WorldWideScience

Sample records for aberration-corrected scanning transmission

  1. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Spherical aberration correction in a scanning transmission electron microscope using a sculpted thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Roy; Remez, Roei; Lu, Peng-Han; Jin, Lei; Lereah, Yossi; Tavabi, Amir H; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Arie, Ady

    2018-06-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Scherzer showed that rotationally symmetric, charge-free, static electron lenses are limited by an unavoidable, positive spherical aberration. Following a long struggle, a major breakthrough in the spatial resolution of electron microscopes was reached two decades ago by abandoning the first of these conditions, with the successful development of multipole aberration correctors. Here, we use a refractive silicon nitride thin film to tackle the second of Scherzer's constraints and demonstrate an alternative method for correcting spherical aberration in a scanning transmission electron microscope. We reveal features in Si and Cu samples that cannot be resolved in an uncorrected microscope. Our thin film corrector can be implemented as an immediate low cost upgrade to existing electron microscopes without re-engineering of the electron column or complicated operation protocols and can be extended to the correction of additional aberrations. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical depth sectioning in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission and scanning confocal electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behan, G; Nellist, P D

    2008-01-01

    The use of spherical aberration correctors in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has the effect of reducing the depth of field of the microscope, making three-dimensional imaging of a specimen possible by optical sectioning. Depth resolution can be improved further by placing aberration correctors and lenses pre and post specimen to achieve an imaging mode known as scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM). We present the calculated incoherent point spread functions (PSF) and optical transfer functions (OTF) of a STEM and SCEM. The OTF for a STEM is shown to have a missing cone region which results in severe blurring along the optic axis, which can be especially severe for extended objects. We also present strategies for reconstruction of experimental data, such as three-dimensional deconvolution of the point spread function.

  4. Determination of aberration center of Ronchigram for automated aberration correctors in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannomiya, Takumi, E-mail: sannomiya@mtl.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka; Nakamichi, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Fumio [JEOL Limited, Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Yoshio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    A generic method to determine the aberration center is established, which can be utilized for aberration calculation and axis alignment for aberration corrected electron microscopes. In this method, decentering induced secondary aberrations from inherent primary aberrations are minimized to find the appropriate axis center. The fitness function to find the optimal decentering vector for the axis was defined as a sum of decentering induced secondary aberrations with properly distributed weight values according to the aberration order. Since the appropriate decentering vector is determined from the aberration values calculated at an arbitrary center axis, only one aberration measurement is in principle required to find the center, resulting in /very fast center search. This approach was tested for the Ronchigram based aberration calculation method for aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both in simulation and in experiments, the center search was confirmed to work well although the convergence to find the best axis becomes slower with larger primary aberrations. Such aberration center determination is expected to fully automatize the aberration correction procedures, which used to require pre-alignment of experienced users. This approach is also applicable to automated aperture positioning. - Highlights: • A generic method to determine the aberration center is established for (S)TEM. • Decentering induced secondary aberrations are utilized to find the center. • The method is tested on Ronchigrams both in simulation and experiment. • Proper weighting of the aberration gives a good convergence. • Larger primary aberration results in a slower convergence.

  5. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  6. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  8. Towards atomic scale engineering of rare-earth-doped SiAlON ceramics through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurdakul, Hilmi; Idrobo, Juan C.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Turan, Servet

    2011-01-01

    Direct visualization of rare earths in α- and β-SiAlON unit-cells is performed through Z-contrast imaging technique in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. The preferential occupation of Yb and Ce atoms in different interstitial locations of β-SiAlON lattice is demonstrated, yielding higher solubility for Yb than Ce. The triangular-like host sites in α-SiAlON unit cell accommodate more Ce atoms than hexagonal sites in β-SiAlON. We think that our results will be applicable as guidelines for many kinds of rare-earth-doped materials.

  9. Aberration-corrected STEM: current performance and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellist, P D [Department of Physics, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Chisholm, M F [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Lupini, A R [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Borisevich, A [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Jr, W H Sides [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Pennycook, S J [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Dellby, N [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Keyse, R [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Krivanek, O L [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Murfitt, M F [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Szilagyi, Z S [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)

    2006-02-22

    Through the correction of spherical aberration in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the resolving of a 78 pm atomic column spacing has been demonstrated along with information transfer to 61 pm. The achievement of this resolution required careful control of microscope instabilities, parasitic aberrations and the compensation of uncorrected, higher order aberrations. Many of these issues are improved in a next generation STEM fitted with a new design of aberration corrector, and an initial result demonstrating aberration correction to a convergence semi-angle of 40 mrad is shown. The improved spatial resolution and beam convergence allowed for by such correction has implications for the way in which experiments are performed and how STEM data should be interpreted.

  10. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field’s components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field’s derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. - Highlights: • The formula of partial coherence for aberration corrected TEM is derived. • Transfer functions are calculated with several residual aberrations. • The calculated transfer function shows the characteristic damping. • The odd-symmetric wave aberrations can cause the attenuation of image via coherence. • The examples of aberration corrected TEM image simulations are shown.

  11. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Fumio, E-mail: hosokawa@bio-net.co.jp [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka [JEOL (UK) Ltd., JEOL House, Silver Court, Watchmead, Welwyn Garden City, Herts AL7 1LT (United Kingdom); Shinkawa, Takao [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Sannomiya, Takumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field’s components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field’s derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. - Highlights: • The formula of partial coherence for aberration corrected TEM is derived. • Transfer functions are calculated with several residual aberrations. • The calculated transfer function shows the characteristic damping. • The odd-symmetric wave aberrations can cause the attenuation of image via coherence. • The examples of aberration corrected TEM image simulations are shown.

  12. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L. Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Batson, Philip E. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Devices and Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Materials Science, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dellby, Niklas [Nion Company, 11515 NE 118th Street, Kirkland, WA 98034 (United States); Krivanek, Ondrej L. [Nion Company, 11515 NE 118th Street, Kirkland, WA 98034 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper “In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday”, recently published in Ultramicroscopy. - Highlights: • We provide a brief history of the Cambridge project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction work and related research. • We summarize our corrector development work that followed the Cambridge project, and which was the first to reach higher spatial resolution than any non-corrected electron microscope.

  13. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L. Michael; Batson, Philip E.; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper “In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday”, recently published in Ultramicroscopy. - Highlights: • We provide a brief history of the Cambridge project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction work and related research. • We summarize our corrector development work that followed the Cambridge project, and which was the first to reach higher spatial resolution than any non-corrected electron microscope

  14. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrobo, Juan C., E-mail: idrobojc@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Walkosz, Weronika [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Klie, Robert F.; Oeguet, Serdar [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface and in bulk Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Revealing the atomic structure of the {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and lattice location of oxygen impurities in bulk {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering of nitrogen and oxygen at the {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  15. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D., E-mail: marta.rossell@empa.ch

    2017-05-15

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. - Highlights: • The heterogeneous integration of high-quality compound semiconductors remains a challenge. • Lattice defects cause severe degradation of the semiconductor device performances. • Aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM allows atomic-scale characterization of defects. • An overview of lattice defects found in cubic semiconductors is presented. • Theoretical modelling and calculations are needed to determine the defect properties.

  16. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth.

  17. The influence of Cs/Cc correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (C s ) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (C c ) which augments those accomplishments. In this paper we will review and summarize how the combination of C s /C c technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationally mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments

  18. Direct observation of dislocation dissociation and Suzuki segregation in a Mg–Zn–Y alloy by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhiqing; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Duscher, Gerd; Ma Xiuliang; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal defects in a plastically deformed Mg–Zn–Y alloy have been studied on the atomic scale using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, providing important structural data for understanding the material’s deformation behavior and strengthening mechanisms. Atomic scale structures of deformation stacking faults resulting from dissociation of different types of dislocations have been characterized experimentally, and modeled. Suzuki segregation of Zn and Y along stacking faults formed through dislocation dissociation during plastic deformation at 300 °C is confirmed experimentally on the atomic level. The stacking fault energy of the Mg–Zn–Y alloy is evaluated to be in the range of 4.0–10.3 mJ m −2 . The newly formed nanometer-wide stacking faults with their Zn/Y segregation in Mg grains play an important role in the superior strength of this alloy at elevated temperatures.

  19. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, O L; Dellby, N; Murfitt, M F

    2011-01-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been able to image individual heavy atoms in a light matrix for some time. It is now able to do much more: it can resolve individual atoms as light as boron in monolayer materials; image atomic columns as light as hydrogen, identify the chemical type of individual isolated atoms from the intensity of their annular dark field (ADF) image and by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); and map elemental composition at atomic resolution by EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). It can even map electronic states, also by EELS, at atomic resolution. The instrumentation developments that have made this level of performance possible are reviewed, and examples of applications to semiconductors and oxides are shown.

  20. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  1. First experimental proof for aberration correction in XPEEM: Resolution, transmission enhancement, and limitation by space charge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Th.; Sala, A.; Marchetto, H.; Umbach, E.; Freund, H.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The positive effect of double aberration correction in x-ray induced Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (XPEEM) has been successfully demonstrated for both, the lateral resolution and the transmission, using the Au 4f XPS peak for element specific imaging at a kinetic energy of 113 eV. The lateral resolution is improved by a factor of four, compared to a non-corrected system, whereas the transmission is enhanced by a factor of 5 at a moderate resolution of 80 nm. With an optimized system setting, a lateral resolution of 18 nm could be achieved, which is up to now the best value reported for energy filtered XPEEM imaging. However, the absolute resolution does not yet reach the theoretical limit of 2 nm, which is due to space charge limitation. This occurs along the entire optical axis up to the contrast aperture. In XPEEM the pulsed time structure of the exciting soft x-ray light source causes a short and highly intense electron pulse, which results in an image blurring. In contrast, the imaging with elastically reflected electrons in the low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) mode yields a resolution clearly below 5 nm. Technical solutions to reduce the space charge effect in an aberration-corrected spectro-microscope are discussed. - Highlights: ► First successful double aberration correction in XPEEM. ► Improvement of resolution and transmission by aberration correction. ► Lateral resolution of 18 nm in energy filtered XPEEM is the best up to now reported value. ► First investigation of space charge effects in aberrations corrected PEEM

  2. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  3. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivanek, O.L. [Nion Co., 1102 8th Street, Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)], E-mail: krivanek.ondrej@gmail.com; Corbin, G.J.; Dellby, N.; Elston, B.F.; Keyse, R.J.; Murfitt, M.F.; Own, C.S.; Szilagyi, Z.S.; Woodruff, J.W. [Nion Co., 1102 8th Street, Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown.

  4. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, O.L.; Corbin, G.J.; Dellby, N.; Elston, B.F.; Keyse, R.J.; Murfitt, M.F.; Own, C.S.; Szilagyi, Z.S.; Woodruff, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown

  5. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM

  6. Investigating the chemical and morphological evolution of GaAs capped InAs/InP quantum dots emitting at 1.5μm using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    The emission wavelength of InAs quantum dots grown on InP has been shown to shift to the technologically desirable 1.5μm with the deposition of 1–2 monolayers of GaAs on top of the quantum dots. Here, we use aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy to investigate morphological...... and compositional changes occurring to the quantum dots as a result of the deposition of 1.7 monolayers of GaAs on top of them, prior to complete overgrowth with InP. The results are compared with theoretical models describing the overgrowth process....

  7. Design for an aberration corrected scanning electron microscope using miniature electron mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Hideto; Kruit, Pieter

    2018-06-01

    Resolution of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) is determined by aberrations of the objective lens. It is well known that both spherical and chromatic aberrations can be compensated by placing a 90-degree bending magnet and an electron mirror in the beam path before the objective lens. Nevertheless, this approach has not led to wide use of these aberration correctors, partly because aberrations of the bending magnet can be a serious problem. A mirror corrector with two mirrors placed perpendicularly to the optic axis of an SEM and facing each other is proposed. As a result, only small-angle magnetic deflection is necessary to guide the electron beam around the top mirror to the bottom mirror and around the bottom mirror to the objective lens. The deflection angle, in the order of 50 mrad, is sufficiently small to avoid deflection aberrations. In addition, lateral dispersion at the sample plane can be avoided by making the deflection fields symmetric. Such a corrector system is only possible if the incoming beam can pass the top mirror at a distance in the order of millimeters, without being disturbed by the electric fields of electrodes of the mirror. It is proposed that condition can be satisfied with micro-scale electron optical elements fabricated by using MEMS technology. In the proposed corrector system, the micro-mirrors have to provide the exact negative spherical and chromatic aberrations for correcting the aberration of the objective lens. This exact tuning is accomplished by variable magnification between the micro-mirrors and the objective lens using an additional transfer lens. Extensive optical calculations are reported. Aberrations of the micro-mirrors were analyzed by numerical calculation. Dispersion and aberrations of the deflectors were calculated by using an analytical field model. Combination aberrations caused by the off-axis position of dispersive rays in the mirrors and objective lens were also analyzed. It is concluded that the proposed

  8. Aberration-corrected STEM/TEM imaging at 15 kV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takeo; Sawada, Hidetaka; Hosokawa, Fumio; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu

    2014-01-01

    The performance of aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV was evaluated in a low-voltage microscope equipped with a cold-field emission gun and a higher-order aberration corrector. Aberrations up to the fifth order were corrected by the aberration measurement and auto-correction system using the diffractogram tableau method in TEM and Ronchigram analysis in STEM. TEM observation of nanometer-sized particles demonstrated that aberrations up to an angle of 50 mrad were compensated. A TEM image of Si[110] exhibited lattice fringes with a spacing of 0.192 nm, and the power spectrum of the image showed spots corresponding to distances of 0.111 nm. An annular dark-field STEM image of Si[110] showed lattice fringes of (111) and (22¯0) planes corresponding to lattice distances of 0.314 nm and 0.192 nm, respectively. At an accelerating voltage of 15 kV, the developed low-voltage microscope achieved atomic-resolution imaging with a small chromatic aberration and a large uniform phase. - Highlights: • Aberration-corrected STEM/TEM imaging at 15 kV demonstrated lattice fringes of Si[110] single crystal with a spacing of 0.192 nm. • To achieve this performance at a lower accelerating voltage, uniform phase area over 50 mrad is mandatory in Ronchigram and Diffractogram tableau. • This means a higher-order aberration of six-fold astigmatism should be compensated. • In addition, decreasing the effect of chromatic aberration plays an important role for improving the performance of linear scattering component at 15 kV TEM

  9. The influence of C{sub s}/C{sub c} correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, Nestor J., E-mail: zaluzec@microscopy.com

    2015-04-15

    Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (C{sub s}) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (C{sub c}) which augments those accomplishments. In this paper we will review and summarize how the combination of C{sub s}/C{sub c} technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationally mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments.

  10. Imaging single atoms using secondary electrons with an aberration-corrected electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Inada, H; Nakamura, K; Wall, J

    2009-10-01

    Aberration correction has embarked on a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes. However, improvement of spatial resolution using aberration correction so far has been limited to the use of transmitted electrons both in scanning and stationary mode, with an improvement of 20-40% (refs 3-8). In contrast, advances in the spatial resolution of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), which are by far the most widely used instrument for surface imaging at the micrometre-nanometre scale, have been stagnant, despite several recent efforts. Here, we report a new SEM, with aberration correction, able to image single atoms by detecting electrons emerging from its surface as a result of interaction with the small probe. The spatial resolution achieved represents a fourfold improvement over the best-reported resolution in any SEM (refs 10-12). Furthermore, we can simultaneously probe the sample through its entire thickness with transmitted electrons. This ability is significant because it permits the selective visualization of bulk atoms and surface ones, beyond a traditional two-dimensional projection in transmission electron microscopy. It has the potential to revolutionize the field of microscopy and imaging, thereby opening the door to a wide range of applications, especially when combined with simultaneous nanoprobe spectroscopy.

  11. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häussler, Dietrich [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Houben, Lothar [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Essig, Stephanie [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Kurttepeli, Mert [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Dimroth, Frank [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jäger, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.jaeger@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) investigations have been applied to investigate the structure and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar cells are of particular interest since efficiencies well above 40% have been obtained for concentrator solar cells which are based on III-V compound semiconductors. In this methodologically oriented investigation, we explore the potential of combining aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field STEM imaging (HAADF-STEM) with spectroscopic techniques, such as EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), in order to analyze the effects of fast atom beam (FAB) and ion beam bombardment (IB) activation treatments on the structure and composition of bonding interfaces of wafer-bonded solar cells on Si substrates. Investigations using STEM/EELS are able to measure quantitatively and with high precision the widths and the fluctuations in element distributions within amorphous interface layers of nanometer extensions, including those of light elements. Such measurements allow the control of the activation treatments and thus support assessing electrical conductivity phenomena connected with impurity and dopant distributions near interfaces for optimized performance of the solar cells. - Highlights: • Aberration-corrected TEM and EELS reveal structural and elemental profiles across GaAs/Si bond interfaces in wafer-bonded GaInP/GaAs/Si - multi-junction solar cells. • Fluctuations in elemental concentration in nanometer-thick amorphous interface layers, including the disrubutions of light elements, are measured using EELS. • The projected widths of the interface layers are determined on the atomic scale from STEM-HAADF measurements. • The effects of atom and ion beam activation treatment on the bonding

  12. Attainment of 40.5 pm spatial resolution using 300 kV scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with fifth-order aberration corrector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ryo; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2018-02-01

    The achievement of a fine electron probe for high-resolution imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy requires technological developments, especially in electron optics. For this purpose, we developed a microscope with a fifth-order aberration corrector that operates at 300 kV. The contrast flat region in an experimental Ronchigram, which indicates the aberration-free angle, was expanded to 70 mrad. By using a probe with convergence angle of 40 mrad in the scanning transmission electron microscope at 300 kV, we attained the spatial resolution of 40.5 pm, which is the projected interatomic distance between Ga-Ga atomic columns of GaN observed along [212] direction.

  13. High-resolution TEM and the application of direct and indirect aberration correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Chang, Lan-Yun Shery; Haigh, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Aberration correction leads to a substantial improvement in the directly interpretable resolution of transmission electron microscopes. Correction of the aberrations has been achieved electron-optically through a hexapole-based corrector and also indirectly by computational analysis of a focal or...

  14. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  15. The effect, identification and correction of misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans on brain PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; He Zuoxiang; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans of brain on brain PET imaging, and the Methods to identify and correct it. Methods: 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed on 8 volunteers. The emission images were reconstructed with attenuation correction after some translations and rotations in the x-axis and transverse plane were given, 1 mm and 1 degree each step, respectively. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans was used to identify the suspected misalignment on 10 18F-FDG PET brain imaging. Three Methods were used to correct the misalignment. First, to quantitate the amount of the misalignment by 3-D volume registration of PET emission and transmission scans, the emission images were reconstructed with corrected translations and rotations in x-direction and transverse plane. Second, the emission images were reconstructed with mathematic calculation of brain attenuation. Third, 18F-FDG PET brain imaging was redone with careful application of laser alignment. Results: The translations greater than 3 mm in x-direction and the rotations greater than 8 degrees in transverse plane could lead to visible artifacts, which were presented with decreasing radioactivity uptake in the cortex of half cerebrum and in the frontal cortex at the side in the translating or rotating direction, respectively. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans could identify and quantitate the amount of misalignment between PET emission and transmission scans of brain. The PET emission images reconstructed with corrected misalignment and mathematic calculation of brain attenuation were consistent with redone PET brain imaging. Conclusions: The misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans of brain can lead to visible artifacts. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans can identify and quantitate the amount of the misalignment. The visible artifacts caused by the misalignment can be

  16. Hartmann characterization of the PEEM-3 aberration-corrected X-ray photoemission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, A; Marcus, M A; Doran, A; Nasiatka, J R; Young, A T; MacDowell, A A; Streubel, R; Kent, N; Feng, J; Wan, W; Padmore, H A

    2018-05-01

    Aberration correction by an electron mirror dramatically improves the spatial resolution and transmission of photoemission electron microscopes. We will review the performance of the recently installed aberration corrector of the X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscope PEEM-3 and show a large improvement in the efficiency of the electron optics. Hartmann testing is introduced as a quantitative method to measure the geometrical aberrations of a cathode lens electron microscope. We find that aberration correction leads to an order of magnitude reduction of the spherical aberrations, suggesting that a spatial resolution of below 100 nm is possible at 100% transmission of the optics when using x-rays. We demonstrate this improved performance by imaging test patterns employing element and magnetic contrast. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Seeing atoms with aberration-corrected sub-Angstroem electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, National Center for Electron Microscopy, 2R0200, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8197 (United States)], E-mail: sub-Angstrom@comcast.net

    2008-02-15

    High-resolution electron microscopy is able to provide atomic-level characterization of many materials in low-index orientations. To achieve the same level of characterization in more complex orientations requires that instrumental resolution be improved to values corresponding to the sub-Angstroem separations of atom positions projected into these orientations. Sub-Angstroem resolution in the high-resolution transmission electron microscope has been achieved in the last few years by software aberration correction, electron holography, and hardware aberration correction; the so-called 'one-Angstroem barrier' has been left behind. Aberration correction of the objective lens currently allows atomic-resolution imaging at the sub-0.8 A level and is advancing towards resolutions in the deep sub-Angstroem range (near 0.5 A). At current resolution levels, images with sub-Rayleigh resolution require calibration in order to pinpoint atom positions correctly. As resolution levels approach the 'sizes' of atoms, the atoms themselves will produce a limit to resolution, no matter how much the instrumental resolution is improved. By arranging imaging conditions suitably, each atom peak in the image can be narrower, so atoms are imaged smaller and may be resolved at finer separations.

  18. Aberration-corrected imaging of active sites on industrial catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Chang, L-Y; Hetherington, CJD

    2007-01-01

    Picture perfect: Information about the local topologies of active sites on commercial nanoparticles can be gained with atomic resolution through spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A powder of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black was examined with two advanced TEM t...

  19. Iteration of ultrasound aberration correction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasoey, Svein-Erik; Angelsen, Bjoern; Varslot, Trond

    2004-05-01

    Aberration in ultrasound medical imaging is usually modeled by time-delay and amplitude variations concentrated on the transmitting/receiving array. This filter process is here denoted a TDA filter. The TDA filter is an approximation to the physical aberration process, which occurs over an extended part of the human body wall. Estimation of the TDA filter, and performing correction on transmit and receive, has proven difficult. It has yet to be shown that this method works adequately for severe aberration. Estimation of the TDA filter can be iterated by retransmitting a corrected signal and re-estimate until a convergence criterion is fulfilled (adaptive imaging). Two methods for estimating time-delay and amplitude variations in receive signals from random scatterers have been developed. One method correlates each element signal with a reference signal. The other method use eigenvalue decomposition of the receive cross-spectrum matrix, based upon a receive energy-maximizing criterion. Simulations of iterating aberration correction with a TDA filter have been investigated to study its convergence properties. A weak and strong human-body wall model generated aberration. Both emulated the human abdominal wall. Results after iteration improve aberration correction substantially, and both estimation methods converge, even for the case of strong aberration.

  20. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Low-energy foil aberration corrector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aken, R.H. van; Hagen, C.W.; Barth, J.E.; Kruit, P.

    2002-01-01

    A spherical and chromatic aberration corrector for electron microscopes is proposed, consisting of a thin foil sandwiched between two apertures. The electrons are retarded at the foil to almost zero energy, so that they can travel ballistically through the foil. It is shown that such a low-voltage corrector has a negative spherical aberration for not too large distances between aperture and foil, as well as a negative chromatic aberration. For various distances the third- and fifth-order spherical aberration coefficients and the first- and second-order chromatic aberration coefficients are calculated using ray tracing. Provided that the foils have sufficient electron transmission the corrector is able to correct the third-order spherical aberration and the first-order chromatic aberration of a typical low-voltage scanning electron microscope. Preliminary results show that the fifth-order spherical aberration and the second-order chromatic aberration can be kept sufficiently low

  2. Correction for polychromatic aberration in computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naparstek, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting a computed tomography image for polychromatic aberration caused by the non-linear interaction (i.e. the energy dependent attenuation characteristics) of different body constituents, such as bone and soft tissue, with a polychromatic X-ray beam are described in detail. An initial image is conventionally computed from path measurements made as source and detector assembly scan a body section. In the improvement, each image element of the initial computed image representing attenuation is recorded in a store and is compared with two thresholds, one representing bone and the other soft tissue. Depending on the element value relative to the thresholds, a proportion of the respective constituent is allocated to that element location and corresponding bone and soft tissue projections are determined and stored. An error projection generator calculates projections of polychromatic aberration errors in the raw image data from recalled bone and tissue projections using a multidimensional polynomial function which approximates the non-linear interaction involved. After filtering, these are supplied to an image reconstruction computer to compute image element correction values which are subtracted from raw image element values to provide a corrected reconstructed image for display. (author)

  3. Aberration corrected and monochromated environmental transmission electron microscopy: challenges and prospects for materials science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    The latest generation of environmental transmission electron microscopes incorporates aberration correctors and monochromators, allowing studies of chemical reactions and growth processes with improved spatial resolution and spectral sensitivity. Here, we describe the performance of such an instr...

  4. The correction of electron lens aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, P.W., E-mail: peter.hawkes@cemes.fr

    2015-09-15

    The progress of electron lens aberration correction from about 1990 onwards is chronicled. Reasonably complete lists of publications on this and related topics are appended. A present for Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek in the year of their 65th birthdays. By a happy coincidence, this review was completed in the year that both Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek reached the age of 65. It is a pleasure to dedicate it to the two leading actors in the saga of aberration corrector design and construction. They would both wish to associate their colleagues with such a tribute but it is the names of Haider and Krivanek (not forgetting Joachim Zach) that will remain in the annals of electron optics, next to that of Harald Rose. I am proud to know that both regard me as a friend as well as a colleague. - Highlights: • Geometrical aberration correction. • Chromatic aberration correction. • 50 pm resolution. • High-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. • Extensive bibliographies.

  5. The correction of electron lens aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, P.W.

    2015-01-01

    The progress of electron lens aberration correction from about 1990 onwards is chronicled. Reasonably complete lists of publications on this and related topics are appended. A present for Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek in the year of their 65th birthdays. By a happy coincidence, this review was completed in the year that both Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek reached the age of 65. It is a pleasure to dedicate it to the two leading actors in the saga of aberration corrector design and construction. They would both wish to associate their colleagues with such a tribute but it is the names of Haider and Krivanek (not forgetting Joachim Zach) that will remain in the annals of electron optics, next to that of Harald Rose. I am proud to know that both regard me as a friend as well as a colleague. - Highlights: • Geometrical aberration correction. • Chromatic aberration correction. • 50 pm resolution. • High-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. • Extensive bibliographies

  6. Catadioptric aberration correction in cathode lens microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    In this paper I briefly review the use of electrostatic electron mirrors to correct the aberrations of the cathode lens objective lens in low energy electron microscope (LEEM) and photo electron emission microscope (PEEM) instruments. These catadioptric systems, combining electrostatic lens elements with a reflecting mirror, offer a compact solution, allowing simultaneous and independent correction of both spherical and chromatic aberrations. A comparison with catadioptric systems in light optics informs our understanding of the working principles behind aberration correction with electron mirrors, and may point the way to further improvements in the latter. With additional developments in detector technology, 1 nm spatial resolution in LEEM appears to be within reach. - Highlights: • The use of electron mirrors for aberration correction in LEEM/PEEM is reviewed. • A comparison is made with similar systems in light optics. • Conditions for 1 nm spatial resolution are discussed.

  7. Measuring and correcting aberrations of a cathode objective lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromp, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I discuss several theoretical and practical aspects related to measuring and correcting the chromatic and spherical aberrations of a cathode objective lens as used in Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo Electron Emission Microscopy (PEEM) experiments. Special attention is paid to the various components of the cathode objective lens as they contribute to chromatic and spherical aberrations, and affect practical methods for aberration correction. This analysis has enabled us to correct a LEEM instrument for the spherical and chromatic aberrations of the objective lens. -- Research highlights: → Presents a comprehensive theory of the relation between chromatic aberration and lens current in a cathode objective lens. → Presents practical methods for measuring both spherical and chromatic aberrations of a cathode objective lens. → Presents measurements of these aberrations in good agreement with theory. → Presents practical methods for measuring and correcting these aberrations with an electron mirror.

  8. Statistical image reconstruction methods for simultaneous emission/transmission PET scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, H.; Fessler, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Transmission scans are necessary for estimating the attenuation correction factors (ACFs) to yield quantitatively accurate PET emission images. To reduce the total scan time, post-injection transmission scans have been proposed in which one can simultaneously acquire emission and transmission data using rod sources and sinogram windowing. However, since the post-injection transmission scans are corrupted by emission coincidences, accurate correction for attenuation becomes more challenging. Conventional methods (emission subtraction) for ACF computation from post-injection scans are suboptimal and require relatively long scan times. We introduce statistical methods based on penalized-likelihood objectives to compute ACFs and then use them to reconstruct lower noise PET emission images from simultaneous transmission/emission scans. Simulations show the efficacy of the proposed methods. These methods improve image quality and SNR of the estimates as compared to conventional methods

  9. Adaptive aberration correction using a triode hyperbolic electron mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, J.P.S.; Word, R.C.; Koenenkamp, R.

    2011-01-01

    A converging electron mirror can be used to compensate spherical and chromatic aberrations in an electron microscope. This paper presents an analytical solution to a novel triode (three electrode) hyperbolic mirror as an improvement to the well-known diode (two electrode) hyperbolic mirror for aberration correction. A weakness of the diode mirror is a lack of flexibility in changing the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients independently without changes in the mirror geometry. In order to remove this limitation, a third electrode can be added. We calculate the optical properties of the resulting triode mirror analytically on the basis of a simple model field distribution. We present the optical properties-the object/image distance, z 0 , and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration, C s and C c , of both mirror types from an analysis of electron trajectories in the mirror field. From this analysis, we demonstrate that while the properties of both designs are similar, the additional parameters in the triode mirror improve the range of aberration that can be corrected. The triode mirror is also able to provide a dynamic adjustment range of chromatic aberration for fixed spherical aberration and focal length, or any permutation of these three parameters. While the dynamic range depends on the values of aberration correction needed, a nominal 10% tuning range is possible for most configurations accompanied by less than 1% change in the other two properties. -- Highlights: → Electrostatic aberration correction for chromatic and spherical aberration in electron optics. → Simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations over a wide, adjustable range. → Analytic and quantitative description of correction parameters.

  10. Investigation of focusing and correcting aberrations with binary amplitude and polarization modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Peter; Li, Yunqi; Dorrer, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the focusing and correcting wavefront aberration of an optical wave using binary amplitude and polarization modulation. Focusing is performed by selectively modulating the field in different zones of the pupil to obtain on-axis constructive interference at a given distance. The conventional Soret zone plate (binary amplitude profile) is expanded to a polarization Soret zone plate with twice the focusing efficiency. Binary pixelated devices that approximate the sinusoidal transmission profile of a Gabor zone plate by spatial dithering are also investigated with amplitude and polarization modulation. Wavefront aberrations are corrected by modulation of the field in the pupil plane to prevent destructive interference in the focal plane of an ideal focusing element. Polarization modulation improves the efficiency obtained by amplitude-only modulation, with a gain that depends on the aberration. Experimental results obtained with Cr-on-glass devices for amplitude modulation and liquid crystal devices operating in the Mauguin condition for polarization modulation are in very good agreement with simulations.

  11. Morphological evolution of InAs/InP quantum wires through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, D L; Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Varela, M; Pennycook, S J [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Gonzalez, L; Gonzalez, Y [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Fuster, D, E-mail: david.sales@uca.es [UMDO - Unidad Asociada al CSIC-IMM, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, PO Box 22085, 4607 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-13

    Evolution of the size, shape and composition of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum wires through the Stranski-Krastanov transition has been determined by aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging. High resolution compositional maps of the wires in the initial, intermediate and final formation stages are presented. (001) is the main facet at their very initial stage of formation, which is gradually reduced in favour of {l_brace}114{r_brace} or {l_brace}118{r_brace}, ending with the formation of mature quantum wires with {l_brace}114{r_brace} facets. Significant changes in wire dimensions are measured when varying slightly the amount of InAs deposited. These results are used as input parameters to build three-dimensional models that allow calculation of the strain energy during the quantum wire formation process. The observed morphological evolution is explained in terms of the calculated elastic energy changes at the growth front. Regions of the wetting layer close to the nanostructure perimeters have higher strain energy, causing migration of As atoms towards the quantum wire terraces, where the structure is partially relaxed; the thickness of the wetting layer is reduced in these zones and the island height increases until the (001) facet is removed.

  12. Influence of Misalignment on High-Order Aberration Correction for Normal Human Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao-Xin; Xu, Bing; Xue, Li-Xia; Dai, Yun; Liu, Qian; Rao, Xue-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Although a compensation device can correct aberrations of human eyes, the effect will be degraded by its misalignment, especially for high-order aberration correction. We calculate the positioning tolerance of correction device for high-order aberrations, and within what degree the correcting effect is better than low-order aberration (defocus and astigmatism) correction. With fixed certain misalignment within the positioning tolerance, we calculate the residual wavefront rms aberration of the first-6 to first-35 terms along with the 3rd-5th terms of aberrations corrected, and the combined first-13 terms of aberrations are also studied under the same quantity of misalignment. However, the correction effect of high-order aberrations does not meliorate along with the increase of the high-order terms under some misalignment, moreover, some simple combined terms correction can achieve similar result as complex combinations. These results suggest that it is unnecessary to correct too much the terms of high-order aberrations which are difficult to accomplish in practice, and gives confidence to correct high-order aberrations out of the laboratory.

  13. Influence of Misalignment on High-Order Aberration Correction for Normal Human Eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao-Xin, Zhao; Bing, Xu; Li-Xia, Xue; Yun, Dai; Qian, Liu; Xue-Jun, Rao

    2008-01-01

    Although a compensation device can correct aberrations of human eyes, the effect will be degraded by its misalignment, especially for high-order aberration correction. We calculate the positioning tolerance of correction device for high-order aberrations, and within what degree the correcting effect is better than low-order aberration (defocus and astigmatism) correction. With fixed certain misalignment within the positioning tolerance, we calculate the residual wavefront rms aberration of the first-6 to first-35 terms along with the 3rd-5th terms of aberrations corrected, and the combined first-13 terms of aberrations are also studied under the same quantity of misalignment. However, the correction effect of high-order aberrations does not meliorate along with the increase of the high-order terms under some misalignment, moreover, some simple combined terms correction can achieve similar result as complex combinations. These results suggest that it is unnecessary to correct too much the terms of high-order aberrations which are difficult to accomplish in practice, and gives confidence to correct high-order aberrations out of the laboratory

  14. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, L D; Rivas, J; José-Yacamán, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS 2 will be discussed. MoS 2 -based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important

  15. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-12

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed C_{c}/C_{s} corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations.

  16. An aberration corrected photoemission electron microscope at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, J.; MacDowell, A.A.; Duarte, R.; Doran, A.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.; Munson, D.; Padmore, H.; Petermann, K.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Design of a new aberration corrected Photoemission electron microscope PEEM3 at the Advanced Light Source is outlined. PEEM3 will be installed on an elliptically polarized undulator beamline and will be used for the study of complex materials at high spatial and spectral resolution. The critical components of PEEM3 are the electron mirror aberration corrector and aberration-free magnetic beam separator. The models to calculate the optical properties of the electron mirror are discussed. The goal of the PEEM3 project is to achieve the highest possible transmission of the system at resolutions comparable to our present PEEM2 system (50 nm) and to enable significantly higher resolution, albeit at the sacrifice of intensity. We have left open the possibility to add an energy filter at a later date, if it becomes necessary driven by scientific need to improve the resolution further

  17. Ultrashort echo-time MRI versus CT for skull aberration correction in MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound: In vitro comparison on human calvaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G Wilson; Eames, Matthew; Snell, John; Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) brain treatment systems compensate for skull-induced beam aberrations by adjusting the phase and amplitude of individual ultrasound transducer elements. These corrections are currently calculated based on a preacquired computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient's head. The purpose of the work presented here is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) instead of CT to calculate and apply aberration corrections on a clinical TcMRgFUS system. Phantom experiments were performed in three ex-vivo human skulls filled with tissue-mimicking hydrogel. Each skull phantom was imaged with both CT and UTE MRI. The MR images were then segmented into "skull" and "not-skull" pixels using a computationally efficient, threshold-based algorithm, and the resulting 3D binary skull map was converted into a series of 2D virtual CT images. Each skull was mounted in the head transducer of a clinical TcMRgFUS system (ExAblate Neuro, Insightec, Israel), and transcranial sonications were performed using a power setting of approximately 750 acoustic watts at several different target locations within the electronic steering range of the transducer. Each target location was sonicated three times: once using aberration corrections calculated from the actual CT scan, once using corrections calculated from the MRI-derived virtual CT scan, and once without applying any aberration correction. MR thermometry was performed in conjunction with each 10-s sonication, and the highest single-pixel temperature rise and surrounding-pixel mean were recorded for each sonication. The measured temperature rises were ∼ 45% larger for aberration-corrected sonications than for noncorrected sonications. This improvement was highly significant (p skull-induced ultrasound aberration corrections. Their results suggest that UTE MRI could be used instead of CT to implement such corrections on

  18. Numerical correction of anti-symmetric aberrations in single HRTEM images of weakly scattering 2D-objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Ossi; Geiger, Dorin; Lee, Zhongbo; Whitwick, Michael Brian; Chen, Ming-Wei; Kis, Andras; Kaiser, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a numerical post-processing method for removing the effect of anti-symmetric residual aberrations in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of weakly scattering 2D-objects. The method is based on applying the same aberrations with the opposite phase to the Fourier transform of the recorded image intensity and subsequently inverting the Fourier transform. We present the theoretical justification of the method, and its verification based on simulated images in the case of low-order anti-symmetric aberrations. Ultimately the method is applied to experimental hardware aberration-corrected HRTEM images of single-layer graphene and MoSe 2 resulting in images with strongly reduced residual low-order aberrations, and consequently improved interpretability. Alternatively, this method can be used to estimate by trial and error the residual anti-symmetric aberrations in HRTEM images of weakly scattering objects

  19. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  20. Atomic-scale Ge diffusion in strained Si revealed by quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Favre, L.; Couillard, M.; Amiard, G.; Berbezier, I.; Botton, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to investigate the local chemistry in the vicinity of a Si0.8Ge0.2/Si interface grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark field contrast reveals the presence of a nonuniform diffusion of Ge from the substrate into the strained Si thin film. On the basis of multislice calculations, a model is proposed to quantify the experimental contrast, showing that the Ge concentration in the thin film reaches about 4% at the interface and decreases monotonically on a typical length scale of 10 nm. Diffusion occurring during the growth process itself therefore appears as a major factor limiting the abruptness of interfaces in the Si-Ge system.

  1. Angstrom analysis with dynamic in-situ aberration corrected electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2010-01-01

    Following the pioneering development of atomic resolution in-situ environmental TEM (ETEM) for direct probing of gas-solid reactions, recent developments are presented of dynamic real time in-situ studies at the Angstrom level in an aberration corrected electron microscope. The in-situ data from Pt-Pd nanoparticles on carbon with the corresponding FFT/optical diffractogram (OD) illustrate an achieved resolution of 0 C and higher, in a double aberration corrected JEOL 2200 FS TEM/STEM employing a wider gap objective pole piece and gas tolerant TMP column pumping system. Direct observations of dynamic biofuel catalysts under controlled calcinations conditions and quantified with catalytic reactivity and physico-chemical studies show the benefits in-situ aberration correction in unveiling the evolution of surface active sites necessary for the development efficient heterogeneous catalysts. The new results open up opportunities for dynamic studies of materials in an aberration corrected environment and direct future development activities.

  2. In-situ environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy of catalysts at the atomic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2014-01-01

    Observing reacting single atoms on the solid catalyst surfaces under controlled reaction conditions is a key goal in understanding and controlling heterogeneous catalytic reactions. In-situ real time aberration corrected environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (E(S)TEM permit the direct imaging of dynamic surface and sub-surface structures of reacting catalysts. In this paper in-situ AC ETEM and AC ESTEM studies under controlled reaction environments of oxide catalysts and supported metal nanocatalysts important in chemical industry are presented. They provide the direct evidence of dynamic processes at the oxide catalyst surface at the atomic scale and single atom dynamics in catalytic reactions. The ESTEM studies of single atom dynamics in controlled reaction environments show that nanoparticles act as reservoirs of ad-atoms. The results have important implications in catalysis and nanoparticle studies

  3. Aberration Correction in the Brewer Spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.E.; Kerr, J.B.; McElroy, C.T.; Wardle, D.I.

    2000-01-01

    The optical design of the Brewer Spectrophotometer has been optimised for measurements in the 300-320 nm wavelength range. An aberration resolution limit that is much less than the 0.6 nm FWHM (full width at half maximum) is achieved by using an Ebert-Fastie spectrometer design, modified by the inclusion tilted lens that optimises performance at 310 nm. The small contribution of the remaining aberration to the measured instrument function is critical to radiometric measurement quality. Ramifications of this design to the development of instrumentation with enhanced scanning abilities are discussed. (author)

  4. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  5. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  6. Prospects for electron beam aberration correction using sculpted phase masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiloh, Roy, E-mail: royshilo@post.tau.ac.il; Remez, Roei; Arie, Ady

    2016-04-15

    Technological advances in fabrication methods allowed the microscopy community to take incremental steps towards perfecting the electron microscope, and magnetic lens design in particular. Still, state of the art aberration-corrected microscopes are yet 20–30 times shy of the theoretical electron diffraction limit. Moreover, these microscopes consume significant physical space and are very expensive. Here, we show how a thin, sculpted membrane is used as a phase-mask to induce specific aberrations into an electron beam probe in a standard high resolution TEM. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate beam splitting, two-fold astigmatism, three-fold astigmatism, and spherical aberration. - Highlights: • Thin membranes can be used as aberration correctors in electron columns. • We demonstrate tilt, twofold-, threefold-astigmatism, and spherical aberrations. • Experimental and physical-optics simulation results are in good agreement. • Advantages in cost, size, nonmagnetism, and nearly-arbitrary correction.

  7. Addressing preservation of elastic contrast in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.G.; D' Alfonso, A.J.; Forbes, B.D.; Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au

    2016-01-15

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images with resolutions of the order of an Ångström can be obtained using modern microscopes corrected for chromatic aberration. However, the delocalized nature of the transition potentials for atomic ionization often confounds direct interpretation of EFTEM images, leading to what is known as “preservation of elastic contrast”. In this paper we demonstrate how more interpretable images might be obtained by scanning with a focused coherent probe and incoherently averaging the energy-filtered images over probe position. We dub this new imaging technique energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM). We develop a theoretical framework for EFISTEM and show that it is in fact equivalent to precession EFTEM, where the plane wave illumination is precessed through a range of tilts spanning the same range of angles as the probe forming aperture in EFISTEM. It is demonstrated that EFISTEM delivers similar results to scanning transmission electron microscopy with an electron energy-loss spectrometer but has the advantage that it is immune to coherent aberrations and spatial incoherence of the probe and is also more resilient to scan distortions. - Highlights: • Interpretation of EFTEM images is complicated by preservation of elastic contrast. • More direct images obtained by scanning with a focused coherent probe and averaging. • This is equivalent to precession EFTEM through the solid angle defined by the probe. • Also yields similar results to energy-loss scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Scanning approach immune to probe aberrations and resilient to scan distortions.

  8. Effect of correction of aberration dynamics on chaos in human ocular accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Karen M; Cufflin, Matthew P; Mallen, Edward A H

    2013-11-15

    We used adaptive optics to determine the effect of monochromatic aberration dynamics on the level of chaos in the accommodation control system. Four participants viewed a stationary target while the dynamics of their aberrations were either left uncorrected, defocus was corrected, or all aberrations except defocus were corrected. Chaos theory analysis was used to discern changes in the accommodative microfluctuations. We found a statistically significant reduction in the chaotic nature of the accommodation microfluctuations during correction of defocus, but not when all aberrations except defocus were corrected. The Lyapunov exponent decreased from 0.71 ± 0.07 D/s (baseline) to 0.55 ± 0.03 D/s (correction of defocus fluctuations). As the reduction of chaos in physiological signals is indicative of stress to the system, the results indicate that for the participants included in this study, fluctuations in defocus have a more profound effect than those of the other aberrations. There were no changes in the power spectrum between experimental conditions. Hence chaos theory analysis is a more subtle marker of changes in the accommodation control system and will be of value in the study of myopia onset and progression.

  9. Spherical aberration correction with threefold symmetric line currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Ryuji; Takaoka, Akio; Munro, Eric

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that N-fold symmetric line current (henceforth denoted as N-SYLC) produces 2N-pole magnetic fields. In this paper, a threefold symmetric line current (N3-SYLC in short) is proposed for correcting 3rd order spherical aberration of round lenses. N3-SYLC can be realized without using magnetic materials, which makes it free of the problems of hysteresis, inhomogeneity and saturation. We investigate theoretically the basic properties of an N3-SYLC configuration which can in principle be realized by simple wires. By optimizing the parameters of a system with beam energy of 5.5keV, the required excitation current for correcting 3rd order spherical aberration coefficient of 400 mm is less than 1AT, and the residual higher order aberrations can be kept sufficiently small to obtain beam size of less than 1 nm for initial slopes up to 5 mrad. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Yin; Chen, Xinhua; Tang, Minxue

    2014-11-01

    Membrane mirror with flexible polymer film substrate is a new-concept ultra lightweight mirror for space applications. Compared with traditional mirrors, membrane mirror has the advantages of lightweight, folding and deployable, low cost and etc. Due to the surface shape of flexible membrane mirror is easy to deviate from the design surface shape, it will bring wavefront aberration to the optical system. In order to solve this problem, a method of membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction based on the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) will be studied in this paper. The wavefront aberration correction principle of LCSLM is described and the phase modulation property of a LCSLM is measured and analyzed firstly. Then the membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction system is designed and established according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror. The LCSLM and a Hartmann-Shack sensor are used as a wavefront corrector and a wavefront detector, respectively. The detected wavefront aberration is calculated and converted into voltage value on LCSLM for the mirror wavefront aberration correction by programming in Matlab. When in experiment, the wavefront aberration of a glass plane mirror with a diameter of 70 mm is measured and corrected for verifying the feasibility of the experiment system and the correctness of the program. The PV value and RMS value of distorted wavefront are reduced and near diffraction limited optical performance is achieved. On this basis, the wavefront aberration of the aperture center Φ25 mm in a membrane mirror with a diameter of 200 mm is corrected and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror.

  11. The objective lens of the electron microscope with correction of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimurzaev, S B; Aldiyarov, N U; Yakushev, E M

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes the principle of operation of a relatively simple aberration corrector for the transmission electron microscope objective lens. The electron-optical system of the aberration corrector consists of the two main elements: an electrostatic mirror with rotational symmetry and a magnetic deflector formed by the round-shaped magnetic poles. The corrector operation is demonstrated by calculations on the example of correction of basic aberrations of the well-known objective lens with a bell-shaped distribution of the axial magnetic field. Two of the simplest versions of the corrector are considered: a corrector with a two-electrode electrostatic mirror and a corrector with a three-electrode electrostatic mirror. It is shown that using the two-electrode mirror one can eliminate either spherical or chromatic aberration of the objective lens, without changing the value of its linear magnification. Using a three-electrode mirror, it is possible to eliminate spherical and chromatic aberrations of the objective lens simultaneously, which is especially important in designing electron microscopes with extremely high resolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Chromatic aberration correction: an enhancement to the calibration of low-cost digital dermoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wighton, Paul; Lee, Tim K; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David; Atkins, M Stella

    2011-08-01

    We present a method for calibrating low-cost digital dermoscopes that corrects for color and inconsistent lighting and also corrects for chromatic aberration. Chromatic aberration is a form of radial distortion that often occurs in inexpensive digital dermoscopes and creates red and blue halo-like effects on edges. Being radial in nature, distortions due to chromatic aberration are not constant across the image, but rather vary in both magnitude and direction. As a result, distortions are not only visually distracting but could also mislead automated characterization techniques. Two low-cost dermoscopes, based on different consumer-grade cameras, were tested. Color is corrected by imaging a reference and applying singular value decomposition to determine the transformation required to ensure accurate color reproduction. Lighting is corrected by imaging a uniform surface and creating lighting correction maps. Chromatic aberration is corrected using a second-order radial distortion model. Our results for color and lighting calibration are consistent with previously published results, while distortions due to chromatic aberration can be reduced by 42-47% in the two systems considered. The disadvantages of inexpensive dermoscopy can be quickly substantially mitigated with a suitable calibration procedure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Evaluation of transmission methodology and attenuation correction for the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Wencke; Meikle, Steven R; Siegel, Stefan; Newport, Danny; Banati, Richard B; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2006-01-01

    An accurate, low noise estimate of photon attenuation in the subject is required for quantitative microPET studies of molecular tracer distributions in vivo. In this work, several transmission-based measurement techniques were compared, including coincidence mode with and without rod windowing, singles mode with two different energy sources ( 68 Ge and 57 Co), and postinjection transmission scanning. In addition, the effectiveness of transmission segmentation and the propagation of transmission bias and noise into the emission images were examined. The 57 Co singles measurements provided the most accurate attenuation coefficients and superior signal-to-noise ratio, while 68 Ge singles measurements were degraded due to scattering from the object. Scatter correction of 68 Ge transmission data improved the accuracy for a 10 cm phantom but over-corrected for a mouse phantom. 57 Co scanning also resulted in low bias and noise in postinjection transmission scans for emission activities up to 20 MBq. Segmentation worked most reliably for transmission data acquired with 57 Co but the minor improvement in accuracy of attenuation coefficients and signal-to-noise may not justify its use, particularly for small subjects. We conclude that 57 Co singles transmission scanning is the most suitable method for measured attenuation correction on the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner

  14. A new aberration-corrected, energy-filtered LEEM/PEEM instrument. I. Principles and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromp, R.M.; Hannon, J.B.; Ellis, A.W.; Wan, W.; Berghaus, A.; Schaff, O.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new design for an aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (LEEM) and photo electron emission microscope (PEEM), equipped with an in-line electron energy filter. The chromatic and spherical aberrations of the objective lens are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror that provides independent control over the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients C c and C 3 , as well as the mirror focal length, to match and correct the aberrations of the objective lens. For LEEM (PEEM) the theoretical resolution is calculated to be ∼1.5 nm (∼4 nm). Unlike previous designs, this instrument makes use of two magnetic prism arrays to guide the electron beam from the sample to the electron mirror, removing chromatic dispersion in front of the mirror by symmetry. The aberration correction optics was retrofitted to an uncorrected instrument with a base resolution of 4.1 nm in LEEM. Initial results in LEEM show an improvement in resolution to ∼2 nm.

  15. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-09-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum and pons in HRRT brain images have been reported. The two main sources of the problem with MAP-TR are poor bone/soft tissue segmentation below the brain and overestimation of bone mass in the skull. We developed the new transmission processing with total variation (TXTV) method that introduces scatter correction in the μ-map reconstruction and total variation filtering to the transmission processing. Comparing MAP-TR and the new TXTV with gold standard CT-based attenuation correction, we found that TXTV has less bias as compared to MAP-TR. We also compared images acquired at the HRRT scanner using TXTV to the GE Advance scanner images and found high quantitative correspondence. TXTV has been used to reconstruct more than 4000 HRRT scans at seven different sites with no reports of biases. TXTV-based reconstruction is recommended for human brain scans on the HRRT.

  16. The application of aberration-corrected electron microscopy to the characterization of gold-based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzing, Andrew A.

    Electron microscopy has long been used to study the morphology of heterogeneous catalysts. Recent advances in electron optics now allow for the correction of the inherent spherical aberration (Cs) produced by the objective lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM, resulting in a significantly improved spatial resolution as well as the ability to use a much larger probe-current than was previously possible. In this thesis, the combination of high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging and microanalysis by x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) in an aberration-corrected STEM has been applied for the first time to the characterization of gold-based heterogeneous catalysts. Multi-variate statistical analysis (MSA) has been employed in order to further improve the STEM-XEDS spectrum image data acquired with this technique. In addition, supplemental analysis using electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in an aberration-corrected instrument has also been attempted. These techniques have proven extremely valuable in providing complimentary information to more traditional catalyst characterization techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction in four specific problems relating to catalysis. Firstly, the atomic-scale resolution of Cs-corrected HAADF imaging has been utilized to study Au/FeOx catalysts in order to determine the size and structure of the Au clusters present on the support surface. It was discovered that, while both inactive and active catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation contained large Au particles (> 5 nm) and individual Au atoms, the active catalyst also contained sub-nm clusters comprised of only a few Au atoms. Secondly, novel CeO2 support materials for Au and Au-Pd catalysts were synthesized by precipitation with supercritical CO2. These supports were found to produce significantly more active catalysts than those based on CeO2

  17. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-01-01

    scatter correction in the μ-map reconstruction and total variation filtering to the transmission processing. Results: Comparing MAP-TR and the new TXTV with gold standard CT-based attenuation correction, we found that TXTV has less bias as compared to MAP-TR. We also compared images acquired at the HRRT......In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum...

  18. Prospects for versatile phase manipulation in the TEM: Beyond aberration correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzinati, Giulio; Clark, Laura; Béché, Armand; Juchtmans, Roeland; Van Boxem, Ruben; Mazilu, Michael; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore the desirability of a transmission electron microscope in which the phase of the electron wave can be freely controlled. We discuss different existing methods to manipulate the phase of the electron wave and their limitations. We show how with the help of current techniques the electron wave can already be crafted into specific classes of waves each having their own peculiar properties. Assuming a versatile phase modulation device is feasible, we explore possible benefits and methods that could come into existence borrowing from light optics where the so-called spatial light modulators provide programmable phase plates for quite some time now. We demonstrate that a fully controllable phase plate building on Harald Rose's legacy in aberration correction and electron optics in general would open an exciting field of research and applications. - Highlights: • We offer a review of available phase manipulation techniques. • We demonstrate a method for producing Airy waves through aberration manipulation. • We outline hypothetical applications of arbitrary phase manipulation methods

  19. Axial geometrical aberration correction up to 5th order with N-SYLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Takaoka, Akio; Nishi, Ryuji

    2017-11-01

    We present N-SYLC (N-fold symmetric line currents) models to correct 5th order axial geometrical aberrations in electron microscopes. In our previous paper, we showed that 3rd order spherical aberration can be corrected by 3-SYLC doublet. After that, mainly the 5th order aberrations remain to limit the resolution. In this paper, we extend the doublet to quadruplet models also including octupole and dodecapole fields for correcting these higher order aberrations, without introducing any new unwanted ones. We prove the validity of our models by analytical calculations. Also by computer simulations, we show that for beam energy of 5keV and initial angle 10mrad at the corrector object plane, beam size of less than 0.5nm is achieved at the corrector image plane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A lateral chromatic aberration correction system for ultrahigh-definition color video camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takayuki; Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Funatsu, Ryohei; Mitani, Kohji; Nojiri, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    We have developed color camera for an 8k x 4k-pixel ultrahigh-definition video system, which is called Super Hi- Vision, with a 5x zoom lens and a signal-processing system incorporating a function for real-time lateral chromatic aberration correction. The chromatic aberration of the lens degrades color image resolution. So in order to develop a compact zoom lens consistent with ultrahigh-resolution characteristics, we incorporated a real-time correction function in the signal-processing system. The signal-processing system has eight memory tables to store the correction data at eight focal length points on the blue and red channels. When the focal length data is inputted from the lens control units, the relevant correction data are interpolated from two of eights correction data tables. This system performs geometrical conversion on both channels using this correction data. This paper describes that the correction function can successfully reduce the lateral chromatic aberration, to an amount small enough to ensure the desired image resolution was achieved over the entire range of the lens in real time.

  1. Correcting for color crosstalk and chromatic aberration in multicolor particle shadow velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhail, M J; Fontaine, A A; Krane, M H; Goss, L; Crafton, J

    2015-01-01

    Color crosstalk and chromatic aberration can bias estimates of fluid velocity measured by color particle shadow velocimetry (CPSV), using multicolor illumination and a color camera. This article describes corrections to remove these bias errors, and their evaluation. Color crosstalk removal is demonstrated with linear unmixing. It is also shown that chromatic aberrations may be removed using either scale calibration, or by processing an image illuminated by all colors simultaneously. CPSV measurements of a fully developed turbulent pipe flow of glycerin were conducted. Corrected velocity statistics from these measurements were compared to both single-color PSV and LDV measurements and showed excellent agreement to fourth-order, to well into the viscous sublayer. Recommendations for practical assessment and correction of color aberration and color crosstalk are discussed. (paper)

  2. Adaptive compensation of aberrations in ultrafast 3D microscopy using a deformable mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Leah R.; Albert, O.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Vdovin, Gleb V.; Mourou, Gerard A.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2000-05-01

    3D imaging using a multiphoton scanning confocal microscope is ultimately limited by aberrations of the system. We describe a system to adaptively compensate the aberrations with a deformable mirror. We have increased the transverse scanning range of the microscope by three with compensation of off-axis aberrations.We have also significantly increased the longitudinal scanning depth with compensation of spherical aberrations from the penetration into the sample. Our correction is based on a genetic algorithm that uses second harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal excited by femtosecond pulses from the sample as the enhancement parameter. This allows us to globally optimize the wavefront without a wavefront measurement. To improve the speed of the optimization we use Zernike polynomials as the basis for correction. Corrections can be stored in a database for look-up with future samples.

  3. Revisiting Cross-Channel Information Transfer for Chromatic Aberration Correction

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Tiancheng; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Image aberrations can cause severe degradation in image quality for consumer-level cameras, especially under the current tendency to reduce the complexity of lens designs in order to shrink the overall size of modules. In simplified optical designs, chromatic aberration can be one of the most significant causes for degraded image quality, and it can be quite difficult to remove in post-processing, since it results in strong blurs in at least some of the color channels. In this work, we revisit the pixel-wise similarity between different color channels of the image and accordingly propose a novel algorithm for correcting chromatic aberration based on this cross-channel correlation. In contrast to recent weak prior-based models, ours uses strong pixel-wise fitting and transfer, which lead to significant quality improvements for large chromatic aberrations. Experimental results on both synthetic and real world images captured by different optical systems demonstrate that the chromatic aberration can be significantly reduced using our approach.

  4. Revisiting Cross-Channel Information Transfer for Chromatic Aberration Correction

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Tiancheng

    2017-12-25

    Image aberrations can cause severe degradation in image quality for consumer-level cameras, especially under the current tendency to reduce the complexity of lens designs in order to shrink the overall size of modules. In simplified optical designs, chromatic aberration can be one of the most significant causes for degraded image quality, and it can be quite difficult to remove in post-processing, since it results in strong blurs in at least some of the color channels. In this work, we revisit the pixel-wise similarity between different color channels of the image and accordingly propose a novel algorithm for correcting chromatic aberration based on this cross-channel correlation. In contrast to recent weak prior-based models, ours uses strong pixel-wise fitting and transfer, which lead to significant quality improvements for large chromatic aberrations. Experimental results on both synthetic and real world images captured by different optical systems demonstrate that the chromatic aberration can be significantly reduced using our approach.

  5. Restoring defect structures in 3C-SiC/Si (001) from spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope images by means of deconvolution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C; Wan, W; Li, F H; Tang, D

    2015-04-01

    The [110] cross-sectional samples of 3C-SiC/Si (001) were observed with a spherical aberration-corrected 300 kV high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Two images taken not close to the Scherzer focus condition and not representing the projected structures intuitively were utilized for performing the deconvolution. The principle and procedure of image deconvolution and atomic sort recognition are summarized. The defect structure restoration together with the recognition of Si and C atoms from the experimental images has been illustrated. The structure maps of an intrinsic stacking fault in the area of SiC, and of Lomer and 60° shuffle dislocations at the interface have been obtained at atomic level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on the Phase Aberration Correction with a Deformable Mirror Controlled by a Genetic Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, P; Hu, S J; Chen, S Q; Yang, W; Xu, B; Jiang, W H

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve laser beam quality, a real number encoding genetic algorithm based on adaptive optics technology was presented. This algorithm was applied to control a 19-channel deformable mirror to correct phase aberration in laser beam. It is known that when traditional adaptive optics system is used to correct laser beam wave-front phase aberration, a precondition is to measure the phase aberration information in the laser beam. However, using genetic algorithms, there is no necessary to know the phase aberration information in the laser beam beforehand. The only parameter need to know is the Light intensity behind the pinhole on the focal plane. This parameter was used as the fitness function for the genetic algorithm. Simulation results show that the optimal shape of the 19-channel deformable mirror applied to correct the phase aberration can be ascertained. The peak light intensity was improved by a factor of 21, and the encircled energy strehl ratio was increased to 0.34 from 0.02 as the phase aberration was corrected with this technique

  7. A new aberration-corrected, energy-filtered LEEM/PEEM instrument II. Operation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromp, R.M.; Hannon, J.B.; Wan, W.; Berghaus, A.; Schaff, O.

    2013-01-01

    In Part I we described a new design for an aberration-corrected Low Energy Electron Microscope (LEEM) and Photo Electron Emission Microscope (PEEM) equipped with an in-line electron energy filter. The chromatic and spherical aberrations of the objective lens are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror that provides independent control of the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients C c and C 3 , as well as the mirror focal length. In this Part II we discuss details of microscope operation, how the microscope is set up in a systematic fashion, and we present typical results. - Highlights: ► The C c and C 3 aberrations of a LEEM/PEEM instrument are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror. ► The mirror provides independent control over C c , C 3 and focal length in close agreement with theory. ► A detailed alignment procedure for the corrected microscope is given. ► Novel methods to measure C c and C 3 of the objective lens and the mirror are presented. ► We demonstrate a record spatial resolution of 2 nm

  8. Effects of SMILE and Trans-PRK on corneal higher order aberrations after myopic correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the effects of small incision lenticule extraction(SMILEand trans-epithelial photorefractive keratectomy(Trans-PRKon corneal horizontal coma, vertical coma, and spherical aberration and total higher order aberrations after refractive correction for myopia. METHODS: This was a prospective non-randomized cohort study. The cohort included 40 patients(80 eyeswith myopia, who received refraction correction surgery from December 2016 to February 2017 in Leshan Ophthalmic Center. Twenty patients(40 eyesreceived SMILE surgery and the other 20 patients(40 eyesreceived Trans-PRK surgery. Corneal aberrations were determined by a high-resolution Pentacam Scheimpflug camera before the surgery and at 1 and 3mo after the operation. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of variance of repeated measures. RESULTS: At 1 and 3mo post-operation, the uncorrected visual acuity in both groups was better than or equal to the preoperative best corrected visual acuity. The preoperative corneal aberrations showed no significant difference between the two groups(P>0.05. Significantly higher aberration was found after the surgery in both groups(PP>0.05. Post-operation, horizontal and vertical coma had no significant difference between the two groups(P>0.05, while SMILE group showed lower spherical aberration and lower total higher order aberration than Trans-PRK group(PCONCLUSION: Both SMILE and Trans-PRK increase corneal aberration and their effects on horizontal and vertical coma are similar. However, SMILE has a minor influence on spherical aberration and total high order aberration than Trans-PRK.

  9. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  10. Statistical estimation of ultrasonic propagation path parameters for aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Robert C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P

    2005-05-01

    Parameters in a linear filter model for ultrasonic propagation are found using statistical estimation. The model uses an inhomogeneous-medium Green's function that is decomposed into a homogeneous-transmission term and a path-dependent aberration term. Power and cross-power spectra of random-medium scattering are estimated over the frequency band of the transmit-receive system by using closely situated scattering volumes. The frequency-domain magnitude of the aberration is obtained from a normalization of the power spectrum. The corresponding phase is reconstructed from cross-power spectra of subaperture signals at adjacent receive positions by a recursion. The subapertures constrain the receive sensitivity pattern to eliminate measurement system phase contributions. The recursion uses a Laplacian-based algorithm to obtain phase from phase differences. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired from a point reflector and a tissue-like scattering phantom through a tissue-mimicking aberration path from neighboring volumes having essentially the same aberration path. Propagation path aberration parameters calculated from the measurements of random scattering through the aberration phantom agree with corresponding parameters calculated for the same aberrator and array position by using echoes from the point reflector. The results indicate the approach describes, in addition to time shifts, waveform amplitude and shape changes produced by propagation through distributed aberration under realistic conditions.

  11. Integral image rendering procedure for aberration correction and size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Holger; Ihrig, Andreas; Ebenau, Melanie; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2014-05-20

    The challenge in rendering integral images is to use as much information preserved by the light field as possible to reconstruct a captured scene in a three-dimensional way. We propose a rendering algorithm based on the projection of rays through a detailed simulation of the optical path, considering all the physical properties and locations of the optical elements. The rendered images contain information about the correct size of imaged objects without the need to calibrate the imaging device. Additionally, aberrations of the optical system may be corrected, depending on the setup of the integral imaging device. We show simulation data that illustrates the aberration correction ability and experimental data from our plenoptic camera, which illustrates the capability of our proposed algorithm to measure size and distance. We believe this rendering procedure will be useful in the future for three-dimensional ophthalmic imaging of the human retina.

  12. Comparison of wavefront aberrations under cycloplegic, scotopic and photopic conditions using WaveScan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Fan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the differences of wavefront aberrations under cycloplegic, scotopic and photopic conditions. METHODS: A total of 174 eyes of 105 patients were measured using the wavefront sensor (WaveScan® 3.62 under different pupil conditions: cycloplegic 8.58 ± 0.54 mm (6.4 mm - 9.5 mm, scotopic 7.53 ± 0.69 mm (5.7 mm - 9.1 mm and photopic 6.08 ± 1.14 mm (4.1 mm - 8.8 mm. The pupil diameter, standard Zernike coefficients, root mean square of higher-order aberrations and dominant aberrations were compared between cycloplegic and scotopic conditions, and between scotopic and photopic conditions. RESULTS: The pupil diameter was 7.53 ± 0.69 mm under the scotopic condition, which reached the requirement of about 6.5 mm optical zone design in the wavefront-guided surgery and prevented measurement error due to the pupil centroid shift caused by mydriatics. Pharmacological pupil dilation induced increase of standard Zernike coefficients Z3-3, Z4(0 and Z5-5. The higher-order aberrations, third-order aberration, fourth-order aberration, fifth-order aberration, sixth-order aberration, and spherical aberration increased statistically significantly, compared to the scotopic condition (P<0.010. When the scotopic condition shifted to the photopic condition, the standard Zernike coefficients Z4(0, Z4², Z6-4, Z6-2, Z6² decreased and all the higher-order aberrations decreased statistically significantly (P<0.010, demonstrating that accommodative miosis can significantly improve vision under the photopic condition. Under the three conditions, the vertical coma aberration appears the most frequently within the dominant aberrations without significant effect by pupil size variance, and the proportion of spherical aberrations decreased with the decrease of the pupil size. CONCLUSIONS: The wavefront aberrations are significantly different under cycloplegic, scotopic and photopic conditions. Using the wavefront sensor (VISX WaveScan to measure scotopic

  13. Event-based motion correction for PET transmission measurements with a rotating point source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Victor W; Kyme, Andre Z; Meikle, Steven R; Fulton, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Accurate attenuation correction is important for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies. When performing transmission measurements using an external rotating radioactive source, object motion during the transmission scan can distort the attenuation correction factors computed as the ratio of the blank to transmission counts, and cause errors and artefacts in reconstructed PET images. In this paper we report a compensation method for rigid body motion during PET transmission measurements, in which list mode transmission data are motion corrected event-by-event, based on known motion, to ensure that all events which traverse the same path through the object are recorded on a common line of response (LOR). As a result, the motion-corrected transmission LOR may record a combination of events originally detected on different LORs. To ensure that the corresponding blank LOR records events from the same combination of contributing LORs, the list mode blank data are spatially transformed event-by-event based on the same motion information. The number of counts recorded on the resulting blank LOR is then equivalent to the number of counts that would have been recorded on the corresponding motion-corrected transmission LOR in the absence of any attenuating object. The proposed method has been verified in phantom studies with both stepwise movements and continuous motion. We found that attenuation maps derived from motion-corrected transmission and blank data agree well with those of the stationary phantom and are significantly better than uncorrected attenuation data.

  14. Aberration correction in photoemission microscopy and applications in photonics and plasmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenenkamp, Rolf [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-09-28

    We report on the design, assembly, operation and application of an aberration-corrected photoemission electron microscope. The instrument used novel hyperbolic mirror-correctors with two and three electrodes that allowed simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. A spatial resolution of 5.4nm was obtained with this instrument in 2009, and 4.7nm in subsequent years. New imaging methodology was introduced involving interferometric imaging of light diffraction. This methodology was applied in nano-photonics and in the characterization of surface-plasmon polaritons. Photonic crystals and waveguides, optical antennas and new plasmonic devices such as routers, localizers and filters were designed and demonstrated using the new capabilities offered by the microscope.

  15. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  16. Spherical aberration correction with an in-lens N-fold symmetric line currents model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Ryuji

    2018-04-01

    In our previous works, we have proposed N-SYLC (N-fold symmetric line currents) models for aberration correction. In this paper, we propose "in-lens N-SYLC" model, where N-SYLC overlaps rotationally symmetric lens. Such overlap is possible because N-SYLC is free of magnetic materials. We analytically prove that, if certain parameters of the model are optimized, an in-lens 3-SYLC (N = 3) doublet can correct 3rd order spherical aberration. By computer simulation, we show that the required excitation current for correction is less than 0.25 AT for beam energy 5 keV, and the beam size after correction is smaller than 1 nm at the corrector image plane for initial slope less than 4 mrad. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. From Nanoparticles to Process An Aberration Corrected TEM Study of Fischer Tropsch Catalysts at Various Steps of the Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braidy, N.; Blanchard, J.; Abatzoglou, N.; Andrei, C.

    2011-01-01

    χThe nanostructure of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Fe carbides are investigated using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plasma-generated Fe carbides are analyzed just after synthesis, following reduction via a H2 treatment step and once used as FT catalyst and deactivated. The as-produced nanoparticles (NPs) are seen to be abundantly covered with graphitic and amorphous carbon. Using the extended information limit from the spherical aberration-corrected TEM, the NPs could be indexed as a mixture of NPs in the θ-Fe 3 C and χ-Fe 5 C 2 phases. The reduction treatment exposed the NPs by removing most of the carbonaceous speSubscript textcies while retaining the χ-Fe 5 C 2 . Fe-carbides NPs submitted to conditions typical to FT synthesis develop a Fe3O4 shell which eventually consumes the NPs up to a point where 3-4 nm residual carbide is left at the center of the particle. Subscript textVarious mechanisms explaining the formation of such a microstructure are discussed. (author)

  18. Chromatic aberrations correction for imaging spectrometer based on acousto-optic tunable filter with two transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijie; Wang, Ziye; Jia, Guorui; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Zefu

    2017-10-02

    The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) with wide wavelength range and high spectral resolution has long crystal and two transducers. A longer crystal length leads to a bigger chromatic focal shift and the double-transducer arrangement induces angular mutation in diffracted beam, which increase difficulty in longitudinal and lateral chromatic aberration correction respectively. In this study, the two chromatic aberrations are analyzed quantitatively based on an AOTF optical model and a novel catadioptric dual-path configuration is proposed to correct both the chromatic aberrations. The test results exhibit effectiveness of the optical configuration for this type of AOTF-based imaging spectrometer.

  19. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 , with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN 4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P6 3 (α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce 4-0.5x Li 3 P 18 N 35-1.5x O 1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  20. Optimum aberration coefficients for recording high-resolution off-axis holograms in a Cs-corrected TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linck, Martin, E-mail: linck@ceos-gmbh.de [CEOS GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Amongst the impressive improvements in high-resolution electron microscopy, the Cs-corrector also has significantly enhanced the capabilities of off-axis electron holography. Recently, it has been shown that the signal above noise in the reconstructable phase can be significantly improved by combining holography and hardware aberration correction. Additionally, with a spherical aberration close to zero, the traditional optimum focus for recording high-resolution holograms ('Lichte's defocus') has become less stringent and both, defocus and spherical aberration, can be selected freely within a certain range. This new degree of freedom can be used to improve the signal resolution in the holographically reconstructed object wave locally, e.g. at the atomic positions. A brute force simulation study for an aberration corrected 200 kV TEM is performed to determine optimum values for defocus and spherical aberration for best possible signal to noise in the reconstructed atomic phase signals. Compared to the optimum aberrations for conventional phase contrast imaging (NCSI), which produce 'bright atoms' in the image intensity, the resulting optimum values of defocus and spherical aberration for off-axis holography enable 'black atom contrast' in the hologram. However, they can significantly enhance the local signal resolution at the atomic positions. At the same time, the benefits of hardware aberration correction for high-resolution off-axis holography are preserved. It turns out that the optimum is depending on the object and its thickness and therefore not universal. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized aberration parameters for high-resolution off-axis holography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulation and analysis of noise in high-resolution off-axis holograms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improving signal resolution in the holographically reconstructed phase shift. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of &apos

  1. Optimum aberration coefficients for recording high-resolution off-axis holograms in a Cs-corrected TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linck, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the impressive improvements in high-resolution electron microscopy, the Cs-corrector also has significantly enhanced the capabilities of off-axis electron holography. Recently, it has been shown that the signal above noise in the reconstructable phase can be significantly improved by combining holography and hardware aberration correction. Additionally, with a spherical aberration close to zero, the traditional optimum focus for recording high-resolution holograms (“Lichte's defocus”) has become less stringent and both, defocus and spherical aberration, can be selected freely within a certain range. This new degree of freedom can be used to improve the signal resolution in the holographically reconstructed object wave locally, e.g. at the atomic positions. A brute force simulation study for an aberration corrected 200 kV TEM is performed to determine optimum values for defocus and spherical aberration for best possible signal to noise in the reconstructed atomic phase signals. Compared to the optimum aberrations for conventional phase contrast imaging (NCSI), which produce “bright atoms” in the image intensity, the resulting optimum values of defocus and spherical aberration for off-axis holography enable “black atom contrast” in the hologram. However, they can significantly enhance the local signal resolution at the atomic positions. At the same time, the benefits of hardware aberration correction for high-resolution off-axis holography are preserved. It turns out that the optimum is depending on the object and its thickness and therefore not universal. -- Highlights: ► Optimized aberration parameters for high-resolution off-axis holography. ► Simulation and analysis of noise in high-resolution off-axis holograms. ► Improving signal resolution in the holographically reconstructed phase shift. ► Comparison of “black” and “white” atom contrast in off-axis holograms.

  2. Simultaneous correction of large low-order and high-order aberrations with a new deformable mirror technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooms, F.; Camet, S.; Curis, J. F.

    2010-02-01

    A new technology of deformable mirror will be presented. Based on magnetic actuators, these deformable mirrors feature record strokes (more than +/- 45μm of astigmatism and focus correction) with an optimized temporal behavior. Furthermore, the development has been made in order to have a large density of actuators within a small clear aperture (typically 52 actuators within a diameter of 9.0mm). We will present the key benefits of this technology for vision science: simultaneous correction of low and high order aberrations, AO-SLO image without artifacts due to the membrane vibration, optimized control, etc. Using recent papers published by Doble, Thibos and Miller, we show the performances that can be achieved by various configurations using statistical approach. The typical distribution of wavefront aberrations (both the low order aberration (LOA) and high order aberration (HOA)) have been computed and the correction applied by the mirror. We compare two configurations of deformable mirrors (52 and 97 actuators) and highlight the influence of the number of actuators on the fitting error, the photon noise error and the effective bandwidth of correction.

  3. Correction of 157-nm lens based on phase ring aberration extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meute, Jeff; Rich, Georgia K.; Conley, Will; Smith, Bruce W.; Zavyalova, Lena V.; Cashmore, Julian S.; Ashworth, Dominic; Webb, James E.; Rich, Lisa

    2004-05-01

    Early manufacture and use of 157nm high NA lenses has presented significant challenges including: intrinsic birefringence correction, control of optical surface contamination, and the use of relatively unproven materials, coatings, and metrology. Many of these issues were addressed during the manufacture and use of International SEMATECH"s 0.85NA lens. Most significantly, we were the first to employ 157nm phase measurement interferometry (PMI) and birefringence modeling software for lens optimization. These efforts yielded significant wavefront improvement and produced one of the best wavefront-corrected 157nm lenses to date. After applying the best practices to the manufacture of the lens, we still had to overcome the difficulties of integrating the lens into the tool platform at International SEMATECH instead of at the supplier facility. After lens integration, alignment, and field optimization were complete, conventional lithography and phase ring aberration extraction techniques were used to characterize system performance. These techniques suggested a wavefront error of approximately 0.05 waves RMS--much larger than the 0.03 waves RMS predicted by 157nm PMI. In-situ wavefront correction was planned for in the early stages of this project to mitigate risks introduced by the use of development materials and techniques and field integration of the lens. In this publication, we document the development and use of a phase ring aberration extraction method for characterizing imaging performance and a technique for correcting aberrations with the addition of an optical compensation plate. Imaging results before and after the lens correction are presented and differences between actual and predicted results are discussed.

  4. Measuring chromatic aberrations in imaging systems using plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Roschuk, Tyler R; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a method to measure chromatic aberrations of microscope objectives with metallic nanoparticles using white light. Extinction spectra are recorded while scanning a single nanoparticle through a lens's focal plane. We show a direct correlation between the focal wavelength and the longitudinal chromatic focal shift through our analysis of the variations between the scanned extinction spectra at each scan position and the peak extinction over the entire scan. The method has been tested on achromat and apochromat objectives using aluminum disks varying in size from 260-520 nm. Our method is straightforward, robust, low cost, and broadband with a sensitivity suitable for assessing longitudinal chromatic aberrations in high-numerical-aperture apochromatic corrected lenses.

  5. Automated aberration correction of arbitrary laser modes in high numerical aperture systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hering, Julian; Waller, Erik H.; Freymann, Georg von

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the point-spread-function in three-dimensional laser lithography is crucial for fabricating structures with highest definition and resolution. In contrast to microscopy, aberrations have to be physically corrected prior to writing, to create well defined doughnut modes, bottlebeams or multi foci modes. We report on a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for spatial-light-modulator based automated aberration compensation to optimize arbitrary laser-modes in a high numerical aperture...

  6. Pulse compressor with aberration correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankos, Marian [Electron Optica, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing an electron mirror-based pulse compressor attachment to new and retrofitted dynamic transmission electron microscopes (DTEMs) and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) cameras for improving the temporal resolution of these instruments from the characteristic range of a few picoseconds to a few nanoseconds and beyond, into the sub-100 femtosecond range. The improvement will enable electron microscopes and diffraction cameras to better resolve the dynamics of reactions in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. EOI’s pulse compressor technology utilizes the combination of electron mirror optics and a magnetic beam separator to compress the electron pulse. The design exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in the mirror in order to compress the temporally broadened beam. This system also simultaneously corrects the chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens for improved spatial resolution. This correction will be found valuable as the source size is reduced with laser-triggered point source emitters. With such emitters, it might be possible to significantly reduce the illuminated area and carry out ultrafast diffraction experiments from small regions of the sample, e.g. from individual grains or nanoparticles. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate pulse compressor architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between temporal resolution and electron bunch size to achieve the optimum design for two particular applications with market potential: increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of UEDs, and increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of DTEMs. Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key pulse compressor components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were folded

  7. Automated aberration correction of arbitrary laser modes in high numerical aperture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Julian; Waller, Erik H; Von Freymann, Georg

    2016-12-12

    Controlling the point-spread-function in three-dimensional laser lithography is crucial for fabricating structures with highest definition and resolution. In contrast to microscopy, aberrations have to be physically corrected prior to writing, to create well defined doughnut modes, bottlebeams or multi foci modes. We report on a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for spatial-light-modulator based automated aberration compensation to optimize arbitrary laser-modes in a high numerical aperture system. Using circularly polarized light for the measurement and first-guess initial conditions for amplitude and phase of the pupil function our scalar approach outperforms recent algorithms with vectorial corrections. Besides laser lithography also applications like optical tweezers and microscopy might benefit from the method presented.

  8. Coherence and diffraction limited resolution in microscopic OCT by a unified approach for the correction of dispersion and aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Hildebrandt, H.; Münter, Michael; Ahrens, M.; Spahr, H.; Hillmann, D.; König, P.; Hüttmann, G.

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images scattering tissues with 5 to 15 μm resolution. This is usually not sufficient for a distinction of cellular and subcellular structures. Increasing axial and lateral resolution and compensation of artifacts caused by dispersion and aberrations is required to achieve cellular and subcellular resolution. This includes defocus which limit the usable depth of field at high lateral resolution. OCT gives access the phase of the scattered light and hence correction of dispersion and aberrations is possible by numerical algorithms. Here we present a unified dispersion/aberration correction which is based on a polynomial parameterization of the phase error and an optimization of the image quality using Shannon's entropy. For validation, a supercontinuum light sources and a costume-made spectrometer with 400 nm bandwidth were combined with a high NA microscope objective in a setup for tissue and small animal imaging. Using this setup and computation corrections, volumetric imaging at 1.5 μm resolution is possible. Cellular and near cellular resolution is demonstrated in porcine cornea and the drosophila larva, when computational correction of dispersion and aberrations is used. Due to the excellent correction of the used microscope objective, defocus was the main contribution to the aberrations. In addition, higher aberrations caused by the sample itself were successfully corrected. Dispersion and aberrations are closely related artifacts in microscopic OCT imaging. Hence they can be corrected in the same way by optimization of the image quality. This way microscopic resolution is easily achieved in OCT imaging of static biological tissues.

  9. Time-resolved magnetic imaging in an aberration-corrected, energy-filtered photoemission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, F.; Gottlob, D.M.; Krug, I.P.; Doganay, H.; Cramm, S.; Kaiser, A.M.; Lin, G.; Makarov, D.; Schmidt, O.G.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the implementation and usage of a synchrotron-based time-resolving operation mode in an aberration-corrected, energy-filtered photoemission electron microscope. The setup consists of a new type of sample holder, which enables fast magnetization reversal of the sample by sub-ns pulses of up to 10 mT. Within the sample holder current pulses are generated by a fast avalanche photo diode and transformed into magnetic fields by means of a microstrip line. For more efficient use of the synchrotron time structure, we developed an electrostatic deflection gating mechanism capable of beam blanking within a few nanoseconds. This allows us to operate the setup in the hybrid bunch mode of the storage ring facility, selecting one or several bright singular light pulses which are temporally well-separated from the normal high-intensity multibunch pulse pattern. - Highlights: • A new time-resolving operation mode in photoemission electron microscopy is shown. • Our setup works within an energy-filtered, aberration-corrected PEEM. • A new gating system for bunch selection using synchrotron radiation is developed. • An alternative magnetic excitation system is developed. • First tr-imaging using an energy-filtered, aberration-corrected PEEM is shown

  10. Present status and future prospects of spherical aberration corrected TEM/STEM for study of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    The present status of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is described from the viewpoint of the observation of nanomaterials. Characteristic features in TEM and STEM are explained using the experimental data obtained by our group and other research groups. Cs correction up to the 3rd-order aberration of an objective lens has already been established and research interest is focused on correcting the 5th-order spherical aberration and the chromatic aberration in combination with the development of a monochromator below an electron gun for smaller point-to-point resolution in optics. Another fundamental area of interest is the limitation of TEM and STEM resolution from the viewpoint of the scattering of electrons in crystals. The minimum size of the exit-wave function below samples undergoing TEM imaging is determined from the calculation of scattering around related atomic columns in the crystals. STEM does not have this limitation because the resolution is, in principle, determined by the probe size. One of the future prospects of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is the possibility of extending the space around the sample holder by correcting the chromatic and spherical aberrations. This wider space will contribute to the ease of performing in situ experiments and various combinations of TEM and other analysis methods. High-resolution, in situ dynamic and 3D observations/analysis are the most important keywords in the next decade of high-resolution electron microscopy. (topical review)

  11. Methods for Motion Correction Evaluation Using 18F-FDG Human Brain Scans on a High-Resolution PET Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H.; Sibomana, Merence; Olesen, Oline Vinter

    2012-01-01

    Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias in the reconstr......Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias...... in the reconstructed emission images. The purpose of this work was the development of quality control (QC) methods for MC procedures based on external motion tracking (EMT) for human scanning using an optical motion tracking system. Methods: Two scans with minor motion and 5 with major motion (as reported...... (automated image registration) software. The following 3 QC methods were used to evaluate the EMT and AIR MC: a method using the ratio between 2 regions of interest with gray matter voxels (GM) and white matter voxels (WM), called GM/WM; mutual information; and cross correlation. Results: The results...

  12. The structure of dodecagonal (Ta,V){sub 1.6}Te imaged by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumeich, F., E-mail: krumeich@inorg.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mueller, E.; Wepf, R.A. [Electron Microscopy ETH Zurich (EMEZ), Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Conrad, M.; Reich, C.; Harbrecht, B. [Department of Chemistry and Centre of Materials Science, Philipps-Universitaet, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Nesper, R. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    While HRTEM is the well-established method to characterize the structure of dodecagonal tantalum (vanadium) telluride quasicrystals and their periodic approximants, phase-contrast imaging performed on an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) represents a favorable alternative. The (Ta,V){sub 151}Te{sub 74} clusters, the basic structural unit in all these phases, can be visualized with high resolution. A dependence of the image contrast on defocus and specimen thickness has been observed. In thin areas, the projected crystal potential is basically imaged with either dark or bright contrast at two defocus values close to Scherzer defocus as confirmed by image simulations utilizing the principle of reciprocity. Models for square-triangle tilings describing the arrangement of the basic clusters can be derived from such images. - Graphical abstract: PC-STEM image of a (Ta,V){sub 151}Te{sub 74} cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub s}-corrected STEM is applied for the characterization of dodecagonal quasicrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The projected potential of the structure is mirrored in the images. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase-contrast STEM imaging depends on defocus and thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For simulations of phase-contrast STEM images, the reciprocity theorem is applicable.

  13. Strain fields around dislocation arrays in a Σ9 silicon bicrystal measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, Martin; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2013-04-01

    Strain fields around grain boundary dislocations are measured by applying geometric phase analysis on atomic resolution images obtained from multiple fast acquisitions in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Maps of lattice distortions in silicon introduced by an array of pure edge dislocations located at a Σ9(122) grain boundary are compared with the predictions from isotropic elastic theory, and the atomic structure of dislocation cores is deduced from images displaying all the atomic columns. For strain measurements, reducing the acquisition time is found to significantly decrease the effects of instabilities on the high-resolution images. Contributions from scanning artefacts are also diminished by summing multiple images following a cross-correlation alignment procedure. Combined with the sub-Ångström resolution obtained with an aberration corrector, and the stable dedicated microscope's environment, therapid acquisition method provides the measurements of atomic displacements with accuracy below 10 pm. Finally, the advantages of combining strain measurements with the collection of various analytical signals in a scanning transmission electron microscope are discussed.

  14. Measured attenuation correction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertag, H.; Kuebler, W.K.; Doll, J.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate attenuation correction is a prerequisite for the determination of exact local radioactivity concentrations in positron emission tomography. Attenuation correction factors range from 4-5 in brain studies to 50-100 in whole body measurements. This report gives an overview of the different methods of determining the attenuation correction factors by transmission measurements using an external positron emitting source. The long-lived generator nuclide 68 Ge/ 68 Ga is commonly used for this purpose. The additional patient dose from the transmission source is usually a small fraction of the dose due to the subsequent emission measurement. Ring-shaped transmission sources as well as rotating point or line sources are employed in modern positron tomographs. By masking a rotating line or point source, random and scattered events in the transmission scans can be effectively suppressed. The problems of measured attenuation correction are discussed: Transmission/emission mismatch, random and scattered event contamination, counting statistics, transmission/emission scatter compensation, transmission scan after administration of activity to the patient. By using a double masking technique simultaneous emission and transmission scans become feasible. (orig.)

  15. Depth-resolution imaging of crystalline nanoclusters attached on and embedded in amorphous films using aberration-corrected TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Jun, E-mail: yamasaki@uhvem.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Mori, Masayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hirata, Akihiko [Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Hirotsu, Yoshihiko [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuo [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    For observations of crystalline nanoclusters, the features and capabilities of depth-resolution imaging by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were investigated using image simulations and experiments for two types of samples. The first sample was gold clusters attached on an amorphous carbon film. The experimental through-focal series indicated that the focal plane for the cluster was shifted 3 nm from that for the supporting film. This difference is due to the depth-resolution imaging of the cluster and film, the mid-planes of which are separated by 3 nm along the depth direction (the electron incident direction). On the basis of this information, the three-dimensional configuration of the sample, such as the film thickness of 2 nm, was successfully illustrated. The second sample was a Zr{sub 66.7}Ni{sub 33.3} metallic glass including a medium-range-order (MRO) structure, which was approximately considered to be a crystalline cluster with a diameter of 1.6 nm. In the experimental through-focal series, the lattice fringe of the MRO cluster was visible at limited focal conditions. Image simulations reproduced well the focal conditions and also indicated a structural condition for the visualization that the embedded cluster must be apart from the mid-plane of the matrix film. Similar to the case of the first sample, this result can be explained by the idea that the “effective focal planes” for the film and cluster are at different heights. This type of depth-resolution phase contrast imaging is possible only in aberration-corrected TEM and when the sample has a simple structure and is sufficiently thin for the kinematical scattering approximation. - Highlights: • Depth-resolution imaging by aberration-corrected TEM was demonstrated. • Thickness of a carbon film supporting gold nano-crystals was successfully estimated. • A crystalline nanocluster embedded in an amorphous matrix was successfully observed. • It was clarified that

  16. Magnitude of speed of sound aberration corrections for ultrasound image guided radiotherapy for prostate and other anatomical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Stroian, Gabriela; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of speed of sound (SOS) aberrations in three-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging systems in image guided radiotherapy. The discrepancy between the fixed SOS value of 1540 m/s assumed by US systems in human soft tissues and its actual nonhomogeneous distribution in patients produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. Methods: A correction, provided by a previously published density-based algorithm, was applied to a set of five prostate, five liver, and five breast cancer patients. The shifts of the centroids of target structures and the change in shape were evaluated. Results: After the correction the prostate cases showed shifts up to 3.6 mm toward the US probe, which may explain largely the reported positioning discrepancies in the literature on US systems versus other imaging modalities. Liver cases showed the largest changes in volume of the organ, up to almost 9%, and shifts of the centroids up to more than 6 mm either away or toward the US probe. Breast images showed systematic small shifts of the centroids toward the US probe with a maximum magnitude of 1.3 mm. Conclusions: The applied correction in prostate and liver cancer patients shows positioning errors of several mm due to SOS aberration; the errors are smaller in breast cancer cases, but possibly becoming more important when breast tissue thickness increases.

  17. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8 nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J. [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Häkkinen, Hannu [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Department of Physics, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Palmer, Richard E., E-mail: richardepalmerwork@yahoo.com [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au{sub 144}(SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 60} provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were “weighed” by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123–151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au{sub 144}(SR){sub 60} structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesised gold clusters were “weighed” by atom counting to get true size. • Image simulations show a few percent of clusters have the predicted atomic structure. • But a specific ring-dot feature indicates local icosahedral order in many clusters.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Present status and future prospects of spherical aberration corrected TEM/STEM for study of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present status of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is described from the viewpoint of the observation of nanomaterials. Characteristic features in TEM and STEM are explained using the experimental data obtained by our group and other research groups. Cs correction up to the 3rd-order aberration of an objective lens has already been established and research interest is focused on correcting the 5th-order spherical aberration and the chromatic aberration in combination with the development of a monochromator below an electron gun for smaller point-to-point resolution in optics. Another fundamental area of interest is the limitation of TEM and STEM resolution from the viewpoint of the scattering of electrons in crystals. The minimum size of the exit-wave function below samples undergoing TEM imaging is determined from the calculation of scattering around related atomic columns in the crystals. STEM does not have this limitation because the resolution is, in principle, determined by the probe size. One of the future prospects of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is the possibility of extending the space around the sample holder by correcting the chromatic and spherical aberrations. This wider space will contribute to the ease of performing in situ experiments and various combinations of TEM and other analysis methods. High-resolution, in situ dynamic and 3D observations/analysis are the most important keywords in the next decade of high-resolution electron microscopy.

  19. A monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-07-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous emission and transmission scanning in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Kazumi; Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Miura, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Examination by PET (positron emission tomography) scanning, following the dosage of 2-deoxy- 18 F fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), is positively utilized for the diagnosis of cancers, rather than for the purpose of studies. This is because the examination by FDG-PET (PET scanning following the dosage of FDG) ensures higher efficiency in discrimination of cancers, than conventional CT and PET. The method of whole body scanning by PET scanning following the dosage of FDG is effectively utilized not only for discrimination cancers, but also for determining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of treatment of cancers. In conventional methods for examining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of cancer treatment, it is necessary to correct for the gamma-ray attenuation, which requires a longer time for examination, increasing the physical and psychological pains of the patients. We have installed the simultaneous emission and transmission scanning capability into the HEADTOME-V of the Shimadzu SET-2000W Series positron emission tomographic scanning instruments, to establish an instrument that permits FDG-PET whole body scanning in actual clinical fields, with minimized physical and psychological pains of patients concerned, yet ensuring an outstandingly high examination efficiency. This report also presents some data obtained by this newly developed instrument and those obtained in practical applications. (author)

  1. Aberration compensation of an ultrasound imaging instrument with a reduced number of channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2012-10-01

    Focusing and imaging qualities of an ultrasound imaging system that uses aberration correction were experimentally investigated as functions of the number of parallel channels. Front-end electronics that consolidate signals from multiple physical elements can be used to lower hardware and computational costs by reducing the number of parallel channels. However, the signals from sparse arrays of synthetic elements yield poorer aberration estimates. In this study, aberration estimates derived from synthetic arrays of varying element sizes are evaluated by comparing compensated receive focuses, compensated transmit focuses, and compensated b-scan images of a point target and a cyst phantom. An array of 80 x 80 physical elements with a pitch of 0.6 x 0.6 mm was used for all of the experiments and the aberration was produced by a phantom selected to mimic propagation through abdominal wall. The results show that aberration correction derived from synthetic arrays with pitches that have a diagonal length smaller than 70% of the correlation length of the aberration yield focuses and images of approximately the same quality. This connection between correlation length of the aberration and synthetic element size provides a guideline for determining the number of parallel channels that are required when designing imaging systems that employ aberration correction.

  2. Dynamic Correction of Higher-Order Deflection Aberrations in the Environmental SEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oral, Martin; Neděla, Vilém

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 194-199 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : environmental SEM * ESEM * shifted deflection pivot point * Higher order deflection aberrations * vignetting * dynamic focusing * dynamic stigmator * dynamic correction Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  3. Joint denoising, demosaicing, and chromatic aberration correction for UHD video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanov, Ljubomir; Philips, Wilfried; Damstra, Klaas Jan; Ellenbroek, Frank

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution video capture is crucial for numerous applications such as surveillance, security, industrial inspection, medical imaging and digital entertainment. In the last two decades, we are witnessing a dramatic increase of the spatial resolution and the maximal frame rate of video capturing devices. In order to achieve further resolution increase, numerous challenges will be facing us. Due to the reduced size of the pixel, the amount of light also reduces, leading to the increased noise level. Moreover, the reduced pixel size makes the lens imprecisions more pronounced, which especially applies to chromatic aberrations. Even in the case when high quality lenses are used some chromatic aberration artefacts will remain. Next, noise level additionally increases due to the higher frame rates. To reduce the complexity and the price of the camera, one sensor captures all three colors, by relying on Color Filter Arrays. In order to obtain full resolution color image, missing color components have to be interpolated, i.e. demosaicked, which is more challenging than in the case of lower resolution, due to the increased noise and aberrations. In this paper, we propose a new method, which jointly performs chromatic aberration correction, denoising and demosaicking. By jointly performing the reduction of all artefacts, we are reducing the overall complexity of the system and the introduction of new artefacts. In order to reduce possible flicker we also perform temporal video enhancement. We evaluate the proposed method on a number of publicly available UHD sequences and on sequences recorded in our studio.

  4. Improvement of the repeatability of parallel transmission at 7T using interleaved acquisition in the calibration scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Taisuke; Iwadate, Yuji; Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-12-04

    Respiration-induced phase shift affects B 0 /B 1 + mapping repeatability in parallel transmission (pTx) calibration for 7T brain MRI, but is improved by breath-holding (BH). However, BH cannot be applied during long scans. To examine whether interleaved acquisition during calibration scanning could improve pTx repeatability and image homogeneity. Prospective. Nine healthy subjects. 7T MRI with a two-channel RF transmission system was used. Calibration scanning for B 0 /B 1 + mapping was performed under sequential acquisition/free-breathing (Seq-FB), Seq-BH, and interleaved acquisition/FB (Int-FB) conditions. The B 0 map was calculated with two echo times, and the B 1 + map was obtained using the Bloch-Siegert method. Actual flip-angle imaging (AFI) and gradient echo (GRE) imaging were performed using pTx and quadrature-Tx (qTx). All scans were acquired in five sessions. Repeatability was evaluated using intersession standard deviation (SD) or coefficient of variance (CV), and in-plane homogeneity was evaluated using in-plane CV. A paired t-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used. The intersession CV/SDs for the B 0 /B 1 + maps were significantly smaller in Int-FB than in Seq-FB (Bonferroni-corrected P FB, Seq-BH, and qTx than in Seq-FB (Bonferroni-corrected P FB, Int-FB, and Seq-BH were significantly smaller than in qTx (Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.01 for all). Using interleaved acquisition during calibration scans of pTx for 7T brain MRI improved the repeatability of B 0 /B 1 + mapping, AFI, and GRE images, without BH. 1 Technical Efficacy Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Camera processing with chromatic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneliussen, Jan Tore; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2014-10-01

    Since the refractive index of materials commonly used for lens depends on the wavelengths of light, practical camera optics fail to converge light to a single point on an image plane. Known as chromatic aberration, this phenomenon distorts image details by introducing magnification error, defocus blur, and color fringes. Though achromatic and apochromatic lens designs reduce chromatic aberration to a degree, they are complex and expensive and they do not offer a perfect correction. In this paper, we propose a new postcapture processing scheme designed to overcome these problems computationally. Specifically, the proposed solution is comprised of chromatic aberration-tolerant demosaicking algorithm and post-demosaicking chromatic aberration correction. Experiments with simulated and real sensor data verify that the chromatic aberration is effectively corrected.

  6. Mirror-based broadband scanner with minimized aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Tzeng, Yu-Yi; Huang, Chen-Han; Chui, Hsiang-Chen; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2009-02-01

    To obtain specific biochemical information in optical scanning microscopy, labeling technique is routinely required. Instead of the complex and invasive sample preparation procedures, incorporating spectral acquisition, which commonly requires a broadband light source, provides another mechanism to enhance molecular contrast. But most current optical scanning system is lens-based and thus the spectral bandwidth is limited to several hundred nanometers due to anti-reflection coating and chromatic aberration. The spectral range of interest in biological research covers ultraviolet to infrared. For example, the absorption peak of water falls around 3 μm, while most proteins exhibit absorption in the UV-visible regime. For imaging purpose, the transmission window of skin and cerebral tissues fall around 1300 and 1800 nm, respectively. Therefore, to extend the spectral bandwidth of an optical scanning system from visible to mid-infrared, we propose a system composed of metallic coated mirrors. A common issue in such a mirror-based system is aberrations induced by oblique incidence. We propose to compensate astigmatism by exchanging the sagittal and tangential planes of the converging spherical mirrors in the scanning system. With the aid of an optical design software, we build a diffraction-limited broadband scanning system with wavefront flatness better than λ/4 at focal plane. Combined with a mirror-based objective this microscopic system will exhibit full spectral capability and will be useful in microscopic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  7. Nonlinear adaptive optics: aberration correction in three photon fluorescence microscopy for mouse brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P.; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Mengran; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Xu, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a well-established technique for deep-tissue imaging with subcellular resolution. Three-photon microscopy (3PM) when combined with long wavelength excitation was shown to allow deeper imaging than two-photon microscopy (2PM) in biological tissues, such as mouse brain, because out-of-focus background light can be further reduced due to the higher order nonlinear excitation. As was demonstrated in 2PM systems, imaging depth and resolution can be improved by aberration correction using adaptive optics (AO) techniques which are based on shaping the scanning beam using a spatial light modulator (SLM). In this way, it is possible to compensate for tissue low order aberration and to some extent, to compensate for tissue scattering. Here, we present a 3PM AO microscopy system for brain imaging. Soliton self-frequency shift is used to create a femtosecond source at 1675 nm and a microelectromechanical (MEMS) SLM serves as the wavefront shaping device. We perturb the 1020 segment SLM using a modified nonlinear version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. The nonlinearity of the fluorescence signal used for feedback ensures that the signal is increasing when the spot size decreases, allowing compensation of phase errors in an iterative optimization process without direct phase measurement. We compare the performance for different orders of nonlinear feedback, showing an exponential growth in signal improvement as the nonlinear order increases. We demonstrate the impact of the method by applying the 3PM AO system for in-vivo mouse brain imaging, showing improvement in signal at 1-mm depth inside the brain.

  8. Application of transmission scan-based attenuation compensation to scatter-corrected thallium-201 myocardial single-photon emission tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Jun; Kubo, Atsushi; Ogawa, Koichi; Ichihara, Takashi; Motomura, Nobutoku; Takayama, Takuzo; Iwanaga, Shiro; Mitamura, Hideo; Ogawa, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    A practical method for scatter and attenuation compensation was employed in thallium-201 myocardial single-photon emission tomography (SPET or ECT) with the triple-energy-window (TEW) technique and an iterative attenuation correction method by using a measured attenuation map. The map was reconstructed from technetium-99m transmission CT (TCT) data. A dual-headed SPET gamma camera system equipped with parallel-hole collimators was used for ECT/TCT data acquisition and a new type of external source named ''sheet line source'' was designed for TCT data acquisition. This sheet line source was composed of a narrow long fluoroplastic tube embedded in a rectangular acrylic board. After injection of 99m Tc solution into the tube by an automatic injector, the board was attached in front of the collimator surface of one of the two detectors. After acquiring emission and transmission data separately or simultaneously, we eliminated scattered photons in the transmission and emission data with the TEW method, and reconstructed both images. Then, the effect of attenuation in the scatter-corrected ECT images was compensated with Chang's iterative method by using measured attenuation maps. Our method was validated by several phantom studies and clinical cardiac studies. The method offered improved homogeneity in distribution of myocardial activity and accurate measurements of myocardial tracer uptake. We conclude that the above correction method is feasible because a new type of 99m Tc external source may not produce truncation in TCT images and is cost-effective and easy to prepare in clinical situations. (orig.)

  9. Effects of residual aberrations explored on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biskupek, Johannes; Hartel, Peter; Haider, Maximilian; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-01-01

    The effects of geometric residual aberrations such as coma B 2 and two-fold astigmatism A 1 on the contrast in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images are investigated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The individual aberrations are adjusted and set up manually using an imaging C S -corrector. We demonstrate how coma B 2 can be recognized by an experienced user directly in the image and how it blurs the contrast. Even with uncorrected (resolution limiting) spherical aberration C S the coma B 2 has to be considered and must be minimized. Limits for a tolerable coma are given. The experiments are confirmed by image simulations. -- Highlights: ► Individual effects of residual aberrations such as B 2 , A 1 , and C S are demonstrated. ► Experimental HRTEM and simulated images of carbon nanotubes are compared. ► A detection limit of 50 nm B 2 in a single HRTEM image is determined.

  10. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state. - Highlights: • We investigate the temporal stability of optical aberrations in HRTEM. • We develop a statistical framework for the estimation of optical lifetimes. • We introduce plots showing the success probability for aberration-free work. • Optical lifetimes in sub-Ångström electron microscopy are surprisingly low. • The success of aberration correction depends strongly on the optical stability

  11. Optical traps with geometric aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roichman, Yael; Waldron, Alex; Gardel, Emily; Grier, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We assess the influence of geometric aberrations on the in-plane performance of optical traps by studying the dynamics of trapped colloidal spheres in deliberately distorted holographic optical tweezers. The lateral stiffness of the traps turns out to be insensitive to moderate amounts of coma, astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Moreover holographic aberration correction enables us to compensate inherent shortcomings in the optical train, thereby adaptively improving its performance. We also demonstrate the effects of geometric aberrations on the intensity profiles of optical vortices, whose readily measured deformations suggest a method for rapidly estimating and correcting geometric aberrations in holographic trapping systems

  12. Wavefront correction for static and dynamic aberrations to within 1 second of the system shot in the NIF Beamlet demonstration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, R.; Kartz, M.; Behrendt, W.

    1996-10-01

    The laser wavefront of the NIF Beamlet demonstration system is corrected for static aberrations with a wavefront control system. The system operates closed loop with a probe beam prior to a shot and has a loop bandwidth of about 3 Hz. However, until recently the wavefront control system was disabled several minutes prior to the shot to allow time to manually reconfigure its attenuators and probe beam insertion mechanism to shot mode. Thermally-induced dynamic variations in gas density in the Beamlet main beam line produce significant wavefront error. After about 5-8 seconds, the wavefront error has increased to a new, higher level due to turbulence- induced aberrations no longer being corrected- This implies that there is a turbulence-induced aberration noise bandwidth of less than one Hertz, and that the wavefront controller could correct for the majority of turbulence-induced aberration (about one- third wave) by automating its reconfiguration to occur within one second of the shot, This modification was recently implemented on Beamlet; we call this modification the t 0 -1 system

  13. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-15

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  14. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  15. Evaluation of scatter correction using a single isotope for simultaneous emission and transmission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Kuikka, J.T.; Vanninen, E.; Laensimies, E.; Kauppinen, T.; Patomaeki, L.

    1999-01-01

    Photon scatter is one of the most important factors degrading the quantitative accuracy of SPECT images. Many scatter correction methods have been proposed. The single isotope method was proposed by us. Aim: We evaluate the scatter correction method of improving the quality of images by acquiring emission and transmission data simultaneously with single isotope scan. Method: To evaluate the proposed scatter correction method, a contrast and linearity phantom was studied. Four female patients with fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome and four with chronic back pain (BP) were imaged. Grey-to-cerebellum (G/C) and grey-to-white matter (G/W) ratios were determined by one skilled operator for 12 regions of interest (ROIs) in each subject. Results: The linearity of activity response was improved after the scatter correction (r=0.999). The y-intercept value of the regression line was 0.036 (p [de

  16. A new method to detect and correct sample tilt in scanning transmission electron microscopy bright-field imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.G. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ishikawa, R.; Sánchez-Santolino, G. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lugg, N.R., E-mail: shibata@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Important properties of functional materials, such as ferroelectric shifts and octahedral distortions, are associated with displacements of the positions of lighter atoms in the unit cell. Annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is a good experimental method for investigating such phenomena due to its ability to image light and heavy atoms simultaneously. To map atomic positions at the required accuracy precise angular alignment of the sample with the microscope optical axis is necessary, since misalignment (tilt) of the specimen contributes to errors in position measurements of lighter elements in annular bright-field imaging. In this paper it is shown that it is possible to detect tilt with the aid of images recorded using a central bright-field detector placed within the inner radius of the annular bright-field detector. For a probe focus near the middle of the specimen the central bright-field image becomes especially sensitive to tilt and we demonstrate experimentally that misalignment can be detected with a precision of less than a milliradian, as we also confirm in simulation. Coma in the probe, an aberration that can be misidentified as tilt of the specimen, is also investigated and it is shown how the effects of coma and tilt can be differentiated. The effects of tilt may be offset to a large extent by shifting the diffraction plane detector an amount equivalent to the specimen tilt and we provide an experimental proof of principle of this using a segmented detector system. - Highlights: • Octahedral distortions are associated with displacements of lighter atoms. • Annular bright-field imaging is sensitive to light and heavy atoms simultaneously. • Mistilt of the specimen leads to errors in position measurements of lighter elements. • It is possible to detect tilt using images taken by a central bright-field detector. • Tilt may be offset by shifting the diffraction plane detector by an equivalent amount.

  17. Nanochannel alignment analysis by scanning transmission ion microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajta, I.; Gál, G.A.B.; Szilasi, S.Z.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a study on the ion transmission ratio of a nanoporous alumina sample is presented. The sample was investigated by scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) with different beam sizes. The hexagonally close-packed AlO nanocapillary array, realized as a suspended membrane of 15 νm...

  18. Seeing the atoms more clearly: STEM imaging from the Crewe era to today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    This review covers the development of scanning transmission electron microscopy from the innovations of Albert Crewe to the two-dimensional spectrum imaging in the era of aberration correction. It traces the key events along the path, the first atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging of individual atoms, the realization of incoherent imaging in crystals and the role of dynamical diffraction, simultaneous, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, and finally the tremendous impact of the successful correction of lens aberrations, not just in terms of resolution but also in single atom sensitivity. -- Highlights: ► We review the development of scanning transmission electron microscopy. ► We discuss the innovations of Albert Crewe in the first field emission STEM. ► We discuss use of the high angle annular detector for materials science. ► We discuss atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging and EELS. ► We discuss the benefits of aberration correction.

  19. Automatic low-order aberration correction based on geometrical optics for slab lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Dong, Lizhi; Lai, Boheng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong; Kong, Qingfeng; Yang, Kangjian; Tang, Guomao; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we present a method based on geometry optics to simultaneously correct low-order aberrations and reshape the beams of slab lasers. A coaxial optical system with three lenses is adapted. The positions of the three lenses are directly calculated based on the beam parameters detected by wavefront sensors. The initial sizes of the input beams are 1.8  mm×11  mm, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of the wavefront range up to several tens of microns. After automatic correction, the dimensions may reach nearly 22  mm×22  mm as expected, and PV values of the wavefront are less than 2 μm. The effectiveness and precision of this method are verified with experiments.

  20. Changes in higher order aberrations after wavefront-guided PRK for correction of low to moderate myopia and myopic astigmatism: two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigledowska-Promienska, D; Zawojska, I

    2007-01-01

    To assess efficacy, safety, and changes in higher order aberrations after wavefront-guided photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in comparison with conventional PRK for low to moderate myopia with myopic astigmatism using a WASCA Workstation with the MEL 70 G-Scan excimer laser. A total of 126 myopic or myopic-astigmatic eyes of 112 patients were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1, the study group; and Group 2, the control group. Group 1 consisted of 78 eyes treated with wavefront-guided PRK. Group 2 consisted of 48 eyes treated with spherocylindrical conventional PRK. Two years postoperatively, in Group 1, 5% of eyes achieved an uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) of 0.05; 69% achieved a UCVA of 0.00; 18% of eyes experienced enhanced visual acuity of -0.18 and 8% of -0.30. In Group 2, 8% of eyes achieved a UCVA of 0.1; 25% achieved a UCVA of 0.05; and 67% achieved a UCVA of 0.00 according to logMAR calculation method. Total higher-order root-mean square increased by a factor 1.18 for Group 1 and 1.6 for Group 2. There was a significant increase of coma by a factor 1.74 in Group 2 and spherical aberration by a factor 2.09 in Group 1 and 3.56 in Group 2. The data support the safety and effectiveness of the wavefront-guided PRK using a WASCA Workstation for correction of low to moderate refractive errors. This method reduced the number of higher order aberrations induced by excimer laser surgery and improved uncorrected and spectacle-corrected visual acuity when compared to conventional PRK.

  1. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-01-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. - Highlights: • Novel scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) called TESEM. • Use of the gaseous detection device (GDD) in scintillation mode that allows high resolution bright and dark field imaging in the TESEM. • Novel approach towards a unification of both vacuum and environmental conditions in both bulk/surface and transmission mode of electron microscopy

  2. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-01-01

    -Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF

  3. A model of distributed phase aberration for deblurring phase estimated from scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, Jason C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Correction of aberration in ultrasound imaging uses the response of a point reflector or its equivalent to characterize the aberration. Because a point reflector is usually unavailable, its equivalent is obtained using statistical methods, such as processing reflections from multiple focal regions in a random medium. However, the validity of methods that use reflections from multiple points is limited to isoplanatic patches for which the aberration is essentially the same. In this study, aberration is modeled by an offset phase screen to relax the isoplanatic restriction. Methods are developed to determine the depth and phase of the screen and to use the model for compensation of aberration as the beam is steered. Use of the model to enhance the performance of the noted statistical estimation procedure is also described. Experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms that implement different models and produce different amounts of aberration are presented to show the efficacy of these methods. The improvement in b-scan resolution realized with the model is illustrated. The results show that the isoplanatic patch assumption for estimation of aberration can be relaxed and that propagation-path characteristics and aberration estimation are closely related.

  4. Safety, efficacy, and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis to correct myopia or myopic astigmatism with a 750 Hz scanning-spot laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Minoru; Watabe, Miyuki; Yukawa, Satoshi; Nakamura, Nobuo; Nakamura, Tadayuki; Magnago, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to correct myopia or myopic astigmatism using the Amaris 750S 750 Hz excimer laser. Private LASIK center, Tokyo, Japan. Case series. Patients with myopia or myopic astigmatism (spherical equivalent -0.50 to -11.63 diopters [D]), a corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of 20/20 or better, and an estimated residual bed thickness of 300 μm or more had LASIK using the aspheric aberration-free ablation profile of the 750 Hz scanning-spot laser and the Femto LDV Crystal Line femtosecond laser for flap creation. Study parameters included uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), CDVA, manifest refraction, astigmatism, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs). The study included 1280 eyes (685 patients). At 3 months, 96.6% of eyes had a UDVA of 20/20 or better and 99.1% had 20/32 or better; 94.1% of eyes were within ± 0.50 D of the intended correction and 98.9% were within ± 1.00 D; 89.7% of eyes had no residual cylinder and 96.0% had a postoperative astigmatism of less than 0.50 D. All eyes had a postoperative CDVA of 20/20 or better. The HOAs increased postoperatively (PLaser in situ keratomileusis with the 750 Hz scanning-spot laser was safe, effective, and predictable. No specific clinical side effects that might be associated with a high repetition rate occurred. Mr. Magnago is an employee of Schwind eye-tech-solutions GmbH. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of scatter correction using a single isotope for simultaneous emission and transmission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Kuikka, J.T.; Vanninen, E.; Laensimies, E. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine; Kauppinen, T.; Patomaeki, L. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1999-05-01

    Photon scatter is one of the most important factors degrading the quantitative accuracy of SPECT images. Many scatter correction methods have been proposed. The single isotope method was proposed by us. Aim: We evaluate the scatter correction method of improving the quality of images by acquiring emission and transmission data simultaneously with single isotope scan. Method: To evaluate the proposed scatter correction method, a contrast and linearity phantom was studied. Four female patients with fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome and four with chronic back pain (BP) were imaged. Grey-to-cerebellum (G/C) and grey-to-white matter (G/W) ratios were determined by one skilled operator for 12 regions of interest (ROIs) in each subject. Results: The linearity of activity response was improved after the scatter correction (r=0.999). The y-intercept value of the regression line was 0.036 (p<0.0001) after scatter correction and the slope was 0.954. Pairwise correlation indicated the agreement between nonscatter corrected and scatter corrected images. Reconstructed slices before and after scatter correction demonstrate a good correlation in the quantitative accuracy of radionuclide concentration. G/C values have significant correlation coefficients between original and corrected data. Conclusion: The transaxial images of human brain studies show that the scatter correction using single isotope in simultaneous transmission and emission tomography provides a good scatter compensation. The contrasts were increased on all 12 ROIs. The scatter compensation enhanced details of physiological lesions. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Photonenstreuung gehoert zu den wichtigsten Faktoren, die die quantitative Genauigkeit von SPECT-Bildern vermindern. Es wurde eine ganze Reihe von Methoden zur Streuungskorrektur vorgeschlagen. Von uns wurde die Einzelisotopen-Methode empfohlen. Ziel: Wir untersuchten die Streuungskorrektur-Methode zur Verbesserung der Bildqualitaet durch simultane Gewinnung von Emissions

  6. Sextupole system for the correction of spherical aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kopf, D.A.

    In an electron beam device in which an electron beam is developed and then focused by a lens to a particular spot, there is provided a means for eliminating spherical aberration. A sextupole electromagnetic lens is positioned between two focusing lenses. The interaction of the sextupole with the beam compensates for spherical aberration. (GHT)

  7. On the benefit of the negative-spherical-aberration imaging technique for quantitative HRTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, C.L.; Houben, L.; Thust, A.; Barthel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Employing an aberration corrector in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, the spherical aberration C S can be tuned to negative values, resulting in a novel imaging technique, which is called the negative C S imaging (NCSI) technique. The image contrast obtained with the NCSI technique is compared quantitatively with the image contrast formed with the traditional positive C S imaging (PCSI) technique. For the case of thin objects negative C S images are superior to positive C S images concerning the magnitude of the obtained contrast, which is due to constructive rather than destructive superposition of fundamental contrast contributions. As a consequence, the image signal obtained with a negative spherical aberration is significantly more robust against noise caused by amorphous surface layers, resulting in a measurement precision of atomic positions which is by a factor of 2-3 better at an identical noise level. The quantitative comparison of the two alternative C S -corrected imaging modes shows that the NCSI mode yields significantly more precise results in quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of thin objects than the traditional PCSI mode.

  8. Error analysis of motion correction method for laser scanning of moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, S.; Lohani, B.

    2014-05-01

    The limitation of conventional laser scanning methods is that the objects being scanned should be static. The need of scanning moving objects has resulted in the development of new methods capable of generating correct 3D geometry of moving objects. Limited literature is available showing development of very few methods capable of catering to the problem of object motion during scanning. All the existing methods utilize their own models or sensors. Any studies on error modelling or analysis of any of the motion correction methods are found to be lacking in literature. In this paper, we develop the error budget and present the analysis of one such `motion correction' method. This method assumes availability of position and orientation information of the moving object which in general can be obtained by installing a POS system on board or by use of some tracking devices. It then uses this information along with laser scanner data to apply correction to laser data, thus resulting in correct geometry despite the object being mobile during scanning. The major application of this method lie in the shipping industry to scan ships either moving or parked in the sea and to scan other objects like hot air balloons or aerostats. It is to be noted that the other methods of "motion correction" explained in literature can not be applied to scan the objects mentioned here making the chosen method quite unique. This paper presents some interesting insights in to the functioning of "motion correction" method as well as a detailed account of the behavior and variation of the error due to different sensor components alone and in combination with each other. The analysis can be used to obtain insights in to optimal utilization of available components for achieving the best results.

  9. Higher-order aberrations and best-corrected visual acuity in Native American children with a high prevalence of astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph M; Harvey, Erin M; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in children from a highly astigmatic population differ from population norms and whether HOAs are associated with astigmatism and reduced best-corrected visual acuity. Subjects were 218 Tohono O'odham Native American children 5-9 years of age. Noncycloplegic HOA measurements were obtained with a handheld Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS). Signed (z06s to z14s) and unsigned (z06u to z14u) wavefront aberration Zernike coefficients Z(3,-3) to Z(4,4) were rescaled for a 4 mm diameter pupil and compared to adult population norms. Cycloplegic refraction and best-corrected logMAR letter visual acuity (BCVA) were also measured. Regression analyses assessed the contribution of astigmatism (J0) and HOAs to BCVA. The mean root-mean-square (RMS) HOA of 0.191 ± 0.072 μm was significantly greater than population norms (0.100 ± 0.044 μm). All unsigned HOA coefficients (z06u to z14u) and all signed coefficients except z09s, z10s, and z11s were significantly larger than population norms. Decreased BCVA was associated with astigmatism (J0) and spherical aberration (z12u) but not RMS coma, with the effect of J0 about 4 times as great as z12u. Tohono O'odham children show elevated HOAs compared to population norms. Astigmatism and unsigned spherical aberration are associated with decreased acuity, but the effects of spherical aberration are minimal and not clinically significant. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phantom evaluation of a cardiac SPECT/VCT system that uses a common set of solid-state detectors for both emission and transmission scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Conwell, Richard; Kindem, Joel; Babla, Hetal; Gurley, Mike; De Los Santos, Romer; Old, Rex; Weatherhead, Randy; Arram, Samia; Maddahi, Jamshid

    2010-06-01

    We developed a cardiac SPECT system (X-ACT) with low dose volume CT transmission-based attenuation correction (AC). Three solid-state detectors are configured to form a triple-head system for emission scans and reconfigured to form a 69-cm field-of-view detector arc for transmission scans. A near mono-energetic transmission line source is produced from the collimated fluorescence x-ray emitted from a lead target when the target is illuminated by a narrow polychromatic x-ray beam from an x-ray tube. Transmission scans can be completed in 1 min with insignificant patient dose (deep dose equivalent used phantom studies to evaluate (1) the accuracy of the reconstructed attenuation maps, (2) the effect of AC on image uniformity, and (3) the effect of AC on defect contrast (DC). The phantoms we used included an ACR phantom, an anthropomorphic phantom with a uniform cardiac insert, and an anthropomorphic phantom with two defects in the cardiac insert. The reconstructed attenuation coefficient of water at 140 keV was .150 +/- .003/cm in the uniform region of the ACR phantom, .151 +/- .003/cm and .151 +/- .002/cm in the liver and cardiac regions of the anthropomorphic phantom. The ACR phantom images with AC showed correction of the bowing effect due to attenuation in the images without AC (NC). The 17-segment scores of the images of the uniform cardiac insert were 78.3 +/- 6.5 before and 87.9 +/- 3.3 after AC (average +/- standard deviation). The inferior-to-anterior wall ratio and the septal-to-lateral wall ratio were .99 and 1.16 before and 1.02 and 1.00 after AC. The DC of the two defects was .528 and .156 before and .628 and .173 after AC. The X-ACT system generated accurate attenuation maps with 1-minute transmission scans. AC improved image quality and uniformity over NC.

  11. Index mismatch aberration correction over long working distances using spatial light modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick; Bonn, Mischa; Domke, Katrin F

    2012-11-20

    For many microscopy applications, millimeters-long free working distances (LWD) are required. However, the high resolution and contrast of LWD objectives operated in air are lost when introducing glass and/or liquid with the sample. We propose to use spatial light modulation to correct for such beam aberrations caused by refractive index mismatches. Focusing a monochromatic laser beam with a 10 mm working distance air objective (50×, 0.5 NA) through air, glass, and water, we manage to restore a sharp, intense focus (FWHMLWD air objectives, extending their usage beyond applications in air.

  12. Is attenuation correction of myocardial SPET scans worth the effort?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.; Saunders, C.; Dixson, H.; Cook, P.; Burnett, P.; Croll, F.; Dunn, R.; Hasche, E.; Kelleher, P.; Nasser, F.; Wilson, D.; Lee, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In this prospective study, we compared gated (GS), attenuation-corrected (AC) and non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) myocardial SPET scans. 119 consecutive patients were scanned after 800 MBq 99 Tc m -Sestamibi (MIBI) injected at peak stress. AC studies were performed using a Siemens Multispect 3 triple-headed camera with a MμSIC attenuation correction system. Transmission data were provided by an Am241 line source mounted opposite an offset fan beam collimator. Simultaneous emission data were collected from all 3 heads over a 360deg rotation (acquisition time 25 min). The NAC and GS studies were performed using a Siemens ECAM variable-angle dual-headed gamma camera using 8 gating frames over a 90deg rotation (acquisition time 15 min). The myocardium was divided into 9 segments and the studies were reported separately by two observers. Clinical data and angiography results were obtained when available. For GS, myocardial segments with normal systolic wall thickening were considered to have normal perfusion. AC studies were used as the standard for measuring myocardial perfusion. In the 119 patients studied, the overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for NAC vs AC were 100%, 25%, 54% and for GS vs AC were 86%, 84% and 85% respectively. There were 265 abnormal segments on NAC. GS demonstrated normal thickening in 90/265 segments and AC demonstrated normal perfusion in 94/265 segments. There were 33 segments with discordant GS and AC. 16/33 segments (9 inferior, 3 anterior, 4 other) with normal thickening had abnormal perfusion on AC and 17/33 segments (9 inferior, 6 anterior, 2 other) with abnormal thickening had normal perfusion on AC. Weight and sex did not predict discordance. In conclusion, attenuation artefacts are common and are not predicted by body habitus or sex. They are usually accurately identified by normal systolic wall thickening on GS. GS is strongly recommended when AC is not available. AC provides additional information, particularly

  13. Depth sectioning using electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A J; Findlay, S D; Allen, L J; Cosgriff, E C; Kirkland, A I; Nellist, P D; Oxley, M P

    2008-01-01

    The continued development of electron probe aberration correctors for scanning transmission electron microscopy has enabled finer electron probes, allowing atomic resolution column-by-column electron energy loss spectroscopy. Finer electron probes have also led to a decrease in the probe depth of focus, facilitating optical slicing or depth sectioning of samples. The inclusion of post specimen aberration corrected image forming lenses allows for scanning confocal electron microscopy with further improved depth resolution and selectivity. We show that in both scanning transmission electron microscopy and scanning confocal electron microscopy geometries, by performing a three dimensional raster scan through a specimen and detecting electrons scattered with a characteristic energy loss, it will be possible to determine the location of isolated impurities embedded within the bulk.

  14. Bulk sample self-attenuation correction by transmission measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.L.; Reilly, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Various methods used in either finding or avoiding the attenuation correction in the passive γ-ray assay of bulk samples are reviewed. Detailed consideration is given to the transmission method, which involves experimental determination of the sample linear attenuation coefficient by measuring the transmission through the sample of a beam of gamma rays from an external source. The method was applied to box- and cylindrically-shaped samples

  15. Attenuation correction using simultaneous emission - transmission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.; Marinkovic, P.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce degrading influence of attenuation on SPECT image quality, possibility for correction, based on simultaneous emission / transmission measurements, is discussed. Numerical photon transport simulations through the phantom and acquisition of of tomographic projections are performed by using Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. Amount of contamination in transmission data due to photon Compton scattering for emission energy window is specially analyzed and appropriate spatial depending 'noise / signal' factors for three different external sources, applied with Tc-99m, are determined (author)

  16. Third-rank chromatic aberrations of electron lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixiong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper the third-rank chromatic aberration coefficients of round electron lenses are analytically derived and numerically calculated by Mathematica. Furthermore, the numerical results are cross-checked by the differential algebraic (DA) method, which verifies that all the formulas for the third-rank chromatic aberration coefficients are completely correct. It is hoped that this work would be helpful for further chromatic aberration correction in electron microscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduction of chromatic aberration influences in vertical scanning white-light interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Kühnhold, Peter; Xie, Weichang

    2014-01-01

    Vertical scanning white-light interferometry (SWLI) is a well-established method that is widely used in high precision surface topography measurement. However, SWLI results show characteristic slope-dependent errors due to dispersion effects and lateral chromatic aberrations of the optical imaging system. In this paper, we present methods to characterize these systematic errors related to dispersion and lateral colour. Lateral colour leads to field-dependent systematic discrepancies of the topography data obtained from the envelope position of a low-coherence interference signal and the data resulting from its interference phase. Hence, an erroneous fringe order obtained from the envelope position leads to a 2π phase jump and thus to a so-called ghost step in the measured topography. Our first approach to solve this problem is based on the measurement of a surface standard of well-known geometry. By comparison of measurement results related to the envelope position and the phase of SWLI signals, the systematic error is estimated and a numerical error compensation method is proposed. Both experimental and simulation results confirm the validity of this numerical method. In addition, using an improved design of a white-light Michelson interferometer we demonstrate experimentally that lateral chromatic aberrations and dispersion influences can be reduced also in a physical way. In this context, a conventional long working distance microscope objective is used which was not originally designed for a Michelson interference microscope. (paper)

  18. Design and commissioning of an aberration-corrected ultrafast spin-polarized low energy electron microscope with multiple electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weishi; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Feng, Jun; Kunze, Kai; Schaff, Oliver; Tromp, Ruud; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2017-03-01

    We describe the design and commissioning of a novel aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (AC-LEEM). A third magnetic prism array (MPA) is added to the standard AC-LEEM with two prism arrays, allowing the incorporation of an ultrafast spin-polarized electron source alongside the standard cold field emission electron source, without degrading spatial resolution. The high degree of symmetries of the AC-LEEM are utilized while we design the electron optics of the ultrafast spin-polarized electron source, so as to minimize the deleterious effect of time broadening, while maintaining full control of electron spin. A spatial resolution of 2nm and temporal resolution of 10ps (ps) are expected in the future time resolved aberration-corrected spin-polarized LEEM (TR-AC-SPLEEM). The commissioning of the three-prism AC-LEEM has been successfully finished with the cold field emission source, with a spatial resolution below 2nm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization and stability of the contrast transfer function in aberration-corrected electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromp, R.M.; Schramm, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    The Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) describes the manner in which the electron microscope modifies the object exit wave function as a result of objective lens aberrations. For optimum resolution in C 3 -corrected microscopes it is well established that a small negative value of C 3 , offset by positive values of C 5 and defocus C 1 results in the most optimal instrument resolution, and optimization of the CTF has been the subject of several studies. Here we describe a simple design procedure for the CTF that results in a most even transfer of information below the resolution limit. We address not only the resolution of the instrument, but also the stability of the CTF in the presence of small disturbances in C 1 and C 3 . We show that resolution can be traded for stability in a rational and transparent fashion. These topics are discussed quantitatively for both weak-phase and strong-phase (or amplitude) objects. The results apply equally to instruments at high electron energy (TEM) and at very low electron energy (LEEM), as the basic optical properties of the imaging lenses are essentially identical. - Highlights: ► An optimized Contrast Transfer Function for aberration corrected electron microscopes is proposed. ► Based on the properties of the CTF near optimum settings, we address its stability. ► Over some range of parameters resolution can be traded for stability. ► These issues are addressed for weak-phase objects, as well as strong-phase and amplitude object. ► We compare our results with CTF settings previously proposed

  20. Progress toward an aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope for DNA sequencing and surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar; N'diaye, Alpha T; Schmid, Andreas K; Persson, Henrik H J; Davis, Ronald W

    2012-11-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel imaging technique aimed at high resolution imaging of macromolecules, nanoparticles, and surfaces. MAD-LEEM combines three innovative electron-optical concepts in a single tool: a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, and dual electron beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector is needed to achieve subnanometer resolution at landing energies of a few hundred electronvolts. The dual flood illumination approach eliminates charging effects generated when a conventional, single-beam LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. The low landing energy of electrons in the range of 0 to a few hundred electronvolts is also critical for avoiding radiation damage, as high energy electrons with kilo-electron-volt kinetic energies cause irreversible damage to many specimens, in particular biological molecules. The performance of the key electron-optical components of MAD-LEEM, the aberration corrector combined with the objective lens and a magnetic beam separator, was simulated. Initial results indicate that an electrostatic electron mirror has negative spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients that can be tuned over a large parameter range. The negative aberrations generated by the electron mirror can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies and provide a path to achieving subnanometer spatial resolution. First experimental results on characterizing DNA molecules immobilized on Au substrates in a LEEM are presented. Images obtained in a spin-polarized LEEM demonstrate that high contrast is achievable at low electron energies in the range of 1-10 eV and show that small changes in landing energy have a strong impact on the achievable contrast. The MAD-LEEM approach

  1. Geometrical E-beam proximity correction for raster scan systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belic, Nikola; Eisenmann, Hans; Hartmann, Hans; Waas, Thomas

    1999-04-01

    High pattern fidelity is a basic requirement for the generation of masks containing sub micro structures and for direct writing. Increasing needs mainly emerging from OPC at mask level and x-ray lithography require a correction of the e-beam proximity effect. The most part of e-beam writers are raster scan system. This paper describes a new method for geometrical pattern correction in order to provide a correction solution for e-beam system that are not able to apply variable doses.

  2. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Compensation of aberrations of deflected electron probe by means of dynamical focusing with stigmator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Norio; Ebe, Toyoe; Ikehata, Koichi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Terada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Electron beam passing through a deflecting field is in general, subjected to aberrations such as distortion, astigmatism and coma in accordance with the deflecting angle. Accordingly the aberration defect of deflected beam is the most serious limiting factor in the performances of micromachining, microminiaturization and high resolution scanning electron microscopes. From many investigators' results, it is obvious that three important compensation methods to aberrations exist in principle, i.e., double deflection system, dynamical focusing, and the dynamical correction using a stigmator. In this paper, based on the aberration formula derived from the eikonal or the path method, the practical data of the aberration constants of deflected electron beam for the sequential deflection system with parallel plates are calculated, and using its result, the distorted spot patterns of an electron probe deflected in two-dimensional directions for various defocusings are graphically displayed by the aid of a computer. Further, by means of the dynamical focusing with a stigmator, the conditions to completely compensate the second order astigmatic aberration are derived, and spot patterns and the electron density distributions within the spots in the case when the compensating conditions are satisfied are also graphically displayed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Effect of aberrations in human eye on contrast sensitivity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Wang, Feng-lin; Wang, Zhao-qi

    2011-06-01

    The quantitative analysis of the effect of aberrations in human eye on vision has important clinical value in the correction of aberrations. The wave-front aberrations of human eyes were measured with the Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor and modulation transfer function (MTF) was computed from the wave-front aberrations. Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was obtained from MTF and the retinal aerial image modulation (AIM). It is shown that the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Zernike aberrations deteriorate contrast sensitivity function. When the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Zernike aberrations are corrected high contrast sensitivity function can be obtained.

  5. A weighted least-squares lump correction algorithm for transmission-corrected gamma-ray nondestructive assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Sheppard, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    With transmission-corrected gamma-ray nondestructive assay instruments such as the Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) and the Tomographic Gamma Scanner (TGS) that is currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the amount of gamma-ray emitting material can be underestimated for samples in which the emitting material consists of particles or lumps of highly attenuating material. This problem is encountered in the assay of uranium and plutonium-bearing samples. To correct for this source of bias, we have developed a least-squares algorithm that uses transmission-corrected assay results for several emitted energies and a weighting function to account for statistical uncertainties in the assay results. The variation of effective lump size in the fitted model is parameterized; this allows the correction to be performed for a wide range of lump-size distributions. It may be possible to use the reduced chi-squared value obtained in the fit to identify samples in which assay assumptions have been violated. We found that the algorithm significantly reduced bias in simulated assays and improved SGS assay results for plutonium-bearing samples. Further testing will be conducted with the TGS, which is expected to be less susceptible than the SGS to systematic source of bias

  6. Study the microstructure of three and four component phases in Al-Ni-Fe-La alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kolobylina, Natalia; Vasiliev, Alexander; Lopatin, Sergei; Presniakov, Mikhail; Bakhteeva, Natalia; Ivanova, Anna; Todorova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    in air were studied by scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructural analyses were performed in a aberration corrected TITAN 80-300 TEM/STEM (FEI, USA

  7. Segmented attenuation correction using artificial neural networks in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.K.; Nahmias, C.

    1996-01-01

    The measured attenuation correction technique is widely used in cardiac positron tomographic studies. However, the success of this technique is limited because of insufficient counting statistics achievable in practical transmission scan times, and of the scattered radiation in transmission measurement which leads to an underestimation of the attenuation coefficients. In this work, a segmented attenuation correction technique has been developed that uses artificial neural networks. The technique has been validated in phantoms and verified in human studies. The results indicate that attenuation coefficients measured in the segmented transmission image are accurate and reproducible. Activity concentrations measured in the reconstructed emission image can also be recovered accurately using this new technique. The accuracy of the technique is subject independent and insensitive to scatter contamination in the transmission data. This technique has the potential of reducing the transmission scan time, and satisfactory results are obtained if the transmission data contain about 400 000 true counts per plane. It can predict accurately the value of any attenuation coefficient in the range from air to water in a transmission image with or without scatter correction. (author)

  8. Defect imaging and channeling studies using channeling scanning transmission ion microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, PJC; Breese, MBH; Smulders, PJM; Wilshaw, PR; Grime, GW

    The technique of channeling scanning transmission ion microscopy (CSTIM) can be used to produce images of individual crystal defects (such as dislocations and stacking faults) using the scanned, focused ion beam from a nuclear microprobe. As well as offering a new method for studies of crystal

  9. Mask-induced aberration in EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Sato, Takashi; Inanami, Ryoichi; Nakasugi, Tetsuro; Higashiki, Tatsuhiko

    2009-04-01

    We estimated aberrations using Zernike sensitivity analysis. We found the difference of the tolerated aberration with line direction for illumination. The tolerated aberration of perpendicular line for illumination is much smaller than that of parallel line. We consider this difference to be attributable to the mask 3D effect. We call it mask-induced aberration. In the case of the perpendicular line for illumination, there was a difference in CD between right line and left line without aberration. In this report, we discuss the possibility of pattern formation in NA 0.25 generation EUV lithography tool. In perpendicular pattern for EUV light, the dominant part of aberration is mask-induced aberration. In EUV lithography, pattern correction based on the mask topography effect will be more important.

  10. Scanning transmission ion micro-tomography (STIM-T) of biological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwertner, Michael; Sakellariou, Arthur; Reinert, Tilo; Butz, Tilman

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was applied to sets of Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) projections recorded at the LIPSION ion beam laboratory (Leipzig) in order to visualize the 3D-mass distribution in several specimens. Examples for a test structure (copper grid) and for biological specimens (cartilage cells, cygospore) are shown. Scanning Transmission Micro-Tomography (STIM-T) at a resolution of 260 nm was demonstrated for the first time. Sub-micron features of the Cu-grid specimen were verified by scanning electron microscopy. The ion energy loss measured during a STIM-T experiment is related to the mass density of the specimen. Typically, biological specimens can be analysed without staining. Only shock freezing and freeze-drying is required to preserve the ultra-structure of the specimen. The radiation damage to the specimen during the experiment can be neglected. This is an advantage compared to other techniques like X-ray micro-tomography. At present, the spatial resolution is limited by beam position fluctuations and specimen vibrations

  11. Effects of ocular aberrations on contrast detection in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Liu, Rong; Dai, Yun; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2012-08-06

    We use adaptive optics (AO) techniques to manipulate the ocular aberrations and elucidate the effects of these ocular aberrations on contrast detection in a noisy background. The detectability of sine wave gratings at frequencies of 4, 8, and 16 circles per degree (cpd) was measured in a standard two-interval force-choice staircase procedure against backgrounds of various levels of white noise. The observer's ocular aberrations were either corrected with AO or left uncorrected. In low levels of external noise, contrast detection thresholds are always lowered by AO correction, whereas in high levels of external noise, they are generally elevated by AO correction. Higher levels of external noise are required to make this threshold elevation observable when signal spatial frequencies increase from 4 to 16 cpd. The linear-amplifier-model fit shows that mostly sampling efficiency and equivalent noise both decrease with AO correction. Our findings indicate that ocular aberrations could be beneficial for contrast detection in high-level noises. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future.

  13. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  14. Survival and transmission of symmetrical chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, J.R.K.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction between the lesions to produce chromosomal structural changes may be either asymmetrical (A) or symmetrical (S). In A, one or more acentric fragments are always produced, and there may also be the mechanical separation problems resulting from bridges at anaphase, while S-changes never produce fragment, and pose no mechanical problem in cell division. If A and S events occur with equal frequency, it might be an indication that they are truly the alternative modes of lesion interaction. Unstimulated lymphocytes were irradiated with 2.68 Gy 250 kV X-ray, and metaphases were sampled at 50 h after the stimulation. Preparations were complete diploid cells, and any obvious second division cells were rejected. So far as dermal repair and fibroblast functions are concerned, aberration burden seems to have little consequence from the view-point of the long-term survival in vivo. Large numbers of aberrations (mainly S translocation and terminal deletion) were found in the samples taken up to 60 years after therapy. Skin biopsies were removed 1 day and 6 months after irradiation and cultured. In irradiated cells, reciprocal translocations dominated, followed by terminal deletions, then inversions, while no chromosome-type aberration was seen in the control cells. a) The relative occurrence of A : S changes, b) long-term survival in vivo, c) the possibility of in vivo repair, and d) some unusual features of translocation found in Syrian hamsters are reviewed. The relevance or importance of major S events is clearly dependent upon the cells, the tissues or the organisms in which they occur. (Yamashita, S.)

  15. Rooting Out Aberrant Behavior in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalis, Jerry, Jr.; Paquin, Dave

    1989-01-01

    Discusses aberrant, or disruptive, behavior in an industrial/business, classroom-based, instructor-led training setting. Three examples of aberrant behavior are described, typical case studies are provided for each, and preventive (long-term) and corrective (on-the-spot) strategies for dealing with the problems are discussed. (LRW)

  16. Secure and Reliable IPTV Multimedia Transmission Using Forward Error Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Huang Shih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the wide deployment of Internet Protocol (IP infrastructure and rapid development of digital technologies, Internet Protocol Television (IPTV has emerged as one of the major multimedia access techniques. A general IPTV transmission system employs both encryption and forward error correction (FEC to provide the authorized subscriber with a high-quality perceptual experience. This two-layer processing, however, complicates the system design in terms of computational cost and management cost. In this paper, we propose a novel FEC scheme to ensure the secure and reliable transmission for IPTV multimedia content and services. The proposed secure FEC utilizes the characteristics of FEC including the FEC-encoded redundancies and the limitation of error correction capacity to protect the multimedia packets against the malicious attacks and data transmission errors/losses. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme obtains similar performance compared with the joint encryption and FEC scheme.

  17. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Myung-Geun, E-mail: mghan@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Garlow, Joseph A. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marshall, Matthew S.J.; Tiano, Amanda L. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) are demonstrated in STEM mode combined with in situ electrical biasing in a TEM. • Electrostatic potential maps in ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC data. • Simultaneous EBIC and active SE-VC performed with atomic resolution STEM are demonstrated. - Abstract: The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fields and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.

  18. Outline of an ultracorrector compensating for all primary chromatic and geometrical aberrations of charged-particle lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Harald

    2004-01-01

    A novel ultracorrector is outlined which compensates for the primary and secondary first-order chromatic aberrations and all third-order geometrical aberrations of electron optical systems with a straight axis. Owing to the imposed symmetry conditions on the fields and the paraxial fundamental rays, the corrector does not introduce aberrations with 2-fold symmetry. The chromatic aberrations are corrected by means of crossed electric magnetic quadrupoles while the third-order geometrical aberrations are eliminated by octopoles. By placing these elements at distinct positions within the corrector, it is possible to successively eliminate the third-order aberrations in such a way that each subsequent correction does not affect the aberrations corrected in the preceding correction steps

  19. Correção das aberrações oculares nos retratamentos de LASIK personalizado e convencional Correction of ocular aberrations in custom and standard LASIK retreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Peltier Urbano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a correção das aberrações oculares nos retratamentos de LASIK personalizado e convencional. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo prospectivo, randomizado, de 74 olhos de 37 pacientes submetidos ao retratamento de LASIK para correção de miopia e astigmatismo. Cada paciente foi submetido ao retratamento de LASIK personalizado Zyoptix (Bausch & Lomb em um olho e convencional Planoscan (Bausch & Lomb no olho contralateral. Foi comparada a correção das aberrações oculares nos retratamentos personalizado e convencional. RESULTADOS: No sexto mês pós-operatório, os olhos submetidos ao retratamento Zyoptix apresentaram diminuição estatisticamente significativa do defocus, astigmatismo, coma, aberração esférica, segunda ordem, terceira ordem, alta ordem e aberrações totais. Os olhos submetidos ao retratamento Planoscan apresentaram diminuição estatisticamente significativa do defocus, segunda ordem e aberrações totais. CONCLUSÕES: O retratamento personalizado foi superior ao retratamento convencional para a correção das aberrações oculares de baixa e alta ordens.PURPOSE: To compare the correction of ocular aberrations between custom and standard LASIK retreatment. METHODS: Prospective, randomized trial with paired eye control of 74 eyes from 37 patients who underwent LASIK retreatment. Each patient underwent retreatment using Zyoptix LASIK (Bausch & Lomb in 1 eye and Planoscan LASIK (Bausch & Lomb in the fellow eye. Correction of ocular aberrations was compared between custom and standard LASIK retreatments. RESULTS: At 6 months, there was a statistically significant reduction in defocus, astigmatism, coma, spherical aberration, second, third, higher-order and total aberration in Zyoptix eyes. There was a statistically significant reduction in defocus, second-order and total aberration in Planoscan eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Custom retreatment was statistically superior than standard retreatment for correction of lower

  20. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  1. Deep Tissue Wavefront Estimation for Sensorless Aberration Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahimovic Emina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple light scattering in biological tissues limits the measurement depth for traditional wavefront sensor. The attenuated ballistic light and the background noise caused by the diffuse light give low signal to noise ratio for wavefront measurement. To overcome this issue, we introduced a wavefront estimation method based on a ray tracing algorithm to overcome this issue. With the knowledge of the refractive index of the medium, the wavefront is estimated by calculating optical path length of rays from the target inside of the samples. This method can provide not only the information of spherical aberration from the refractive-index mismatch between the medium and biological sample but also other aberrations caused by the irregular interface between them. Simulations based on different configurations are demonstrated in this paper.

  2. Higher order aberrations in amblyopic children and their role in refractory amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Dias-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Some studies have hypothesized that an unfavourable higher order aberrometric profile could act as an amblyogenic mechanism and may be responsible for some amblyopic cases that are refractory to conventional treatment or cases of “idiopathic” amblyopia. This study compared the aberrometric profile in amblyopic children to that of children with normal visual development and compared the aberrometric profile in corrected amblyopic eyes and refractory amblyopic eyes with that of healthy eyes. Methods: Cross-sectional study with three groups of children – the CA group (22 eyes of 11 children with unilateral corrected amblyopia, the RA group (24 eyes of 13 children with unilateral refractory amblyopia and the C group (28 eyes of 14 children with normal visual development. Higher order aberrations were evaluated using an OPD-Scan III (NIDEK. Comparisons of the aberrometric profile were made between these groups as well as between the amblyopic and healthy eyes within the CA and RA groups. Results: Higher order aberrations with greater impact in visual quality were not significantly higher in the CA and RA groups when compared with the C group. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in the higher order aberrometric profile between the amblyopic and healthy eyes within the CA and RA groups. Conclusions: Contrary to lower order aberrations (e.g., myopia, hyperopia, primary astigmatism, higher order aberrations do not seem to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of amblyopia. Therefore, these are likely not the cause of most cases of refractory amblyopia.

  3. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. X-ray-based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Beyer, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    A synergy of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners is the use of the CT data for x-ray-based attenuation correction of the PET emission data. Current methods of measuring transmission use positron sources, gamma-ray sources, or x-ray sources. Each of the types of transmission scans involves different trade-offs of noise versus bias, with positron transmission scans having the highest noise but lowest bias, whereas x-ray scans have negligible noise but the potential for increased quantitative errors. The use of x-ray-based attenuation correction, however, has other advantages, including a lack of bias introduced from post-injection transmission scanning, which is an important practical consideration for clinical scanners, as well as reduced scan times. The sensitivity of x-ray-based attenuation correction to artifacts and quantitative errors depends on the method of translating the CT image from the effective x-ray energy of approximately 70 keV to attenuation coefficients at the PET energy of 511 keV. These translation methods are usually based on segmentation and/or scaling techniques. Errors in the PET emission image arise from positional mismatches caused by patient motion or respiration differences between the PET and CT scans; incorrect calculation of attenuation coefficients for CT contrast agents or metallic implants; or keeping the patient's arms in the field of view, which leads to truncation and/or beam-hardening (or x-ray scatter) artifacts. Proper interpretation of PET emission images corrected for attenuation by using the CT image relies on an understanding of the potential artifacts. In cases where an artifact or bias is suspected, careful inspection of all three available images (CT and PET emission with and without attenuation correction) is recommended. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Elemental mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Lugg, N R; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss atomic resolution chemical mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and also on energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) imaging. Chemical mapping using EELS can yield counterintuitive results which, however, can be understood using first principles calculations. Experimental chemical maps based on EDX bear out the thesis that such maps are always likely to be directly interpretable. This can be explained in terms of the local nature of the effective optical potential for ionization under those imaging conditions. This is followed by an excursion into the complementary technique of elemental mapping using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in a conventional transmission electron microscope. We will then consider the widely used technique of Z-contrast or high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, which is based on phonon excitation, where it has recently been shown that intensity variations can be placed on an absolute scale by normalizing the measured intensities to the incident beam. Results, showing excellent agreement between theory and experiment to within a few percent, are shown for Z-contrast imaging from a sample of PbWO 4 .

  7. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, Timothy J., E-mail: tpennycook@gmail.com [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lupini, Andrew R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Yang, Hao [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Murfitt, Matthew F. [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Jones, Lewys [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D. [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested.

  8. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  9. Aberration characteristics of immersion lenses for LVSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the on-axis aberration characteristics of various immersion objective lenses for low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM). A simple aperture lens model is used to generate smooth axial field distributions. The simulation results show that mixed field electric-magnetic immersion lenses are predicted to have between 1.5 and 2 times smaller aberration limited probe diameters than their pure-field counterparts. At a landing energy of 1 keV, mixed field immersion lenses operating at the vacuum electrical field breakdown limit are predicted to have on-axis aberration coefficients between 50 and 60 μm, yielding an ultimate image resolution of below 1 nm. These aberrations lie in the same range as those for LVSEM systems that employ aberration correctors

  10. 3D scanning based mold correction for planar and cylindrical parts in aluminum die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Seno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum die casting is an important manufacturing process for mechanical components. Die casting is known to be more accurate than other types of casting; however, post-machining is usually necessary to achieve the required accuracy. The goal of this investigation is to develop machining- free aluminum die casting. Improvement of the accuracy of planar and cylindrical parts is expected by correcting metal molds. In the proposed method, the shape of cast aluminum made with the initial metal molds is measured by 3D scanning. The 3D scan data includes information about deformations that occur during casting. Therefore, it is possible to estimate the deformation and correction amounts by comparing 3D scan data with product computer-aided design (CAD data. We corrected planar and cylindrical parts of the CAD data for the mold. In addition, we corrected the planar part of the metal mold using the corrected mold data. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by evaluating the accuracy improvement of the cast aluminum made with the corrected mold.

  11. Optimization of transmission-scan time for the FixER method: a MR-based PET attenuation correction with a weak fixed-position external radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kershaw, Jeff; Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shiraishi, Takahiro [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suga, Mikio [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University (Japan); Obata, Takayuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-07-29

    In recent work, we proposed an MRI-based attenuation-coefficient (μ-value) estimation method that uses a weak fixed-position external radiation source to construct an attenuation map for PET/MRI. In this presentation we refer to this method as FixER, and perform a series of simulations to investigate the duration of the transmission scan required to accurately estimate μ-values.

  12. Optimization of transmission-scan time for the FixER method: a MR-based PET attenuation correction with a weak fixed-position external radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kershaw, Jeff; Yoshida, Eiji; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Suga, Mikio; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-01-01

    In recent work, we proposed an MRI-based attenuation-coefficient (μ-value) estimation method that uses a weak fixed-position external radiation source to construct an attenuation map for PET/MRI. In this presentation we refer to this method as FixER, and perform a series of simulations to investigate the duration of the transmission scan required to accurately estimate μ-values.

  13. Brillouin micro-spectroscopy through aberrations via sensorless adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrei, Eitan; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2018-04-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy is a powerful optical technique for non-contact viscoelastic characterizations which has recently found applications in three-dimensional mapping of biological samples. Brillouin spectroscopy performances are rapidly degraded by optical aberrations and have therefore been limited to homogenous transparent samples. In this work, we developed an adaptive optics (AO) configuration designed for Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to engineer the incident wavefront and correct for aberrations. Our configuration does not require direct wavefront sensing and the injection of a "guide-star"; hence, it can be implemented without the need for sample pre-treatment. We used our AO-Brillouin spectrometer in aberrated phantoms and biological samples and obtained improved precision and resolution of Brillouin spectral analysis; we demonstrated 2.5-fold enhancement in Brillouin signal strength and 1.4-fold improvement in axial resolution because of the correction of optical aberrations.

  14. Towards sub-0.5 A electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivanek, O.L.; Nellist, P.D.; Dellby, N.; Murfitt, M.F.; Szilagyi, Z

    2003-09-15

    In the 4 years since the previous meeting in the SALSA series, aberration correction has progressed from a promising concept to a powerful research tool. We summarize the factors that have enabled 100-120 kV scanning transmission electron microscopes to achieve sub-A resolution, and to increase the current available in an atom-sized probe by a factor of 10 and more. Once C{sub s} is corrected, fifth-order spherical aberration (C{sub 5}) and chromatic aberration (C{sub c}) pose new limits on resolution. We describe a quadrupole/octupole corrector of a new design, which will correct all fifth-order aberrations while introducing less than 0.2 mm of additional C{sub c}. Coupled to an optimized STEM column, the new corrector promises to lead to routine sub-A electron probes at 100 kV, and to sub-0.5 A probes at higher operating voltages.

  15. Scatter measurement and correction method for cone-beam CT based on single grating scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuidong; Shi, Wenlong; Wang, Xinyu; Dong, Yin; Chang, Taoqi; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Dinghua

    2017-06-01

    In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems based on flat-panel detector imaging, the presence of scatter significantly reduces the quality of slices. Based on the concept of collimation, this paper presents a scatter measurement and correction method based on single grating scan. First, according to the characteristics of CBCT imaging, the scan method using single grating and the design requirements of the grating are analyzed and figured out. Second, by analyzing the composition of object projection images and object-and-grating projection images, the processing method for the scatter image at single projection angle is proposed. In addition, to avoid additional scan, this paper proposes an angle interpolation method of scatter images to reduce scan cost. Finally, the experimental results show that the scatter images obtained by this method are accurate and reliable, and the effect of scatter correction is obvious. When the additional object-and-grating projection images are collected and interpolated at intervals of 30 deg, the scatter correction error of slices can still be controlled within 3%.

  16. Aberration compensation using a spatial light modulator LCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amezquita, R; Rincon, O; Torres, Y M

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic correction of aberrations introduced in optical systems have been a widely discussed topic in the past 10 years. Adaptive optics is the most important developed field where the Shack-Hartmann sensors and deformable mirrors are used for the measurement and correction of wavefronts. In this paper, an interferometric set-up which uses a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) as an active element is proposed. Using this SLM a procedure for the compensation of all phase aberrations present in the experimental setup is shown.

  17. Simulation of eye-tracker latency, spot size, and ablation pulse depth on the correction of higher order wavefront aberrations with scanning spot laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueeler, Michael; Mrochen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this theoretical work was to investigate the robustness of scanning spot laser treatments with different laser spot diameters and peak ablation depths in case of incomplete compensation of eye movements due to eye-tracker latency. Scanning spot corrections of 3rd to 5th Zernike order wavefront errors were numerically simulated. Measured eye-movement data were used to calculate the positioning error of each laser shot assuming eye-tracker latencies of 0, 5, 30, and 100 ms, and for the case of no eye tracking. The single spot ablation depth ranged from 0.25 to 1.0 microm and the spot diameter from 250 to 1000 microm. The quality of the ablation was rated by the postoperative surface variance and the Strehl intensity ratio, which was calculated after a low-pass filter was applied to simulate epithelial surface smoothing. Treatments performed with nearly ideal eye tracking (latency approximately 0) provide the best results with a small laser spot (0.25 mm) and a small ablation depth (250 microm). However, combinations of a large spot diameter (1000 microm) and a small ablation depth per pulse (0.25 microm) yield the better results for latencies above a certain threshold to be determined specifically. Treatments performed with tracker latencies in the order of 100 ms yield similar results as treatments done completely without eye-movement compensation. CONCWSIONS: Reduction of spot diameter was shown to make the correction more susceptible to eye movement induced error. A smaller spot size is only beneficial when eye movement is neutralized with a tracking system with a latency <5 ms.

  18. Use of Gamma Correction Pinhole Bone Scans in Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Youg Whee; Chung, Youg An; Park, Jung Mee

    2012-01-01

    99 mTc hydroxydiphosphonate (HDP) bone scanning is a classic metabolic nuclear imaging method and the most frequently performed examination. Clinically, it has long been cherished as an indispensable diagnostic screening tool and for monitoring of patients with bone, joint, and soft tissue diseases. The HDP bone scan, the pinhole scan in particular, is known for its ability to detect increased, decreased, or defective tracer uptake along with magnified anatomy. Unfortunately, however, the findings of such uptake changes are not specific in many traumatic bone disorders, especially when lesions are minute and complex. This study discusses the recently introduced gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS), emphasizing its usefulness in the diagnosis of traumatic bone diseases including occult fractures; and fish vertebra. Indeed, GCPBS can remarkably enhance the diagnostic feasibility of HDP pinhole bone scans by refining the topography, pathologic anatomy, and altered chemical profile of the traumatic diseases in question. The fine and precise depiction of anatomic and metabolic changes in these diseases has been shown to be unique to GCPBS, and they are not appreciated on conventional radiographs, multiple detector CT, or ultrasonographs. It is true that MR imaging can portray proton change, but understandably, it is a manifestation that is common to any bone disease

  19. Scanning transmission ion microscopy on Fudan SPM facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongqiang; Shen Hao; Zheng Yi; Li Xinyi; Liu Bo; Satoh Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report a novel measurement system based on the development of Fudan Scanning Proton Microscopy (SPM) facility. By using Si-PIN diode(Hamamatsu S1223-01) detector, scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) measurement system has been set up. It can provide density and structural images with high probing efficiency and non-destruction by utilizing the energy loss of high energy (MeV) and focused ions penetrating through a thin sample. STIM measurement is able to map the density distribution of organic elements which mostly compose biology materials, such information can not be detected by using conventional Be-windowed Si (Li) X-ray detector in Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. The spatial resolution capability of STIM is higher than PIXE technique at same accelerator status. As a result of STIM measurement, Paramecium attached on the top of Kapton tube was measured by STIM. (authors)

  20. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  1. Characterization of catalysts by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targos, W.M.; Bradley, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an integral tool for characterizing catalysts because of its unique ability to image and analyze nanosized volumes. This information is valuable in optimizing catalyst formulations and determining causes for reduced catalyst performance. For many commercial catalysts direct correlations between structural features of metal crystallites and catalytic performance are not attainable. When these instances occur, determination of elemental distribution may be the only information available. In this paper the authors discuss some of the techniques employed and limitations associated with characterizing commercial catalysts

  2. eV-TEM: Transmission electron microscopy in a low energy cathode lens instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelen, Daniël, E-mail: geelen@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Thete, Aniket [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schaff, Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander [SPECS GmbH, Voltastrasse 5, D-13355 Berlin (Germany); Molen, Sense Jan van der [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Tromp, Rudolf [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We are developing a transmission electron microscope that operates at extremely low electron energies, 0–40 eV. We call this technique eV-TEM. Its feasibility is based on the fact that at very low electron energies the number of energy loss pathways decreases. Hence, the electron inelastic mean free path increases dramatically. eV-TEM will enable us to study elastic and inelastic interactions of electrons with thin samples. With the recent development of aberration correction in cathode lens instruments, a spatial resolution of a few nm appears within range, even for these very low electron energies. Such resolution will be highly relevant to study biological samples such as proteins and cell membranes. The low electron energies minimize adverse effects due to radiation damage. - Highlights: • We present a new way of performing low energy transmission electron microscopy in an aberration corrected LEEM/PEEM instrument. • We show a proof of principle where we measure transmitted electrons through a suspended graphene monolayer with a preliminary setup. • We present an improved setup design that provides better control of the incident electron beam.

  3. Aberration corrected STEM of defects in epitaxial n=4 Ruddlesden-Popper phase Can+1MnnO3n+1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P; Bleloch, A L; Goodhew, P J; Yan, L; Niu, H J; Rosseinsky, M J; Chalker, P R

    2008-01-01

    Defects in Ruddlesden-Popper phase CaO·[(CaMnO 3 )] 4 epitaxial films grown on SrTiO 3 (001) by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated using high angle annular dark field imaging in an aberration-corrected STEM. The stacking faults perpendicular and parallel to the substrate formed during the growth are discussed in detail. The desired n = 4 RP phase is imaged and chemically analyzed at the atomic scale using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

  4. Estimation of dose from chromosome aberration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deping

    1990-01-01

    The methods and skills of evaluating dose from correctly scored shromsome aberration rate are presented, and supplemented with corresponding BASIC computer code. The possibility and preventive measures of excessive probability of missing score of the aberrations in some of the current routine score methods are discussed. The use of dose-effect relationship with exposure time correction factor G in evaluating doses and their confidence intervals, dose estimation in mixed n-γ exposure, and identification of high by nonuniform acute exposure to low LET radiation and its dose estimation are discussed in more detail. The difference of estimated dose due to whether the interaction between subleisoms produced by n and γ have been taken into account is examined. In fitting the standard dose-aberration rate curve, proper weighing of experiment points and comparison with commonly accepted values are emphasised, and the coefficient of variation σ y √y of the aberration rate y as a function of dose and exposure time is given. In appendix I and II, the dose-aberration rate formula is derived from dual action theory, and the time variation of subleisom is illustrated and in appendix III, the estimation of dose from scores of two different types of aberrations (of other related score) is illustrated. Two computer codes are given in appendix IV, one is a simple code, the other a complete code, including the fitting of standard curve. the skills of using compressed data storage, and the production of simulated 'data ' for testing the curve fitting procedure are also given

  5. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Ryan M; O’Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood–brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring techniques currently exist. (paper)

  6. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  7. Monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechberger, W.; Kothleitner, G.; Hofer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has developed into an established technique for chemical and structural analysis of thin specimens in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM. The energy resolution in EELS is largely limited by the stability of the high voltage supply, by the resolution of the spectrometer and by the energy spread of the source. To overcome this limitation a Wien filter monochromator was recently introduced with commercially available STEMs, offering the advantage to better resolve EELS fine structures, which contain valuable bonding information. The method of atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging within an STEM, utilizing a high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector can perfectly complement the excellent energy resolution, since EELS spectra can be collected simultaneously. In combination with a monochromator microscope not only high spatial resolution images can be recorded but also high energy resolution EELS spectra are attainable. In this work we investigated the STEM performance of a 200 kV monochromated Tecnai F20 with a high resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (HR-GIF). (author)

  8. A high-resolution analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy study of the early stages of spinodal decomposition in binary Fe–Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westraadt, J.E.; Olivier, E.J.; Neethling, J.H.; Hedström, P.; Odqvist, J.; Xu, X.; Steuwer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Spinodal decomposition (SD) is an important phenomenon in materials science and engineering. For example, it is considered to be responsible for the 475 °C embrittlement of stainless steels comprising the bcc (ferrite) or bct (martensite) phases. Structural characterization of the evolving minute nano-scale concentration fluctuations during SD in the Fe–Cr system is, however, a notable challenge, and has mainly been considered accessible via atom probe tomography (APT) and small-angle neutron scattering. The standard tool for nanostructure characterization, viz. transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has only been successfully applied to late stages of SD when embrittlement is already severe. However, we here demonstrate that the structural evolution in the early stages of SD in binary Fe–Cr, and alloys based on the binary, are accessible via analytical scanning TEM. An Fe–36 wt% Cr alloy aged at 500 °C for 1, 10 and 100 h is investigated using an aberration-corrected microscope and it is found that highly coherent and interconnected Cr-rich regions develop. The wavelength of decomposition is rather insensitive to the sample thickness and it is quantified to 2, 3 and 6 nm after ageing for 1, 10 and 100 h, which is in reasonable agreement with prior APT analysis. The concentration amplitude is more sensitive to the sample thickness and acquisition parameters but the TEM analysis is in good agreement with APT analysis for the longest ageing time. These findings open up for combinatorial TEM studies where both local crystallography and chemistry is required. - Highlights: • STEM-EELS analysis was successfully applied to resolve early stage SD in Fe–Cr. • Compositional wavelength measured with STEM-EELS compares well to previous ATP studies. • Compositional amplitude measured with STEM-EELS is a function of experimental parameters. • STEM-EELS allows for combinatorial studies of SD using complementary techniques.

  9. A high-resolution analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy study of the early stages of spinodal decomposition in binary Fe–Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westraadt, J.E., E-mail: johan.westraadt@nmmu.ac.za [Centre for High Resolution TEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, University Way, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Olivier, E.J.; Neethling, J.H. [Centre for High Resolution TEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, University Way, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Hedström, P.; Odqvist, J.; Xu, X. [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvägen 23, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Steuwer, A. [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Av., Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Spinodal decomposition (SD) is an important phenomenon in materials science and engineering. For example, it is considered to be responsible for the 475 °C embrittlement of stainless steels comprising the bcc (ferrite) or bct (martensite) phases. Structural characterization of the evolving minute nano-scale concentration fluctuations during SD in the Fe–Cr system is, however, a notable challenge, and has mainly been considered accessible via atom probe tomography (APT) and small-angle neutron scattering. The standard tool for nanostructure characterization, viz. transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has only been successfully applied to late stages of SD when embrittlement is already severe. However, we here demonstrate that the structural evolution in the early stages of SD in binary Fe–Cr, and alloys based on the binary, are accessible via analytical scanning TEM. An Fe–36 wt% Cr alloy aged at 500 °C for 1, 10 and 100 h is investigated using an aberration-corrected microscope and it is found that highly coherent and interconnected Cr-rich regions develop. The wavelength of decomposition is rather insensitive to the sample thickness and it is quantified to 2, 3 and 6 nm after ageing for 1, 10 and 100 h, which is in reasonable agreement with prior APT analysis. The concentration amplitude is more sensitive to the sample thickness and acquisition parameters but the TEM analysis is in good agreement with APT analysis for the longest ageing time. These findings open up for combinatorial TEM studies where both local crystallography and chemistry is required. - Highlights: • STEM-EELS analysis was successfully applied to resolve early stage SD in Fe–Cr. • Compositional wavelength measured with STEM-EELS compares well to previous ATP studies. • Compositional amplitude measured with STEM-EELS is a function of experimental parameters. • STEM-EELS allows for combinatorial studies of SD using complementary techniques.

  10. Quantification by aberration corrected (S)TEM of boundaries formed by symmetry breaking phase transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryvers, D., E-mail: nick.schryvers@uantwerpen.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Salje, E.K.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Nishida, M. [Department of Engineering Sciences for Electronics and Materials, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); De Backer, A. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Idrissi, H. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe, 2, B-1348, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Van Aert, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-05-15

    The present contribution gives a review of recent quantification work of atom displacements, atom site occupations and level of crystallinity in various systems and based on aberration corrected HR(S)TEM images. Depending on the case studied, picometer range precisions for individual distances can be obtained, boundary widths at the unit cell level determined or statistical evolutions of fractions of the ordered areas calculated. In all of these cases, these quantitative measures imply new routes for the applications of the respective materials. - Highlights: • Quantification of picometer displacements at ferroelastic twin boundary in CaTiO{sub 3.} • Quantification of kinks in meandering ferroelectric domain wall in LiNbO{sub 3}. • Quantification of column occupation in anti-phase boundary in Co-Pt. • Quantification of atom displacements at twin boundary in Ni-Ti B19′ martensite.

  11. Radiation exposure during transmission measurements: comparison between CT- and germanium-based techniques with a current PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Yung-Hui; Lee, Jason J.S.; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Su-Cheng; Su, Cheng-Tau; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2004-01-01

    In positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning, transmission measurements for attenuation correction are commonly performed by using external germanium-68 rod sources. Recently, combined PET and computed tomographic (CT) scanners have been developed in which the CT data can be used for both anatomical-metabolic image formation and attenuation correction of the PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between germanium- and CT-based transmission scanning in terms of their radiation doses by using the same measurement technique and to compare the doses that patients receive during brain, cardiac and whole-body scans. Measurement of absorbed doses to organs was conducted by using a Rando Alderson phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Effective doses were calculated according to the guidelines in the International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication Number 60. Compared with radionuclide doses used in routine 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET imaging, doses absorbed during germanium-based transmission scans were almost negligible. On the other hand, absorbed doses from CT-based transmission scans were significantly higher, particularly with a whole-body scanning protocol. Effective doses were 8.81 mSv in the high-speed mode and 18.97 mSv in the high-quality mode for whole-body CT-based transmission scans. These measurements revealed that the doses received by a patient during CT-based transmission scanning are more than those received in a typical PET examination. Therefore, the radiation doses represent a limitation to the generalised use of CT-based transmission measurements with current PET/CT scanner systems. (orig.)

  12. Is Necessary Attenuation Correction for Cat Brain PET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Min Hyun; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Seung Ha; Lee, Dong Soo; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2007-01-01

    Photon attenuation and scatter corrections (AC and SC) were necessary for quantification of human PET. However, there is no consensus on whether AC and SC are necessary for the cat brain PET imaging. Since post-injection transmission (TX) PET scans are not permitted or provided to microPET scanner users at present, additional time for performing TX scan and awaiting FDG uptake is required for attenuation and scatter corrections. Increasing probability of subject movement and possible biological effect of long term anesthesia would be the problem in additional TX scan. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of AC and SC for the quantification of cat brain PET data

  13. [Accuracy of attenuation coefficient obtained by 137Cs single-transmission scanning in PET: comparison with conventional germanium line source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Kitamura, Keishi; Mizuta, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Keiji; Murase, Kenya; Senda, Michio

    2006-02-20

    Transmission scanning can be successfully performed with a Cs-137 single-photon-emitting point source for three-dimensional PET imaging. This method was effective for postinjection transmission scanning because of differences in physical energy. However, scatter contamination in the transmission data lowers measured attenuation coefficients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the influence of object scattering by measuring the attenuation coefficients on the transmission images. We also compared the results with the conventional germanium line source method. Two different types of PET scanner, the SET-3000 G/X (Shimadzu Corp.) and ECAT EXACT HR(+) (Siemens/CTI) , were used. For the transmission scanning, the SET-3000 G/X and ECAT HR(+) were the Cs-137 point source and Ge-68/Ga-68 line source, respectively. With the SET-3000 G/X, we performed transmission measurement at two energy gate settings, the standard 600-800 keV as well as 500-800 keV. The energy gate setting of the ECAT HR(+) was 350-650 keV. The effects of scattering in a uniform phantom with different cross-sectional areas ranging from 201 cm(2) to 314 cm(2) to 628 cm(2) (apposition of the two 20 cm diameter phantoms) and 943 cm(2) (stacking of the three 20 cm diameter phantoms) were acquired without emission activity. First, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients of the two different types of transmission scanning using region of interest (ROI) analysis. In addition, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients with and without segmentation for Cs-137 transmission images using the same analysis. The segmentation method was a histogram-based soft-tissue segmentation process that can also be applied to reconstructed transmission images. In the Cs-137 experiment, the maximum underestimation was 3% without segmentation, which was reduced to less than 1% with segmentation at the center of the largest phantom. In the Ge-68/Ga-68 experiment, the difference in mean attenuation

  14. Accuracy of attenuation coefficient obtained by 137Cs single-transmission scanning in PET. Comparison with conventional germanium line source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Shimizu, Keiji; Senda, Michio; Kitamura, Keishi; Mizuta, Tetsuro; Murase, Kenya

    2006-01-01

    Transmission scanning can be successfully performed with a Cs-137 single-photon-emitting point source for three-dimensional PET imaging. This method was effective for postinjection transmission scanning because of differences in physical energy. However, scatter contamination in the transmission data lowers measured attenuation coefficients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the influence of object scattering by measuring the attenuation coefficients on the transmission images. We also compared the results with the conventional germanium line source method. Two different types of PET scanner, the SET-3000 G/X (Shimadzu Corp.) and ECAT EXACT HR + (Siemens/CTI), were used. For the transmission scanning, the SET-3000 G/X and ECAT HR + were the Cs-137 point source and Ge-68/Ga-68 line source, respectively. With the SET-3000 G/X, we performed transmission measurement at two energy gate settings, the standard 600-800 keV as well as 500-800 keV. The energy gate setting of the ECAT HR 2 + was 350-650 keV. The effects of scattering in a uniform phantom with different cross-sectional areas ranging from 201 cm 2 to 314 cm 2 to 628 cm 2 (apposition of the two 20 cm diameter phantoms) and 943 cm 2 (stacking of the three 20 cm diameter phantoms) were acquired without emission activity. First, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients of the two different types of transmission scanning using region of interest (ROI) analysis. In addition, we evaluated the attenuation coefficients with and without segmentation for Cs-137 transmission images using the same analysis. The segmentation method was a histogram-based soft-tissue segmentation process that can also be applied to reconstructed transmission images. In the Cs-137 experiment, the maximum underestimation was 3% without segmentation, which was reduced to less than 1% with segmentation at the center of the largest phantom. In the Ge-68/Ga-68 experiment, the difference in mean attenuation coefficients

  15. Spherical aberrations of human astigmatic corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huawei; Dai, Guang-Ming; Chen, Li; Weeber, Henk A; Piers, Patricia A

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate whether the average spherical aberration of human astigmatic corneas is statistically equivalent to human nonastigmatic corneas. Spherical aberrations of 445 astigmatic corneas prior to laser vision correction were retrospectively investigated to determine Zernike coefficients for central corneal areas 6 mm in diameter using CTView (Sarver and Associates). Data were divided into groups according to cylinder power (0.01 to 0.25 diopters [D], 0.26 to 0.75 D, 0.76 to 1.06 D, 1.07 to 1.53 D, 1.54 to 2.00 D, and >2.00 D) and according to age by decade. Spherical aberrations were correlated with age and astigmatic power among groups and the entire population. Statistical analyses were conducted, and P.05 for all tested groups). Mean spherical aberration of astigmatic corneas was not correlated significantly with cylinder power or age (P>.05). Spherical aberrations are similar to those of nonastigmatic corneas, permitting the use of these additional data in the design of aspheric toric intra-ocular lenses. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. On- and off-eye spherical aberration of soft contact lenses and consequent changes of effective lens power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Holger H; Cox, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    Soft contact lenses produce a significant level of spherical aberration affecting their power on-eye. A simple model assuming that a thin soft contact lens aligns to the cornea predicts that these effects are similar on-eye and off-eye. The wavefront aberration for 17 eyes and 33 soft contact lenses on-eye was measured with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The Zernike coefficients describing the on-eye spherical aberration of the soft contact lens were compared with off-eye ray-tracing results. Paraxial and effective lens power changes were determined. The model predicts the on-eye spherical aberration of soft contact lenses closely. The resulting power change for a +/- 7.00 D spherical soft contact lens is +/- 0.5 D for a 6-mm pupil diameter and +/- 0.1 D for a 3-mm pupil diameter. Power change is negligible for soft contact lenses corrected for off-eye spherical aberration. For thin soft contact lenses, the level of spherical aberration and the consequent power change is similar on-eye and off-eye. Soft contact lenses corrected for spherical aberration in air will be expected to be aberration-free on-eye and produce only negligibly small power changes. For soft contact lenses without aberration correction, for higher levels of ametropia and large pupils, the soft contact lens power should be determined with trial lenses with their power and p value similar to the prescribed lens. The benefit of soft contact lenses corrected for spherical aberration depends on the level of ocular spherical aberration.

  17. Analysis of the 'dilemma effect' in fifth-order deflection aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaobing; Yin Hanchun; Lei Wei; Xue Kunxing; Tong Linsu

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the coma of the fifth-order aberration at a large deflection angle has been analyzed by using multipole field theory. The dilemma effect exists in the comas of fifth-order aberration. The dilemma effect, whose value D r is constant and independent of the 10-pole field, is the linear combination of coma aberrations. The coma of the fifth-order aberration is corrected by adjusting the 10-pole field distribution when D r is zero or small. The factors that influence the dilemma effect have been calculated and analyzed

  18. In-air scanning transmission ion microscopy of cultured cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, R.; Deves, G.; Moretto, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    Scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging of living cultured cells has been carried out using a proton external-beam with the nuclear microprobe of Bordeaux-Gradignan. STIM could be performed in air atmosphere after passage of a focused proton beam through a 150 nm thick silicon nitride window. Energy loss STIM images were obtained with a spatial resolution in the micrometer range and enabled the identification of sub-cellular ultrastructures

  19. Correction for dynamic bias error in transmission measurements of void fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Svärd, S. Jacobsson; Sjöstrand, H.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic bias errors occur in transmission measurements, such as X-ray, gamma, or neutron radiography or tomography. This is observed when the properties of the object are not stationary in time and its average properties are assessed. The nonlinear measurement response to changes in transmission within the time scale of the measurement implies a bias, which can be difficult to correct for. A typical example is the tomographic or radiographic mapping of void content in dynamic two-phase flow systems. In this work, the dynamic bias error is described and a method to make a first-order correction is derived. A prerequisite for this method is variance estimates of the system dynamics, which can be obtained using high-speed, time-resolved data acquisition. However, in the absence of such acquisition, a priori knowledge might be used to substitute the time resolved data. Using synthetic data, a void fraction measurement case study has been simulated to demonstrate the performance of the suggested method. The transmission length of the radiation in the object under study and the type of fluctuation of the void fraction have been varied. Significant decreases in the dynamic bias error were achieved to the expense of marginal decreases in precision.

  20. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  1. A computer program for scanning transmission ion microscopy simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Shen, H.; Mi, Y.; Sun, M.D.; Yang, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    With the installation of the Scanning Proton Microprobe system at Fudan University, we are in the process of developing a three-dimension reconstruction technique based on scanning transmission ion microscopy-computed tomography (STIM-CT). As the first step, a related computer program of STIM simulation has been established. This program is written in the Visual C++[reg], using the technique of OOP (Object Oriented Programming) and it is a standard multiple-document Windows[reg] program. It can be run with all MS Windows[reg] operating systems. The operating mode is the menu mode, using a multiple process technique. The stopping power theory is based on the Bethe-Bloch formula. In order to simplify the calculation, the improved cylindrical coordinate model was introduced in the program instead of a usual spherical or cylindrical coordinate model. The simulated results of a sample at several rotation angles are presented

  2. Real-time scatter measurement and correction in film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for real-time scatter measurement and correction in scanning film radiography is described. With this technique, collimated x-ray fan beams are used to partially reject scattered radiation. Photodiodes are attached to the aft-collimator for sampled scatter measurement. Such measurement allows the scatter distribution to be reconstructed and subtracted from digitized film image data for accurate transmission measurement. In this presentation the authors discuss the physical and technical considerations of this scatter correction technique. Examples are shown that demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Improved x-ray transmission measurement and dual-energy subtraction imaging are demonstrated with phantoms

  3. 3-d chemical imaging using angle-scan nanotomography in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, A.P.; Johansson, G.A. [McMaster, BIMR, Hamilton (Canada); Mitchell, G.E. [Dow Chemical, Analytical Science, Midland, MI (United States); Keefe, M.H. [Dow Chemical, Dow Latex, Midland, MI (United States); Tyliszcak, T. [LBNL, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Three-dimensional chemical mapping using angle scan nanotomography in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) has been used to investigate the spatial distributions of a low density polyacrylate polyelectrolyte ionomer inside submicron sized polystyrene microspheres. Acquisition of tomograms at multiple photon energies provides true, quantifiable 3-d chemical sensitivity. Both pre-O 1s and C 1s results are shown. The study reveals aspects of the 3-d distribution of the polyelectrolyte that were inferred indirectly or had not been known prior to this study. The potential and challenges for extension of the technique to studies of other polymeric and to biological systems is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Fifth-order canonical geometric aberration analysis of electrostatic round lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Zhi Xiong

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the fifth-order canonical geometric aberration patterns are analyzed and a numerical example is given on the basis of the analytical expressions of fifth-order aberration coefficients derived in the present work. The fifth-order spherical aberration, astigmatism and field curvature, and distortion are similar to the third-order ones and the fifth-order coma is slightly different. Besides, there are two more aberrations which do not exist in the third-order aberration: they are peanut aberration and elliptical coma in accordance with their shapes. In the numerical example, by using a cross-check of the calculated coefficients with those computed through the differential algebraic method, it has been verified that all the expressions are correct and the computational results are reliable with high precision.

  5. Impact of subject head motion on quantitative brain 15O PET and its correction by image-based registration algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Keisuke; Ibaraki, Masanobu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Umetsu, Atsushi; Kinoshita, Fumiko; Kinoshita, Toshibumi

    2013-01-01

    Subject head motion during sequential 15 O positron emission tomography (PET) scans can result in artifacts in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism maps. However, to our knowledge, there are no systematic studies examining this issue. Herein, we investigated the effect of head motion on quantification of CBF and oxygen metabolism, and proposed an image-based motion correction method dedicated to 15 O PET study, correcting for transmission-emission mismatch and inter-scan mismatch of emission scans. We analyzed 15 O PET data for patients with major arterial steno-occlusive disease (n=130) to determine the occurrence frequency of head motion during 15 O PET examination. Image-based motion correction without and with realignment between transmission and emission scans, termed simple and 2-step method, respectively, was applied to the cases that showed severe inter-scan motion. Severe inter-scan motion (>3 mm translation or >5deg rotation) was observed in 27 of 520 adjacent scan pairs (5.2%). In these cases, unrealistic values of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) or cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) were observed without motion correction. Motion correction eliminated these artifacts. The volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis demonstrated that the motion correction changed the OEF on the middle cerebral artery territory by 17.3% at maximum. The inter-scan motion also affected cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolism rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) and CBF, which were improved by the motion correction. A difference of VOI values between the simple and 2-step method was also observed. These data suggest that image-based motion correction is useful for accurate measurement of CBF and oxygen metabolism by 15 O PET. (author)

  6. Whole eye wavefront aberrations in Mexican male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú, Roberto; Rosales, Marco A; Tepichín, Eduardo; Curioca, Andrée; Montes, Victor; Bonilla, Julio

    2004-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics, incidence, and appearance of wavefront aberrations in undilated, normal, unoperated eyes. Eighty-eight eyes of 44 healthy male Mexican subjects (mean age 25.32 years, range 18 to 36 yr) were divided into three groups based on uncorrected visual acuity of greater than or equal to 20/20, 20/30, or 20/40. UCVA measurements were obtained using an Acuity Max computer screen chart. Wavefront aberrations were measured with the Nidek OPD-Scan ARK 10000, Ver. 1.11b. All measurements were carried out at the same center by the same technician during a single session, following manufacturer instructions. Background illumination was 3 Lux. Wavefront aberration measurements for each group were statistically analyzed using StatView; an average eye was characterized and the resulting aberrations were simulated using MATLAB. We obtained wavefront aberration maps for the 20/20 undilated normal unoperated eyes for total, low, and high order aberration coefficients. Wavefront maps for right eyes were practically the same as those for left eyes. Higher aberrations did not contribute substantially to total wavefront analysis. Average aberrations of this "normal eye" will be used as criteria to decide the necessity of wavefront-guided ablation in our facilities. We will focus on the nearly zero average of high order aberrations in this normal whole eye as a reference to be matched.

  7. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  8. Scanning transmission x-ray microscope for materials science spectromicroscopy at the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, T.; Seal, S.; Shin, H. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The brightness of the Advanced Light Source will be exploited by several new instruments for materials science spectromicroscopy over the next year or so. The first of these to become operational is a scanning transmission x-ray microscope with which near edge x-ray absorption spectra (NEXAFS) can be measured on spatial features of sub-micron size. Here the authors describe the instrument as it is presently implemented, its capabilities, some studies made to date and the developments to come. The Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope makes use of a zone plate lens to produce a small x-ray spot with which to perform absorption spectroscopy through thin samples. The x-ray beam from ALS undulator beamline 7.0 emerges into the microscope vessel through a silicon nitride vacuum window 160nm thick and 300{mu}m square. The vessel is filled with helium at atmospheric pressure. The zone plate lens is illuminated 1mm downstream from the vacuum window and forms an image in first order of a pinhole which is 3m upstream in the beamline. An order sorting aperture passes the first order converging light and blocks the unfocused zero order. The sample is at the focus a few mm downstream of the zone plate and mounted from a scanning piezo stage which rasters in x and y so that an image is formed, pixel by pixel, by an intensity detector behind the sample. Absorption spectra are measured point-by-point as the photon energy is scanned by rotating the diffraction grating in the monochromator and changing the undulator gap.

  9. Measurement of specimen-induced aberrations of biological samples using phase stepping interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwertner, M; Booth, M J; Neil, M A A; Wilson, T

    2004-01-01

    Confocal or multiphoton microscopes, which deliver optical sections and three-dimensional (3D) images of thick specimens, are widely used in biology. These techniques, however, are sensitive to aberrations that may originate from the refractive index structure of the specimen itself. The aberrations cause reduced signal intensity and the 3D resolution of the instrument is compromised. It has been suggested to correct for aberrations in confocal microscopes using adaptive optics. In order to define the design specifications for such adaptive optics systems, one has to know the amount of aberrations present for typical applications such as with biological samples. We have built a phase stepping interferometer microscope that directly measures the aberration of the wavefront. The modal content of the wavefront is extracted by employing Zernike mode decomposition. Results for typical biological specimens are presented. It was found for all samples investigated that higher order Zernike modes give only a small contribution to the overall aberration. Therefore, these higher order modes can be neglected in future adaptive optics sensing and correction schemes implemented into confocal or multiphoton microscopes, leading to more efficient designs.

  10. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  11. "Narrowing the transmission gap: A synthesis of three decades of research on intergenerational transmission of attachment": Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Reports an error in "Narrowing the transmission gap: A synthesis of three decades of research on intergenerational transmission of attachment" by Marije L. Verhage, Carlo Schuengel, Sheri Madigan, R. M. Pasco Fearon, Mirjam Oosterman, Rosalinda Cassibba, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg and Marinus H. van IJzendoorn ( Psychological Bulletin , 2016[Apr], Vol 142[4], 337-366). In the article, there are errors in Table 7. The percentages of the attachment classifications do not add up to 100%. The corrected version of Table 7 is provided in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-55801-001.) Twenty years ago, meta-analytic results (k = 19) confirmed the association between caregiver attachment representations and child-caregiver attachment (Van IJzendoorn, 1995). A test of caregiver sensitivity as the mechanism behind this intergenerational transmission showed an intriguing "transmission gap." Since then, the intergenerational transmission of attachment and the transmission gap have been studied extensively, and now extend to diverse populations from all over the globe. Two decades later, the current review revisited the effect sizes of intergenerational transmission, the heterogeneity of the transmission effects, and the size of the transmission gap. Analyses were carried out with a total of 95 samples (total N = 4,819). All analyses confirmed intergenerational transmission of attachment, with larger effect sizes for secure-autonomous transmission (r = .31) than for unresolved transmission (r = .21), albeit with significantly smaller effect sizes than 2 decades earlier (r = .47 and r = .31, respectively). Effect sizes were moderated by risk status of the sample, biological relatedness of child-caregiver dyads, and age of the children. Multivariate moderator analyses showed that unpublished and more recent studies had smaller effect sizes than published and older studies. Path analyses showed that the transmission could not

  12. Cell survival and radiation induced chromosome aberrations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Braselmann, H.

    1986-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated in whole blood with 0.5-4.0 Gy of 220 kVp X-rays and the frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in 1st or 2nd division metaphases discriminated by fluorescence plus giemsa staining. Using the empirical distributions of aberrations among cells, cell survival and transmission of aberrations were investigated. Considering both daughter cells, we found that 20% of fragments and 55% of dicentrics or ring chromosomes are lost during the 1st cell division; i.e. cell survival rate from 1st to 2nd generation is mainly influenced by anaphase bridging of these two-hit aberrations. Cell survival to 2nd mitosis was calculated considering this situation and compared with the survival derived from the fraction of M1 cells without unstable aberrations. The resulting shouldered survival curves showed significantly different slopes, indicating that cell reproductive death is overestimated in the latter approach. (orig.)

  13. 78 FR 22773 - Revisions to Reliability Standard for Transmission Vegetation Management; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ...; Order No. 777] Revisions to Reliability Standard for Transmission Vegetation Management; Correction... modifying certain Reliability Standards. DATES: Effective on May 28, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Requirement R2 of Reliability Standard FAC-003-2 within 45 days of the effective date of the Final Rule, while...

  14. Visualization of magnetic dipolar interaction based on scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Hiroyuki; Iwano, Kaoru; Takeichi, Yasuo; Ono, Kanta; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Yano, Masao; Kato, Akira; Miyamoto, Noritaka; Shoji, Tetsuya; Manabe, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), in this report we visualized the magnetic dipolar interactions in nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets and imaged their magnetization distributions at various applied fields. We calculated the magnetic dipolar interaction by analyzing the interaction between the magnetization at each point and those at the other points on the STXM image.

  15. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, NOV (2012), s. 48-59 ISSN 0304-3991 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : stereoscopy * scanning transmission electron microscopy * single crystal Ni-base superalloys * Dislocation substructures * Foil thickness measurement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.470, year: 2012

  16. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan M; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-07-01

    Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981-5005 (2013)]. A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11-0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors' previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O'Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285-1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position obtained using source-based corrections. Taken

  17. Poster - 17: Characterization and correction of radiation induced background in scanning water tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Elsayed [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To characterize and correct for radiation-induced background (RIB) observed in the signals from a class of scanning water tanks. Methods: A method was developed to isolate the RIB through detector measurements in the background-free linac console area. Variation of the RIB against a large number of parameters was characterized, and its impact on basic clinical data for photon and electron beams was quantified. Different methods to minimize and/or correct for the RIB were proposed and evaluated. Results: The RIB is due to the presence of the electrometer and connection box in a low background radiation field (by design). The absolute RIB current with a biased detector is up to 2 pA, independent of the detector size, which is 0.6% and 1.5% of the central axis reference signal for a standard and a mini scanning chamber, respectively. The RIB monotonically increases with field size, is three times smaller for detectors that do not require a bias (e.g., diodes), is up to 80% larger for positive (versus negative) polarity, decreases with increasing photon energy, exhibits a single curve versus dose rate at the electrometer location, and is negligible for electron beams. Data after the proposed field-size correction method agree with point measurements from an independent system to within a few tenth of a percent for output factor, head scatter, depth dose at depth, and out-of-field profile dose. Manufacturer recommendations for electrometer placement are insufficient and sometimes incorrect. Conclusions: RIB in scanning water tanks can have a non-negligible effect on dosimetric data.

  18. Theoretical estimates of spherical and chromatic aberration in photoemission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, J.P.S., E-mail: fit@pdx.edu; Word, R.C.; Könenkamp, R.

    2016-01-15

    We present theoretical estimates of the mean coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration for low energy photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Using simple analytic models, we find that the aberration coefficients depend primarily on the difference between the photon energy and the photoemission threshold, as expected. However, the shape of the photoelectron spectral distribution impacts the coefficients by up to 30%. These estimates should allow more precise correction of aberration in PEEM in experimental situations where the aberration coefficients and precise electron energy distribution cannot be readily measured. - Highlights: • Spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients of the accelerating field in PEEM. • Compact, analytic expressions for coefficients depending on two emission parameters. • Effect of an aperture stop on the distribution is also considered.

  19. Electron magnetic chiral dichroism in CrO2 thin films using monochromatic probe illumination in a transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukya, B.; Zhang, X.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2012-01-01

    Electron magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) has been studied in CrO 2 thin films (with (100) and (110) growth orientations on TiO 2 substrates) using a gun monochromator in an aberration corrected transmission electron microscope operating at 300 kV. Excellent signal-to-noise ratio is obtained at spatial resolution ∼10 nm using a monochromatic probe as compared to conventional parallel illumination, large area convergent beam electron diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques of EMCD. Relatively rapid exposure using mono probe illumination enables collection of EMCD spectra in total of 8–9 min in energy filtered imaging mode for a given Cr L 2,3 energy scan (energy range ∼35 eV). We compared the EMCD signal obtained by extracting the Cr L 2,3 spectra under three beam diffraction geometry of two different reciprocal vectors (namely g=110 and 200) and found that the g=200 vector enables acquisition of excellent EMCD signal from relatively thicker specimen area due to the associated larger extinction distance. Orbital to spin moment ratio has been calculated using EMCD sum rules for 3d elements and dichroic spectral features associated with CrO 2 are compared and discussed with XMCD theoretical spectra. - Highlights: ► Electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) of CrO 2 thin film with two different orientations. ► Improved EMCD signal with Gun monochromator illumination. ► Improved EMCD signal with higher g vector.

  20. Determining oxygen relaxations at an interface: A comparative study between transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauquelin, N; van den Bos, K H W; Béché, A; Krause, F F; Lobato, I; Lazar, S; Rosenauer, A; Van Aert, S; Verbeeck, J

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a popular method to characterise nanomaterials at the atomic scale. Here, atomically resolved images of nanomaterials are acquired, where the contrast depends on the illumination, imaging and detector conditions of the microscope. Visualization of light elements is possible when using low angle annular dark field (LAADF) STEM, annular bright field (ABF) STEM, integrated differential phase contrast (iDPC) STEM, negative spherical aberration imaging (NCSI) and imaging STEM (ISTEM). In this work, images of a NdGaO 3 -La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 (NGO-LSMO) interface are quantitatively evaluated by using statistical parameter estimation theory. For imaging light elements, all techniques are providing reliable results, while the techniques based on interference contrast, NCSI and ISTEM, are less robust in terms of accuracy for extracting heavy column locations. In term of precision, sample drift and scan distortions mainly limits the STEM based techniques as compared to NCSI. Post processing techniques can, however, partially compensate for this. In order to provide an outlook to the future, simulated images of NGO, in which the unavoidable presence of Poisson noise is taken into account, are used to determine the ultimate precision. In this future counting noise limited scenario, NCSI and ISTEM imaging will provide more precise values as compared to the other techniques, which can be related to the mechanisms behind the image recording. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L; Shiju, N R; Brown, D R

    2010-01-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  3. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L [York JEOL Nanocentre (United Kingdom); Shiju, N R; Brown, D R, E-mail: pgb500@york.ac.u [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  4. Aberration corrected and 3D cryo-tomography HAADF-STEM surface studies of ZnO tetrapods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M R; Gai, P L; Boyes, E D; Sugiura, H; Tanaka, N; Yoshida, K

    2012-01-01

    We present a morphology study of ZnO tetrapods using aberration corrected TEM, HAADF-STEM and 3D HAADF-STEM cryotomography as an alternative to more conventional TEM and SEM techniques. We use 3D IMOD reconstructions to show that the {11-bar 0} facets dominate the total surface area of uniform hexagonal prism tetrapods. Using HRTEM we show that the small tetrapods have a zincblende phase core from which the four legs extend. The facets and the edges of these legs were found to be atomically clean and flat with the potential for ZnO tetrapods as model substrates. We deposited ultrafine Pt/Pd nanoparticles onto the tetrapods and investigated the resulting morphologies. We found using HAADF-STEM cryotomography and reconstruction techniques that the nanoparticle coverage gave separate nanoparticles and overall uniform coverage. We believe these techniques and the results from them could be useful for the development of nanoparticle-ZnO tetrapod composite systems with applications in optoelectronics, gas sensing and catalysis.

  5. Attenuation correction for the large non-human primate brain imaging using microPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo-Variawa, S; Lehnert, W; Kassiou, M; Banati, R; Meikle, S R

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in vivo is often performed on animal models of human disease prior to their use in humans. The baboon brain is physiologically and neuro-anatomically similar to the human brain and is therefore a suitable model for evaluating novel CNS radioligands. We previously demonstrated the feasibility of performing baboon brain imaging on a dedicated small animal PET scanner provided that the data are accurately corrected for degrading physical effects such as photon attenuation in the body. In this study, we investigated factors affecting the accuracy and reliability of alternative attenuation correction strategies when imaging the brain of a large non-human primate (papio hamadryas) using the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner. For measured attenuation correction, the best bias versus noise performance was achieved using a 57 Co transmission point source with a 4% energy window. The optimal energy window for a 68 Ge transmission source operating in singles acquisition mode was 20%, independent of the source strength, providing bias-noise performance almost as good as for 57 Co. For both transmission sources, doubling the acquisition time had minimal impact on the bias-noise trade-off for corrected emission images, despite observable improvements in reconstructed attenuation values. In a [ 18 F]FDG brain scan of a female baboon, both measured attenuation correction strategies achieved good results and similar SNR, while segmented attenuation correction (based on uncorrected emission images) resulted in appreciable regional bias in deep grey matter structures and the skull. We conclude that measured attenuation correction using a single pass 57 Co (4% energy window) or 68 Ge (20% window) transmission scan achieves an excellent trade-off between bias and propagation of noise when imaging the large non-human primate brain with a microPET scanner.

  6. Chromosome painting analysis of radiation-induced aberrant cell clones in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruill, M.D.; Nath, J.; Tucker, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    In a study of the persistence of radiation-induced translocations over the life span of the mouse, we observed a number of clonal cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of clones caused the mean frequency of aberrations at various time points to be elevated which interfered with biodosimetry. For this reason, we have corrected our data for the presence of clones. Mice were given an acute dose of 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 Gy 137 Cs at 8 weeks of age. Aberrations were measured by painting chromosomes 2 and 8 and cells were examined for clones at 3 months and every 3 months thereafter until 21 months. Clones were identified by comparing the color photographic slides of all abnormal cells from each animal. Determination of clonality was made on the basis of similar breakpoint locations or the presence of other identifying characteristics such as unusual aberrations. To correct the frequency of translocations for the presence of clones, each clone, regardless of how many cells it contained, was counted only once. This reflects the original aberration frequency since each clone originated as only one cell. Among mice exposed to 4 Gy, the mean frequencies of aberrant cell clones ranged from 3-29% of the total number of metaphase cells scored with the highest frequency being 1 year post exposure. 32-70% of reciprocal and 19-92% of non-reciprocal translocations were clonal. A dose response relationship for clones was evident until 21 months when the unexposed animals exhibited a mean frequency of aberrant cell clones >10% of the total number of cells scored. Almost 75% of reciprocal and 95% of non-reciprocal translocations in these unexposed control animals were of clonal origin. Correction for clonal expansion greatly reduced the means and their standard errors at most time points where clonal expansion was prevalent. The biodosimetry was much improved suggesting that correction is beneficial in long-term studies

  7. Measurement of eye aberrations in a speckle field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larichev, A V; Ivanov, P V; Iroshnikov, N G; Shmalgauzen, V I

    2001-01-01

    The influence of speckles on the performance of a Shark-Hartmann wavefront sensor is investigated in the eye aberration studies. The dependence of the phase distortion measurement error on the characteristic speckle size is determined experimentally. Scanning of the reference source was used to suppress the speckle structure of the laser beam scattered by the retina. The technique developed by us made it possible to study the time dependence of the human eye aberrations with a resolution of 30 ms. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Digital acquisition and processing of electron micrographs using a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Christen, F.; Michel, B.

    1981-01-01

    A digital acquisition system that collects multichannel information from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and its application are described. The hardware comprises (i) single electron counting detectors, (ii) a digital scan generator, (iii) a digital multi-channel on-line processor, (iv) an interface to a minicomputer, and (v) a display system. Experimental results characterizing these components are presented, and their performance is discussed. The software includes assembler coded programs for dynamic file maintenance and fast acquisition of image data, a display driver, and FORTRAN coded application programs. The usefulness of digitized STEM is illustrated by a variety of biological applications. (orig.)

  9. Path-separated electron interferometry in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Fehmi S.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan J.; Pierce, Jordan S.; McMorran, Benjamin J.

    2018-05-01

    We report a path-separated electron interferometer within a scanning transmission electron microscope. In this setup, we use a nanofabricated grating as an amplitude-division beamsplitter to prepare multiple spatially separated, coherent electron probe beams. We achieve path separations of 30 nm. We pass the  +1 diffraction order probe through amorphous carbon while passing the 0th and  ‑1 orders through vacuum. The probes are then made to interfere via imaging optics, and we observe an interference pattern at the CCD detector with up to 39.7% fringe visibility. We show preliminary experimental results in which the interference pattern was recorded during a 1D scan of the diffracted probes across a test phase object. These results qualitatively agree with a modeled interference predicted by an independent measurement of the specimen thickness. This experimental design can potentially be applied to phase contrast imaging and fundamental physics experiments, such as an exploration of electron wave packet coherence length.

  10. [Correction of light refraction and reflection in medical transmission optical tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, S A; Potapov, D A

    2002-01-01

    The effects of light refraction and reflection on the quality of image reconstruction in medical transmission optical tomography of high-scattering media are considered. It has been first noted that light refraction not only distorts the geometric scheme of measurements, but may lead to the appearance of object areas that cannot be scanned. Some ways of decreasing the effect of refraction on the reconstruction of spatial distribution of the extinction coefficient are stated.

  11. Spherical aberration compensation method for long focal-length measurement based on Talbot interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yupeng; Huang, Xiao; Bai, Jian; Du, Juan; Liu, Qun; Luo, Yujie; Luo, Jia

    2017-08-01

    Large-aperture and long focal-length lens is widely used in high energy laser system. The method based on Talbot interferometry is a reliable method to measure the focal length of such elements. By employing divergent beam and two gratings of different periods, this method could realize full-aperture measurement, higher accuracy and better repeatability. However, it does not take into account the spherical aberration of the measured lens resulting in the moiré fringes bending, which will introduce measurement error. Furthermore, in long-focal measurement with divergent beam, this error is an important factor affecting the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we propose a new spherical aberration compensation method, which could significantly reduce the measurement error. Characterized by central-symmetric scanning window, the proposed method is based on the relationship between spherical aberration and the lens aperture. Angle data of moiré fringes in each scanning window is retrieved by Fourier analysis and statistically fitted to estimate a globally optimum value for spherical-aberration-free focal length calculation. Simulation and experiment have been carried out. Compared to the previous work, the proposed method is able to reduce the relative measurement error by 50%. The effect of scanning window size and shift step length on the results is also discussed.

  12. Novel use of gamma correction for precise 99mTc-HDP pinhole bone scan diagnosis and classification of knee occult fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong-Whee; Jeon, Ho-Seung; Kim, Jang Min; Park, Jung Mee; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Soo-Kyo; Chung, Yong-An; Kim, E.E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS) to depict specific signs of knee occult fractures (OF) on 99m Tc-hydroxydiphosphonate (HDP) scan. Thirty-six cases of six different types of knee OF in 27 consecutive patients (male = 20, female = 7, and age = 18-86 years) were enrolled. The diagnosis was made on the basis of a history of acute or subacute knee trauma, local pain, tenderness, cutaneous injury, negative conventional radiography, and positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the impracticability of histological verification of individual OF, MRI was utilized as a gold standard of diagnosis and classification. All patients had 99m Tc-HDP bone scanning and supplementary GCPBS. GCPBS signs were correlated and compared with those of MRI. The efficacy of gamma correction of ordinary parallel collimator and pinhole collimator scans were collated. Gamma correction pinhole bone scan depicted the signs characteristic of six different types of OF. They were well defined stuffed globular tracer uptake in geographic I fractures (n = 9), block-like uptake in geographic II fractures (n = 7), simple or branching linear uptake in linear cancellous fractures (n = 4), compression in impacted fractures (n = 2), stippled-serpentine uptake in reticular fractures (n = 11), and irregular subcortical uptake in osteochondral fractures (n = 3). All fractures were equally well or more distinctly depicted on GCPBS than on MRI except geographic II fracture, the details of which were not appreciated on GCPBS. Parallel collimator scan also yielded to gamma correction, but the results were inferior to those of the pinhole scan. Gamma correction pinhole bone scan can depict the specific diagnostic signs in six different types of knee occult fractures. The specific diagnostic capability along with the lower cost and wider global availability of bone scanning would make GCPBS an effective alternative. (orig.)

  13. Scanning transmission ion microscopy of polycarbonate nanocapillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, G.A.B.; Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Juhasz, Z.; Biri, S.; Csik, A.; Sulik, B.; Cserhati, Cs.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Nanochanneled materials are of a great interest due to their peculiar properties and high potential impact for the fabrication of nanostructures and nanodevices. Polycarbonate membranes are produced by heavy ion irradiation followed by chemical etching of the ion tracks. The irradiation parameters determine the porosity (areal density of the capillaries) and angular spread, while the channel diameters and shapes depend on the chemical process parameters. Such polycarbonate (and other materials) membranes are commercially available from a few manufacturers. The primary use of the filters involves packaging and filtering applications. Moreover, they are used for collecting atmospheric aerosols for environmental research. The nanocapillaries formed in membranes are particularly suitable for ion and electron guiding studies of a recently discovered, but not yet completely understood capillary guiding phenomenon. This interesting guiding effect is very promising for patterning by parallel writing with ions and/or electrons through masks. In order to get a better understanding of this phenomenon, we need a better characterization of the capillaries themselves. This study is addressing the angular distribution of the nanochannels in the polycarbonate filters by using a nuclear microprobe facility and the method of scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). The STIM experiments in this work have been performed at ATOMKI. The proton energy was 2 MeV, the beam intensity was about 1000 protons s -1 , the beam spot size was about 1 x 1 μm, the scan size was 100 x 100 μm and the beam divergence was smaller than 0.07 deg. A scanning electron microscope (SEM, Hitachi S4300 CFE) was used to measure the capillary diameters and the membrane porosity. The sample thickness was determined by a profilometer (AMBIOS XP-I). We have investigated two different pieces of Millipore Isopore TM samples. A typical SEM image showed several overlapping

  14. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  15. Compact scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Yasuo; Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta; Suga, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and performance of a compact scanning transmission X-ray microscope developed at the Photon Factory. Piezo-driven linear stages are used as coarse stages of the microscope to realize excellent compactness, mobility, and vibrational and thermal stability. An X-ray beam with an intensity of ∼10 7 photons/s was focused to a diameter of ∼40 nm at the sample. At the soft X-ray undulator beamline used with the microscope, a wide range of photon energies (250–1600 eV) is available. The microscope has been used to research energy materials and in environmental sciences

  16. Real-time scanning charged-particle microscope image composition with correction of drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmar, Petr; Vladár, András E; Postek, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    In this article, a new scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image composition technique is described, which can significantly reduce drift related image corruptions. Drift distortion commonly causes blur and distortions in the SEM images. Such corruption ordinarily appears when conventional image-acquisition methods, i.e., "slow scan" and "fast scan," are applied. The damage is often very significant; it may render images unusable for metrology applications, especially where subnanometer accuracy is required. The described correction technique works with a large number of quickly taken frames, which are properly aligned and then composed into a single image. Such image contains much less noise than the individual frames, while the blur and deformation is minimized. This technique also provides useful information about changes of the sample position in time, which may be applied to investigate the drift properties of the instrument without a need of additional equipment.

  17. Electrostatic axisymmetric mirror with removable spherical aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birmuzaev, S.B.; Serikbaeva, G.S.; Hizirova, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The electrostatic axisymmetric mirror, assembled from three coaxial cylinders with an equal diameter d and under the potential v1, v2 and v3, was computed. The proportions of geometrical and electric parameters of the mirror, with which the spherical 3-order aberration may be eliminated, were determined. The computation outcomes of the case, when the focal power of the mirror is enough large and the object plane in the focus is out of its field, are presented (Fig. 1 - potentials proportion that makes elimination of the spherical aberration possible; Fig. 2 - the focus coordinates when the spherical aberration is eliminated). The geometrical values are presented by d, and the electric ones are presented by v1. The figures on the curves present a length of the second (middle) electrode. The zero point is located in the middle of the gap between the first and second electrodes The investigated mirror may be used as a lens for the transmission electron microscope

  18. SU-F-BRD-15: Quality Correction Factors in Scanned Or Broad Proton Therapy Beams Are Indistinguishable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorriaux, J; Lee, J; Testa, M; Paganetti, H; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The IAEA TRS-398 code of practice details the reference conditions for reference dosimetry of proton beams using ionization chambers and the required beam quality correction factors (kQ). Pencil beam scanning (PBS) requires multiple spots to reproduce the reference conditions. The objective is to demonstrate, using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, that kQ factors for broad beams can be used for scanned beams under the same reference conditions with no significant additional uncertainty. We consider hereafter the general Alfonso formalism (Alfonso et al, 2008) for non-standard beam. Methods: To approach the reference conditions and the associated dose distributions, PBS must combine many pencil beams with range modulation and shaping techniques different than those used in passive systems (broad beams). This might lead to a different energy spectrum at the measurement point. In order to evaluate the impact of these differences on kQ factors, ion chamber responses are computed with MC (Geant4 9.6) in a dedicated scanned pencil beam (Q-pcsr) producing a 10×10cm2 composite field with a flat dose distribution from 10 to 16 cm depth. Ion chamber responses are also computed by MC in a broad beam with quality Q-ds (double scattering). The dose distribution of Q -pcsr matches the dose distribution of Q-ds. k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) is computed for a 2×2×0.2cm 3 idealized air cavity and a realistic plane-parallel ion chamber (IC). Results: Under reference conditions, quality correction factors for a scanned composite field versus a broad beam are the same for air cavity dose response, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =1.001±0.001 and for a Roos IC, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =0.999±0.005. Conclusion: Quality correction factors for ion chamber response in scanned and broad proton therapy beams are identical under reference conditions within the calculation uncertainties. The results indicate that quality correction factors published in IAEA TRS-398 can be used for scanned beams in the SOBP of a high

  19. SU-F-BRD-15: Quality Correction Factors in Scanned Or Broad Proton Therapy Beams Are Indistinguishable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorriaux, J; Lee, J [Molecular Imaging Radiotherapy & Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Testa, M; Paganetti, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, Massachusetts (United States); Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J [Ion Beam Applications, Louvain-la-neuve, Brabant Wallon (Belgium); Palmans, H [EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Vynckier, S [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Molecular Imaging Radiotherapy & Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The IAEA TRS-398 code of practice details the reference conditions for reference dosimetry of proton beams using ionization chambers and the required beam quality correction factors (kQ). Pencil beam scanning (PBS) requires multiple spots to reproduce the reference conditions. The objective is to demonstrate, using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, that kQ factors for broad beams can be used for scanned beams under the same reference conditions with no significant additional uncertainty. We consider hereafter the general Alfonso formalism (Alfonso et al, 2008) for non-standard beam. Methods: To approach the reference conditions and the associated dose distributions, PBS must combine many pencil beams with range modulation and shaping techniques different than those used in passive systems (broad beams). This might lead to a different energy spectrum at the measurement point. In order to evaluate the impact of these differences on kQ factors, ion chamber responses are computed with MC (Geant4 9.6) in a dedicated scanned pencil beam (Q-pcsr) producing a 10×10cm2 composite field with a flat dose distribution from 10 to 16 cm depth. Ion chamber responses are also computed by MC in a broad beam with quality Q-ds (double scattering). The dose distribution of Q -pcsr matches the dose distribution of Q-ds. k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) is computed for a 2×2×0.2cm{sup 3} idealized air cavity and a realistic plane-parallel ion chamber (IC). Results: Under reference conditions, quality correction factors for a scanned composite field versus a broad beam are the same for air cavity dose response, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =1.001±0.001 and for a Roos IC, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =0.999±0.005. Conclusion: Quality correction factors for ion chamber response in scanned and broad proton therapy beams are identical under reference conditions within the calculation uncertainties. The results indicate that quality correction factors published in IAEA TRS-398 can be used for scanned beams in the SOBP of a

  20. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels.

  1. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  2. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. “Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny” in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, K.W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Rose, H. [Materialwissenschaftliche Elektronenmikroskopie, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. - Highlights: • We scrutinize assertions made on the evolution of Cambridge Cs corrector project. • References [22-24] do not demonstrate improvement of resolution by Cs correction. • According to literature such improvement is only shown in reference [10] in 2001. • Corresponding evidence was published by Heidelberg project already in 1998. • The Heidelberg Cs corrector project antedates the Cambridge project by 3 years.

  3. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. “Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny” in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, K.W.; Rose, H.

    2016-01-01

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. - Highlights: • We scrutinize assertions made on the evolution of Cambridge Cs corrector project. • References [22-24] do not demonstrate improvement of resolution by Cs correction. • According to literature such improvement is only shown in reference [10] in 2001. • Corresponding evidence was published by Heidelberg project already in 1998. • The Heidelberg Cs corrector project antedates the Cambridge project by 3 years.

  4. An accurate optical design method for synchrotron radiation beamlines with wave-front aberration theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaojiang, E-mail: slsyxj@nus.edu.sg; Diao, Caozheng; Breese, Mark B. H. [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117603 (Singapore)

    2016-07-27

    An aberration calculation method which was developed by Lu [1] can treat individual aberration term precisely. Spectral aberration is the linear sum of these aberration terms, and the aberrations of multi-element systems also can be calculated correctly when the stretching ratio, defined herein, is unity. Evaluation of focusing mirror-grating systems which are optimized according to Lu’s method, along with the Light Path Function (LPF) and the Spot Diagram method (SD) are discussed to confirm the advantage of Lu’s methodology. Lu’s aberration terms are derived from a precise wave-front treatment, whereas the terms of the power series expansion of the light path function do not yield an accurate sum of the aberrations. Moreover, Lu’s aberration terms can be individually optimized. This is not possible with the analytical spot diagram formulae.

  5. Visualization of bacterial polysaccharides by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanski, B S; McAleer, W J; Hilleman, M R

    1983-04-01

    Highly purified capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis groups A, B, and C have been visualized by high resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). Spheroidal macromolecules approximately 200 A in diameter are characteristic of the Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides whereas filaments that are 400-600 A in length are found in Meningococcus B polysaccharide preparations. Filaments are occasionally found associated with the spheroidal Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides and it is proposed that these structures are composed of a long (1-4 microns) filament or filaments that are arranged in spheroidal molecules or micelles of high molecular weight. The Meningococcus B polysaccharide, by contrast, is a short flexuous filament or strand of relatively low molecular weight. A relationship between morphology and antigenicity is proposed.

  6. Dual ring multilayer ionization chamber and theory-based correction technique for scanning proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Taisuke; Nihongi, Hideaki; Nishiuchi, Hideaki; Tadokoro, Masahiro; Ito, Yuki; Nakashima, Chihiro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Matsuda, Koji; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    To develop a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and a correction technique that suppresses differences between the MLIC and water phantom measurements in order to achieve fast and accurate depth dose measurements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. The authors distinguish between a calibration procedure and an additional correction: 1-the calibration for variations in the air gap thickness and the electrometer gains is addressed without involving measurements in water; 2-the correction is addressed to suppress the difference between depth dose profiles in water and in the MLIC materials due to the nuclear interaction cross sections by a semiempirical model tuned by using measurements in water. In the correction technique, raw MLIC data are obtained for each energy layer and integrated after multiplying them by the correction factor because the correction factor depends on incident energy. The MLIC described here has been designed especially for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. This MLIC is called a dual ring multilayer ionization chamber (DRMLIC). The shape of the electrodes allows the DRMLIC to measure both the percentage depth dose (PDD) and integrated depth dose (IDD) because ionization electrons are collected from inner and outer air gaps independently. IDDs for which the beam energies were 71.6, 120.6, 159, 180.6, and 221.4 MeV were measured and compared with water phantom results. Furthermore, the measured PDDs along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) were compared. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 and 3 cm for fields with a range of 6.9 cm. The IDDs measured with the DRMLIC using the correction technique were consistent with those that of the water phantom; except for the beam energy of 71.6 MeV, all of the points satisfied the 1% dose/1 mm distance to agreement criterion of the gamma index. The 71.6 MeV depth dose profile showed slight differences in the shallow

  7. Local chromatic correction scheme for LER of PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, E.; Robin, D.; Zholents, A.; Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Sullivan, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the interaction point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher-order chromatic aberrations. Here we consider the approach for ampersand PEP-II B Factory low energy ring (LER) where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. For the IP straight section the lattice is designed in such a way that the chromatic aberrations are made small and sextupole-like aberrations are eliminated. The results of dimensional tracking simulations are presented

  8. Novel use of gamma correction for precise {sup 99m}Tc-HDP pinhole bone scan diagnosis and classification of knee occult fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong-Whee [Sung Ae General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Jeon, Ho-Seung [Sung Ae General Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jang Min [Sung Ae General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Park, Jung Mee; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Soo-Kyo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Chung, Yong-An [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Institute of Catholic Integrative Medicine (ICIM), Incheon (Korea); Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Incheon (Korea); Kim, E.E. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-08-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS) to depict specific signs of knee occult fractures (OF) on {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxydiphosphonate (HDP) scan. Thirty-six cases of six different types of knee OF in 27 consecutive patients (male = 20, female = 7, and age = 18-86 years) were enrolled. The diagnosis was made on the basis of a history of acute or subacute knee trauma, local pain, tenderness, cutaneous injury, negative conventional radiography, and positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the impracticability of histological verification of individual OF, MRI was utilized as a gold standard of diagnosis and classification. All patients had {sup 99m}Tc-HDP bone scanning and supplementary GCPBS. GCPBS signs were correlated and compared with those of MRI. The efficacy of gamma correction of ordinary parallel collimator and pinhole collimator scans were collated. Gamma correction pinhole bone scan depicted the signs characteristic of six different types of OF. They were well defined stuffed globular tracer uptake in geographic I fractures (n = 9), block-like uptake in geographic II fractures (n = 7), simple or branching linear uptake in linear cancellous fractures (n = 4), compression in impacted fractures (n = 2), stippled-serpentine uptake in reticular fractures (n = 11), and irregular subcortical uptake in osteochondral fractures (n = 3). All fractures were equally well or more distinctly depicted on GCPBS than on MRI except geographic II fracture, the details of which were not appreciated on GCPBS. Parallel collimator scan also yielded to gamma correction, but the results were inferior to those of the pinhole scan. Gamma correction pinhole bone scan can depict the specific diagnostic signs in six different types of knee occult fractures. The specific diagnostic capability along with the lower cost and wider global availability of bone scanning would make GCPBS an effective alternative. (orig.)

  9. Spectral estimation for characterization of acoustic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varslot, Trond; Angelsen, Bjørn; Waag, Robert C

    2004-07-01

    Spectral estimation based on acoustic backscatter from a motionless stochastic medium is described for characterization of aberration in ultrasonic imaging. The underlying assumptions for the estimation are: The correlation length of the medium is short compared to the length of the transmitted acoustic pulse, an isoplanatic region of sufficient size exists around the focal point, and the backscatter can be modeled as an ergodic stochastic process. The motivation for this work is ultrasonic imaging with aberration correction. Measurements were performed using a two-dimensional array system with 80 x 80 transducer elements and an element pitch of 0.6 mm. The f number for the measurements was 1.2 and the center frequency was 3.0 MHz with a 53% bandwidth. Relative phase of aberration was extracted from estimated cross spectra using a robust least-mean-square-error method based on an orthogonal expansion of the phase differences of neighboring wave forms as a function of frequency. Estimates of cross-spectrum phase from measurements of random scattering through a tissue-mimicking aberrator have confidence bands approximately +/- 5 degrees wide. Both phase and magnitude are in good agreement with a reference characterization obtained from a point scatterer.

  10. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  12. Inverse scattering and refraction corrected reflection for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskin, J.; Borup, D.; Johnson, S.; Berggren, M.; Robinson, D.; Smith, J.; Chen, J.; Parisky, Y.; Klock, John

    2010-03-01

    Reflection ultrasound (US) has been utilized as an adjunct imaging modality for over 30 years. TechniScan, Inc. has developed unique, transmission and concomitant reflection algorithms which are used to reconstruct images from data gathered during a tomographic breast scanning process called Warm Bath Ultrasound (WBU™). The transmission algorithm yields high resolution, 3D, attenuation and speed of sound (SOS) images. The reflection algorithm is based on canonical ray tracing utilizing refraction correction via the SOS and attenuation reconstructions. The refraction correction reflection algorithm allows 360 degree compounding resulting in the reflection image. The requisite data are collected when scanning the entire breast in a 33° C water bath, on average in 8 minutes. This presentation explains how the data are collected and processed by the 3D transmission and reflection imaging mode algorithms. The processing is carried out using two NVIDIA® Tesla™ GPU processors, accessing data on a 4-TeraByte RAID. The WBU™ images are displayed in a DICOM viewer that allows registration of all three modalities. Several representative cases are presented to demonstrate potential diagnostic capability including: a cyst, fibroadenoma, and a carcinoma. WBU™ images (SOS, attenuation, and reflection modalities) are shown along with their respective mammograms and standard ultrasound images. In addition, anatomical studies are shown comparing WBU™ images and MRI images of a cadaver breast. This innovative technology is designed to provide additional tools in the armamentarium for diagnosis of breast disease.

  13. Characterization of Li-rich layered oxides by using transmission electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-rich layered oxides (LrLOs deliver extremely high specific capacities and are considered to be promising candidates for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, the application of LrLOs needs further understanding of the structural complexity and dynamic evolution of monoclinic and rhombohedral phases, in order to overcome the issues including voltage decay, poor rate capability, initial irreversible capacity loss and etc. The development of aberration correction for the transmission electron microscope and concurrent progress in electron spectroscopy, have fueled rapid progress in the understanding of the mechanism of such issues. New techniques based on the transmission electron microscope are first surveyed, and the applications of these techniques for the study of the structure, migration of transition metal, and the activation of oxygen of LrLOs are then explored in detail, with a particular focus on the mechanism of voltage decay. Keywords: Lithium-ion battery, Transmission electron microscope, Lithium-rich layered oxide, Cathode material

  14. Correction of aberrations in beams filling elliptical phase-space areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollnik, H.

    1988-01-01

    For the optimization of an optical system it is advantageous to amend the system by a virtual object lens so that the calculation always starts from an upright phase-space distribution. Furthermore, in case of a beam filling an elliptical phase-space volume, the most extreme rays of a beam, filling a parallelogram-like phase-space volume, do not exist, so that the corresponding sum of aberrations is smaller. For an optimization thus corresponding attenuation factors should be taken into accout

  15. Compact design of a transmission electron microscope-scanning tunneling microscope holder with three-dimensional coarse motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, K.; Jompol, Y.; Olin, H.; Olsson, E.

    2003-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a compact, three-dimensional, inertial slider design is presented. Inertial sliding of the STM tip, in three dimensions, enables coarse motion and scanning using only one piezoelectric tube. Using the same electronics both for scanning and inertial sliding, step lengths of less than 5% of the piezo range were achieved. The compact design, less than 1 cm3 in volume, ensures a low mechanical noise level and enables us to fit the STM into the sample holder of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), while maintaining atomic scale resolution in both STM and TEM imaging

  16. Performance evaluation of spatial compounding in the presence of aberration and adaptive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jeremy J.; Guenther, Drake; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Spatial compounding has been used for years to reduce speckle in ultrasonic images and to resolve anatomical features hidden behind the grainy appearance of speckle. Adaptive imaging restores image contrast and resolution by compensating for beamforming errors caused by tissue-induced phase errors. Spatial compounding represents a form of incoherent imaging, whereas adaptive imaging attempts to maintain a coherent, diffraction-limited aperture in the presence of aberration. Using a Siemens Antares scanner, we acquired single channel RF data on a commercially available 1-D probe. Individual channel RF data was acquired on a cyst phantom in the presence of a near field electronic phase screen. Simulated data was also acquired for both a 1-D and a custom built 8x96, 1.75-D probe (Tetrad Corp.). The data was compounded using a receive spatial compounding algorithm; a widely used algorithm because it takes advantage of parallel beamforming to avoid reductions in frame rate. Phase correction was also performed by using a least mean squares algorithm to estimate the arrival time errors. We present simulation and experimental data comparing the performance of spatial compounding to phase correction in contrast and resolution tasks. We evaluate spatial compounding and phase correction, and combinations of the two methods, under varying aperture sizes, aperture overlaps, and aberrator strength to examine the optimum configuration and conditions in which spatial compounding will provide a similar or better result than adaptive imaging. We find that, in general, phase correction is hindered at high aberration strengths and spatial frequencies, whereas spatial compounding is helped by these aberrators.

  17. Fifty years old, and still going strong: Transmission electron optical studies of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Highlights in the history of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy include the introduction of diffraction contrast, resolution of periodic lattices by phase contrast and incoherent imaging via the high-angle annular dark-field detector. Convergent-beam electron diffraction and analytical electron microscopy, especially the application of energy-dispersive X-ray and electron energy-loss spectrometry, have provided structural and chemical information in addition to strain contrast from lattice defects. From the outset, novel specimen stages and improvements to aid the operator enhanced the electron-optical engineering provided by the instrument makers. The spatial resolution achieved was mainly determined by the way the instrument was used, and not by the basic resolution limit set by the electron optics. However, the application of computer controlled correction of spherical (and higher order) aberration has resulted in a new generation of instruments capable of sub-Angstrom point-to-point resolution. This improved performance, combined with electron energy-loss spectrometry, promises genuine three-dimensional determination of atomic and electronic structure: an indispensable weapon in the battle to fabricate and control useful nanostructures. The uncertainty principle now fundamentally restricts some of the observations one can make, but much more technical development over the next decades must occur before one can say that the techniques of electron-optical imaging of material structure have reached their fundamental limitations. One can expect remarkable progress over the next few years

  18. Dual ring multilayer ionization chamber and theory-based correction technique for scanning proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, Taisuke; Nishiuchi, Hideaki; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Nihongi, Hideaki; Tadokoro, Masahiro; Ito, Yuki; Nakashima, Chihiro; Matsuda, Koji; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and a correction technique that suppresses differences between the MLIC and water phantom measurements in order to achieve fast and accurate depth dose measurements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods: The authors distinguish between a calibration procedure and an additional correction: 1—the calibration for variations in the air gap thickness and the electrometer gains is addressed without involving measurements in water; 2—the correction is addressed to suppress the difference between depth dose profiles in water and in the MLIC materials due to the nuclear interaction cross sections by a semiempirical model tuned by using measurements in water. In the correction technique, raw MLIC data are obtained for each energy layer and integrated after multiplying them by the correction factor because the correction factor depends on incident energy. The MLIC described here has been designed especially for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. This MLIC is called a dual ring multilayer ionization chamber (DRMLIC). The shape of the electrodes allows the DRMLIC to measure both the percentage depth dose (PDD) and integrated depth dose (IDD) because ionization electrons are collected from inner and outer air gaps independently. Results: IDDs for which the beam energies were 71.6, 120.6, 159, 180.6, and 221.4 MeV were measured and compared with water phantom results. Furthermore, the measured PDDs along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 × 10 cm 2 were compared. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 and 3 cm for fields with a range of 6.9 cm. The IDDs measured with the DRMLIC using the correction technique were consistent with those that of the water phantom; except for the beam energy of 71.6 MeV, all of the points satisfied the 1% dose/1 mm distance to agreement criterion of the gamma index. The 71.6 MeV depth dose profile showed slight

  19. Using Aberrant Behaviors as Reinforcers for Autistic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlop, Marjorie H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments assessed the efficacy of various reinforcers to increase correct task responding in a total of 10 autistic children, aged 6-9. Of the reinforcers used (stereotypy, delayed echolalia, perseverative behavior, and food), task performance was highest with opportunities to engage in aberrant behaviors, and lowest with edible…

  20. Dynamics of annular bright field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of image formation in the so-called annular bright field mode in scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereby an annular detector is used with detector collection range lying within the cone of illumination, i.e. the bright field region. We show that this imaging mode allows us to reliably image both light and heavy columns over a range of thickness and defocus values, and we explain the contrast mechanisms involved. The role of probe and detector aperture sizes is considered, as is the sensitivity of the method to intercolumn spacing and local disorder.

  1. Theory of aberration fields for general optical systems with freeform surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P; Thompson, Kevin P

    2014-11-03

    This paper utilizes the framework of nodal aberration theory to describe the aberration field behavior that emerges in optical systems with freeform optical surfaces, particularly φ-polynomial surfaces, including Zernike polynomial surfaces, that lie anywhere in the optical system. If the freeform surface is located at the stop or pupil, the net aberration contribution of the freeform surface is field constant. As the freeform optical surface is displaced longitudinally away from the stop or pupil of the optical system, the net aberration contribution becomes field dependent. It is demonstrated that there are no new aberration types when describing the aberration fields that arise with the introduction of freeform optical surfaces. Significantly it is shown that the aberration fields that emerge with the inclusion of freeform surfaces in an optical system are exactly those that have been described by nodal aberration theory for tilted and decentered optical systems. The key contribution here lies in establishing the field dependence and nodal behavior of each freeform term that is essential knowledge for effective application to optical system design. With this development, the nodes that are distributed throughout the field of view for each aberration type can be anticipated and targeted during optimization for the correction or control of the aberrations in an optical system with freeform surfaces. This work does not place any symmetry constraints on the optical system, which could be packaged in a fully three dimensional geometry, without fold mirrors.

  2. Static telescope aberration measurement using lucky imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Marrero, Marcos; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis Fernando; Marichal-Hernández, José Gil; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2012-07-01

    A procedure has been developed to compute static aberrations once the telescope PSF has been measured with the lucky imaging technique, using a nearby star close to the object of interest as the point source to probe the optical system. This PSF is iteratively turned into a phase map at the pupil using the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and then converted to the appropriate actuation information for a deformable mirror having low actuator number but large stroke capability. The main advantage of this procedure is related with the capability of correcting static aberration at the specific pointing direction and without the need of a wavefront sensor.

  3. Fast Focal Point Correction in Prism-Coupled Total Internal Reflection Scanning Imager Using an Electronically Tunable Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggang Zhu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Total internal reflection (TIR is useful for interrogating physical and chemical processes that occur at the interface between two transparent media. Yet prism-coupled TIR imaging microscopes suffer from limited sensing areas due to the fact that the interface (the object plane is not perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. In this paper, we show that an electrically tunable lens can be used to rapidly and reproducibly correct the focal length of an oblique-incidence scanning microscope (OI-RD in a prism-coupled TIR geometry. We demonstrate the performance of such a correction by acquiring an image of a protein microarray over a scan area of 4 cm2 with an effective resolution of less than 20 microns. The electronic focal length tuning eliminates the mechanical movement of the illumination lens in the scanning microscope and in turn the noise and background drift associated with the motion.

  4. Automated correction on X-rays calibration using transmission chamber and LabVIEWTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, Flavio; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainties during prolonged exposure times on X-rays calibration procedures at the Instruments Calibration facilities at IPEN may suffer from efficiency (and therefore intensity) variations on the industrial X-Ray generator used. Using a transmission chamber as an online reference chamber during the whole irradiation process is proposed in order to compensate for such error source. Also temperature (and pressure) fluctuations may arise from the performance limited calibration room air conditioning system. As an open ionization chamber, that monitor chamber does require calculation of a correction factor due to the temperature and pressure effects on air density. Sending and processing data from all related instruments (electrometer, thermometer and barometer) can be more easily achieved by interfacing them to a host computer running an especially developed algorithm using LabVIEW TM environment which will not only apply the proper correction factors during runtime, but also determine the exact length of time to reach a desired condition, which can be: time period, charge collected, or air kerma, based on the previous calibration of the whole system using a reference chamber traceable to primary standard dosimetry laboratories. When performing such calibration, two temperature sensors (secondary standard thermistors) are simultaneously used, one for the transmission chamber, and other for the reference chamber. As the substitution method is used during actual customer's calibration, the readings from the second thermistor can also be used when desired for further corrections. Use of LabVIEW TM programming language allowed for a shorter development time, and it is also extremely convenient to make things easier when improvements and modifications are called for. (author)

  5. Quantitative atom column position analysis at the incommensurate interfaces of a (PbS)1.14NbS2 misfit layered compound with aberration-corrected HRTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbrecht, M.; Spiecker, E.; Tillmann, K.; Jaeger, W.

    2011-01-01

    Aberration-corrected HRTEM is applied to explore the potential of NCSI contrast imaging to quantitatively analyse the complex atomic structure of misfit layered compounds and their incommensurate interfaces. Using the (PbS) 1.14 NbS 2 misfit layered compound as a model system it is shown that atom column position analyses at the incommensurate interfaces can be performed with precisions reaching a statistical accuracy of ±6 pm. The procedure adopted for these studies compares experimental images taken from compound regions free of defects and interface modulations with a structure model derived from XRD experiments and with multi-slice image simulations for the corresponding NCSI contrast conditions used. The high precision achievable in such experiments is confirmed by a detailed quantitative analysis of the atom column positions at the incommensurate interfaces, proving a tetragonal distortion of the monochalcogenide sublattice. -- Research Highlights: → Quantitative aberration-corrected HRTEM analysis of atomic column positions in (PbS) 1.14 NbS 2 misfit layered compound reveals tetragonal distortion of the PbS subsystem. → Detailed comparison of multi-slice simulations with the experimental NCSI contrast condition imaging results lead to a high precision (better than 10 pm) for determining the positions of atoms. → Precision in gaining information of local structure at atomic scale is demonstrated, which may not be accessible by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction analysis.

  6. Beacon-S TM: Non-uniform attenuation correction for SPECT imaging. The new medium-energy transmission device for AXIS and IRIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel Gagnon, D.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents new medium-energy transmission device for SPECT imaging. Beacon-S includes a 356-keV medium energy 133 Ba source with a 10.54-year half-life. Beacon-S provide high-resolution and high-contrast transmission scans. The higher energy of the gamma substantially improves the transmission contrast for larger patients by virtue of better penetration through the body

  7. Three-dimensional ophthalmic optical coherence tomography with a refraction correction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Leisser, Christoph; Leitgeb, Rainer; Pircher, Michael; Fercher, Adolf F.

    2003-10-01

    We built an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a rapid scanning optical delay (RSOD) line, which allows probing full axial eye length. The system produces Three-dimensional (3D) data sets that are used to generate 3D tomograms of the model eye. The raw tomographic data were processed by an algorithm, which is based on Snell"s law to correct the interface positions. The Zernike polynomials representation of the interfaces allows quantitative wave aberration measurements. 3D images of our results are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system and the algorithm performance. The system allows us to measure intra-ocular distances.

  8. Transmission/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy | Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    crystallographic structure of a material. Amplitude-contrast images yield information about the chemistry and microstructure of a material and its defects. Phase-contrast imaging or high-resolution (HR) TEM imaging gives information about the microstructure of a material and its defects at an atomic resolution. With scanning

  9. Optical Aberrations and Wavefront

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Polat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The deviation of light to create normal retinal image in the optical system is called aberration. Aberrations are divided two subgroup: low-order aberrations (defocus: spherical and cylindrical refractive errors and high-order aberrations (coma, spherical, trefoil, tetrafoil, quadrifoil, pentafoil, secondary astigmatism. Aberrations increase with aging. Spherical aberrations are compensated by positive corneal and negative lenticular spherical aberrations in youth. Total aberrations are elevated by positive corneal and positive lenticular spherical aberrations in elderly. In this study, we aimed to analyze the basic terms regarding optic aberrations which have gained significance recently. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 306-11

  10. Examination of SUV of regional activity concentration for simultaneous emission/transmission acquisition using the mask technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Shinji; Nishino, Masanari; Yamashita, Masato; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To achieve quantitative accuracy of simultaneous emission/transmission (SET) acquisition using the mask technique, we determined the factor of expression that derives the true transmission data from the measured transmission and emission data. We then evaluated the standardized uptake value (SUV) of the regional activity concentration derived respectively from the SET scans and conventional scans. First, to determine the attenuation factor for the transmission source when the photons of the cylindrical phantom filled with 18 F solution reached emission memory, SET scans were performed with a dummy transmission source and under the blank status of the transmission source. Second, to evaluate the SUV, we used a hollow-sphere phantom filled with 18 F solution whose activity concentrations were approximately 3 and 5 times that of the background. Then we performed conventional and SET scans of the phantom for solutions ranging from the higher concentration to the lower concentration. All of the data were reconstructed with the decay correction, and the SUV of each sphere was derived. The results demonstrated that, when the conventional factor was used, SUV was underestimated according to the increasing activity concentration of the solution. However, when a new factor that took into account the attenuation of the transmission source was used, there was no significant difference in the SUV. We estimated the SUV derived from the SET scans was within 3% for the large spheres and within 16% for the small spheres. (author)

  11. 3D printing of microlenses for aberration correction in GRIN microendoscopes

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea; Bovetti, Serena; Moretti, Claudio; Succol, Francesca; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar Palanisamy; Bertoncini, Andrea; Fellin, Tommaso; Liberale, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy provides high resolution information on the anatomy and function of cellular structures located several hundreds of microns deep within biological tissues. However, light scattering poses a fundamental limit to imaging of deeper areas (> 1.5 mm). Implantable microendoscopic probes based on graded index (GRIN) lenses are widely used tools to perform two-photon fluorescence microscopy in otherwise inaccessible regions[1], but the optical performances of with these probes are limited by intrinsic aberrations.

  12. 3D printing of microlenses for aberration correction in GRIN microendoscopes

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea

    2017-11-02

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy provides high resolution information on the anatomy and function of cellular structures located several hundreds of microns deep within biological tissues. However, light scattering poses a fundamental limit to imaging of deeper areas (> 1.5 mm). Implantable microendoscopic probes based on graded index (GRIN) lenses are widely used tools to perform two-photon fluorescence microscopy in otherwise inaccessible regions[1], but the optical performances of with these probes are limited by intrinsic aberrations.

  13. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  14. Characterization of gaseous species in scanning atmospheric rf plasma with transmission infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kang, Bang-Kwon

    2008-01-01

    A scanning atmospheric radio-frequency (rf) plasma was analyzed with transmission infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The IR analyses were made for the plasmas used for hydrophobic coating deposition and superhydrophobic coating deposition processes. Since the rf plasma was generated in a small open space with a high gas flow rate in ambient air, the density of gas-phase molecules was very high and the plasma-generated reactive species seemed to undergo various reactions in the gas phase. So, the transmission IR spectra of the scanning atmospheric rf plasma were dominated by gas-phase reaction products, rather than plasma-generated intermediate species. In the CH 4 /He plasma used for hydrophobic coating deposition, C 2 H 6 , C 2 H 2 , and a small amount of C 2 H 4 as well as CO were detected in transmission IR. The intensities of these peaks increased as the rf power increased. The CO formation is due to the activation of oxygen and water in the air. In the CF 4 /H 2 /He plasma used for deposition of superhydrophobic coatings, C 2 F 6 , CF 3 H, COF 2 , and HF were mainly detected. When the H 2 /CF 4 ratio was ∼0.5, the consumption of CF 4 was the highest. As the H 2 /CF 4 ratio increased higher, the C 2 F 6 production was suppressed while the CF 3 H peak grew and the formation of CH 4 were detected. In both CH 4 /He and CF 4 /H 2 /He plasma systems, the undissociated feed gas molecules seem to be highly excited vibrationally and rotationally. The information on plasma-generated reactive species and their reactions was deduced from the distribution of these gas-phase reaction products

  15. Development of a scanning transmission x-ray microscope for the beamline P04 at PETRA III DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, Konstantin; Ewald, Johannes; Nisius, Thomas; Wilhein, Thomas; Lühl, Lars; Malzer, Wolfgang; Kanngießer, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) built on top of our existing modular platform for high resolution imaging experiments. This platform consists of up to three separate vacuum chambers and custom designed piezo stages. These piezo stages are able to move precisely in x-, y- and z-direction, this makes it possible to adjust the components for different imaging modes. During recent experiments the endstation was operated mainly as a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) [1, 2

  16. A transmission positron microscope and a scanning positron microscope being built at KEK, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Yagishita, A.; Shidara, T.; Nakahara, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the plans of positron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan improving used electron microscopes. The kinetic energies of positron produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays have not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam will be guided near electron microscopes, a transmission electron microscope (JEM100S) and a scanning electron microscope (JSM25S). Positrons are slowed down by a tungsten foil, accelerated and focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam will be injected into an electron microscope. The focusing of positrons and electrons is achieved by magnetic system of the electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (orig.)

  17. An Image Processing Approach to Pre-compensation for Higher-Order Aberrations in the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Alonso Jr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Human beings rely heavily on vision for almost all of the tasks that are required in daily life. Because of this dependence on vision, humans with visual limitations, caused by genetic inheritance, disease, or age, will have difficulty in completing many of the tasks required of them. Some individuals with severe visual impairments, known as high-order aberrations, may have difficulty in interacting with computers, even when using a traditional means of visual correction (e.g., spectacles, contact lenses. This is, in part, because these correction mechanisms can only compensate for the most regular (low-order distortions or aberrations of the image in the eye. This paper presents an image processing approach that will pre-compensate the images displayed on the computer screen, so as to counter the effect of the eye's aberrations on the image. The characterization of the eye required to perform this customized pre-compensation is the eye's Point Spread Function (PSF. Ophthalmic instruments generically called "Wavefront Analyzers" can now measure this description of the eye's optical properties. The characterization provided by these instruments also includes the "higher-order aberration components" and could, therefore, lead to a more comprehensive vision correction than traditional mechanisms. This paper explains the theoretical foundation of the methods proposed and illustrates them with experiments involving the emulation of a known and constant PSF by interposing a lens in the field of view of normally sighted test subjects.

  18. Simulação computacional de cirurgias foto-refrativas personalizadas e precisão relacionada à ordem das aberrações ópticas Computational simulation of customized photorefractive surgery and precision of correction related to different order aberrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Vieira de Carvalho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo principal deste trabalho foi o desenvolvimento e a implementação de um algoritmo para simulação de cirurgias foto-refrativas. Sabe-se que os atuais " flying-spot" lasers para cirurgia refrativa disponíveis no mercado ainda contêm limitações na correção de algumas aberrações de ordem alta. No entanto, há muito pouca informação quantitativa sobre os erros envolvidos em função da complexidade das aberrações. Aplicando-se superfícies objetivo descritas por uma série de coeficientes de Zernike e o conceito matemático de convolução, várias ablações personalizadas foram simuladas para várias aberrações, desde baixa ordem (esfero-cilíndricas até aberrações de décima ordem (como coma, aberração esférica, entre outras. Os resultados mostram que o perfil de ablação de cada pulso do laser assim como seu diâmetro são fatores críticos quando o objetivo é corrigir aberrações de alta ordem. Além disso, outras conclusões foram possíveis, como por exemplo a de que nem todas as aberrações de alta ordem induzem aos mesmos erros na ablação. Também foi possível verificar que a correção de aberrações de alta ordem nos termos radiais (como aberração esférica é bem mais difícil do que naqueles termos contendo alta frequência angular (como trefoil.PURPOSE: To develop and implement an algorithm for simulation of photorefractive surgery. It is well known that many flying-spot lasers in the market have limitations in correcting higher order aberrations, but there is little quantitative information about errors related to aberration complexity. METHODS: By applying known surfaces described by Zernike polynomials of different orders it was possible to simulate several target surfaces that may well resemble in vivo cases of refractive surgery candidates. An algorithm that uses the mathematical concept of convolution was implemented and several simulated surfaces were tested, ranging from low order

  19. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  20. Clinical usefulness of scatter and attenuation correction for brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Itaru; Doi, Kenji; Komori, Tsuyoshi; Hou, Nobuyoshi; Tabuchi, Koujirou; Matsui, Ritsuo; Sueyoshi, Kouzou; Utsunomiya, Keita; Narabayashi, Isamu

    1998-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study clinical usefulness of scatter and attenuation correction (SAC) of brain SPECT in infants to compare the standard reconstruction (STD). The brain SPECT was performed in 31 patients with 19 epilepsy, 5 cerebro-vascular disease, 2 brain tumor, 3 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus and psychosis (mean age 5.0±4.9 years old). Many patients was necessary to be injected sedatives for restraining body motion after Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO) was injected at the convulsion or rest. Brain SPECT data were acquired with triple detector gamma camera (GCA-9300 Toshiba Japan). These data were reconstructed by filtered backprojection after the raw data were corrected by triple energy windows method of scatter correction and Chang filtered method of attenuation correction. The same data was reconstructed by filtered backprojection without these corrections. Both SAC and STD SPECT images were analyzed by the visual interpretation. The uptake ratio of cerebral basal nuclei was calculated by the counts of the thalamus or lenticular nuclei divided by the cortex. All images of SAC method were excellent than that of STD method. The thalamic uptake ratio in SAC method was higher than that of STD method (1.22±0.09>0.87±0.22 p 1.02±0.16 p<0.01). Transmission scan is the most suitable method of absorption correction. But the transmission scan is not adequate for examination of children, because this scan needs a lot of time and the infants are exposed by the line source radioisotope. It was concluded that these scatter and absorption corrections were most suitable method for brain SPECT in pediatrics. (author)

  1. A high resolution chromosome image processor for study purposes, NIRS-1000:CHROMO STUDY, and algorithm developing to classify radiation induced aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M; Hayata, I; Furuta, S

    1992-03-01

    Since 1989 we have promoted a project to develop an automated scoring system of radiation induced chromosome aberrations. As a first step, a high resolution image processing system for study purposes, NIRS-1000:CHROMO STUDY, has been developed. It is composed of: (1) CHROMO MARKER whose main purpose is to mark on images to make image data base, (2) CHROMO ALGO whose purpose is algorithm development, and (3) METAPHASE RANKER whose purposes are metaphase finding and ranking with a high power objective lens. However, METAPHASE RANKER is presently under development. The system utilizes a high definition video system so as to realize the best spatial resolution that is achievable with an optical microscope using an objective lens (x 100, numerical aperture 1.4). The video camera has 1024 effective scan lines to realize 0.1 microns sampling on a specimen. The system resolution achieved on the hard copy is less than 0.3 microns on a specimen. A preliminary algorithm has been developed to classify the aberrations on the system using projection information of gray level. The preliminary test results on excellent 10 metaphases show that the correct classification ratio is 92.7%, that the detection rate of the aberrations is 83.3% and that the false positive rate is 6.1%.

  2. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  3. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5 Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. -- Highlights: ► TV-rate STEM imaging of heavy atoms is demonstrated. ► DNA sequencing by STEM dark field imaging should be possible at a rate of 10 6 bases/s. ► Individual silicon atom impurities in graphene are imaged atom-by-atom. ► Single atoms of nitrogen and boron incorporated in graphene are imaged spectroscopically. ► Bonding of individual atoms can be probed by analyzing the fine structures of their EEL spectra.

  4. Analysis of self-organized In(Ga)As quantum structures with the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwald, Andres

    2008-01-01

    Aim of this thesis was to apply the analytical methods of the scanning transmission electron microscopy to the study of self-organized In(Ga)As quantum structures. With the imaging methods Z contrast and bright field (position resolutions in the subnanometer range) and especially with the possibilities of the quantitative chemical EELS analysis of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) fundamental questions concerning morphology and chemical properties of self-organized quantum structures should be answered. By the high position resolution of the STEM among others essentail morphological and structural parameters in the growth behaviour of ''dot in a well'' (DWell) structures and of vertically correlated quantum dots (QDs) could be analyzed. For the optimization of DWell structures samples were studied, the nominal InAs-QD growth position was directedly varied within the embedding InGaAs quantum wells. The STEM offers in connection with the EELS method a large potential for the chemical analysis of quantum structures. Studied was a sample series of self-organized InGaAs/GaAs structures on GaAs substrate, the stress of which was changed by varying the Ga content of the INGaAs material between 2.4 % and 4.3 % [de

  5. Impact of attenuation correction strategies on the quantification of High Resolution Research Tomograph PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velden, Floris H P van; Kloet, Reina W; Berckel, Bart N M van; Molthoff, Carla F M; Jong, Hugo W A M de; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the quantitative accuracy of different attenuation correction strategies presently available for the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) was investigated. These attenuation correction methods differ in reconstruction and processing (segmentation) algorithms used for generating a μ-image from measured 2D transmission scans, an intermediate step in the generation of 3D attenuation correction factors. Available methods are maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction (MAP-TR), unweighted OSEM (UW-OSEM) and NEC-TR, which transforms sinogram values back to their noise equivalent counts (NEC) to restore Poisson distribution. All methods can be applied with or without μ-image segmentation. However, for MAP-TR a μ-histogram is a prior during reconstruction. All possible strategies were evaluated using phantoms of various sizes, simulating preclinical and clinical situations. Furthermore, effects of emission contamination of the transmission scan on the accuracy of various attenuation correction strategies were studied. Finally, the accuracy of various attenuation corrections strategies and its relative impact on the reconstructed activity concentration (AC) were evaluated using small animal and human brain studies. For small structures, MAP-TR with human brain priors showed smaller differences in μ-values for transmission scans with and without emission contamination (<8%) than the other methods (<26%). In addition, it showed best agreement with true AC (deviation <4.5%). A specific prior designed to take into account the presence of small animal fixation devices only very slightly improved AC precision to 4.3%. All methods scaled μ-values of a large homogeneous phantom to within 4% of the water peak, but MAP-TR provided most accurate AC after reconstruction. However, for clinical data MAP-TR using the default prior settings overestimated the thickness of the skull, resulting in overestimations of μ-values in regions near the skull and thus in incorrect

  6. The problem in 180 deg data sampling and radioactivity decay correction in gated cardiac blood pool scanning using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Junichi

    1986-01-01

    In cardiac blood pool scanning using SPECT, half 180 deg data collection (HD) vs. full 360 deg data collection (FD) and Tc-99m decay are problems in quantifying the ejection count (EC) (end-diastolic count - end-systolic count) of both ventricles and the ratio of the ejection count of the right and left ventricles (RVEC/LVEC). We studied the change produced by altering the starting position of data sampling in HD scans. In our results of phantom and 4 clinical cases, when the cardiac axis deviation was not large and there was not remarkable cardiac enlargement, the change in LVEC, RVEC and RVEC/LVEC was small (1 - 4 %) within 12 degree change of the starting position, and the difference between the results of HD scan with a good starting position (the average of LV peak and RV peak) and FD scan was not large (less than 7 %). Because of this, we think HD scan can be used in those cases. But when the cardiac axis deviation was large or there was remarkable cardiac enlargement, the change of LVEC, RVEC and RVEC/LVEC was large (more than 10 %) even within 12 degree change of the starting position. So we think FD scan would be better in those cases. In our results of 6 patients, the half-life of Tc-99m labeled albumin in blood varied from 2 to 4 hr (3.03 ± 0.59 hr, mean ± s.d.). Using a program for radioactivity (RA) decay correction, we studied the change in LVEC, RVEC and LVEC/RVEC in 11 cases. When RA decay correction was performed using a halflife of 3.0 hr, LVEC increased 7.5 %, RVEC increased 8.7 % and RVEC/LVEC increased 0.9 % on the average in HD scans of 8 cases (LPO to RAO, 32 views, 60 beat/1 view). We think RA decay correction would not be needed in quantifying RVEC/LVEC in most cases because the change of RVEC/LVEC was very small. (author)

  7. A simple way to obtain backscattered electron images in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi; Morita, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a simple detector for backscattered electrons (BSEs) and incorporated the detector into a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) sample holder. Our detector was made from a 4-mm(2) Si chip. The fabrication procedure was easy, and similar to a standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample thinning process based on ion milling. A TEM grid containing particle objects was fixed to the detector with a silver paste. Observations were carried out using samples of Au and latex particles at 75 and 200 kV. Such a detector provides an easy way to obtain BSE images in an STEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Observation of depth-dependent atomic displacements related to dislocations in GaN by optical sectioning in the STEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J G; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Galindo, P L; Yasuhara, A; Okinishi, E; Zhang, S; Humphreys, C J

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to observe depth-dependent atomic displacements in a GaN crystal due to the sufficiently small depth of field achievable in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. The depth-dependent displacements associated with the Eshelby twist of screw dislocations in GaN viewed end on are directly imaged, and makes possible the determination of the sign of the Burgers vector of the dislocation. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical images

  9. Column-by-column compositional mapping by Z-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S.I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)], E-mail: sergio.molina@uca.es; Sales, D.L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Galindo, P.L. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Alen, B.; Gonzalez, L. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Varela, M.; Pennycook, S.J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    A phenomenological method is developed to determine the composition of materials, with atomic column resolution, by analysis of integrated intensities of aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images. The method is exemplified for InAs{sub x}P{sub 1-x} alloys using epitaxial thin films with calibrated compositions as standards. Using this approach we have determined the composition of the two-dimensional wetting layer formed between self-assembled InAs quantum wires on InP(0 0 1) substrates.

  10. Morphobiochemical diagnosis of acute trabecular microfractures using gamma correction Tc-99m HDP pinhole bone scan with histopathological verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahk, Yong-Whee; Hwang, Seok-Ha; Lee, U-Young; Chung, Yong-An; Jung, Joo-Young; Jeong, Hyeonseok S

    2017-11-01

    We prospectively performed gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS) and histopathologic verification study to make simultaneous morphobiochemical diagnosis of trabecular microfractures (TMF) occurred in the femoral head as a part of femoral neck fracture.Materials consisted of surgical specimens of the femoral head in 6 consecutive patients. The specimens were imaged using Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HDP) pinhole scan and processed by the gamma correction. After cleansing with 10% formalin solution, injured specimen surface was observed using a surgical microscope to record TMF. Morphological findings shown in the photograph, naive pinhole bone scan, GCPBS, and hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain of the specimen were reciprocally correlated for histological verification and the usefulness of suppression and enhancement of Tc-99m HDP uptake was biochemically investigated in TMF and edema and hemorrhage using gamma correction.On the one hand, GCPBS was able to depict the calcifying calluses in TMF with enhanced Tc-99m HDP uptake. They were pinpointed, speckled, round, ovoid, rod-like, geographic, and crushed in shape. The smallest callus measured was 0.23 mm in this series. On the other hand, GCPBS biochemically was able to discern the calluses with enhanced high Tc-99m HDP uptake from the normal and edema dipped and hemorrhage irritated trabeculae with washed out uptake.Morphobiochemically, GCPBS can clearly depict microfractures in the femoral head produced by femoral neck fracture. It discerns the microcalluses with enhanced Tc-99m HDP uptake from the intact and edema dipped and hemorrhage irritated trabeculae with suppressed washed out Tc-99m HDP uptake. Both conventional pinhole bone scan and gamma correction are useful imaging means to specifically diagnose the microcalluses naturally formed in TMF.

  11. On the sensitivity of probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with high-order probes using double phi-step theta-scanning scheme against various measurement uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relatively recently introduced double phi-step theta-scanning scheme and the probe correction technique associated with it is examined against the traditional phi-scanning scheme and the first-order probe correction. The important result of this paper is that the double phi......-step theta-scanning scheme is shown to be clearly less sensitive to the probe misalignment errors compared to the phi-scanning scheme. The two methods show similar sensitivity to noise and channel balance error....

  12. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to raise the awareness of the influence of coma-like higher-order aberrations (HOAs) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics. Eleven eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics and with low lenticular astigmatism (LA) were selected for astigmatism analysis and for treatment simulations with topography-guided custom ablation. Vector analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of coma-like corneal HOAs to RA. Two different strategies were used for simulated treatments aiming to regularize irregular corneal optics: With both strategies correction of anterior corneal surface irregularities (corneal HOAs) were intended. Correction of total corneal astigmatism (TCA) and RA was intended as well with strategies 1 and 2, respectively. Axis of discrepant astigmatism (RA minus TCA minus LA) correlated strongly with axis of coma. Vertical coma influenced RA by canceling the effect of the with-the-rule astigmatism and increasing the effect of the against-the-rule astigmatism. After simulated correction of anterior corneal HOAs along with TCA and RA (strategies 1 and 2), only a small amount of anterior corneal astigmatism (ACA) and no TCA remained after strategy 1, while considerable amount of ACA and TCA remained after strategy 2. Coma-like corneal aberrations seem to contribute a considerable astigmatic component to RA in eyes with coma-like-aberrations dominant corneal optics. If topography-guided ablation is programmed to correct the corneal HOAs and RA, the astigmatic component caused by the coma-like corneal HOAs will be treated twice and will result in induced astigmatism. Disregarding RA and treating TCA along with the corneal HOAs is recommended instead.

  13. Evaluation of an automated karyotyping system for chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome aberration analysis is a promising complement to conventional radiation dosimetry, particularly in the complex radiation fields encountered in the space environment. The capabilities of a recently developed automated karyotyping system were evaluated both to determine current capabilities and limitations and to suggest areas where future development should be emphasized. Cells exposed to radiometric chemicals and to photon and particulate radiation were evaluated by manual inspection and by automated karyotyping. It was demonstrated that the evaluated programs were appropriate for image digitization, storage, and transmission. However, automated and semi-automated scoring techniques must be advanced significantly if in-flight chromosome aberration analysis is to be practical. A degree of artificial intelligence may be necessary to realize this goal

  14. Self-Correcting Electronically-Scanned Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C.; Basta, T.

    1982-01-01

    High-data-rate sensor automatically corrects for temperature variations. Multichannel, self-correcting pressure sensor can be used in wind tunnels, aircraft, process controllers and automobiles. Offers data rates approaching 100,000 measurements per second with inaccuracies due to temperature shifts held below 0.25 percent (nominal) of full scale over a temperature span of 55 degrees C.

  15. Scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography of reconstruction cells from simulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Conghua; Li Min; Hou Qing

    2011-01-01

    For scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography, to compare cell images of the proton stopping power and relative electron density, two cell phantoms are designed and simulated by code FLUKA. The cell images are reconstructed by the filtered back projection algorithm, and compared with their tomography imaging. The images of stopping power and relative electron density slightly vary with proton energies, but the internal images are of clear with high resolution. The organic glass image of relative electron density reveals the resolution power of proton tomography. Also, the simulation results reflect effects of the boundary enhancement, the weak artifacts, and the internal structure border extension by multiple scattering. So using proton tomography to analyze internal structure of a cell is a superior. (authors)

  16. On the Frequency Correction in Temperature-Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Glass Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, J.C.; Allan, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Simulations of TMDSC signals were performed for Corning EAGLE XG® glass over a wide range of modulation frequencies. Our results reveal that the frequency...... correction commonly used in the interpretation of TMDSC signals leads to a master nonreversing heat flow curve independent of modulation frequency, provided that sufficiently high frequencies are employed in the TMDSC measurement. A master reversing heat flow curve can also be generated through the frequency...

  17. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  18. Seamless stitching of tile scan microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, F B; Chernavskaia, O; Heuke, S; Bocklitz, T; Meyer, T; Popp, J; Heintzmann, R

    2015-06-01

    For diagnostic purposes, optical imaging techniques need to obtain high-resolution images of extended biological specimens in reasonable time. The field of view of an objective lens, however, is often smaller than the sample size. To image the whole sample, laser scanning microscopes acquire tile scans that are stitched into larger mosaics. The appearance of such image mosaics is affected by visible edge artefacts that arise from various optical aberrations which manifest in grey level jumps across tile boundaries. In this contribution, a technique for stitching tiles into a seamless mosaic is presented. The stitching algorithm operates by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at corners to a common value. The corrected image mosaics appear to be free from stitching artefacts and are, therefore, suited for further image analysis procedures. The contribution presents a novel method to seamlessly stitch tiles captured by a laser scanning microscope into a large mosaic. The motivation for the work is the failure of currently existing methods for stitching nonlinear, multimodal images captured by our microscopic setups. Our method eliminates the visible edge artefacts that appear between neighbouring tiles by taking into account the overall illumination differences among tiles in such mosaics. The algorithm first corrects the nonuniform brightness that exists within each of the tiles. It then compensates for grey level differences across tile boundaries by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at the corners to a common value. After these artefacts have been removed further image analysis procedures can be applied on the microscopic images. Even though the solution presented here is tailored for the aforementioned specific case, it could be easily adapted to other contexts where image tiles are assembled into mosaics such as in astronomical or satellite photos. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal

  19. Automatic phase aberration compensation for digital holographic microscopy based on deep learning background detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Lam, Van; Raub, Christopher B; Chang, Lin-Ching; Nehmetallah, George

    2017-06-26

    We propose a fully automatic technique to obtain aberration free quantitative phase imaging in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) based on deep learning. The traditional DHM solves the phase aberration compensation problem by manually detecting the background for quantitative measurement. This would be a drawback in real time implementation and for dynamic processes such as cell migration phenomena. A recent automatic aberration compensation approach using principle component analysis (PCA) in DHM avoids human intervention regardless of the cells' motion. However, it corrects spherical/elliptical aberration only and disregards the higher order aberrations. Traditional image segmentation techniques can be employed to spatially detect cell locations. Ideally, automatic image segmentation techniques make real time measurement possible. However, existing automatic unsupervised segmentation techniques have poor performance when applied to DHM phase images because of aberrations and speckle noise. In this paper, we propose a novel method that combines a supervised deep learning technique with convolutional neural network (CNN) and Zernike polynomial fitting (ZPF). The deep learning CNN is implemented to perform automatic background region detection that allows for ZPF to compute the self-conjugated phase to compensate for most aberrations.

  20. Clinical usefulness of scatter and attenuation correction for brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Itaru; Doi, Kenji; Komori, Tsuyoshi; Hou, Nobuyoshi; Tabuchi, Koujirou; Matsui, Ritsuo; Sueyoshi, Kouzou; Utsunomiya, Keita; Narabayashi, Isamu [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study clinical usefulness of scatter and attenuation correction (SAC) of brain SPECT in infants to compare the standard reconstruction (STD). The brain SPECT was performed in 31 patients with 19 epilepsy, 5 cerebro-vascular disease, 2 brain tumor, 3 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus and psychosis (mean age 5.0{+-}4.9 years old). Many patients was necessary to be injected sedatives for restraining body motion after Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) was injected at the convulsion or rest. Brain SPECT data were acquired with triple detector gamma camera (GCA-9300 Toshiba Japan). These data were reconstructed by filtered backprojection after the raw data were corrected by triple energy windows method of scatter correction and Chang filtered method of attenuation correction. The same data was reconstructed by filtered backprojection without these corrections. Both SAC and STD SPECT images were analyzed by the visual interpretation. The uptake ratio of cerebral basal nuclei was calculated by the counts of the thalamus or lenticular nuclei divided by the cortex. All images of SAC method were excellent than that of STD method. The thalamic uptake ratio in SAC method was higher than that of STD method (1.22{+-}0.09>0.87{+-}0.22 p<0.01). The lenticular nuclear uptake ratio in SAC method was higher than that of STD method (1.26{+-}0.15>1.02{+-}0.16 p<0.01). Transmission scan is the most suitable method of absorption correction. But the transmission scan is not adequate for examination of children, because this scan needs a lot of time and the infants are exposed by the line source radioisotope. It was concluded that these scatter and absorption corrections were most suitable method for brain SPECT in pediatrics. (author)

  1. Is attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT scans worth the effort?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, C.; Nguyen, D.; Dixson, H.; Saunders, C.; Cook, P.; Burnett, P.; Croll, F.; Dunn, R.; Hasche, E.; Kelleher, P.; Nasser, F.; Wilson, D.; Lee, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Gated (GS), attenuation-corrected (AC) and non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) myocardial SPECT scans were performed after injection of 99 Tc m -Sestamibi (MIBI) at peak stress in 253 patients between September 1998 and March 1999. 60 patients have undergone cardiac catheterisation (37 males, 23 females, age range 34-80). For whole heart analysis, significant coronary disease was defined as 50% or greater diameter narrowing in any of the coronary arteries and/or documented myocardial infarction. For vascular territory analysis, significant coronary disease was defined as 50% or greater diameter narrowing of any artery in that territory. The three coronary artery territories were assigned as: left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCA) and right coronary (RCA). The septum, apex and anterior wall; the lateral wall; and the inferior wall were assigned to the LAD; LCA; and RCA territories respectively. In conclusion for this selected subgroup of patients with angiographic follow-up, NAC, AC and GS were of similar accuracy in the detection of significant CAD in both whole heart analysis and individual vascular territory analysis. AC and GS were of superior specificity when compared with NAC in both whole heart analysis and individual vascular territory analysis. AC and GS may be of additional diagnostic value in improving the specificity of NAC. Further outcome data will be presented. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  2. Reference nano-dimensional metrology by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Fluegge, Jens; Bosse, Harald; Heidelmann, Markus; Kübel, Christian; Prang, Robby

    2013-01-01

    Traceable and accurate reference dimensional metrology of nano-structures by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is introduced in the paper. Two methods, one based on the crystal lattice constant and the other based on the pitch of a feature pair, were applied to calibrate the TEM magnification. The threshold value, which was defined as the half-intensity of boundary materials, is suggested to extract the boundary position of features from the TEM image. Experimental investigations have demonstrated the high potential of the proposed methods. For instance, the standard deviation from ten repeated measurements of a line structure with a nominal 100 nm critical dimension (CD) reaches 1σ = 0.023 nm, about 0.02%. By intentionally introduced defocus and larger sample alignment errors, the investigation shows that these influences may reach 0.20 and 1.3 nm, respectively, indicating the importance of high-quality TEM measurements. Finally, a strategy for disseminating the destructive TEM results is introduced. Using this strategy, the CD of a reference material has been accurately determined. Its agreement over five independent TEM measurements is below 1.2 nm. (paper)

  3. Reduced sintering of mass-selected Au clusters on SiO2 by alloying with Ti: an aberration-corrected STEM and computational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niu, Yubiao; Schlexer, Philomena; Sebök, Béla

    2018-01-01

    with a reactive metal, Ti. Mass-selected Au/Ti clusters (400 000 amu) and Au2057 clusters (405 229 amu) were produced with a magnetron sputtering, gas condensation cluster beam source in conjunction with a lateral time-of-flight mass filter, deposited onto a silica support and characterised by XPS and LEIS....... The sintering dynamics of mass-selected Au and Au/Ti alloy nanoclusters were investigated in real space and real time with atomic resolution aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM imaging, supported by model DFT calculations. A strong anchoring effect was revealed in the case of the Au/Ti clusters, because of a much...

  4. SU-E-T-464: On the Equivalence of the Quality Correction Factor for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorriaux, J; Paganetti, H; Testa, M; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In current practice, most proton therapy centers apply IAEA TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol. Quality correction factors (kQ) take into account in the dose determination process the differences in beam qualities used for calibration unit and for treatment unit. These quality correction factors are valid for specific reference conditions. TRS-398 reference conditions should be achievable in both scattered proton beams (i.e. DS) and scanned proton beams (i.e. PBS). However, it is not a priori clear if TRS-398 kQ data, which are based on Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in scattered beams, can be used for scanned beams. Using TOPAS-Geant4 MC simulations, the study aims to determine whether broad beam quality correction factors calculated in TRS-398 can be directly applied to PBS delivery modality. Methods: As reference conditions, we consider a 10×10×10 cm 3 homogeneous dose distribution delivered by PBS system in a water phantom (32/10 cm range/modulation) and an air cavity placed at the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak. In order to isolate beam differences, a hypothetical broad beam is simulated. This hypothetical beam reproduces exactly the same range modulation, and uses the same energy layers than the PBS field. Ion chamber responses are computed for the PBS and hypothetical beams and then compared. Results: For an air cavity of 2×2×0.2 cm 3 , the ratio of ion chamber responses for the PBS and hypothetical beam qualities is 0.9991 ± 0.0016. Conclusion: Quality correction factors are insensitive to the delivery pattern of the beam (broad beam or PBS), as long as similar dose distributions are achieved. This investigation, for an air cavity, suggests that broad beam quality correction factors published in TRS-398 can be applied for scanned beams. J. Sorriaux is financially supported by a public-private partnership involving the company Ion Beam Applications (IBA)

  5. Correct mutual information, quantum bit error rate and secure transmission efficiency in Wojcik's eavesdropping scheme on ping-pong protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhanjun

    2004-01-01

    Comment: The wrong mutual information, quantum bit error rate and secure transmission efficiency in Wojcik's eavesdropping scheme [PRL90(03)157901]on ping-pong protocol have been pointed out and corrected

  6. Large area strain analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy across multiple images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; LeBeau, J. M.; Raju, S. V.; Saxena, S.; Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.; Rajan, K.; Kumar, A.; Sinnott, S.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we apply revolving scanning transmission electron microscopy to measure lattice strain across a sample using a single reference area. To do so, we remove image distortion introduced by sample drift, which usually restricts strain analysis to a single image. Overcoming this challenge, we show that it is possible to use strain reference areas elsewhere in the sample, thereby enabling reliable strain mapping across large areas. As a prototypical example, we determine the strain present within the microstructure of a Ni-based superalloy directly from atom column positions as well as geometric phase analysis. While maintaining atomic resolution, we quantify strain within nanoscale regions and demonstrate that large, unit-cell level strain fluctuations are present within the intermetallic phase

  7. The Fresnel mode of Lorentz microscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.N.; Waddell, E.M.; Batson, P.E.; Ferrier, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    The most widely used method of investigating ferromagnetic films in the transmission electron microscope is the Fresnel or defocus mode of Lorentz microscopy. This may be implemented either in a fixed beam or a scanning instrument. Despite a rather inefficient utilization of electrons, several advantages accrue if the latter is used, and provided it is equipped with a field emission gun, low noise images may be obtained in acceptable recording times. To extract quantitative estimates of domain wall widths from such images it is necessary to measure accurately both instrumental and specimen parameters. Methods for this are discussed and an example of an analysis using a polycrystalline permalloy film is given. (Auth.)

  8. Population spherical aberration: associations with ametropia, age, corneal curvature, and image quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingston AC

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Amanda C Kingston,1,2 Ian G Cox11Bausch + Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USAPurpose: The aim of this analysis was to determine the total ocular wavefront aberration values of a large phakic population of physiologically normal, ametropic eyes, gathered under the same clinical protocol using the same diagnostic wavefront sensor.Materials and methods: Studies were conducted at multiple sites in Asia, North America, Europe, and Australia. A Bausch + Lomb Zywave II Wavefront Aberrometer (Rochester, NY, USA was used to measure the lower and higher order aberrations of each eye. Data analysis was conducted using linear regression analysis to determine the relationship between total spherical aberration, ametropia, age, corneal curvature, and image quality.Results: Linear regression analysis showed no correlation (r = 0.0207, P = 0.4874 between degree of ametropia and the amount of spherical aberration. There was also no correlation when the population was stratified into myopic and hyperopic refractive groups (rm = 0.0529, Pm = 0.0804 and rh = 0.1572, Ph = 0.2754. There was a statistically significant and weak positive correlation (r = 0.1962, P < 0.001 between age and the amount of spherical aberration measured in the eye; spherical aberration became more positive with increasing age. Also, there was a statistically significant and moderately positive correlation (r = 0.3611, P < 0.001 with steepness of corneal curvature; spherical aberration became more positive with increasing power of the anterior corneal surface. Assessment of image quality using optical design software (Zemax™, Bellevue, WA, USA showed that there was an overall benefit in correcting the average spherical aberration of this population.Conclusion: Analysis of this dataset provides insights into the inherent spherical aberration of a typical phakic, pre-presbyopic, population and provides the ability to

  9. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Burlaud-Gaillard

    Full Text Available The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy. CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  10. Transmission imaging for integrated PET-MR systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L; Fuin, Niccolò; Levine, Michael A; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-08-07

    Attenuation correction for PET-MR systems continues to be a challenging problem, particularly for body regions outside the head. The simultaneous acquisition of transmission scan based μ-maps and MR images on integrated PET-MR systems may significantly increase the performance of and offer validation for new MR-based μ-map algorithms. For the Biograph mMR (Siemens Healthcare), however, use of conventional transmission schemes is not practical as the patient table and relatively small diameter scanner bore significantly restrict radioactive source motion and limit source placement. We propose a method for emission-free coincidence transmission imaging on the Biograph mMR. The intended application is not for routine subject imaging, but rather to improve and validate MR-based μ-map algorithms; particularly for patient implant and scanner hardware attenuation correction. In this study we optimized source geometry and assessed the method's performance with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom scans. We utilized a Bayesian reconstruction algorithm, which directly generates μ-map estimates from multiple bed positions, combined with a robust scatter correction method. For simulations with a pelvis phantom a single torus produced peak noise equivalent count rates (34.8 kcps) dramatically larger than a full axial length ring (11.32 kcps) and conventional rotating source configurations. Bias in reconstructed μ-maps for head and pelvis simulations was  ⩽4% for soft tissue and  ⩽11% for bone ROIs. An implementation of the single torus source was filled with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and the proposed method quantified for several test cases alone or in comparison with CT-derived μ-maps. A volume average of 0.095 cm(-1) was recorded for an experimental uniform cylinder phantom scan, while a bias of  <2% was measured for the cortical bone equivalent insert of the multi-compartment phantom. Single torus μ-maps of a hip implant phantom showed significantly

  11. Effect of Spherical Aberration on the Optical Quality after Implantation of Two Different Aspherical Intraocular Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lasta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the effect of spherical aberration on optical quality in eyes with two different aspherical intraocular lenses. Methods. 120 eyes of 60 patients underwent phacoemulsification. In patients’ eyes, an aberration-free IOL (Aspira-aA; Human Optics or an aberration-correcting aspherical IOL (Tecnis ZCB00; Abott Medical Optics was randomly implanted. After surgery, contrast sensitivity and wavefront measurements as well as tilt and decentration measurements were performed. Results. Contrast sensitivity was significantly higher in eyes with Aspira lens under mesopic conditions with 12 cycles per degree (CPD and under photopic conditions with 18 CPD (p=0.02. Wavefront measurements showed a higher total spherical aberration with a minimal pupil size of 4 mm in the Aspira group (0.05 ± 0.03 than in the Tecnis group (0.03 ± 0.02 (p=0.001. Strehl ratio was higher in eyes with Tecnis (0.28 ± 0.17 with a minimal pupil size larger than 5 mm than that with Aspira (0.16 ± 0.14 (p=0.04. In pupils with a minimum diameter of 4 mm spherical aberration had a significant effect on Strehl ratio, but not in pupils with a diameter less than 4 mm. Conclusions. Optical quality was better in eyes with the aberration-correcting Tecnis IOL when pupils were large. In contrast, this could not be shown in eyes with pupils under 4 mm or larger. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03224728.

  12. In situ transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of sintering of Ag and Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoro, M.A.; Ferreira, P.J.; Kovar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies were conducted in situ on 2–5 nm Pt and 10–40 nm Ag nanoparticles to study mechanisms for sintering and to measure relevant sintering kinetics in nanoscale particles. Sintering between two separated particles was observed to initiate by either (1) diffusion of the particles on the sample support or (2) diffusion of atoms or small clusters of atoms to the neck region between the two particles. After particle contact, the rate of sintering was controlled by atomic surface diffusivity. The surface diffusivity was determined as a function of particle size and temperature from experimental measurements of the rate of neck growth of the particles. The surface diffusivities did not show a strong size effect for the range of particle sizes that were studied. The surface diffusivity for Pt nanoparticles exhibited the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence and did not appear to be sensitive to the presence of surface contaminants. In contrast, the surface diffusivity for Ag nanoparticles was affected by the presence of impurities such as carbon. The diffusivities for Ag nanoparticles were consistent with previous measurements of bulk surface diffusivities for Ag in the presence of C, but were significantly slower than those obtained from pristine Ag

  13. Eye aberration analysis with Zernike polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molebny, Vasyl V.; Chyzh, Igor H.; Sokurenko, Vyacheslav M.; Pallikaris, Ioannis G.; Naoumidis, Leonidas P.

    1998-06-01

    New horizons for accurate photorefractive sight correction, afforded by novel flying spot technologies, require adequate measurements of photorefractive properties of an eye. Proposed techniques of eye refraction mapping present results of measurements for finite number of points of eye aperture, requiring to approximate these data by 3D surface. A technique of wave front approximation with Zernike polynomials is described, using optimization of the number of polynomial coefficients. Criterion of optimization is the nearest proximity of the resulted continuous surface to the values calculated for given discrete points. Methodology includes statistical evaluation of minimal root mean square deviation (RMSD) of transverse aberrations, in particular, varying consecutively the values of maximal coefficient indices of Zernike polynomials, recalculating the coefficients, and computing the value of RMSD. Optimization is finished at minimal value of RMSD. Formulas are given for computing ametropia, size of the spot of light on retina, caused by spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism. Results are illustrated by experimental data, that could be of interest for other applications, where detailed evaluation of eye parameters is needed.

  14. Possible mechanisms of chromosome aberrations. 2. Formation of aberrations after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    One of mechanisms of chromosome aberrations after UV-radiation of animal cells initiated by thymine dimerization from different dna threads (by cross joints) and finished in mitosis metaphase is discussed. The model of aberration formation, taking a count of peculiarities of chromosome ansate structure and predicting the important role of chromosome isolation during mitosis in realization of structural aberrations, is suggested. An attempt to present aberration formation under conditions of exact repair is the distinguishing feature of the model

  15. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II-IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction

  16. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction

  17. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  18. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kuwajima

    Full Text Available Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2 (65.54 µm per side at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM system, which were only 66.59 µm(2 (8.160 µm per side at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2 and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm. Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems.

  19. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Carlini

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope's pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample.

  20. Confocal soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy: setup, alignment procedure and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Späth, Andreas; Raabe, Jörg; Fink, Rainer H.

    2015-01-01

    A conventional STXM setup has been upgraded with a second micro zone plate and aligned to confocal geometry. Two confocal geometries (in-line and off-axis) have been evaluated and a discussion on prospects and limitations is presented. Zone-plate-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) is a well established technique for high-contrast imaging of sufficiently transparent specimens (e.g. ultrathin biological tissues, polymer materials, archaeometric specimens or magnetic thin films) with spatial resolutions in the regime of 20 nm and high spectroscopic or chemical sensitivity. However, due to the relatively large depth of focus of zone plates, the resolution of STXM along the optical axis so far stays unambiguously behind for thicker X-ray transparent specimens. This challenge can be addressed by the implementation of a second zone plate in the detection pathway of the beam, resulting in a confocal arrangement. Within this paper a first proof-of-principle study for a confocal STXM (cSTXM) and an elaborate alignment procedure in transmission and fluorescence geometry are presented. Based on first confocal soft X-ray micrographs of well known specimens, the advantage and limitation of cSTXM as well as further development potentials for future applications are discussed

  1. Confocal soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy: setup, alignment procedure and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Späth, Andreas [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Raabe, Jörg [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Fink, Rainer H., E-mail: rainer.fink@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A conventional STXM setup has been upgraded with a second micro zone plate and aligned to confocal geometry. Two confocal geometries (in-line and off-axis) have been evaluated and a discussion on prospects and limitations is presented. Zone-plate-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) is a well established technique for high-contrast imaging of sufficiently transparent specimens (e.g. ultrathin biological tissues, polymer materials, archaeometric specimens or magnetic thin films) with spatial resolutions in the regime of 20 nm and high spectroscopic or chemical sensitivity. However, due to the relatively large depth of focus of zone plates, the resolution of STXM along the optical axis so far stays unambiguously behind for thicker X-ray transparent specimens. This challenge can be addressed by the implementation of a second zone plate in the detection pathway of the beam, resulting in a confocal arrangement. Within this paper a first proof-of-principle study for a confocal STXM (cSTXM) and an elaborate alignment procedure in transmission and fluorescence geometry are presented. Based on first confocal soft X-ray micrographs of well known specimens, the advantage and limitation of cSTXM as well as further development potentials for future applications are discussed.

  2. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm.

  3. Environmental TEM in an Aberration Corrected Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    ‐resolution imaging. A gaseous atmosphere in the pole‐piece gap of the objective lens of the microscope alters both the incoming electron wave prior to interaction with the sample and the outgoing wave below the sample. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 10‐20 nm), the gas in the environmental...... the microscope column. The effects of gas on the electron wave in the objective lens are not well understood and needs further attention. Imaging samples with a simple geometry, such as gold particles on a flat graphene substrate and analyzing the variations in contrast, provides a means for understanding...... results from imaging in various elemental as well as di‐molecular gases and their effect on imaging and spectroscopy in the environmental transmission electron microscope....

  4. Characteristics of Transmission-type Microfocus X-ray Tube based-on Carbon Nanotube Field Emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Ihsan, Aamir; Cho, Sung Oh

    2007-01-01

    A high resolution microfocus x-ray source is widely applied to noninvasive detection for industrial demands, material science and engineering, and to diagnostic study of microbiology and micro-tomography. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is regarded as an excellent electron emitter, which outperforms conventional electron sources in point of brightness. It has been suggested that CNT is used as an electron source of a high resolution x-ray tube according to their low threshold field with atomically sharp geometry, chemically robust structure, and electric conductivity. Several researchers have reported miniaturized x-ray tube based on diode structure and micro x-ray radiography and computed tomography systems using triode types with precise emission control and electrostatic focusing. Especially, a microfocus x-ray source of 30 μm resolution has been demonstrated recently using an elliptical CNT cathode and asymmetrical Eingel lens. However, to increase the spatial resolution of x-ray source, a smaller CNT emitter is desired. Electron focusing optics must be corrected to reduce aberrations. A thin wire tip end can provide a micro-area of CNT substrate, and a magnetic lens and transmission x-ray target are proper to reduce the lens aberration and a focal length. Until now, CNT based microfocus x-ray source with less than 10 um resolution has not been shown. Here we report a microfocus x-ray source with 4.7 μm x-ray focal spot consisted of a conical CNT tip, a single solenoid lens, and a transmission type x-ray target. A magnified x-ray image larger than 230 times was resolved with advantage of microfocused focal spot and transmission x-ray target

  5. Seeing with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellist, P.

    2006-01-01

    Commercially available lens correctors are extending the reach of electron microscopes to unprecedented atomic scales, as Peter Nellist describes. The electron microscope was invented in 1933 and is based on the principle that electrons have a wavelength that is inversely proportional to their momentum. There are two basic types: transmission electron microscopes and scanning electron microscopes, plus a hybrid of the two. The lenses in an electron microscope are provided by electromagnetic fields, but they suffer from spherical aberration. The addition of octupole and quadrupole corrector fields has improved the resolution of the electron microscope to better than 0.1 nm in the last decade. The next step is to correct for chromatic aberration, after which the resolution of the microscope will probably be limited by the size of the atom itself. (U.K.)

  6. Effects of gamma irradiation on the sperm transmission and oviposition response in Helicoverpa armigera (L. Noctuidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohui; Wang Huasong; Song Jiaxiang

    1999-12-01

    The transmission of sperm by unirradiated and irradiated cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, was studied by live dissection of the female immediately after the initiation of mating. In cotton bollworm the sperm transfer was a rather complex process. In fact, the unirradiated male failed to transfer sperm in about 19% of their matings. After being irradiated with 250 Gy and 400 Gy, the aberrations of sperm transmission were about 21% and 50% respectively. The failure of spermatophore 'cap' location was an important reason of sperm transmission aberrations. When female mated to high-dose-irradiated males, its oviposition response appeared abnormal

  7. Effect of scatter and attenuation correction in ROI analysis of brain perfusion scintigraphy. Phantom experiment and clinical study in patients with unilateral cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, J. [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). 21st Century Center of Excellence Program; Hashimoto, J.; Kubo, A. [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ogawa, K. [Hosei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Electronic Informatics; Fukunaga, A.; Onozuka, S. [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scatter and attenuation correction in region of interest (ROI) analysis of brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), and to assess the influence of selecting the reference area on the calculation of lesion-to-reference count ratios. Patients, methods: Data were collected from a brain phantom and ten patients with unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis. A simultaneous emission and transmission scan was performed after injecting {sup 123}I-iodoamphetamine. We reconstructed three SPECT images from common projection data: with scatter correction and nonuniform attenuation correction, with scatter correction and uniform attenuation correction, and with uniform attenuation correction applied to data without scatter correction. Regional count ratios were calculated by using four different reference areas (contralateral intact side, ipsilateral cerebellum, whole brain and hemisphere). Results: Scatter correction improved the accuracy of measuring the count ratios in the phantom experiment. It also yielded marked difference in the count ratio in the clinical study when using the cerebellum, whole brain or hemisphere as the reference. Difference between nonuniform and uniform attenuation correction was not significant in the phantom and clinical studies except when the cerebellar reference was used. Calculation of the lesion-to-normal count ratios referring the same site in the contralateral hemisphere was not dependent on the use of scatter correction or transmission scan-based attenuation correction. Conclusion: Scatter correction was indispensable for accurate measurement in most of the ROI analyses. Nonuniform attenuation correction is not necessary when using the reference area other than the cerebellum. (orig.)

  8. Instrumentation for in situ flow electrochemical Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Vinod; Obst, Martin; Hosseinkhannazer, Hooman; Reynolds, Matthew; Rosendahl, Scott; Wang, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2018-06-01

    We report the design and performance of a 3-electrode device for real time in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy studies of electrochemical processes under both static (sealed, non-flow) conditions and with a continuous flow of electrolytes. The device was made using a combination of silicon microfabrication and 3D printing technologies. The performance is illustrated by results of a study of copper deposition and stripping at a gold working electrode. X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy at the Cu 2p edge was used to follow the evolution as a function of potential and time of the spatial distributions of Cu(0) and Cu(i) species electro-deposited from an aqueous solution of copper sulphate. The results are interpreted in terms of competing mechanisms for the reduction of Cu(ii).

  9. Design and analysis of beam separator magnets for third generation aberration compensated PEEMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.K.; Robin, D.S.; Forest, E.; Schlueter, R.; Anders, S.; Feng, J.; Padmore, H.; Wei, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    A state of the art X-ray photoemission electron microscope (PEEM2) is operational at the Advanced Light Source at a resolution of typically 50 nm for a range of chemical and magnetic surface studies. A new microscope, PEEM3, is under development with an aim of achieving a resolution of 5 nm and more than an order of magnitude increase in transmission at the nominal resolution of PEEM2. The resolution and flux improvement is realized by providing geometric and chromatic aberration compensations in the system using an electron mirror and a beam separator magnet. The nearly aberration-free design of the beam separator is critical to the performance of third generation PEEMs. In this paper, we present the optics design model, optimal operation parameters, analyses of aberration impact, as well as the mechanical alignment tolerance for PEEM3 separator prototypes. In particular, we emphasize the importance of a new semi-analytical approach to design complex charged particle optics using the truncated power series algebra. Because of its ability to compute high-order aberrations, this approach allows systematic and comprehensive analyses of any charged particle optics systems with analytical electric and magnetic fields

  10. Localized chromaticity correction of low-beta insertions in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Moshammer, H.; Sullivan, M.; Forest, E.; Robin, D.; Zholents, A.

    1993-01-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in the storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring's arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the insertion point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher order chromatic aberrations. Here the authors consider the approach where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. Each family has two pairs of sextupoles which are located symmetrically on both sides of the IP. The sextupole-like aberrations of individual sextupoles are eliminated by utilizing optics forming a -I transformation between sextupoles in the pair. The optics also includes bending magnets which preserve equal dispersion functions at the two sextupoles in each pair. At sextupoles in one family, the vertical beta function is made large and the horizontal is made small. The situation is reversed in the sextupoles of the other family. The betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate a second order chromatic aberration. The application of the localized chromatic correction is demonstrated using as an example the lattice design for the Low Energy Ring of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory

  11. Localized chromaticity correction of low-beta insertions in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Moshammer, H.; Sullivan, M.; Forest, E.; Robin, D.; Zholents, A.

    1993-04-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in the storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring's arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the insertion point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher order chromatic aberrations. Here we consider the approach where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. Each family has two pairs of sextupoles which are located symmetrically on both sides of the IP. The sextupole-like aberrations of individual sextupoles are eliminated by utilizing optics forming a -I transformation between sextupoles in the pair. The optics also includes bending magnets which preserve equal dispersion functions at the two sextupoles in each pair. At sextupoles in one family, the vertical beta function is made large and the horizontal is made small. The situation is reversed in the sextupoles of the other family. The betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate a second order chromatic aberration. The application of the localized chromatic correction is demonstrated using as an example the lattice design for the Low Energy Ring of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory

  12. Current estimate of functional vision in patients with bifocal pseudophakia after correction of residual defocus by different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V Takhtaev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we evaluated the influence of different surgical methods for correction of residual ametropia on contrast sensitivity at different light conditions and high-order aberrations in patients with bifocal pseudophakia. The study included 45 eyes (30 people after cataract surgery, which studied dependence between contrast sensitivity and aberrations level before and after surgical correction of residual ametropia by of three methods - LASIK, Sulcoflex IOL implantation or IOL exchange. Contrast sensitivity was measured by Optec 6500 and aberration using Pentacam «OCULUS». We processed the results using the Mann-Whitney U-test. This study shows correlation between each method and residual aberrations level and their influence on contrast sensitivity level.

  13. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  14. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  15. Enhanced phase contrast transfer using ptychography combined with a pre-specimen phase plate in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao; Ercius, Peter [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Ophus, Colin, E-mail: clophus@lbl.gov [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The ability to image light elements in both crystalline and noncrystalline materials at near atomic resolution with an enhanced contrast is highly advantageous to understand the structure and properties of a wide range of beam sensitive materials including biological specimens and molecular hetero-structures. This requires the imaging system to have an efficient phase contrast transfer at both low and high spatial frequencies. In this work we introduce a new phase contrast imaging method in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a pre-specimen phase plate in the probe forming aperture, combined with a fast pixelated detector to record diffraction patterns at every probe position, and phase reconstruction using ptychography. The phase plate significantly enhances the contrast transfer of low spatial frequency information, and ptychography maximizes the extraction of the phase information at all spatial frequencies. In addition, the STEM probe with the presence of the phase plate retains its atomic resolution, allowing simultaneous incoherent Z-contrast imaging to be obtained along with the ptychographic phase image. An experimental image of Au nanoparticles on a carbon support shows high contrast for both materials. Multislice image simulations of a DNA molecule shows the capability of imaging soft matter at low dose conditions, which implies potential applications of low dose imaging of a wide range of beam sensitive materials. - Highlights: • This work demonstrates a phase contrast imaging method by combining a pre-specimen phase plate with ptychogrpahy. • This method is shown to have a high phase contrast transfer efficiency at both low and high spatial frequencies. • Unlike CTEM which uses a heavy defocus to gain contrast, the phase plate gives a linear phase contrast at zero defocus aberrations. • Image simulations of DNA suggest this method is highly attractive for imaging beam sensitive materials at a low dose.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  17. Epitaxial ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}Si on GaAs(111)A with atomically smooth surface and interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. C.; Hung, H. Y.; Kwo, J., E-mail: chsu@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. W.; Lin, Y. H.; Cheng, C. K.; Hong, M., E-mail: chsu@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tseng, S. C.; Hsu, C. H., E-mail: chsu@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chang, M. T.; Lo, S. C. [Material and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-21

    Single crystal ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}Si(111) films were grown epitaxially on GaAs(111)A by molecular beam epitaxy. These hetero-structures possess extremely low surface roughness of 1.3 Å and interfacial roughness of 1.9 Å, measured by in-situ scanning tunneling microscope and X-ray reflectivity analyses, respectively, showing superior film quality, comparing to those attained on GaAs(001) in previous publications. The atomically smooth interface was revealed by the atomic-resolution Z (atomic number)-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images using the correction of spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected electron probe. Excellent crystallinity and perfect lattice match were both confirmed by high resolution x-ray diffraction. Measurements of magnetic property for the Fe{sub 3}Si/GaAs(111) yielded a saturation moment of 990 emu/cm{sup 3} with a small coercive field ≤1 Oe at room temperature.

  18. Epitaxial ferromagnetic Fe3Si on GaAs(111)A with atomically smooth surface and interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y. C.; Hung, H. Y.; Kwo, J.; Chen, Y. W.; Lin, Y. H.; Cheng, C. K.; Hong, M.; Tseng, S. C.; Hsu, C. H.; Chang, M. T.; Lo, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Single crystal ferromagnetic Fe 3 Si(111) films were grown epitaxially on GaAs(111)A by molecular beam epitaxy. These hetero-structures possess extremely low surface roughness of 1.3 Å and interfacial roughness of 1.9 Å, measured by in-situ scanning tunneling microscope and X-ray reflectivity analyses, respectively, showing superior film quality, comparing to those attained on GaAs(001) in previous publications. The atomically smooth interface was revealed by the atomic-resolution Z (atomic number)-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images using the correction of spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected electron probe. Excellent crystallinity and perfect lattice match were both confirmed by high resolution x-ray diffraction. Measurements of magnetic property for the Fe 3 Si/GaAs(111) yielded a saturation moment of 990 emu/cm 3 with a small coercive field ≤1 Oe at room temperature

  19. Stellar aberration correction and thermoelastic compensation of Swarm μASC attitude observations: A comment to the Express Letter “Mysterious misalignments between geomagnetic and stellar reference frames seen in CHAMP and Swarm satellite measurements”, by Stefan Maus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, M.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Jørgensen, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    . However, comparison of the Inter Boresight Angle shows a relative attitude variation between the μASC Camera Head Units. These misalignments between Camera Head Units and a geomagnetic reference frame cannot be explained by incorrect aberration correction (as theorized by Maus). Herceg et al. found them...... and clean from any variation caused by thermoelastic effects....

  20. High resolution melting for mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5–8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krypuy, Michael; Dobrovic, Alexander; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Hyland, Sarah J; Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group; Fazio, Anna de; Fox, Stephen B; Brenton, James D; Bowtell, David D

    2007-01-01

    p53 is commonly inactivated by mutations in the DNA-binding domain in a wide range of cancers. As mutant p53 often influences response to therapy, effective and rapid methods to scan for mutations in TP53 are likely to be of clinical value. We therefore evaluated the use of high resolution melting (HRM) as a rapid mutation scanning tool for TP53 in tumour samples. We designed PCR amplicons for HRM mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5 to 8 and tested them with DNA from cell lines hemizygous or homozygous for known mutations. We assessed the sensitivity of each PCR amplicon using dilutions of cell line DNA in normal wild-type DNA. We then performed a blinded assessment on ovarian tumour DNA samples that had been previously sequenced for mutations in TP53 to assess the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the HRM technique. We also performed HRM analysis on breast tumour DNA samples with unknown TP53 mutation status. One cell line mutation was not readily observed when exon 5 was amplified. As exon 5 contained multiple melting domains, we divided the exon into two amplicons for further screening. Sequence changes were also introduced into some of the primers to improve the melting characteristics of the amplicon. Aberrant HRM curves indicative of TP53 mutations were observed for each of the samples in the ovarian tumour DNA panel. Comparison of the HRM results with the sequencing results revealed that each mutation was detected by HRM in the correct exon. For the breast tumour panel, we detected seven aberrant melt profiles by HRM and subsequent sequencing confirmed the presence of these and no other mutations in the predicted exons. HRM is an effective technique for simple and rapid scanning of TP53 mutations that can markedly reduce the amount of sequencing required in mutational studies of TP53

  1. Head motion evaluation and correction for PET scans with 18F-FDG in the Japanese Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (J-ADNI) multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Makishi, Yoko; Miya, Yukari; Ito, Kengo; Koeppe, Robert A; Senda, Michio

    2012-08-01

    Head motion during 30-min (six 5-min frames) brain PET scans starting 30 min post-injection of FDG was evaluated together with the effect of post hoc motion correction between frames in J-ADNI multicenter study carried out in 24 PET centers on a total of 172 subjects consisting of 81 normal subjects, 55 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 36 mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Based on the magnitude of the between-frame co-registration parameters, the scans were classified into six levels (A-F) of motion degree. The effect of motion and its correction was evaluated using between-frame variation of the regional FDG uptake values on ROIs placed over cerebral cortical areas. Although AD patients tended to present larger motion (motion level E or F in 22 % of the subjects) than MCI (3 %) and normal (4 %) subjects, unignorable motion was observed in a small number of subjects in the latter groups as well. The between-frame coefficient of variation (SD/mean) was 0.5 % in the frontal, 0.6 % in the parietal and 1.8 % in the posterior cingulate ROI for the scans of motion level 1. The respective values were 1.5, 1.4, and 3.6 % for the scans of motion level F, but reduced by the motion correction to 0.5, 0.4 and 0.8 %, respectively. The motion correction changed the ROI value for the posterior cingulate cortex by 11.6 % in the case of severest motion. Substantial head motion occurs in a fraction of subjects in a multicenter setup which includes PET centers lacking sufficient experience in imaging demented patients. A simple frame-by-frame co-registration technique that can be applied to any PET camera model is effective in correcting for motion and improving quantitative capability.

  2. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope design with adaptive optics

    OpenAIRE

    Laut, SP; Jones, SM; Olivier, SS; Werner, JS

    2005-01-01

    A design for a high-resolution scanning instrument is presented for in vivo imaging of the human eye at the cellular scale. This system combines adaptive optics technology with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) to image structures with high lateral (∼2 μm) resolution. In this system, the ocular wavefront aberrations that reduce the resolution of conventional SLOs are detected by a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, and compensated with two deformable mirrors in a closed-loop for dynamic cor...

  3. Observations of localised dielectric excitations, secondary events and ionisation damage by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, A.

    1988-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) a high intensity /approximately/0.5nm diameter, probe of 100 keV electrons is formed. This can be positioned to collect energy loss spectra from surfaces, interfaces, small spheres or other particles at controlled values of impact parameter or can be scanned across the object (usually a thin film) to produce high resolution images formed from a variety of signals - small angle or large angle (Z contrast) elastic scattering, inelastic scattering (both valence and core losses), secondary electron emission and x-ray or optical photon emission. The high spatial resolution achievable in a variety of simple structures raises many unsolved theoretical problems concerning the generation, propagation and decay of excitations in inhomogeneous media. These range from quite well posed problems in the mathematical physics of dielectric excitation to problems of plasmon propagation and rather more exotic and less well understood problems of radiation damage. 15 refs., 4 figs

  4. Experimental verification of the minimum number of diffractive zones for effective chromatic correction in the LWIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, J. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Smith, M.; Deegan, J.

    2016-05-01

    With the move to smaller pixel sizes in the longwave IR region there has been a push for shorter focal length lenses that are smaller, cheaper and lighter and that resolve lower spatial frequencies. As a result lenses must have better correction for both chromatic and monochromatic aberrations. This leads to the increased use of aspheres and diffractive optical elements (kinoforms). With recent developments in the molding of chalcogenide materials these aspheres and kinoforms are more cost effective to manufacture. Without kinoforms the axial color can be on the order of 15 μm which degrades the performance of the lens at the Nyquist frequency. The kinoforms are now on smaller elements and are correcting chromatic aberration which is on the order of the design wavelength. This leads to kinoform structures that do not require large phase changes and therefore have 1.5 to just over 2 zones. The question becomes how many zones are required to correct small amounts of chromatic aberration in the system and are they functioning as predicted by the lens design software? We investigate both the design performance and the as-built performance of two designs that incorporate kinoforms for the correction of axial chromatic aberration.

  5. Determination of the cork bark porosity through the gamma ray transmission technology and electronic scanning microscopy image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Antonio M.C.; Moreira, Anderson C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.

    2007-01-01

    This work applies the gamma transmission techniques (GTR) and imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for determination of porosity in the sparkling wine bottle corks. The gamma transmission experimental apparatus consists of a micrometric table (ZX) of sample movement automated, a Am-241 source (59,53 keV, 100 mCi), lead collimators, sample-holder, Na I(Tl) detector and appropriated electronics. For the microscopic images an FEI (Quanta 200), electronic microscope with associated electronics was used, and the image analysis was performed with IMAGO software. The average porosity for 22 samples analysed by GTR was of φ=58 +- 4.6 percent. By the imaging technique the found average porosity was φ=60.0 +- 6.2 percent. (author)

  6. Wavefront correction performed by a deformable mirror of arbitrary actuator pattern within a multireflection waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingkun; Huang, Lei; Bian, Qi; Gong, Mali

    2014-09-10

    The wavefront correction ability of a deformable mirror with a multireflection waveguide was investigated and compared via simulations. By dividing a conventional actuator array into a multireflection waveguide that consisted of single-actuator units, an arbitrary actuator pattern could be achieved. A stochastic parallel perturbation algorithm was proposed to find the optimal actuator pattern for a particular aberration. Compared with conventional an actuator array, the multireflection waveguide showed significant advantages in correction of higher order aberrations.

  7. Impact of Membrane-Induced Particle Immobilization on Seeded Growth Monitored by In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Chen, Dennis P; Unocic, Raymond R; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2016-05-01

    In situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy probes seeded growth in real time. The growth of Pd on Au nanocubes is monitored as a model system to compare growth within a liquid cell and traditional colloidal synthesis. Different growth patterns are observed due to seed immobilization and the highly reducing environment within the liquid cell. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Electronic structure and fine structural features of the air-grown UNxOy on nitrogen-rich uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhong; Zeng, Rongguang; Hu, Yin; Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenyuan; Zhao, Yawen; Luo, Zhipeng; Bai, Bin; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Kezhao

    2018-06-01

    Oxide formation on surface of nitrogen-rich uranium nitride film/particles was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). XPS and AES studies indicated that the oxidized layer on UN2-x film is ternary compound uranium oxynitride (UNxOy) in 5-10 nm thickness. TEM/HAADF-STEM and EELS studies revealed the UNxOy crystallizes in the FCC CaF2-type structure with the lattice parameter close to the CaF2-type UN2-x matrix. The work can provide further information to the oxidation mechanism of uranium nitride.

  9. Comparison of monochromatic aberrations in young adults with different visual acuity and refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Seyhan; Hewitt, Alex W; Forward, Hannah; McKnight, Charlotte M; Tan, Alex; Mountain, Jenny A; Mackey, David A

    2014-03-01

    To compare the monochromatic aberrations in a large cohort of 20-year-old Australians with differing levels of visual acuity and explore the relationship between these aberrations and refractive error. Lions Eye Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Cross-sectional analysis of a population-based cohort. Monochromatic aberrations were measured using a Zywave II wavefront aberrometer with natural pupils in a dark room. The logMAR corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was measured monocularly under normal illumination. Cycloplegic autorefraction was also performed. The study enrolled 2039 eyes of 1040 participants. Data from 1007 right eyes were analyzed. The median CDVA and spherical equivalent were -0.06 logMAR (interquartile range [IQR], -0.10 to 0.00) and +0.25 diopters (D) (IQR, -0.38 to 0.63), respectively. The median 6.0 mm higher-order aberration (HOA) was 0.58 μm (IQR, 0.44 to 0.79). Coma-like aberrations and 3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-order HOAs were significantly different between subjects with a CDVA of -0.10 logMAR or better and those with a CDVA worse than -0.10 logMAR. Fourth-order aberrations Z(4,-4) (P=.024) and Z(4,-2) (P=.029) and 2nd-order aberration Z(2,0) (Peyes, emmetropic eyes, and hyperopic eyes. Subjects with higher myopia had slightly higher total HOAs. The HOAs in this population were marginally higher than previously reported values. The findings confirm there is a difference in monochromatic aberrations between different vision and refractive groups. Results in this study will benefit decision-making processes in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; DuChene, Joseph S; Roberts, Alan D; Wei, Wei David; Herzing, Andrew A

    2016-11-01

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO 2 indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  12. Computer-assisted detection of chromosomal aberrations for the purpose of establishing a biological dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueberreiter, B.

    1982-01-01

    Using a special high-resolution microscopy apparatus, digital light microscope images of human chromosomes were generated, and specific image processing algorithms were developed. The pattern recognition process for computer-assisted detection of specific, radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations comprises three steps: First, the orientation of the segmented objects is defined and corrected. For date reduction purposes, the individual chromosomes are reduced to a few basic types containing typical information. After a linear transformation step, the characteristic parameters thus derived form a parameter vector for statistical classification. The method was well suited for distinguishing normal chromosomes from chromosomal aberrations. 94% of the objects were identified correctly. To achieve even higher accuracy, quality standards were set by which suspectedly misclassified objects can be re-investigated in dialog by the human observer. Implementation of the program system for parameter extraction on a fast polyprocessor system opens up a realistic chance of reducing the computing time for dose estimates to about one hour. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Atomically-resolved mapping of polarization and electric fields across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces by Z-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina; Chang, Hye Jung; Kalinin, Sergei; Morozovska, Anna; Chu, Ying-Hao; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Pennycook, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Polarization, electric field, charge and potential across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces are obtained from direct atomic position mapping by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with Ginsburg-Landau-Devonshire theory. We compare two antiparallel polarization orientations, which allows separation of the polarization and intrinsic interface charge contributions. Using the Born effective charges, the complete interface electrostatics is obtained in real space, providing an alternative method to holography. The results provide new microscopic insight into the thermodynamics of polarization distribution at the atomic level. Research is sponsored by the of Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, U.S. DOE.

  14. Mechanism of coercivity enhancement by Ag addition in FePt-C granular films for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varaprasad, B. S. D. Ch. S.; Takahashi, Y. K., E-mail: takahashi.yukiko@nims.go.jp; Wang, J.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ina, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ueno, W.; Nitta, K.; Uruga, T. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-06-02

    We investigated the Ag distribution in a FePtAg-C granular film that is under consideration for a heat assisted magnetic recording medium by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. Ag is rejected from the core of FePt grains during the deposition, forming Ag-enriched shell surrounding L1{sub 0}-ordered FePt grains. Since Ag has no solubility in both Fe and Pt, the rejection of Ag induces atomic diffusions thereby enhancing the kinetics of the L1{sub 0}-order in the FePt grains.

  15. Detection of fatigue fracture in pearlitic flake graphite cast iron with the help of scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunger, B.; Hunger, J.

    1976-01-01

    To prove the existence of the characteristic features of fatigue fracture in a pearlitic flake graphite cast iron, its fracture surface topography revealed by scanning electron microscopy has been compared with that of a pearlitic steel, the fractures having been caused by static tensile and by cyclic bending tests. The characteristic features of fatigue fracture were visible in the pearlitic matrix of the steel and of the flake graphite cast iron as well. These features differ characteristically from the lamellar structure of the pearlite, particularly after etching the surface area of the fractures. The graphite structures as viewed on the electron scanning and the electron transmission microscope are described. (orig.) [de

  16. Height drift correction in non-raster atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Travis R. [Department of Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ziegler, Dominik [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brune, Christoph [Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of Münster (Germany); Chen, Alex [Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Farnham, Rodrigo; Huynh, Nen; Chang, Jen-Mei [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840 (United States); Bertozzi, Andrea L., E-mail: bertozzi@math.ucla.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ashby, Paul D., E-mail: pdashby@lbl.gov [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We propose a novel method to detect and correct drift in non-raster scanning probe microscopy. In conventional raster scanning drift is usually corrected by subtracting a fitted polynomial from each scan line, but sample tilt or large topographic features can result in severe artifacts. Our method uses self-intersecting scan paths to distinguish drift from topographic features. Observing the height differences when passing the same position at different times enables the reconstruction of a continuous function of drift. We show that a small number of self-intersections is adequate for automatic and reliable drift correction. Additionally, we introduce a fitness function which provides a quantitative measure of drift correctability for any arbitrary scan shape. - Highlights: • We propose a novel height drift correction method for non-raster SPM. • Self-intersecting scans enable the distinction of drift from topographic features. • Unlike conventional techniques our method is unsupervised and tilt-invariant. • We introduce a fitness measure to quantify correctability for general scan paths.

  17. Attenuation correction for freely moving small animal brain PET studies based on a virtual scanner geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, G I; Kyme, A Z; Ryder, W J; Fulton, R R; Meikle, S R

    2014-01-01

    Attenuation correction in positron emission tomography brain imaging of freely moving animals is a very challenging problem since the torso of the animal is often within the field of view and introduces a non negligible attenuating factor that can degrade the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images. In the context of unrestrained small animal imaging, estimation of the attenuation correction factors without the need for a transmission scan is highly desirable. An attractive approach that avoids the need for a transmission scan involves the generation of the hull of the animal’s head based on the reconstructed motion corrected emission images. However, this approach ignores the attenuation introduced by the animal’s torso. In this work, we propose a virtual scanner geometry which moves in synchrony with the animal’s head and discriminates between those events that traversed only the animal’s head (and therefore can be accurately compensated for attenuation) and those that might have also traversed the animal’s torso. For each recorded pose of the animal’s head a new virtual scanner geometry is defined and therefore a new system matrix must be calculated leading to a time-varying system matrix. This new approach was evaluated on phantom data acquired on the microPET Focus 220 scanner using a custom-made phantom and step-wise motion. Results showed that when the animal’s torso is within the FOV and not appropriately accounted for during attenuation correction it can lead to bias of up to 10% . Attenuation correction was more accurate when the virtual scanner was employed leading to improved quantitative estimates (bias < 2%), without the need to account for the attenuation introduced by the extraneous compartment. Although the proposed method requires increased computational resources, it can provide a reliable approach towards quantitatively accurate attenuation correction for freely moving animal studies. (paper)

  18. EVALUATION OF THE ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE SMALL INTESTINE OF HIV INFECTED CHILDREN BY TRANSMISSION AND SCANNING ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Araujo Chaves LEITE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To describe HIV children's small intestinal ultrastructural findings. Methods Descriptive, observational study of small intestine biopsies performed between August 1994 and May 1995 at São Paulo, SP, Brazil. This material pertained to 11 HIV infected children and was stored in a laboratory in paraffin blocks. Scanning and transmission electronic microscopy were used to view those intestine samples and ultrastructural findings were described by analyzing digitalized photos of this material. Ethical Committee approval was obtained. Results In most samples scanning microscopy showed various degrees of shortening and decreasing number of microvilli and also completes effacements in some areas. Derangement of the enterocytes was seen frequently and sometimes cells well defined borders limits seemed to be loosened. In some areas a mucous-fibrin like membrane with variable thickness and extension appeared to partially or totally coat the epithelial surface. Fat drops were present in the intestinal lumen in various samples and a bacterium morphologically resembling bacilli was seen in two occasions. Scanning microscopy confirmed transmission microscopy microvilli findings and also showed little “tufts” of those structures. In addition, it showed an increased number of vacuoles and multivesicular bodies inside various enterocytes, an increased presence of intraepithelial lymphocytes, mitochondrial vacuolization and basement membrane enlargement in the majority of samples analyzed. However, some samples exhibited normal aspect. Conclusions Our study showed the common occurrence of various important intestinal ultrastructural alterations with variable degrees among HIV infected children, some of them in our knowledge not described before.

  19. Effect of tubing length on the dispersion correction of an arterially sampled input function for kinetic modeling in PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, Jim; Chilcott, Anna; Dunn, Joel

    2015-11-01

    Arterial sampling with dispersion correction is routinely performed for kinetic analysis of PET studies. Because of the the advent of PET-MRI systems, non-MR safe instrumentation will be required to be kept outside the scan room, which requires the length of the tubing between the patient and detector to increase, thus worsening the effects of dispersion. We examined the effects of dispersion in idealized radioactive blood studies using various lengths of tubing (1.5, 3, and 4.5 m) and applied a well-known transmission-dispersion model to attempt to correct the resulting traces. A simulation study was also carried out to examine noise characteristics of the model. The model was applied to patient traces using a 1.5 m acquisition tubing and extended to its use at 3 m. Satisfactory dispersion correction of the blood traces was achieved in the 1.5 m line. Predictions on the basis of experimental measurements, numerical simulations and noise analysis of resulting traces show that corrections of blood data can also be achieved using the 3 m tubing. The effects of dispersion could not be corrected for the 4.5 m line by the selected transmission-dispersion model. On the basis of our setup, correction of dispersion in arterial sampling tubing up to 3 m by the transmission-dispersion model can be performed. The model could not dispersion correct data acquired using a 4.5 m arterial tubing.

  20. A Rare Case of Esophageal Dysphagia in Children: Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Barone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is an impairment of swallowing that may involve any structures from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal dysphagia presents with the sensation of food sticking, pain with swallowing, substernal pressure, or chronic heartburn. There are many causes of esophageal dysphagia, such as motility disorders and mechanical and inflammatory diseases. Infrequently dysphagia arises from extrinsic compression of the esophagus from any vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The most common embryologic abnormality of the aortic arch is aberrant right subclavian artery, clinically known as arteria lusoria. This abnormality is usually silent. Here, we report a case of six-year-old child presenting to us with a history of progressive dysphagia without respiratory symptoms. A barium esophagogram showed an increase of the physiological esophageal narrowing at the level of aortic arch, while at esophagogastroduodenoscopy there was an extrinsic pulsatile compression of the posterior portion of the esophagus suggesting an extrinsic compression by an aberrant vessel. Angio-CT (computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery.

  1. Geometrical correction of the e-beam proximity effect for raster scan systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belic, Nikola; Eisenmann, Hans; Hartmann, Hans; Waas, Thomas

    1999-06-01

    Increasing demands on pattern fidelity and CD accuracy in e- beam lithography require a correction of the e-beam proximity effect. The new needs are mainly coming from OPC at mask level and x-ray lithography. The e-beam proximity limits the achievable resolution and affects neighboring structures causing under- or over-exposion depending on the local pattern densities and process settings. Methods to compensate for this unequilibrated does distribution usually use a dose modulation or multiple passes. In general raster scan systems are not able to apply variable doses in order to compensate for the proximity effect. For system of this kind a geometrical modulation of the original pattern offers a solution for compensation of line edge deviations due to the proximity effect. In this paper a new method for the fast correction of the e-beam proximity effect via geometrical pattern optimization is described. The method consists of two steps. In a first step the pattern dependent dose distribution caused by back scattering is calculated by convolution of the pattern with the long range part of the proximity function. The restriction to the long range part result in a quadratic sped gain in computing time for the transformation. The influence of the short range part coming from forward scattering is not pattern dependent and can therefore be determined separately in a second step. The second calculation yields the dose curve at the border of a written structure. The finite gradient of this curve leads to an edge displacement depending on the amount of underground dosage at the observed position which was previously determined in the pattern dependent step. This unintended edge displacement is corrected by splitting the line into segments and shifting them by multiples of the writers address grid to the opposite direction.

  2. Novel edge treatment method for improving the transmission reconstruction quality in Tomographic Gamma Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Miaomiao; Guo, Zhirong; Liu, Haifeng; Li, Qinghua

    2018-05-01

    Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) is a method used for the nondestructive assay of radioactive wastes. In TGS, the actual irregular edge voxels are regarded as regular cubic voxels in the traditional treatment method. In this study, in order to improve the performance of TGS, a novel edge treatment method is proposed that considers the actual shapes of these voxels. The two different edge voxel treatment methods were compared by computing the pixel-level relative errors and normalized mean square errors (NMSEs) between the reconstructed transmission images and the ideal images. Both methods were coupled with two different interative algorithms comprising Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) with a non-negativity constraint and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM). The results demonstrated that the traditional method for edge voxel treatment can introduce significant error and that the real irregular edge voxel treatment method can improve the performance of TGS by obtaining better transmission reconstruction images. With the real irregular edge voxel treatment method, MLEM algorithm and ART algorithm can be comparable when assaying homogenous matrices, but MLEM algorithm is superior to ART algorithm when assaying heterogeneous matrices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effective wavefront aberration measurement of spectacle lenses in as-worn status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhigang; Xu, Kai; Fang, Fengzhou

    2018-04-01

    An effective wavefront aberration analysis method for measuring spectacle lenses in as-worn status was proposed and verified using an experimental apparatus based on an eye rotation model. Two strategies were employed to improve the accuracy of measurement of the effective wavefront aberrations on the corneal sphere. The influences of three as-worn parameters, the vertex distance, pantoscopic angle, and face form angle, together with the eye rotation and corresponding incident beams, were objectively and quantitatively obtained. The experimental measurements of spherical single vision and freeform progressive addition lenses demonstrate the accuracy and validity of the proposed method and experimental apparatus, which provide a potential means of achieving supernormal vision correction with customization and personalization in optimizing the as-worn status-based design of spectacle lenses and evaluating their manufacturing and imaging qualities.

  4. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnish, Roy; Prevrhal, Sven; Alavi, Abass; Zaidi, Habib; Lang, Thomas F

    2014-07-01

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom hip prosthesis phantom with a lesion-sized cavity filled with 0.2 ml (18)F-FDG solution having an activity of 3.367 MBq adjacent to a prosthesis bore was imaged twice with a chrome-cobalt steel hip prosthesis and a plastic replica, respectively. Scanning was performed on a clinical hybrid PET/CT system equipped with an additional external (137)Cs transmission source. PET emission images were reconstructed from both phantom configurations with CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) and with CT-based attenuation correction using MAR (MARCTAC). To compare results with the attenuation-correction method extant prior to the advent of PET/CT, we also carried out attenuation correction with (137)Cs transmission-based attenuation correction (TXAC). CTAC and MARCTAC images were scaled to attenuation coefficients at 511 keV using a trilinear function that mapped the highest CT values to the prosthesis alloy attenuation coefficient. Accuracy and spatial distribution of the lesion activity was compared between the three reconstruction schemes. Compared to the reference activity of 3.37 MBq, the estimated activity quantified from the PET image corrected by TXAC was 3.41 MBq. The activity estimated from PET images corrected by MARCTAC was similar in accuracy at 3.32 MBq. CTAC corrected PET images resulted in nearly 40 % overestimation of lesion activity at 4.70 MBq. Comparison of PET images obtained with the plastic and metal prostheses in place showed that CTAC resulted in a marked distortion of the (18)F-FDG distribution within the lesion, whereas application of MARCTAC and TXAC resulted in lesion distributions similar to those observed with the plastic replica. MAR combined

  5. Aberrant chlamydial developmental forms in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs spontaneously and experimentally infected with Chlamydia suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Borel, Nicole; Chowdhury, Emdad H; Guscetti, Franco

    2009-03-16

    The phenomenon of persistence is well known from in vitro studies, where it is associated with the production of aberrant bodies, but its occurrence in vivo is less well documented. The objective of this study was to search for aberrant bodies in intestinal tissues from pigs, describe their ultrastructure, and investigate the suitability of immunohistochemical staining for chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (cHSP60) to detect such forms. Intestinal tissues derived from pigs naturally and experimentally infected with Chlamydia (C.) suis were examined by immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. The chlamydial species involved in the natural infection were determined using an Array Tube Microarray to C. suis and Chlamydophila abortus. Ultrastructurally, aberrant bodies were detected in the gut of both naturally and experimentally infected pigs. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that the aberrant bodies were labeled less strongly than the normal forms by antibodies against LPS and cHSP60 respectively. It was concluded that aberrant bodies occur in vivo in pigs and that the gnotobiotic pig model might be suitable for the study of chlamydial persistence in vivo. The antibody against cHSP60 does not appear to be suitable to specifically detect such forms.

  6. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D.; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We present STEMsalabim, a modern implementation of the multislice algorithm for simulation of STEM images. • Our package is highly parallelizable on high-performance computing clusters, combining shared and distributed memory architectures. • With STEMsalabim, computationally and memory expensive STEM image simulations can be carried out within reasonable time. - Abstract: We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space.

  7. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver, E-mail: jan.oliver.oelerich@physik.uni-marburg.de; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D.; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We present STEMsalabim, a modern implementation of the multislice algorithm for simulation of STEM images. • Our package is highly parallelizable on high-performance computing clusters, combining shared and distributed memory architectures. • With STEMsalabim, computationally and memory expensive STEM image simulations can be carried out within reasonable time. - Abstract: We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space.

  8. CT vs 68Ge attenuation correction in a combined PET/CT system: evaluation of the effect of lowering the CT tube current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, Ehab; Hany, Thomas F.; Burger, Cyrill; Treyer, Valerie; Schulthess von, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred; Lonn, Albert H.R.

    2002-01-01

    With the introduction of combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) systems, several questions have to be answered. In this work we addressed two of these questions: (a) to what value can the CT tube current be reduced while still yielding adequate maps for the attenuation correction of PET emission scans and (b) how do quantified uptake values in tumours derived from CT and germanium-68 attenuation correction compare. In 26 tumour patients, multidetector CT scans were acquired with 10, 40, 80 and 120 mA (CT 10 , CT 40 , CT 80 and CT 120 ) and used for the attenuation correction of a single FDG PET emission scan, yielding four PET scans designated PET CT10 -PET CT120 . In 60 tumorous lesions, FDG uptake and lesion size were quantified on PET CT10 -PET CT120 . In another group of 18 patients, one CT scan acquired with 80 mA and a standard transmission scan acquired using 68 Ge sources were employed for the attenuation correction of the FDG emission scan (PET CT80 , PET 68Ge ). Uptake values and lesion size in 26 lesions were compared on PET CT80 and PET 68Ge . In the first group of patients, analysis of variance revealed no significant effect of CT current on tumour FDG uptake or lesion size. In the second group, tumour FDG uptake was slightly higher using CT compared with 68 Ge attenuation correction, especially in lesions with high FDG uptake. Lesion size was similar on PET CT80 and PET 68Ge . In conclusion, low CT currents yield adequate maps for the attenuation correction of PET emission scans. Although the discrepancy between CT- and 68 Ge-derived uptake values is probably not relevant in most cases, it should be kept in mind if standardised uptake values derived from CT and 68 Ge attenuation correction are compared. (orig.)

  9. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  10. A proposal for PET/MRI attenuation correction with μ-values measured using a fixed-position radiation source and MRI segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi, E-mail: kwgc@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Hirano, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yhirano@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kershaw, Jeff, E-mail: len@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takahiro, E-mail: tshira@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suga, Mikio, E-mail: mikio.suga@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering of Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ikoma, Yoko, E-mail: ikoma@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Obata, Takayuki, E-mail: t_obata@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi, E-mail: hito@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga, E-mail: taiga@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-01-11

    Several MRI-based attenuation correction methods have been reported for PET/MRI; these methods are expected to make efficient use of high-quality anatomical MRIs and reduce the radiation dose for PET/MRI scanning. The accuracy of the attenuation map (μ-map) from an MRI depends on the accuracy of tissue segmentation and the attenuation coefficients to be assigned (μ-values). In this study, we proposed an MRI-based μ-value estimation method with a non-rotational radiation source to construct a suitable μ-map for PET/MRI. The proposed method uses an accurately segmented tissue map, the partial path length of each tissue, and detected intensities of attenuated radiation from a fixed-position (rather than a rotating) radiation source to obtain the μ-map. We estimated the partial path length from a virtual blank scan of fixed-point radiation with the same scanner geometry using the known tissue map from MRI. The μ-values of every tissue were estimated by inverting a linear relationship involving the partial path lengths and measured radioactivity intensity. Validation of the proposed method was performed by calculating a fixed- point data set based upon real a real transmission scan. The root-mean-square error between the μ-values derived from a conventional transmission scan and those obtained with our proposed method were 2.4±1.4%, 17.4±9.1% and 6.6±4.3% for brain, bone and soft tissue other than brain, respectively. Although the error estimates for bone and soft tissue are not insignificant, the method we propose is able to estimate the brain μ-value accurately and it is this factor that most strongly affects the quantitative value of PET images because of the large volumetric ratio of the brain. -- Highlights: • An MRI-derived µ-map for the attenuation correction of PET images is proposed. • Method relies on segmentation of MRI and a fixed-point source transmission scan. • Tissue segmentation reduces the number of unknown µ-values. • Method

  11. A proposal for PET/MRI attenuation correction with μ-values measured using a fixed-position radiation source and MRI segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kershaw, Jeff; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Suga, Mikio; Ikoma, Yoko; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-01-01

    Several MRI-based attenuation correction methods have been reported for PET/MRI; these methods are expected to make efficient use of high-quality anatomical MRIs and reduce the radiation dose for PET/MRI scanning. The accuracy of the attenuation map (μ-map) from an MRI depends on the accuracy of tissue segmentation and the attenuation coefficients to be assigned (μ-values). In this study, we proposed an MRI-based μ-value estimation method with a non-rotational radiation source to construct a suitable μ-map for PET/MRI. The proposed method uses an accurately segmented tissue map, the partial path length of each tissue, and detected intensities of attenuated radiation from a fixed-position (rather than a rotating) radiation source to obtain the μ-map. We estimated the partial path length from a virtual blank scan of fixed-point radiation with the same scanner geometry using the known tissue map from MRI. The μ-values of every tissue were estimated by inverting a linear relationship involving the partial path lengths and measured radioactivity intensity. Validation of the proposed method was performed by calculating a fixed- point data set based upon real a real transmission scan. The root-mean-square error between the μ-values derived from a conventional transmission scan and those obtained with our proposed method were 2.4±1.4%, 17.4±9.1% and 6.6±4.3% for brain, bone and soft tissue other than brain, respectively. Although the error estimates for bone and soft tissue are not insignificant, the method we propose is able to estimate the brain μ-value accurately and it is this factor that most strongly affects the quantitative value of PET images because of the large volumetric ratio of the brain. -- Highlights: • An MRI-derived µ-map for the attenuation correction of PET images is proposed. • Method relies on segmentation of MRI and a fixed-point source transmission scan. • Tissue segmentation reduces the number of unknown µ-values. • Method

  12. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material in low density scrap and waste by segmented passive gamma-Ray scanning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the transmission-corrected nondestructive assay (NDA) of gamma-ray emitting special nuclear materials (SNMs), most commonly 235U, 239Pu, and 241Am, in low-density scrap or waste, packaged in cylindrical containers. The method can also be applied to NDA of other gamma-emitting nuclides including fission products. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is used to detect and measure the nuclides of interest and to measure and correct for gamma-ray attenuation in a series of horizontal segments (collimated gamma detector views) of the container. Corrections are also made for counting losses occasioned by signal processing limitations (1-3). 1.2 There are currently several systems in use or under development for determining the attenuation corrections for NDA of radioisotopic materials (4-8). A related technique, tomographic gamma-ray scanning (TGS), is not included in this test method (9, 10, 11). 1.2.1 This test method will cover two implementations of the Segmented Gamma Scanning ...

  13. Kidney Scanning with Hippuran: A Necessary Complement for Correct Interpretation of Renography in the Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, E.; Lewitus, Z.; Rosenfeld, J.; Levi, M. [Beilinson Medical Centre, University of Tel Aviv School of Medicine (Israel)

    1969-05-15

    Every impairment of the kidneys' blood supply, and the production or excretion of urine, is reflected by abnormal renograms that are not specific enough in the information they provide. The subsequent performance of renal scans with Hippuran {sup 131}I adds information to the topographical distribution of the Hippuran {sup 131}I in the renal parenchyma, and to the dynamics of its transport through the urinary system. The information thus obtained is valuable in itself and is necessary for the correct interpretation of renography. We have found this specially useful in the follow-up of the transplanted kidneys. In cases of anuria following renal transplantation, the renogram is useful for indicating that renal circulation is present in the transplanted kidney but is inadequate as a method to differentiate between other renal and post-renal causes of anuria. The anuric transplanted kidney should be scanned thirty minutes after the injection of Hippuran {sup 131}I. Patterns of complementary results of renograms and renal scannings are presented that correspond to prerenal, renal and postrenal causes of anuria, with all the important therapeutic implications this differential diagnosis has. (author)

  14. 18FDG PET scanning of benign and malignant musculoskeletal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Frieda; Heertum, Ronald van; Manos, Chitra

    2003-01-01

    To describe the technique, applications and advantages of 18 FDG PET scanning in detection, analysis and management of musculoskeletal lesions.Design and patients Forty-five patients (19 males,26 females) aged 9 to 81 years had radiographs, routine radionuclide scans, CT and/or MRI of clinically suspected active benign or malignant musculoskeletal lesions. 18 FDG scans with a Siemens ECAT EXACT 921 dedicated PET unit (Knoxville, Tenn.) and FWH=6 mm images acquired as a 5-6 bed examination (6 min emission and 4 min transmission) used OSEM iterative reconstruction with segmented transmission attenuation correction and a Gaussian filter (cutoff 6.7 mm). Region of interest (ROI) 3 x 3 pixel image analysis based on transverse whole body images (slice thickness 3.37 mm) generated Maximum Standard Uptake Values (Max SUV) with a cutoff of 2.0 used to distinguish benign and malignant lesions. Thirty-nine studies were available for SUV ROI analysis. Overall sensitivity for differentiating malignant from benign osseous and non-osseous lesions was 91.7% (22/24), overall specificity was 100% (11/11) with an accuracy of 91.7%. All aggressive lesions had a Max SUV >2.0. Data separating benign from malignant lesions and aggressive from benign lesions were statistically significant (P 18 FDG PET contributes unique information regarding metabolism of musculoskeletal lesions. By supplying a physiologic basis for more informed treatment and management, it influences prognosis and survival. Moreover, since residual, recurrent or metastatic tumors can be simultaneously documented on a single whole body scan, PET may theoretically prove to be cost-effective. (orig.)

  15. Simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity in ToF PET/MRI with additional transmission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Hoe, Ester [MEDISIP Medical Imaging and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, IBBT-IBiTech, iMinds Medical IT, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Mollet, Pieter; Mikhaylova, Ekaterina [MEDISIP Medical Imaging and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, IBBT-IBiTech, iMinds Medical IT, Ghent (Belgium); Defrise, Michel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Stefaan [MEDISIP Medical Imaging and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, IBBT-IBiTech, iMinds Medical IT, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-05-18

    In Time-of-Flight PET/MRI systems accurate attenuation correction, based on the MRI image, is not straight forward. An alternative is attenuation correction based on emission data only. This is for instance done by simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity with the MLAA algorithm, but the method as originally proposed has certain limits. The attenuation can only be determined up to a constant and in regions of low tracer uptake, the method results in less accurate attenuation values. An adapted MLAA algorithm has been proposed to overcome this issues and was successfully applied on simulation studies. The so called MLAA+ algorithm uses regular PET emission data as well as transmission data. This transmission data is acquired after insertion of an annulus shaped transmission source into the scanner bore. The Time-of-Flight information allows to separate transmission and emission data in a simultaneous acquisition. With the transmission data, an MLTR-based reference attenuation image is reconstructed. Afterwards, this attenuation image is used in the MLAA+ simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and emission as a reference. We here propose the results of the reconstruction of patient data, based on the MLAA+ algorithm. In total, seven patients were scanned in a sequential PET/MRI scanner and afterwards in a CT scanner. The CT scan is used as an attenuation map to reconstruct the PET emission data with the well established MLEM algorithm. This reconstruction can be seen as the gold standard to which we can compare the MLAA and MLAA+ reconstructions. A preliminary study on one patient indicates that the MLAA+ algorithm results in better reconstructed emission and attenuation images as compared to the MLAA algorithm. If we compare the MLAA+ method to the gold standard, there is still room for improvement.

  16. Simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity in ToF PET/MRI with additional transmission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Hoe, Ester; Mollet, Pieter; Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; Defrise, Michel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-01-01

    In Time-of-Flight PET/MRI systems accurate attenuation correction, based on the MRI image, is not straight forward. An alternative is attenuation correction based on emission data only. This is for instance done by simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity with the MLAA algorithm, but the method as originally proposed has certain limits. The attenuation can only be determined up to a constant and in regions of low tracer uptake, the method results in less accurate attenuation values. An adapted MLAA algorithm has been proposed to overcome this issues and was successfully applied on simulation studies. The so called MLAA+ algorithm uses regular PET emission data as well as transmission data. This transmission data is acquired after insertion of an annulus shaped transmission source into the scanner bore. The Time-of-Flight information allows to separate transmission and emission data in a simultaneous acquisition. With the transmission data, an MLTR-based reference attenuation image is reconstructed. Afterwards, this attenuation image is used in the MLAA+ simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and emission as a reference. We here propose the results of the reconstruction of patient data, based on the MLAA+ algorithm. In total, seven patients were scanned in a sequential PET/MRI scanner and afterwards in a CT scanner. The CT scan is used as an attenuation map to reconstruct the PET emission data with the well established MLEM algorithm. This reconstruction can be seen as the gold standard to which we can compare the MLAA and MLAA+ reconstructions. A preliminary study on one patient indicates that the MLAA+ algorithm results in better reconstructed emission and attenuation images as compared to the MLAA algorithm. If we compare the MLAA+ method to the gold standard, there is still room for improvement.

  17. Low-cost, high-resolution scanning laser ophthalmoscope for the clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, P.; Larichev, A.; Zamora, G.; Murillo, S.; Barriga, E. S.

    2010-02-01

    Researchers have sought to gain greater insight into the mechanisms of the retina and the optic disc at high spatial resolutions that would enable the visualization of small structures such as photoreceptors and nerve fiber bundles. The sources of retinal image quality degradation are aberrations within the human eye, which limit the achievable resolution and the contrast of small image details. To overcome these fundamental limitations, researchers have been applying adaptive optics (AO) techniques to correct for the aberrations. Today, deformable mirror based adaptive optics devices have been developed to overcome the limitations of standard fundus cameras, but at prices that are typically unaffordable for most clinics. In this paper we demonstrate a clinically viable fundus camera with auto-focus and astigmatism correction that is easy to use and has improved resolution. We have shown that removal of low-order aberrations results in significantly better resolution and quality images. Additionally, through the application of image restoration and super-resolution techniques, the images present considerably improved quality. The improvements lead to enhanced visualization of retinal structures associated with pathology.

  18. Double deflection system for an electron beam device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, N.W.; Crewe, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    A double deflection scanning system for electron beam instruments is provided embodying a means of correcting isotropic coma, and anisotropic coma aberrations induced by the magnetic lens of such an instrument. The scanning system deflects the beam prior to entry into the magnetic lens from the normal on-axis intersection of the beam with the lens according to predetermined formulas and thereby reduces the aberrations

  19. Real-space post-processing correction of thermal drift and piezoelectric actuator nonlinearities in scanning tunneling microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yothers, Mitchell P.; Browder, Aaron E.; Bumm, Lloyd A.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a real-space method to correct distortion due to thermal drift and piezoelectric actuator nonlinearities on scanning tunneling microscope images using Matlab. The method uses the known structures typically present in high-resolution atomic and molecularly resolved images as an internal standard. Each image feature (atom or molecule) is first identified in the image. The locations of each feature's nearest neighbors are used to measure the local distortion at that location. The local distortion map across the image is simultaneously fit to our distortion model, which includes thermal drift in addition to piezoelectric actuator hysteresis and creep. The image coordinates of the features and image pixels are corrected using an inverse transform from the distortion model. We call this technique the thermal-drift, hysteresis, and creep transform. Performing the correction in real space allows defects, domain boundaries, and step edges to be excluded with a spatial mask. Additional real-space image analyses are now possible with these corrected images. Using graphite(0001) as a model system, we show lattice fitting to the corrected image, averaged unit cell images, and symmetry-averaged unit cell images. Statistical analysis of the distribution of the image features around their best-fit lattice sites measures the aggregate noise in the image, which can be expressed as feature confidence ellipsoids.

  20. Real-space post-processing correction of thermal drift and piezoelectric actuator nonlinearities in scanning tunneling microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yothers, Mitchell P; Browder, Aaron E; Bumm, Lloyd A

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a real-space method to correct distortion due to thermal drift and piezoelectric actuator nonlinearities on scanning tunneling microscope images using Matlab. The method uses the known structures typically present in high-resolution atomic and molecularly resolved images as an internal standard. Each image feature (atom or molecule) is first identified in the image. The locations of each feature's nearest neighbors are used to measure the local distortion at that location. The local distortion map across the image is simultaneously fit to our distortion model, which includes thermal drift in addition to piezoelectric actuator hysteresis and creep. The image coordinates of the features and image pixels are corrected using an inverse transform from the distortion model. We call this technique the thermal-drift, hysteresis, and creep transform. Performing the correction in real space allows defects, domain boundaries, and step edges to be excluded with a spatial mask. Additional real-space image analyses are now possible with these corrected images. Using graphite(0001) as a model system, we show lattice fitting to the corrected image, averaged unit cell images, and symmetry-averaged unit cell images. Statistical analysis of the distribution of the image features around their best-fit lattice sites measures the aggregate noise in the image, which can be expressed as feature confidence ellipsoids.

  1. Correction of chromatic and geometric aberrations using sextupoles and octupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.

    1978-01-01

    The procedure for applying some chromatic corrections to a final transport line, neglecting space charge, utilizing the method suggested by Brown is described. The possibility of including octupoles into a point-to-point triplet system, as outlined by Fenster is studied. Positive results were obtained in both cases: (i) using 2 + I correcting sections with two pairs of non-interlaced sextupoles increased the fraction of beam with ΔP/P = 1% onto a 0.1 cm radius target by more than a factor of 1.75; (ii) six octupoles placed into a point-to-point triplet system increased the fraction of a full emittance ΔP/P = 0% beam striking a 0.1 cm radius target by a factor of 2.5

  2. Performance of analytical methods for tomographic gamma scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Mercer, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The use of gamma-ray computerized tomography for nondestructive assay of radioactive materials has led to the development of specialized analytical methods. Over the past few years, Los Alamos has developed and implemented a computer code, called ARC-TGS, for the analysis of data obtained by tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). ARC-TGS reduces TGS transmission and emission tomographic data, providing the user with images of the sample contents, the activity or mass of selected radionuclides, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measured quantities. The results provided by ARC-TGS can be corrected for self-attenuation when the isotope of interest emits more than one gamma-ray. In addition, ARC-TGS provides information needed to estimate TGS quantification limits and to estimate the scan time needed to screen for small amounts of radioactivity. In this report, an overview of the analytical methods used by ARC-TGS is presented along with an assessment of the performance of these methods for TGS

  3. Characterizing deformed ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline materials using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimby, Patrick W.; Cao, Yang; Chen, Zibin; Han, Shuang; Hemker, Kevin J.; Lian, Jianshe; Liao, Xiaozhou; Rottmann, Paul; Samudrala, Saritha; Sun, Jingli; Wang, Jing Tao; Wheeler, John; Cairney, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: The recent development of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) in a scanning electron microscope enables fast, automated orientation mapping of electron transparent samples using standard electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) hardware. TKD in a scanning electron microscope has significantly better spatial resolution than conventional EBSD, enabling routine characterization of nanocrystalline materials and allowing effective measurement of samples that have undergone severe plastic deformation. Combining TKD with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides complementary chemical information, while a standard forescatter detector system below the EBSD detector can be used to generate dark field and oriented dark field images. Here we illustrate the application of this exciting new approach to a range of deformed, ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline samples, including duplex stainless steel, nanocrystalline copper and highly deformed titanium and nickel–cobalt. The results show that TKD combined with EDS is a highly effective and widely accessible tool for measuring key microstructural parameters at resolutions that are inaccessible using conventional EBSD

  4. Towards quantitative analysis of core-shell catalyst nano-particles by aberration corrected high angle annular dark field STEM and EDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haibo, E; Nellist, P D; Lozano-Perez, S; Ozkaya, D

    2010-01-01

    Core-shell structured heterogeneous catalyst nano-particles offer the promise of more efficient precious metal usage and also novel functionalities but are as yet poorly characterised due to large compositional variations over short ranges. High angle annular dark field detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope is frequently used to image at high resolution because of its Z-contrast and incoherent imaging process, but generally little attention is paid to quantification. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis provides information on thickness and chemical composition and, used in conjunction with HAADF-STEM, aids interpretation of imaged nano-particles. We present important calibrations and initial data for truly quantitative high resolution analysis.

  5. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  6. Pixelized measurement of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP micro particles formed in gamma correction phantom pinhole scan: A reference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joo Young; Yoon, Do Kyun; Chung, Yong An [Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Yun Sang; Ha, Seunggyun [Radiopharmaceutical Science Laboratory, Dept. of Nuclear MedicineSeoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bahk, Yong Whee [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Sung Ae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Currently, traumatic bone diseases are diagnosed by assessing the micro {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HDP) uptake in injured trabeculae with ongoing osteoneogenesis demonstrated by gamma correction pinhole scan (GCPS). However, the mathematic size quantification of micro-uptake is not yet available. We designed and performed this phantom-based study to set up an in-vitro model of the mathematical calculation of micro-uptake by the pixelized measurement. The micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposits used in this study were spontaneously formed both in a large standard flood and small house-made dish phantoms. The processing was as follows: first, phantoms were flooded with distilled water and {sup 99m}Tc-HDP was therein injected to induce micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposition; second, the deposits were scanned using parallel-hole and pinhole collimator to generally survey {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposition pattern; and third, the scans underwent gamma correction (GC) to discern individual deposits for size measurement. In original naïve scans, tracer distribution was simply nebulous in appearance and, hence, could not be measured. Impressively, however, GCPS could discern individual micro deposits so that they were calculated by pixelized measurement. Phantoms naturally formed micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposits that are analogous to {sup 99m}Tc-HDP uptake on in-vivo bone scan. The smallest one we measured was 0.414 mm. Flooded phantoms and therein injected {sup 99m}Tc-HDP form nebulous micro {sup 99m}Tc-HDP deposits that are rendered discernible by GCPB and precisely calculable using pixelized measurement. This method can be used for precise quantitative and qualitative diagnosis of bone and joint diseases at the trabecular level.

  7. Bone scan in mastocytosis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, W.M.; Bonventre, M.V.; Camera, A.

    1976-01-01

    A 45-year-old man with well-documented systemic mastocytosis showed generalized symmetric increased activity on bone imaging. These scan findings are grossly indistinguishable from those of patients with renal osteodystrophy or secondary hyperparathyroidism. The images of the hands, however, failed to show the changes observed in secondary hyperparathyroidism. The mechanism for this intense activity is thought to be due to aberrant new-bone formation

  8. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-08-24

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images.

  9. Optimization of exit-plane waves restored from HRTEM through-focal series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D.; Nakashima, Philip N.H.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy has largely benefited from the implementation of aberration correctors in the imaging part of the microscope. Though the dominant geometrical axial aberrations can in principle be corrected or suitably adjusted, the impact of higher-order aberrations, which are mainly due to the implementation of non-round electron optical elements, on the imaging process remains unclear. Based on a semi-empirical criterion, we analyze the impact of residual aperture aberrations on the quality of exit-plane waves that are retrieved from through-focal series recorded using an aberration-corrected and monochromated instrument which was operated at 300 kV and enabled for an information transfer of ∼0.05 nm. We show that the impact of some of the higher-order aberrations in retrieved exit-plane waves can be balanced by a suitable adjustment of symmetry equivalent lower-order aberrations. We find that proper compensation and correction of 1st and 2nd order aberrations is critical, and that the required accuracy is difficult to achieve. This results in an apparent insensitivity towards residual higher-order aberrations. We also investigate the influence of the detector characteristics on the image contrast. We find that correction for the modulation transfer function results in a contrast gain of up to 40%.

  10. Effect of methods of myopia correction on visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and depth of focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nio, YK; Jansonius, NM; Wijdh, RHJ; Beekhuis, WH; Worst, JGF; Noorby, S; Kooijman, AC

    Purpose. To psychophysically measure spherical and irregular aberrations in patients with various types of myopia correction. Setting: Laboratory of Experimental Ophthalmology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. Methods: Three groups of patients with low myopia correction

  11. Three-dimensional nanofabrication by electron-beam-induced deposition using 200-keV electrons in scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.Q.; Mitsuishi, K.; Furuya, K.

    2005-01-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate three-dimensional nanostructures on and out of a substrate by electron-beam-induced deposition in a 200-kV scanning transmission electron microscope. Structures with parallel wires over the substrate surface were difficult to fabricate due to the direct deposition of wires on both top and bottom surfaces of the substrate. Within the penetration depth of the incident electron beam, nanotweezers were fabricated by moving the electron beam beyond different substrate layers. Combining the deposition of self-supporting wires and self-standing tips, complicated three-dimensional doll-like, flag-like, and gate-like nanostructures that extend out of the substrate were successfully fabricated with one-step or multi-step scans of the electron beam. Effects of coarsening, nucleation, and distortion during electron-beam-induced deposition are discussed. (orig.)

  12. The usefulness and the problems of attenuation correction using simultaneous transmission and emission data acquisition method. Studies on normal volunteers and phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijima, Tetsuji; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Mizumura, Sunao; Cho, Keiichi; Ishihara, Makiko; Toba, Masahiro; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Munehiro.

    1997-01-01

    Attenuation correction using simultaneous transmission data (TCT) and emission data (ECT) acquisition method was applied to 201 Tl myocardial SPECT with ten normal adults and the phantom in order to validate the efficacy of attenuation correction using this method. Normal adults study demonstrated improved 201 Tl accumulation to the septal wall and the posterior wall of the left ventricle and relative decreased activities in the lateral wall with attenuation correction (p 201 Tl uptake organs such as the liver and the stomach pushed up the activities in the septal wall and the posterior wall. Cardiac dynamic phantom studies showed partial volume effect due to cardiac motion contributed to under-correction of the apex, which might be overcome using gated SPECT. Although simultaneous TCT and ECT acquisition was conceived of the advantageous method for attenuation correction, miss-correction of the special myocardial segments should be taken into account in assessment of attenuation correction compensated images. (author)

  13. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  14. Reduction of variance in spectral estimates for correction of ultrasonic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Pilkington, Wayne C; Waag, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    A variance reduction factor is defined to describe the rate of convergence and accuracy of spectra estimated from overlapping ultrasonic scattering volumes when the scattering is from a spatially uncorrelated medium. Assuming that the individual volumes are localized by a spherically symmetric Gaussian window and that centers of the volumes are located on orbits of an icosahedral rotation group, the factor is minimized by adjusting the weight and radius of each orbit. Conditions necessary for the application of the variance reduction method, particularly for statistical estimation of aberration, are examined. The smallest possible value of the factor is found by allowing an unlimited number of centers constrained only to be within a ball rather than on icosahedral orbits. Computations using orbits formed by icosahedral vertices, face centers, and edge midpoints with a constraint radius limited to a small multiple of the Gaussian width show that a significant reduction of variance can be achieved from a small number of centers in the confined volume and that this reduction is nearly the maximum obtainable from an unlimited number of centers in the same volume.

  15. Non-random intrachromosomal distribution of radiation-induced chromatid aberrations in Vicia faba. [Aberration clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, I; Rieger, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Gatersleben. Zentralinst. fuer Genetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

    1976-04-01

    A reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba, with all chromosomes individually distinguishable, was treated with X-rays, fast neutrons, (/sup 3/H) uridine (/sup 3/HU). The distribution within metaphase chromosomes of induced chromatid aberrations was non-random for all agents used. Aberration clustering, in part agent specific, occurred in chromosome segments containing heterochromatin as defined by the presence of G bands. The pattern of aberration clustering found after treatment with /sup 3/HU did not allow the recognition of chromosome regions active in transcription during treatment. Furthermore, it was impossible to obtain unambiguous indications of the presence of AT- and GC-base clusters from the patterns of /sup 3/HT- and /sup 3/HC-induced chromatid aberrations, respectively. Possible reasons underlying these observations are discussed.

  16. Design and performance of a compact scanning transmission X-ray microscope at the Photon Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeichi, Y., E-mail: yasuo.takeichi@kek.jp; Mase, K.; Ono, K. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Materials Structure Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Inami, N. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Suga, H. [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Miyamoto, C. [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku 113-0033 (Japan); Ueno, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    We present a new compact instrument designed for scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. It has piezo-driven linear stages, making it small and light. Optical components from the virtual source point to the detector are located on a single optical table, resulting in a portable instrument that can be operated at a general-purpose spectroscopy beamline without requiring any major reconstruction. Careful consideration has been given to solving the vibration problem common to high-resolution microscopy, so as not to affect the spatial resolution determined by the Fresnel zone plate. Results on bacteriogenic iron oxides, single particle aerosols, and rare-earth permanent magnets are presented as examples of its performance under diverse applications.

  17. Surgical treatment of massive bleeding of a right aberrant subclavian artery after oesophageal stent removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Raum

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 9-year-old female who required surgical treatment and resuscitation after severe transoesophageal bleeding of a right aberrant subclavian artery (RASA. Bleeding of this RASA was caused by a mechanical irritation due to an oesophageal stent. The stent was placed weeks before to dilate the oesophagus after accidental ingestion of a caustic agent. Although conservative management of benign oesophageal stenosis in children is highly recommended, there are still some major complications to be considered. To avoid erosion of aberrant subclavian artery vascular rings and slings, as described in several case reports, these vessels should be excluded by computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans before placement of oesophageal stents. This case suggests that management of caustic ingestion in children is still a major challenge in paediatric surgical departments. Keywords: Paediatric surgery, Chemical Burn, Oesophageal stenosis, Oesophageal stenting, Vascular abnormalities, Right aberrant subclavian artery

  18. Impulse radio ultra wideband wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrazeh, Ali; Bozorgzadeh, Bardia; Mohseni, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing impulse radio ultra wideband (IR-UWB) signaling technique for reliable, wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to address the problem of elevated data rates in high-channel-count neurochemical monitoring. Utilizing an FSCV-sensing chip fabricated in AMS 0.35μm 2P/4M CMOS, a 3-5-GHz, IR-UWB transceiver (TRX) chip fabricated in TSMC 90nm 1P/9M RF CMOS, and two off-chip, miniature, UWB antennae, wireless transfer of pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) data at 50Mbps over a distance of wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels prerecorded with FSCV at a CFM during flow injection analysis (FIA) is also demonstrated with transmitter (TX) power dissipation of only ~4.4μW from 1.2V, representing two orders of magnitude reduction in TX power consumption compared to that of a conventional frequency-shift-keyed (FSK) link operating at ~433MHz.

  19. Structural and functional changes in the intenstine of irradiated and hypothermic irradiated rats : a scanning and transmission electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, S.; Chaudhuri, Swapna; Roy, Bijon

    1982-01-01

    Severe destructive changes in the intestine of rats following whole body exposure to gamma rays (832 rads) were observed by light microscope, scanning and transmission electron microscope studies. Hypothermia (15deg C rectal temperature) induced prior to irradiation protected the intestinal mucosa from destruction. A simultaneous study showed that glucose absorption decreased significantly in irradiated rats, whereas it was increased in hypothermic irradiated animals. (author)

  20. Color corrected Fresnel lens for solar concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritchman, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    A new linear convex Fresnel lens with its groove side down is described. The design philosophy is similar to the highly concentrating two focal Fresnel lens but including a correction for chromatic aberration. A solar concentration ratio as high as 80 is achieved. For wide acceptance angles the concentration nears the theoretical maximum. (author)

  1. Simultaneous emission transmission tomography using technetium-99m for both emission and transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnden, L.R.; Ong, P.L.; Rowe, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    This phantom study investigates whether attenuation maps from transmission data degraded by increased noise from subtraction of emission counts can still provide useful attenuation correction in the regular and obese chest. Technetium-99m was used for both emission and transmission on a triple head simultaneous emission transmission tomography (Tc-Tc SETT) system. Fanbeam transmission counts were computed by subtracting emission counts estimated from the two parallel collimator heads. Radioactive decay was used to simulate organ counts from injections of 900 and 400 MBq sestamibi for regular and obese chest sizes. Line source activity was 350 MBq. Control attenuation maps were obtained with no emission activity. Noise control included catering for negative and zero transmission counts, pre-filtering and segmentation of mu maps. Pre-filtering was tried before and after subtraction and before and after setting negative pixels to zero. Mean±SD count/pixel at the heart in anterior transmission projections was typically 33±18 for the regular and 1±7 for the obese chest. For the obese chest, pre-filtering before resetting negative counts best preserved mean mu in soft tissue and lung. Tc-Tc SETT mu mean±SD for the regular chest were 0.144±0.012 and 0.058±0.004 for soft tissue and lung and for the obese chest, 0.152±0.075 and 0.059±0.017. The accuracy of the Tc-Tc SETT bullseye plots for the regular chest was the same as with control map attenuation correction and 3 times better than with no correction. For the obese chest it was as good as with control map correction only if mu map segmentation was applied. Tc-Tc SETT soft tissue and lung mu in 28 patient studies indicated that segmentation is practical for a wide range of chest sizes. Tc-Tc SETT on a triple-head system offers an accurate, inexpensive method of attenuation correction for the majority of chest sizes. (orig.)

  2. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, A.

    2012-01-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: ► The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. ► The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. ► The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. ► We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  3. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudo Jacome, L., E-mail: leonardo.agudo@bam.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Eggeler, G., E-mail: gunther.eggeler@ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dlouhy, A., E-mail: dlouhy@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  4. Chromosome painting in biological dosimetry: Semi-automatic system to score stable chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sagredo, J.M.; Vallcorba, I.; Sanchez-Hombre, M.C.; Ferro, M.T.; San Roman Cos-Gayon, C.; Santos, A.; Malpica, N.; Ortiz, C.

    1997-01-01

    From the beginning of the description of the procedure of chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), it was thought its possible application to score induced chromosomal aberrations in radiation exposition. With chromosome painting it is possible to detect changes between chromosomes that has been validated in radiation exposition. Translocation scoring by FISH, contrarily to the unstable dicentrics, mainly detect stable chromosome aberrations that do not disappear, it allows the capability of quantify delayed acute expositions or chronic cumulative expositions. The large number of cells that have to be analyzed for high accuracy, specially when dealing with low radiation doses, makes it almost imperative to use an automatic analysis system. After validate translocation scoring by FISH in our, we have evaluated the ability and sensitivity to detect chromosomal aberrations by chromosome using different paint probes used, showing that any combination of paint probes can be used to score induced chromosomal aberrations. Our group has developed a FISH analysis that is currently being adapted for translocation scoring analysis. It includes systematic error correction and internal control probes. The performance tests carried out show that 9,000 cells can be analyzed in 10 hr. using a Sparc 4/370. Although with a faster computer, a higher throughput is expected, for large population screening or very low radiation doses, this performance still has to be improved. (author)

  5. Transmission of Neurodegenerative Disorders Through Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aggregation of misfolded proteins in the brain occurs in several neurodegenerative disorders. Aberrant protein aggregation is inducible in rodents and primates by intracerebral inoculation. Possible transfusion transmission of neurodegenerative diseases has important public health...... implications. OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible transfusion transmission of neurodegenerative disorders. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Nationwide registers of transfusions in Sweden and Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 1 465 845 patients who received transfusions between 1968 and 2012. MEASUREMENTS.......9% received a transfusion from a donor diagnosed with one of the studied neurodegenerative diseases. No evidence of transmission of any of these diseases was found, regardless of approach. The hazard ratio for dementia in recipients of blood from donors with dementia versus recipients of blood from healthy...

  6. A new Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope at the ALS for operation up to 2500eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, David; Ade, Harald; Attwood, David; Hitchcock, Adam; McKean, Pat; Mitchell, Gary; Monteiro, Paulo; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-01

    We report on the design and construction of a higher energy Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope on a new bend magnet beam line at the Advanced Light Source. Previously we have operated such an instrument on a bend magnet for C, N and O 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. The new instrument will have similar performance at higher energies up to and including the S 1s edge at 2472eV. A new microscope configuration is planned. A more open geometry will allow a fluorescence detector to count emitted photons from the front surface of the sample. There will be a capability for zone plate scanning in addition to the more conventional sample scanning mode. This will add the capability for imaging a massive sample at high resolution over a limited field of view, so that heavy reaction cells may be used to study processes in-situ, exploiting the longer photon attenuation length and the longer zone plate working distances available at higher photon energy. The energy range will extend down to include the C1s edge at 300eV, to allow high energy NEXAFS microscopic studies to correlate with the imaging of organics in the same sample region of interest.

  7. ac driving amplitude dependent systematic error in scanning Kelvin probe microscope measurements: Detection and correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yan; Shannon, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of the contact potential difference (CPD) reading on the ac driving amplitude in scanning Kelvin probe microscope (SKPM) hinders researchers from quantifying true material properties. We show theoretically and demonstrate experimentally that an ac driving amplitude dependence in the SKPM measurement can come from a systematic error, and it is common for all tip sample systems as long as there is a nonzero tracking error in the feedback control loop of the instrument. We further propose a methodology to detect and to correct the ac driving amplitude dependent systematic error in SKPM measurements. The true contact potential difference can be found by applying a linear regression to the measured CPD versus one over ac driving amplitude data. Two scenarios are studied: (a) when the surface being scanned by SKPM is not semiconducting and there is an ac driving amplitude dependent systematic error; (b) when a semiconductor surface is probed and asymmetric band bending occurs when the systematic error is present. Experiments are conducted using a commercial SKPM and CPD measurement results of two systems: platinum-iridium/gap/gold and platinum-iridium/gap/thermal oxide/silicon are discussed

  8. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy as a speciation tool for natural organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, J.; Plaschke, M.; Denecke, M.A. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    A molecular-scale understanding of the basic processes affecting stability and transport behavior of actinide cations, complexes or hydroxide ('eigencolloid') species is prerequisite to performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in geological formations. Depending on their functional group chemistry and macromolecular structure, naturally occurring organic molecules (NOM) possess a high tendency towards actinide complexation reactions. However, the compositional and structural heterogeneity of NOM and mixed aggregates with inorganic phases makes speciation by spectromicroscopy techniques highly desirable. The applicability of Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) as a speciation tool for the characterization of NOM is demonstrated for a multifunctional natural organic acid (chlorogenic acid), Eu(III)-loaded humic acid (HA) aggregates and Eu(III)-oxo/hydroxide/HA hetero-aggregates. It is shown that in situ probing of HA functional group chemistry down to a spatial resolution < 100 nm (i.e., less than femto-liter sampled volumes) is feasible, at the same time revealing morphological details on NOM aggregates and NOM/mineral associations. (orig.)

  9. How to simplify transmission-based scatter correction for clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccarne, V.; Hutton, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The performances of ordered subsets (OS) EM reconstruction including attenuation, scatter and spatial resolution correction are evaluated using cardiac Monte Carlo data. We demonstrate how simplifications in the scatter model allow one to correct SPECT data for scatter in terms of quantitation and quality in a reasonable time. Initial reconstruction of the 20% window is performed including attenuation correction (broad beam μ values), to estimate the activity quantitatively (accuracy 3%), but not spatially. A rough reconstruction with 2 iterations (subset size: 8) is sufficient for subsequent scatter correction. Estimation of primary photons is obtained by projecting the previous distribution including attenuation (narrow beam μ values). Estimation of the scatter is obtained by convolving the primary estimates by a depth dependent scatter kernel, and scaling the result by a factor calculated from the attenuation map. The correction can be accelerated by convolving several adjacent planes with the same kernel, and using an average scaling factor. Simulation of the effects of the collimator during the scatter correction was demonstrated to be unnecessary. Final reconstruction is performed using 6 iterations OSEM, including attenuation (narrow beam μ values) and spatial resolution correction. Scatter correction is implemented by incorporating the estimated scatter as a constant offset in the forward projection step. The total correction + reconstruction (64 proj. 40x128 pixel) takes 38 minutes on a Sun Sparc 20. Quantitatively, the accuracy is 7% in a reconstructed slice. The SNR inside the whole myocardium (defined from the original object), is equal to 2.1 and 2.3 - in the corrected and the primary slices respectively. The scatter correction preserves the myocardium to ventricle contrast (primary: 0.79, corrected: 0.82). These simplifications allow acceleration of correction without influencing the quality of the result

  10. Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect in dependence of the attenuation correction of a state-of-the-art small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannheim, Julia G; Judenhofer, Martin S; Schmid, Andreas; Pichler, Bernd J; Tillmanns, Julia; Stiller, Detlef; Sossi, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE) of the Siemens Inveon PET scanner were evaluated. The influence of transmission source activities (40 and 160 MBq) on the quantification accuracy and the PVE were determined. Dynamic range, object size and PVE for different sphere sizes, contrast ratios and positions in the field of view (FOV) were evaluated. The acquired data were reconstructed using different algorithms and correction methods. The activity level of the transmission source and the total emission activity in the FOV strongly influenced the attenuation maps. Reconstruction algorithms, correction methods, object size and location within the FOV had a strong influence on the PVE in all configurations. All evaluated parameters potentially influence the quantification accuracy. Hence, all protocols should be kept constant during a study to allow a comparison between different scans. (paper)

  11. Depth-of-Focus and its Association with the Spherical Aberration Sign. A Ray-Tracing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C. Bakaraju

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: As regards presbyopic-correction strategies that use deliberately induced aberrations to increase the depth of focus, the current study suggests that both positive and negative SA have equal potential. However, practical considerations will probably limit the useful DoF achievable through the utilization of SCE in presbyopes. for reference to a contemporary record detailing refractive history.

  12. Zyoptix wavefront-guided versus standard photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in low and moderate myopia: randomized controlled 6-month study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, L; Toto, L; Zuppardi, E; Nubile, M; Carpineto, P; Di Nicola, M; Ballone, E

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the refractive and aberrometric outcome of wavefront-guided photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) compared to standard PRK in myopic patients. Fifty-six eyes of 56 patients were included in the study and were randomly divided into two groups. The study group consisted of 28 eyes with a mean spherical equivalent (SE) of -2.25+/-0.76 diopters (D) (range: -1.5 to -3.5 D) treated with wavefront-guided PRK using the Zywave ablation profile and the Bausch & Lomb Technolas 217z excimer laser (Zyoptix system) and the control group included 28 eyes with a SE of -2.35+/-1.01 D (range: -1.5 to -3.5 D) treated with standard PRK (PlanoScan ablation) using the same laser. A Zywave aberrometer was used to analyze and calculate the root-mean-square (RMS) of total high order aberrations (HOA) and Zernike coefficients of third and fourth order before and after (over a 6-month follow-up period) surgery in both groups. Preoperative and postoperative SE, un-corrected visual acuity (UCVA), and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were evaluated in all cases. There was a high correlation between achieved and intended correction. The differences between the two treatment groups were not statistically significant for UCVA, BCVA, or SE cycloplegic refraction . Postoperatively the RMS value of high order aberrations was raised in both groups. At 6-month control, on average it increased by a factor of 1.17 in the Zyoptix PRK group and 1.54 in the PlanoScan PRK group (p=0.22). In the Zyoptix group there was a decrease of coma aberration, while in the PlanoScan group this third order aberration increased. The difference between postoperative and preoperative values between the two groups was statistically significant for coma aberration (p=0.013). No statistically significant difference was observed for spherical-like aberration between the two groups. In the study group eyes with a low amount of preoperative aberrations (HOA RMS lower than the median value; PRK is as safe and

  13. Vacuum chamber eddy current correction coil for the AGS Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.

    1988-01-01

    The AGS Booster injector will perform a variety of functions. Heavy ion acceleration requires a bakeable, ultra-high vacuum system (VC). Acceleration for intense proton beams requires rapid cycling (B /preceq/ 10T/sec). If straight forward heavy walled VC are used, the field perturbations due to eddy currents are large. The state of the art lattice has highly distributed lumped sextupoles capable of substantially correcting the induced field nonlinearity. Nevertheless, for the very highest space charge-intensity limits, it is desirable to have the capability to remove eddy current fields at the source. Correction coils attached to the outside of the VC cancel its current aberrations over the required good field aperture. These can be passively powered by transformer action, using two turn windings around the magnet yoke. Programmed power supplies can also be used. This inexpensive additional correction option uses a three turn per quadrant coil which follows the local contour of the VC. Transverse movements of several mms of the VC will have no beam optical effect since the large field aberrations and their corrections have the same displaced coordinates. Experimental and computer studies will be presented, as well as mechanical and electrical design of a simple method of construction. 6 figs

  14. Vacuum chamber eddy current correction coil for the AGS booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the AGS Booster injector that performs a variety of functions. Heavy ion acceleration requires a bakeable, ultra-high vacuum system (VC). Acceleration for intense proton beams requires rapid cycling (B ≤10T/sec). If straight forward heavy walled VC are used, the field perturbations due to eddy currents are large. The state of the art lattice has highly distributed lumped sextupoles capable of substantially correcting the induced field nonlinearity. Nevertheless, for the very highest space charge-intensity limits, it is desirable to have the capability to remove eddy current fields at the source. Correction coils attached to the outside of the VC cancel its current aberrations over the required good field aperture. These can be passively powered by transformer action, using two turn windings around the magnet yoke. Programmed power supplies can also be used. This inexpensive additional correction option uses a three turn per quadrant coil which follows the local contour of the VC. Transverse movements of several mms of the VC will have no beam optical effect since the large field aberrations and their corrections have the same displace coordinates. Experimental and computer studies will be presented, as well as mechanical and electrical design of a simple method of construction

  15. [Monochromatic aberration in accommodation. Dynamic wavefront analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, M; Dawczynski, J; Jurkutat, S; Vollandt, R; Strobel, J

    2011-06-01

    Monochromatic aberrations may influence the visual acuity of the eye. They are not stable and can be affected by different factors. The subject of the following paper is the dynamic investigation of the changes in wavefront aberration with accommodation. Dynamic measurement of higher and lower order aberrations was performed with a WASCA Wavefront Analyzer (Carl-Zeiss-Meditec) and a specially constructed target device for aligning objects in far and near distances on 25 subjects aged from 15 to 27 years old. Wavefront aberrations showed some significant changes in accommodation. In addition to the characteristic sphere reaction accompanying miosis and changes in horizontal prism (Z(1) (1)) in the sense of a convergence movement of the eyeball also occurred. Furthermore defocus rose (Z(2) (0)) and astigmatism (Z(2) (-2)) changed. In higher-order aberrations a decrease in coma-like Zernike polynomials (Z(3) (-1), Z(3) (1)) was found. The most obvious change appeared in spherical aberration (Z(4) (0)) which increased and changed from positive to negative. In addition the secondary astigmatism (Z(4) (-2)) and quadrafoil (Z(4) (4)) rise also increased. The total root mean square (RMS), as well as the higher-order aberrations (RMS-HO) significantly increased in accommodation which is associated with a theoretical reduction of visual acuity. An analysis of the influence of pupil size on aberrations showed significant increases in defocus, spherical aberration, quadrafoil, RMS and RMS HO by increasing pupil diameter. By accommodation-associated miosis, the growing aberrations are partially compensated by focusing on near objects. Temporal analysis of the accommodation process with dynamic wavefront analysis revealed significant delays in pupil response and changing of prism in relation to the sphere reaction. In accommodation to near objects a discrete time ahead of third order aberrations in relation to the sphere response was found. Using dynamic wavefront measurement

  16. Chromatic aberration compensation in numerical reconstruction of digital holograms by Fresnel-Bluestein propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Diego; Velasquez, Daniel; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-12-15

    In this Letter, we present a method for chromatic compensation in numerical reconstruction of digitally recorded holograms based on Fresnel-Bluestein propagation. The proposed technique is applied to correct the chromatic aberration that arises in the reconstruction of RGB holograms of both millimeter- and micrometer-sized objects. The results show the feasibility of this strategy to remove the wavelength dependence of the size of the numerically propagated wavefields.

  17. Correcting sample drift using Fourier harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena-González, G; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Guerrero, E; Reyes, D F; Braza, V; Yañez, A; Nuñez-Moraleda, B; González, D; Galindo, P L

    2018-07-01

    During image acquisition of crystalline materials by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, the sample drift could lead to distortions and shears that hinder their quantitative analysis and characterization. In order to measure and correct this effect, several authors have proposed different methodologies making use of series of images. In this work, we introduce a methodology to determine the drift angle via Fourier analysis by using a single image based on the measurements between the angles of the second Fourier harmonics in different quadrants. Two different approaches, that are independent of the angle of acquisition of the image, are evaluated. In addition, our results demonstrate that the determination of the drift angle is more accurate by using the measurements of non-consecutive quadrants when the angle of acquisition is an odd multiple of 45°. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-correcting electronically scanned pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multiple channel high data rate pressure sensing device is disclosed for use in wind tunnels, spacecraft, airborne, process control, automotive, etc., pressure measurements. Data rates in excess of 100,000 measurements per second are offered with inaccuracies from temperature shifts less than 0.25% (nominal) of full scale over a temperature span of 55 C. The device consists of thirty-two solid state sensors, signal multiplexing electronics to electronically address each sensor, and digital electronic circuitry to automatically correct the inherent thermal shift errors of the pressure sensors and their associated electronics.

  19. The prediction of spherical aberration with schematic eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, H L; Brennan, N A

    1996-07-01

    Many model eyes have been proposed; they differ in optical characteristics and therefore have different aberrations and image quality. In predicting the visual performance of the eye, we are most concerned with the central foveal vision. Spherical aberration is the only on-axis monochromatic aberration and can be used as a criterion to assess the degree of resemblance of eye models to the human eye. We reviewed and compiled experimental values of the spherical aberration of the eye, calculated the spherical aberration of several different categories of model eyes and compared the calculated results to the experimental data. Results show an over-estimation of spherical aberration by all models, the finite schematic eyes predicting values of spherical aberration closest to the experimental data. Current model eyes do not predict the average experimental values of the spherical aberration of the eye. A new model eye satisfying this assessment criterion is required for investigations of the visual performance of the eye.

  20. List-Mode PET Motion Correction Using Markerless Head Tracking: Proof-of-Concept With Scans of Human Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Mulnix, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A custom designed markerless tracking system was demonstrated to be applicable for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Precise head motion registration is crucial for accurate motion correction (MC) in PET imaging. State-of-the-art tracking systems applied with PET brain imaging rely...... on markers attached to the patient's head. The marker attachment is the main weakness of these systems. A healthy volunteer participating in a cigarette smoking study to image dopamine release was scanned twice for 2 h with $^{11}{\\rm C}$-racolopride on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET...... in contrast recovery of small structures....

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier epouse Mory, Claudie

    1985-01-01

    This thesis contains a theoretical and experimental study of image formation in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Using a detailed description of the different optical elements between the field emission source and the specimen, one calculates the shape and size of the primary probe of electrons impinging on the sample. This modelization enables to estimate the spatial resolution in the different imaging or microanalytical modes. The influence of the specimen and the role of the various detectors are taken into account to calculate the point spread function of the instrument in STEM imaging modes. An experimental study of the characteristic properties of phase contrast bright field micrographs and incoherent dark field ones is performed by comparison of digitally recorded images in similar conditions. Spatial resolution, contrast and signal/noise ratio are assessed by correlation methods, Fourier analysis and statistical considerations; one can deduce the optimum focusing conditions. Limits such as the point resolution on quasi-atomic metallic clusters are determined and an analysis of the capabilities of signal mixing concludes this work. Applications are offered in various domains such as the visualisation of small metallic particles, biomolecules and unstained biological sections. (author) [fr

  2. Imaging characteristics of Zernike and annular polynomial aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Virendra N; Díaz, José Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The general equations for the point-spread function (PSF) and optical transfer function (OTF) are given for any pupil shape, and they are applied to optical imaging systems with circular and annular pupils. The symmetry properties of the PSF, the real and imaginary parts of the OTF, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a system with a circular pupil aberrated by a Zernike circle polynomial aberration are derived. The interferograms and PSFs are illustrated for some typical polynomial aberrations with a sigma value of one wave, and 3D PSFs and MTFs are shown for 0.1 wave. The Strehl ratio is also calculated for polynomial aberrations with a sigma value of 0.1 wave, and shown to be well estimated from the sigma value. The numerical results are compared with the corresponding results in the literature. Because of the same angular dependence of the corresponding annular and circle polynomial aberrations, the symmetry properties of systems with annular pupils aberrated by an annular polynomial aberration are the same as those for a circular pupil aberrated by a corresponding circle polynomial aberration. They are also illustrated with numerical examples.

  3. Geometric characteristics of aberrations of plane-symmetric optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Lijun; Deng Zhiyong

    2009-01-01

    The geometric characteristics of aberrations of plane-symmetric optical systems are studied in detail with a wave-aberration theory. It is dealt with as an extension of the Seidel aberrations to realize a consistent aberration theory from axially symmetric to plane-symmetric systems. The aberration distribution is analyzed with the spot diagram of a ray and an aberration curve. Moreover, the root-mean-square value and the centroid of aberration distribution are discussed. The numerical results are obtained with the focusing optics of a toroidal mirror at grazing incidence.

  4. Nodal aberration theory applied to freeform surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P.; Thompson, Kevin P.

    2014-12-01

    When new three-dimensional packages are developed for imaging optical systems, the rotational symmetry of the optical system is often broken, changing its imaging behavior and making the optical performance worse. A method to restore the performance is to use freeform optical surfaces that compensate directly the aberrations introduced from tilting and decentering the optical surfaces. In order to effectively optimize the shape of a freeform surface to restore optical functionality, it is helpful to understand the aberration effect the surface may induce. Using nodal aberration theory the aberration fields induced by a freeform surface in an optical system are explored. These theoretical predications are experimentally validated with the design and implementation of an aberration generating telescope.

  5. Improved image quality of cone beam CT scans for radiotherapy image guidance using fiber-interspaced antiscatter grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Uros; van Herk, Marcel; Ploeger, Lennert S; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-06-01

    Medical linear accelerator mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner provides useful soft tissue contrast for purposes of image guidance in radiotherapy. The presence of extensive scattered radiation has a negative effect on soft tissue visibility and uniformity of CBCT scans. Antiscatter grids (ASG) are used in the field of diagnostic radiography to mitigate the scatter. They usually do increase the contrast of the scan, but simultaneously increase the noise. Therefore, and considering other scatter mitigation mechanisms present in a CBCT scanner, the applicability of ASGs with aluminum interspacing for a wide range of imaging conditions has been inconclusive in previous studies. In recent years, grids using fiber interspacers have appeared, providing grids with higher scatter rejection while maintaining reasonable transmission of primary radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one such grid on CBCT image quality. The grid used (Philips Medical Systems) had ratio of 21:1, frequency 36 lp/cm, and nominal selectivity of 11.9. It was mounted on the kV flat panel detector of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and tested in a phantom and a clinical study. Due to the flex of the linac and presence of gridline artifacts an angle dependent gain correction algorithm was devised to mitigate resulting artifacts. Scan reconstruction was performed using XVI4.5 augmented with inhouse developed image lag correction and Hounsfield unit calibration. To determine the necessary parameters for Hounsfield unit calibration and software scatter correction parameters, the Catphan 600 (The Phantom Laboratory) phantom was used. Image quality parameters were evaluated using CIRS CBCT Image Quality and Electron Density Phantom (CIRS) in two different geometries: one modeling head and neck and other pelvic region. Phantoms were acquired with and without the grid and reconstructed with and without software correction which was adapted for the different acquisition

  6. Defocus and twofold astigmatism correction in HAADF-STEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnaya, M.E.; Van den Broek, W.; Doornbos, R.M.P.; Mattheij, R.M.M.; Maubach, J.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    A new simultaneous autofocus and twofold astigmatism correction method is proposed for High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The method makes use of a modification of image variance, which has already been used before as an image quality measure for different types of microscopy, but its use is often justified on heuristic grounds. In this paper we show numerically that the variance reaches its maximum at Scherzer defocus and zero astigmatism. In order to find this maximum a simultaneous optimization of three parameters (focus, x- and y-stigmators) is necessary. This is implemented and tested on a FEI Tecnai F20. It successfully finds the optimal defocus and astigmatism with time and accuracy, compared to a human operator. -- Research highlights: → A new simultaneous defocus and astigmatism correction method is proposed. → The method does not depend on the image Fourier transform. → The method does not require amorphous area of the sample. → The method is tested numerically as well, as for the real-world application.

  7. Differentiated Effects of Sensory Activities as Abolishing Operations via Non-Contingent Reinforcement on Academic and Aberrant Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancil, G. Richmond; Haydon, Todd; Boman, Marty

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of sensory activities used as antecedent interventions on the percentage correct on academic tasks and rate of aberrant behavior in three elementary aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Study activities were conducted in an after school program for children with ASD where…

  8. Quantitation of size of myocardial infarctions by computerized transmission tomography. Comparison with hot-spot and cold-spot radionuclide scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, K.H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The current study evaluated the ability to quantitate the volume of myocardial infarctions when they are outlined by intravenously administered contrast media in the myocardial perfusion phase and in the phase of delayed contrast enhancement of the infarct. Quantitation by contrast media was assessed from computerized transmission tomography (CTT) scans of the ex situ heart and compared with quantitation by technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc)pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/Tc PYP) and thallium-201 (201Tl) scans of the same ex situ hearts. True volume was defined by histochemical morphometry. CTT during the contrast perfusion phase uniformly underestimated infarct size but had a good correlation with true volume. CTT during enhancement phase correlated closely with true volume (r . 0.98) and most precisely measured true size (y . 1.06 X 0.23). The /sup 99m/Tc PYP scan overestimated infarct volume (predictive overestimation of 6 to 199%) but had a good correlation with true volume. 201Tl underestimated infarct volume but correlated well with true volume. Thus, quantitation of infarct volume from CTT scans performed during either the perfusion or infarct enhancement phase after intravenous contrast media provides a good estimate of true infarct volume. Delineation of the infarct by contrast media in the ex situ heart is more precise during the phase of delayed enhancement of the infarct

  9. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Montaldo, G; Tanter, M; Fink, M; Marsac, L

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  10. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquet, F; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Montaldo, G; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, Universite Paris VII, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Marsac, L [Supersonic Imagine, Les Jardins de la Duranne, 510 rue Rene Descartes, 13857 Aix-en-Provence (France)], E-mail: fabrice.marquet@espci.org

    2009-05-07

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  11. A preliminary investigation into the effects of ocular lubricants on higher order aberrations in normal and dry eye subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnigle, Samantha; Eperjesi, Frank; Naroo, Shehzad A

    2014-04-01

    To study the effects of ocular lubricants on higher order aberrations in normal and self-diagnosed dry eyes. Unpreserved hypromellose drops, Tears Again™ liposome spray and a combination of both were administered to the right eye of 24 normal and 24 dry eye subjects following classification according to a 5 point questionnaire. Total ocular higher order aberrations, coma, spherical aberration and Strehl ratios for higher order aberrations were measured using the Nidek OPD-Scan III (Nidek Technologies, Gamagori, Japan) at baseline, immediately after application and after 60 min. The aberration data were analyzed over a 5mm natural pupil using Zernike polynomials. Each intervention was assessed on a separate day and comfort levels were recorded before and after application. Corneal staining was assessed and product preference recorded after the final measurement for each intervention. Hypromellose drops caused an increase in total higher order aberrations (p=dry eyes) and a reduction in Strehl ratio (normal eyes: p=dry eyes p=0.01) immediately after instillation. There were no significant differences between normal and self-diagnosed dry eyes for response to intervention and no improvement in visual quality or reduction in higher order aberrations after 60 min. Differences in comfort levels failed to reach statistical significance. Combining treatments does not offer any benefit over individual treatments in self-diagnosed dry eyes and no individual intervention reached statistical significance. Symptomatic subjects with dry eye and no corneal staining reported an improvement in comfort after using lubricants. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoparticles Observed in a CS Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    resulting in the formation of larger particles and a loss of catalytic performance. Several models of sintering in different systems have been put forward [1,2]. However, most investigations have been post mortem studies, revealing only the final state of the catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM....... The combined capabilities of ETEM and image CS correction provide unique possibilities to study this relationship. However, in order to fully quantify image contrast from such experiments, a deeper understanding of the scattering of fast electrons in the presence of gas molecules in the pole piece gap...... of the microscope is needed. As industrial catalysts are usually complex high surface area materials, they are often not suited for fundamental studies. For this purpose, model systems consisting of gold nanoparticles on sheets of low surface area boron nitride and graphite supports were produced. Sheets...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  14. Common Bias Readout for TES Array on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Maehisa, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    A transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array as an X-ray sensor for a scanning transmission electron microscope system is being developed. The technical challenge of this system is a high count rate of ˜ 5000 counts/second/array. We adopted a 64 pixel array with a parallel readout. Common SQUID bias, and common TES bias are planned to reduce the number of wires and the resources of a room temperature circuit. The reduction rate of wires is 44 % when a 64 pixel array is read out by a common bias of 8 channels. The possible degradation of the energy resolution has been investigated by simulations and experiments. The bias fluctuation effects of a series connection are less than those of a parallel connection. Simple calculations expect that the fluctuations of the common SQUID bias and common TES bias in a series connection are 10^{-7} and 10^{-3}, respectively. We constructed 8 SQUIDs which are connected to 8 TES outputs and a room temperature circuit for common bias readout and evaluated experimentally. Our simulation of crosstalk indicates that at an X-ray event rate of 500 cps/pixel, crosstalk will broaden a monochromatic line by about 0.01 %, or about 1.5 eV at 15 keV. Thus, our design goal of 10 eV energy resolution across the 0.5-15 keV band should be achievable.

  15. Structure and chemistry of passivated SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston Dycus, J.; Xu, Weizong; LeBeau, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States); Lichtenwalner, Daniel J.; Hull, Brett; Palmour, John W. [Power Devices R& D, Wolfspeed, A Cree Company, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Here, we report on the chemistry and structure of 4H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces passivated either by nitric oxide annealing or Ba deposition. Using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy, we find that Ba and N remain localized at SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface after processing. Further, we find that the passivating species can introduce significant changes to the near-interface atomic structure of SiC. Specifically, we quantify significant strain for nitric oxide annealed sample where Si dangling bonds are capped by N. In contrast, strain is not observed at the interface of the Ba treated samples. Finally, we place these results in the context of field effect mobility.

  16. On the significance of density-induced speed of sound variations on US-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To show the effect of speed of sound (SOS) aberration on ultrasound guided radiotherapy (US-gRT) as a function of implemented workflow. US systems assume that SOS is constant in human soft tissues (at a value of 1540 m/s), while its actual nonuniform distribution produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. When a coregistered computerized tomography (CT) scan is available, the US image can be corrected for SOS aberration. Typically, image guided radiotherapy workflows implementing US systems only provide a CT scan at the simulation (SIM) stage. If changes occur in geometry or density distribution between SIM and treatment (TX) stage, SOS aberration can change accordingly, with a final impact on the measured position of structures which is dependent on the workflow adopted. Methods: Four basic scenarios were considered of possible changes between SIM and TX: (1) No changes, (2) only patient position changes (rigid rotation-translation), (3) only US transducer position changes (constrained on patient's surface), and (4) patient tissues thickness changes. Different SOS aberrations may arise from the different scenarios, according to the specific US-gRT workflow used: intermodality (INTER) where TX US scans are compared to SIM CT scans; intramodality (INTRA) where TX US scans are compared to SIM US scans; and INTERc and INTRAc where all US images are corrected for SOS aberration (using density information provided by SIM CT). For an experimental proof of principle, the effect of tissues thickness change was simulated in the different workflows: a dual layered phantom was filled with layers of sunflower oil (SOS 1478 m/s), water (SOS 1482 m/s), and 20% saline solution (SOS 1700 m/s). The phantom was US scanned, the layer thicknesses were increased and the US scans were repeated. The errors resulting from the different workflows were compared. Results: Theoretical considerations show that workflows

  17. Online correction of scanning probe microscopes with pixel accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirscherl, Kai

    2000-01-01

    of 10 nm and an opening angle of 30.0 °. Even atomic resolution can be achieved. The scan movement of the tip is not linear however. This is caused by the propelling device of the SPM for the scan motion - a piezoelectric ceramic. The two major non-linear responses o f the piezo to the applied control....... The algorithm typically contains 5 - 7 parameters which have to be calibrated manually. Still, non-linear errors remain in the order of 1-2%. One pixel in a 512x 512 image corresponds to 0.2% per direction. This goal of measurement accuracy i s reached with the algorithm developed in this thesis. Three...... different SPM are analyzed for their non-linearity. Two commercial tube sc anners are applied with a maximum scan range in x and y of 40.0 µm and 160.0 µm as well as one specially designed stack scanner with a maximum range of 5.0 µm. For the tube scanners, a 1-dimensional line pattern with a reference...

  18. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock, A. P.; Lee, V.; Wu, J.; Cooper, G.; West, M. M.; Berejnov, V.; Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined

  19. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, A. P., E-mail: aph@mcmaster.ca; Lee, V.; Wu, J.; Cooper, G. [Chemistry & Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); West, M. M.; Berejnov, V. [Faculty of Health Sciences Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J. [Automotive Fuel Cell Cooperation Corp., Burnaby BC V5J 5J8 (Canada)

    2016-01-28

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined.

  20. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachtel, J A; Haglund, R F; Pantelides, S T; Marvinney, C; Mayo, D; Mouti, A; Lupini, A R; Chisholm, M F; Mu, R; Pennycook, S J

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications. (paper)

  1. Freeform aberrations in phase space: an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babington, James

    2017-06-01

    We consider how optical propagation and aberrations of freeform systems can be formulated in phase space. As an example system, a freeform prism is analyzed and discussed. Symmetry considerations and their group theory descriptions are given some importance. Numerical aberrations are also highlighted and put into the context of the underlying aberration theory.

  2. Chromatic correction for a VIS-SWIR zoom lens using optical glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Williams, Daniel J. L.; McCarthy, Peter; Visconti, Anthony J.; Bentley, Julie L.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2015-09-01

    With the advancement in sensors, hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared (SWIR 0.9 μm to 1.7 μm) now has wide applications, including night vision, haze-penetrating imaging, etc. Most conventional optical glasses can be material candidates for designing in the SWIR as they transmit up to 2.2 μm. However, since SWIR is in the middle of the glasses' major absorption wavebands in UV and IR, the flint glasses in SWIR are less dispersive than in the visible spectrum. As a result, the glass map in the SWIR is highly compressed, with crowns and flints all clustering together. Thus correcting for chromatic aberration is more challenging in the SWIR, since the Abbé number ratio of the same glass combination is reduced. Conventionally, fluorides, such as CaF2 and BaF2, are widely used in designing SWIR system due to their unique dispersion properties, even though they are notorious for poor manufacturability or even high toxicity. For lens elements in a zoom system, the ray bundle samples different sections of the each lens aperture as the lens zooms. This creates extra uncertainty in correcting chromatic aberrations. This paper focuses on using only commercially available optical glasses to color-correct a 3X dual-band zoom lens system in the VIS-SWIR. The design tools and techniques are detailed in terms of material selections to minimize the chromatic aberrations in such a large spectrum band and all zoom positions. Examples are discussed for designs with different aperture stop locations, which considerably affect the material choices.

  3. Chromosome aberration model combining radiation tracks, chromatin structure, DSB repair and chromatin mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, W.; Kundrat, P.

    2015-01-01

    The module that simulates the kinetics and yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations within the biophysical code PARTRAC is described. Radiation track structures simulated by Monte Carlo methods are overlapped with multi-scale models of DNA and chromatin to assess the resulting DNA damage. Spatial mobility of individual DNA ends from double-strand breaks is modelled simultaneously with their processing by the non-homologous end-joining enzymes. To score diverse types of chromosome aberrations, the joined ends are classified regarding their original chromosomal location, orientation and the involvement of centromeres. A comparison with experimental data on dicentrics induced by gamma and alpha particles shows that their relative dose dependence is predicted correctly, although the absolute yields are overestimated. The critical model assumptions on chromatin mobility and on the initial damage recognition and chromatin remodelling steps and their future refinements to solve this issue are discussed. (authors)

  4. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Z.; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions

  5. Method and system for automatically correcting aberrations of a beam of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The location of a beam of charged particles within a deflection field is determined by its orthogonal deflection voltages. With the location of the beam in the field, correction currents are supplied to a focus coil and to each of a pair of stigmator coils to correct for change of focal length and astigmatism due to the beam being deflected away from the center of its deflection field

  6. Double phi-Step theta-Scanning Technique for Spherical Near-Field Antenna Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi

    2008-01-01

    Probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with an arbitrary probe set certain requirements on an applicable scanning technique. The computational complexity of the general high-order probe correction technique for an arbitrary probe, that is based on the Phi scanning, is O(N4...... a specific double Phi-step thetas scanning technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements. This technique not only constitutes an alternative spherical scanning technique, but it also enables formulating an associated probe correction technique for arbitrary probes with the computational complexity...

  7. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM)-in-SEM for Bio- and Organo-Mineral Interface Characterization in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Guillaume; Hellal, Jennifer; Ollivier, Patrick; Richard, Annie; Burel, Agnes; Jolly, Louis; Crampon, Marc; Michel, Caroline

    2017-12-01

    Understanding biofilm interactions with surrounding substratum and pollutants/particles can benefit from the application of existing microscopy tools. Using the example of biofilm interactions with zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), this study aims to apply various approaches in biofilm preparation and labeling for fluorescent or electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) microanalysis for accurate observations. According to the targeted microscopy method, biofilms were sampled as flocs or attached biofilm, submitted to labeling using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol, lectins PNA and ConA coupled to fluorescent dye or gold nanoparticles, and prepared for observation (fixation, cross-section, freezing, ultramicrotomy). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that nZVI were embedded in the biofilm structure as aggregates but the resolution was insufficient to observe individual nZVI. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed nZVI aggregates close to bacteria, but it was not possible to confirm direct interactions between nZVI and cell membranes. Scanning transmission electron microscopy in the SEM (STEM-in-SEM) showed that nZVI aggregates could enter the biofilm to a depth of 7-11 µm. Bacteria were surrounded by a ring of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) preventing direct nZVI/membrane interactions. STEM/EDS mapping revealed a co-localization of nZVI aggregates with lectins suggesting a potential role of EPS in nZVI embedding. Thus, the combination of divergent microscopy approaches is a good approach to better understand and characterize biofilm/metal interactions.

  8. Genomic copy number analysis of a spectrum of blue nevi identifies recurrent aberrations of entire chromosomal arms in melanoma ex blue nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, May P; Andea, Aleodor A; Harms, Paul W; Durham, Alison B; Patel, Rajiv M; Wang, Min; Robichaud, Patrick; Fisher, Gary J; Johnson, Timothy M; Fullen, Douglas R

    2016-03-01

    Blue nevi may display significant atypia or undergo malignant transformation. Morphologic diagnosis of this spectrum of lesions is notoriously difficult, and molecular tools are increasingly used to improve diagnostic accuracy. We studied copy number aberrations in a cohort of cellular blue nevi, atypical cellular blue nevi, and melanomas ex blue nevi using Affymetrix's OncoScan platform. Cases with sufficient DNA were analyzed for GNAQ, GNA11, and HRAS mutations. Copy number aberrations were detected in 0 of 5 (0%) cellular blue nevi, 3 of 12 (25%) atypical cellular blue nevi, and 6 of 9 (67%) melanomas ex blue nevi. None of the atypical cellular blue nevi displayed more than one aberration, whereas complex aberrations involving four or more regions were seen exclusively in melanomas ex blue nevi. Gains and losses of entire chromosomal arms were identified in four of five melanomas ex blue nevi with copy number aberrations. In particular, gains of 1q, 4p, 6p, and 8q, and losses of 1p and 4q were each found in at least two melanomas. Whole chromosome aberrations were also common, and represented the sole finding in one atypical cellular blue nevus. When seen in melanomas, however, whole chromosome aberrations were invariably accompanied by partial aberrations of other chromosomes. Three melanomas ex blue nevi harbored aberrations, which were absent or negligible in their precursor components, suggesting progression in tumor biology. Gene mutations involving GNAQ and GNA11 were each detected in two of eight melanomas ex blue nevi. In conclusion, copy number aberrations are more common and often complex in melanomas ex blue nevi compared with cellular and atypical cellular blue nevi. Identification of recurrent gains and losses of entire chromosomal arms in melanomas ex blue nevi suggests that development of new probes targeting these regions may improve detection and risk stratification of these lesions.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in ore miners of Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beno, M.; Vladar, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Vicanova, M.; Durcik, M.

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in which the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners in ore mines located in Central Slovakia was monitored and related to lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. The conclusions drawn from the results of the study were as follows: the counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners were significantly higher than in an age matched control group of white-collar staff; the higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; a dependence of chromosomal aberration counts on the exposure to radon could not be assessed. (A.K.)

  10. Improved image quality of cone beam CT scans for radiotherapy image guidance using fiber-interspaced antiscatter grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, Uros; Herk, Marcel van; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Medical linear accelerator mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner provides useful soft tissue contrast for purposes of image guidance in radiotherapy. The presence of extensive scattered radiation has a negative effect on soft tissue visibility and uniformity of CBCT scans. Antiscatter grids (ASG) are used in the field of diagnostic radiography to mitigate the scatter. They usually do increase the contrast of the scan, but simultaneously increase the noise. Therefore, and considering other scatter mitigation mechanisms present in a CBCT scanner, the applicability of ASGs with aluminum interspacing for a wide range of imaging conditions has been inconclusive in previous studies. In recent years, grids using fiber interspacers have appeared, providing grids with higher scatter rejection while maintaining reasonable transmission of primary radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one such grid on CBCT image quality. Methods: The grid used (Philips Medical Systems) had ratio of 21:1, frequency 36 lp/cm, and nominal selectivity of 11.9. It was mounted on the kV flat panel detector of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and tested in a phantom and a clinical study. Due to the flex of the linac and presence of gridline artifacts an angle dependent gain correction algorithm was devised to mitigate resulting artifacts. Scan reconstruction was performed using XVI4.5 augmented with inhouse developed image lag correction and Hounsfield unit calibration. To determine the necessary parameters for Hounsfield unit calibration and software scatter correction parameters, the Catphan 600 (The Phantom Laboratory) phantom was used. Image quality parameters were evaluated using CIRS CBCT Image Quality and Electron Density Phantom (CIRS) in two different geometries: one modeling head and neck and other pelvic region. Phantoms were acquired with and without the grid and reconstructed with and without software correction which was adapted for the different

  11. The evaluation of the effect of attenuation correction on lesion detectability in whole-body FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Uno, Kimiichi; Oka, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi; Jin Wu

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation corrected and non-