦中均可诱导表达,而在中国春小麦中未检测到该基因表达;在低温胁迫条件下,未检测到TaPM19-1的表达.[结论]获得了小麦质膜蛋白基因TaPM19-1的cDNA 全长,其编码蛋白可形成典型的跨膜结构特征;该基因受植物激素ABA的诱导,在洛旱2号中也可被干旱、高盐和高温胁迫诱导,但在中国春中对高盐和高温胁迫无响应.推测TaPM19-1在洛旱2号和中国春中存在不同的转录调控机制.%[Objective] The characteristics of a plasma membrane protein gene TaPM19-1 and its response to abiotic stresses in wheat were studied, which will provide an insight into its biological roles involved in the molecular mechanisms of abiotic-sterss response in wheat. [Method] RACE technology was

  18. Application of Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry to Field Grown Crop Plants To Allow Dissection of the Molecular Mechanisms of Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Jacoby

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One major constraint upon the application of molecular crop breeding approaches is the small number of genes linked to agronomically desirable traits through defined biochemical mechanisms. Proteomic investigations of crop plants under abiotic stress treatments have identified many proteins that differ in control versus stress comparisons, however this broad profiling of cell physiology is poorly suited to ranking the effects and identifying the specific proteins that are causative in agronomically relevant traits. Here we will reason that insights into a protein’s function, its biochemical process and links to stress tolerance are more likely to arise through approaches that evaluate these differential abundances of proteins and include varietal comparisons, precise discrimination of protein isoforms, enrichment of functionally related proteins and integration of proteomic datasets with physiological measurements of both lab and field grown plants. We will briefly explain how applying the emerging proteomic technology of multiplexed selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry with its accuracy and throughput can facilitate and enhance these approaches and provide a clear means to rank the growing cohort of stress responsive proteins. We will also highlight the benefit of integrating proteomic analyses with cultivar-specific genetic databases and physiological assessments of cultivar performance in relevant field environments for revealing deeper insights into molecular crop improvement.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Sunflower Genotypes with Contrasting Oxidative Stress Tolerance Reveals Individual- and Combined- Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Vemanna S; Paramanantham, Anjugam; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Mohan-Raju, Basavaiah; Udayakumar, Makarla; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2016-01-01

    In nature plants are often simultaneously challenged by different biotic and abiotic stresses. Although the mechanisms underlying plant responses against single stress have been studied considerably, plant tolerance mechanisms under combined stress is not understood. Also, the mechanism used to combat independently and sequentially occurring many number of biotic and abiotic stresses has also not systematically studied. From this context, in this study, we attempted to explore the shared response of sunflower plants to many independent stresses by using meta-analysis of publically available transcriptome data and transcript profiling by quantitative PCR. Further, we have also analyzed the possible role of the genes so identified in contributing to combined stress tolerance. Meta-analysis of transcriptomic data from many abiotic and biotic stresses indicated the common representation of oxidative stress responsive genes. Further, menadione-mediated oxidative stress in sunflower seedlings showed similar pattern of changes in the oxidative stress related genes. Based on this a large scale screening of 55 sunflower genotypes was performed under menadione stress and those contrasting in oxidative stress tolerance were identified. Further to confirm the role of genes identified in individual and combined stress tolerance the contrasting genotypes were individually and simultaneously challenged with few abiotic and biotic stresses. The tolerant hybrid showed reduced levels of stress damage both under combined stress and few independent stresses. Transcript profiling of the genes identified from meta-analysis in the tolerant hybrid also indicated that the selected genes were up-regulated under individual and combined stresses. Our results indicate that menadione-based screening can identify genotypes not only tolerant to multiple number of individual biotic and abiotic stresses, but also the combined stresses.

  20. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Narita, Norio; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium(IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current ...

  1. Can soil respiration estimate neglect the contribution of abiotic exchange?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi CHEN; WenFeng WANG; GePing LUO; Hui YE

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that soil respiration can always be interpreted purely in terms of biotic processes, neglecting the contribution of abiotic exchange to CO2 fluxes in alkaline soils of arid areas that characterize 5%of the Earth’s total land surface. Analyses on flux data collected from previous studies suggested reconciling soil respiration as organic (root/microbial respiration) and inorganic (abiotic CO2 exchange) respiration, whose contributions in the total CO2 flux were determined by soil alkaline content. On the basis of utilizing mete-orological and soil data collected from the Xinjiang and Central Asia Scientific Data Sharing Platform, an incorpo-rated model indicated that inorganic respiration represents almost half of the total CO2 flux. Neglecting the abiotic module may result in overestimates of soil respiration in arid alkaline lands, which partly explains the long-sought“missing carbon sink”.

  2. On Testing Constraint Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Lazaar, Nadjib; Yahia, Lebbah

    2010-01-01

    The success of several constraint-based modeling languages such as OPL, ZINC, or COMET, appeals for better software engineering practices, particularly in the testing phase. This paper introduces a testing framework enabling automated test case generation for constraint programming. We propose a general framework of constraint program development which supposes that a first declarative and simple constraint model is available from the problem specifications analysis. Then, this model is refined using classical techniques such as constraint reformulation, surrogate and global constraint addition, or symmetry-breaking to form an improved constraint model that must be thoroughly tested before being used to address real-sized problems. We think that most of the faults are introduced in this refinement step and propose a process which takes the first declarative model as an oracle for detecting non-conformities. We derive practical test purposes from this process to generate automatically test data that exhibit no...

  3. Abiotic methane formation during experimental serpentinization of olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.

    2016-12-01

    Fluids circulating through actively serpentinizing systems are often highly enriched in methane (CH4). In many cases, the CH4 in these fluids is thought to derive from abiotic reduction of inorganic carbon, but the conditions under which this process can occur in natural systems remain unclear. In recent years, several studies have reported abiotic formation of CH4 during experimental serpentinization of olivine at temperatures at or below 200 °C. However, these results seem to contradict studies conducted at higher temperatures (300 °C to 400 °C), where substantial kinetic barriers to CH4 synthesis have been observed. Here, the potential for abiotic formation of CH4 from dissolved inorganic carbon during olivine serpentinization is reevaluated in a series of laboratory experiments conducted at 200 °C to 320 °C. A 13C-labeled inorganic carbon source was used to unambiguously determine the origin of CH4 generated in the experiments. Consistent with previous high-temperature studies, the results indicate that abiotic formation of CH4 from reduction of dissolved inorganic carbon during the experiments is extremely limited, with nearly all of the observed CH4 derived from background sources. The results indicate that the potential for abiotic synthesis of CH4 in low-temperature serpentinizing environments may be much more limited than some recent studies have suggested. However, more extensive production of CH4 was observed in one experiment performed under conditions that allowed an H2-rich vapor phase to form, suggesting that shallow serpentinization environments where a separate gas phase is present may be more favorable for abiotic synthesis of CH4.

  4. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Andrew; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Enantiomeric ratios of amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic racemize abiotically. Based on a heating experiment, we report Arrhenius parameters...... between different amino acids or depths. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of D:L amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial...

  5. Adaptations to “Thermal Time” Constraints in Papilio: Latitudinal and Local Size Clines Differ in Response to Regional Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    J Mark Scriber; Ben Elliot; Emily Maher; Molly McGuire; Marjie Niblack

    2014-01-01

    Adaptations to “thermal time” (=Degree-day) constraints on developmental rates and voltinism for North American tiger swallowtail butterflies involve most life stages, and at higher latitudes include: smaller pupae/adults; larger eggs; oviposition on most nutritious larval host plants; earlier spring adult emergences; faster larval growth and shorter molting durations at lower temperatures. Here we report on forewing sizes through 30 years for both the northern univoltine P. canadensis (with ...

  6. A membrane-bound NAC transcription factor as an integrator of biotic and abiotic stress signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2010-05-01

    Transcription factors are central components of gene regulatory networks that mediate virtually all aspects of growth and developmental processes in biological systems. The activity of transcription factors is regulated at multiple steps, such as gene transcription, posttranscriptional RNA processing, posttranslational modification, protein-protein interactions, and controlled protein turnover. Controlled activation of dormant, membrane-bound transcription factor (MTF) is an intriguing regulatory mechanism that ensures quick transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations in plants, in which various stress hormones serve as signaling mediators. NTL6 is proteolytically activated upon exposure to cold and induces expression of the Pathogenesis-Related (PR) genes. The membrane-mediated cold signaling in inducing pathogen resistance is considered to be an adaptive strategy that protects plants against infection by hydrophilic pathogens frequently occurring during cold season. We found that NTL6 also mediates abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis. NTL6 is proteolytically activated by ABA. Transgenic plants overexpressing a nuclear NTL6 form (35S:6ΔC) exhibited a hypersensitive response to ABA and high salinity in seed germination. Taken together, these observations indicate that NTL6 plays an integrative role in plant responses to both biotic and abiotic stress conditions.

  7. Modulation of thiamine metabolism in Zea mays seedlings under conditions of abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapala-Kozik, Maria; Kowalska, Ewa; Ostrowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    The responses of plants to abiotic stress involve the up-regulation of numerous metabolic pathways, including several major routes that engage thiamine diphosphate (TDP)-dependent enzymes. This suggests that the metabolism of thiamine (vitamin B1) and its phosphate esters in plants may be modulated under various stress conditions. In the present study, Zea mays seedlings were used as a model system to analyse for any relation between the plant response to abiotic stress and the properties of thiamine biosynthesis and activation. Conditions of drought, high salt, and oxidative stress were induced by polyethylene glycol, sodium chloride, and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The expected increases in the abscisic acid levels and in the activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were found under each stress condition. The total thiamine compound content in the maize seedling leaves increased under each stress condition applied, with the strongest effects on these levels observed under the oxidative stress treatment. This increase was also found to be associated with changes in the relative distribution of free thiamine, thiamine monophosphate (TMP), and TDP. Surprisingly, the activity of the thiamine synthesizing enzyme, TMP synthase, responded poorly to abiotic stress, in contrast to the significant enhancement found for the activities of the TDP synthesizing enzyme, thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and a number of the TDP/TMP phosphatases. Finally, a moderate increase in the activity of transketolase, one of the major TDP-dependent enzymes, was detectable under conditions of salt and oxidative stress. These findings suggest a role of thiamine metabolism in the plant response to environmental stress.

  8. Abiotic Stresses Downregulate Key Genes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Goel

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought and extreme temperatures affect nitrogen (N uptake and assimilation in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of N pathway genes at transcriptional level under abiotic stress conditions in Brassica juncea. In the present work, genes encoding nitrate transporters (NRT, ammonium transporters (AMT, nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamine synthetase (GS, glutamate synthase (GOGAT, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, asparagines synthetase (ASN were cloned from Brassica juncea L. var. Varuna. The deduced protein sequences were analyzed to predict their subcellular localization, which confirmed localization of all the proteins in their respective cellular organelles. The protein sequences were also subjected to conserved domain identification, which confirmed presence of characteristic domains in all the proteins, indicating their putative functions. Moreover, expression of these genes was studied after 1h and 24h of salt (150 mM NaCl, osmotic (250 mM Mannitol, cold (4°C and heat (42°C stresses. Most of the genes encoding nitrate transporters and enzymes responsible for N assimilation and remobilization were found to be downregulated under abiotic stresses. The expression of BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2, BjGS1.1, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 1hr, while expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT2.1, BjNiR1, BjAMT2, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 24h of all the stress treatments. However, expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.5 and BjGDH2 was upregulated after 1h of all stress treatments, while no gene was found to be upregulated after 24h of stress treatments, commonly. These observations indicate that expression of most of the genes is adversely affected under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under prolonged stress exposure (24h, which may be one of the reasons of reduction in plant growth and development under abiotic stresses.

  9. Cullin-RING Ubiquitin Ligase Family in Plant Abiotic Stress Pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liquan Guo; Cynthia D.Nezames; Lianxi Sheng; Xingwang Deng; Ning Wei

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a key mechanism that plants use to generate adaptive responses in coping with various environmental stresses.Cullin-RING (CRL) complexes represent a predominant group of ubiquitin E3 ligases in this system.In this review,we focus on the CRL E3s that have been implicated in abiotic stress signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.By comparing and analyzing these cases,we hope to gain a better understanding on how CRL complexes work under various settings in an attempt to decipher the clues about the regulatory mechanism of CRL E3s.

  10. Flowering phenology, growth forms, and pollination syndromes in tropical dry forest species: Influence of phylogeny and abiotic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Flores, Jorge; Hernández-Esquivel, Karen Beatriz; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Analyses of the influence of temporal variation in abiotic factors on flowering phenology of tropical dry forest species have not considered the possible response of species with different growth forms and pollination syndromes, while controlling for phylogenetic relationships among species. Here, we investigated the relationship between flowering phenology, abiotic factors, and plant functional attributes, while controlling for phylogenetic relationship among species, in a dry forest community in Mexico. We characterized flowering phenology (time and duration) and pollination syndromes of 55 tree species, 49 herbs, 24 shrubs, 15 lianas, and 11 vines. We tested the influence of pollination syndrome, growth form, and abiotic factors on flowering phenology using phylogenetic generalized least squares. We found a relationship between flowering duration and time. Growth form was related to flowering time, and the pollination syndrome had a more significant relationship with flowering duration. Flowering time variation in the community was explained mainly by abiotic variables, without an important phylogenetic effect. Flowering time in lianas and trees was negatively and positively correlated with daylength, respectively. Functional attributes, environmental cues, and phylogeny interact with each other to shape the diversity of flowering patterns. Phenological differentiation among species groups revealed multiples strategies associated with growth form and pollination syndromes that can be important for understanding species coexistence in this highly diverse plant community. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  11. The impact of individual and combined abiotic factors on daily otolith growth in a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Amelia S; Whinney, James; Taylor, Brett; Kroon, Frederieke

    2016-06-28

    Coral reefs are increasingly subjected to both local and global stressors, however, there is limited information on how reef organisms respond to their combined effects under natural conditions. This field study examined the growth response of the damselfish Neopomacentrus bankieri to the individual and combined effects of multiple abiotic factors. Turbidity, temperature, tidal movement, and wave action were recorded every 10 minutes for four months, after which the daily otolith growth of N. bankieri was aligned with corresponding abiotic conditions. Temperature was the only significant driver of daily otolith increment width, with increasing temperatures resulting in decreasing width. Although tidal movement was not a significant driver of increment width by itself, the combined effect of tidal movement and temperature had a greater negative effect on growth than temperature alone. Our results indicate that temperature can drive changes in growth even at very fine scales, and demonstrate that the cumulative impact of abiotic factors can be substantially greater than individual effects. As abiotic factors continue to change in intensity and duration, the combined impacts of them will become increasingly important drivers of physiological and ecological change.

  12. An ATL78-like RING-H2 finger protein confers abiotic stress tolerance through interacting with RAV2 and CSN5B in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available RING finger proteins play an important role in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. In the present study, a wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites cold-induced RING-H2 finger gene, ShATL78L, was isolated, which has been identified as an abiotic stress responsive gene in tomato. The results showed that ShATL78L was constitutively expressed in various tissues such as root, lea petiole, stem, flower, and fruit. Cold stress up-regulated ShATL78L in the cold-tolerant S. habrochaites compared to the susceptible cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum. Furthermore, ShATL78L expression was also regulated under different stresses such as drought, salt, heat, wound, osmotic stress, and exogenous hormones. Functional characterization showed that cultivated tomato overexpressing ShATL78L had improved tolerance to cold, drought and oxidative stresses compared to the wild-type and the knockdown lines. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of ShATL78L regulating abiotic stress responses, we performed yeast one-hybrid and two-hybrid assays and found that RAV2 could bind to the promoter of ShATL78L and activate its transcription, and CSN5B could interact with ShATL78L to regulate abiotic stress responses. Taken together, these results show that ShATL78L plays an important role in regulating plant adaptation to abiotic stresses through bound by RAV2 and interacting with CSN5B.

  13. Constraints meet concurrency

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro, Jacopo

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the benefits that emerge when the fields of constraint programming and concurrency meet. On the one hand, constraints can be used in concurrency theory to increase the conciseness and the expressive power of concurrent languages from a pragmatic point of view. On the other hand, problems modeled by using constraints can be solved faster and more efficiently using a concurrent system. Both directions are explored providing two separate lines of development. Firstly the expressive power of a concurrent language is studied, namely Constraint Handling Rules, that supports constraints as a primitive construct. The features of this language which make it Turing powerful are shown. Then a framework is proposed to solve constraint problems that is intended to be deployed on a concurrent system. For the development of this framework the concurrent language Jolie following the Service Oriented paradigm is used. Based on this experience, an extension to Service Oriented Languages is also proposed in ...

  14. Abiotic Ozone and Oxygen in Atmospheres Similar to Prebiotic Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; Claire, Mark W; Robinson, Tyler D; Meadows, Victoria S

    2014-01-01

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely-detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O_2) or ozone (O_3) simultaneous to methane (CH_4) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here, we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O_2 and O_3 production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O_2 and O_3 build up, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O_3 and CH_4 features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O_2 features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O_3 and CH_4 by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrim...

  15. STRESS ECOLOGY IN FUCUS : ABIOTIC, BIOTIC AND GENETIC INTERACTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahl, Martin; Jormalainen, Veijo; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Coyer, James A.; Molis, Markus; Schubert, Hendrik; Dethier, Megan; Karez, Rolf; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Pearson, Gareth; Rohde, Sven; Wikstrom, Sofia A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Lesser, M

    2011-01-01

    Stress regimes defined as the synchronous or sequential action of abiotic and biotic stresses determine the performance and distribution of species. The natural patterns of stress to which species are more or less well adapted have recently started to shift and alter under the influence of global ch

  16. Temporal abiotic variability structures invertebrate communities in agricultural drainage ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whatley, M.H.; Vonk, J.A.; van der Geest, H.G.; Admiraal, W.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic variability is known to structure lotic invertebrate communities, yet its influence on lentic invertebrates is not clear. This study tests the hypothesis that variability of nutrients and macro-ions are structuring invertebrate communities in agricultural drainage ditches. This was determine

  17. Compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eZechmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tripeptide thiol glutathione (γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression and important for the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state of plants through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, Tobacco Mosaic Virus. The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g. glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol. Thus this review will reveal the compartment specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions.

  18. Temporal abiotic variability structures invertebrate communities in agricultural drainage ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whatley, M.H.; Vonk, J.A.; van der Geest, H.G.; Admiraal, W.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic variability is known to structure lotic invertebrate communities, yet its influence on lentic invertebrates is not clear. This study tests the hypothesis that variability of nutrients and macro-ions are structuring invertebrate communities in agricultural drainage ditches. This was

  19. Ecogenomics of plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila Olivas, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary

    In natural and agricultural ecosystems, plants are exposed to a wide diversity of abiotic and biotic stresses such as drought, salinity, pathogens and insect herbivores. Under natural conditions, these stresses do not occur in isolation but commonly occur simultaneo

  20. STRESS ECOLOGY IN FUCUS : ABIOTIC, BIOTIC AND GENETIC INTERACTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahl, Martin; Jormalainen, Veijo; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Coyer, James A.; Molis, Markus; Schubert, Hendrik; Dethier, Megan; Karez, Rolf; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Pearson, Gareth; Rohde, Sven; Wikstrom, Sofia A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Lesser, M

    2011-01-01

    Stress regimes defined as the synchronous or sequential action of abiotic and biotic stresses determine the performance and distribution of species. The natural patterns of stress to which species are more or less well adapted have recently started to shift and alter under the influence of global

  1. A membraneless single compartment abiotic glucose fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Gymama; Sunday, Joshua

    2014-09-01

    A simple energy harvesting strategy has been developed to selectively catalyze glucose in the presence of oxygen in a glucose/O2 fuel cell. The anode consists of an abiotic catalyst Al/Au/ZnO, in which ZnO seed layer was deposited on the surface of Al/Au substrate using hydrothermal method. The cathode is constructed from a single rod of platinum with an outer diameter of 500 μm. The abiotic glucose fuel cell was studied in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) containing 5 mM glucose at a temperature of 22 °C. The cell is characterized according to its open-circuit voltage, polarization profile, and power density plot. Under these conditions, the abiotic glucose fuel cell possesses an open-circuit voltage of 840 mV and delivered a maximum power density of 16.2 μW cm-2 at a cell voltage of 495 mV. These characteristics are comparable to biofuel cell utilizing a much more complex system design. Such low-cost lightweight abiotic catalyzed glucose fuel cells have a great promise to be optimized, miniaturized to power bio-implantable devices.

  2. On Minimal Constraint Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gottlob, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In a minimal binary constraint network, every tuple of a constraint relation can be extended to a solution. It was conjectured that computing a solution to such a network is NP complete. We prove this conjecture true and show that the problem remains NP hard even in case the total domain of all values that may appear in the constraint relations is bounded by a constant.

  3. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Valencia Posso, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...... reflect the reactive interactions between concurrent constraint processes and their environment, as well as internal interactions between individual processes. Relationships between the suggested notions are studied, and they are all proved to be decidable for a substantial fragment of the calculus...

  4. Sugar signalling and gene expression in relation to carbohydrate metabolism under abiotic stresses in plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil K Gupta; Narinder Kaur

    2005-12-01

    Sucrose is required for plant growth and development. The sugar status of plant cells is sensed by sensor proteins. The signal generated by signal transduction cascades, which could involve mitogen-activated protein kinases, protein phosphatases, Ca2+ and calmodulins, results in appropriate gene expression. A variety of genes are either induced or repressed depending upon the status of soluble sugars. Abiotic stresses to plants result in major alterations in sugar status and hence affect the expression of various genes by down- and up-regulating their expression. Hexokinase-dependent and hexokinase-independent pathways are involved in sugar sensing. Sucrose also acts as a signal molecule as it affects the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter. The sucrose transporter acts as a sucrose sensor and is involved in phloem loading. Fructokinase may represent an additional sensor that bypasses hexokinase phosphorylation especially when sucrose synthase is dominant. Mutants isolated on the basis of response of germination and seedling growth to sugars and reporter-based screening protocols are being used to study the response of altered sugar status on gene expression. Common cis-acting elements in sugar signalling pathways have been identified. Transgenic plants with elevated levels of sugars/sugar alcohols like fructans, raffinose series oligosaccharides, trehalose and mannitol are tolerant to different stresses but have usually impaired growth. Efforts need to be made to have transgenic plants in which abiotic stress responsive genes are expressed only at the time of adverse environmental conditions instead of being constitutively synthesized.

  5. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S., E-mail: shawn.goldman@nasa.gov [NASA Astrobiology Institute—Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States)

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  6. Exogenous application of hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide enhanced multiple abiotic stress tolerance in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Chan, Zhulong

    2013-10-01

    As a gaseous molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently found to be involved in plant responses to multiple abiotic stress. In this study, salt (150 and 300 mM NaCl), osmotic (15% and 30% PEG6000) and cold (4 °C) stress treatments induced accumulation of endogenous H2S level, indicating that H2S might play a role in bermudagrass responses to salt, osmotic and cold stresses. Exogenous application of H2S donor (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS) conferred improved salt, osmotic and freezing stress tolerances in bermudagrass, which were evidenced by decreased electrolyte leakage and increased survival rate under stress conditions. Additionally, NaHS treatment alleviated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and cell damage induced by abiotic stress, via modulating metabolisms of several antioxidant enzymes [catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and GR (glutathione reductase)] and non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool and redox state. Moreover, exogenous NaHS treatment led to accumulation of osmolytes (proline, sucrose and soluble total sugars) in stressed bermudagrass plants. Taken together, all these data indicated the protective roles of H2S in bermudagrass responses to salt, osmotic and freezing stresses, via activation of the antioxidant response and osmolyte accumulation. These findings might be applicable to grass and crop engineering to improve abiotic stress tolerance.

  7. Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Aage U.

    2004-01-01

    Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process.......Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process....

  8. Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Aage U.

    2004-01-01

    Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process.......Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process....

  9. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...

  10. Evaluating Distributed Timing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.H.; Drejer, N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems.......In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems....

  11. The shifting influence of abiotic drivers during landslide succession in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. R. Walker; A. B. Shiels; P. J. Bellingham; A. D. Sparrow; N. Fetcher; F. H. Landau; D. J. Lodge

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Abiotic variables are critical drivers of succession in most primary seres, but how their influence on biota changes over time is rarely examined. Landslides provide good model systems for examining abiotic influences because they are spatially and temporally heterogeneous habitats with distinct abiotic and biotic gradients and post-landslide erosion. 2. In...

  12. Decentralized Constraint Satisfaction

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, K R; Leith, D J

    2011-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) lie at the heart of many modern industrial and commercial tasks. An important new collection of CSPs has recently been emerging that differ from classical problems in that they impose constraints on the class of algorithms that can be used to solve them. In computer network applications, these constraints arise as the variables within the CSP are located at physically distinct devices that cannot communicate. At each instant, every variable only knows if all its constraints are met or at least one is not. Consequently, the CSP's solution must be found using a decentralized approach. Existing algorithms for solving CSPs are either centralized or distributed, both of which violate these algorithmic constraints. In this article we present the first algorithm for solving CSPs that fulfills these new requirements. It is fully decentralized, making no use of a centralized controller or message-passing between variables. We prove that this algorithm converges with probability ...

  13. Constraints in Quantum Geometrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gentle, A P; Kheyfets, A I; Miller, W A; Gentle, Adrian P.; George, Nathan D.; Kheyfets, Arkady; Miller, Warner A.

    2003-01-01

    We compare different treatments of the constraints in canonical quantum gravity. The standard approach on the superspace of 3-geometries treats the constraints as the sole carriers of the dynamic content of the theory, thus rendering the traditional dynamic equations obsolete. Quantization of the constraints in both the Dirac and ADM square root Hamiltonian approach lead to the well known problems of the description of time evolution. These problems of time are both of interpretational and technical nature. In contrast, the so-called geometrodynamic quantization procedure on the superspace of the true dynamic variables separates the issue of quantization from enforcing the constraints. The resulting theory takes into account the states that are off shell with respect to the constraints, and thus avoids the problems of time. Here, we develop, for the first time, the geometrodynamic quantization formalism in a general setting and show that it retains all essential features previously illustrated in the context ...

  14. Resilience of Penicillium resedanum LK6 and exogenous gibberellin in improving Capsicum annuum growth under abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Waqas, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how endophytic fungi mitigate abiotic stresses in plants will be important in a changing global climate. A few endophytes can produce phytohormones, but their ability to induce physiological changes in host plants during extreme environmental conditions are largely unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the ability of Penicillium resedanum LK6 to produce gibberellins and its role in improving the growth of Capsicum annuum L. under salinity, drought, and heat stresses. These effects were compared with exogenous application of gibberellic acid (GA3). Endophyte treatment significantly increased shoot length, biomass, chlorophyll content, and the photosynthesis rate compared with the uninfected control during abiotic stresses. The endophyte and combined endophyte + GA3 treatments significantly ameliorated the negative effects of stresses compared with the control. Stress-responsive endogenous abscisic acid and its encoding genes, such as zeaxanthin epoxidase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 3, and ABA aldehyde oxidase 3, were significantly reduced in endophyte-treated plants under stress. Conversely, salicylic acid and biosynthesis-related gene (isochorismate synthase) had constitutive expressions while pathogenesis related (PR1 and PR5) genes showed attenuated responses during endophyte treatment under abiotic stresses. The present findings suggest that endophytes have effects comparable to those of exogenous GA3; both can significantly increase plant growth and yield under changing environmental conditions by reprogramming the host plant's physiological responses.

  15. The Alfin-like homeodomain finger protein AL5 suppresses multiple negative factors to confer abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Tao, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hao-Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Lin, Qing; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2015-03-01

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger proteins affect processes of growth and development by changing transcription and reading epigenetic histone modifications, but their functions in abiotic stress responses remain largely unclear. Here we characterized seven Arabidopsis thaliana Alfin1-like PHD finger proteins (ALs) in terms of the responses to abiotic stresses. ALs localized to the nucleus and repressed transcription. Except AL6, all the ALs bound to G-rich elements. Mutations of the amino acids at positions 34 and 35 in AL6 caused loss of ability to bind to G-rich elements. Expression of the AL genes responded differentially to osmotic stress, salt, cold and abscisic acid treatments. AL5-over-expressing plants showed higher tolerance to salt, drought and freezing stress than Col-0. Consistently, al5 mutants showed reduced stress tolerance. We used ChIP-Seq assays to identify eight direct targets of AL5, and found that AL5 binds to the promoter regions of these genes. Knockout mutants of five of these target genes exhibited varying tolerances to stresses. These results indicate that AL5 inhibits multiple signaling pathways to confer stress tolerance. Our study sheds light on mechanisms of AL5-mediated signaling in abiotic stress responses, and provides tools for improvement of stress tolerance in crop plants.

  16. Seed treatment with Trichoderma harzianum alleviates biotic, abiotic, and physiological stresses in germinating seeds and seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastouri, Fatemeh; Björkman, Thomas; Harman, Gary E

    2010-11-01

    Trichoderma spp. are endophytic plant symbionts that are widely used as seed treatments to control diseases and to enhance plant growth and yield. Although some recent work has been published on their abilities to alleviate abiotic stresses, specific knowledge of mechanisms, abilities to control multiple plant stress factors, their effects on seed and seedlings is lacking. We examined the effects of seed treatment with T. harzianum strain T22 on germination of seed exposed to biotic stress (seed and seedling disease caused by Pythium ultimum) and abiotic stresses (osmotic, salinity, chilling, or heat stress). We also evaluated the ability of the beneficial fungus to overcome physiological stress (poor seed quality induced by seed aging). If seed were not under any of the stresses noted above, T22 generally had little effect upon seedling performance. However, under stress, treated seed germinated consistently faster and more uniformly than untreated seeds whether the stress was osmotic, salt, or suboptimal temperatures. The consistent response to varying stresses suggests a common mechanism through which the plant-fungus association enhances tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses as well as biotic stress. A common factor that negatively affects plants under these stress conditions is accumulation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), and we tested the hypothesis that T22 reduced damages resulting from accumulation of ROS in stressed plants. Treatment of seeds reduced accumulation of lipid peroxides in seedlings under osmotic stress or in aged seeds. In addition, we showed that the effect of exogenous application of an antioxidant, glutathione, or application of T22, resulted in a similar positive effect on seed germination under osmotic stress or in aged seed. This evidence supports the model that T. harzianum strain T22 increases seedling vigor and ameliorates stress by inducing physiological protection in plants against oxidative damage.

  17. Constraint-based reachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gotlieb

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iterative imperative programs can be considered as infinite-state systems computing over possibly unbounded domains. Studying reachability in these systems is challenging as it requires to deal with an infinite number of states with standard backward or forward exploration strategies. An approach that we call Constraint-based reachability, is proposed to address reachability problems by exploring program states using a constraint model of the whole program. The keypoint of the approach is to interpret imperative constructions such as conditionals, loops, array and memory manipulations with the fundamental notion of constraint over a computational domain. By combining constraint filtering and abstraction techniques, Constraint-based reachability is able to solve reachability problems which are usually outside the scope of backward or forward exploration strategies. This paper proposes an interpretation of classical filtering consistencies used in Constraint Programming as abstract domain computations, and shows how this approach can be used to produce a constraint solver that efficiently generates solutions for reachability problems that are unsolvable by other approaches.

  18. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young solar system and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan s atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25 permil relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental set...

  19. Transcriptional networks-crops, clocks, and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehan, Malia A; Greenham, Kathleen; Mockler, Todd C; McClung, C Robertson

    2015-04-01

    Several factors affect the yield potential and geographical range of crops including the circadian clock, water availability, and seasonal temperature changes. In order to sustain and increase plant productivity on marginal land in the face of both biotic and abiotic stresses, we need to more efficiently generate stress-resistant crops through marker-assisted breeding, genetic modification, and new genome-editing technologies. To leverage these strategies for producing the next generation of crops, future transcriptomic data acquisition should be pursued with an appropriate temporal design and analyzed with a network-centric approach. The following review focuses on recent developments in abiotic stress transcriptional networks in economically important crops and will highlight the utility of correlation-based network analysis and applications.

  20. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Andrew D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10(-5)-11×10(-5) yr(-1). These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations.

  1. Seismological Constraints on Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2004-12-01

    Earth is an open thermodynamic system radiating heat energy into space. A transition from geostatic earth models such as PREM to geodynamical models is needed. We discuss possible thermodynamic constraints on the variables that govern the distribution of forces and flows in the deep Earth. In this paper we assume that the temperature distribution is time-invariant, so that all flows vanish at steady state except for the heat flow Jq per unit area (Kuiken, 1994). Superscript 0 will refer to the steady state while x denotes the excited state of the system. We may write σ 0=(J{q}0ṡX{q}0)/T where Xq is the conjugate force corresponding to Jq, and σ is the rate of entropy production per unit volume. Consider now what happens after the occurrence of an earthquake at time t=0 and location (0,0,0). The earthquake introduces a stress drop Δ P(x,y,z) at all points of the system. Response flows are directed along the gradients toward the epicentral area, and the entropy production will increase with time as (Prigogine, 1947) σ x(t)=σ 0+α {1}/(t+β )+α {2}/(t+β )2+etc A seismological constraint on the parameters may be obtained from Omori's empirical relation N(t)=p/(t+q) where N(t) is the number of aftershocks at time t following the main shock. It may be assumed that p/q\\sim\\alpha_{1}/\\beta times a constant. Another useful constraint is the Mexican-hat geometry of the seismic transient as obtained e.g. from InSAR radar interferometry. For strike-slip events such as Landers the distribution of \\DeltaP is quadrantal, and an oval-shaped seismicity gap develops about the epicenter. A weak outer triggering maxiμm is found at a distance of about 17 fault lengths. Such patterns may be extracted from earthquake catalogs by statistical analysis (Lomnitz, 1996). Finally, the energy of the perturbation must be at least equal to the recovery energy. The total energy expended in an aftershock sequence can be found approximately by integrating the local contribution over

  2. Influence of abiotic stress during soybean germination followed by recovery on the phenolic compounds of radicles and their antioxidant capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Swigonska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress factors are among the major causes of lower crop yields. It is known, that in response to cold and/or osmotic stress, crops activate various defense mechanisms, including morphological, physiological and metabolic adaptations. Secondary metabolism, especially phenolic compounds, seem to be an important factor of stress-induced metabolic re-engineering as their levels are alternated by abiotic stress in plants. Despite the fact, that the nature and function of phenolic compounds was already studied in various plant species, it is important to define tissue-specific changes induced by two most potent abiotic stressors – low temperature and decreased water potential. Moreover, in fields, the appearance of single stress is rather rare. Usually two or more factors are acting in parallel, which may potentially result in different effects. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze selected elements of secondary metabolism in roots of germinating soybean seeds under cold stress, osmotic stress and both stresses combined. In addition the effects of constant and persistent stress were compared to those induced by sudden and brief stress appearance, as well as after the post-stress recovery process. In the presented study standard methods for identification and quantification of phenolic acids and isoflavones were used and the antioxidant capacity of the radicle extracts was measured. The phenolic metabolism in plants was greatly intensified in response to cold and osmotic stress and remained at high level during the post-stress recovery. The amount and composition of both phenolic acids and identified isoflavones also changed in stress- and duration-dependent manner. This proves an important role of phenolic compounds in abiotic stress response of germinating soybean seeds and opens up new perspectives for further investigations.

  3. Ecogenomics of plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Davila Olivas, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In natural and agricultural ecosystems, plants are exposed to a wide diversity of abiotic and biotic stresses such as drought, salinity, pathogens and insect herbivores. Under natural conditions, these stresses do not occur in isolation but commonly occur simultaneously. However, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to survive and reproduce under suboptimal conditions. Genetic screenings and molecular genetic assays have shed light on the molecular players that provide resis...

  4. Energy harvesting by implantable abiotically catalyzed glucose fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerzenmacher, S.; von Stetten, F. [Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ducree, J. [HSG-IMIT, Wilhelm-Schickard-Str. 10, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany); Zengerle, R. [Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); HSG-IMIT, Wilhelm-Schickard-Str. 10, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Implantable glucose fuel cells are a promising approach to realize an autonomous energy supply for medical implants that solely relies on the electrochemical reaction of oxygen and glucose. Key advantage over conventional batteries is the abundant availability of both reactants in body fluids, rendering the need for regular replacement or external recharging mechanisms obsolete. Implantable glucose fuel cells, based on abiotic catalysts such as noble metals and activated carbon, have already been developed as power supply for cardiac pacemakers in the late-1960s. Whereas, in vitro and preliminary in vivo studies demonstrated their long-term stability, the performance of these fuel cells is limited to the {mu}W-range. Consequently, no further developments have been reported since high-capacity lithium iodine batteries for cardiac pacemakers became available in the mid-1970s. In recent years research has been focused on enzymatically catalyzed glucose fuel cells. They offer higher power densities than their abiotically catalyzed counterparts, but the limited enzyme stability impedes long-term application. In this context, the trend towards increasingly energy-efficient low power MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) implants has revived the interest in abiotic catalysts as a long-term stable alternative. This review covers the state-of-the-art in implantable abiotically catalyzed glucose fuel cells and their development since the 1960s. Different embodiment concepts are presented and the historical achievements of academic and industrial research groups are critically reviewed. Special regard is given to the applicability of the concept as sustainable micro-power generator for implantable devices. (author)

  5. Communication with Disturbance Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Bandemer, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The problem of communication with disturbance constraints is introduced. The rate-disturbance region is established for the single constraint case. The optimal encoding scheme turns out to be the same as the Han-Kobayashi scheme for the two user-pair interference channel. For communication with two disturbance constraints, a coding scheme and a corresponding inner bound for the deterministic case are presented. The results suggest a natural way to obtain a new inner bound on the capacity region of the interference channel with more than two user pairs.

  6. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-12-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.Reference:Narita N. et al.,Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 13977 (2015)http://www.nature.com/articles/srep13977

  7. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  8. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-10

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.

  9. Adaptations to “Thermal Time” Constraints in Papilio: Latitudinal and Local Size Clines Differ in Response to Regional Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriber, J. Mark; Elliot, Ben; Maher, Emily; McGuire, Molly; Niblack, Marjie

    2014-01-01

    Adaptations to “thermal time” (=Degree-day) constraints on developmental rates and voltinism for North American tiger swallowtail butterflies involve most life stages, and at higher latitudes include: smaller pupae/adults; larger eggs; oviposition on most nutritious larval host plants; earlier spring adult emergences; faster larval growth and shorter molting durations at lower temperatures. Here we report on forewing sizes through 30 years for both the northern univoltine P. canadensis (with obligate diapause) from the Great Lakes historical hybrid zone northward to central Alaska (65° N latitude), and the multivoltine, P. glaucus from this hybrid zone southward to central Florida (27° N latitude). Despite recent climate warming, no increases in mean forewing lengths of P. glaucus were observed at any major collection location (FL to MI) from the 1980s to 2013 across this long latitudinal transect (which reflects the “converse of Bergmann’s size Rule”, with smaller females at higher latitudes). Unlike lower latitudes, the Alaska, Ontonogon, and Chippewa/Mackinac locations (for P. canadensis) showed no significant increases in D-day accumulations, which could explain lack of size change in these northernmost locations. As a result of 3–4 decades of empirical data from major collection sites across these latitudinal clines of North America, a general “voltinism/size/D-day” model is presented, which more closely predicts female size based on D-day accumulations, than does latitude. However, local “climatic cold pockets” in northern Michigan and Wisconsin historically appeared to exert especially strong size constraints on female forewing lengths, but forewing lengths quickly increased with local summer warming during the recent decade, especially near the warming edges of the cold pockets. Results of fine-scale analyses of these “cold pockets” are in contrast to non-significant changes for other Papilio populations seen across the latitudinal

  10. Optimization under Nonlinear Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In this paper a timesaving method is proposed for maximizing likelihood functions when the parameter space is subject to nonlinear constraints, expressible as second order polynomials. The suggested approach is especially attractive when dealing with systems with many parameters.

  11. Cloning of four DREB genes from Tibetan Sophora moorcroftiana and analysis of their expression during abiotic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijie Yao; Yaru Fu; Yanfu Zhang; Hui-e Li

    2016-01-01

    Sophora moorcroftiana is an endemic, drought-resistant shrub that grows in Tibet and has some degree of resistance to salt, cold, heat, and drought. In the present study, four dehydration responsive element-binding (DREB) genes (SmDREB1, SmDREB2, SmDREB and SmDREB1) were isolated from S. moorcroftiana for the first time and their expression and proline content under abiotic stress were analyzed. Proline accumulated in seedlings under drought, salt, cold, and heat stress treat-ments. The four genes were variously expressed in response to the four abiotic stresses. SmDREB1 was induced by drought, cold, and heat stresses;SmDREB2 and SmDREB4 were both induced by salt, cold, and heat stresses, whereas SmDREB3 was induced by drought and heat stresses. Thus, these four genes may participate in conferring tolerance to these four abiotic stresses and are candidate genes for genetic engineering in the future.

  12. Transgenic Alfalfa Plants Expressing the Sweetpotato Orange Gene Exhibit Enhanced Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr) is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants), three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8) selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands. PMID:25946429

  13. Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing the sweetpotato Orange gene exhibit enhanced abiotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2 promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants, three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8 selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  14. Age-related Decline of Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Young Drosophila melanogaster Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Hervé; Chertemps, Thomas; Boulogne, Isabelle; Siaussat, David

    2016-12-01

    Stress tolerance generally declines with age as a result of functional senescence. Age-dependent alteration of stress tolerance can also occur in early adult life. In Drosophila melanogaster, evidence of such a decline in young adults has only been reported for thermotolerance. It is not known whether early adult life entails a general stress tolerance reduction and whether the response is peculiar to thermal traits. The present work was designed to investigate whether newly eclosed D melanogaster adults present a high tolerance to a range of biotic and abiotic insults. We found that tolerance to most of the abiotic stressors tested (desiccation, paraquat, hydrogen peroxide, deltamethrin, and malathion) was high in newly eclosed adults before dramatically declining over the next days of adult life. No clear age-related pattern was found for resistance to biotic stress (septic or fungal infection) and starvation. These results suggest that newly eclosed adults present a culminating level of tolerance to extrinsic stress which is likely unrelated to immune process. We argue that stress tolerance variation at very young age is likely a residual attribute from the previous life stage (ontogenetic carryover) or a feature related to the posteclosion development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Abiotic Versus Biotic Weathering Of Olivine As Possible Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longazo, Teresa G.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Clemett, Simon J.; Southam, Gordon; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    We are investigating the weathering of silicate minerals by both purely inorganic, and biologically mediated processes using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). By resolving surface textures and chemical compositions of weathered surfaces at the sub-micron scale we hope to be able to distinguish abiotic from biotic weathering processes and so establish a new biosignature applicable to the study of astromaterials including but not limited to the Martian meteorites. Sterilized olivine grains (San Carlos, Arizona) no more than 1-2 mm in their longest dimension were optically assayed to be uniform in color and free of inclusions were selected as weathering subjects. Prior to all experiments surface morphologies and Fe/Mg ratios were determined for each grain using FE-SEM and EDS. Experiments were divided into two categories abiotic and biotic and were compared with "naturally" weathered samples. For the preliminary experiments, two trials (open and closed to the ambient laboratory environment) were performed under abiotic conditions, and three trials under biotic conditions (control, day 1 and day 2). The open system abiotic trials used sterile grains heated at 98 C and 200 C for both 24 and 48 hours in 1L double distilled de-ionized water. The closed system abiotic trials were conducted under the same conditions but in a sealed two layer steel/Teflon "bomb" apparatus. The biotic trials used sterile grains mounted in a flow-through device attached to a wellhead on the Columbia River aquifer. Several discolored, altered, grains were selected to document "natural" weathering surface textures for comparison with the experimental samples. Preliminary results indicate there are qualitative differences in weathered surface textures among all the designed experiments. The olivine grains in abiotic trials displayed etching, pitting, denticulate margins, dissolution and clay formation. The scale of the features

  16. Altered expression of cytosolic/nuclear HSC70-1 molecular chaperone affects development and abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Clément, Mathilde; Chiarenza, Serge; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Pochon, Nathalie; Creff, Audrey; Marin, Elena; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Noël, Laurent D

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock cognate 70 kDa (HSC70) family are highly conserved in all living organisms and assist nascent protein folding in normal physiological conditions as well as in biotic and abiotic stress conditions. In the absence of specific inhibitors or viable knockout mutants, cytosolic/nuclear HSC70-1 overexpression (OE) and mutants in the HSC70 co-chaperone SGT1 (suppressor of G(2)/M allele of skp1) were used as genetic tools to identify HSC70/SGT1 functions in Arabidopsis development and abiotic stress responses. HSC70-1 OE caused a reduction in root and shoot meristem activities, thus explaining the dwarfism of those plants. In addition, HSC70-1 OE did not impair auxin-dependent phenotypes, suggesting that SGT1 functions previously identified in auxin signalling are HSC70 independent. While responses to abiotic stimuli such as UV-C exposure, phosphate starvation, or seedling de-etiolation were not perturbed by HSC70-1 OE, it specifically conferred gamma-ray hypersensitivity and tolerance to salt, cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As). Cd and As perception was not perturbed, but plants overexpressing HSC70-1 accumulated less Cd, thus providing a possible molecular explanation for their tolerance phenotype. In summary, genetic evidence is provided for HSC70-1 involvement in a limited set of physiological processes, illustrating the essential and yet specific functions of this chaperone in development and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  17. Relative importance of abiotic, biotic, and disturbance drivers of plant community structure in the sagebrush steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel M; Bakker, Jonathan D; Vincent, John B; Davies, G Matt

    2017-04-01

    Abiotic conditions, biotic factors, and disturbances can act as filters that control community structure and composition. Understanding the relative importance of these drivers would allow us to understand and predict the causes and consequences of changes in community structure. We used long-term data (1989-2002) from the sagebrush steppe in the state of Washington, USA, to ask three questions: (1) What are the key drivers of community-level metrics of community structure? (2) Do community-level metrics and functional groups differ in magnitude or direction of response to drivers of community structure? (3) What is the relative importance of drivers of community structure? The vegetation in 2002 was expressed as seven response variables: three community-level metrics (species richness, total cover, compositional change from 1989 to 2002) and the relative abundances of four functional groups. We used a multi-model inference framework to identify a set of top models for each response metric beginning from a global model that included two abiotic drivers, six disturbances, a biotic driver (initial plant community), and interactions between the disturbance and biotic drivers. We also used a permutational relative variable importance metric to rank the influence of drivers. Moisture availability was the most important driver of species richness and of native forb cover. Fire was the most important driver of shrub cover and training area usage was important for compositional change, but disturbances, including grazing, were of secondary importance for most other variables. Biotic drivers, as represented by the initial plant communities, were the most important driver for total cover and for the relative covers of exotics and native grasses. Our results indicate that the relative importance of drivers is dependent on the choice of metric, and that drivers such as disturbance and initial plant community can interact. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. Pathways for abiotic organic synthesis at submarine hydrothermal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Jill M; Seewald, Jeffrey S; German, Christopher R; Sylva, Sean P

    2015-06-23

    Arguments for an abiotic origin of low-molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hot springs are compelling owing to implications for the sustenance of deep biosphere microbial communities and their potential role in the origin of life. Theory predicts that warm H2-rich fluids, like those emanating from serpentinizing hydrothermal systems, create a favorable thermodynamic drive for the abiotic generation of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Here, we constrain two distinct reaction pathways for abiotic organic synthesis in the natural environment at the Von Damm hydrothermal field and delineate spatially where inorganic carbon is converted into bioavailable reduced carbon. We reveal that carbon transformation reactions in a single system can progress over hours, days, and up to thousands of years. Previous studies have suggested that CH4 and higher hydrocarbons in ultramafic hydrothermal systems were dependent on H2 generation during active serpentinization. Rather, our results indicate that CH4 found in vent fluids is formed in H2-rich fluid inclusions, and higher n-alkanes may likely be derived from the same source. This finding implies that, in contrast with current paradigms, these compounds may form independently of actively circulating serpentinizing fluids in ultramafic-influenced systems. Conversely, widespread production of formate by ΣCO2 reduction at Von Damm occurs rapidly during shallow subsurface mixing of the same fluids, which may support anaerobic methanogenesis. Our finding of abiogenic formate in deep-sea hot springs has significant implications for microbial life strategies in the present-day deep biosphere as well as early life on Earth and beyond.

  19. Field evaluation of durum wheat landraces for prevailing abiotic and biotic stresses in highland rainfed regions of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Mohammadi; Behzad Sadeghzadeh; Hasan Ahmadi; Nowzar Bahrami; Ahmed Amri

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses are major limiting factors for high crop productivity worldwide. A landrace collection consisting of 380 durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) entries originating in several countries along with four check varieties were evaluated for biotic stresses:yellow rust (Puccinia stri formis Westendorf f. sp. tritici) and wheat stem sawfly (WSS) Cephus cinctus Norton (Hymenoptera:Cephidae), and abiotic stresses:cold and drought. The main objectives were to (i) quantify phenotypic diversity and identify variation in the durum wheat landraces for the different stresses and (ii) characterize the agronomic profiles of landraces in reaction to the stresses. Significant changes in reactions of landraces to stresses were observed. Landraces resistant to each stress were identified and agronomically characterized. Percentage reduction due to the stresses varied from 11.4% (yellow rust) to 21.6% (cold stress) for 1000-kernel weight (TKW) and from 19.9 (yellow rust) to 91.9%(cold stress) for grain yield. Landraces from Asia and Europe showed enhanced genetic potential for both grain yield and cold tolerance under highland rainfed conditions of Iran. The findings showed that TKW and yield productivity could be used to assess the response of durum wheat landraces to different stresses. In conclusion, landraces showed high levels of resistance to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and selected landraces can serve in durum wheat breeding for adaptation to cold and drought-prone environments.

  20. Field evaluation of durum wheat landraces for prevailing abiotic and biotic stresses in highland rainfed regions of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza; Mohammadi; Behzad; Sadeghzadeh; Hasan; Ahmadi; Nowzar; Bahrami; Ahmed; Amri

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses are major limiting factors for high crop productivity worldwide. A landrace collection consisting of 380 durum wheat(Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) entries originating in several countries along with four check varieties were evaluated for biotic stresses:yellow rust(Puccinia striiformis Westendorf f. sp. tritici) and wheat stem sawfly(WSS) Cephus cinctus Norton(Hymenoptera: Cephidae), and abiotic stresses: cold and drought. The main objectives were to(i) quantify phenotypic diversity and identify variation in the durum wheat landraces for the different stresses and(ii) characterize the agronomic profiles of landraces in reaction to the stresses. Significant changes in reactions of landraces to stresses were observed.Landraces resistant to each stress were identified and agronomically characterized.Percentage reduction due to the stresses varied from 11.4%(yellow rust) to 21.6%(cold stress) for 1000-kernel weight(TKW) and from 19.9(yellow rust) to 91.9%(cold stress) for grain yield. Landraces from Asia and Europe showed enhanced genetic potential for both grain yield and cold tolerance under highland rainfed conditions of Iran. The findings showed that TKW and yield productivity could be used to assess the response of durum wheat landraces to different stresses. In conclusion, landraces showed high levels of resistance to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and selected landraces can serve in durum wheat breeding for adaptation to cold and drought-prone environments.

  1. Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    of microbiota in removing potentially oxidizing species such as nitrate or oxygen. Alternatively, the biotic pathway may be more significant 0 20...than previously shown at pH 10.5 (Figures 4.6 and 4.10; half-life as fast as 8 hours) due to a smaller sediment/water ratio used in the...primarily abiotic, as described in previous experi- ments (Figure 4.36). NDMA mineraliza- tion was surprisingly fast , with an average half-life of 410

  2. Abiotic Racemization Kinetics of Amino Acids in Marine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, Andrew D.; Bo Barker Jørgensen; Bente Aa Lomstein

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth be...

  3. The photogrammetric inner constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermanis, Athanasios

    A derivation of the complete inner constraints, which are required for obtaining "free network" solutions in close-range photogrammetry, is presented. The inner constraints are derived analytically for the bundle method, by exploiting the fact that the rows of their coefficient matrix from a basis for the null subspace of the design matrix used in the linearized observation equations. The derivation is independent of any particular choice of rotational parameters and examples are given for three types of rotation angles used in photogrammetry, as well as for the Rodriguez elements. A convenient algorithm based on the use of the S-transformation is presented, for the computation of free solutions with either inner or partial inner constraints. This approach is finally compared with alternative approaches to free network solutions.

  4. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V. O., E-mail: Vladimir.Soloviev@ihep.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  5. Psychological constraints on egalitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Debates over egalitarianism for the most part are not concerned with constraints on achieving an egalitarian society, beyond discussions of the deficiencies of egalitarian theory itself. This paper looks beyond objections to egalitarianism as such and investigates the relevant psychological...... processes motivating people to resist various aspects of egalitarianism. I argue for two theses, one normative and one descriptive. The normative thesis holds that egalitarians must take psychological constraints into account when constructing egalitarian ideals. I draw from non-ideal theories in political...... philosophy, which aim to construct moral goals with current social and political constraints in mind, to argue that human psychology must be part of a non-ideal theory of egalitarianism. The descriptive thesis holds that the most fundamental psychological challenge to egalitarian ideals comes from what...

  6. Mismatch in microbial food webs: predators but not prey perform better in their local biotic and abiotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, Elodie C; Gravel, Dominique; Rohr, Rudolf P; Bersier, Louis-Félix; Gray, Sarah M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how trophic levels respond to changes in abiotic and biotic conditions is key for predicting how food webs will react to environmental perturbations. Different trophic levels may respond disproportionately to change, with lower levels more likely to react faster, as they typically consist of smaller-bodied species with higher reproductive rates. This response could cause a mismatch between trophic levels, in which predators and prey will respond differently to changing abiotic or biotic conditions. This mismatch between trophic levels could result in altered top-down and bottom-up control and changes in interaction strength. To determine the possibility of a mismatch, we conducted a reciprocal-transplant experiment involving Sarracenia purpurea food webs consisting of bacterial communities as prey and a subset of six morphologically similar protozoans as predators. We used a factorial design with four temperatures, four bacteria and protozoan biogeographic origins, replicated four times. This design allowed us to determine how predator and prey dynamics were altered by abiotic (temperature) conditions and biotic (predators paired with prey from either their local or non-local biogeographic origin) conditions. We found that prey reached higher densities in warmer temperature regardless of their temperature of origin. Conversely, predators achieved higher densities in the temperature condition and with the prey from their origin. These results confirm that predators perform better in abiotic and biotic conditions of their origin while their prey do not. This mismatch between trophic levels may be especially significant under climate change, potentially disrupting ecosystem functioning by disproportionately affecting top-down and bottom-up control.

  7. Carbon Isotopes of Alkanes in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperatures and Pressures: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques [1-4]. With more evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history [5-7], abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis during serpentization reactions may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars [8, 9]. While the experimental studies performed to date leave little doubt that chemical reactions exist for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds by mineral surface-catalyzed reactions [10-12], little is known about the reaction pathways by which CO2 and/or CO are reduced under hydrothermal conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements of alkanes have been used as an effective tool to constrain the origin and reaction pathways of hydrocarbon formation. Alkanes generated by thermal breakdown of high molecular weight organic compounds have carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures completely distinct from those formed abiotically [13-15]. Recent experimental studies, however, showed that different abiogenic hydrocarbon formation processes (e.g., polymerization vs. depolymerization) may have different carbon and hydrogen isotopic patterns [16]. Results from previous experiments studying decomposition of higher molecular weight organic compounds (lignite) also suggested that pressure could be a crucial factor affecting fractionation of carbon isotopes [17]. Under high pressure conditions, no experimental data are available describing fractionation of carbon isotope during mineral catalyzed FTT synthesis. Thus, hydrothermal experiments present an excellent opportunity to provide the requisite carbon isotope data. Such data can also be used to identify reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis under experimental conditions.

  8. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcript Profiling Reveals the Presence of Abiotic Stress and Developmental Stage Specific Ascorbate Oxidase Genes in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batth, Rituraj; Singh, Kapil; Kumari, Sumita; Mustafiz, Ananda

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stress and climate change is the major concern for plant growth and crop yield. Abiotic stresses lead to enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) consequently resulting in cellular damage and major losses in crop yield. One of the major scavengers of ROS is ascorbate (AA) which acts as first line of defense against external oxidants. An enzyme named ascorbate oxidase (AAO) is known to oxidize AA and deleteriously affect the plant system in response to stress. Genome-wide analysis of AAO gene family has led to the identification of five, three, seven, four, and six AAO genes in Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis, Glycine max, Zea mays, and Sorghum bicolor genomes, respectively. Expression profiling of these genes was carried out in response to various abiotic stresses and during various stages of vegetative and reproductive development using publicly available microarray database. Expression analysis in Oryza sativa revealed tissue specific expression of AAO genes wherein few members were exclusively expressed in either root or shoot. These genes were found to be regulated by both developmental cues as well as diverse stress conditions. The qRT-PCR analysis in response to salinity and drought stress in rice shoots revealed OsAAO2 to be the most stress responsive gene. On the other hand, OsAAO3 and OsAAO4 genes showed enhanced expression in roots under salinity/drought stresses. This study provides lead about important stress responsive AAO genes in various crop plants, which could be used to engineer climate resilient crop plants. PMID:28261251

  10. The postseismic response to the 2002 M 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake: Constraints from InSAR 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, J.; Burgmann, R.; Freymueller, J.T.; Lu, Zhiming; Parsons, B.; Ryder, I.; Schmalzle, G.; Wright, Tim

    2009-01-01

    InSAR is particularly sensitive to vertical displacements, which can be important in distinguishing between mechanisms responsible for the postseismic response to large earthquakes (afterslip, viscoelastic relaxation). We produce maps of the surface displacements resulting from the postseismic response to the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake, using data from the Canadian Radarsat-1 satellite from the periods summer 2003, summer 2004 and summer 2005. A peak-to-trough signal of amplitude 4 cm in the satellite line of sight was observed between summer 2003 and summer 2004. By the period between summer 2004 and summer 2005, the displacement rate had dropped below the threshold required for observation with InSAR over a single year. The InSAR observations show that the principal postseismic relaxation process acted at a depth of ???50 km, equivalent to the top of the mantle. However, the observations are still incapable of distinguishing between distributed (viscoelastic relaxation) and localized (afterslip) deformation. The imposed coseismic stresses are highest in the lower crust and, assuming a Maxwell rheology, a viscosity ratio of at least 5 between lower crust and upper mantle is required to explain the contrast in behaviour. The lowest misfits are produced by mixed models of viscoelastic relaxation in the mantle and shallow afterslip in the upper crust. Profiles perpendicular to the fault show significant asymmetry, which is consistent with differences in rheological structure across the fault. ?? 2008 The Author Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  11. Constraints as evolutionary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rácz, István

    2016-01-01

    The constraint equations for smooth $[n+1]$-dimensional (with $n\\geq 3$) Riemannian or Lorentzian spaces satisfying the Einstein field equations are considered. It is shown, regardless of the signature of the primary space, that the constraints can be put into the form of an evolutionary system comprised either by a first order symmetric hyperbolic system and a parabolic equation or, alternatively, by a strongly hyperbolic system and a subsidiary algebraic relation. In both cases the (local) existence and uniqueness of solutions are also discussed.

  12. Are Ultra-faint Galaxies at z = 6-8 Responsible for Cosmic Reionization? Combined Constraints from the Hubble Frontier Fields Clusters and Parallels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atek, Hakim; Richard, Johan; Jauzac, Mathilde; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Limousin, Marceau; Schaerer, Daniel; Jullo, Eric; Ebeling, Harald; Egami, Eiichi; Clement, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the Frontier Fields to accurately measure the galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function (UV LF) in the redshift range z ˜ 6-8. We combine observations in three lensing clusters, A2744, MACS 0416, and MACS 0717, and their associated parallel fields to select high-redshift dropout candidates. We use the latest lensing models to estimate the flux magnification and the effective survey volume in combination with completeness simulations performed in the source plane. We report the detection of 227 galaxy candidates at z = 6-7 and 25 candidates at z ˜ 8. While the total survey area is about 4 arcmin2 in each parallel field, it drops to about 0.6-1 arcmin2 in the cluster core fields because of the strong lensing. We compute the UV LF at z ˜ 7 using the combined galaxy sample and perform Monte Carlo simulations to determine the best-fit Schechter parameters. We are able to reliably constrain the LF down to an absolute magnitude of MUV = -15.25, which corresponds to 0.005 L⋆. More importantly, we find that the faint-end slope remains steep down to this magnitude limit with α =-{2.04}-0.17+0.13. We find a characteristic magnitude of {M}\\star =-{20.89}-0.72+0.60 and log(ϕ⋆) = -{3.54}-0.45+0.48. Our results confirm the most recent results in deep blank fields but extend the LF measurements more than two magnitudes deeper. The UV LF at z ˜ 8 is not very well constrained below MUV = -18 owing to the small number statistics and incompleteness uncertainties. To assess the contribution of galaxies to cosmic reionization, we derive the UV luminosity density at z ˜ 7 by integrating the UV LF down to an observational limit of MUV = -15. We show that our determination of log(ρUV) = 26.2 ± 0.13 (erg s-1 Hz-1 Mpc-3) can be sufficient to maintain reionization with an escape fraction of ionizing radiation of fesc = 10%-15%. Future Hubble Frontier Fields observations will certainly improve the constraints on the UV LF at

  13. Constraint-based scheduling applying constraint programming to scheduling problems

    CERN Document Server

    Baptiste, Philippe; Nuijten, Wim

    2001-01-01

    Constraint Programming is a problem-solving paradigm that establishes a clear distinction between two pivotal aspects of a problem: (1) a precise definition of the constraints that define the problem to be solved and (2) the algorithms and heuristics enabling the selection of decisions to solve the problem. It is because of these capabilities that Constraint Programming is increasingly being employed as a problem-solving tool to solve scheduling problems. Hence the development of Constraint-Based Scheduling as a field of study. The aim of this book is to provide an overview of the most widely used Constraint-Based Scheduling techniques. Following the principles of Constraint Programming, the book consists of three distinct parts: The first chapter introduces the basic principles of Constraint Programming and provides a model of the constraints that are the most often encountered in scheduling problems. Chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5 are focused on the propagation of resource constraints, which usually are responsibl...

  14. Quantitative changes of secondary metabolites of Matricaria chamomilla by abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasová, Adriana; Repcák, Miroslav; Pastírová, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The responses of young plants of diploid and tetraploid Matricaria chamomilla cultivars to abiotic stress were studied. The course of quantitative changes of main leaf secondary metabolites was evaluated within an interval from 6 h before to 54 h after spraying the leaf rosettes with aqueous CuCl2 solution. The content of herniarin in the treated plants rose approximately 3 times, simultaneously with a decline of its precursor (Z)- and (E)-2-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acid. The highest amounts of umbelliferone in stressed plants exceeded 9 times and 20 times those observed in control plants of the tetraploid and diploid cultivar, respectively. Due to stress the concentration of ene-yne-dicycloether in leaves decreased by more than 40%. The pattern of quantity changes of the examined compounds in tetraploid and diploid plants was similar.

  15. Effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the temporal dynamic of bat-fruit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Rafael de Souza; Gregorin, Renato; Tavares, Davi Castro

    2017-08-01

    Mutualistic interactions between animals and plants vary over time and space based on the abundance of fruits or animals and seasonality. Little is known about this temporal dynamic and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on the structure of interaction networks. We evaluated changes in the structure of network interactions between bats and fruits in relation to variations in rainfall. Our results suggest that fruit abundance is the main variable responsible for temporal changes in network attributes, such as network size, connectance, and number of interactions. In the same way, temperature positively affected the abundance of fruits and bats. An increase in temperature and alterations in rainfall patterns, due to human induced climate change, can cause changes in phenological patterns and fruit production, with negative consequences to biodiversity maintenance, ecological interactions, and ecosystem functioning.

  16. Abiotic/biotic coupling in the rhizosphere: a reactive transport modeling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Steefel, Carl; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    A new generation of models is needed to adequately simulate patterns of soil biogeochemical cycling in response changing global environmental drivers. For example, predicting the influence of climate change on soil organic matter storage and stability requires models capable of addressing complex biotic/abiotic interactions of rhizosphere and weathering processes. Reactive transport modeling provides a powerful framework simulating these interactions and the resulting influence on soil physical and chemical characteristics. Incorporation of organic reactions in an existing reactive transport model framework has yielded novel insights into soil weathering and development but much more work is required to adequately capture root and microbial dynamics in the rhizosphere. This endeavor provides many advantages over traditional soil biogeochemical models but also many challenges.

  17. Enhanced tolerance of transgenic potato plants over-expressing non-specific lipid transfer protein-1 (StnsLTP1 against multiple abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baniekal Hiremath Gangadhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as heat, drought and salinity are major environmental constraints that limit potato (Solanum tuberosum L. production worldwide. Previously, we found a potential thermo-tolerance gene, named StnsLTP1 from potato using yeast functional screening. Here, we report the functional characterization of StnsLTP1 and its role in multiple abiotic stresses in potato plants. Computational analysis of StnsLTP1 with other plant LTPs showed eight conserved cysteine residues, and four α-helices stabilized by four disulfide bridges. Expression analysis of StnsLTP1 gene showed differential expression under heat, water-deficit and salt stresses. Transgenic potato lines over-expressing StnsLTP1 gene displayed enhanced cell membrane integrity under stress conditions, as indicated by reduced membrane lipid per-oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide content relative to untransformed (UT control plants. In addition, transgenic lines over-expressing StLTP1 also exhibited increased antioxidant enzyme activity with enhanced accumulation of ascorbates, and up-regulation of stress-related genes including StAPX, StCAT, StSOD, StHsfA3, StHSP70, and StsHSP20 compared with the UT plants. These results suggests that StnsLTP1 transgenic plants acquired improved tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses through enhanced activation of antioxidative defense mechanisms via cyclic scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS and regulated expression of stress-related genes.

  18. Reductive transformation of carbamazepine by abiotic and biotic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Anne; Weidauer, Cindy; Seiwert, Bettina; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Unger, Tina; Jekel, Martin

    2016-09-15

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) is ubiquitously present in the anthropogenic water cycle and is therefore of concern regarding the potable water supply. Despite of its persistent behavior in the aquatic environment, a redox dependent removal at bank filtration sites with anaerobic aquifer passage was reported repeatedly but not elucidated in detail yet. The reductive transformation of CBZ was studied, using abiotic systems (catalytic hydrogenation, electrochemistry) as well as biologically active systems (column systems, batch degradation tests). In catalytic hydrogenation CBZ is gradually hydrogenated and nine transformation products (TPs) were detected by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry. 10,11-Dihydro-CBZ ((2H)-CBZ) was the major stable product in these abiotic, surface catalyzed reduction processes and turned out to be not a precursor of the more hydrogenated TPs. In the biotic reduction processes the formation of (2H)-CBZ alone could not explain the observed CBZ decline. There, also traces of (6H)-CBZ and (8H)-CBZ were formed by microbes under anaerobic conditions and four phase-II metabolites of reduced CBZ could be detected and tentatively identified. Thus, the spectrum of reduction products of CBZ is more diverse than previously thought. In environmental samples CBZ removal along an anaerobic soil passage was confirmed and (2H)-CBZ was determined at one of the sites.

  19. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Steen

    Full Text Available The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10(-5-11×10(-5 yr(-1. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations.

  20. Identification of Discriminant Factors after Exposure of Maize and Common Bean Plantlets to Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro HERNÁNDEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adverse environmental conditions limit crop yield and better understanding of plant response to stress will assist the development of more tolerant cultivars. Maize and common bean plantlets were evaluated under salinity, high temperature, drought and waterlogged conditions to identify biochemical markers which could be useful for rapid identification of putative stress tolerant plants. The levels of phenolics (free, cell wall-linked, total, aldehydes including malondialdehyde and chlorophylls (a, b, total were measured on stressed plantlets.  Only two indicators were statistically non-significant:  chlorophyll b in maize plantlets stressed with sodium chloride and malondialdehyde content in drought stressed maize. The most remarkable effects of abiotic stresses can be summarized as follows: (i salinity increased levels of free phenolics in maize plantlets and chlorophylls (a, b, total in common bean; (ii high temperature (40 °C elevated levels of chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize but decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total and free phenolics in common bean; (iii drought increased phenolics and decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize and increased chlorophyll pigments (a, b, total in common bean; (iv waterlogging increased free phenolics and decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize and increased chlorophyll (a, total in common bean. Free phenolics and chlorophylls, especially a, were the most responsive indicators to stress and can, therefore, be considered putative biochemical markers for abiotic stress tolerance in maize and common bean. The use of Fisher’s linear discriminant analysis to differentiate non-stressed and stressed plants in breeding programs is also a novel aspect of this report. Fisher’s linear discriminant functions classified correctly 100% of non-stressed or stressed originally grouped plants.

  1. Exophiala sp. LHL08 reprograms Cucumis sativus to higher growth under abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul L; Hamayun, Muhammad; Ahmad, Nadeem; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Lee, In-Jung

    2011-12-01

    Endophytic fungi are potential sources of secondary metabolites; however, they are little known for phytohormones secretion and amelioration of plant growth under abiotic stresses. We isolated a novel endophyte from the roots of Cucumis sativus and identified it as a strain of Exophiala sp. by sequencing internal transcribed spacer/large subunit rDNA and phylogenetic analysis. Prior to identification, culture filtrate (CF) of Exophiala sp. has shown significant growth promotion of Waito-C [a gibberellins (GAs)-deficient mutant cultivar] and Dongjin-byeo (normal GAs biosynthesis cultivar) rice seedlings. CF analysis of Exophiala sp. showed the presence of physiologically active GAs (GA₁, GA₃, GA₄ and GA₇) and inactive GAs (GA₅, GA₈, GA₉, GA₁₂ and GA₂₀). Exophiala sp. had higher GAs in its CF than wild-type strain of Gibberella fujikuroi except GA₃. Influence of Exophiala sp. was assessed on cucumber plant's growth and endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and bioactive GAs under salinity and drought stresses. Exophiala sp.-treated plants have shown significantly higher growth and rescued the host plants from stress promulgated water deficit, osmotic and cellular damage. The altered levels of stress-responsive ABA showed low level of stress confined to endophyte-applied plants than control. Elevated levels of SA and bioactive GAs (GA₃ and GA₄) in endophyte-associated plants suggest stress-modulating response toward salinity and drought. In conclusion, symbiotic relations between Exophiala and cucumber have reprogrammed the host plant growth under abiotic stresses, thus indicating a possible threshold role of endophytic fungi in stress alleviation. This study could be extended for improving agricultural productivity under extreme environmental conditions.

  2. Biotic and abiotic controls of argentine ant invasion success at local and landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, S.B.; Fisher, R.N.; Jetz, W.; Holway, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Although the ecological success of introduced species hinges on biotic interactions and physical conditions, few experimental studies - especially on animals - have simultaneously investigated the relative importance of both types of factors. The lack of such research may stem from the common assumption that native and introduced species exhibit similar environmental tolerances. Here we combine experimental and spatial modeling approaches (1) to determine the relative importance of biotic and abiotic controls of Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) invasion success, (2) to examine how the importance of these factors changes with spatial scale in southern California (USA), and (3) to assess how Argentine ants differ from native ants in their environmental tolerances. A factorial field experiment that combined native ant removal with irrigation revealed that Argentine ants failed to invade any dry plots (even those lacking native ants) but readily invaded all moist plots. Native ants slowed the spread of Argentine ants into irrigated plots but did not prevent invasion. In areas without Argentine ants, native ant species showed variable responses to irrigation. At the landscape scale, Argentine ant occurrence was positively correlated with minimum winter temperature (but not precipitation), whereas native ant diversity increased with precipitation and was negatively correlated with minimum winter temperature. These results are of interest for several reasons. First, they demonstrate that fine-scale differences in the physical environment can eclipse biotic resistance from native competitors in determining community susceptibility to invasion. Second, our results illustrate surprising complexities with respect to how the abiotic factors limiting invasion can change with spatial scale, and third, how native and invasive species can differ in their responses to the physical environment. Idiosyncratic and scale-dependent processes complicate attempts to forecast where

  3. Constraint Optimization Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    COPs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS high-performance computing, mobile ad hoc network, optimization, constraint, satisfaction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...France): INRA Editions; 1996. p. 111–150. Black PE. Branch-and-bound. US national institute of standards and technology dictionary of algorithms

  4. ASSESSMENT OF PRODUCTION CONSTRAINTS AND FARMERS’ PREFERENCES FOR SWEETPOTATO GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Kivuva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sweetpotato is one of the most important staple food crops with significant role for food security and also a potential commercial crop in many sub Saharan African countries. In Kenya, its production is hindered by numerous biotic, abiotic and social factors. A baseline survey study was conducted in central, eastern and western Kenya between September and December 2012, to determine the farmers’ preferences of sweetpotato varieties, production constraints and farmers’ coping strategies. A structured questionnaire was randomly administered to 345 farmers in five counties. Data on households demographics, sweetpotato varieties grown, sources of seed, cultural practices, and production constraints were collected and analysed using statistical package for social scientists (SPSS. Results indicated that 60% of the farmers interviewed were women and family sizes varied between 3-5 persons in 55% of the households. Farm sizes ranged 0.41-0.8 ha with 90% of sweetpotato being grown on 0.24 ha or less. The main food crops grown on the surveyed farms included maize, beans, sweetpotato, cassava, sorghum, and pigeon peas, while the main cash crops were; kale, banana, sugarcane, bean, maize, sweetpotato and groundnut. The average sweetpotato yield on the farms surveyed ranged from 5.5-7.4 t ha-1. The preferred sweetpotato varieties were Vitaa, Kembu 10, and Kabonde because they were orange fleshed with high beta carotene. Production constraints in the three regions were basically similar, with 35% of the farmers identifying weevils as the major pest, and sweetpotato virus disease (SPVD as the major disease. Drought was identified by 28% of the farmers as a major production constraint. Farmers indicated the use of clean seed, high yielding varieties, high planting density, and manure application as some of the strategies they used to cope with the production constraints. To improve sweetpotato production in Kenya, these production constraints need to be

  5. Crop Production under Drought and Heat Stress: Plant Responses and Management Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Fahad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses are one of the major constraints to crop production and food security worldwide. The situation has aggravated due to the drastic and rapid changes in global climate. Heat and drought are undoubtedly the two most important stresses having huge impact on growth and productivity of the crops. It is very important to understand the physiological, biochemical, and ecological interventions related to these stresses for better management. A wide range of plant responses to these stresses could be generalized into morphological, physiological, and biochemical responses. Interestingly, this review provides a detailed account of plant responses to heat and drought stresses with special focus on highlighting the commonalities and differences. Crop growth and yields are negatively affected by sub-optimal water supply and abnormal temperatures due to physical damages, physiological disruptions, and biochemical changes. Both these stresses have multi-lateral impacts and therefore, complex in mechanistic action. A better understanding of plant responses to these stresses has pragmatic implication for remedies and management. A comprehensive account of conventional as well as modern approaches to deal with heat and drought stresses have also been presented here. A side-by-side critical discussion on salient responses and management strategies for these two important abiotic stresses provides a unique insight into the phenomena. A holistic approach taking into account the different management options to deal with heat and drought stress simultaneously could be a win-win approach in future.

  6. Crop Production under Drought and Heat Stress: Plant Responses and Management Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Bajwa, Ali A; Nazir, Usman; Anjum, Shakeel A; Farooq, Ayesha; Zohaib, Ali; Sadia, Sehrish; Nasim, Wajid; Adkins, Steve; Saud, Shah; Ihsan, Muhammad Z; Alharby, Hesham; Wu, Chao; Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are one of the major constraints to crop production and food security worldwide. The situation has aggravated due to the drastic and rapid changes in global climate. Heat and drought are undoubtedly the two most important stresses having huge impact on growth and productivity of the crops. It is very important to understand the physiological, biochemical, and ecological interventions related to these stresses for better management. A wide range of plant responses to these stresses could be generalized into morphological, physiological, and biochemical responses. Interestingly, this review provides a detailed account of plant responses to heat and drought stresses with special focus on highlighting the commonalities and differences. Crop growth and yields are negatively affected by sub-optimal water supply and abnormal temperatures due to physical damages, physiological disruptions, and biochemical changes. Both these stresses have multi-lateral impacts and therefore, complex in mechanistic action. A better understanding of plant responses to these stresses has pragmatic implication for remedies and management. A comprehensive account of conventional as well as modern approaches to deal with heat and drought stresses have also been presented here. A side-by-side critical discussion on salient responses and management strategies for these two important abiotic stresses provides a unique insight into the phenomena. A holistic approach taking into account the different management options to deal with heat and drought stress simultaneously could be a win-win approach in future.

  7. Exploring the utility of high resolution "nano-" computed tomography imaging to place quantitative constraints on shell biometric changes in marine pteropods in response to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, R.; Howes, E.; Lischka, S.; Rudolph, R.; Büdenbender, J.; Bijma, J.; Gattuso, J. P.; Riebesell, U.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the response of marine organisms to present and future ocean acidification remains a major challenge encompassing observations on single species in culture and scaling up to the ecosystem and global scale. Understanding calcification changes in culture experiments designed to simulate present and future ocean conditions under potential CO2 emissions scenarios, and especially detecting the likely more subtle changes that may occur prior to the onset of more extreme ocean acidification, depends on the tools available. Here we explore the utility of high-resolution computed tomography (nano-CT) to provide quantitative biometric data on field collected and cultured marine pteropods, using the General Electric Company Phoenix Nanotom S Instrument. The technique is capable of quantitating the whole shell of the organism, allowing shell dimensions to be determined as well as parameters such as average shell thickness, the variation in thickness across the whole shell and in localized areas, total shell volume and surface area and when combined with weight measurements shell density can be calculated. The potential power of the technique is the ability to derive these parameters even on very small organisms less than 1 millimeter in size. Tuning the X-ray strength of the instrument allows organic material to be excluded from the analysis. Through replicate analysis of standards, we assess the reproducibility of data, and by comparison with dimension measurements derived from light microscopy we assess the accuracy of dimension determinations. We present results from historical and modern pteropod populations from the Mediterranean and cultured polar pteropods, resolving statistically significant differences in shell biometrics in both cases that may represent responses to ocean acidification.

  8. Constraint-Referenced Analytics of Algebra Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Scot M.; White, Tobin F.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the constraint-referenced analytics tool for monitoring algebra learning activities presented here came from the desire to firstly, take a more quantitative look at student responses in collaborative algebra activities, and secondly, to situate those activities in a more traditional introductory algebra setting focusing on…

  9. Loosening Psychometric Constraints on Educational Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    In response to an argument by Baird, Andrich, Hopfenbeck and Stobart (2017), Michael Kane states that there needs to be a better fit between educational assessment and learning theory. In line with this goal, Kane will examine how psychometric constraints might be loosened by relaxing some psychometric "rules" in some assessment…

  10. Geomorphic and Salmon Habitat Response to Dam Removal with Minimal Constraints to Channel Evolution, Wa'atch Creek, Western Washington, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, A. C.; Shellberg, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Dam removal has become an important component of aquatic ecosystem restoration, but studies documenting the physical and ecological response to dam removal across a range of human modified hydroclimatic and physiographic settings are still lacking. This research documents channel geomorphic response and fine sediment storage in salmon spawning gravels after removing two derelict dams (largest 6m) from Wa’atch Creek, located in the temperate coastal-marine zone of the Pacific Northwest, USA. After removing dam sheet pile and earthen fill, natural river processes including sediment flushing were allowed occur. Technical engineering solutions were avoided, unlike comparably sized dam removals in western Washington that over-engineered channel stability. However, two-hundred large-logs (LWD) were placed unanchored below the dam sites and throughout the reservoir before drawdown to sort and store sediment and provide future habitat complexity. Initial sedimentation impacts were severe following dam removal, temporarily smothering the bed of the creek with a fine sediment slurry (fluid mud) from dam to delta, killing aquatic biota, and covering spawning gravels with inhospitable levels of fine sediment. Subsequently, several large floods within the first year (max 10-yr recurrence interval) flushed the channel sediment slurry and over half (11,000 m^3) of the fine sediment stored in the reservoir out to sea. Coarse sediment aggraded immediately below the dam where wood was placed in the channel, while channel incision occurred through the reservoir and into tributaries, both diminishing away from the disturbance center. Channel changes were greatest immediately following removal due to high stream power, steep energy slope and saturated unconsolidated alluvium. The rate of change in sediment volume diminished over time (2003 to 2008) due to sediment consolidation, vegetation colonization, and a reduction in energy slope. After reservoir and channel flushing, fine

  11. A constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangians subjected to nonholonomic constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, M. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); de Diego, D.M. [Departamento de Economia Aplicada Cuantitativa, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas y Empresariales, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-06-01

    We construct a constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangian systems subjected to nonholonomic constraints which generalizes that of Dirac for constrained Hamiltonian systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Melatonin induces the transcripts of CBF/DREB1s and their involvement in both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; He, Chaozu

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule that acts as an important secondary messenger in plant stress responses. However, the mechanism underlying the melatonin-mediated signaling pathway in plant stress responses has not been established. C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) encode transcription factors that play important roles in plant stress responses. This study has determined that endogenous melatonin and transcripts level of CBFs (AtCBF1, AtCBF2, and AtCBF3) in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses and by pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection. Moreover, both exogenous melatonin treatment and overexpression of CBFs conferred enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Notably, AtCBFs and exogenous melatonin treatment positively regulated the mRNA expression of several stress-responsive genes (COR15A, RD22, and KIN1) and accumulation of soluble sugars content such as sucrose in Arabidopsis under control and stress conditions. Additionally, exogenous sucrose also conferred improved resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Taken together, this study indicates that AtCBFs confer enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, and AtCBF-mediated signaling pathway and sugar accumulation may be involved in melatonin-mediated stress response in Arabidopsis, at least partially.

  13. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Maïa; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young Solar System and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. The nitrogen content, the N speciation and the N isotopic composition were analyzed in the resulting organic aerosols. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25‰ relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental setup is. Such an isotopic fractionation is attributed to mass-dependent kinetic effect(s). Nitrogen isotope fractionation upon electric discharge cannot account for the large N isotope variations observed among Solar System objects and reservoirs. Extreme N isotope signatures in the Solar System are more likely the result of self-shielding during N2 photodissociation, exotic effect during photodissociation of N2 and/or low temperature ion-molecule isotope exchange. Kinetic N isotope fractionation may play a significant role in the Titan's atmosphere. On the Titan's night side, 15N-depletion resulting from electron driven reactions may counterbalance photo-induced 15N enrichments occurring on the day's side. We also suggest that the low δ15N values of Archaean organic matter (Beaumont and Robert, 1999) are partly the result of abiotic synthesis of

  14. A thaumatin-like protein of Ocimum basilicum confers tolerance to fungal pathogen and abiotic stress in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rajesh Chandra; Sandeep; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Santosh; Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-05-06

    Plant often responds to fungal pathogens by expressing a group of proteins known as pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). The expression of PR is mediated through pathogen-induced signal-transduction pathways that are fine-tuned by phytohormones such as methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Here, we report functional characterization of an Ocimum basilicum PR5 family member (ObTLP1) that was identified from a MeJA-responsive expression sequence tag collection. ObTLP1 encodes a 226 amino acid polypeptide that showed sequence and structural similarities with a sweet-tasting protein thaumatin of Thaumatococcus danielli and also with a stress-responsive protein osmotin of Nicotiana tabacum. The expression of ObTLP1 in O. basilicum was found to be organ-preferential under unstressed condition, and responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses, and multiple phytohormone elicitations. Bacterially-expressed recombinant ObTLP1 inhibited mycelial growth of the phytopathogenic fungi, Scleretonia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea; thereby, suggesting its antifungal activity. Ectopic expression of ObTLP1 in Arabidopsis led to enhanced tolerance to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea infections, and also to dehydration and salt stress. Moreover, induced expression of the defense marker genes suggested up-regulation of the defense-response pathways in ObTLP1-expressing Arabidopsis upon fungal challenge. Thus, ObTLP1 might be useful for providing tolerance to the fungal pathogens and abiotic stresses in crops.

  15. ABI-like transcription factor gene TaABL1 from wheat improves multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Bei; Gao, Shi-Qing; Ma, You-Zhi; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Zhao, Chang-Ping; Tang, Yi-Miao; Li, Xue-Yin; Li, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Yao-Feng; Chen, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in adaptive responses of plants to abiotic stresses. ABA-responsive element binding proteins (AREBs) are basic leucine zipper transcription factors that regulate the expression of downstream genes containing ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in promoter regions. A novel ABI-like (ABA-insensitive) transcription factor gene, named TaABL1, containing a conserved basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain was cloned from wheat. Southern blotting showed that three copies were present in the wheat genome. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that TaABL1 belonged to the AREB subfamily of the bZIP transcription factor family and was most closely related to ZmABI5 in maize and OsAREB2 in rice. Expression of TaABL1 was highly induced in wheat roots, stems, and leaves by ABA, drought, high salt, and low temperature stresses. TaABL1 was localized inside the nuclei of transformed wheat mesophyll protoplast. Overexpression of TaABL1 enhanced responses of transgenic plants to ABA and hastened stomatal closure under stress, thereby improving tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses. Furthermore, overexpression of TaABL1 upregulated or downregulated the expression of some stress-related genes controlling stomatal closure in transgenic plants under ABA and drought stress conditions, suggesting that TaABL1 might be a valuable genetic resource for transgenic molecular breeding.

  16. The WRKY transcription factors in the diploid woodland strawberry Fragaria vesca: Identification and expression analysis under biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang; Han, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Feng-Li; Feng, Jia-Yue

    2016-08-01

    WRKY proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses and in plant growth and development. To date, little is known about the WRKY gene family in strawberry. In this study, we identified 62 WRKY genes (FvWRKYs) in the wild diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca, 2n = 2x = 14) accession Heilongjiang-3. According to the phylogenetic analysis and structural features, these identified strawberry FvWRKY genes were classified into three main groups. In addition, eight FvWRKY-GFP fusion proteins showed distinct subcellular localizations in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the 62 FvWRKY genes in 'Heilongjiang-3' under various conditions, including biotic stress (Podosphaera aphanis), abiotic stresses (drought, salt, cold, and heat), and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, ethephon, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid). The expression levels of 33 FvWRKY genes were upregulated, while 12 FvWRKY genes were downregulated during powdery mildew infection. FvWRKY genes responded to drought and salt treatment to a greater extent than to temperature stress. Expression profiles derived from quantitative real-time PCR suggested that 11 FvWRKY genes responded dramatically to various stimuli at the transcriptional level, indicating versatile roles in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Interaction networks revealed that the crucial pathways controlled by WRKY proteins may be involved in the differential response to biotic stress. Taken together, the present work may provide the basis for future studies of the genetic modification of WRKY genes for pathogen resistance and stress tolerance in strawberry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Credit Constraints in Education. NBER Working Paper No. 17435

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints are increasingly important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, since their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  18. Credit Constraints in Education. NBER Working Paper No. 17435

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints are increasingly important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, since their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  19. A Diary Study of Difficulties and Constraints in EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on learners' course diaries, this paper explores Chinese EFL learners' perceptions of difficulties and constraints in EFL learning and their responses to the perceived difficulties and constraints. The diary data appear to indicate that the students' learning difficulties lay mainly with their linguistic competence, but a closer scrutiny…

  20. Multi-objective Wing Optimization under Constraint Based on Response Surface Method%多种约束条件下机翼的双目标响应面优化方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱良骏; 宋文滨; 孙卫平

    2013-01-01

    提出一种在较强的工程约束条件下,开展机翼优化设计的高效率多目标方法.综合升力线理论和RANS的流场计算方法以及数学近似的响应面方法,研究在多种工程约束条件下,巡航设计点中升阻比和翼根弯矩的多目标优化问题.采用分步嵌套优化的方法,首先,固定平面形状,优化展向的扭转角分布;然后优化固定形式下的平面形状参数,对于每一个平面外形,展向扭转角分布的优化为平面形状优化的内迭代;最后通过响应面的结果得到双目标的近似Pareto锋面.该方法对完成特定约束条件下的气动设计具有参考价值.%A multi-object optimization is carried out considering wing lift-to-drag ratio and bending moment performance at cruise flight condition using a combination of lift line theory, CFD RANS calculation and response surface methods. Wing is optimized under strong engineering constraints with constant planform topology, reference area, and wing root chord length. The airfoil shapes are also kept the same along the span. The optimization work is conducted in two steps. Spanwise twist angle is optimized at fixed wing planform at first. Wing planform is then optimized with wing twist optimized in the inner loop. Pareto front for the two objectives are obtained based on a response surface methods. The method presented in the paper can be used in cases where there are strong engineering constraints in wing optimization problems.

  1. Effects of solar radiation on the abiotic and bacterially mediated carbon flux in aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anesio, A.M.

    2000-05-01

    In this thesis, I studied some of the current aspects of organic matter photochemistry. I analyzed abiotic photo transformations of several types of dissolved (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM). I also evaluated the effects of photo transformation of several types of DOM on bacteria. Finally, in a field experiment, I analyzed net effects of solar radiation on organic matter decomposition. DOM undergoes several transformations due to solar irradiation. One such transformation is photooxidation of organic matter into inorganic carbon. Results of this Thesis show that photooxidation is ubiquitous to all kinds of organic matter in both dissolved and particulate forms. The intensity of this process depends on several factors, including DOM composition, radiation type and time of exposure. Besides mineralization to inorganic carbon, DOM undergoes other chemical transformations due to UV radiation, with profound consequences to DOM availability for bacteria. Bioavailability was tested by measuring bacterial growth and respiration on irradiated and nonirradiated DOM from several types of humic matter and plant leachates. Irradiation of freshly-leached DOM often produced negative effects on bacteria, whereas irradiation of humic material was followed by stimulation of bacterial growth. The degree of stimulation seems to be related to the initial bioavailability of the DOM and to the capability of the DOM to produce hydrogen peroxide upon irradiation. Other factors also accounted for differences in bacterial response to photochemical modification of DOM, including length and type of irradiation exposure. The effects of solar radiation on litter decomposition were also evaluated using experiments that more closely mimic natural conditions. I could not observe differences between dry weight loss of leaves and culms exposed to solar radiation or kept in darkness, which may be explained by the fact that abiotic decomposition under solar radiation is counterbalanced by

  2. Comprehensive expression profiling of rice tetraspanin genes reveals diverse roles during development and abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji eM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanin family is comprised of evolutionarily conserved integral membrane proteins. The incredible ability of tetraspanins to form ‘micro domain complexes’ and their preferential targeting to membranes emphasizes their active association with signal recognition and communication with neighboring cells, thus acting as key modulators of signaling cascades. In animals, tetraspanins are associated with multitude of cellular processes. Unlike animals, the biological relevance of tetraspanins in plants has not been well investigated. In Arabidopsis tetraspanins are known to contribute in important plant development processes such as leaf morphogenesis, root and floral organ formation. In the present study we investigated the genomic organization, chromosomal distribution, phylogeny and domain structure of 15 rice tetraspanin proteins (OsTETs. OsTET proteins had similar domain structure and signature ‘GCCK/R’ motif as reported in Arabidopsis. Comprehensive expression profiling of OsTET genes suggested their possible involvement during rice development. While OsTET9 and 10 accumulated predominantly in flowers, OsTET5, 8 and 12 were preferentially expressed in root tissues. Noticeably, seven OsTETs exhibited more than 2-fold up regulation at early stages of flag leaf senescence in rice. Furthermore, several OsTETs were differentially regulated in rice seedlings exposed to abiotic stresses, exogenous treatment of hormones and nutrient deprivation. Transient subcellular localization studies of eight OsTET proteins in tobacco epidermal cells showed that these proteins localized in plasma membrane. The present study provides valuable insights into the possible roles of tetraspanins in regulating development and defining response to abiotic stresses in rice. Targeted proteomic studies would be useful in identification of their interacting partners under different conditions and ultimately their biological function in plants

  3. Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing AtNDPK2 exhibit increased growth and tolerance to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Li, Hongbing; Ke, Qingbo; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xi-Ping; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we generated and evaluated transgenic alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L. cv. Xinjiang Daye) expressing the Arabidopsis nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (AtNDPK2) gene under the control of the oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SN plants) to develop plants with enhanced tolerance to various abiotic stresses. We selected two SN plants (SN4 and SN7) according to the expression levels of AtNDPK2 and the enzyme activity of NDPK in response to methyl viologen (MV)-mediated oxidative stress treatment using leaf discs for further characterization. SN plants showed enhanced tolerance to high temperature, NaCl, and drought stress on the whole-plant level. When the plants were subjected to high temperature treatment (42 °C for 24 h), the non-transgenic (NT) plants were severely wilted, whereas the SN plants were not affected because they maintained high relative water and chlorophyll contents. The SN plants also showed significantly higher tolerance to 250 mM NaCl and water stress treatment than the NT plants. In addition, the SN plants exhibited better plant growth through increased expression of auxin-related indole acetic acid (IAA) genes (MsIAA3, MsIAA5, MsIAA6, MsIAA7, and MsIAA16) under normal growth conditions compared to NT plants. The results suggest that induced overexpression of AtNDPK2 in alfalfa will be useful for increasing biomass production under various abiotic stress conditions.

  4. Biotic and abiotic degradation of four cephalosporin antibiotics in a lake surface water and sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Muxian; Wang, Lianhong; Ji, Rong

    2010-09-01

    Cephalosporins are widely used veterinary and human antibiotics, but their environmental fate and impacts are still unclear. We studied degradation of four cephalosporins (cefradine, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and cefepime) from each generation in the surface water and sediment of Lake Xuanwu, China. The four cephalosporins degraded abiotically in the surface water in the dark with half-lives of 2.7-18.7d, which were almost the same as that in sterilized surface water. Under exposure to simulated sunlight, the half-lives of the cephalosporins decreased significantly to 2.2-5.0d, with the maximal decrease for ceftriaxone from 18.7d in the dark to 4.1d under the light exposure. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nitrate on photodegradation of the cephalosporins were compound-specific. While DOM (5 mg L(-1)) stimulated the photodegradation of only cefradine (by 9%) and cefepime (by 34%), nitrate (10 microM) had effects only on cefepime (stimulation by 13%). Elimination rates of the cephalosporins in oxic sediment (half-lives of 0.8-3.1d) were higher than in anoxic sediment (half-lives of 1.1-4.1d), mainly attributed to biodegradation. The data indicate that abiotic hydrolysis (for cefradine, cefuroxime, and cefepime) and direct photolysis (for ceftriaxone) were the primary processes for elimination of the cephalosporins in the surface water of the lake, whereas biodegradation was responsible for the elimination of the cephalosporins in the sediment. Further studies are needed on chemical structure, toxicity, and persistence of transformation products of the cephalosporins in the environment.

  5. Dynamical Constraints on Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonti; Tinney, Chris; Hinse, Tobias C; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical studies of new exoplanet systems are a critical component of the discovery and characterisation process. Such studies can provide firmer constraints on the parameters of the newly discovered planets, and may even reveal that the proposed planets do not stand up to dynamical scrutiny. Here, we demonstrate how dynamical studies can assist the characterisation of such systems through two examples: QS Virginis and HD 73526.

  6. The NCL natural constraint language

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jianyang

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the Natural Constraint Language (NCL) language, a description language in conventional mathematical logic for modeling and solving constraint satisfaction problems. It uses illustrations and tutorials to detail NCL and its applications.

  7. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process.

  8. Endophytic fungi: resource for gibberellins and crop abiotic stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Hussain, Javid; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-03-01

    The beneficial effects of endophytes on plant growth are important for agricultural ecosystems because they reduce the need for fertilizers and decrease soil and water pollution while compensating for environmental perturbations. Endophytic fungi are a novel source of bioactive secondary metabolites; moreover, recently they have been found to produce physiologically active gibberellins as well. The symbiosis of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi with crops can be a promising strategy to overcome the adverse effects of abiotic stresses. The association of such endophytes has not only increased plant biomass but also ameliorated plant-growth during extreme environmental conditions. Endophytic fungi represent a trove of unexplored biodiversity and a frequently overlooked component of crop ecology. The present review describes the role of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi, suggests putative mechanisms involved in plant endophyte stress interactions and discusses future prospects in this field.

  9. Landrace Germplasm for Improving Yield and Abiotic Stress Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Sangam L; Ceccarelli, Salvatore; Blair, Matthew W; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Are, Ashok K; Ortiz, Rodomiro

    2016-01-01

    Plant landraces represent heterogeneous, local adaptations of domesticated species, and thereby provide genetic resources that meet current and new challenges for farming in stressful environments. These local ecotypes can show variable phenology and low-to-moderate edible yield, but are often highly nutritious. The main contributions of landraces to plant breeding have been traits for more efficient nutrient uptake and utilization, as well as useful genes for adaptation to stressful environments such as water stress, salinity, and high temperatures. We propose that a systematic landrace evaluation may define patterns of diversity, which will facilitate identifying alleles for enhancing yield and abiotic stress adaptation, thus raising the productivity and stability of staple crops in vulnerable environments.

  10. Abiotic stresses as tools for metabolites in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Chetan; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; Bharadwaj, S V Vamsi; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Dubey, Sonam; Mishra, Sandhya

    2017-11-01

    Microalgae, due to various environmental stresses, constantly tune their cellular mechanisms to cope with them. The accumulation of the stress metabolites is closely related to the changes occurring in their metabolic pathways. The biosynthesis of metabolites can be triggered by a number of abiotic stresses like temperature, salinity, UV- radiation and nutrient deprivation. Although, microalgae have been considered as an alternative sustainable source for nutraceutical products like pigments and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to cater the requirement of emerging human population but inadequate biomass generation makes the process economically impractical. The stress metabolism for carotenoid regulation in green algae is a 2-step metabolism. There are a few major stresses which can influence the formation of phycobiliprotein in cyanobacteria. This review would primarily focus on the cellular level changes under stress conditions and their corresponding effects on lipids (including omega-3 PUFAs), pigments and polymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Murray GRAY, Geodiversity, valuing  and conserving abiotic nature

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    « Geodiversity : valuing and conserving abiotic nature » est un ouvrage dédié exclusivement à la conservation et à la valorisation du patrimoine géologique et géomorphologique de la Terre, y compris pédologique. Comme le souligne l’auteur, le terme géodiversité est fortement lié à d’autres néologismes tels que géoconservation, géohéritage ou encore géo-indicateurs. Tous ces termes défendent l’idée que les activités humaines menacent la diversité des roches, des sols et des formes du relief ai...

  12. Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2006-01-01

    The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum depends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until recently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the so-called "standard model of solar system formation", which is incorrect and leads to the contradiction of terrestrial planets having insufficiently massive cores. By contrast, that prognosis is considerably enhanced (i) by the new vision I have disclosed of Earth formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant; (ii) by core formation contemporaneous with raining out from within a giant gaseous protoplanet rather than through subsequent whole-Earth re-melting after loss of gases; (iii) by the consequences of whole-Earth decompression dynamics, which obviates the unfounded assumption of mantle convection, and; (iv) by the process of mantle decompression thermal-tsunami. The latter, in addition to accounting for much of the heat leaving the Earth's surface, for the geothermal gradient observ...

  13. Effects of Abiotic Environmental Factors on Soybean Cyst Nematode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yu-xi; ZHENG Ya-nan; CHEN Li-jie; ZHOU Xiao-min; WANG Yuan-yuan; SUN Jing-shuang

    2009-01-01

    As a pest, in order to complete its life history and reproduces effectively, soybean cyst nematode (SCN) (Heterodera glycines Ichinche 1952) must adapt to various environments and conditions for long periods of evolution. The nematode is widely dispersed year after year. Controlling this pest requires understanding characters and adaptability of SCN.Effects of abiotic factors, such as temperature, soil humidity, agrotype, pH value, ions, plant exudates, agricultural chemical and cultivation systems on SCN, are reviewed in this paper. The results show that SCN is able to endure various environmental stresses, especially low temperature. Because of its special life history, cyst stage help SCN over winter,resistance of SCN to environmental stress is strong. A few studies have reported the mechanism of SCN environmental adaptability. We emphasized the importance of studying environmental adaptability of SCN, which would benefit the control of SCN by ecological means.

  14. A comprehensive genome-wide study on tissue-specific and abiotic stress-specific miRNAs in Triticum aestivum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Pandey

    Full Text Available Productivity of wheat crop is largely dependent on its growth and development that, in turn, is mainly regulated by environmental conditions, including abiotic stress factors. miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression networks involved in diverse aspects of development and stress responses in plants. Using high-throughput sequencing of eight small RNA libraries prepared from diverse abiotic stresses and tissues, we identified 47 known miRNAs belonging to 20 families, 49 true novel and 1030 candidate novel miRNAs. Digital gene expression analysis revealed that 257 miRNAs exhibited tissue-specific expression and 74 were associated with abiotic stresses. Putative target genes were predicted for miRNAs identified in this study and their grouping into functional categories indicated that the putative targets were involved in diverse biological processes. RLM-RACE of predicted targets of three known miRNAs (miR156, miR160 and miR164 confirmed their mRNA cleavage, thus indicating their regulation at post-transcriptional level by the corresponding miRNAs. Mapping of the sequenced data onto the wheat progenitors and closely related monocots revealed a large number of evolutionary conserved miRNAs. Additional expression profiling of some of these miRNAs in other abiotic stresses underline their involvement in multiple stresses. Our findings provide valuable resource for an improved understanding of the role of miRNAs in stress tolerance as well as plant development.

  15. A stress-associated NAC transcription factor (SlNAC35) from tomato plays a positive role in biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guodong; Zhang, Song; Ma, Xiaocui; Wang, Yong; Kong, Fanying; Meng, Qingwei

    2016-09-01

    The NAC transcription factor family participates in responses to various kinds of environmental stimuli in plants. Responses of NAC genes to abiotic stresses have been widely studied, but their functions in response to biotic stress are little reported in plants, especially in crops. In the present study, we examined the functions of a novel tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) NAC protein (SlNAC35) in abiotic and biotic stress resistance by using transgenic tobacco. Expression analysis found that SlNAC35 expression was induced by drought stress, salt stress, bacterial pathogen, and signaling molecules, suggesting its involvement in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. Moreover, transgenic lines exhibited a greater number of lateral roots and longer root length compared with Vec lines (empty vector lines) after drought and salt treatment. These results indicate that overexpression of SlNAC35 promoted root growth and development under drought and salt stresses. Higher expressions of NtARF1, NtARF2 and NtARF8 were observed under drought and salt stresses in transgenic lines, suggesting that overexpression of SlNAC35 promoted growth and development of roots in transgenic lines possibly by involving auxin signaling and by regulating NtARF expression. In addition, SlNAC35 overexpression improved resistance to bacterial pathogen in transgenic tobacco, and reactive oxygen species may be in the upstream of salicylic acid (SA) signaling in transgenic tobacco during defense response.

  16. Oxygen dependency of neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix differs from abiotic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizing microorganisms are found in many natural environments. It has been hypothesized that, at low oxygen concentrations, microbial iron oxidation is favored over abiotic oxidation. Here, we compare the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation to oxidation in the presence of

  17. Biotic and abiotic variables show little redundancy in explaining tree species distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Elaine S.; Kienast, Felix; Pearman, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    of the abiotic (topo-climatic) predictors. The influence of biotic predictors was relatively high for species preferably growing under low disturbance and low abiotic stress, species with long seed dispersal distances, species with high shade tolerance as juveniles and adults, and species that occur frequently...

  18. Parallel Handling of Integrity Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Flokstra, Jan; Apers, Peter M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Integrity constraints form an important part of a data model. Therefore, a complete integrity constraint handling subsystem is considered an important part of any modern DBMS. In implementing an integrity constraint handling subsystem, there are two major problem areas: providing enough functionalit

  19. Elevational gradients in phylogenetic structure of ant communities reveal the interplay of biotic and abiotic constraints on diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machac, Antonin; Janda, Milan; Dunn, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    A central focus of ecology and biogeography is to determine the factors that govern spatial variation in biodiversity. Here, we examined patterns of ant diversity along climatic gradients in three temperate montane systems: Great Smoky Mountains National Park (USA), Chiricahua Mountains (USA), an...

  20. Assessing the effects of abiotic stress and livestock grazing disturbance on an alpine grassland with CSR model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Peng; Mou, Chengxiang; Yang, Hao; Mo, Li; Luo, Chuan; Kattge, Jens

    2016-04-01

    How the abiotic factors represented by cold environment and biotic factors represented by livestock grazing will affect the vegetation structure of alpine grassland is a core issue in understanding the cause of biodiversity change on Tibetan Plateau. Past studies on changes of floristic composition, growth forms did not adequately answer question. Given the fact that the response of plant to environment change depend on its life strategy, a synthetical method that based on plant life strategy may deepen our understanding of the mechanism. Using Grime's concept of CSR plant classification, we carried out a vegetation survey along a gradient (three levels) of graze intensity on the south-east of Tibet Plateau, in order to evaluate the role and mechanism of abiotic stress and grazing disturbance in driving plant diversity change, by analyzing the plant life strategy compositions in each of the community and by comparing the characteristic of the strategy compositions along the graze gradient. When the graze intensity was relative low, the dominant plant life strategy gathered in the stress tolerance corner, which conformed the theory of environmental filter, indicating that the ideal top plant community may be dominated by the species with stress tolerant strategy. We also found that the response of strategy dominance to graze intensity increase is positively correlated with the competitive capacity (R 2=0.671; PCSR plant strategy be a useful tool to evaluate the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on plant community assembly of alpine grassland, which may contribute to predict the impacts of climate change and human activity on alpine grassland plant diversity and ecosystem service function related.

  1. An osmotin from the resurrection plant Tripogon loliiformis (TlOsm) confers tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trang T T; Williams, Brett; Mundree, Sagadevan G

    2017-05-03

    Osmotin is a key protein associated with abiotic and biotic stress response in plants. In this study, an osmotin from the resurrection plant Tripogon loliiformis (TlOsm) was characterized and functionally analyzed under abiotic stress conditions in T. loliiformis as well as in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Oryza sativa (rice) plants. Real-time PCR analysis on mixed elicitor cDNA libraries from T. loliiformis showed that TlOsm was upregulated a 1000-fold during the early stages of osmotic stresses (cold, drought, and salinity) in both shoots and roots but downregulated in shoots during heat stress. There was no change in TlOsm gene expression in roots of heat-stressed plants and during plant development. The plasma membrane localization of TlOsm was showed in fluorescent-tagged TlOsm tobacco plants using confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis. Transgenic rice plants expressing TlOsm were assessed for enhanced tolerance to salinity, drought and cold stresses. Constitutively expressed TlOsm in transgenic rice plants showed increased tolerance to cold, drought and salinity stress when compared with the wild-type and vector control counterparts. This was evidenced by maintained growth, retained higher water content and membrane integrity, and improved survival rate of TlOsm-expressing plants. The results thus indicate the involvement of TlOsm in plant response to multiple abiotic stresses, possibly through the signaling pathway, and highlight its potential applications for engineering crops with improved tolerance to cold, drought and salinity stress. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  2. Overexpression of GmHsp90s, a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 gene family cloning from soybean, decrease damage of abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Xu

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is one of the most conserved and abundant molecular chaperones and is an essential component of the protective stress response; however, its roles in abiotic stress responses in soybean (Glycine max remain obscure. Here, 12 GmHsp90 genes from soybean were identified and found to be expressed and to function differentially under abiotic stresses. The 12 GmHsp90 genes were isolated and named GmHsp90A1-GmHsp90A6, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90B2, GmHsp90C1.1, GmHsp90C1.2, GmHsp90C2.1 and GmHsp90C2.2 based on their characteristics and high homology to other Hsp90s according to a new nomenclature system. Quantitative real-time PCR expression data revealed that all the genes exhibited higher transcript levels in leaves and could be strongly induced under heat, osmotic and salt stress but not cold stress. Overexpression of five typical genes (GmHsp90A2, GmHsp90A4, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90C1.1 and GmHsp90C2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana provided useful evidences that GmHsp90 genes can decrease damage of abiotic stresses. In addition, an abnormal accumulation of proline was detected in some transgenic Arabidopsis plants suggested overexpressing GmHsp90s may affect the synthesis and response system of proline. Our work represents a systematic determination of soybean genes encoding Hsp90s, and provides useful evidence that GmHsp90 genes function differently in response to abiotic stresses and may affect the synthesis and response system of proline.

  3. Role of brassinosteroid in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses and its interplay with other hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammed, Golam J; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Li, Xin; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are ubiquitous plant steroid hormones, playing diverse roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. Defects in BRs biosynthesis or signaling result in physiologic and phenotypic abnormalities. To date, numerous studies have highlighted BRs-induced stress tolerance to various environmental extremes such as high temperature, chilling, drought, salinity and heavy metals in a range of plant species. However, the in-depth mechanisms of BRs-induced stress tolerance still remain largely unknown. It is now clear that BRs-induced stress responses are strictly concentration dependent and the optimal concentration for improving the plant adaptability may vary depending on the plant species, developmental stages and environmental conditions as well. Conflicting evidences concerning regulation of stress adaptation by BRs demand further elucidation of mechanism of BRs action in response to environmental stresses in plants. Recent advances in phytohormone research suggest that the effect of BRs on stress tolerance relies largely on its interplay with other hormones. In this review, we critically analyze the multifaceted roles of BRs in various abiotic stresses and its potential crosstalk with other hormones in stress adaptation. The discrepancy in the dose and mode of application of BRs analogues for stress management is also discussed.

  4. Drivers of carabid functional diversity: abiotic environment, plant functional traits, or plant functional diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakeman, Robin J; Stockan, Jenni A

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how community assembly is controlled by the balance of abiotic drivers (environment or management) and biotic drivers (community composition of other groups) is important in predicting the response of ecosystems to environmental change. If there are strong links between plant assemblage structure and carabid beetle functional traits and functional diversity, then it is possible to predict the impact of environmental change propagating through different functional and trophic groups. Vegetation and pitfall trap beetle surveys were carried out across twenty four sites contrasting in land use, and hence productivity and disturbance regime. Plant functional traits were very successful at explaining the distribution of carabid functional traits across the habitats studied. Key carabid response traits appeared to be body length and wing type. Carabid functional richness was significantly smaller than expected, indicating strong environmental filtering, modulated by management, soil characteristics, and by plant response traits. Carabid functional divergence was negatively related to plant functional evenness, while carabid functional evenness was positively correlated to plant functional evenness and richness. The study shows that there are clear trait linkages between the plant and the carabid assemblage that act not only through the mean traits displayed, but also via their distribution in trait space; powerful evidence that both the mean and variance of traits in one trophic group structure the assemblage of another.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of trihelix genes and their expression under biotic and abiotic stresses in Populus trichocarpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanchao; Liu, Quangang; Wang, Hanzeng; Zhang, Haizhen; Xu, Xuemei; Li, Chenghao; Yang, Chuanping

    2016-01-01

    Trihelix genes play important roles in plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we identified 56 full-length trihelix genes in Populus trichocarpa and classified them into five groups. Most genes within a given group had similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The trihelix genes were unequally distributed across 19 different linkage groups. Fifteen paralogous pairs were identified, 14 of which have undergone segmental duplication events. Promoter cis-element analysis indicated that most trihelix genes contain stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements. The expression profiles of the trihelix genes suggest that they are primarily expressed in leaves and roots. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that members of the trihelix gene family are significantly induced in response to osmotic, abscisic acid, salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate and pathogen infection. PtrGT10 was identified as a target gene of miR172d, which is involved in the osmotic response. Repression of PtrGT10 could increase reactive oxygen species scavenging ability and decrease cell death. This study provides novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships and functions of the P. trichocarpa trihelix genes, which will aid future functional studies investigating the divergent roles of trihelix genes belonging to other species. PMID:27782188

  6. Firms Merge in Response to Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical IO models of horizontal mergers and acquisitions make the critical assumption of efficiency gains.Without efficiency gains, these models predict either that mergers are not profitable or that mergers are welfare reducing.A problem here is the empirical observation that on average mergers

  7. Firms Merge in Response to Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical IO models of horizontal mergers and acquisitions make the critical assumption of efficiency gains.Without efficiency gains, these models predict either that mergers are not profitable or that mergers are welfare reducing.A problem here is the empirical observation that on average mergers

  8. Taboo, Constraint, and Responsibility in Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    A controversial educational researcher lists personal experiences which seem to have ethical implications for his profession. His list includes: (1) a claim that one of his articles contained 53 errors, but after two years, the American Psychological Association (APA) Committee on Ethical Standards had only received a list of 53 non-errors; (2) a…

  9. Isolation and characterization of a catalase gene "HuCAT3" from pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) and its expression under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qiong; Gao, Guo-Li; Fan, Qing-jie; Qiao, Guang; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Tao; Peng, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yong-Qiang

    2015-05-25

    Abiotic stresses usually cause H2O2 accumulation, with harmful effects, in plants. Catalase may play a key protective role in plant cells by detoxifying this excess H2O2. Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) shows broad ecological adaptation due to its high tolerance to abiotic stresses, e.g. drought, heat and poor soil. However, involvement of the pitaya catalase gene (HuCAT) in tolerance to abiotic stresses is unknown. In the present study, a full-length HuCAT3 cDNA (1870 bp) was isolated from pitaya based on our previous microarray data and RACE method. The cDNA sequence and deduced amino acid sequence shared 73-77% and 75-80% identity with other plant catalases, respectively. HuCAT3 contains conserved catalase family domain and catalytic sites. Pairwise comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that HuCAT3 is most similar to Eriobotrya japonica CAT, followed by Dimocarpus longan CAT and Nicotiana tabacum CAT1. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that HuCAT3 is mainly expressed in green cotyledons and mature stems, and was regulated by H2O2, drought, cold and salt stress, whereas, its expression patterns and maximum expression levels varied with stress types. HuCAT activity increased as exposure to the tested stresses, and the fluctuation of HuCAT activity was consistent with HuCAT3 mRNA abundance (except for 0.5 days upon drought stress). HuCAT3 mRNA elevations and HuCAT activities changes under cold stress were also in conformity with the cold tolerances among the four genotypes. The obtained results confirmed a major role of HuCAT3 in abiotic stress response of pitaya. This may prove useful in understanding pitaya's high tolerance to abiotic stresses at molecular level.

  10. Changes in abiotic influences on seed plants and ferns during 18 years of primary succession on Puerto Rican landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence R. Walker; Aaron B. Shiels; Peter J. Bellingham; Ashley D. Sparrow; Ned Fetcher; Fred H. Landau; Deborah J. Lodge

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic variables are critical drivers of succession in most primary seres, but how their influence on biota changes over time is rarely examined. Landslides provide good model systems for examining abiotic influences because they are spatially and temporally heterogeneous habitats with distinct abiotic and biotic gradients and post-landslide erosion. In an 18-year...

  11. Asteroseismic constraints for Gaia

    CERN Document Server

    Creevey, O L

    2012-01-01

    Distances from the Gaia mission will no doubt improve our understanding of stellar physics by providing an excellent constraint on the luminosity of the star. However, it is also clear that high precision stellar properties from, for example, asteroseismology, will also provide a needed input constraint in order to calibrate the methods that Gaia will use, e.g. stellar models or GSP_phot. For solar-like stars (F, G, K IV/V), asteroseismic data delivers at the least two very important quantities: (1) the average large frequency separation and (2) the frequency corresponding to the maximum of the modulated-amplitude spectrum nu_max. Both of these quantities are related directly to stellar parameters (radius and mass) and in particular their combination (gravity and density). We show how the precision in , nu_max, and atmospheric parameters T_eff and [Fe/H] affect the determination of gravity (log g) for a sample of well-known stars. We find that log g can be determined within less than 0.02 dex accuracy for ou...

  12. Design with Nonlinear Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2015-12-10

    Most modern industrial and architectural designs need to satisfy the requirements of their targeted performance and respect the limitations of available fabrication technologies. At the same time, they should reflect the artistic considerations and personal taste of the designers, which cannot be simply formulated as optimization goals with single best solutions. This thesis aims at a general, flexible yet e cient computational framework for interactive creation, exploration and discovery of serviceable, constructible, and stylish designs. By formulating nonlinear engineering considerations as linear or quadratic expressions by introducing auxiliary variables, the constrained space could be e ciently accessed by the proposed algorithm Guided Projection, with the guidance of aesthetic formulations. The approach is introduced through applications in different scenarios, its effectiveness is demonstrated by examples that were difficult or even impossible to be computationally designed before. The first application is the design of meshes under both geometric and static constraints, including self-supporting polyhedral meshes that are not height fields. Then, with a formulation bridging mesh based and spline based representations, the application is extended to developable surfaces including origami with curved creases. Finally, general approaches to extend hard constraints and soft energies are discussed, followed by a concluding remark outlooking possible future studies.

  13. Magmatic MORB Volatiles, Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems and Abiotic Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    A plausible model for the origin of the observed C-O-H volatiles observed in MORB glasses is that they were incorporated in primary melts of the upwelling mantle. Based on the observed ferric/ferrous ratios in MORB glass, it is probable that the MORB source mantle contained diamond or graphite, depending on pressure. If true, then during partial mantle melting the graphite/diamond would react with FeO1.5 in garnet/spinel and clinopyroxene to form CO2 which would dissolve in the melt as carbonate ion. Using equation of state models for CO2 activity and ferric/ferrous ratios in the magma it is possible to model the amount of carbonate dissolved in the basaltic magma as a function of the degree of melting (Holloway and O'Day, 2000). The results require that rising MORB magma will become saturated in CO2 at depths much greater than those proposed for MORB magma chambers. Conversely H2O values observed in MORB glasses are far below saturation. However as CO2 reaches saturation and exsolves from the melt the low fO2 imposed by the low ferric/ferrous ratio results in a high H2/H2O ratio in the exsolving supercritical fluid. We have shown that fluids with this composition produce methanol (CH3OH) in the presence of magnetite at seafloor hydrothermal P-T conditions in a flow-through system (Voglesonger, et al., 2001) and that aqueous methanol solutions react in montmorillonite clay interlayers to form a wide variety of complex hydrocarbon molecules, the most abundant being hexamethyl benzene (Williams, et al., 2005). Methyl stearate (C17H35COOCH3) was also observed in moderate amounts. Holloway, J. R. and P. A. O'Day (2000). "Production of CO2 and H2 by Diking-Eruptive Events at Mid-Ocean Ridges: Implications for Abiotic Organic Synthesis and Global Geochemical Cycling." International Geology Review 42: 673-683. Voglesonger, K. M., J. R. Holloway, E. E. Dunn, P. J. Dalla-Betta and P. A. O'Day (2001). "Experimental Abiotic Synthesis of Methanol in Seafloor Hydrothermal

  14. Phytohormones and their metabolic engineering for abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shabir H. Wani; Vinay Kumar; Varsha Shriram; Saroj Kumar Sah

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses including drought, salinity, heat, cold, flooding, and ultraviolet radiation causes crop losses worldwide. In recent times, preventing these crop losses and producing more food and feed to meet the demands of ever-increasing human populations have gained unprecedented importance. However, the proportion of agricultural lands facing multiple abiotic stresses is expected only to rise under a changing global climate fueled by anthropogenic activities. Identifying the mechanisms developed and deployed by plants to counteract abiotic stresses and maintain their growth and survival under harsh conditions thus holds great significance. Recent investigations have shown that phytohormones, including the classical auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, and gibberellins, and newer members including brassinosteroids, jasmonates, and strigolactones may prove to be important metabolic engineering targets for producing abiotic stress-tolerant crop plants. In this review, we summarize and critically assess the roles that phytohormones play in plant growth and development and abiotic stress tolerance, besides their engineering for conferring abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic crops. We also describe recent successes in identifying the roles of phytohormones under stressful conditions. We conclude by describing the recent progress and future prospects including limitations and challenges of phytohormone engineering for inducing abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  15. Phytohormones and their metabolic engineering for abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shabir H.Wani; Vinay Kumar; Varsha Shriram; Saroj Kumar Sah

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses including drought,salinity,heat,cold,flooding,and ultraviolet radiation causes crop losses worldwide.In recent times,preventing these crop losses and producing more food and feed to meet the demands of ever-increasing human populations have gained unprecedented importance.However,the proportion of agricultural lands facing multiple abiotic stresses is expected only to rise under a changing global climate fueled by anthropogenic activities.Identifying the mechanisms developed and deployed by plants to counteract abiotic stresses and maintain their growth and survival under harsh conditions thus holds great significance.Recent investigations have shown that phytohormones,including the classical auxins,cytokinins,ethylene,and gibberellins,and newer members including brassinosteroids,jasmonates,and strigolactones may prove to be important metabolic engineering targets for producing abiotic stress-tolerant crop plants.In this review,we summarize and critically assess the roles that phytohormones play in plant growth and development and abiotic stress tolerance,besides their engineering for conferring abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic crops.We also describe recent successes in identifying the roles of phytohormones under stressful conditions.We conclude by describing the recent progress and future prospects including limitations and challenges of phytohormone engineering for inducing abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  16. Phytohormones and their metabolic engineering for abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabir H. Wani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses including drought, salinity, heat, cold, flooding, and ultraviolet radiation causes crop losses worldwide. In recent times, preventing these crop losses and producing more food and feed to meet the demands of ever-increasing human populations have gained unprecedented importance. However, the proportion of agricultural lands facing multiple abiotic stresses is expected only to rise under a changing global climate fueled by anthropogenic activities. Identifying the mechanisms developed and deployed by plants to counteract abiotic stresses and maintain their growth and survival under harsh conditions thus holds great significance. Recent investigations have shown that phytohormones, including the classical auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, and gibberellins, and newer members including brassinosteroids, jasmonates, and strigolactones may prove to be important metabolic engineering targets for producing abiotic stress-tolerant crop plants. In this review, we summarize and critically assess the roles that phytohormones play in plant growth and development and abiotic stress tolerance, besides their engineering for conferring abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic crops. We also describe recent successes in identifying the roles of phytohormones under stressful conditions. We conclude by describing the recent progress and future prospects including limitations and challenges of phytohormone engineering for inducing abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  17. Impact of biotic and abiotic stresses on the competitive ability of multiple herbicide resistant wild oat (Avena fatua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnhoff, Erik A; Keith, Barbara K; Dyer, William E; Menalled, Fabian D

    2013-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fitness costs of herbicide resistance should lead to the reduced relative abundance of resistant populations upon the cessation of herbicide use. This greenhouse research investigated the potential fitness costs of two multiple herbicide resistant (MHR) wild oat (Avena fatua) populations, an economically important weed that affects cereal and pulse crop production in the Northern Great Plains of North America. We compared the competitive ability of two MHR and two herbicide susceptible (HS) A. fatua populations along a gradient of biotic and abiotic stresses The biotic stress was imposed by three levels of wheat (Triticum aestivum) competition (0, 4, and 8 individuals pot(-1)) and an abiotic stress by three nitrogen (N) fertilization rates (0, 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1)). Data were analyzed with linear mixed-effects models and results showed that the biomass of all A. fatua populations decreased with increasing T. aestivum competition at all N rates. Similarly, A. fatua relative growth rate (RGR) decreased with increasing T. aestivum competition at the medium and high N rates but there was no response with 0 N. There were no differences between the levels of biomass or RGR of HS and MHR populations in response to T. aestivum competition. Overall, the results indicate that MHR does not confer growth-related fitness costs in these A. fatua populations, and that their relative abundance will not be diminished with respect to HS populations in the absence of herbicide treatment.

  18. Expression of a finger millet transcription factor, EcNAC1, in tobacco confers abiotic stress-tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkategowda Ramegowda

    Full Text Available NAC (NAM, ATAF1-2, and CUC2 proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors and have been shown to be involved in diverse plant processes including plant growth, development, and stress-tolerance. In this study, a stress-responsive NAC gene, EcNAC1, was isolated from the subtracted stress cDNA library generated from a drought adapted crop, finger millet, and characterized for its role in stress-tolerance. The expression analysis showed that EcNAC1 was highly induced during water-deficit and salt stress. EcNAC1 shares high amino acid similarity with rice genes that have been phylogenetically classified into stress-related NAC genes. Our results demonstrated that tobacco transgenic plants expressing EcNAC1 exhibit tolerance to various abiotic stresses like simulated osmotic stress, by polyethylene glycol (PEG and mannitol, and salinity stress. The transgenic plants also showed enhanced tolerance to methyl-viologen (MV induced oxidative stress. Reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-induced damage were noticed in pot grown transgenic lines under water-deficit and natural high light conditions. Root growth under stress and recovery growth after stress alleviation was more in transgenic plants. Many stress-responsive genes were found to be up-regulated in transgenic lines expressing EcNAC1. Our results suggest that EcNAC1 overexpression confers tolerance against abiotic stress in susceptible species, tobacco.

  19. Impact of biotic and abiotic stresses on the competitive ability of multiple herbicide resistant wild oat (Avena fatua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A Lehnhoff

    Full Text Available Ecological theory predicts that fitness costs of herbicide resistance should lead to the reduced relative abundance of resistant populations upon the cessation of herbicide use. This greenhouse research investigated the potential fitness costs of two multiple herbicide resistant (MHR wild oat (Avena fatua populations, an economically important weed that affects cereal and pulse crop production in the Northern Great Plains of North America. We compared the competitive ability of two MHR and two herbicide susceptible (HS A. fatua populations along a gradient of biotic and abiotic stresses The biotic stress was imposed by three levels of wheat (Triticum aestivum competition (0, 4, and 8 individuals pot(-1 and an abiotic stress by three nitrogen (N fertilization rates (0, 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1. Data were analyzed with linear mixed-effects models and results showed that the biomass of all A. fatua populations decreased with increasing T. aestivum competition at all N rates. Similarly, A. fatua relative growth rate (RGR decreased with increasing T. aestivum competition at the medium and high N rates but there was no response with 0 N. There were no differences between the levels of biomass or RGR of HS and MHR populations in response to T. aestivum competition. Overall, the results indicate that MHR does not confer growth-related fitness costs in these A. fatua populations, and that their relative abundance will not be diminished with respect to HS populations in the absence of herbicide treatment.

  20. The NAC-type transcription factor OsNAC2 regulates ABA-dependent genes and abiotic stress tolerance in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiabin; Lv, Bo; Luo, Liqiong; He, Jianmei; Mao, Chanjuan; Xi, Dandan; Ming, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Plants can perceive environmental changes and respond to external stressors. Here, we show that OsNAC2, a member of the NAC transcription factor family, was strongly induced by ABA and osmotic stressors such as drought and high salt. With reduced yields under drought conditions at the flowering stage, OsNAC2 overexpression lines had lower resistance to high salt and drought conditions. RNAi plants showed enhanced tolerance to high salinity and drought stress at both the vegetative and flowering stages. Furthermore, RNAi plants had improved yields after drought stress. A microarray assay indicated that many ABA-dependent stress-related genes were down-regulated in OsNAC2 overexpression lines. We further confirmed that OsNAC2 directly binds the promoters of LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT 3 (OsLEA3) and Stress-Activated Protein Kinases 1 (OsSAPK1), two marker genes in the abiotic stress and ABA response pathways, respectively. Our results suggest that in rice OsNAC2 regulates both abiotic stress responses and ABA-mediated responses, and acts at the junction between the ABA and abiotic stress pathways. PMID:28074873

  1. A wheat salinity-induced WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93 confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Liu, Xiuzhi

    2015-08-21

    Wheat is an important crop in the world. But most of the cultivars are salt sensitive, and often adversely affected by salt stress. WRKY transcription factors play a major role in plant responses to salt stress, but the effective salinity regulatory WRKYs identified in bread wheat are limited and the mechanism of salt stress tolerance is also not well explored. Here, we identified a salt (NaCl) induced class II WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93. Its transcript level was strongly induced by salt (NaCl) and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expression of TaWRKY93 in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced salt (NaCl), drought, low temperature and osmotic (mannitol) stress tolerance, mainly demonstrated by transgenic plants forming longer primary roots or more lateral roots on MS plates supplemented with NaCl and mannitol individually, higher survival rate under drought and low temperature stress. Further, transgenic plants maintained a more proline content, higher relative water content and less electrolyte leakage than the wild type plants. The transcript abundance of a series of abiotic stress-related genes was up-regulated in the TaWRKY93 transgenic plants. In summary, TaWRKY93 is a new positive regulator of abiotic stress, it may increase salinity, drought and low temperature stress tolerance through enhancing osmotic adjustment, maintaining membrane stability and increasing transcription of stress related genes, and contribute to the superior agricultural traits of SR3 through promoting root development. It can be used as a candidate gene for wheat transgenic engineering breeding against abiotic stress.

  2. Influence of Various Levels of Iron and Other Abiotic Factors on Siderophorogenesis in Paddy Field Cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Siderophore production in Anabaena oryzae was investigated under the influence of various levels of iron and other abiotic factors such as pH, temperature, light and different nitrogen sources. Optimization of culture conditions under controlled mechanisms of these abiotic factors lead to the siderophore production in significant amount. Under iron-starved condition, A. oryzae extracellularly releases 89.17% hydroxymate-type siderophore. Slightly alkaline pH and 30 °C temperature was found stimulatory for the cyanobacterial growth and siderophorogenesis (88.52% SU and 83.87% SU, respectively). Excess iron loading had a negative impact on siderophore production along with the alterations in the morphology and growth. Further, scanning electron microphotographs signified that higher concentrations of iron lead to complete damage of the cells and alterations in membrane proteins possibly transporters responsible for exchange of siderophore complex from environment to the cell. SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell proteins showed overexpression of low molecular weight proteins ranges between 20.1 to 29.0 kDa up to 100-μM iron concentrations. These polypeptides/proteins might be involved in maintaining iron homeostasis by regulating siderophore production. Results suggest that lower concentrations of iron ≤ 50 μM along with other abiotic factors are stimulatory, whereas higher concentrations (>50 μM) are toxic. Data further suggested that cyanobacterium A. oryzae can serve as a potential biofertilizer especially in iron-rich soil through sequestration by the power of natural Fe(III)-siderophore complex formation.

  3. Association genetics and expression patterns of a CBF4 homolog in Populus under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Xu, Baohua; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for prevention and treatment of abiotic stress require an improved understanding of stress responses. Here, we examined response differences of a C-repeat binding factor gene (PsCBF4) between five species in the genus Populus. We also used a candidate gene-based approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within PsCBF4 that were associated with physiological and biochemical traits in a natural population (528 unrelated individuals) of Populus simonii. We first isolated a 1,044-bp PsCBF4 cDNA encoding a polypeptide of 256 amino acids. Expression profiling revealed that CBF4 is differentially expressed under cold, heat, drought, and salt conditions among five Populus species. Cold stress is the most significant interspecific difference, and PsCBF4 transcript levels ranged from 6.5 to 379.5 times higher than in unstressed controls. A natural population of P. simonii showed high nucleotide diversity (π T = 0.00880, θ w = 0.01192) and low linkage disequilibrium (r (2) ≥ 0.1, within 700 bp) across PsCBF4. Association analysis showed that nine SNPs (false discovery rate Q stress tolerance in P. simonii.

  4. Soybean NAC transcription factors promote abiotic stress tolerance and lateral root formation in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Wei, Wei; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Wang, Fang; Zou, Hong-Feng; Lei, Gang; Tian, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2011-10-01

    NAC transcription factors play important roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. Previously, we identified multiple NAC genes in soybean (Glycine max). Here, we identify the roles of two genes, GmNAC11 and GmNAC20, in stress responses and other processes. The two genes were differentially induced by multiple abiotic stresses and plant hormones, and their transcripts were abundant in roots and cotyledons. Both genes encoded proteins that localized to the nucleus and bound to the core DNA sequence CGT[G/A]. In the protoplast assay system, GmNAC11 acts as a transcriptional activator, whereas GmNAC20 functions as a mild repressor; however, the C-terminal end of GmANC20 has transcriptional activation activity. Over-expression of GmNAC20 enhances salt and freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants; however, GmNAC11 over-expression only improves salt tolerance. Over-expression of GmNAC20 also promotes lateral root formation. GmNAC20 may regulate stress tolerance through activation of the DREB/CBF-COR pathway, and may control lateral root development by altering auxin signaling-related genes. GmNAC11 probably regulates DREB1A and other stress-related genes. The roles of the two GmNAC genes in stress tolerance were further analyzed in soybean transgenic hairy roots. These results provide a basis for genetic manipulation to improve the agronomic traits of important crops.

  5. The Role of Ubiquitin and the 26S Proteasome in Plant Abiotic Stress Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone L Sophia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin is a small, highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic protein with immensely important and diverse regulatory functions. A well-studied function of ubiquitin is its role in selective proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS. The UPS has emerged as an integral player in plant response and adaptation to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and nutrient deprivation. The UPS has also been shown to influence the production and signal transduction of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid. Understanding UPS function has centered mainly on defining the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which are the substrate-recruiting component of the ubiquitination pathway. The recent identification of stress signaling/regulatory proteins that are the subject of ubiquitin-dependent degradation has increased our knowledge of how the UPS facilitate responses to adverse environmental conditions. A brief overview is provided on role of the UPS in modulating protein stability during abiotic stress signaling. E3 ubiquitin ligases for which stress-related substrate proteins have been identified are discussed.

  6. Comparison of U and Np uptake on biogenic and abiotic ferrihydrite by XAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    XAS spectra of U and Np sorption biogenic ferrihydrite samples were compared to abiotic samples. The k{sup 3}-weighted χ-spectrum and its Fourier-transform of the studied biogenic ferrihydrite sample bears close resemblance to the bidentate edge-sharing innersphere sorption {sup 1}E complex, which is the main sorption species on abiotic ferrihydrite. Based on the shell fit analysis, the distances of the coordination shells U-O{sub eq}, U-O{sub ax}, and U-Fe are similar to those determined for abiotic ferrihydrite samples.

  7. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  8. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z., E-mail: zzhel@ic.bas.bg; Shopska, M., E-mail: shopska@ic.bas.bg; Paneva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria)

    2016-12-15

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media (Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  9. Grape Composition under Abiotic Constrains: Water Stress and Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirás-Avalos, José M; Intrigliolo, Diego S

    2017-01-01

    Water stress and increasing soil salt concentration represent the most common abiotic constrains that exert a negative impact on Mediterranean vineyards performance. However, several studies have proven that deficit irrigation strategies are able to improve grape composition. In contrast, irrigation with saline waters negatively affected yield and grape composition, although the magnitude of these effects depended on the cultivar, rootstock, phenological stage when water was applied, as well as on the salt concentration in the irrigation water. In this context, agronomic practices that minimize these effects on berry composition and, consequently, on wine quality must be achieved. In this paper, we briefly reviewed the main findings obtained regarding the effects of deficit irrigation strategies, as well as irrigation with saline water, on the berry composition of both red and white cultivars, as well as on the final wine. A meta-analysis was performed using published data for red and white varieties; a general liner model accounting for the effects of cultivar, rootstock, and midday stem water potential was able to explain up to 90% of the variability in the dataset, depending on the selected variable. In both red and white cultivars, berry weight, must titratable acidity and pH were fairly well simulated, whereas the goodness-of-fit for wine attributes was better for white cultivars.

  10. Grape Composition under Abiotic Constrains: Water Stress and Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Mirás-Avalos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Water stress and increasing soil salt concentration represent the most common abiotic constrains that exert a negative impact on Mediterranean vineyards performance. However, several studies have proven that deficit irrigation strategies are able to improve grape composition. In contrast, irrigation with saline waters negatively affected yield and grape composition, although the magnitude of these effects depended on the cultivar, rootstock, phenological stage when water was applied, as well as on the salt concentration in the irrigation water. In this context, agronomic practices that minimize these effects on berry composition and, consequently, on wine quality must be achieved. In this paper, we briefly reviewed the main findings obtained regarding the effects of deficit irrigation strategies, as well as irrigation with saline water, on the berry composition of both red and white cultivars, as well as on the final wine. A meta-analysis was performed using published data for red and white varieties; a general liner model accounting for the effects of cultivar, rootstock, and midday stem water potential was able to explain up to 90% of the variability in the dataset, depending on the selected variable. In both red and white cultivars, berry weight, must titratable acidity and pH were fairly well simulated, whereas the goodness-of-fit for wine attributes was better for white cultivars.

  11. Abiotic oxidation of catechol by soil metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colarieti, Maria Letizia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Toscano, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: giuseppe.toscano@unina.it; Ardi, Maria Raffaella [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Greco, Guido [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2006-06-30

    The mechanism of catechol oxidation by soil metal oxides is investigated in a slurry reactor. This abiotic transformation is shown to consist in a three-step process. The first step is a heterogeneous reaction. Catechol undergoes fast, partial oxidation at the expenses of Fe and Mn oxides contained in the soil. In the second step, reduced Fe and Mn are released into the aqueous solution and immediately complexed by catechol. Metal-catecholate complexes are stable at the very low dissolved-oxygen concentration levels attained under nitrogen sparging. The third step is a homogenous reaction. The highly reactive intermediate produced by catechol partial oxidation initiates catechol polymerisation. Under nitrogen sparging, the polymerisation process ends rather rapidly, thus yielding only partial conversion of the phenol and producing low-molecular weight, water-soluble polymers. Further oxidation of the metal-catecholate complexes formed in the second step only occurs under air sparging. Thus, reactive intermediates are formed at much higher concentration levels than those attained when nearly no oxygen is present in solution. The polymerisation proceeds at a much faster rate until, under the experimental conditions adopted, complete catechol conversion is attained and high-molecular-weight, insoluble polymers are produced.

  12. Abiotic Factors Affecting Canola Establishment and Insect Pest Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Nansen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canola is grown mainly as an oil-seed crop, but recently the interest in canola has increased due to its potential as a biodiesel crop. The main objectives of this paper were to evaluate effects of abiotic factors and seed treatment on canola plant establishment and pest pressure in the Southern High Plains of Texas. Data was collected at two field locations during the first seven months of two field seasons. Based on multi-regression analysis, we demonstrated that precipitation was positively associated with ranked plant weight, daily minimum relative humidity and maximum temperature were negatively associated with plant weight, and that there may be specific optimal growth conditions regarding cumulative solar radiation and wind speed. The outlined multi-regression approach may be considered appropriate for ecological studies of canola establishment and pest communities elsewhere and therefore enable identification of suitable regions for successful canola production. We also demonstrated that aphids were about 35% more abundant on non-treated seeds than on treated seeds, but the sensitivity to seed treatment was only within four months after plant emergence. On the other hand, seed treatment had negligible effect on presence of thrips.

  13. Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menno, Dominik Francesco; Balleer, Almut; Hristov, Nikolay

    This paper investigates how financial market imperfections and the frequency of price adjustment interact. Based on new firm-level evidence for Germany, we document that financially constrained firms adjust prices more often than their unconstrained counterparts, both upwards and downwards. We show...... that these empirical patterns are consistent with a partial equilibrium menu-cost model with a working capital constraint. We then use the model to show how the presence of financial frictions changes profits and the price distribution of firms compared to a model without financial frictions. Our results suggest...... that tighter financial constraints are associated with higher nominal rigidities, higher prices and lower output. Moreover, in response to aggregate shocks, aggregate price rigidity moves substantially, the response of inflation is dampened, while output reacts more in the presence of financial frictions...

  14. Rewriting Constraint Models with Metamodels

    CERN Document Server

    Chenouard, Raphael; Soto, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    An important challenge in constraint programming is to rewrite constraint models into executable programs calculat- ing the solutions. This phase of constraint processing may require translations between constraint programming lan- guages, transformations of constraint representations, model optimizations, and tuning of solving strategies. In this paper, we introduce a pivot metamodel describing the common fea- tures of constraint models including different kinds of con- straints, statements like conditionals and loops, and other first-class elements like object classes and predicates. This metamodel is general enough to cope with the constructions of many languages, from object-oriented modeling languages to logic languages, but it is independent from them. The rewriting operations manipulate metamodel instances apart from languages. As a consequence, the rewriting operations apply whatever languages are selected and they are able to manage model semantic information. A bridge is created between the metamode...

  15. Constraint Propagation as Information Maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, A Nait

    2012-01-01

    Dana Scott used the partial order among partial functions for his mathematical model of recursively defined functions. He interpreted the partial order as one of information content. In this paper we elaborate on Scott's suggestion of regarding computation as a process of information maximization by applying it to the solution of constraint satisfaction problems. Here the method of constraint propagation can be interpreted as decreasing uncertainty about the solution -- that is, as gain in information about the solution. As illustrative example we choose numerical constraint satisfaction problems to be solved by interval constraints. To facilitate this approach to constraint solving we formulate constraint satisfaction problems as formulas in predicate logic. This necessitates extending the usual semantics for predicate logic so that meaning is assigned not only to sentences but also to formulas with free variables.

  16. Efficient Searching with Linear Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan; Erickson, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    We show how to preprocess a set S of points in d into an external memory data structure that efficiently supports linear-constraint queries. Each query is in the form of a linear constraint xd a0+∑d−1i=1 aixi; the data structure must report all the points of S that satisfy the constraint. This pr......We show how to preprocess a set S of points in d into an external memory data structure that efficiently supports linear-constraint queries. Each query is in the form of a linear constraint xd a0+∑d−1i=1 aixi; the data structure must report all the points of S that satisfy the constraint...

  17. ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENTATION IN TRITICUM AESTIVUM L.: GENETIC BASIS AND ROLE UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereshchenko O.Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are secondary metabolites of plants. They have a wide range of biological activity such as antioxidant, photoprotection, osmoregulation, heavy metal ions chelation, antimicrobial and antifungal activities, which help plants to survive under different stress conditions. Bread wheat (T. aestivum L. can have purple pigmentation provided by anthocyanin compounds in different organs, such as grain pericarp, coleoptile, culm, leaf blades, leaf sheaths, glumes and anthers. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying formation of these traits as well as contribution of the pigmentation to stress tolerance have not been widely studied in wheat. The aim of the current study was to investigate molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying anthocyanin pigmentation in different wheat organs and to estimate the role of the pigmentation under different abiotic stress conditions in wheat seedlings. In the current study, near-isogenic lines (NILs: cv. ‘Saratovskaya 29’ (‘S29’ and lines i:S29Pp1Pp2PF and i:S29Pp1Pp3P developed on the ‘S29’ background but having grain pericarp coloration (genes Pp and more intense coleoptile (Rc, culm (Pc, leaf blade (Plb, leaf sheath (Pls pigmentation in comparison with ‘S29’, were used. Comparative transcriptional analysis of the five structural genes Chs, Chi, F3h, Dfr, Ans, encoding enzymes participating in the anthocyanin biosynthesis, was performed in different organs of NILs. It was shown that the presence of the Rc, Pc, Plb, Pls and Pp alleles conferring strong anthocyanin pigmentation induced more intense transcription of the structural genes, suggesting the genes Rc, Pc, Plb, Pls and Pp to play a regulatory role in anthocyanin biosynthesis network. To evaluate the role of anthocyanins in stress response at the seedling stage, growth ability of the NILs and anthocyanin content in their coleoptiles were assessed after treatments with NaCl (100 and 200 mM, CdCl2 (25 and 50 μM and 15% PEG 6000

  18. Constraints On Cosmic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mbonye, M R

    2003-01-01

    Observationally, the universe appears virtually critical. Yet, there is no simple explanation for this state. In this article we advance and explore the premise that the dynamics of the universe always seeks equilibrium conditions. Vacuum-induced cosmic accelerations lead to creation of matter-energy modes at the expense of vacuum energy. Because they gravitate, such modes constitute inertia against cosmic acceleration. On the other extreme, the would-be ultimate phase of local gravitational collapse is checked by a phase transition in the collapsing matter fields leading to a de Sitter-like fluid deep inside the black hole horizon, and at the expense of the collapsing matter fields. As a result, the universe succumbs to neither vacuum-induced run-away accelerations nor to gravitationally induced spacetime curvature singularities. Cosmic dynamics is self-regulating. We discuss the physical basis for these constraints and the implications, pointing out how the framework relates and helps resolve standing puzzl...

  19. Constraints on Spontaneous Entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has revealed that a person's rhythmic limb movements become spontaneously entrained to an environmental rhythm if a. visual information about the environmental rhythm is available and b. its frequency of the environmental rhythm is near that of the person's movements. Further, this research has demonstrated that if the eyes track the environmental stimulus, the spontaneous entrainment to the environmental rhythm is strengthened. Experiments were performed to investigate two hypotheses that could explain this eye-tracking enhancement of spontaneous entrainment. One hypothesis is that eye tracking allows for the pick up of important coordinative information at the turn-around points of a movement trajectory. Another hypothesis is that the limb movements entrain to the moving eyes through a neuromotor synergy linking the eyes and limb. Results of these experiments will help delineate the informational and dynamical constraints that can impact the acquisition of skilled actions.

  20. Constraint-Based Categorial Grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, G; Bouma, Gosse; Noord, Gertjan van

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Categorial Grammar in which lexical categories are defined by means of recursive constraints. In particular, the introduction of relational constraints allows one to capture the effects of (recursive) lexical rules in a computationally attractive manner. We illustrate the linguistic merits of the new approach by showing how it accounts for the syntax of Dutch cross-serial dependencies and the position and scope of adjuncts in such constructions. Delayed evaluation is used to process grammars containing recursive constraints.

  1. Enabling inclusive sport participation: Effects of disability and support needs on constraints to sport participation

    OpenAIRE

    Darcy, S.; Lock, Daniel; Taylor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Framed by a social approach to disability and leisure constraints theory, this paper presents the results of a national study examining the constraints to sport participation for people with disability. Responses were obtained from a multi-platform questionnaire survey capturing data on constraints to participation, dimensions of disability, and level of support needs. The Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five structural together with intrapersonal and interpersonal constraint factors. ...

  2. Isolation and Expression Analysis of a Novel Abiotic Stress-Induced Gene W89 from Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-yue; XU Zhao-shi; LI Lian-cheng; CHEN Ming; MA You-zhi

    2007-01-01

    Water stress and cold stress are important factors restricting plant growth. However, there is little knowledge on the function of stress-responsive genes in plants. Therefore, it is necessary to clone some important genes to study the mechanism of plant adaptation to abiot