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Sample records for abductor muscle strength

  1. Comparison of Hip Abductor and Adductor Muscle Strength in Taekwondo and Non-taekwondo Practitioners

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    Seet Jia Sheng; Fachry Ambia Tandjung; Marietta Shanti Prananta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Taekwondo is an empty hand combat that entails the use of the whole body. Spinning and turning kicks are the proper way of kicking in taekwondo which allow one to maximally perform the hip abductor and adductor muscles simultaneously. To measure the hip abductor and adductor muscles of Taekwondo and Non-taekwondo practitioners, Hand-Held Dynamometer (HHD) is used. This study aimed to compare the hip abductor and adductor muscles strength in Taekwondo and Non-taekwondo practitioner...

  2. The relationship between hip abductor muscle strength and iliotibial band tightness in individuals with low back pain

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    Nourbakhsh Mohammad R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shortening of the iliotibial band (ITB has been considered to be associated with low back pain (LBP. It is theorized that ITB tightness in individuals with LBP is a compensatory mechanism following hip abductor muscle weakness. However, no study has clinically examined this theory. The purpose of this study was to investigate the muscle imbalance of hip abductor muscle weakness and ITB tightness in subjects with LBP. Methods A total of 300 subjects with and without LBP between the ages of 20 and 60 participated in this cross-sectional study. Subjects were categorized in three groups: LBP with ITB tightness (n = 100, LBP without ITB tightness (n = 100 and no LBP (n = 100. Hip abductor muscle strength was measured in all subjects. Results Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA with the body mass index (BMI as the covariate revealed significant difference in hip abductor strength between three groups (P Conclusion The relationship between ITB tightness and hip abductor weakness in patients with LBP is not supported as assumed in theory. More clinical studies are needed to assess the theory of muscle imbalance of hip abductor weakness and ITB tightness in LBP.

  3. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty

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    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength. PMID:28265161

  4. Effects of hip joint center location and femoral offset on abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty.

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    Tezuka, Taro; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Kawamura, Masaki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the changes in the hip joint center (HJC) position and the femoral offset (FO) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 2) to investigate the effects of the HJC and FO on isometric abductor muscle strength. We evaluated 51 patients who underwent unilateral primary THA. The FO, and horizontal and vertical distances from the HJC to the tip of the teardrop were measured and isometric hip abductor muscle strength was measured. The HJC of the affected side moved medially postoperatively compared with that of the unaffected side (p < 0.05), and the FO was reconstructed similarly to the unaffected side. There were significant negative correlations between the changes in the horizontal distance from the HJC and FO to the tip of the teardrop. An increase in the FO and infero-medial cup position optimized hip abductor muscle strength. The HJC was reconstructed medially and superiorly, and the change in the FO after THA was influenced by the change in the horizontal distance of the HJC. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the medial and inferior HJC and increase in the FO constitute an effective procedure for restoring abductor strength.

  5. A randomised trial into the effect of an isolated hip abductor strengthening programme and a functional motor control programme on knee kinematics and hip muscle strength.

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    Palmer, Kathryn; Hebron, Clair; Williams, Jonathan M

    2015-05-03

    Dynamic knee valgus and internal femoral rotation are proposed to be contributory risk factors for patellofemoral pain and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Multimodal interventions including hip abductor strengthening or functional motor control programmes have a positive impact of pain, however their effect on knee kinematics and muscle strength is less clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of isolated hip abductor strengthening and a functional motor control exercise on knee kinematics and hip abductor strength. This prospective, randomised, repeated measures design included 29 asymptomatic volunteers presenting with increase knee valgus and femoral internal rotation. Participants completed either isolated hip abductor strengthening or a functional motor control exercise for 5 weeks. Knee kinematics were measured using inertial sensors during 2 functional activities and hip abductor strength measured using a load cell during isometric hip abduction. There were no significant differences in dynamic knee valgus and internal rotation following the isolated hip abductor or functional motor control intervention, and no significant differences between the groups for knee angles. Despite this, the actual magnitude of reduction in valgus was 10° and 5° for the functional motor control group and strengthening group respectively. The actual magnitude of reduction in internal rotation was 9° and 18° for the functional motor control group and strengthening group respectively. Therefore there was a tendency towards clinically significant improvements in knee kinematics in both exercise groups. A statistically significant improvement in hip abductor strength was evident for the functional motor control group (27% increase; p = 0.008) and strengthening group (35% increase; p = 0.009) with no significant difference between the groups being identified (p = 0.475). Isolated hip strengthening and functional motor control exercises resulted in

  6. The Comparison of the Effects of Trigger Points Pressure Release and Kinesio Taping on Pain and Hip Abductor Muscles Strength in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

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    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Hip muscles insufficiency plays a significant role in deterioration of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS, which can be manifested as myofascial trigger point (MTrPs in hip muscles. Then, our purpose was to determine the prevalence of MTrPs in the gluteus medius (GMe and quadratus lumborum (QL muscles and to investigate the effect of a therapeutic intervention on pain intensity and hip abductor muscles isometric strength in patients with PFPS. Methods: Forty volunteer subjects (20 patients and 20 healthy participated in the study. Latent MTrPs in GMe and QL were evaluated and a handheld dynamometer was used to measure peak isometric strength test (PIST for hip abductors. Patients with PFPS having MTrPs in GMe were randomly divided into either a treatment group (Mean age±SD: 23.2±4.3 years or control (Mean age±SD: 24.4±4.6 years. The therapeutic intervention included trigger point pressure release (TrPPR and Kinesio Taping® (KT. Pain intensity and PIST for hip abductors were assessed at baseline and after intervention in both groups. Results: There is more significant patients with PFPS having latent MTrPs in GMe and QL than the healthy counterparts (p0.05. Conclusion: Concomitant using of TrPPR therapy and KT method can decrease pain intensity in individuals with PFPS. Further studies are required to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Hip abductors and thigh muscles strength ratios and their relation to electromyography amplitude during split squat and walking lunge exercises

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    Petr Stastny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hip abductors (HAB, quadriceps (Q and hamstrings (H reciprocal strength ratios are predictors of electromyography (EMG amplitude during load carrying walking at moderate intensity. Therefore, these strength ratios might predict also the EMG during the exercises as walking lunge (WL or split squat (SSq at submaximal intensity. Objective: To determine whether the EMG amplitude of vastus mediali (VM, vastus laterali (VL, biceps femoris (BF and gluteus medius (Gmed is associated with muscle strength ratio during SSqs and WLs. To determine whether the EMG amplitude differs between individuals with HAB/H ratio above and below one and between individuals with H/Q or HAB/Q ratio above and below 0.5 during SSqs and WLs. Methods: 17 resistance-trained men (age 29.6 ± 4.6 years with at least 3 years of strength training performed in cross-sectional design 5 s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC on an isokinetic dynamometer for knee extension, knee flexion, and hip abduction. The MVIC was used to normalize the EMG signal and estimate the individual strength ratios. Than participants performed WL and SSq for a 5 repetition maximum, to find out muscle activity at submaximal intensity of exercise. Results: The H/Q ratio was associated by Kendall's tau (τ with VM (τ = .33 and BF (τ = -.71 amplitude, HAB/Q ratio was associated with BF (τ = -.43 and Gmed (τ = .38 amplitude, as well as HAB/H was associated with VM (τ = -.41 and Gmed (τ = .74 amplitude. ANOVA results showed significant differences between SSq and WL (F(4, 79 = 10, p < .001, ηp2 = .34 in Gmed amplitude, where WL resulted in higher Gmed amplitude compared to SSq. Other significant differences were found between H/Q groups (F(4, 29 = 3, p = .04, ηp2 = .28 in VM and Gmed amplitude, where group with H/Q > 0.5 showed higher VMO amplitude and lower Gmed amplitude. Furthermore, significant difference was found

  8. Resisted side-stepping: the effect of posture on hip abductor muscle activation

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    Berry, Justin W.; Lee, Theresa S.; Foley, Hanna D.; Lewis, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Objectives To compare hip abductor muscle activity and hip and knee joint kinematics in the moving limb to the stance limb during resisted side-stepping and also to determine if muscle activity was affected by the posture (upright standing versus squat) used to perform the exercise. Background Hip abductor weakness has been associated with a variety of lower extremity injuries. Resisted side-stepping is often used as an exercise to increase strength and endurance of the hip abductors. Exercise prescription would benefit from knowing the relative muscle activity level generated in each limb and for different postures during the side-stepping exercise. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults participated in this study. Kinematics and surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata (TFL) were collected as participants performed side-stepping with a resistive band around the ankle while maintaining each of 2 postures: 1) upright standing and 2) squat. Results Mean normalized EMG signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and TFL was higher in the stance limb than the moving limb (P≤.001). Gluteal muscle activity was higher, while TFL muscle activity was lower, in the squat posture compared to the upright standing posture (P<.001). Hip abduction excursion was greater in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P<.001). Conclusions The 3 hip abductor muscles respond differently to the posture variations of side-stepping exercise in healthy individuals. When prescribing resisted side-stepping exercises, therapists should consider the differences in hip abductor activation across limbs and variations in trunk posture. PMID:26161629

  9. Isokinetic imbalance of adductor-abductor hip muscles in professional soccer players with chronic adductor-related groin pain.

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    Belhaj, K; Meftah, S; Mahir, L; Lmidmani, F; Elfatimi, A

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to compare the isokinetic profile of hip abductor and adductor muscle groups between soccer players suffering from chronic adductor-related groin pain (ARGP), soccer players without ARGP and healthy volunteers from general population. Study included 36 male professional soccer players, who were randomly selected and followed-up over two years. Of the 21 soccer players eligible to participate in the study, 9 players went on to develop chronic ARGP and 12 players did not. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly selected from the general population as a control group. Comparison between the abductor and adductor muscle peak torques for players with and without chronic ARGP found a statistically significant difference on the dominant and non-dominant sides (p muscle significantly stronger than the adductor muscle. In the group of healthy volunteers, the adductor muscle groups were significantly stronger than the abductor muscle groups on both dominant and non-dominant sides (p muscle strength was also significantly decreased on the affected side. This imbalance appears to be a risk factor for adductor-related groin injury. Therefore, restoring the correct relationship between these two agonist and antagonist hip muscles may be an important preventative measure that should be a primary concern of training and rehabilitation programmes.

  10. Isolated bilateral absence of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis muscles: A case report

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    Cihan Sahin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a 21-year-old man with a bilateral absence of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis muscles, which has not been previously reported. He presented with weakness in both of his hands. On physical examination there was atrophy on the thenar eminences of both of his hands and there was an absence of gross functional impairment in his hand functions. On magnetic resonance imaging, abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis muscles were bilaterally absent. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 29-31

  11. The strength and function of hip abductors following anterolateral minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Jixiang; Chen Hong; Chen Cheng; Liang Xi; Huang Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the extent of postoperative hip abductor insufficiency in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients undergoing anterolateral minimally invasive (ALMI) approach,and to investigate whether the clinical outcomes are more favorable in femoral neck fracture (FNF) patients than in non-femoral neck fracture (nFNF) patients.Methods:A total of 48 patients were enrolled in this study.Each patient underwent a clinical examination preoperatively and 6,12,24 and 48 weeks postoperatively.The abductor torque,Trendelenburg's sign,gait velocity,Harris hip score,Oxford hip score,Westren Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score and visual analog scale pain score were recorded.Statistical evaluation was performed with SPSS software version 18.0.The significance level was set at P<0.05.Results:The abductor torque of the operated hip and the recovery ratio showed a gradual improving tendency from 6 weeks postoperatively until the last follow-up.Gait velocity,Harris hip score,Oxford hip score and WOMAC score improved significantly after the operation until 24 weeks postoperatively.In the FNF group,the abductor torque of the operated side and the recovery ratio were significantly higher than in nFNF group at 6 weeks postoperatively,however,as time passed,this trend tended to disappear.Conclusion:This study demonstrates that patients can obtain good abductor strength and function in the early postoperative period and the hip abductor function of patients who suffer from hip osteoarthritis,rheumatoid arthritis,avascular necrosis of the femoral head could be significantly improved following ALMI THA.

  12. The strength and function of hip abductors following anterolateral minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty

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    Tan Jixiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the extent of postoperative hip abductor insufficiency in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA patients undergoing anterolateral minimally invasive (ALMI approach, and to investigate whether the clinical outcomes are more favorable in femoral neck fracture (FNF patients than in non-femoral neck fracture (nFNF patients. Methods:A total of 48 patients were enrolled in this study. Each patient underwent a clinical examination preoperatively and 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks postoperatively. The abductor torque, Trendelenburg's sign, gait velocity, Harris hip score, Oxford hip score, Westren Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC score and visual analog scale pain score were recorded. Statistical evaluation was performed with SPSS software version 18.0. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results:The abductor torque of the operated hip and the recovery ratio showed a gradual improving tendency from 6 weeks postoperatively until the last follow-up. Gait velocity, Harris hip score, Oxford hip score and WOMAC score improved significantly after the operation until 24 weeks postoperatively. In the FNF group, the abductor torque of the operated side and the recovery ratio were significantly higher than in nFNF group at 6 weeks postoperatively, however, as time passed, this trend tended to disappear. Conclusion:This study demonstrates that patients can obtain good abductor strength and function in the early postoperative period and the hip abductor function of patients who suffer from hip osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head could be significantly improved following ALMI THA. Key words: Arthroplasty, replacement, hip; Surgical procedures, minimally invasive; Recovery of function

  13. Abductor tendon tears are associated with hypertrophy of the tensor fasciae latae muscle.

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    Sutter, Reto; Kalberer, Fabian; Binkert, Christoph A; Graf, Nicole; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Gutzeit, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the association between hypertrophy of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and abductor tendon tears. Thirty-five patients who underwent MRI of the abductor tendons of the hip were included in this retrospective study. A subgroup of 18 patients was examined bilaterally. The area of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and the area of the sartorius muscle (size reference) were quantified at the level of the femoral head, and a ratio was calculated. Two radiologists assessed the integrity of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon in consensus. Data were analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U test. Sixteen out of 35 patients (46 %) had a tear of the gluteus medius or minimus tendon. The ratio of the area of the tensor fasciae latae to the sartorius muscle was significantly higher (p = .028) in the group with an abductor tendon tear (median 2.25; Interquartile Range [IQR] = 1.97-3.21) compared to the group without any tears (median 1.91; IQR = 1.52-2.26). The bilateral subanalysis showed that in patients without a tear, the ratio of the two areas did not differ between each side (p = .966), with a median of 1.54 (primary side) and 1.76 (contralateral side). In patients with an abductor tendon tear the ratio was significantly higher (p = .031) on the side with a tear (median 2.81) compared to the contralateral healthy side (1.67). Patients with abductor tendon tears showed hypertrophy of the tensor fasciae latae muscle when compared to the contralateral healthy side and to patients without a tear.

  14. Abductor hallucis muscle flap with circular external fixation for Charcot foot osteomyelitis: a case report

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    Zgonis, Thomas; Ramanujam, Crystal L.; Facaros, Zacharia

    2011-01-01

    Complicated soft tissue defects of the diabetic foot often call for alternative methods to traditional primary closure. Despite the popularity of microvascular free flaps, local muscle flaps can offer reliable reconstruction for these challenging wounds with shorter surgical times and reduced complication rates. In this article, the authors describe the successful use of the abductor hallucis muscle flap and external fixation for soft tissue reconstruction of a chronic Charcot foot wound and ...

  15. Abductor hallucis muscle flap with circular external fixation for Charcot foot osteomyelitis: a case report

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    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Complicated soft tissue defects of the diabetic foot often call for alternative methods to traditional primary closure. Despite the popularity of microvascular free flaps, local muscle flaps can offer reliable reconstruction for these challenging wounds with shorter surgical times and reduced complication rates. In this article, the authors describe the successful use of the abductor hallucis muscle flap and external fixation for soft tissue reconstruction of a chronic Charcot foot wound and osteomyelitis in a diabetic patient.

  16. Outcomes of Open Versus Endoscopic Repair of Abductor Muscle Tears of the Hip: A Systematic Review.

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    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lodhia, Parth; Gui, Chengcheng; Vemula, S Pavan; Martin, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    To compare the outcome of open versus endoscopic gluteal tendon repair. An extensive review of PubMed was conducted by 2 independent reviewers for articles containing at least 1 of the following search terms: gluteus medius, gluteus medius tear, gluteus medius tendinopathy, gluteus medius repair, hip abductors, hip abductor tears, hip abductor repair, hip rotator cuff, hip rotator cuff repair, trochanteric bursa, trochanteric bursitis, trochanteric bursectomy, peritrochanteric procedures, peritrochanteric repair, and peritrochanteric arthroscopy. This yielded 313 articles. Of these articles, 7 satisfied the following inclusion criteria: description of an open or endoscopic gluteal repair with outcomes consisting of patient-reported outcome scores, patient satisfaction, strength scores, pain scores, and complications. Three studies on open gluteal repairs and 4 on endoscopic gluteal repairs met the inclusion criteria. In total, there were 127 patients who underwent open procedures and 40 patients who underwent endoscopic procedures. Of the 40 patients who underwent endoscopic procedures, 15 had concomitant intra-articular procedures documented, as compared with 0 in the open group. The modified Harris Hip Score was common to 1 study on open repairs and 3 studies on endoscopic repairs. The scores were similar for follow-up periods of 1 and 2 years. Visual analog pain scale scores were reported in 1 study on open gluteal repairs and 1 study on endoscopic repairs and were similar between the 2 studies. Improvement in abductor strength was also similarly reported in selected studies between the 2 groups. The only difference between the 2 groups was the reported incidence of complications, which was higher in the open group. Open and endoscopic gluteal repairs have similar patient-reported outcome scores, pain scores, and improvement in abduction strength. Open techniques have a higher reported complication rate. Randomized studies of sufficient numbers of patients are

  17. System identification of evoked mechanomyogram from abductor pollicis brevis muscle in isometric contraction.

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    Uchiyama, Takanori; Sakai, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of a sixth-order model to the mechanomyogram (MMG) system of the parallel-fibered muscle, which was identified from the MMG of the pennation muscle. The median nerve was stimulated, and an MMG and torque of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were measured. The MMGs were detected with either a capacitor microphone or an acceleration sensor. The transfer functions between stimulation and the MMG and between stimulation and torque were identified by the singular value decomposition method. The torque and the MMG, which were detected with a capacitor microphone, DMMG, were approximated with a second- and a third-order model, respectively. The natural frequency of the torque, reflecting longitudinal mechanical characteristics, did not show a significant difference from that of the DMMG. The MMG detected with an acceleration sensor was approximated with a fourth-order model. The natural frequencies of the AMMG reflecting the muscle and subcutaneous tissue in the transverse direction were obtained. Both DMMG and AMMG have to be measured to investigate the model of the MMG system for parallel-fibered muscle. The MMG system of parallel-fibered muscle was also modeled with a sixth-order model.

  18. Discharge properties of motor units of the abductor hallucis muscle during cramp contractions.

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    Minetto, Marco A; Holobar, Ales; Botter, Alberto; Farina, Dario

    2009-09-01

    We analyzed individual motor units during electrically elicited cramp contractions with the aim of characterizing the variability and degree of common oscillations in their discharges. Intramuscular and surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the abductor hallucis muscle of 11 healthy subjects (age 27.0+/-3.7 yr) during electrically elicited cramps. In all, 48 motor units were identified from the intramuscular EMG. These motor units were active for 23.6+/-16.2 s, during which their average discharge rate was 14.5+/-5.1 pulses/s (pps) and their minimum and maximum rates were, respectively, 6.0+/-0.8 and 25.0+/-8.0 pps (Pcramps showed a range of discharge rates similar to that observed during voluntary contractions but larger ISI variability, probably due to large synaptic noise. Moreover, the discharge rates of the active motor units showed common oscillations.

  19. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

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    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty.

  20. The effects of gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises for four weeks on navicular drop and lower extremity muscle activity during gait with flatfoot

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    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of abductor hallucis and gluteus maximus strengthening exercises on pronated feet. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was conducted with 18 adults without no history of surgery on the foot or ankle. One group performed both gluteus maximus strengthening exercises and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises, while the other group performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] The group that performed both gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises showed smaller values in the height of navicular drop than the group that performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises. The muscle activity of the gluteus maximus and the vastus medialis increased during heel-strike in the group that added gluteus maximus exercises, and the muscle activity of the abductor hallucis significantly increased in both groups. [Conclusion] Given the results of the present study, it can be suggested that strengthening the gluteus maximus while also performing exercises to correct the pronated foot is an effective method for achieving normal gait. PMID:27134383

  1. Isometric hip muscle strength in posttraumatic below-knee amputees

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    Jandrić Slavica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Traumas and war injuries, next to chronic occlusive artery disease and diabetes mellitus-derived complications, are the most frequent cause of the lower limbs amputation. They affect mostly younger population that need a higher level of activities as compared with the elderly. Medical rehabilitation is very significant for the muscle performance improvement in this population providing their social reintegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of below-knee amputation on the hip isometric muscle strength and effect of rehabilitation on improvement of hip muscle strength in below-knee amputees, secondary to war wounding. Methods. Forty below-knee amputees (after war wounding, average age 35.6±10.6 years, that were included in primary rehabilitation program with prosthetics, were examined. Objective parameters were used to evaluate therapeutical effects. Isometric muscle strength of hip flexors, extensors, abductors and adductors was measured by dynamometer and expressed in Newton (N at admission, control and discharge for each patient. Average length of the treatment was 51 ± 34.1 days. Results. For isometric hip flexors (t = - 1.99346, p < 0.05, extensors (t = -4.629073, p < 0.001, abductors (t = -4.9408, p < 0.001 and adductors (t = -2.00228, p < 0.05, muscle strength was significantly less on the amputated than on nonamputated side. The highest differences in muscle strength between amputated and nonamputated limbs were noted for hip abductors (26.6% and extensors (23.3%. There was significant improvement of mean values of strength for all examined hip muscles after rehabilitation and prosthetics for both legs in comparison to beginning of the therapy. The hip abductor on the amputated side was for 19.4% weaker after rehabilitation in comparison to the nonamputated limb. Conclusion. Decreases of isometric muscle strength in all examined hip muscles were observed, more in the amputated limb. Rehabilitation

  2. [Strength of muscles surrounding the hip joint and gait in patients following implantation of a cementless hip endoprosthesis].

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    Horstmann, T; Martini, F; Mayer, F; Sell, S; Knak, J; Zacher, J

    1995-01-01

    There are only a few studies which could support conclusions concerning the strength of the muscles surrounding the hip joint and especially concerning the strength relationships following implantation of endoprotheses. The aim of this study was to examine the pre- and postoperative course of strength deficits in this musculature compared to clinical parameters and the uninvolved side. Fifty-eight patients between 30 and 67 years of age, in whom individual total hip protheses were implanted were clinically examined prior, 9 weeks and 6 months after surgery. Moreover, the maximum isometric strength of abductors, flexors, and rotator muscles as well as maximum isokinetic strength of the extensors and flexor musculature at 60% and 120%/s were measured. The flexor and extensor musculature already showed a clear increase in maximum strength after 9 weeks and 6 months (90-124%). By contrast, the isometric strengths of the rotators increased only slightly, the abductor strength decreased after 6 weeks to below the preoperative baseline level and attained this level again only after 6 months. The clinical parameters Trendelenburg sign, limping and walking capacity were clearly improved after 6 months, but no correlation to the abductor strength could be demonstrated. It is concluded that limp-free gait can be attained even without maximum strength increase in the abductors, which are important for fluid gait, at least for short distances. The importance of regular training of the rotator and abductor musculature in coxarthrosis is emphasized to delay limitation of movement and decreased strength in the sense of capsule pattern.

  3. Changes in knee biomechanics after a hip-abductor strengthening protocol for runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferber, Reed; Kendall, Karen D; Farr, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    .... To investigate this relationship using a 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening program to identify changes in strength, pain, and biomechanics in runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Cohort study...

  4. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

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    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hip abductor weakness is not the cause for iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, S; Krauss, I; Maiwald, C; Best, R; Horstmann, T

    2008-07-01

    Muscular deficits in the hip abductors are presumed to be a major factor in the development of Iliotibial Band Syndrome in runners. No definite relationship between muscular weakness of the hip abductors and the development of Iliotibial Band Syndrome or different ratios between hip adduction to abduction have been reported so far. Isokinetic measurements were taken from 10 healthy runners and 10 runners with Iliotibial Band Syndrome. Primary outcome variables were concentric, eccentric, and isometric peak torque of the hip abductors and adductors at 30 degrees/s, and a concentric endurance quotient at the same angle velocity. Differences in muscle strength of the hip abductors between healthy (CO) and injured runners (ITBS) were not statistically significant in any of the muscle functions tested. Both groups showed the same strength differences between hip adduction and abduction, and increased strength in hip adduction. Weakness of hip abductors does not seem to play a role in the etiology of Iliotibial Band Syndrome in runners, since dynamic and static strength measurements did not differ between groups, and differences between hip abduction and adduction were the same. Strengthening of hip abductors seems to have little effect on the prevention of Iliotibial Band Syndrome in runners.

  6. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained...... physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength...... (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between...

  7. Late repair of abductor avulsion after the transgluteal approach for hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miozzari, Hermes H; Dora, Claudio; Clark, John M; Nötzli, Hubert P

    2010-04-01

    The abductor release sometimes does not heal after a transgluteal approach for hip arthroplasty. Factors influencing the success of subsequent repair are unclear. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare the condition of the gluteus medius with clinical outcome after late repair of abductor dehiscence in 12 total hip patients. Evaluation included a pain rating, gait evaluation, Trendelenburg test, strength grading, and Harris Hip Score. Most had both prerepair and postrepair MRI studies to assess the repair and to grade abductor muscle fatty degeneration. Two repairs without MRI were explored surgically. Although average pain, limp, and strength scores improved significantly, rerupture occurred in 4 subjects and fatty degeneration in the gluteus medius did not improve, even with intact repair. Nine patients were satisfied; 7 of these had an intact repair. Magnetic resonance imaging and operative observations suggest that chronic degeneration in the abductor mechanism is the major impediment to successful repair.

  8. Effect of muscle contraction strength on gating of somatosensory magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Kotan, Shinichi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-11-01

    Afferent somatosensory information is modulated before the afferent input arrives at the primary somatosensory cortex during voluntary movement. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of muscular contraction strength on somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) during voluntary movement. In addition, we examined the differences in gating between innervated and non-innervated muscle during contraction. We investigated the changes in gating effect by muscular contraction strength and innervated and non-innervated muscles in human using 306-channel magnetoencephalography. SEFs were recorded following the right median nerve stimulation in a resting condition and during isometric muscular contractions from 10 % electromyographic activity (EMG), 20 and 30 % EMG of the right extensor indicis muscle and abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Our results showed that the equivalent current dipole (ECD) strength for P35m decreased with increasing strength of muscular contraction of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle. However, changes were observed only at 30 % EMG contraction level of the right extensor indicis muscle, which was not innervated by the median nerve. There were no significant changes in the peak latencies and ECD locations of each component in all conditions. The ECD strength did not differ significantly for N20m and P60m regardless of the strength of muscular contraction and innervation. Therefore, we suggest that the gating of SEF waveforms following peripheral nerve stimulation was affected by the strength of muscular contraction and innervation of the contracting muscle.

  9. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Systematic Review of Muscle Strength Assessment and Muscle Strength Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-02-01

    To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion isokinetic dynamometry. A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles were reviewed. Twenty studies covering 316 PPSH were included. High intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) inter- and intrasession reliability was reported for isokinetic dynamometry, which was independent of the tested muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Slightly higher ICC values were found for the nonparetic extremity. Standard error of the mean (SEM) values showed that a change of 7% to 20% was required for a real group change to take place for most muscle groups, with the knee extensors showing the smallest SEM% values. The muscle strength of paretic muscles showed deficits when compared with both healthy and nonparetic muscles, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Nonparetic muscles only showed minor strength impairments when compared with healthy muscles. Criterion isokinetic dynamometry is a reliable test in persons with stroke, generally showing marked reductions in muscle strength of paretic and, to a lesser degree, nonparetic muscles when compared with healthy controls, independent of muscle group, contraction mode, and contraction velocity. Copyright

  10. Changes in knee biomechanics after a hip-abductor strengthening protocol for runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, Reed; Kendall, Karen D; Farr, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Very few authors have investigated the relationship between hip-abductor muscle strength and frontal-plane knee mechanics during running. To investigate this relationship using a 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening program to identify changes in strength, pain, and biomechanics in runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Cohort study. University-based clinical research laboratory. Fifteen individuals (5 men, 10 women) with PFPS and 10 individuals without PFPS (4 men, 6 women) participated. The patients with PFPS completed a 3-week hip-abductor strengthening protocol; control participants did not. The dependent variables of interest were maximal isometric hip-abductor muscle strength, 2-dimensional peak knee genu valgum angle, and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability. All measures were recorded at baseline and 3 weeks later. Between-groups differences were compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. At baseline, the PFPS group exhibited reduced strength, no difference in peak genu valgum angle, and increased stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with the control group. After the 3-week protocol, the PFPS group demonstrated increased strength, less pain, no change in peak genu valgum angle, and reduced stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with baseline. A 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening protocol was effective in increasing muscle strength and decreasing pain and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability in individuals with PFPS. However, concomitant changes in peak knee genu valgum angle were not observed.

  11. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  12. Muscle Strength and Poststroke Hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Otto H; Stenager, Egon; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review (1) psychometric properties of criterion isokinetic dynamometry testing of muscle strength in persons with poststroke hemiplegia (PPSH); and (2) literature that compares muscle strength in patients poststroke with that in healthy controls assessed by criterion...... isokinetic dynamometry. DATA SOURCES: A systematic literature search of 7 databases was performed. STUDY SELECTION: Included studies (1) enrolled participants with definite poststroke hemiplegia according to defined criteria; (2) assessed muscle strength or power by criterion isokinetic dynamometry; (3) had...... undergone peer review; and (4) were available in English or Danish. DATA EXTRACTION: The psychometric properties of isokinetic dynamometry were reviewed with respect to reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Furthermore, comparisons of strength between paretic, nonparetic, and comparable healthy muscles...

  13. Muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, S; Vissing, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by fatigue and fluctuating muscle weakness as a result of impaired neuromuscular transmission (NMT). Although MG is a prototypic fatiguing disorder, little is known about how the condition affects fixed weakness, and if present, whether weakness...... is related to disease duration or gender. The aim of this study was to quantify the strength of patients with MG and investigate whether it is related to disease duration. METHODS: Eight muscle groups were tested by manual muscle testing and with a hand-held dynamometer in 38 patients with generalized MG...... and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The disease duration was recorded and compared with strength measures. RESULTS: On average, muscle strength was decreased by 28% compared with controls (Pmuscle...

  14. Ultrasonographic quantification of intrinsic hand muscle cross-sectional area; reliability and validity for predicting muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseny, Behnam; Nijhuis, Tim H; Hundepool, Caroline A; Janssen, Wim G; Selles, Ruud W; Coert, J Henk

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether ultrasonographic measurement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the intrinsic hand muscles can be used to predict muscle strength in a valid and reliable manner, and to determine if this method can be used for follow-up of patients with peripheral nerve injury between the wrist and elbow. Repeated-measures cross-sectional study. Clinical and academic hospital. Healthy adults (n=31) and patients with ulnar and median nerve injuries (n=16) between the wrist and elbow who were visiting the Erasmus Medical Center or Maasstad Hospital were included in the study (N=47). Not applicable. Correlation between measured muscle CSA and strength and assessment of inter- and intrarater reliability. Ultrasound and strength measurements of the intrinsic hand muscles were conducted bilaterally. To establish validity, the CSA of 4 muscles (abductor digiti minimi, first dorsal interosseus, abductor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis) was compared with strength measurements of the same muscles conducted with the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer. Repeated measures were conducted to assess inter- and intrarater reliability. The assessed CSA strongly correlated with strength measurements, with correlations ranging from 0.82 to 0.93 in healthy volunteers and from 0.63 to 0.94 in patients. Test-retest reliability showed excellent intrarater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.99-1.00) in patients and volunteers and good interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.88-0.95) in healthy volunteers. We found that ultrasound is a valid and reliable method to assess the CSA of specific muscles in the hand. Therefore, this technique could be useful to monitor muscle reinnervation in patients suffering from peripheral nerve injury as a valuable addition to strength dynamometers. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A rare anomaly of abductor digiti minimi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo, J R; Mirapeix, R M; Ferreira, B

    1993-06-01

    Two cases with anomalous fascicles in abductor digiti minimi, noted in the course of dissecting 62 adult postmortem forearms, are described. Both fascicles arose from the flexor retinaculum and the antebrachial fascia; one was inserted into abductor digiti minimi and the other on the proximal phalanx of the 5th finger. The anomalous muscles crossed the ulnar nerve and in 1 case also the median nerve. In the 2nd case the palmar nerve to the 5th finger was seen to penetrate the anomalous muscle. The ontogeny, morphology and clinical significance of this anomaly are discussed in relation to previously described anomalies of the hypothenar muscles.

  16. Operative outcome of partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conflitti, Joseph M; Tarquinio, Thom A

    2004-07-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of 23 patients (26 feet) to assess operative outcome of partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Nonsurgical treatment was implemented in all patients with no relief of symptoms (average 20.8 months) prior to surgery. Using a visual analog pain scale (0-10), the average preoperative pain was 9.2 (range, 8-10). Prior to surgery, 65.2% of patients had severe limitations of activity, and 34.8% of patients had moderate limitations of activity. An average 25.3-month follow-up (range, 8-51) was performed by telephone interview. Average postoperative pain decreased to 1.7 using the same visual analog scale. Thirteen patients (57%) had no functional limitations postoperatively and nine patients (39%) had minimal functional limitations postoperatively. One patient (4%) had moderate functional limitations postoperatively. Twenty patients (87%) were completely satisfied with the surgery, two patients (9%) were satisfied with reservations, and one patient (4%) was unsatisfied with the surgery. The average period before return to work or daily activities was 1.5 months. Two patients had minor complications of partial wound dehiscence that healed uneventfully and mild dorsal midfoot pain which required temporary use of a boot walker. While the majority of patients with plantar fasciitis can be managed with nonoperative treatment, those patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis can be effectively treated with partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle.

  17. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  18. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  19. The hip abductors at MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, A., E-mail: adrienne.hoffmann@balgrist.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zürich (Switzerland); Pfirrmann, C.W.A., E-mail: christian.pfirrmann@balgrist.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Imaging of the hip abductors plays an increasing role for the evaluation of greater trochanteric pain in patients with and without total hip arthroplasty. This review article addresses the anatomy of the hip abductors and their intervening bursae. It highlights different possible imaging appearances such as tendinopathy or partial and full thickness tears of the gluteal tendons. Muscle atrophy or fatty degeneration of the gluteal muscles is an important reason for limping. Inflammatory diseases such as hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease or spondylarthritis have to be considered. Knowledge of these different entities is important to achieve optimal treatment and outcomes.

  20. Procedural Options for Measuring Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindova S.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to provide alternative means of measurement and evaluation of muscle strength in rehabilitation practice and diagnostics. In the last few years many electronic devices for evaluation of muscle strength have developed. Contemporary studies have shown that in addition to the standard manual muscle testing muscle strength can be assessed more objectively and analytically using electronic dynamometers and equipment. The strain gauges are used as a tool of precision in the industry that allows measurement of mechanical loads by dynamometers. By using these tools is possible to obtain continuous digital measurement and recording of muscle strength.

  1. Hip-joint and abductor-muscle forces adequately represent in vivo loading of a cemented total hip reconstruction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Huiskes, R.

    2001-01-01

    Using finite element analyses, we investigated which muscle groups acting around the hip-joint most prominently affected the load distributions in cemented total hip reconstructions with a bonded and debonded femoral stem. The purpose was to determine which muscle groups should be included in pre-cl

  2. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  3. Clinical Implications for Muscle Strength Differences in Women of Different Age and Racial Groups: The WIN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine; Ferro, Emerenciana; Morrow, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reduction in muscle strength is strongly associated with functional decline in women, and women with lower quadriceps strength adjusted for body weight are more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis. Objective To compare body weight--adjusted strength among women of different age/racial groups. Study Design Cross-sectional study of muscle strength in 918 women aged 20--83 (M ± SD = 52 ± 13). Methods An orthopedic examination was conducted including measurement of handgrip and lower extremity strength (hip abductors/external rotators, knee flexors/extensors). Data were grouped into young (20--39 years, n = 139), middle (40--54 years, n = 300), and older (55+ years, n = 424) ages for white (n = 699) and African American (AA) (n = 164) women. Means and standard deviations for strength adjusted for body weight were calculated for each age and racial group and compared using 2-way multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc tests. Results No significant age-by-race interaction (P = .092) but significant main effects for age and race (P < .001). Pairwise comparisons revealed significant differences in knee extensor and flexor strength between all age groups. For grip and hip external rotator strength, significant differences were found between the middle and older groups. Differences in hip abductor strength were found between the young and middle-aged groups. AA women had lower strength than white women in all muscle groups (P < .05) except hip external rotators. Conclusions Strength decreased with age in all muscle groups but magnitude of decrease varied by muscle. Strengthening programs should target different muscles, depending on a woman's age and race. PMID:21666779

  4. Asymmetry of Muscle Strength in Elite Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drid, Patrik; Drapsin, Miodrag; Trivic, Tatjana; Lukac, Damir; Obadov, Slavko; Milosevic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    "Study aim": To determine muscle strength variables in elite judoists and wrestlers since thigh muscle strength and bilaterally balanced flexor-to-extensor ratio minimise injury risk and are desirable for achieving sport successes. "Material and methods": Judoists, wrestlers and untrained subjects, 10 each, were subjected to isokinetic strength…

  5. Botulinum toxin therapy for abductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, Gayle; Hochstetler, Heidi; Murry, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Botulinum toxin has been widely accepted as an effective therapy for controlling the symptoms of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Reported experience with botulinum treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia (ABSD) has been less impressive. Factors that may impair outcomes for ABSD include differences in the pathophysiology of ADSD and ABSD and limitation of maximal dose from airway restriction with posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA) weakness. We report our experience with botulinum injection of the PCA with an asymmetric dose escalation protocol, based on clinical observations that in ABSD, abductor spasms are often stronger on one side, usually the left. The nondominant side was injected with 1.25 units. Dominant side dose began at 5 units, with step-wise increments of 5 units per week until one of three endpoints was reached: Elimination of breathy voice breaks, complete abductor paralysis of the dominant side, or airway compromise. Fourteen of 17 patients achieved good or fair voice, with dominant-side doses ranging from 10 to 25 units. Exercise intolerance limited PCA dose in two patients. One patient had persisting breathiness that improved with medialization thyroplasty. Asymmetric botulinum toxin injection into PCA muscles can suppress abductor spasm in patients with ABSD, but breathiness may persist, because of inadequate glottal closure.

  6. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caviglia Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39% with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years. The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven. The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001. Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001 and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001. The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001. Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions.

  7. Pilates: Build Strength in Your Core Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Pilates may sound intimidating, but it's an accessible way to build strength in your core muscles for better posture, balance and flexibility. By Mayo Clinic Staff Pilates isn't just for fitness fanatics. It's actually ...

  8. Personality Typology in Relation to Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; Milaneschi, Yuri; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity plays a central role in the age-related decline in muscle strength, an important component in the process leading to disability. Personality, a significant determinant of health behaviors including physical activity, could therefore impact muscle strength throughout adulthood and affect the rate of muscle strength decline with aging. Personality typologies combining “high neuroticism” (N≥55), “low extraversion” (Epersonality types. Facet analyses suggest an important role for the N components of depression and hostility. Physical activity level appears to partly explain some of these associations. Conclusion Findings provide support for the notion that the typological approach to personality may be useful in identifying specific personality types at risk of low muscle strength and offer the possibility for more targeted prevention and intervention programs. PMID:21614452

  9. Effects of strength training and detraining on knee extensor strength, muscle volume and muscle quality in elderly women

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Cleiton Silva; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Radaelli, Régis; Lanferdini,Fábio Juner; Cunha, Giovani dos Santos; Reischak-Oliveira, Álvaro; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Pinto, Ronei Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Strength training seems to be an interesting approach to counteract decreases that affect knee extensor strength, muscle mass and muscle quality (force per unit of muscle mass) associated with ageing. However, there is no consensus regarding the changes in muscle mass and their contribution to strength during periods of training and detraining in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed at verifying the behaviour of knee extensor muscle strength, muscle volume and muscle quality in elderly wo...

  10. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (pmuscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  11. Test-retest reliability of innovated strength tests for hip muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Meyer

    Full Text Available The burden of hip muscles weakness and its relation to other impairments has been well documented. It is therefore a pre-requisite to have a reliable method for clinical assessment of hip muscles function allowing the design and implementation of a proper strengthening program. Motor-driven dynamometry has been widely accepted as the gold-standard for lower limb muscle strength assessment but is mainly related to the knee joint. Studies focusing on the hip joint are less exhaustive and somewhat discrepant with regard to optimal participants position, consequently influencing outcome measures. Thus, we aimed to develop a standardized test setup for the assessment of hip muscles strength, i.e. flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors, with improved participant stability and to define its psychometric characteristics. Eighteen participants performed unilateral isokinetic and isometric contractions of the hip muscles in the sagittal and coronal plane at two separate occasions. Peak torque and normalized peak torque were measured for each contraction. Relative and absolute measures of reliability were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient and standard error of measurement, respectively. Results from this study revealed higher levels of between-day reliability of isokinetic/isometric hip abduction/flexion peak torque compared to existing literature. The least reliable measures were found for hip extension and adduction, which could be explained by a less efficient stabilization technique. Our study additionally provided a first set of reference normalized data which can be used in future research.

  12. Multiple tendons of abductor pollicis longus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur DI

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic variations of the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL and its knowledge is important to assess the diseased and traumatized hand and when considering tendons for repair or graft. During routine dissection of a 63-year-old male cadaver, in the Department of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India we came across an unusual APL in the right upper limb. The muscle had altogether 9 tendons and they were inserted to the lateral and anterolateral sides of the base of the 1st metacarpal bone, opponens pollicis (two tendons each, the abductor pollicis brevis, trapezium and thenar fascia (one tendon each. The number of accessory tendons of APL has functional significance in the development of de Quervain’s syndrome.

  13. Hip abductor moment arm - a mathematical analysis for proximal femoral replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temple H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients undergoing proximal femoral replacement for tumor resection often have compromised hip abductor muscles resulting in a Trendelenberg limp and hip instability. Commercially available proximal femoral prostheses offer several designs with varying sites of attachment for the abductor muscles, however, no analyses of these configurations have been performed to determine which design provides the longest moment arm for the hip abductor muscles during normal function. Methods This study analyzed hip abductor moment arm through hip adduction and abduction with a trigonometric mathematical model to evaluate the effects of alterations in anatomy and proximal femoral prosthesis design. Prosthesis dimensions were taken from technical schematics that were obtained from the prosthesis manufacturers. Manufacturers who contributed schematics for this investigation were Stryker Orthopaedics and Biomet. Results Superior and lateral displacement of the greater trochanter increased the hip abductor mechanical advantage for single-leg stance and adduction and preserved moment arm in the setting of Trendelenberg gait. Hip joint medialization resulted in less variance of the abductor moment arm through coronal motion. The Stryker GMRS endoprosthesis provided the longest moment arm in single-leg stance. Conclusions Hip abductor moment arm varies substantially throughout the hip's range of motion in the coronal plane. Selection of a proximal femur endoprosthesis with an abductor muscle insertion that is located superiorly and laterally will optimize hip abductor moment arm in single-leg stance compared to one located inferiorly or medially.

  14. Long-term outcome of muscle strength in ulnar and median nerve injury: Comparing manual muscle strength testing, grip and pinch strength dynamometers and a new intrinsic muscle strength dynamometer

    OpenAIRE

    Schreuders, Ton; Roebroeck, Marij; Jaquet, Jean; Hovius, Steven; Stam, Henk

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the outcome of muscle strength with manual muscle strength testing grip and pinch strength measurements and a dynamometer which allows for measurements of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation (the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer, RIHM). Methods: Thirty-four patients more than 2 years after ulnar and/or median nerve injury. Muscle strength was evaluated using manual muscle strength testing (MMST), grip, pinch and intrinsic muscle strength measureme...

  15. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise trainin

  16. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise trainin

  17. SELECTIVE LARYNGEAL ABDUCTOR REINNERVATION IN CATS USING A PHRENIC-NERVE TRANSFER AND ORG-2766

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; VANLITHBIJL, JT; GROENHOUT, C; TONNAER, JADM; DEWILDE, P

    1993-01-01

    Reinnervation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve following nerve injury often leads to laryngeal synkinesis. Selective reinnervation of adductor and abductor muscles might be able to avoid synkinesis. This study presents the results of selective abductor reinnervation in cats, using a phrenic nerve tr

  18. Muscle strength, pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Reduced muscle strength is regarded as a risk factor for pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, various indices for muscle strength are used when assessing determinants of pain and disability. The goal of the present study was to evaluate these indices of muscle strength.

  19. Muscle strength, pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Reduced muscle strength is regarded as a risk factor for pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, various indices for muscle strength are used when assessing determinants of pain and disability. The goal of the present study was to evaluate these indices of muscle strength.

  20. Rationale for Treatment of Hip Abductor Pain Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bewyer, Dennis C; Bewyer, Kathryn J

    2003-01-01

    Patients with lower back or buttock pain that radiates into the posterior or lateral leg are often referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of sciatica. Often the physical exam does not reveal neurologic findings indicative of radiculopathy. Instead, there is hip abductor muscle pain and weakness. This syndrome involves muscle imbalances that result in overuse strain of the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus muscles, myofascial trigger points, and trochanteric bursitis. This paper descri...

  1. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and strength training to gain muscle strength in elderly women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesário, Denise Ferreira; Mendes, Geovânia Barbosa da Silva; Uchôa, Érica Patrícia Borba Lira; Veiga, Paulo Henrique Altran

    2014-01-01

    ...: To perform comparative analyze of results of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and strength training to gain muscle strength of biceps and quadriceps and grip in the elderly...

  2. The efficacy of modified direct lateral versus posterior approach on gait function and hip muscle strength after primary total hip arthroplasty at 12months follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Broeng, Leif; Overgaard, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    -seven patients with primary hip osteoarthritis were randomised to total hip arthroplasty with either posterior or lateral approach and evaluated pre-operatively, 3 and 12months post-operatively using 3-dimensional gait analyses as objective measures of gait function, including Gait Deviation Index, temporo...... in a randomised controlled trial. The aim was to compare the efficacy of total hip arthroplasty performed by lateral or posterior approach on gait function and hip muscle strength up to 12months post-operatively. We hypothesised that posterior approach would be superior to lateral approach. METHODS: Forty......-spatial parameters and range of motion. Isometric maximal hip muscle strength in abduction, flexion and extension was also tested. FINDINGS: Post-operatively, no between-group difference in gait function was observed. However, both hip abductor and flexor muscle strength improved more in the posterior approach group...

  3. Relationship between Isometric Strength of Six Lower Limb Muscle Groups and Motor Skills among Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckinx, F; Croisier, J L; Reginster, J Y; Petermans, J; Goffart, E; Bruyère, O

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the correlation between isometric muscle strength of the lower limb and motor skills. This is a cross sectional study performed among volunteer nursing home residents included in the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. The present analysis focused on isometric muscle strength of 6 lower limb muscle groups (i.e. knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, ankle flexors and ankle extensors), assessed using a validated hand-held dynamometer (i.e. the MicroFET2 device), and motor skills evaluated using the Tinetti test, the Timed Up and Go test, the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB) and the walking speed. The relationship between all these parameters was tested by means of a multiple correlation, adjusted on age, sex and body mass index. 450 nursing home residents (69.8% of women) with a mean age of 83.1±9.4 years were included in this study. Our results showed a significant inverse correlation between lower limb muscle strength and the time required to perform the TUG test or gait speed, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. The relationship between the Tinetti test or the SPPB score, and lower limb muscle strength was significant, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. In conclusion, a positive association between lower limb muscle strength of the four main muscle groups and motor skills of the elderly nursing residents was found in this research. Therefore, special attention should be given to these muscle groups during rehabilitation programs.

  4. Mechanisms behind Estrogens’ Beneficial Effect on Muscle Strength in Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Dawn A.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Greising, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    Muscle weakness ensues when serum testosterone declines with age in men. Testosterone’s female counterpart, estrogen, has also been implicated in age-related strength loss but these results are less conclusive. Our working hypothesis is that estrogens do benefit muscle strength, and that the underlying mechanism involves estrogen receptors to improve muscle quality more so than quantity. PMID:20335737

  5. Knee joint contact mechanics during downhill gait and its relationship with varus/valgus motion and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p < 0.02) and greater heel-strike joint contact point velocities (p < 0.05) for the medial and lateral compartments compared to the control group. The peak medial/lateral joint contact point velocity of the medial compartment was also greater for patients with knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p = 0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p < 0.01) and greater quadriceps and hip abductor muscle weakness (p = 0.03). In general, increased joint contact point excursions and velocities in patients with knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p < 0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with deficits in muscle strength.

  6. Autism Severity and Muscle Strength: A Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Adams, James B.; Troutman, Melissa R.; Davis, Georgia; King, Paul G.; Young, John L.; Geier, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between muscle strength, as measured by hand grip strength, and autism severity, as measured by the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). Thirty-seven (37) children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were evaluated using the CARS and then tested for hand muscle strength using a hand grip…

  7. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  8. Effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise strength training on muscle strength and mobility in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A; Becher, Jules G; Comuth, Anton; Dekkers, Hurnet; Van Dijk, Lieseke; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) strength training on muscle strength and mobility in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-one children with spastic uni- and bilateral CP; (29 males, 22 females; mean age 10 y 5 mo, SD 1 y 10 mo, range 6 y 0 mo-13 y 10 mo; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-III) were randomized to the intervention group (n=26) or the control group (n=25, receiving usual care). The intervention group trained for 12 weeks, three times a week, on a five-exercise circuit, which included a leg-press and functional exercises. The training load progressively increased based on the child's maximum level of strength, determined by the eight-repetition maximum. Muscle strength (measured with hand-held dynamometry and a six-repetition maximum leg-press test), mobility (measured with the Gross Motor Function Measure, two functional tests, and a mobility questionnaire), and spasticity (measured by the appearance of a catch) were evaluated before, during, directly after, and 6 weeks after the end of training by two blinded research assistants. Directly after training, there was a statistically significant effect (pstrength (knee extensors +12% [0.56 N/kg; 95% confidence interval {CI} 0.13-0.99]; hip abductors +11% [0.27 N/kg; 95% CI 0.00-0.54]; total +8% [1.30 N/kg; 95% CI 0.56-2.54]; six-repetition maximum +14% [14%; 95% CI 1.99-26.35]), but not on mobility or spasticity. A detraining effect was seen after 6 weeks. Twelve weeks of functional PRE strength training increases muscle strength up to 14%. This strength gain did not lead to improved mobility.

  9. Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Miller, Michael E; Davis, Cralen C; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2012-01-10

    Aging is associated with the loss of muscle volume (MV) and force leading to difficulties with activities of daily living. However, the relationship between upper limb MV and joint strength has not been characterized for older adults. Quantifying this relationship may help our understanding of the functional declines of the upper limb that older adults experience. Our objective was to assess the relationship between upper limb MV and maximal isometric joint moment-generating capacity (IJM) in a single cohort of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65 years) for 6 major functional groups (32 muscles). MV was determined from MRI for 18 participants (75.1±4.3 years). IJM at the shoulder (abduction/adduction), elbow (flexion/extension), and wrist (flexion/extension) was measured. MV and IJM measurements were compared to previous reports for young adults (28.6±4.5 years). On average older adults had 16.5% less total upper limb MV compared to young adults. Additionally, older adult wrist extensors composed a significantly increased percentage of upper limb MV. Older adult IJM was reduced across all joints, with significant differences for shoulder abductors (pIJM was accounted for by MV changes (p≤0.027), compared to 81.0% in young adults. We conclude that for older adults, MV and IJM are, on average, reduced but the significant linear relationship between MV and IJM is maintained. These results suggest that older adult MV and IJM cannot be simply scaled from young adults.

  10. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin preserves muscle strength in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is superior to placebo treatment for maintenance of muscle strength during 12 weeks in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The present study evaluated whether SCIG preserves muscle strength for 1 year...... evaluated after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary end-points were changes in muscle strength evaluated by isokinetic dynamometry in four affected muscle groups and a composite score of muscle performance and function tests, including Medical Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, 40-m walking test (40-MWT...... remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: SCIG preserves muscle strength and functional ability in patients with CIDP who previously responded to IVIG. SCIG should be considered as an alternative in long-term treatment of CIDP patients....

  11. Effect of Dynamic Platform Lateral Step-Up versus Stable Platform Lateral Step-Up Weight Bearing Exercise in Hip Abductor Strengthening on Healthy Male Volunteers - Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagatheesan Alagesan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective & Background: To determine the effect of the dynamic platform lateral step-up and stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise in strengthening of hip abductor. Many researchers have reported that strengthening of hip muscles as important component especially hip abductors in lower extremity rehabilitation program. Study Design: Single blinded randomized comparative clinical trial. Methodology: Sixty five healthy college going male subjects (Age group of 18 – 24 years volunteered for this study. They were randomly assigned to one of the 2 groups. One group received the dynamic platform lateral step-up and the other received stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise. The strength measurements were recorded using hand held dynamometer. Results: The results indicate that both groups had a positive effect on the outcome measures. The strength of hip abductors in dynamic platform group improved from a mean value (SD of 19.47(3.59 to 26.93(3.19 and in stable platform group from 19.07(2.32 to 22.67(2.46. Significant difference is also observed between the two groups at p value .05. Conclusion: The study shows that dynamic platform lateral step-up exercise is more beneficial than stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise in improving hip abductor muscle strength.

  12. Long-term outcome of muscle strength in ulnar and median nerve injury: Comparing manual muscle strength testing, grip and pinch strength dynamometers and a new intrinsic muscle strength dynamometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Schreuders (Ton); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij); J.B. Jaquet (Jean); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the outcome of muscle strength with manual muscle strength testing grip and pinch strength measurements and a dynamometer which allows for measurements of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation (the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer, RIHM). Methods:

  13. Long-term outcome of muscle strength in ulnar and median nerve injury: Comparing manual muscle strength testing, grip and pinch strength dynamometers and a new intrinsic muscle strength dynamometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Schreuders (Ton); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij); J.B. Jaquet (Jean); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the outcome of muscle strength with manual muscle strength testing grip and pinch strength measurements and a dynamometer which allows for measurements of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation (the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer, RIHM). Methods: Thirty-f

  14. In cirrhotic patients reduced muscle strength is unrelated to muscle capacity for ATP turnover suggesting a central limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin; Nielsen, H B; Secher, Niels H.

    2011-01-01

      We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria.......  We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria....

  15. Does muscle strength predict future musculoskeletal disorders and sickness absence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, A; Sell, L; Hansen, J V

    2012-01-01

    High muscle strength is considered relevant for preventing musculoskeletal disorders and long-term sickness absence. However, prospective studies on the association between muscle strength and future musculoskeletal disorders and long-term sickness absence are few and show contrasting results....

  16. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  17. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  18. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis-A Cross-Sectional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Gait Deviation Index summarizes overall gait 'quality', based on kinematic data from a 3-dimensional gait analysis. However, it is unknown which clinical outcomes may affect the Gait Deviation Index in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this study......) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the 'Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability...... was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait 'quality' and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. METHOD: Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2...

  19. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait 'quality' and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. METHOD: Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2......BACKGROUND: The Gait Deviation Index summarizes overall gait 'quality', based on kinematic data from a 3-dimensional gait analysis. However, it is unknown which clinical outcomes may affect the Gait Deviation Index in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this study......) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the 'Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability...

  20. Generalization of Muscle Strength Capacities as Assessed From Different Variables, Tests, and Muscle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, Ivan; Prebeg, Goran; Sreckovic, Sreten; Mirkov, Dragan M; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-02-01

    Cuk, I, Prebeg, G, Sreckovic, S, Mirkov, DM, and Jaric, S. Generalization of muscle strength capacities as assessed from different variables, tests, and muscle groups. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 305-312, 2017-The muscle strength capacities to exert force under various movement conditions have been indiscriminately assessed from various strength tests and variables applied on different muscles. We tested the hypotheses that the distinctive strength capacities would be revealed (H1) through different strength tests, and (H2) through different strength variables. Alternatively, (H3) all strength variables independent of the selected test could depict the same strength capacity of the tested muscle. Sixty subjects performed both the standard strength test and the test of alternating contractions of 6 pairs of antagonistic muscles acting in different leg and arm joints. The dependent variables obtained from each test and muscle were the maximum isometric force and the rate of force development. A confirmatory principle component analysis set to 2 factors explained 31.9% of the total variance. The factor loadings discerned between the tested arm and leg muscles, but not between the strength tests and variables. An exploratory analysis applied on the same data revealed 6 factors that explained 60.1% of the total variance. Again, the individual factors were mainly loaded by different tests and variables obtained from the same pair of antagonistic muscles. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of the muscle strength capacity of the tested individual should be based on a single strength test and variable obtained from a number of different muscles, than on a single muscle tested through different tests and variables. The selected muscles should act in different limbs and joints, while the maximum isometric force should be the variable of choice.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of trunk muscle strength in wheelchair basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sileno da Silva Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trunk muscle strength affects trunk controlling playing an important role in performance and to define the classes of wheelchair basketball players. Trunk control capacity differs among players and quantitative assessments of trunk muscle strength have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to identify and correlate quantitative measures of trunk muscle strength with the wheelchair basketball players' classification. Forty-two male wheelchair basketball players with spinal cord injury, amputation, post-poliomyelitis sequelae, and cerebral palsy had their trunk extension and flexion strength evaluated with isokinetic dynamometer. The classes 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 were considered for statistical analysis. Comparison of trunk muscle strength differed significantly between classes: 1.0 and 3.0; 1.0 and 4.0; 2.0 and 3.0; and 2.0 and 4.0. High correlation was found between the trunk muscle strength and players' classes. The findings of the present study showed a strong correlation of trunk muscle strength and wheelchair basketball classes being able to distinguish players in their classes. However, this quantitative method of evaluation of the trunk muscle strength cannot be solely used to make a decision on the full trunk control.

  2. Effects of Muscle Strength and Balance Control on Sit-to-Walk and Turn Durations in the Timed Up and Go Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzurei; Chou, Li-Shan

    2017-04-30

    To examine the association of muscle strength and balance control with the amount of time taken to perform sit-to-walk (STW) or turning components of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test in older adults. Correlations; multiple regression models. General community. Older adults (N=60) age >70 years recruited from the community. Not applicable. Muscle strength, balance control, and TUG test performance time. Muscle strength was quantified by peak joint moments during the isometric maximal voluntary contraction test for bilateral hip abductors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors. Balance control was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale, and center of mass and ankle inclination angle derived during the TUG test performance. We found that balance control measures were significantly associated with both STW and turning durations even after controlling for muscle strength and other confounders (STW duration: P<.001, turning duration: P=.001). Adding strength to the regression model was found to significantly improve its prediction of STW duration (F change =5.945, P=.018), but not turning duration (F change =1.03, P=.14). Our findings suggest that poor balance control is an important factor that contributes to longer STW and turning durations on the TUG test. Furthermore, strength has a higher association with STW than turning duration. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The association between hip muscle cross-sectional area, muscle strength, and bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahedi, Harbeer; Aitken, Dawn; Scott, David; Blizzard, Leigh; Cicuttini, Flavia; Jones, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    Studies examining the association between muscle size, muscle strength, and bone mineral density (BMD) are limited. Thus, this study aimed to describe the association between hip muscles cross-sectional area (CSA), muscle strength, and BMD of the hip and spine. A total of 321 subjects from the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort study with a right hip MRI scan conducted between 2004 and 2006 were included. Hip muscles were measured on MR images by OsiriX (Geneva) software measuring maximum muscle CSA (cm(2)) of gluteus maximus, obturator externus, gemelli, quadratus femoris, piriformis, pectineus, sartorius, and iliopsoas. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured total hip, femoral neck, and spine BMD, and lower limb muscle strength was assessed by dynamometer. Muscle CSA of the hip flexors (pectineus, sartorius, and iliopsoas) and the hip rotators, obturator externus, and quadratus femoris were associated with both total hip and femoral neck BMD (all p muscles (except gluteus maximus and gemelli) were positively associated with leg strength (p = 0.02 to strength was weakly associated with BMD (p = 0.11-0.007). Hip muscle CSA, and to a lesser extent muscle strength, were positively associated with hip BMD. These data suggest that both higher muscle mass and strength may contribute to the maintenance of bone mass and prevention of disease progression in older adults.

  4. Progressive resistance muscle strength training of hospitalized frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D H; Wall, P T; Bariola, J R; Bopp, M M; Frost, Y M

    2001-07-01

    To determine whether frail elderly patients recuperating from acute illnesses could safely participate in and gain appreciable improvement in muscle strength from progressive resistance muscle strength training. Muscle strength (one repetition maximum), functional abilities (sit-to-stand maneuver and 20-sec maximal safe gait speed), and body composition were measured before and at the conclusion of a 10-wk program of lower limb progressive resistance muscle strength training. The nonrandomized study was conducted in a 30-bed geriatric rehabilitation unit of a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs hospital and a 28-bed transitional care unit of a community nursing home. Participants included 19 recuperating elderly subjects (14 male, 5 female; 13 ambulatory, 6 nonambulatory) >64 yr (mean age, 82.8+/-7.9 yr). The one repetition maximum increased an average of 74%+/-49% (median, 70%; interquartile range, 38%-95%, and an average of 20+/-13 kg (P = 0.0001). Sit-to-stand maneuver times improved in 15 of 19 cases (79%). Maximum safe gait speeds improved in 10 of 19 cases (53%). Four of the six nonambulatory subjects progressed to ambulatory status. No subject experienced a complication. A carefully monitored program of progressive resistance muscle strength training to regain muscle strength is a safe and possibly effective method for frail elderly recuperating from acute illnesses. A randomized control study is needed to examine the degree to which progressive resistance muscle strength training offers advantages, if any, over routine posthospital care that includes traditional low-intensity physical therapy.

  5. Relationship between Muscle Strength and Front Crawl Swimming Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gola Radosław

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. competitive performance in swimming depends on a number of factors including, among others, the development of relevant muscle groups. The aim of the study was to clarify the relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity and the role of individual muscle groups in front crawl swimming. Methods. sixteen physical education university students participated in the study. The strength values, defined as torque produced during isometric contractions, of eight upper and lower extremity muscle groups were measured. Data were compared with participants' front crawl swim times in the 25m and 50m distances. Results. correlation analysis demonstrated a relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity. statistically significant relationships were observed between swimming velocity and the torque values of the elbow flexor and shoulder extensor muscles as well as the sum of upper extremity muscle torque values (p ⋋ 0.05. Conclusions. The results indicate the need for a focus on training those muscle groups identified as having a statistically significant relationship with swimming velocity for a given distance, as the sample showed deficiencies in the strength of those muscle groups responsible for generating propulsive force in the front crawl. Additionally, the collected data can serve as a diagnostic tool in evaluating the development of muscle groups critical for swimming performance.

  6. The contribution of the palmaris longus muscle to the strength of thumb abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangata, Hope; Ndou, Robert; Louw, Graham

    2010-05-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is described as a weak flexor of the wrist and a tensor of the palmar aponeurosis, but not a thumb abductor. The PLM is believed to aid thumb abduction through its insertion onto the thenar eminence. Two groups, both right hand dominant, were selected from 1,200 sampled participants. The first group comprised of 38 subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM and was used to determine the strength of thumb abduction. The second group comprised of 30 subjects, with bilateral presence of the PLM, and it was used to calculate the effects of hand dominance. A significant number of subjects with bilateral absence of the PLM were observed and undocumented. Using a dynamometer in subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM, the force of thumb abduction was significantly greater on the hand with a PLM than the one without it (P = 0.014), irrespective of hand dominance. In the second sample with bilateral PLM, thumb abduction on the dominant hand was 10% stronger than on the nondominant hand and was similar to the universally accepted average of 10% increase in grip strength of the dominant hand. Thus, 10% was deducted from all the dominant hands, and the force of thumb abduction remained greater on the hand with PLM than the hand without it (P = 0.049). The results of this study demonstrated the PLM to be involved in thumb abduction, and the authors therefore recommend that this action of the muscle be universally accepted by anatomists and hand surgeons.

  7. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  8. [Progress on cervical muscle strength and soft tissue stiffness testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Zhang, Shi-min

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical evaluation of neck muscles has important significance in the diagnosis and treatment for cervical spondylosis, the neck muscle strength and soft tissue stiffness test is two aspects of biomechanical testing. Isometric muscle testing operation is relatively simple, the cost is lower, which can evaluate the muscle force below grade 3. However, isokinetic muscle strength testing can assess the muscle strength of joint motion in any position. It is hard to distinguish stiffness difference in different soft tissues when the load-displacement curve is used to evaluate the local soft tissue stiffness. Elasticity imaging technique can not only show the elastic differences of different tissues by images, but also quantify the elastic modulus of subcutaneous tissues and muscles respectively. Nevertheless, it is difficult to observe the flexibility of the cervical spine by means of the analysis of the whole neck stiffness. In a word, a variety of test method will conduce not only the biomechanical evaluation of neck muscles, but also making an effective biomechanics mathematical model of neck muscles. Besides, isokinetic muscle testing and the elasticity imaging technology still need further validation and optimization before they are better applied to neck muscles biomechanical testing.

  9. Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Physical Disability in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James S.; Trupin, Laura; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Barton, Jennifer; Margaretten, Mary; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Limited data exist describing relationships between muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical disability among individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study examines the relationship of muscle strength and muscle mass with physical disability among adult women with SLE. Methods One hundred forty-six women from a longitudinal SLE cohort participated in the study. All measures were collected during an in-person research visit. Lower extremity muscle strength was assessed by peak knee torque of extension and flexion and by chair-stand time. Total lean body mass, appendicular lean mass, and fat mass (kg/m2) were measured by whole-body dual energy absorptiometry. Self-reported physical disability was assessed using the SF-36 Physical Functioning subscale and Valued Life Activities (VLA) Disability scale. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients tested the correlations between muscle strength, muscle mass, and disability scores. Regression analyses modeled the effect of lower extremity muscle strength and mass on SF-36 and VLA disability scores controlling for age, SLE duration, SLE disease activity measured with the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ), physical activity level, prednisone use, body composition, and depression. Results On all measures, reduced lower extremity muscle strength was associated with poorer SF-36 and VLA disability scores. Trends persisted after adjustment for covariates. Muscle mass was moderately correlated with muscle strength, but did not contribute significantly to adjusted regression models. Conclusions Lower extremity muscle strength, but not muscle mass, was strongly associated with physical disability scores. While further studies are needed, these findings suggest that improving muscle strength may reduce physical disability among women with SLE. PMID:25049114

  10. Muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the effect of an exercise programme: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Decreased muscle strength, fitness and well-being are common in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared to healthy peers. Biological drugs have improved health in children with JIA, but despite this pain is still a major symptom and bone health is reported as decreased in the group. The improvement made by the biological drugs makes it possible to more demanding exercises. To jump is an exercise that can improve bone heath, fitness and muscle strength. The aim of the study was to see if an exercise programme with jumps had an effect on muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being and how it was tolerated. Methods Muscle strength and well-being were studied before and after a 12-week exercise programme in 54 children and adolescents with JIA, 9–21 years old. The participants were randomized into an exercise and a control group. Muscle strength, fitness and well-being were documented before and after the training period and at follow-up after 6 months. Physical activity in leisure time was documented in diaries. The fitness/exercise programme was performed at home three times a week and included rope skipping and muscle strength training exercises. Assessment included measurement of muscle strength with a handheld device, and with Grip-it, step-test for fitness with documentation of heart rate and pain perception and two questionnaires (CHAQ, CHQ) on well-being. Results There were no differences between exercise and control group regarding muscle strength, grip strength, fitness or well-being at base line. Muscle weakness was present in hip extensors, hip abductors and handgrip. For the exercise group muscle strength in hip and knee extensors increased after the 12-week exercise programme and was maintained in knee extensors at follow-up. There was no change in fitness tested with the individually adapted step-test. The CHQ questionnaire showed that pain was common in the exercise group and in the control group

  11. INFLUENCE OF STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM ON ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN YOUNG ATHLETES

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Radovanovic; Aleksandar Ignjatovic; Ratko Stankovic

    2007-01-01

    Strength training, or resistance training, is a form of physical conditioning used to increase the ability to resist force. Since muscular strength is required for success in many sports, it is logical to assume that stronger and more powerful young athletes will achieve better results. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of strength training on young athletes. An eight-week strength training program for developing muscle strength was performed in this study. Training protocol was...

  12. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men

  13. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men an

  14. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

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    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  15. Distally Based Abductor Hallucis Adipomuscular Flap for Forefoot Plantar Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanglim; Kim, Min Bom; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Jeong Kook; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Soft tissue and bone defects of the lower leg, ankle, and heel region often require coverage by local or distant flaps. The authors successfully used the distally based adipomuscular abductor hallucis flap for the treatment of 7 patients with soft tissue defect on the plantar forefoot after diabetic ulcer (n = 2), excision of melanoma at the medial forefoot (n = 3), and posttraumatic defects of the plantar forefoot (n = 2). The size of the defects ranged from 6 to 36 cm. All defects were covered successfully without major complications. The distally based adipomuscular flap from the abductor hallucis muscle provides a reliable coverage for small and moderate defects of the plantar and medial forefoot. This flap is often preferable to the use of free flaps because the surgery is rapidly performed and does not require microsurgical expertise.

  16. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and eff

  17. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MUSCLE MASS, MUSCLE STRENGTH, PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, AND MUSCLE FATIGUE RESISTANCE IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING ELDERLY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the correlations between muscle mass, muscle strength, physical performance, and muscle fatigue resistance in community-dwelling elderly people in order to elucidate factors which contribute to elderly’s performance of daily activities. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on community-dwelling elderly in Bandung from September to December 2014. One hundred and thirty elderly, 60 years old or above, were evaluated using bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure muscle mass; grip strength to measure muscle strength and muscle fatigue resistance; habitual gait speed to measure physical performance; and Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ to assess physical activity. Results: There were significant positive correlations between muscle mass (r=0,27, p=0,0019, muscle strength (r=0,26, p=0,0024, and physical performance (r=0,32, p=0,0002 with muscle fatigue resistance. Physical performance has the highest correlation based on multiple regression test (p=0,0025. In association with muscle mass, the physical activity showed a significant positive correlation (r=0,42, p=0,0000. Sarcopenia was identified in 19 (14.61% of 130 subjects. Conclusions: It is suggested that muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance influence muscle fatigue resistance.

  18. Poor physical function in elderly women in low-level aged care is related to muscle strength rather than to measures of sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Woods

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Julie L Woods1, Sandra Iuliano-Burns2, Susannah J King1, Boyd J Strauss1, Karen Z Walker11Nutrition and Dietetics Department, Monash University, Victoria, Australia; 2Endocrine Centre of Excellence, Department of Medicine, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, West Heidelberg, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate relationships among body composition, muscle strength, and physical function in elderly women in low-level aged care.Subjects and methods: Sixty-three ambulatory women (mean age 86 years participated in this cross-sectional study where body composition was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA; ankle, knee, and hip strength by the Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester; and physical function by ‘timed up and go’ (TUG and walking speed (WS over 6 meters. Body composition data from a female reference group (n = 62, mean age 29 years provided cut-off values for defining sarcopenia.Results: Elderly women had higher body mass index (P < 0.001, lower lean mass (P < 0.001, and higher fat mass (P < 0.01 than the young reference group. Only a small proportion (3.2% had absolute sarcopenia (defined by appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height squared whereas 37% had relative sarcopenia class II (defined by percentage skeletal muscle mass. Scores for TUG and WS indicated relatively poor physical function, yet these measures were not associated with muscle mass or indices of sarcopenia. In multivariate analysis, only hip abductor strength predicted both TUG and WS (both P = 0.01.Conclusion: Hip strength is a more important indicator of physical functioning than lean mass. Measurement of hip strength may therefore be a useful screening tool to detect those at risk of functional decline and requirement for additional care. Further longitudinal studies with a range of other strength measures are warranted.Keywords: aged care, body composition, muscle strength, sarcopenia 

  19. Indoor mobility-related fatigue and muscle strength in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Ekmann, Anette; Thinggaard, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    significantly (P muscle strength during the entire study period. Longitudinal analyses indicated slightly slower decline in muscle strength among participants with fatigue compared to those without; however, observed selective dropout of participants with fatigue and poor performance at baseline...... needs to be considered when interpreting the results. Accordingly, participants without fatigue had significantly higher chances of being alive and having muscle strength above gender-specific median at first (RR 1.32, 95 % CI 1.07-1.58), second (RR 1.51, 1.06-1.96) and third (RR 1.39, 1......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mobility-related fatigue is an important indicator of functional decline in old age, however, very little is known about fatigue in the oldest old population segment. The aim of this study was to examine the association between indoor mobility-related fatigue and muscle...

  20. Physical function and muscle strength in sporadic inclusion body myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders N; Aagaard, Per; Nielsen, Jakob L

    2017-01-01

    chair stand performance were evaluated. In addition, patients were tested for knee extensor muscle strength (isokinetic dynamometer) and leg extension power (Nottingham power rig). RESULTS: TUG performance was the strongest predictor of self-reported physical function (r(2) = 0.56, P ... extension strength and between-limb strength asymmetry were the strongest multi-regression indicators of TUG performance (r(2) = 0.51, P 2) = 0.49, P

  1. Stature is an essential predictor of muscle strength in children

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    Hogrel Jean-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with growth retardation or short stature generally present with lower strength than children of the same chronological age. The aim of the study was to establish if strength was dependent on variables related to stature in a population of healthy children and to propose practical predictive models for the muscle functions tested. A secondary aim was to test for any learning effects concerning strength measured at two successive visits by children. Methods Hand grip, elbow flexion and extension, and knee flexion and extension were measured by fixed dynamometry in 96 healthy subjects (47 girls and 49 boys, aged from 5 to 17 years. Results For the present paediatric population, muscle strength was highly dependent on height. Predictive models are proposed for the muscle functions tested. No learning effect between the first and the second visit was detected for any of the muscle functions tested. Conclusions This work shows that strength measurements using fixed dynamometry are reliable in children when using appropriate standardization of operating procedures. It underlines the particular relationship between body stature and muscle strength. Predictive equations may help with assessing the neuromuscular involvement in children suffering from various disorders, particularly those affecting their stature.

  2. Do Running and Strength Exercises Reduce Daily Muscle Inactivity Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taija Finni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how a specific exercise changes daily activity patterns is important when designing physical activity interventions. We examined the effects of strength and interval running exercise sessions on daily activity patterns using recordings of quadriceps and hamstring muscle electromyographic (EMG activity and inactivity. Five male and five female subjects taking part in a 10-week training programme containing both strength and interval running training sessions were measured for daily muscle EMG activities during three days: on a strength day, an interval running day, and a day without exercise. EMG was measured using textile electrodes embedded into sport shorts that were worn 9.1 ± 1.4 hours/day and results are given as % of recording time. During the total measurement time the muscles were inactive 55 ± 26%, 53 ± 30% and 71 ± 12% during strength training day, interval running day, and day without exercise (n.s.. When compared to the day without exercise, the change in muscle inactivity correlated negatively with change in light muscle activity in strength (r = -0.971,p< 0.001 and interval running days (r = -0.965,p< 0.001. While interval running exercise bout induced a more systematic decrease in muscle inactivity time (from 62 ± 15% to 6 ± 6%,p< 0.001, reductions in muscle inactivity in response to strength exercise were highly individual (range 5–70 pp despite the same training programme. Strength, but not running exercise bout, increased muscle activity levels occurring above 50% MVC (p< 0.05 when compared to a similar period without exercise. The effect of strength exercise bout on totaldaily recording time increased the EMG amplitudes across the entire intensity spectrum. While strength and interval running exercise are effective in increasing muscle moderate-to-vigorous activity when compared to a similar period without exercise, it comprises only a small part of the day and does not seem to have a systematic effect

  3. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

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    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  4. Variation of neck muscle strength along the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Nelson; Pandy, Marcus G; Myers, Barry S; Nightingale, Roger W; Chancey, Valeta Carol

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and explain the variation of neck muscle strength along the cervical spine. A three-dimensional model of the head-neck complex was developed to test the hypothesis that the moment-generating capacity of the neck musculature is lower in the upper cervical spine than in the lower cervical spine. The model calculations suggest that the neck muscles can protect the lower cervical spine from injury during extension and lateral bending. The maximum flexor moment developed in the lower cervical spine was 2 times higher than that developed in the upper spine. The model also predicted that the neck musculature is 30% stronger in the lower cervical spine during lateral bending. Peak compressive forces (up to 3 times body weight) were higher in the lower cervical spine. These results are consistent with the clinical finding that extension loading of the neck often leads to injuries in the upper cervical spine. Analysis of the model results showed that neck flexor strength was greater in the lower cervical spine because of the relatively large size of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The hyoid muscles developed significant flexor moments about the joints of the upper cervical spine, as these muscles had relatively large flexor moment arms; however, this effect was offset by the action of the sternocleidomastoid, which exerted a large extensor moment in the upper spine. Lateral bending strength of the neck muscles was governed by geometry (i.e., moment arms) rather than by muscle size.

  5. Bilateral variations of abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis: Surgical significance

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) muscles are known to exhibit numerous variations. Aims: We would like to put across an accidental unusual finding of APL and EPB muscles. Materials and Methods: During routine cadaveric dissection of a 52 year old female cadaver, we found an unusual APL and EPB muscles variations bilaterally. Results: Duplication of APL tendon was noted, one showing normal attachment and the additional one on trapezium. EPB muscle had an ...

  6. Muscle strength and knee range of motion after femoral lengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Woelber, Erik; Apelyan, Arman; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral lengthening may result in decrease in knee range of motion (ROM) and quadriceps and hamstring muscle weakness. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative knee ROM, hamstring muscle strength, and quadriceps muscle strength in a diverse group of patients undergoing femoral lengthening. We hypothesized that lengthening would not result in a significant change in knee ROM or muscle strength. Patients and methods This prospective study of 48 patients (mean age 27 (9–60) years) compared ROM and muscle strength before and after femoral lengthening. Patient age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, level of osteotomy, fixation time, and method of lengthening were also evaluated regarding knee ROM and strength. The average length of follow-up was 2.9 (2.0–4.7) years. Results Mean amount of lengthening was 5.2 (2.4–11.0) cm. The difference between preoperative and final knee flexion ROM was 2° for the overall group. Congenital shortening cases lost an average of 5% or 6° of terminal knee flexion, developmental cases lost an average of 3% or 4°, and posttraumatic cases regained all motion. The difference in quadriceps strength at 45° preoperatively and after lengthening was not statistically or clinically significant (2.7 Nm; p = 0.06). Age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, osteotomy level, fixation time, and lengthening method had no statistically significant influence on knee ROM or quadriceps strength at final follow-up. Interpretation Most variables had no effect on ROM or strength, and higher age did not appear to be a limiting factor for femoral lengthening. Patients with congenital causes were most affected in terms of knee flexion. PMID:27892743

  7. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  8. Muscle strength in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, C; Jones, D A; Round, J; Grant, D B

    1987-05-01

    To assess whether exposure to excessive adrenal androgens increases muscle strength in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, eighteen girls with 21 hydroxylase type congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), aged 4.3-12.1 years were studied and compared with 78 healthy control girls aged 4-16 years. Maximum voluntary isometric strength was measured using a muscle testing chair, and the highest value from at least three attempts with each leg was recorded. Height and weight were also measured in the patients and controls. When compared with normal girls of similar age, some of the girls with CAH seemed unusually strong, but this difference was less marked when the CAH girls were compared with controls of similar weights. However, our data suggest that girls diagnosed later in childhood may have unusual muscle strength.

  9. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength in Mouth Breathers: Clinical Evidences

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    Cunha, Renata Andrade da

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The child who chronically breathes through the mouth may develop a weakness of the respiratory muscles. Researchers and clinical are seeking for methods of instrumental evaluation to gather complementary data to clinical evaluations. With this in mind, it is important to evaluate breathing muscles in the child with Mouth Breathing. Objective To develop a review to investigate studies that used evaluation methods of respiratory muscle strength in mouth breathers. Data Synthesis  The authors were unanimous in relation to manovacuometry method as a way to evaluate respiratory pressures in Mouth Breathing children. Two of them performed with an analog manovacuometer and the other one, digital. The studies were not evaluated with regard to the method efficacy neither the used instruments. Conclusion There are few studies evaluating respiratory muscle strength in Mouth Breathing people through manovacuometry and the low methodological rigor of the analyzed studies hindered a reliable result to support or refuse the use of this technique.

  10. Muscle strength and endurance following lowerlimb suspension in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Haggmark, Tom; Ohlsen, Hans; Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of lower-limb suspension on the muscle strength and muscle endurance was investigated in six men subjected to four weeks of unilateral unloading of a lower limb (using of a harness attached to a modified shoe), followed by seven weeks of weight-bearing recovery. Results showed a decrease in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle and in the average peak torque (APT) during three bouts of 30 concentric knee extensions. While the the thigh muscle CSA returned to normal after seven weeks of recovery, the APT recovery was still reduced by 11 percent, suggesting that muscle metabolic function was severely affected by unloading and was not restored by ambulation.

  11. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva; Anderson Luiz Bezerra da Silveira; Fabrízio Di Masi; Cláudio Melibeu Bentes; Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa; Jefferson da Silva Novaes

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4025/actascihealthsci.v36i1.15581 This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on the static muscle strength (SMS). Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a) hand grip without stretching; b) hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexor...

  12. Changes in muscle strength and morphology after muscle unloading in Special Forces missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Jakobsen, O; Madsen, T

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the changes in maximal muscle strength, rapid force capacity, jumping performance and muscle morphology following a Special Forces military operation involving 8 days of muscle unloading. Nine male Special Forces soldiers were tested before (pre......) and immediately after (post1) an 8-day simulated special support and reconnaissance (SSR) mission and after 3 h of active recovery (post2). Maximal muscle strength (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) were measured along with maximal counter movement jump height (JH). Muscle biopsies were obtained from...... the vastus lateralis at pre and post1. Acute reductions were found in MVC (11%), JH (10%) and RFD (17-22%) after 8 days of muscle unloading (post1) (P...

  13. Associations of Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity With Metabolic Syndrome Considering Both Muscle Mass and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the associations of sarcopenia-defined both in terms of muscle mass and muscle strength-and sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome. Methods: Secondary data pertaining to 309 subjects (85 men and 224 women) were collected from participants in exercise programs at a health center in a suburban area. Muscle mass was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis, and muscle strength was measured via handgrip strength. Sarcopenia based on muscle mass alone was defined as a weight-adjusted skeletal muscle mass index more than two standard deviations below the mean of a sex-specific young reference group (class II sarcopenia). Two cut-off values for low handgrip strength were used: the first criteria were sarcopenia and being in the two highest quintiles of total body fat percentage among the subjects. The associations of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results: The age-adjusted risk ratios (RRs) of metabolic syndrome being compared in people with or without sarcopenia defined in terms of muscle mass were 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.47, p=0.008) in men and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.19, psarcopenia defined in terms of muscle mass and sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome were statistically significant in both men and women. Therefore, sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity must be considered as part of the community-based management of non-communicable diseases. PMID:26841883

  14. Diagnostic methods to assess inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Pedro; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira de; Santana, Pauliane Vieira; Cardenas, Leticia Zumpano; Ferreira, Jeferson George; Prina, Elena; Trevizan, Patrícia Fernandes; Pereira, Mayra Caleffi; Iamonti, Vinicius; Pletsch, Renata; Macchione, Marcelo Ceneviva; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of (inspiratory and expiratory) respiratory muscles is a common clinical finding, not only in patients with neuromuscular disease but also in patients with primary disease of the lung parenchyma or airways. Although such impairment is common, its recognition is usually delayed because its signs and symptoms are nonspecific and late. This delayed recognition, or even the lack thereof, occurs because the diagnostic tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength are not widely known and available. There are various methods of assessing respiratory muscle strength during the inspiratory and expiratory phases. These methods are divided into two categories: volitional tests (which require patient understanding and cooperation); and non-volitional tests. Volitional tests, such as those that measure maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, are the most commonly used because they are readily available. Non-volitional tests depend on magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerve accompanied by the measurement of inspiratory mouth pressure, inspiratory esophageal pressure, or inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure. Another method that has come to be widely used is ultrasound imaging of the diaphragm. We believe that pulmonologists involved in the care of patients with respiratory diseases should be familiar with the tests used in order to assess respiratory muscle function.Therefore, the aim of the present article is to describe the advantages, disadvantages, procedures, and clinical applicability of the main tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength.

  15. Relation between body mass index percentile and muscle strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha Abdel Kader Abdel Kader Hasan

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... time to fatigue to evaluate endurance time. ... a positive correlation between muscle strength and body mass index ... Isokinetic dynamometry, hand-held dynamometry, field tests, .... dominant side of each child was selected and attached. ... toward elbow flexion (since the elbow flexors were not measured.

  16. The relationship between oestrogen and muscle strength: a current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Jayne Elliott-Sale

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between muscle strength and oestrogen is ambiguous and is still largely unresolved. The evidence for and against an effect of oestradiol on determinants of muscle function is equivocal and often contradictory. The bulk of the research in this area was performed during the eighties and nineties, using models of reproductive functioning such as; the menstrual cycle, the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives and in vitro fertilisation treatment, to alter the female hormonal milieu. In the last decade, approximately 15 papers have demonstrated a relationship, both positive and negative, between the concentration of oestrogen and skeletal muscle strength. Conversely, around 20 articles have not shown any influence of oestrogen on a number of strength measures. The majority of these studies were performed using post-menopausal and eumenorrheic females. Most current studies use hormonal assays to confirm oestrogen status, however no recent studies have reported the bioavailable concentration of oestradiol. Similarly, no research in the last 10 years has used in vitro fertilisation treatment or pregnancy as acute and chronic models of supra-physiological changes in sex hormone concentration. Future work should focus on performing meta-analyses on each of the key components of muscle strength in an attempt to elucidate a causal relationship. In addition, models of reproductive functioning that cause the greatest magnitude of change to oestrogen concentration should be used, while controlling as many confounding factors as possible.

  17. Effects of high and low volume of strength training on muscle strength, muscle volume and lipid profile in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Silva Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lipid profile are considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, especially in postmenopausal woman who have been associated with age-related loss of muscle mass. The beneficial role of aerobic exercise in the prevention of CVD has been well documented. However, the effect of strength training has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of lipoprotein levels after 12 weeks of different volumes of strength training and its correlation with strength and muscle volume in postmenopausal women. The participants were randomized into three groups: low volume (LVST; n = 12, 1 set and high volume of strength training (HVST; n = 11, 3 sets, or control group (n = 12. Training groups performed 12 weeks of supervised strength exercises, 15 maximum repetitions, five times a week, 20 minutes for LVST and 40 minutes for HVST for each training session. Measurements included body composition, strength and muscle volume, as well as blood analysis (glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein pre- and post-training. The HVST and LVST improved the one-repetition maximum knee extension strength (p < 0.001, maximal dynamic strength (p < 0.001, and muscle volume (p = 0.048. Post-training triglyceride was lower in HVST when compared to LVST and the control group (p = 0.047. Even though they present the same neuromuscular and morphological adaptations in postmenopausal women, the HVST is more effective than LVST in improving the lipid profile of postmenopausal woman, and can be considered as an ideal program of intervention to reverse changes in lipid metabolism commonly found in this group.

  18. Myotonometry as a Surrogate Measure of Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, B. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Leonard, C. T.; Sykes, J.; Kruger, E.; Clarke, M. S. F.

    2007-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy/neuromuscular degradation and the consequent decrements in crew-member performance are of increasing concern as mission duration lengthens, and planetary exploration after extended space flight is planned. Pre- to post-flight strength measures have demonstrated that specific countermeasures, such as resistive exercise, are effective at countering microgravity-induced muscle atrophy and preventing decrements in muscle strength. However, in-flight assessment/monitoring of exercise countermeasure effectiveness will be essential during exploration class missions due to their duration. The ability to modify an exercise countermeasure prescription based on such real-time information will allow each individual crew member to perform the optimal amount and type of exercise countermeasure to maintain performance. In addition, such measures can be used to determine if a crew member is physically capable of performing a particular mission-related task during exploration class missions. The challenges faced in acquiring such data are those common to all space operations, namely the requirement for light-weight, low power, mechanically reliable technologies that make valid measurements in microgravity, in this case of muscle strength/neuromuscular function. Here we describe a simple, light-weight, low power, non-invasive device, known as the Myotonometer, that measures tissue stiffness as an indirect measure of muscle contractile state and muscle force production. Repeat myotonometer measurements made at the same location on the surface of the rectis femoris muscle (as determined using a 3D locator device, SEM plus or minus 0.34 mm) were shown to be reproducible over time at both maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at rest in a total of 17 sedentary subjects assessed three times over a period of seven days. In addition, graded voluntary isometric force production (i.e. 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% & 100% of MVC) during knee extension was shown to

  19. Levator plate upward lift and levator muscle strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Peck, Jennifer; Quiroz, Lieschen; Shobeiri, S. Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to compare digital palpation with the levator plate lift measured by endovaginal and transperineal dynamic ultrasound. Methods Dynamic transperineal and endovaginal ultrasound were performed as part of multicompartmental pelvic floor functional assessment. Patients were instructed to perform Kegels while a probe captured the video clip of the levator plate movement at rest and during contraction in 2D mid-sagittal posterior view. We measured the distance between the levator plate and the probe on endovaginal ultrasound as well as the distance between the levator plate and the gothic arch of the pubis in transperineal ultrasound. The change in diameter (lift) and a levator plate lift ratio (lift / rest) x 100) were calculated. Pelvic floor muscle strength was assessed by digital palpation and divided into functional and non-functional groups using the Modified Oxford Scale (MOS). Mean differences in levator plate upward lifts were compared by MOS score using student t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results 74 women were available for analysis. The mean age was 55 (SD±11.9). When measured by vaginal dynamic ultrasound, mean values of the lift and lift/rest ratio increased with increasing MOS score (ANOVA p=0.09 and p=0.04, respectively). When MOS scores were categorized to represent non-functional (MOS 0-1) and functional (MOS 2-5) muscle strength groups, the mean values of the lift (3.2 mm vs. 4.6 mm, p=0.03) and lift/rest ratio (13% vs 20%, p=0.01) were significantly higher in women with functional muscle strength. All patients with ≥ 30% lift detected by vaginal ultrasound had functional muscle strength. Conclusions Greater levator plate lift ratio detected by dynamic endovaginal ultrasound was associated with higher muscle strength as determined by MOS. This novel measurement can be incorporated into ultrasound evaluation of the levator ani function. PMID:26333568

  20. Muscle strength, working capacity and effort in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Lykkegaard, J J

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the physical capacity and effort in patients with fibromyalgia. Muscle strength and the coefficient of variation of the strength measurements of 181 female fibromyalgia patients and 126 healthy females were compared. These measurements and ergometer...... exercise capacity, work status and psychometric scoring (SCL-90-R) were correlated. The fibromyalgia patients exhibited significant reduction in voluntary muscle strength of the knee and elbow, flexors and extensors in the order of 20-30%. However, the coefficient of variation was higher among patients...... scores. Work status was related to psychometric scoring, but not to physical capacity or effort. In conclusion, we found a low degree of effort but near normal physical capacity in the fibromyalgia patients....

  1. The Pilates Method increases respiratory muscle strength and performance as well as abdominal muscle thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Mateus Beltrame; da Silva, Antônio Marcos Vargas; Weber, Laura Menezes; Monteiro, Mariane Borba

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the Pilates Method (PM) training program on the thickness of the abdominal wall muscles, respiratory muscle strength and performance, and lung function. This uncontrolled clinical trial involved 16 sedentary women who were assessed before and after eight weeks of PM training. The thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was assessed. The respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressure. The lung function and respiratory muscle performance were assessed by spirometry. An increase was found in MIP (p = 0.001), MEP (p = 0.031), maximum voluntary ventilation (p = 0.020) and the TrA (p abdominal wall muscle hypertrophy and an increase in respiratory muscle strength and performance, preventing weakness in abdominal muscles and dysfunction in ventilatory mechanics, which could favor the appearance of illnesses.

  2. Decline in lumbar extensor muscle strength the older adults: correlation with age, gender and spine morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit; Bailey, Martin; Lee, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle morphology, age and gender may be determinants of muscle strength in older adults. However, very few research studies have directly examined such correlation in the ageing spine. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between lumbar extensor muscle strength, its muscle fibre angles, thoracolumbar curvature, age and gender in the older and younger adults. Methods Muscle fibre angles of lumbar extensor muscles, thoracolumbar curvature and lumbar extensor muscle st...

  3. Exercise, muscle, and the applied load-bone strength balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, L; El-Kotob, R

    2017-01-01

    A fracture occurs when the applied load is greater than the bone can withstand. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of osteoporosis include recommendations for exercise; one of the few therapies where the proposed anti-fracture mechanisms that include effects on both bone strength and applied loads, where applied loads can come in the form of a fall, externally applied loads, body weight, or muscle forces. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the clinical evidence pertaining to the potential efficacy of exercise for preventing fractures in older adults, including its direct effects on outcomes along the causal pathway to fractures (e.g., falls, posture, bone strength) and the indirect effects on muscle or the muscle-bone relationship. The evidence is examined as it pertains to application in clinical practice. Considerations for future research are discussed, such as the need for trials in individuals with low bone mass or students that evaluate whether changes in muscle mediate changes in bone. Future trials should also consider adequacy of calorie or protein intake, the confounding effect of exercise-induced weight loss, or the most appropriate therapeutic goal (e.g., strength, weight bearing, or hypertrophy) and outcome measures (e.g., fracture, disability, cost-effectiveness).

  4. Increased inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength following respiratory muscle strength training (RMST) in two patients with late-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harrison N; Moss, Tronda; Edwards, Laurie; Kishnani, Priya S

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory muscle strength training (RMST) is an exercise-based intervention which targets respiratory muscle weakness. We implemented RMST in two patients with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD), both who had received long-term enzyme replacement therapy and had severe respiratory weakness. Over 16-32 weeks, inspiratory muscle strength increased by 73-74%. Expiratory muscle strength increased 31-48% over 12-22 weeks. These findings suggest that RMST may increase respiratory muscle strength, even in the setting of LOPD and severe baseline weakness.

  5. Associations between personality traits, physical activity level, and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolea, Magdalena I; Terracciano, Antonio; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Metter, E Jeffrey; Costa, Paul T; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Associations among personality as measured by the Five Factor Model, physical activity, and muscle strength were assessed using data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (N = 1220, age: mean = 58, SD = 16). General linear modeling with adjustment for age, sex, race, and body mass index, and bootstrapping for mediation were used. We found neuroticism and most of its facets to negatively correlate with strength. The extraversion domain and its facets of warmth, activity, and positive-emotions were positively correlated with strength, independent of covariates. Mediation analysis results suggest that these associations are partly explained by physical activity level. Findings extend the evidence of an association between personality and physical function to its strength component and indicate health behavior as an important pathway.

  6. Muscle strength, working capacity and effort in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Lykkegaard, J J

    1997-01-01

    exercise capacity, work status and psychometric scoring (SCL-90-R) were correlated. The fibromyalgia patients exhibited significant reduction in voluntary muscle strength of the knee and elbow, flexors and extensors in the order of 20-30%. However, the coefficient of variation was higher among patients...... scores. Work status was related to psychometric scoring, but not to physical capacity or effort. In conclusion, we found a low degree of effort but near normal physical capacity in the fibromyalgia patients....

  7. Muscle Strength and Flexibility without and with Visual Impairments Judoka's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, Onder

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine muscle strength and flexibility of judoka with and without visual impairments. A total of 32 male national judoka volunteered to participate in this study. There were 20 male judoka without visual impairments (mean ± SD; age: 19.20 ± 5.76 years, body weight: 66.45 ± 11.09 kg, height: 169.60 ± 7.98 cm, sport…

  8. Concentric resistance training increases muscle strength without affecting microcirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Marc-Andre [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: MarcAndre.Weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hildebrandt, Wulf [Immunochemistry, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Schroeder, Leif [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Kinscherf, Ralf [Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, Martin [Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Bachert, Peter [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan; Essig, Marco [Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Krakowski-Roosen, Holger [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: While the evidence is conclusive regarding the positive effects of endurance training, there is still some controversy regarding the effects of resistance training on muscular capillarity. Thus, the purpose was to assess whether resistance strength training influences resting skeletal muscle microcirculation in vivo. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine middle-aged subjects (15 female, 24 male; mean age, 54 {+-} 9 years) were trained twice a week on an isokinetic system (altogether 16 sessions lasting 50 min, intensity 75% of maximum isokinetic and isometric force of knee flexors and extensors). To evaluate success of training, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the quadriceps femoris muscle and its isokinetic and isometric force were quantified. Muscular capillarization was measured in biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle. In vivo, muscular energy and lipid metabolites were quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and parameters of muscular microcirculation, such as local blood volume, blood flow and velocity, by contrast-enhanced ultrasound analyzing replenishment kinetics. Results: The significant (P < 0.001) increase in CSA (60 {+-} 16 before vs. 64 {+-} 15 cm{sup 2} after training) and in absolute muscle strength (isometric, 146 {+-} 44 vs. 174 {+-} 50 Nm; isokinetic, 151 {+-} 53 vs. 174 {+-} 62 Nm) demonstrated successful training. Neither capillary density ex vivo (351 {+-} 75 vs. 326 {+-} 62) nor ultrasonographic parameters of resting muscle perfusion were significantly different (blood flow, 1.2 {+-} 1.2 vs. 1.1 {+-} 1.1 ml/min/100 g; blood flow velocity, 0.49 {+-} 0.44 vs. 0.52 {+-} 0.74 mm s{sup -1}). Also, the intensities of high-energy phosphates phosphocreatine and {beta}-adenosintriphosphate were not different after training within the skeletal muscle at rest ({beta}-ATP/phosphocreatine, 0.29 {+-} 0.06 vs. 0.28 {+-} 0.04). Conclusion: The significant increase in muscle size and strength in response to concentric isokinetic and isometric

  9. Relation between body mass index percentile and muscle strength and endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Abdel Kader Abdel Kader Hasan

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: The study shows that the BMI of children had a positive correlation with the muscle strength of quadriceps, triceps, and abdominal muscles while a negative correlation with the endurance time of these muscles.

  10. Balance and Muscle Strength in Elderly Women Who Dance Samba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Marcos Maurício; Alonso, Angelica Castilho; Peterson, Mark; Mochizuki, Luis; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa; Garcez-Leme, Luiz Eugênio

    2016-01-01

    Considering the growth of the aging population, and the increasing risk for falls and related morbidity, it is vital to seek efficient, comprehensive, and culturally relevant prevention programs for elderly people to reduce risks for falls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the postural balance and muscle strength among women participating in the "Wing of Baianas" in the carnival parades. One hundred and ten women, with an average age of 67.4±5.9 years, were divided into two groups: Baianas group-elderly participants of the carnival parades in the "Wing of Baianas", and a Control group of women who do not dance samba. Assessments included a physical activity questionnaire, isokinetic muscle strength testing for the knee extensors and flexors, and a postural balance assessment completed on a force platform. There were no differences between groups, for postural balance outcomes, during the eyes open condition; however, with eyes closed, there was a significant effect between groups (Baianas vs Control) in all variables. The Baianas group showed less medio-lateral displacement (p balance with closed eyes, but there were no differences between dancers and non-dancers for muscle strength.

  11. ELECTRICAL MUSCLE STIMULATION (EMS IMPLEMENTATION IN EXPLOSIVE STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Đokić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS, is also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES may be used for therapeutic purposes and training. EMS is causing muscle contractions via electrical impulses. The survey was conducted as a case study. The study was conducted on subject of 3 male of different ages. The study lasted 4 weeks, and the respondents have not used any type of training or activity, which would affect the development of explosive strength of the lower extremities. Electrical stimulation was performed in the evening, every other day, with COMPEX mi sport apparatus (Medical SA - All rights reserved - 07/06 - Art. 885,616 - V.2 model. In 4 week period, a total of 13 treatments were performed on selected muscle groups - quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius. Program of plyometric training (Plyometric (28 min per treatment, for each muscle group were applied. The main objective of this study was to quantify and compare explosive leg strength, using different vertical jump protocols, before and after the EMS program. The initial and final testing was conducted in the laboratory of the Faculty of Sport and Tourism in Novi Sad, on the contact plate AXON JUMP (Bioingeniería Deportiva, VACUMED, 4538 Westinghouse Street Ventura, CA 93 003 under identical conditions. In all three of the respondents indicated an increase in vertical jump in all applied protocols.

  12. Does grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke reflect the strength of other ipsilateral muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jumpei; Nishiyama, Toru; Matsushima, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Grip strength is used as an indicator of overall body muscular strength. However, most studies on grip strength have been performed in healthy people, and no study has evaluated it in the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine if grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke correlates with the strength of other ipsilateral musculature. [Subjects and Methods] The maximal strengths of the muscles on the unaffected side of 31 patients with hemiparetic stroke were measured, and correlation coefficients were calculated. [Results] The results revealed significant positive correlations between grip strength on the unaffected side and the strength of the other ipsilateral muscle groups, with relatively high correlations being observed for the upper extremity muscle groups. [Conclusion] This suggests that grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke can be used as a simple way to estimate overall strength on that side.

  13. Inter-Tester Reliability and Precision of Manual Muscle Testing and Hand-Held Dynamometry in Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Kate; Hunt, Adrienne; Daley, Deborah; Sims, Susan; Adams, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and measurement precision of manual muscle testing (MMT) and hand-held dynamometry (HHD) were compared for children with spina bifida. Strength measures were obtained of the hip flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors of 20 children (10 males, 10 females; mean age 9 years 10 months; range: 5 to 15 years) by two experienced physical…

  14. Inter-Tester Reliability and Precision of Manual Muscle Testing and Hand-Held Dynamometry in Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Kate; Hunt, Adrienne; Daley, Deborah; Sims, Susan; Adams, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and measurement precision of manual muscle testing (MMT) and hand-held dynamometry (HHD) were compared for children with spina bifida. Strength measures were obtained of the hip flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors of 20 children (10 males, 10 females; mean age 9 years 10 months; range: 5 to 15 years) by two experienced physical…

  15. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K W; Regterschot, G R H; Krijnen, W P; Slager, G E C; van der Schans, C P; Zijlstra, W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monito

  16. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K.W.; Regterschot, G.R.H.; Krijnen, W.P.; Slager, G.E.C.; Schans, C.P. van der; Zijlstra, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monito

  17. Is back pain during childhood or adolescence associated with muscle strength, muscle endurance or aerobic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lardon, Arnaud; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Le Scanff, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common condition during childhood and adolescence. The causes of back pain are largely unknown but it seems plausible that some physical factors such as back muscle strength, back muscle endurance and aerobic capacity may play a role in its development, in particular...... in the early years. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review were to investigate in childhood and adolescence 1) if muscular strength in trunk extension is associated with back pain, 2) if muscular endurance in trunk extension is associated with back pain and 3) if aerobic capacity is associated with back...

  18. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    : Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (pevident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly...... are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG....

  19. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery.

  20. Muscle strength in the oldest old and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Ferreira Cardoso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional household-based study was to investigate the factors associated with muscle strength in the oldest old (≥ 80 years living in a rural area, of southern Brazil. We interviewed a total of 56 men (85.0 ± 4.4 y and 78 women (84.5 ± 4.8 y. Prevalence of poor performance in the handgrip test (isometric strength was 39.2% and was associated with illiteracy, underweight, and cognitive deficit. Poor performance in the "chair stand" test (lower body strength/physical function was observed in 48.5% of the elderly and was more prevalent in men and among those who consumed more alcoholic drink/week. The results may be useful as indicators to public health surveillance, and to the development of prevention and intervention actions.

  1. Associations of Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity With Metabolic Syndrome Considering Both Muscle Mass and Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Hong, Yeon-pyo; Shin, Hyun Ju; Lee, Weonyoung

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the associations of sarcopenia-defined both in terms of muscle mass and muscle strength-and sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome. Secondary data pertaining to 309 subjects (85 men and 224 women) were collected from participants in exercise programs at a health center in a suburban area. Muscle mass was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis, and muscle strength was measured via handgrip strength. Sarcopenia based on muscle mass alone was defined as a weight-adjusted skeletal muscle mass index more than two standard deviations below the mean of a sex-specific young reference group (class II sarcopenia). Two cut-off values for low handgrip strength were used: the first criteria were obesity was defined as the combination of class II sarcopenia and being in the two highest quintiles of total body fat percentage among the subjects. The associations of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome were evaluated using logistic regression models. The age-adjusted risk ratios (RRs) of metabolic syndrome being compared in people with or without sarcopenia defined in terms of muscle mass were 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.47, p=0.008) in men and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.19, pmetabolic syndrome being compared in people with or without sarcopenic obesity were 1.31 in men (95% CI, 1.10 to 1.56, p=0.003) and 1.17 in women (95% CI, 1.10 to 1.25, pobesity with metabolic syndrome were statistically significant in both men and women. Therefore, sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity must be considered as part of the community-based management of non-communicable diseases.

  2. CCL2 and CCR2 variants are associated with skeletal muscle strength and change in strength with resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Brennan T; Orkunoglu-Suer, E Funda; Adham, Kasra; Larkin, Justin S; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clarkson, Priscilla M; Thompson, Paul D; Angelopoulos, Theodore J; Gordon, Paul M; Moyna, Niall M; Pescatello, Linda S; Visich, Paul S; Zoeller, Robert F; Hubal, Monica J; Tosi, Laura L; Hoffman, Eric P; Devaney, Joseph M

    2010-12-01

    Baseline muscle size and muscle adaptation to exercise are traits with high variability across individuals. Recent research has implicated several chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of many conditions that are influenced by inflammatory processes, including muscle damage and repair. One specific chemokine, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), is expressed by macrophages and muscle satellite cells, increases expression dramatically following muscle damage, and increases expression further with repeated bouts of exercise, suggesting that CCL2 plays a key role in muscle adaptation. The present study hypothesizes that genetic variations in CCL2 and its receptor (CCR2) may help explain muscle trait variability. College-aged subjects [n = 874, Functional Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Muscle Size and Strength (FAMUSS) cohort] underwent a 12-wk supervised strength-training program for the upper arm muscles. Muscle size (via MR imaging) and elbow flexion strength (1 repetition maximum and isometric) measurements were taken before and after training. The study participants were then genotyped for 11 genetic variants in CCL2 and five variants in CCR2. Variants in the CCL2 and CCR2 genes show strong associations with several pretraining muscle strength traits, indicating that inflammatory genes in skeletal muscle contribute to the polygenic system that determines muscle phenotypes. These associations extend across both sexes, and several of these genetic variants have been shown to influence gene regulation.

  3. Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects.......To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects....

  4. Muscle strength rather than muscle mass is associated with standing balance in elderly outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Astrid Y; Pasma, Jantsje H; Lambers, Dorine; Stijntjes, Marjon; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, Andrea B

    2013-07-01

    Assessment of the association of muscle characteristics with standing balance is of special interest, as muscles are a target for potential intervention (ie, by strength training). Cross-sectional study. Geriatric outpatient clinic. The study included 197 community-dwelling elderly outpatients (78 men, 119 women; mean age 82 years). Muscle characteristics included handgrip and knee extension strength, appendicular lean mass divided by height squared (ALM/height(2)), and lean mass as percentage of body mass. Two aspects of standing balance were assessed: the ability to maintain balance, and the quality of balance measured by Center of Pressure (CoP) movement during 10 seconds of side-by-side, semitandem, and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Logistic and linear regression models were adjusted for age, and additionally for height, body mass, cognitive function, and multimorbidity. Handgrip and knee extension strength, adjusted for age, were positively related to the ability to maintain balance with eyes open in side-by-side (P = .011; P = .043), semitandem (P = .005; P = .021), and tandem stance (P = .012; P = .014), and with eyes closed in side-by-side (P = .004; P = .004) and semitandem stance (not significant; P = .046). Additional adjustments affected the results only slightly. ALM/height(2) and lean mass percentage were not associated with the ability to maintain standing balance, except for an association between ALM/height(2) and tandem stance with eyes open (P = .033) that disappeared after additional adjustments. Muscle characteristics were not associated with CoP movement. Muscle strength rather than muscle mass was positively associated with the ability to maintain standing balance in elderly outpatients. Assessment of CoP movement was not of additional value. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. EFFECT OF HIP ABDUCTOR STRENGTHENING AMONG NON-PROFESSIONAL CYCLISTS WITH ILIOTIBIAL BAND FRICTION SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Nath

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The study was carried out to find out the effect of hip abductor strengthening among non-professional cyclists with iliotibial band friction syndrome. Subjects: 40 non-professional cyclists with ipsilateral ITBFS subject including male and female age between 18 to 50 with positive ober’s and nobble test were included in this study. Methods: 40 subject were selected according to the inclusion criteria and they were assessed pre and post for ROM (hip adduction, IR, hip abductor strength and pain using goniometer,sphygmomanometer and VAS. Subject were assign experimental group(group A 20 subject who received IT band stretching,US,and hip abductor strengthening exercise and control group (group B 20 subject who received same treatment except hip abductor strengthening. Data Analysis and Results: Based on statistical analysis using Wilcoxon test to compare the pre and post test pain in both group,Mann- whitney U- test to compare the post test pain scores of between groups ,Paired t - test to compare the pre and post ROM and strength in both groups, Unpaired t – test to compare post test ROM in between groups showed that pre post difference within group A there was significant difference for adduction ROM (p value <.0001,IR (p value <.0001,VAS(p value <.0001,and strength improve pre mean 40.80 to post mean 66.30 (p value <.0001.However in group B adduction ROM and VAS were found to be significant. In comparision in difference between groups it was found that adduction ROM,IR ROM,VAS and strength all were significant. Baseline data for outcome variable were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Based on outcome variable there was significant difference of hip abductor strengthening among non-professional cyclist with iliotibial band friction syndrome.

  6. Relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass is associated with isokinetic muscle strength and balance in healthy collegiate men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Hong, Ju; Cha, Jun-Youl; Park, Jung-Min; Eun, Denny; Yoo, Jaehyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2016-11-01

    There are few studies on the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and balance in the young ages. We investigated the relationship between appendicular skeletal muscle mass, isokinetic muscle strength of lower extremity, and balance among healthy young men using relative skeletal muscle index. Thirty men were grouped according to relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass index: higher skeletal muscle group (n = 15) and lower skeletal muscle group (n = 15). Static and dynamic balance abilities were measured using the following: a test where participants stood on one leg with eyes closed, a modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) with eyes open and eyes closed, a stability test, and limits of stability test. The muscle strength of lower extremities was measured with an isokinetic analyser in hip, knee, and ankle joints. Participants with higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass were significantly more stable in maintaining dynamic balance than those with lower appendicular skeletal muscle mass. Moreover, appendicular skeletal muscle mass index was positively correlated with dynamic balance ability. Participants with higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass had stronger strength in the lower extremity, and there were significant differences in the isokinetic torque ratios between groups. From these results, it can be inferred that higher appendicular skeletal muscle mass relates to muscle strength and the alteration in the peak torque ratio of the lower extremity, contributing to the maintenance of balance.

  7. The impact of obesity on skeletal muscle strength and structure through adolescence to old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, D J; Erskine, R M; Morse, C I; Winwood, K; Onambélé-Pearson, Gladys

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is associated with functional limitations in muscle performance and increased likelihood of developing a functional disability such as mobility, strength, postural and dynamic balance limitations. The consensus is that obese individuals, regardless of age, have a greater absolute maximum muscle strength compared to non-obese persons, suggesting that increased adiposity acts as a chronic overload stimulus on the antigravity muscles (e.g., quadriceps and calf), thus increasing muscle size and strength. However, when maximum muscular strength is normalised to body mass, obese individuals appear weaker. This relative weakness may be caused by reduced mobility, neural adaptations and changes in muscle morphology. Discrepancies in the literature remain for maximal strength normalised to muscle mass (muscle quality) and can potentially be explained through accounting for the measurement protocol contributing to muscle strength capacity that need to be explored in more depth such as antagonist muscle co-activation, muscle architecture, a criterion valid measurement of muscle size and an accurate measurement of physical activity levels. Current evidence demonstrating the effect of obesity on muscle quality is limited. These factors not being recorded in some of the existing literature suggest a potential underestimation of muscle force either in terms of absolute force production or relative to muscle mass; thus the true effect of obesity upon skeletal muscle size, structure and function, including any interactions with ageing effects, remains to be elucidated.

  8. Reproducibility of Muscle Strength Testing for Children with Spina Bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jia Ling; Thomas, Nicole Maree; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2017-11-01

    Examine the inter-rater reliability of the Daniels and Worthingham (D&W) manual muscle test (MMT) protocol for children with spina bifida between experienced and novice physiotherapists. Thirteen children with spina bifida (two males) aged 6 to 18 years were recruited from a spina bifida service in a state-wide tertiary children's hospital. Each child had the muscle strength of 19, and lower limb muscles were measured bilaterally by one experienced and one novice physiotherapist using the D&W MMT protocol. Examiner and limb order were counterbalanced. Standard training and recording sheets were used. Agreement between raters was examined with quadratic weighted kappa (κw2), percentage exact agreement (%EA), and the Bland-Altmann Limits of Agreement (LoA). Minimal detectable change (MDC) was calculated. Inter-rater agreement between the experienced and novice raters was excellent (κw2 = 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-0.96); %EA was good (72.3%); and clinically appropriate LoA levels were -1.30-1.40. The MDC was 1.11 points on a six-point MMT scale. The D&W MMT protocol, when used after standard training and with standard recording sheets, was reproducible for children with spina bifida, aged 6-18 years.

  9. Effect of intravaginal electrical stimulation on pelvic floor muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, João Luiz; Gameiro, Mônica Orsi; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravaginal electrical stimulation (IES) on pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength in patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). Between January 2001 and February 2002, 40 MUI women (mean age: 48 years) were studied. Urge incontinence was the predominant symptom; 92.5% also presented mild stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Selection criteria were clinical history and urodynamics. Pre-treatment urodynamic study showed no statistical differences between the groups. Ten percent of the women in each group had involuntary detrusor contractions. Patients were randomly distributed, in a double-blind study, into two groups. Group G1 (n=20), effective IES, and group G2 (n=20), sham IES, with follow-up at 1 month. The following parameters were studied: (1) clinical questionnaire, (2) examiner's evaluation of perineal muscle strength, (3) objective evaluation of perineal muscle by perineometry, (4) vaginal weight test, and (5) urodynamic study. The IES protocol consisted of three 20-min sessions per week over a 7-week period using a Dualpex Uro 996 at 4 Hz. There was no statistically significant difference in the demographic data of both groups. The number of micturitions per 24 h after treatment was reduced significantly in both groups. Urge incontinence, present in all patients before treatment, was reduced to 15% in G1 and 31.5% in G2 post-treatment. The subjective evaluation of PFM strength demonstrated a significant improvement in G1. Objective evaluation of PFM force by perineometer showed a significant improvement in maximum peak contraction post-treatment in both groups. In the vaginal weight test, there was a significant increase in average number of cone retentions post-treatment in both groups. With regard to satisfaction level, after treatment, 80% of the patients in G1 and 65% of the patients in G2 were satisfied. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups. There was a significant

  10. Effects of strength training, detraining and retraining in muscle strength, hypertrophy and functional tasks in older female adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Cleiton S; Cunha, Giovani; Marques, Nise; Oliveira-Reischak, Ãlvaro; Pinto, Ronei

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies presented different results regarding the maintenance time of muscular adaptations after strength training and the ability to resume the gains on muscular performance after resumption of the training programme. This study aimed to verify the effect of strength training on knee extensors and elbow flexor muscle strength, rectus femoris muscle volume and functional performance in older female adults after 12 weeks of strength training, 1 year of detraining and followed by 12 weeks of retraining. Twelve sedentary older women performed 12 weeks of strength training, 1 year of detraining and 12 weeks of retraining. The strength training was performed twice a week, and the assessment was made four times: at the baseline, after the strength training, after the detraining and after the retraining. The knee extensor and elbow flexor strength, rectus femoris muscle volume and functional task were assessed. Strength of knee extensor and elbow flexor muscles, rectus femoris muscle volume and 30-s sit-to-stand increased from baseline to post-training (respectively, 40%, 70%, 38% and 46%), decreased after detraining (respectively, -36%, -64%, -35% and -43%) and increased again these parameters after retraining (35%, 68%, 36% and 42%). Strength training induces gains on strength and hypertrophy, also increased the performance on functional tasks after the strength training. The stoppage of the strength caused strength loss and reduction of functional performance. The resumption of the strength training promoted the same gains of muscular performance in older female adults. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The effect of a resistance-training program on muscle strength, physical workload, muscle fatigue and musculoskeletal discomfort: An experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg-Reenen, H.H. van; Visser, B.; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.; Dieën, J.H. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a resistance-training program on muscle strength of the back and neck/shoulder muscles, relative physical workload, muscle fatigue and musculoskeletal discomfort during a simulated assembly and lifting task. Twenty-two workers were randomi

  12. The effect of a resistance-training program on muscle strength, physical workload, muscle fatigue and musculoskeletal discomfort: an experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg-van Reenen, Heleen H; Visser, Bart; van der Beek, Allard J; Blatter, Birgitte M; van Dieën, Jaap H; van Mechelen, Willem

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a resistance-training program on muscle strength of the back and neck/shoulder muscles, relative physical workload, muscle fatigue and musculoskeletal discomfort during a simulated assembly and lifting task. Twenty-two workers were randomized over an 8-week resistance-training group, and a control group. Isokinetic muscle strength was assessed using the Cybex dynamometer, muscle fatigue was measured using EMG, and perceived discomfort was measured using a 10-point scale. At the follow-up, we found no effect of the resistance-training program on isokinetic muscle strength of the back and shoulder muscles. Furthermore, we did not find any effect on EMG data, nor on musculoskeletal discomfort during the simulated work tasks. However, trained workers performed the lifting tasks for a longer time before reporting considerable discomfort than those in the control group.

  13. Relationship between muscle strength and motor function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene F. Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Measuring muscle strength and motor function is part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD assessment. However, the relationship between these variables is controversial. Objective To investigate the relationship between muscle strength and motor function and between these variables and age. Method Muscle strength was measured by Medical Research Council (MRC scale and motor function, by Motor Function Measure (MFM, in 40 non-ambulatory patients. Spearman tests investigated the relationships between muscle strength, motor function and age. Results Total MRC and MFM scores were strongly related to each other (r = 0.94; p 0.05. Strong and moderate relationships between partial muscle strength and motor function scores were found. Higher correlation coefficients were found between total scores and Dimensions 2 (axial/ proximal control and 3 (distal control of MFM. Conclusion Muscle strength and motor function are strongly correlated and seem to decrease proportionally in DMD.

  14. Diurnal and day-to-day variation of isometric muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, Lotte; Jakobsen, Johannes; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    2016-01-01

    medical treatment and in 10 control subjects. To determine diurnal and day-to-day variation, muscle strength was measured 4 times during day 1 and once at day 2. RESULTS: Knee extension strength decreased during the day in both patients and controls. Neither diurnal nor day-to-day variation of muscle...... strength was higher in patients compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mild to moderate MG did not have increased variation of isometric muscle strength during the day or from day-to-day compared with controls. This suggests that isometric muscle performance can be determined with high......INTRODUCTION: In patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), muscle strength is expected to decrease gradually during the day due to physical activities. METHODS: Isometric muscle strength at the shoulder, knee, and ankle was determined in 10 MG patients (MGFA class II-IV) who were receiving usual...

  15. The Gluteus Medius Vs. Thigh Muscles Strength Ratio and Their Relation to Electromyography Amplitude During a Farmer’s Walk Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stastny Petr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The strength ratio between hamstrings and quadriceps (H/Q is associated with knee injuries as well as hip abductor muscle (HAB weakness. Sixteen resistance trained men (age, 32.5 ± 4.2 years performed 5 s maximal isometric contractions at 75° of knee flexion/extension and 15° of hip abduction on a dynamometer. After this isometric test they performed a Farmer´s walk exercise to find out if the muscle strength ratio predicted the electromyography amplitude expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC. The carried load represented a moderate intensity of 75% of the exercise six repetitions maximum (6RM. Electromyography data from the vastus medialis (VM, vastus lateralis (VL, biceps femoris (BF and gluteus medius (Gmed on each leg were collected during the procedure. The groups selected were participants with H/Q ≥ 0.5, HQ < 0.5, HAB/H ≥ 1, HAB/H < 1, HAB/Q ≥ 0.5 and HAB/Q < 0.5. One way ANOVA showed that Gmed activity was significantly greater in the group with HAB/H < 1 (42 ± 14 %MVIC as compared to HAB/H ≥ 1 (26 ± 10 %MVIC and HAB/Q < 0.5 (47 ± 19 %MVIC compared to HAB/Q ≥ 0.5 (26 ± 12 %MVIC. The individuals with HAB/H < 1 were found to have greater activation of their Gmed during the Farmer’s walk exercise. Individuals with HAB/Q < 0.5 had greater activation of the Gmed. Gmed strength ratios predict the muscle involvement when a moderate amount of the external load is used. The Farmer’s walk is recommended as an exercise which can strengthen the gluteus medius, especially for individuals with a HAB/H ratio < 1 and HAB/Q < 0.5.

  16. Muscle activity during functional coordination training: implications for strength gain and rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Andersen, Lars Louis; Kirk, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if different types, body positions, and levels of progression of functional coordination exercises can provide sufficiently high levels of muscle activity to improve strength of the neck, shoulder, and trunk muscles. Nine untrained women were familiarized...... training can be performed with a muscle activity sufficient for strength gain. Functional coordination training may therefore be a good choice for prevention or rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain or injury in the neck, shoulder, or trunk muscles....

  17. Combining strength training and botulinum neurotoxin intervention in children with cerebral palsy: the impact on muscle morphology and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sîan A; Elliott, Catherine; Valentine, Jane; Gubbay, Anna; Shipman, Peter; Reid, Siobhan

    2013-04-01

    Investigate the combination effects of strength training and Botulinum Toxin Type-A (BoNT-A) on muscle strength and morphology in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Fifteen children receiving BoNT-A, classified as Spastic Diplegic CP, GMFCS I-II, and aged 5-12 years were recruited for this study. Randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training either before or after BoNT-A, children were assessed over 6 months. Eight of the 15 children also completed a control period. The Modified Ashworth Scale measured spasticity. The Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) assessed achievement of functional goals. Magnetic Resonance Imaging assessed muscle volume (MV). Instrumented dynamometry assessed strength. Spasticity was significantly reduced following BoNT-A injection (p = 0.033). Children made significant isokinetic strength gains (mean p = 0.022, ES = 0.57) in the intervention period compared to the control period (mean p = 0.15, ES = 0.56). Irrespective of timing, significant strength improvements were seen immediately (10 weeks) and over 6 months for all children. This was also the case for improvements in the GAS (immediately: mean p = 0.007, ES = 4.17, 6 months: mean p = 0.029, ES = 0.99), and improvements in MV in all assessed muscles. The simultaneous use of BoNT-A and strength training was successful in spasticity reduction, improving strength and achieving functional goals, over and above treatment with BoNT-A alone. Muscles targeted for BoNT-A injection should be included in strength training. Cerebral Palsy• Botulinum toxin type-A (BoNT-A) and strength training are available interventions that, on their own have found success in managing spasticity and muscle weakness (both significant motor impairments), respectively in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). • This study has demonstrated that the concurrent treatment of BoNT-A and strength training can achieve positive outcomes in terms of strength, spasticity and for the achievement of set functional goals. • The

  18. EMG-triggered electrical stimulation is a feasible intervention to apply to multiple arm muscles in people early after stroke, but does not improve strength and activity more than usual therapy: a randomized feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, Simone; Ada, Louise; Canning, Colleen G

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether EMG-triggered electrical stimulation applied to multiple muscles daily is a feasible intervention and to determine its effect on strength and activity in very weak stroke patients. A prospective, randomized trial with blinded assessment. Metropolitan mixed acute and rehabilitation units. Thirty-three people within four weeks of a stroke with less than Grade 3 strength in three out of four muscle groups (shoulder flexors, elbow extensors, wrist and finger extensors and thumb abductors) of the affected arm. Participants were randomly allocated to receive EMG-triggered electrical stimulation to the four muscle groups of the affected arm plus usual therapy five times a week for four weeks, or usual therapy only. Feasibility of the intervention was measured by examining compliance with the trial protocol. Strength was measured using manual muscle testing summed across muscle groups (0-20). Activity was measured using the Motor Assessment Scale, summed upper limb items (0-18). The experimental group received 87% of the intervention. Following the intervention period, there was no difference between the groups for strength (mean between-group difference, 0 out of 20, 95% confidence interval (CI) -3 to 3, p = 0.91) or activity (mean between-group difference 1 out of 18, 95% CI -2 to 4, p = 0.44). It is feasible to apply EMG-triggered electrical stimulation to multiple muscles of the upper limb in very weak people early after stroke. However, it does not appear to improve strength or activity beyond usual arm therapy that contains strengthening.

  19. Muscle strength after anterior shoulder stabilization: arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yong Girl; Lim, Chan Teak; Cho, Nam Su

    2007-11-01

    A number of reports have been made on the muscle strength at the last follow-up after arthroscopic or open Bankart repairs. Few have analyzed the change over time in muscle strength and compared the changes between different operative methods. Muscle strength recovers faster after arthroscopic Bankart repair than after open Bankart repair, and the final muscle strength is not different between the 2 procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty patients with anterior shoulder instability and an isolated Bankart lesion were enrolled for this study. Thirty patients underwent open Bankart repair (open group), and 30 patients went through arthroscopic Bankart repair (arthroscopic group). The open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength during forward elevation than did the arthroscopic group up to 3 months after surgery, but the difference narrowed to about 5% at 6 months (P = .074). At 6 months after surgery, the muscle strength of the open group measured 85.8% +/- 11.5% in forward elevation, 89.5% +/- 10.3% in external rotation, and 89.3% +/- 13.3% in internal rotation. The corresponding figures of the arthroscopic group were 90.6% +/- 8.6%, 92.1% +/- 9.1%, and 92.1% +/- 11.7%. As for external and internal rotations, the open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength 6 weeks after surgery, but the differences were reduced to about 6% and 4%, respectively, at 3 months (P = .092 and .163, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in final muscle strength 12 months after the operation between the 2 groups (P = .503, .468, and .659, respectively). Muscle strength recovered faster with an arthroscopic procedure than with an open procedure during the early postoperative periods, and strength was restored to the level of the unaffected side at 6 months postoperatively. In the group with open Bankart repairs, the muscle strength during forward elevation recovered slower than did external and internal rotation muscle

  20. Strength training for the intrinsic flexor muscles of the foot: effects on muscle strength, the foot arch, and dynamic parameters before and after the training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Sakuraba, Keishoku

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify the effects of intrinsic foot flexor strength training. [Subjects] The subjects were 12 healthy males without motor system disease. [Methods] A training method that involved flexion of all toe interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints against a 3-kg load was implemented and was performed for 200 repetitions once per day, three times per week, for a period of eight weeks. [Results] Significant changes were observed for intrinsic foot flexor strength scores, foot arches, vertical jumping, 1-legged long jumping, and 50-m dash time. [Conclusion] This muscle strength training method significantly improved muscle strength scores, foot arch shape, and movement performance.

  1. Serial Changes of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscle Strength Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to analyze serial changes in thigh muscles, including quadriceps and hamstring muscles, from before to one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). All studies sequentially comparing isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths between the TKA side and the contralateral uninjured limb were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies with 7 cohorts were included in this meta-analysis. The mean differences in the strengths of quadriceps and hamstring muscles between the TKA and uninjured sides were greatest three months after surgery (26.8 N∙m, 12.8 N∙m, Pstrengths relative to preoperative levels were 9.2 N∙m and 4.9 N∙m, respectively, three months postoperatively (P = 0.041), but were no longer significant after six months and one year. During the year after TKA, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths were lowest after 3 months, recovering to preoperative level after six months, but not reaching the muscle strength on the contralateral side. Relative to preoperative levels, the difference in muscle strength between the TKA and contralateral knees was only significant at three months. Because decrease of strength of the quadriceps was significantly greater than decrease in hamstring muscle strength at postoperative three months, early rehabilitation after TKA should focus on recovery of quadriceps muscle strength.

  2. Effects of Growth Hormone Administration on Muscle Strength in Men over 50 Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. W. Tavares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH use has been speculated to improve physical capacity in subjects without GH deficiency (GHD through stimulation of collagen synthesis in the tendon and skeletal muscle, which leads to better exercise training and increased muscle strength. In this context, the use of GH in healthy elderly should be an option for increasing muscle strength. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of GH therapy on muscle strength in healthy men over 50 years old. Fourteen healthy men aged 50–70 years were evaluated at baseline for body composition and muscle strength (evaluated by leg press and bench press exercises, which focus primarily on quadriceps—lower body part and pectoralis major—upper body part—muscles, resp.. Subjects were randomised into 2 groups: GH therapy (7 subjects and placebo (7 subjects and reevaluated after 6 months of therapy. Thirteen subjects completed the study (6 subjects in the placebo group and 7 subjects in the GH group. Subjects of both groups were not different at baseline. After 6 months of therapy, muscle strength in the bench press responsive muscles did not increase in both groups and showed a statistically significant increase in the leg press responsive muscles in the GH group. Our study demonstrated an increase in muscle strength in the lower body part after GH therapy in healthy men. This finding must be considered and tested in frail older populations, whose physical incapacity is primarily caused by proximal muscle weakness. The trial was registered with NCT01853566.

  3. Muscle Strength Predicts Changes in Physical Function in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James S.; Trupin, Laura; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Barton, Jennifer; Margaretten, Mary; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cross-sectional studies have observed that muscle weakness is associated with worse physical function among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study examines whether reduced upper and lower extremity muscle strength predict declines in function over time among adult women with SLE. Methods One hundred forty-six women from a longitudinal SLE cohort participated in the study. All measures were collected during in-person research visits approximately 2 years apart. Upper extremity muscle strength was assessed by grip strength. Lower extremity muscle strength was assessed by peak knee torque of extension and flexion. Physical function was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Regression analyses modeled associations of baseline upper and lower extremity muscle strength with follow-up SPPB scores controlling for baseline SPPB, age, SLE duration, SLE disease activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire [SLAQ]), physical activity level, prednisone use, body composition, and depression. Secondary analyses tested whether associations of baseline muscle strength with follow-up in SPPB scores differed between intervals of varying baseline muscle strength. Results Lower extremity muscle strength strongly predicted changes over 2 years in physical function even when controlling for covariates. The association of reduced lower extremity muscle strength with reduced future physical function was greatest among the weakest women. Conclusions Reduced lower extremity muscle strength predicted clinically significant declines in physical function, especially among the weakest women. Future studies should test whether therapies that promote preservation of lower extremity muscle strength may prevent declines in function among women with SLE. PMID:25623919

  4. Effect of expiratory muscle strength training on swallowing-related muscle strength in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Su; Oh, Dong-Hwan; Chang, Moon-Young

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) on swallowing-related muscle strength in community-dwelling elderly individuals. Expiratory muscle strength training is an intervention for patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. This training is associated with respiration, coughing, speech and swallowing, and its effectiveness has been proven in previous studies. However, the effects of EMST on elderly individuals and evidence are still lacking. This study included 24 community-dwelling senior citizens aged ≥65 years (12 men and 12 women). The experimental group trained at the 70% threshold value of the maximum expiratory pressure using an EMST device 5 days per week for 4 weeks and comprised five sets of five breaths through the device for 25 breaths per day. The placebo group trained with a resistance-free sham device. Post-intervention, muscle strength of the bilateral buccinator and the orbicularis oris muscles (OOM) was measured using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument. Surface electromyography was used to measure activation of the suprahyoid muscles (SM). After intervention, the strength of the buccinator and the OOM in the experimental group showed statistically significant improvement. There was also statistically significant activation of the SM. In the placebo group, the strength of the orbicularis oris muscle alone improved. No statistically significant differences between groups were found for the strength of the buccinator and the OOM and the activation of the SM. EMST had a positive effect on swallowing-related muscle strength in elderly participants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The variation of the strength of neck extensor muscles and semispinalis capitis muscle size with head and neck position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezasoltani, A; Nasiri, R; Faizei, A M; Zaafari, G; Mirshahvelayati, A S; Bakhshidarabad, L

    2013-04-01

    Semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) is a massive and long cervico-thoracic muscle which functions as a main head and neck extensor muscle. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of head and neck positions on the strength of neck extensor muscles and size of SECM in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy women students voluntarily participated in this study. An ultrasonography apparatus (Hitachi EUB 525) and a system of tension-meter were used to scan the right SECM at the level of third cervical spine and to measure the strength of neck extensor muscles at three head and neck positions. Neck extensor muscles were stronger in neutral than flexion or than extension positions while the size of SECM was larger in extension than neutral or than flexion position. The force generation capacity of the main neck extensor muscle was lower at two head and neck flexion and extension positions than neutral position. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety and efficacy of exercise training in adults with Pompe disease: evalution of endurance, muscle strength and core stability before and after a 12 week training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Linda E M; Favejee, Marein M; Wens, Stephan C A; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; Praet, Stephan F E; Reuser, Arnold J J; Bussmann, Johannes B J; van Doorn, Pieter A; van der Ploeg, Ans T

    2015-07-19

    Pompe disease is a proximal myopathy. We investigated whether exercise training is a safe and useful adjuvant therapy for adult Pompe patients, receiving enzyme replacement therapy. Training comprised 36 sessions of standardized aerobic, resistance and core stability exercises over 12 weeks. Before and after, the primary outcome measures safety, endurance (aerobic exercise capacity and distance walked on the 6 min walk test) and muscle strength, and secondary outcome measures core stability, muscle function and body composition, were evaluated. Of 25 patients enrolled, 23 successfully completed the training. Improvements in endurance were shown by increases in maximum workload capacity (110 W before to 122 W after training, [95 % CI of the difference 6 · 0 to 19 · 7]), maximal oxygen uptake capacity (69 · 4 % and 75 · 9 % of normal, [2 · 5 to 10 · 4]), and maximum walking distance (6 min walk test: 492 meters and 508, [-4 · 4 to 27 · 7] ). There were increases in muscle strength of the hip flexors (156 · 4 N to 180 · 7 N [1 · 6 to 13 · 6) and shoulder abductors (143 · 1 N to 150 · 7 N [13 · 2 to 35 · 2]). As an important finding in secondary outcome measures the number of patients who were able to perform the core stability exercises rose, as did the core stability balancing time (p core stability exercises is feasible, safe and beneficial to adults with Pompe disease.

  7. Muscle strength and fatigue in newly diagnosed patients with myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, Lotte; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    significantly with manual muscle testing (MG Composite). Dynamometry revealed improved muscle strength of up to 50% (median 17%, range -1.8 - 49.8) despite no change in the MG Composite score. DISCUSSION: Dynamometry appears to be a more sensitive method of identifying changes in limb strength than MG...

  8. Impact on nutrition on muscle strength and performance in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has rec...

  9. The Changes of Muscle Strength and Functional Activities During Aging in Male and Female Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Jung Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: We noted that the muscle strength and functional activities were decreased earlier in female than male individuals. The decrease of functional activities during the aging process seems to be earlier than the decrease of muscle strength. It is important to implement functional activities training in addition to strengthening exercise to maintain functional levels of the geriatric population.

  10. Screen time viewing behaviors and isometric trunk muscle strength in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Froberg, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of screen time viewing behavior with isometric trunk muscle strength in youth.......The objective of this study was to examine the association of screen time viewing behavior with isometric trunk muscle strength in youth....

  11. Strength, power output and symmetry of leg muscles: effect of age and history of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark C; Carville, Serena F; Smith, I Christopher H; Rutherford, Olga M; Newham, Di J

    2007-07-01

    Risk factors for medically unexplained falls may include reduced muscle power, strength and asymmetry in the lower limbs. Conflicting reports exist about strength and there is little information about power and symmetry. Forty-four healthy young people (29.3 +/- 0.6 years), 44 older non-fallers (75.9 +/- 0.6 years), and 34 older fallers (76.4 +/- 0.8 years) were studied. Isometric, concentric and eccentric strength of the knee and ankle muscles and leg extension power were measured bilaterally. The younger group was stronger in all muscles and types of contraction than both older groups (P muscles and types of contraction but overall the fallers had 85% of the strength and 79% of the power of the non-fallers (P muscles and some contraction types. This was similar overall in the two older groups. Both older groups had greater asymmetry in power than the young (P muscle groups.

  12. Effect of strength training on muscle function in elderly hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, C; Magnusson, S P; Beyer, N

    2007-01-01

    to induce muscle hypertrophy and increase muscle strength and functional performance in frail elderly individuals. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that strength training is an effective method to restore muscle function in post-operative patients and in patients with chronic diseases. Despite this......Immobilization due to hospitalization and major surgery leads to an increased risk of morbidity, disability and a decline in muscle function especially in frail elderly individuals. In fact, many elderly patients fail to regain their level of function and self-care before admission to hospital....... Given that reduced lower limb muscle strength and loss of skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) have been associated with functional impairments and disability with aging, attempts to counteract this process seem highly relevant. In recent years, strength training has emerged as an effective method...

  13. Striated muscle fiber size, composition and capillary density in diabetes in relation to neuropathy and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christer Swan; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    study was to evaluate histologic properties and capillarization of diabetic skeletal muscle in relation to DPN and muscle strength. METHODS: Twenty type 1 and 20 type 2 diabetic (T1D and T2D, respectively) patients underwent biopsy of the gastrocnemic muscle, isokinetic dynamometry at the ankle......, electrophysiological studies, clinical examination, and quantitative sensory examinations. Muscle biopsies were stained immunohistochemically and muscle fiber diameter, fiber type distribution, and capillary density determined. Twenty control subjects were also included in the study. RESULTS: No relationship was found...

  14. Abdominal muscle strength is related to the quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Suenimeire; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Ferreira, Vânia Tie Koga; Scheicher, Marcos Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association between abdominal muscle strength and quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis. A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 40 older adults: 20 with lumbar osteoarthritis (12 women and 8 men, mean age of 65.90 ± 4.80 years) and 20 controls (14 women and 6 men, mean age of 67.90 ± 4.60 years). The volunteers were submitted to an abdominal muscle strength test. Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. Both abdominal muscle strength and quality of life scores were significantly lower in the group with lumbar osteoarthritis in comparison to the controls (p muscle strength and the subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire (p muscle strength have a better quality of life.

  15. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in sedentary, healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Navarro, Ximena; Gatica, Darwin; Manterola, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory muscle training is the most commonly used method to revert respiratory muscle weakness; however, the effect of protocols based on non-respiratory maneuvers has not been adequately studied in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in healthy adolescents. This was a quasi-experiment. The sample was made up of healthy adolescents divided into two groups: an experimental group who completed eight weeks of active abdominal muscle training, and an equivalent control group. The following indicators were measured: abdominal muscle strength, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), peak expiratory flow, and peak cough flow, before and after protocol completion. A value of p training, MEP and peak expiratory flow increased in healthy (sedentary) adolescents. Such effects were associated with intervention-induced increases in cough peak flow. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  17. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) flexor digiti minimi brevis; (9) dorsal and plantar interossei. Other important plantar structures: Plantar aponeurosis, long plantar and calcaneonavicular ligament, tendons of posterior tibial, peroneus... muscles of the foot: Plantar: (1) Flexor digitorum brevis; (2) abductor hallucis; (3) abductor...

  18. Respiratory muscle strength and aerobic performance of wheelchair basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael N. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract The respiratory system has been described as a limiting factor in the performance of athletes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the respiratory muscle strength (RMS and aerobic performance of wheelchair basketball players (WCBPs. We evaluated 19 male WCBPs who were divided into two groups: trunk control group (TCG and without trunk control group (WTCG. All participants underwent a pulmonary function test, evaluation of maximal inspiratory (MIP and expiratory (MEP pressures, and an aerobic performance test. The MIP of both groups and the MEP values of TCG exceeded the predicted values for age and gender. No differences were observed in the MIP and aerobic performance between the groups although a difference was observed in the MEP values. Positive correlations were observed between MIP/MEP and the aerobic performance for both groups. These results suggested that the overall RMS of this group of WCBPs fell within or above the predicted values. Hence, the study concluded that RMS can positively influence the aerobic performance of WCBP.

  19. Ultrasonographic quantification of intrinsic hand muscle cross-sectional area; Reliability and validity for predicting muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohseny, Behnam; Nijhuis, Tim H.; Hundepool, Caroline A.; Janssen, Wim G.; Selles, Ruud W.; Coert, J. Henk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether ultrasonographic measurement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the intrinsic hand muscles can be used to predict muscle strength in a valid and reliable manner, and to determine if this method can be used for follow-up of patients with peripheral nerve injury betw

  20. Muscle strength in patients with acromegaly at diagnosis and during long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtbauer, Laila; Olsson, Daniel S; Bengtsson, Bengt-Åke; Norrman, Lise-Lott; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2017-08-01

    Patients with acromegaly have decreased body fat (BF) and increased extracellular water (ECW) and muscle mass. Although there is a lack of systematic studies on muscle function, it is believed that patients with acromegaly may suffer from proximal muscle weakness despite their increased muscle mass. We studied body composition and muscle function in untreated acromegaly and after biochemical remission. Prospective observational study. Patients with acromegaly underwent measurements of muscle strength (dynamometers) and body composition (four-compartment model) at diagnosis (n = 48), 1 year after surgery (n = 29) and after long-term follow-up (median 11 years) (n = 24). Results were compared to healthy subjects. Untreated patients had increased body cell mass (113 ± 9% of predicted) and ECW (110 ± 20%) and decreased BF (67 ± 7.6%). At one-year follow-up, serum concentration of IGF-I was reduced and body composition had normalized. At baseline, isometric muscle strength in knee flexors and extensors was normal and concentric strength was modestly increased whereas grip strength and endurance was reduced. After one year, muscle strength was normal in both patients with still active disease and patients in remission. At long-term follow-up, all patients were in remission. Most muscle function tests remained normal, but isometric flexion and the fatigue index were increased to 153 ± 42% and 139 ± 28% of predicted values, respectively. Patients with untreated acromegaly had increased body cell mass and normal or modestly increased proximal muscle strength, whereas their grip strength was reduced. After biochemical improvement and remission, body composition was normalized, hand grip strength was increased, whereas proximal muscle fatigue increased. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  1. Kinesio taping effect on biceps brachii muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Králová Dagmar; Novotný Jan; Řezaninová Jana

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed at presenting the idea of inventor Dr. Kenzo Kase that kinesio tape application with proximal base leads to muscle contraction facilitation and application with distal base leads to muscle contraction inhibition. Twenty male volleyball players with the dominant shoulder girdle muscle imbalance between the ages of 25 and 30 participated in this study. There were compared two techniques which were placed on biceps brachii muscle in shoulder and elbow joint extension. Isokinetic ...

  2. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pre...

  3. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years parti...

  4. Effects of Age on Strength and Morphology of Toe Flexor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Karen J; Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Nester, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Descriptive, cross-sectional. Background Age-related muscle atrophy is common in lower-limb muscles. We therefore speculated that foot muscles may also diminish with age. However, there is a paucity of literature characterizing foot muscle strength and morphology, and any relationship between these 2, in older people. Objective To compare the strength and size of the toe flexor muscles of older adults relative to their younger counterparts. Methods Seventeen young adults with a normal foot type were matched by sex and body mass index to 17 older adults with a normal foot type, from an available sample of 41 younger (18 to 50 years of age) and 44 older (60 or more years of age) adults. Among the matched groups (n = 34), muscle thickness and cross-sectional area for 5 intrinsic and 2 extrinsic toe flexor muscles were obtained using ultrasound. Toe strength was assessed using a pressure platform. Differences in toe flexor strength and muscle size between the young and older matched groups were determined using analysis of covariance (controlling for height). Correlations between strength and size of the toe flexor muscles of the pooled group (n = 34) were also calculated. Results Toe strength and the thickness and cross-sectional area of most foot muscles were significantly reduced in the older adults (Pstrength values were strongly correlated with the size of the intrinsic toe flexor muscles. Conclusion The smaller foot muscles appear to be affected by sarcopenia in older adults. This could contribute to reduced toe flexion force production and may affect the ability of older people to walk safely. Interventions aimed at reversing foot muscle atrophy in older people require further investigation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1065-1070. Epub 29 Oct 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6597.

  5. Muscle Strength Is Protective Against Osteoporosis in an Ethnically Diverse Sample of Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Ryan P; Kraemer, William J; Vincent, Brenda M; Hall, Orman T; Peterson, Mark D

    2017-09-01

    McGrath, RP, Kraemer, WJ, Vincent, BM, Hall, OT, and Peterson, MD. Muscle strength is protective against osteoporosis in an ethnically diverse sample of adults. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2586-2589, 2017-The odds of developing osteoporosis may be affected by modifiable and nonmodifiable factors such as muscle strength and ethnicity. This study sought to (a) determine whether increased muscle strength was associated with decreased odds of osteoporosis and (b) identify whether the odds of osteoporosis differed by ethnicity. Data from the 2013 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Muscle strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to assess femoral neck bone mineral density. A T-score of ≤2.5 was used to define osteoporosis. Separate covariate-adjusted logistic regression models were performed on each sex to determine the association between muscle strength and osteoporosis. Odds ratios (ORs) were also generated to identify if the association between muscle strength and osteoporosis differed by ethnicity using non-Hispanic blacks as the reference group. There were 2,861 participants included. Muscle strength was shown to be protective against osteoporosis for men (OR: 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.94-0.94) and women (OR: 0.90; CI: 0.90-0.90). Although ORs varied across ethnicities, non-Hispanic Asian men (OR: 6.62; CI: 6.51-6.72) and women (OR: 6.42; CI: 6.37-6.48) were at highest odds of osteoporosis. Increased muscle strength reduced the odds of osteoporosis among both men and women in a nationally representative, ethnically diverse sample of adults. Non-Hispanic Asians had the highest odds of developing osteoporosis. Irrespective of sex or ethnicity, increased muscle strength may help protect against the odds of developing osteoporosis.

  6. Twitch interpolation technique in testing of maximal muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim was to study the methodological aspects of the muscle twitch interpolation technique in estimating the maximal force of contraction in the quadriceps muscle utilizing commercial muscle testing equipment. Six healthy subjects participated in seven sets of experiments testing the effects on...

  7. Quality of life correlates with muscle strength in patients with dermato- or polymyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Karina B; Alexanderson, Helene; Dalgård, Christine

    2017-01-01

    and included 75 patients with DM or PM and 48 healthy controls. HQoL was assessed by the Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36). Muscle strength of the patients was assessed using the Manual Muscle Test-8 (MMT8). Covariables and possible confounding factors were collected by validated tools. Associations were......The aim of this study was to compare health-related quality of life (HQoL) in adults with dermatomyositis (DM) or polymyositis (PM) with a healthy control group and to assess whether muscle strength was associated with HQoL in patients with DM or PM. A cross-sectional study was performed...... Muscle strength was associated with one domain in the patients; Physical Function (β = 1.2; 95% confidence interval 0.37 to 2.1). No statistically significant associations were found between muscle strength and HQoL in the remaining domains. Patients with DM or PM have reduced HQoL compared...

  8. Muscle strength training to improve gait function in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Meta Nyström; Tranberg, Roy; Zügner, Roland; Alkema, Kristina; Beckung, Eva

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of muscle strength training on gait outcomes in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children (two females, 14 males, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-II, mean age 12y 6mo, range 9y 4mo-15y 4mo) underwent muscle strength measurement using a handheld device, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) assessment, three-dimensional gait analysis, joint range of motion assessment, and grading of spasticity before and after 8 weeks of training. All participants had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia and could walk without aids. Training consisted of exercises for lower extremity muscles with free weights, rubber bands, and body weight for resistance, three times a week. Values for muscle strength below normal were identified in all children; this was most pronounced at the ankle, followed by the hip muscles. After training, muscle strength and GMFM scores increased, velocity was unchanged, stride length increased, and cadence was reduced. There was an increase in hip extensor moment and power generated at push off. Eight weeks of muscle strength training can increase muscle strength and improve gait function.

  9. Neck and shoulder muscle strength in patients with tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tension-type headache (TTH) is highly prevalent in the general population, and it is characterized by increased muscle tenderness with increasing headache frequency and intensity. AIM: The aim of this case-control study was to compare muscle strength in neck and shoulder muscles....... Patients were included if they had TTH ≥8 days per month. The MVC neck extensor and flexor muscles were tested with the participant seated upright. MVC shoulder abduction was tested with the individual lying supine. RESULTS: Compared to controls TTH patients had significantly weaker muscle strength in neck...... extension (p = 0.02), resulting in a significantly lower extension/flexion moment ratio (p = 0.03). TTH patients also showed a tendency toward significantly lower muscle strength in shoulder abduction (p = 0.05). Among the 60 TTH patients, 25 had frequent episodic TTH (FETTH), and 35 had chronic TTH (CTTH...

  10. Alteration in Peripheral Muscle Strength among Overweight and Obese Individuals: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Mohan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral muscle dysfunction in Overweight (OW and Obesity (OB leads to fatigue and activity limitations. However, there are contradictory views regarding the exact level with regard to hand grip and quadriceps muscle strength in OW and OB. The main objective of the present systematic review was to synthesize the literature for the strength part of the hand grip and quadriceps muscle strength among OW and OB. Literature search of Scopus, EBSCO and PubMed databases from 01.01.2004 to 30.06.2016, was performed. We set our search strategy using the terms “overweight OR obesity” AND “muscle strength” AND “grip OR quadriceps”. Two reviewers administered established eligible criteria and extracted the data. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE was used to assess the risk of bias. Sixteen articles which were included identified Handgrip Strength (HGS, shoulder flexor, elbow flexor and knee extensor were found to be altered. There were consistent results with an increase in quadriceps muscle strength, whereas differed results were found in hand grip to increase and decrease in muscle strength in the presence of OW and OB. It is concluded that HGS appeared to be diversified with findings of increased and decrease strength, whereas regarding the quadriceps muscles, the findings were homogeneous.

  11. Serial Changes of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscle Strength Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Wan Moon

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis was performed to analyze serial changes in thigh muscles, including quadriceps and hamstring muscles, from before to one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA. All studies sequentially comparing isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths between the TKA side and the contralateral uninjured limb were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies with 7 cohorts were included in this meta-analysis. The mean differences in the strengths of quadriceps and hamstring muscles between the TKA and uninjured sides were greatest three months after surgery (26.8 N∙m, 12.8 N∙m, P<0.001, but were similar to preoperative level at six months (18.4 N∙m, 7.4 N∙m P<0.001 and were maintained for up to one year (15.9 N∙m, 4.1 N∙m P<0.001. The pooled mean differences in changes in quadriceps and hamstring strengths relative to preoperative levels were 9.2 N∙m and 4.9 N∙m, respectively, three months postoperatively (P = 0.041, but were no longer significant after six months and one year. During the year after TKA, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths were lowest after 3 months, recovering to preoperative level after six months, but not reaching the muscle strength on the contralateral side. Relative to preoperative levels, the difference in muscle strength between the TKA and contralateral knees was only significant at three months. Because decrease of strength of the quadriceps was significantly greater than decrease in hamstring muscle strength at postoperative three months, early rehabilitation after TKA should focus on recovery of quadriceps muscle strength.

  12. Effects of a Strength Training Session After an Exercise Inducing Muscle Damage on Recovery Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; Lamblin, Julien; McCall, Alan; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Abaïdia, A-E, Delecroix, B, Leduc, C, Lamblin, J, McCall, A, Baquet, G, and Dupont, G. Effects of a strength training session after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery kinetics. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 115-125, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an upper-limb strength training session the day after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery of performance. In a randomized crossover design, subjects performed the day after the exercise, on 2 separate occasions (passive vs. active recovery conditions) a single-leg exercise (dominant in one condition and nondominant in the other condition) consisting of 5 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the knee flexors. Active recovery consisted of performing an upper-body strength training session the day after the exercise. Creatine kinase, hamstring strength, and muscle soreness were assessed immediately and 20, 24, and 48 hours after exercise-induced muscle damage. The upper-body strength session, after muscle-damaging exercise accelerated the recovery of slow concentric force (effect size = 0.65; 90% confidence interval = -0.06 to 1.32), but did not affect the recovery kinetics for the other outcomes. The addition of an upper-body strength training session the day after muscle-damaging activity does not negatively affect the recovery kinetics. Upper-body strength training may be programmed the day after a competition.

  13. Effects of Kinesio Tape application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz, Timur; Aslan, Meryem Doğan; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Kinesio Tape (KT) application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke. Twenty-four patients were allocated into KT and control groups. All patients participated in the same conventional rehabilitation program 5 times/wk for 4 wk. In addition, KT was applied to quadriceps muscles bilaterally to the patients in the KT group. Compared with baseline, peak torque levels increased significantly in both groups (all p 0.05). KT application to quadriceps muscles in addition to conventional exercises for 4 wk is effective on isokinetic but not functional parameters.

  14. The aerobic capacity and muscle strength are correlated in candidates for liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Homercher Galant

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver diseases are responsible for metabolic and cardiorespiratory alterations. The objective of this paper is to correlate the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and respiratory muscle strength and evaluating the quality of life in liver transplant candidates. Cross-sectional study consisted of 26 patients with cirrhosis who underwent maximal exercise testing, respiratory muscle strength and SF-36. There was a correlation of VO2max with MIP (r = 0.61 and low scores of quality of life. A correlation of VO2max to muscle strength and decreased quality of life in patients with liver disease.

  15. Deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality and mobility in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Eng, Janice J; MacIntyre, Donna L;

    2011-01-01

    strength, mass, and IF were not associated with mobility measures. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with healthy controls, patients with moderate to severe COPD show marked deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality, and mobility. More studies with larger sample size are required to elucidate whether any......PURPOSE: Midthigh intramuscular fat (IF), a feature of reduced muscle quality, is an important predictor of self-reported mobility loss in the elderly. This study compared measures of muscle strength, mass, IF, and mobility in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and healthy...

  16. Muscle strength in athletes-hand kettlebell sport for different meteorological situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulthickiy Z.I.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered indicators of the strength of muscles of hands of students of general physical training and weightlifting athletes. The study involved 16 students of general physical training, 16 weightlifting athletes (III level and 16 athletes (II level. Age 18-23 years of study (men. Investigations were carried out at meteorological situations I and type III. It is established that muscle strength depends on the athletes and sports category varies for different types of weather. When the type III weather in all surveyed groups of athletes, a decrease of muscle strength.

  17. Relationships between Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Locomotor Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk Independently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Chantale; Lepage, Celine; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree B.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify relationships between lower limb muscle strength and locomotor capacity for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) to identify key muscle groups for strength training. Fifty 6- to 16-year-olds with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) participated. Isometric muscle strength of hip…

  18. Relationships between Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Locomotor Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk Independently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Chantale; Lepage, Celine; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree B.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify relationships between lower limb muscle strength and locomotor capacity for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) to identify key muscle groups for strength training. Fifty 6- to 16-year-olds with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) participated. Isometric muscle strength of hip…

  19. Ipsilateral corticomotor responses are confined to the homologous muscle following cross-education of muscular strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Joel; Frazer, Ashlyn K; Horvath, Deanna M; Pearce, Alan J; Avela, Janne; Howatson, Glyn; Kidgell, Dawson J

    2017-08-22

    Cross-education of strength occurs when strength-training one limb increases the strength of the untrained limb and is restricted to the untrained homologous muscle. Cortical circuits located ipsilateral to the trained limb might be involved. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine the corticomotor responses from the untrained homologous (biceps brachii) and non-homologous (flexor carpi radialis) muscle following strength-training of the right elbow flexors. Motor evoked potentials were recorded from the untrained left biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis during a submaximal contraction from 20 individuals (10 women, 10 men, aged 18-35 years; training group; n = 10 and control group; n = 10) before and after 3-weeks of strength-training the right biceps brachii at 80% of 1-repetition maximum (1-RM). Recruitment-curves for corticomotor excitability and inhibition of the untrained homologous and non-homologous muscle were constructed and assessed by examining the area under the recruitment curve (AURC). Strength-training increased strength of the trained elbow flexors (29%), resulting in a 18% increase in contralateral strength of the untrained elbow flexors (P homologous muscle (P homologous muscle (P > 0.05). These findings show that the cross-education of muscular strength is spatially distributed; however, the neural adaptations are confined to the motor pathway ipsilateral to the untrained homologous agonist.

  20. Vitamin D and muscle strength throughout the life course: a review of epidemiological and intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E K; Kiely, M

    2015-12-01

    The putative role of vitamin D in muscle function and strength throughout the life course is of interest because muscle strength is required for engagement in physical activity at all ages. As vitamin D deficiency is widely reported in the population, especially in countries at high latitude, the potential importance of vitamin D in muscle function throughout life, and the potential impacts on growth and development, participation in physical activity, and effects on skeletal and cardio-metabolic health, comprise an important topic for discussion. This review provides an overview of muscle function and summarises the role of the vitamin D receptor and the proposed molecular mechanisms of action of vitamin D in muscle cells. In addition, the review provides a comprehensive assessment of the clinical evidence surrounding the association between vitamin D and muscle strength. Among adults, particularly older adults, cross-sectional and cohort studies reported a positive association between vitamin D status and muscle strength. These associations have been largely confirmed by intervention studies. Limited research has been carried out in adolescents and children; two cross-sectional studies in adolescents have suggested an association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and muscle strength. However, the two intervention studies in adolescents have yielded conflicting results. Other than a single observational study, data in young children are very limited and further investigation in under 12-year-olds is warranted.

  1. Measurement of muscle strength with handheld dynamometer in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi R Samosawala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intensive Care Unit (ICU acquired weakness is a common complication in critically ill patients affecting their prognosis. The handheld dynamometry is an objective method in detecting minimum muscle strength change, which has an impact on the physical function of ICU survivors. The minimal change in the force can be measured in units of weight such as pounds or kilograms. Aim of the Study: To detect the changes in peripheral muscle strength with handheld dynamometer in the early stage of ICU stay and to observe the progression of muscle weakness. Methodology: Three upper and three lower limb muscles force measured with handheld dynamometer during ICU stay. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA to detect changes in force generated by muscle on alternate days of ICU stay. Results: There was a reduction in peripheral muscle strength from day 3 to day 5 as well from day 5 to day 7 of ICU stay (P < 0.01. The average reduction in peripheral muscle strength was 11.8% during ICU stay. Conclusion: This study showed a progressive reduction in peripheral muscle strength as measured by handheld dynamometer during early period of ICU stay.

  2. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain: strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2015-03-01

    Cycle training is widely performed as a major part of any exercise program seeking to improve aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health. However, the effect of cycle training on muscle size and strength gain still requires further insight, even though it is known that professional cyclists display larger muscle size compared to controls. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of cycle training on muscle size and strength of the lower extremity and the possible mechanisms for increasing muscle size with cycle training. It is plausible that cycle training requires a longer period to significantly increase muscle size compared to typical resistance training due to a much slower hypertrophy rate. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy similarly between young and older age groups, while strength gain seems to favor older adults, which suggests that the probability for improving in muscle quality appears to be higher in older adults compared to young adults. For young adults, higher-intensity intermittent cycling may be required to achieve strength gains. It also appears that muscle hypertrophy induced by cycle training results from the positive changes in muscle protein net balance.

  3. Relation between systemic inflammatory markers, peripheral muscle mass, and strength in limb muscles in stable COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Renata; Caram, Laura M O; Faganello, Marcia M; Sanchez, Fernanda F; Tanni, Suzana E; Godoy, Irma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between systemic inflammatory mediators and peripheral muscle mass and strength in COPD patients. Fifty-five patients (69% male; age: 64±9 years) with mild/very severe COPD (defined as forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] =54%±23%) were evaluated. We evaluated serum concentrations of IL-8, CRP, and TNF-α. Peripheral muscle mass was evaluated by computerized tomography (CT); midthigh cross-sectional muscle area (MTCSA) and midarm cross-sectional muscle area (MACSA) were obtained. Quadriceps, triceps, and biceps strength were assessed through the determination of the one-repetition maximum. The multiple regression results, adjusted for age, sex, and FEV1%, showed positive significant association between MTCSA and leg extension (0.35 [0.16, 0.55]; P=0.001), between MACSA and triceps pulley (0.45 [0.31, 0.58]; P=0.001), and between MACSA and biceps curl (0.34 [0.22, 0.47]; P=0.001). Plasma TNF-α was negatively associated with leg extension (-3.09 [-5.99, -0.18]; P=0.04) and triceps pulley (-1.31 [-2.35, -0.28]; P=0.01), while plasma CRP presented negative association with biceps curl (-0.06 [-0.11, -0.01]; P=0.02). Our results showed negative association between peripheral muscle mass (evaluated by CT) and muscle strength and that systemic inflammation has a negative influence in the strength of specific groups of muscles in individuals with stable COPD. This is the first study showing association between systemic inflammatory markers and strength in upper limb muscles.

  4. Effects of a resistance training program and subsequent detraining on muscle strength and muscle power in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Perez, Carlos; de Souza-Teixeira, Fernanda; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; de Paz-Fernandez, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Although resistance training adaptations in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been described, the detraining response in this population is largely unknown. [corrected] This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a 12-week detraining period on muscle strength (isometric and endurance) and muscle power of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that had previously carried out a 12-week resistance training program (RTP). Forty-two MS patients were randomly assigned into two groups: an exercise group (EG) that performed a 12-week RTP for the knee extensors muscles; and a control group (CG), that did not perform any specific training. Knee extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), muscle power and muscle endurance were evaluated before and after the RTP, as well as 12 weeks after training completion. A strain gauge was used to measure the maximal voluntary isometric contraction and muscle power was assessed with a linear encoder. Muscle endurance was interpreted as the number of repetitions that a patient could perform in a single set of knee extension exercise. The EG increased MVIC and muscle power after the training period, although the training did not affect muscle endurance. After 12 weeks of detraining, MVIC returned to pre-training values but muscle power was still greater than pre-training values in the EG. The CG did not present any change in the variables measured during the intervention. A 12-week RTP improved MVIC and muscle power in MS patients. Additionally, 12 weeks of detraining blunted strength training adaptations in MS patients, although muscle power training adaptations were still evident after the detraining period.

  5. Respiratory muscle strength and training in stroke and neurology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Ross D; Rafferty, Ged F; Moxham, John; Kalra, Lalit

    2013-02-01

    We undertook two systematic reviews to determine the levels of respiratory muscle weakness and effects of respiratory muscle training in stroke patients. Two systematic reviews were conducted in June 2011 using a number of electronic databases. Review 1 compared respiratory muscle strength in stroke and healthy controls. Review 2 was expanded to include randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of respiratory muscle training on stroke and other neurological conditions. The primary outcomes of interest were maximum inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressure (maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure, respectively). Meta-analysis of four studies revealed that the maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure were significantly lower (P muscle training on maximum inspiratory pressure in neurological patients compared with control subjects (weighted mean difference 6·94 cmH(2) O) while no effect on maximum expiratory pressure. Respiratory muscle strength appears to be impaired after stroke, possibly contributing to increased incidence of chest infection. Respiratory muscle training can improve inspiratory but not expiratory muscle strength in neurological conditions, although the paucity of studies in the area and considerable variability between them is a limiting factor. Respiratory muscle training may improve respiratory muscle function in neurological conditions, but its clinical benefit remains unknown.

  6. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and motor performance in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy children. ... program for spastic diplegic CP and the WBV group received the same program in addition to WBV training.

  7. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marwa M. Ibrahim

    ) training on muscle strength, spasticity, and motor performance in spastic diplegic cerebral ... force power, velocity and jump performance immediately after ... 90° and resistance was given by the examiner anteriorly 5 cm ... Statistical analysis.

  8. Correlation of the Y-Balance Test with Lower-limb Strength of Adult Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between Y-balance test (YBT) distance and the lower-limb strength of adult women. [Subjects] Forty women aged 45 to 80 years volunteered for this study. [Methods] The participants were tested for maximal muscle strength of the lower limbs (hip extensors, hip flexors, hip abductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle dorsiflexors) and YBT distances in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to quantify the linear relationships between YBT distances and lower-limb strength. [Results] Hip extensor and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with YBT anterior distance. Hip extensor, hip abductor, and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with the YBT posteromedial distance. Hip extensor and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with YBT posterolateral distance. [Conclusion] There was a weak correlation between lower-limb strength (hip extensors, hip abductors, and knee flexors) and dynamic postural control as measured by the YBT.

  9. Relationships between the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, tender point count, and muscle strength in female patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Lund, Hans Peter; Christensen, Robin

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia (FM) patients with reduced lower extremity strength are more symptomatic and tender than FM patients with normal muscle strength.......To test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia (FM) patients with reduced lower extremity strength are more symptomatic and tender than FM patients with normal muscle strength....

  10. Addition of an anabolic steroid to strength training promotes muscle strength in the nonparetic lower limb of poststroke hemiplegia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimodozono, Megumi; Kawahira, Kazumi; Ogata, Atsuko; Etoh, Seiji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2010-09-01

    In this prospective observer-blinded open-label nonrandomized controlled trial, 25 inpatients with hemiplegia 1-8 months after stroke were assigned to an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS; n = 14) or a control (n = 11) group: the former received 100 mg metenolone enanthate by intramuscular injection once a week for 6 weeks along with rehabilitation therapy including muscle strength training of the nonparetic lower limb, which consisted of 100 repetitions of isokinetic reciprocal knee extension/flexion (60 degrees /s) on a dynamometer once a day for 5 days a week over 6 weeks, and the latter received rehabilitation therapy alone. The maximal peak torque of the nonparetic lower limb, including the isokinetic (60 degrees /s, 120 degrees /s, and 180 degrees /s), isotonic, and isometric muscle strength of knee extension/flexion, measured every 2 weeks, was compared with the baseline values. Significant increases in peak torque were seen at 2 weeks in 9 of the 10 conditions and at 6 weeks in 8 of the 10 conditions tested for the AAS group but in only 1 and 5 conditions for the control group, respectively. While no contraindications for AAS were encountered, the combination of AAS and muscle strength training tended to have a positive effect on muscle strength after stroke.

  11. Comparison of Three Methods of Assessing Muscle Strength and Imbalance Ratios of the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Crayton L.; Wright, P. Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Three strength measurement methods for determining muscle strength and imbalance ratios of the knee were compared in 41 (23 female, 18 male) NCAA Division I track and field athletes. Peak quadriceps extensions and hamstring flexions were measured isotonically, isometrically, and isokinetically. Isokinetic measurements were performed on a Cybex II at 60°/s. Isometric extension and flexion measurements were performed using the Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester (Lafayette Instruments; Lafayette, Ind...

  12. Effect of Neck Muscle Strength and Anticipatory Cervical Muscle Activation on the Kinematic Response of the Head to Impulsive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T.; Oh, Youkeun K.; Joshi, Monica S.; Richardson, James K.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Greater neck strength and activating the neck muscles to brace for impact are both thought to reduce an athlete's risk of concussion during a collision by attenuating the head's kinematic response after impact. However, the literature reporting the neck's role in controlling postimpact head kinematics is mixed. Furthermore, these relationships have not been examined in the coronal or transverse planes or in pediatric athletes. Hypotheses In each anatomic plane, peak linear velocity (DV) and peak angular velocity (Dv) of the head are inversely related to maximal isometric cervical muscle strength in the opposing direction (H1). Under impulsive loading, DV and Dv will be decreased during anticipatory cervical muscle activation compared with the baseline state (H2). Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods Maximum isometric neck strength was measured in each anatomic plane in 46 male and female contact sport athletes aged 8 to 30 years. A loading apparatus applied impulsive test forces to athletes' heads in flexion, extension, lateral flexion, and axial rotation during baseline and anticipatory cervical muscle activation conditions. Multivariate linear mixed models were used to determine the effects of neck strength and cervical muscle activation on head DV and Dv. Results Greater isometric neck strength and anticipatory activation were independently associated with decreased head DV and Dv after impulsive loading across all planes of motion (all P\\.001). Inverse relationships between neck strength and head DV and Dv presented moderately strong effect sizes (r = 0.417 to r = 0.657), varying by direction of motion and cervical muscle activation. Conclusion In male and female athletes across the age spectrum, greater neck strength and anticipatory cervical muscle activation (“bracing for impact”) can reduce the magnitude of the head's kinematic response. Future studies should determine whether neck strength contributes to the observed sex and

  13. Effect of back muscle strength and sagittal spinal imbalance on locomotive syndrome in Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kenichi; Imagama, Shiro; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Wakao, Norimitsu; Muramoto, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-07-01

    The Japanese Orthopaedic Association has proposed the term locomotive syndrome to designate a condition of individuals in high-risk groups with musculoskeletal disease who are highly likely to require nursing care. This study investigates the influence of spinal factors on locomotive syndrome in Japanese men. A total of 105 men older than 50 years were enrolled in the study. Those answering yes to least 1 of 7 categories in a self-assessment checklist for locomotive syndrome were defined as having locomotive syndrome. The authors evaluated lateral lumbar radiographs, sagittal parameters, sagittal balance using the spinal inclination angle as an index, spinal range of motion as determined with SpinalMouse (Idiag, Volkerswill, Switzerland), back muscle strength, and body mass index. Age, back muscle strength, and spinal inclination angle significantly correlated with locomotive syndrome. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that a decrease in back muscle strength (odds ratio, 0.964; Pmuscle strength had significant negative correlations with age and spinal inclination angle. Spinal inclination angle had significant negative correlations with back muscle strength and lumbar and total spinal range of motion and significant positive correlations with age, body mass index, sacral slope angle, and lumbar kyphosis. A decrease in back muscle strength and an increase in spinal inclination angle may be the most important risk factors for locomotive syndrome in Japanese men. Back muscle strengthening and spinal range of motion exercises could be useful for improving the symptoms of locomotive syndrome.

  14. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Maria Souza Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods: This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors at three different times: preoperatively (M1, the day of discharge (M2 and hospital discharge (M3. Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results: Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1, with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion: The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline.

  15. Changes in the Muscle strength and functional performance of healthy women with aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Mousavikhatir

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower limbs antigravity muscles weakness and decreased functional ability have significant role in falling. The aim of this study was to find the effects of aging on muscle strength and functional ability, determining the range of decreasing strength and functional ability and relationship between them in healthy women. Methods: Across-section study was performed on 101 healthy women aged 21-80 years. The participants were divided into six age groups. The maximum isometric strength of four muscle groups was measured using a hand-held dynamometer bilaterally. The functional ability was measured with functional reach (FR, timed get up and go (TGUG, single leg stance (SLS, and stairs walking (SW tests. Results: Muscle strength changes were not significant between 21-40 years of age, but decreased significantly thereafter. Also, there was a significant relationship between muscle strength and functional ability in age groups. Conclusion: Both muscle strength and functional ability is reduced as a result of aging, but the decrease in functional ability can be detected earlier.

  16. VO2 Max and Back and Leg Muscle Strength Profile of Universitas Padjadjaran Swimming Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitriyani Nurul Pajar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiorespiratory endurance (VO2 max and back and leg muscle strength are a few components required to support the performance of swimming athlete during competition. The objective of this study was to determine the VO2 max and back and leg muscle strength in high category level of Universitas Padjadjaran swimming team period 2014. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted to 19 swimmers of Universitas Padjadjaran in September 2014. The variables of this study were VO2 max and back and leg muscle strength. Then, the data were categorized based on the standard of The National Sports Committee of Indonesia. Results: The data obtained showed that the VO2 max of the majority of subjects was in the very good category (6/19 subjects and the back muscle strength of the majority of subjects was in the very good category (10/19 subjects. In contrast, the leg muscle strength of majority of subjects was in the low category (11/19 subjects. Conclusions: The VO2 max and back muscle strength in high category level of the swimming team fulfilled the standard of The National Sports Committee of Indonesia.

  17. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Mustalampi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability.

  18. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  19. The effect of strength training on muscle cellular stress in prostate cancer patients on ADT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Nilsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer (PCa is associated with several side effects, including loss of muscle mass. Muscle atrophy is associated with reduced mitochondrial function and increased muscle cellular stress that may be counteracted by strength training. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of strength training on mitochondrial proteins and indicators of muscle cellular stress in PCa patients on ADT. Methods Men diagnosed with locally advanced PCa receiving ADT were randomised to a strength training group (STG (n=16 or a control group (CG (n=15 for 16 weeks. Muscle biopsies were collected pre- and post-intervention from the vastus lateralis muscle, and analysed for mitochondrial proteins (citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COXIV, HSP60 and indicators of muscle cellular stress (heat shock protein (HSP 70, alpha B-crystallin, HSP27, free ubiquitin, and total ubiquitinated proteins using Western blot and ELISA. Results No significant intervention effects were observed in any of the mitochondrial proteins or indicators of muscle cellular stress. However, within-group analysis revealed that the level of HSP70 was reduced in the STG and a tendency towards a reduction in citrate synthase levels was observed in the CG. Levels of total ubiquitinated proteins were unchanged in both groups. Conclusion Although reduced HSP70 levels indicated reduced muscle cellular stress in the STG, the lack of an intervention effect precluded any clear conclusions.

  20. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilaine de Paula Batista Mendes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. Methods: this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. Results: the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2 and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7 in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036 and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010, compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. Conclusion: pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength.

  1. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. Results The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = −0.29; p = 0.19), functional capacity (r = −0.08; p = 0.72), FPPA (r = −0.28; p = 0.19) or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = −0.21; p = 0.35). Conclusion The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS. PMID:27069887

  2. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Peixoto Leão Almeida

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. METHODS: This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. RESULTS: The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = -0.29; p = 0.19, functional capacity (r = -0.08; p = 0.72, FPPA (r = -0.28; p = 0.19 or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = -0.21; p = 0.35. CONCLUSION: The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS.

  3. Isokinetic strength of the trunk Xexor muscles after surgical repair for incisional hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); H.H. Eker (Hasan); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); H.J. Stam (Henk); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPurpose The repair of incisional hernias can be accomplished by open or laparoscopic techniques. The Biodex® dynamometer measures muscle strength during isokinetic movement. The objectives of this study are to compare the strength of the trunk Xexors between patients who underwent repair

  4. Muscle activation strategies during strength training with heavy loading versus repetitions to failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Christoffer H;

    2012-01-01

    Going to failure - or not, have probably been one of the most debated issues during the history of strength training. However, few studies have directly compared the physiological effect of failure versus non-failure strength training. The purpose of this study was to evaluate muscle activation...

  5. Response of growth and myogenic factors in human skeletal muscle to strength training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Heinichen, M.; Wirth, K.; Schmidtbleicher, D.; Steinacker, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the response to different strength training techniques of growth and myogenic factors in human skeletal muscle, with particular emphasis on satellite cell (SC) activation. Methods: 24 volunteers were divided into two groups and performed a 6-week strength training (group A

  6. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  7. The Isolated Effect of Adductor Canal Block on Quadriceps Femoris Muscle Strength After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Johan Kløvgaard; Jæger, Pia; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using peripheral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), without impeding mobility, is challenging. We hypothesized that the analgesic effect of adductor canal block (ACB) could increase the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle after......, expressed as a percentage of postoperative preblock values. In this manner, the effect of the ACB could be isolated from the detrimental effect on muscle strength caused by the surgery. Secondary end points were differences between groups in mobility and pain scores. We planned a subgroup analysis dividing......: ACB improves quadriceps femoris muscle strength, but whether this translates into enhanced mobility is not clearly supported by this study....

  8. NO DECREASE IN MUSCLE STRENGTH AFTER BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN-A INJECTION IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meta Nyström Eek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Spasticity can be treated with Botulinum Neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A, but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with cerebral palsy. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion.Twenty children with spastic cerebral palsy were included in the study, eight girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years. All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around six weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at six months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis and range of motion.There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain.We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the

  9. No Decrease in Muscle Strength after Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Meta N.; Himmelmann, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Spasticity can be treated with botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with CP. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion. Twenty children with spastic CP were included in the study, 8 girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years). All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around 6 weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at 6 months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis, and range of motion. There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain. We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the muscles with voluntary control. Adequate

  10. No Decrease in Muscle Strength after Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Meta N; Himmelmann, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity and muscle weakness is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Spasticity can be treated with botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), but this drug has also been reported to induce muscle weakness. Our purpose was to describe the effect on muscle strength in the lower extremities after BoNT-A injections in children with CP. A secondary aim was to relate the effect of BoNT-A to gait pattern and range of motion. Twenty children with spastic CP were included in the study, 8 girls and 12 boys (mean age 7.7 years). All were able to walk without support, but with increased muscle tone interfering with motor function and gait pattern. Sixteen children had unilateral spastic CP and four bilateral spastic CP. Twenty-four legs received injections with BoNT-A in the plantar flexor muscles. The children were tested before treatment, around 6 weeks after at the peak effect of BoNT-A, and at 6 months after treatment, with measurement of muscle strength, gait analysis, and range of motion. There were no differences in muscle strength in plantar flexors of treated legs at peak effect compared to baseline. Six months after treatment, there was still no change in untreated plantar flexor muscles, but an increasing trend in plantar flexor strength in legs treated with BoNT-A. Parents reported positive effects in all children, graded as: small in three children, moderate in eight, and large in nine children. The gait analysis showed a small improvement in knee extension at initial contact, and there was a small increase in passive range of motion for ankle dorsiflexion. Two children had a period with transient weakness and pain. We found that voluntary force production in plantar flexor muscles did not decrease after BoNT-A, instead there was a trend to increased muscle strength at follow-up. The increase may be explained as an effect of the blocking of involuntary nerve impulses, leading to an opportunity to using and training the muscles with voluntary control. Adequate

  11. Effects of core instability strength training on trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Lacroix, Andre; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Roettger, Katrin; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Age-related postural misalignment, balance deficits and strength/power losses are associated with impaired functional mobility and an increased risk of falling in seniors. Core instability strength training (CIT) involves exercises that are challenging for both trunk muscles and postural control and may thus have the potential to induce benefits in trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility and balance performance. The objective was to investigate the effects of CIT on measures of trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in seniors. Thirty-two older adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group (INT; n = 16, aged 70.8 ± 4.1 years) that conducted a 9-week progressive CIT or to a control group (n = 16, aged 70.2 ± 4.5 years). Maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors/extensors/lateral flexors (right, left)/rotators (right, left) as well as of spinal mobility in the sagittal and the coronal plane was measured before and after the intervention program. Dynamic balance (i.e. walking 10 m on an optoelectric walkway, the Functional Reach test) and functional mobility (Timed Up and Go test) were additionally tested. Program compliance was excellent with participants of the INT group completing 92% of the training sessions. Significant group × test interactions were found for the maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors (34%, p strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility can be mitigated by CIT. This training regimen could be used as an adjunct or even alternative to traditional balance and/or resistance training. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The influence of training status on the drop in muscle strength after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Moerch, L; Kjaer, M

    2009-01-01

    to running exercise immediately after immobilization, the muscle strength of the triceps-surae muscles dropped even further, but just in the immobilized leg (41%; P muscle endurance when evaluating the effect of immobilization on muscle......Skeletal muscles fatigue after exercise, and reductions in maximal force appear. A difference in training status between the legs was introduced by unilateral immobilization of the calf muscles for 2 weeks in young men, who were randomly assigned to two groups, either a RUN group (n = 8......) that was exposed to prolonged exercise (1-h running: individual pace) or a REST group (n = 12) that did no exercise after immobilization. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the triceps-surae muscles was calculated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the plantar flexors...

  13. Long-term aerobic exercise is associated with greater muscle strength throughout the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Justin D; Macneil, Lauren G; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle strength, muscle mass, and aerobic capacity, which reduces mobility and impairs quality of life in elderly adults. Exercise is commonly employed to improve muscle function in individuals of all ages; however, chronic aerobic exercise is believed to largely impact cardiovascular function and oxidative metabolism, with minimal effects on muscle mass and strength. To study the effects of long-term aerobic exercise on muscle strength, we recruited 74 sedentary (SED) or highly aerobically active (ACT) men and women from within three distinct age groups (young: 20-39 years, middle: 40-64 years, and older: 65-86 years) and tested their aerobic capacity, isometric grip and knee extensor strength, and dynamic 1 repetition maximum knee extension. As expected, ACT subjects had greater maximal oxygen uptake and peak aerobic power output compared with SED subjects (p aerobic exercise appears to attenuate age-related reductions in muscle strength in addition to its cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits.

  14. [Use of pulmonary rehabilitation in the treatment of decreased respiratory muscle strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumannová, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    Decreased respiratory muscle strength could lead to other health problems, which can decrease the quality of life of those patients. Ineffective expectoration and dyspnoea during physical activities and during activity of daily living are the most frequent disorders associated with decreased respiratory muscle strength. Multidisciplinary treatment including pulmonary rehabilitation programme is very important for those patients. Ventilatory muscle training (strength and endurance type of training), airway clearance techniques - active (e.g. autogenic drainage, instrumental techniques) and passive (e.g. manual thoracic compression, mechanical insufflator/exsufflator machine) and exercise training are the most frequent used techniques in these patients. Assessment of all respiratory muscles function - especially their respiratory and postural function - is important at the beginning of rehabilitation treatment.

  15. Muscle strength in youth and cardiovascular risk in young adulthood (the European Youth Heart Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Møller, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether muscle strength in youth is related to cardiovascular risk later in life independent of cardiorespiratory fitness is unclear. METHODS: We examined the independent association of isometric muscle strength in youth with cardiovascular risk factors in young adulthood using data...... and cardiorespiratory fitness was obtained from a maximal cycle ergometer test. Cardiovascular risk factors were obtained in youth and in young adulthood. Associations were examined using multivariable-adjusted regression models including major confounding factors. RESULTS: Each 1 SD difference in isometric muscle...... -1.03 to -0.20) in young adulthood in multivariable-adjusted analyses including fitness. Associations to triglyceride, diastolic BP and the cardiovascular risk factor score remained with additional adjustment for waist circumference or BMI. Each 1 SD difference in isometric muscle strength in youth...

  16. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability.

  17. Tinetti mobility test is related to muscle mass and strength in non-institutionalized elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Francesco; Basile, Claudia; Liguori, Ilaria; Della-Morte, David; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Galizia, Gianluigi; Testa, Gianluca; Langellotto, Assunta; Cacciatore, Francesco; Bonaduce, Domenico; Abete, Pasquale

    2016-12-01

    Elderly people are characterized by a high prevalence of falls and sarcopenia. However, the relationship among Tinetti mobility test (TMT) score, a powerful tool to detect elderly people at risk of falls, and sarcopenia is still not thoroughly investigated. Thus, to determine the relationship between TMT score and muscle mass and strength, 337 elderly participants (mean age 77.1 ± 6.9 years) admitted to comprehensive geriatric assessment were enrolled. TMT score, muscle mass by bioimpedentiometer, and muscle strength by grip strength were evaluated. Muscle mass progressively decreased as TMT score decreased (from 15.3 ± 3.7 to 8.8 ± 1.8 kg/m(2); p for trend Tinetti score decreased (from 34.7 ± 8.0 to 23.7 ± 8.7 kg; p for trend 0.001). Linear regression analysis demonstrated that TMT score is linearly related with muscle mass (y = 4.5x + 0.4, r = 0.61; p score and muscle mass (r = 0.48, p = 0.024) and strength (r = 0.39, p = 0.046). The present study indicates that TMT score is significantly related to muscle mass and strength in non-institutionalized elderly participants. This evidence suggests that TMT score, together with evaluation of muscle mass and strength, may identify sarcopenic elderly participants at high risk of falls.

  18. Muscle strength as a predictor of onset of ADL dependence in people aged 75 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantanen, Taina; Avlund, Kirsten; Suominen, Harri

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study over 5 years was to examine maximal isometric strength of multiple muscle groups as a predictor of losing independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The participants were from the Nordic Research on Aging (NORA75). These analyses are restricted to 567 people....... Of the 227 initially ADL independent men, 21 (9.3%) became dependent in ADL. In women, the figures were 30 (8.8%) of 340. Multiple logistic regression models were used to predict the risk of ADL dependence in groups based on strength tertiles. After confirming that the association of muscle strength...... dependent because of poor muscle strength, and who could reduce their risk by strengthening exercises....

  19. FKBP12 deficiency reduces strength deficits after eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Benjamin T.; Rouviere, Clement; Hamilton, Susan L.; Ingalls, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Strength deficits associated with eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury stem, in part, from excitation-contraction uncoupling. FKBP12 is a 12-kDa binding protein known to bind to the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel [ryanodine receptor (RyR1)] and plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. To assess the effects of FKBP12 deficiency on muscle injury and recovery, we measured anterior crural muscle (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles) strength in skeletal muscle-specific FKBP12-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice before and after a single bout of 150 eccentric contractions, as well as before and after the performance of six injury bouts. Histological damage of the tibialis anterior muscle was assessed after injury. Body weight and peak isometric and eccentric torques were lower in FKBP12-deficient mice compared with WT mice. There were no differences between FKBP12-deficient and WT mice in preinjury peak isometric and eccentric torques when normalized to body weight, and no differences in the relative decreases in eccentric torque with a single or multiple injury bouts. After a single injury bout, FKBP12-deficient mice had less initial strength deficits and recovered faster (especially females) than WT mice, despite no differences in the degree of histological damage. After multiple injury bouts, FKBP12-deficient mice recovered muscle strength faster than WT mice and exhibited significantly less histological muscle damage than WT mice. In summary, FKBP12 deficiency results in less initial strength deficits and enhanced recovery from single (especially females) and repeated bouts of injury than WT mice. PMID:18511525

  20. Intrarater reliability of assessing strength of the shoulder and scapular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Derya; Dirican, Ahmet; Baltaci, Gul

    2012-02-29

    Handheld dynamometry (HHD) is considered an objective method of measuring strength, but the reliability of the procedure can be compromised by inadequate tester strength and insufficient stabilization of the dynamometer especially, for the scapular muscles. Primarily, to determine the intrarater reliability of HHD when testing shoulder and scapular muscle strength, and secondarily, to report reliability when corrected for body-mass index (BMI). Technical report. University physiotherapy department. 57 adults (17 men, 40 women; mean age = 35.05 ± 13.5 y), both healthy individuals and patients with shoulder impingement. HHD. Muscle strength of the upper, middle, and lower trapezius; anterior deltoid; serratus anterior; supraspinatus; and latissimus dorsi determined by HHD. Each muscle was assessed 3 times, and the mean value was calculated. The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to BMI. Group 1: BMI ≤ 20 kg/m(2) (n = 22); Group 2: BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m(2) (n = 54); and Group 3: BMI ≤ 29.9 kg/m(2) (n = 38). Correlations were calculated for each pair of strength scores. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) ranged from .77 to .99 in healthy subjects and from .75 to .99 in patients, for all muscle groups except the upper trapezius (P muscle strength illustrates that as BMI increases, there is a decrease in reliability values of the lower trapezius (ICC = .35-.65). The study demonstrates that evaluating the strength of scapular and shoulder muscles using HHD presents reliable results for both patients with impingement syndrome and healthy subjects. Reliability values were compressed when testing the trapezius in subjects with higher BMI. This is likely a result of the examiner's difficulty in overcoming the patients with this maneuver.

  1. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J P F; van Royen, Barend J; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

     Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture.  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I-III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function.  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r = 0.600, p = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation (p > 0.200). Internal rotation strength (r =  - 0.425, p muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL.

  2. Changes in maximum muscle strength and rapid muscle force characteristics after long-term special support and reconnaissance missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Astrup; Jacobsen, Jacob Ole; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2008-01-01

    of force development, and maximal jump height were tested to assess muscle strength/power along with whole-body impedance analysis before and after SSR. RESULTS: Body weight, fat-free mass, and total body water decreased (4-5%) after SSR, along with impairments in maximal jump height (-8%) and knee...

  3. Evaluation of sedentary women’s ambulatory blood pressure and its relation to muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramires Alsamir Tibana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the ambulatory blood pressure in women with different values of relative muscle strength. Methods: Data from 21 (aged 33.8±8.0 years sedentary women from Vila Telebrasília was collected during the period of November 2010 to July 2011. The volunteers were submitted to the evaluation of the handgrip strength and ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (AMBP for a 72-hour period. Following the evaluation of handgrip strength to determine the absolute muscle strength, an adjustment in the body mass was made, in order to determine the relative muscle strength. Based on the relative value of muscular strength, the sample was divided into tertiles to compare systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure during the periods of 24 hours, daytime and night-time, by using an one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test when appropriate, with a significance level of p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were found for systolic blood pressure between tertile 1 (99.3±12.2 and tertile 3 (106.8±11.1 in the night-time (P<0.05. Values of mean blood pressure were also significantly different between tertile 1 (70.2±6.3 and tertile 3 (80.3 ± 8.8 in the night-time (p<0,05. Conclusion: Women with higher relative muscle strength present lower values of blood pressure during night-time

  4. Determinants of inspiratory muscle strength in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter I; Johnson, Michael A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2014-06-01

    We investigated (1) the relationship between the baseline and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) induced increase in maximal inspiratory pressure (P(I,max)) and (2) the relative contributions of the inspiratory chest wall muscles and the diaphragm (P(oes)/P(di)) to P(I,max) prior to and following-IMT. Experiment 1: P(I,max) was assessed during a Müeller manoeuvre before and after 4-wk IMT (n=30). Experiment 2: P(I,max) and the relative contribution of the inspiratory chest wall muscles to the diaphragm (P(oes)/P(di)) were assessed during a Müeller manoeuvre before and after 4-wk IMT (n=20). Experiment 1: P(I,max) increased 19% (Pinspiratory muscles relative to the diaphragm affect, in part, baseline and IMT-induced P(I,max). Great care should be taken when designing future IMT studies to ensure parity in the between-subject baseline P(I,max).

  5. Early changes in muscle strength after total knee arthroplasty. A 6-month follow-up of 30 knees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, J S; Petersen, M M; Brot, C

    1999-01-01

    to surgery, and after 3 and 6 months, isokinetic and isometric muscle strength in both legs were measured, using a Cybex 6000 dynamometer. Isokinetic tests showed a bilateral, significant, and progressive increase (30-53%) in flexor muscle strength most pronounced in the operated legs. Isokinetic extensor...... to the preoperative level. No significant change in isometric strength was observed in the contralateral legs. The knee pain during the muscle strength measurements decreased significantly from the preoperative level, which may indicate that the substantial pain relief within 3 months after a TKA is an important...... factor for evaluation of muscle strength....

  6. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  7. Relation between systemic inflammatory markers, peripheral muscle mass, and strength in limb muscles in stable COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Renata Ferrari,1 Laura MO Caram,1 Marcia M Faganello,2 Fernanda F Sanchez,3 Suzana E Tanni,1 Irma Godoy1 1Botucatu Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Pneumology Area, Botucatu, São Paulo, 2Paulista State University, Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Marilia, São Paulo, 3Federal University of Amazonas, Department of Physiotherapy, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between systemic inflammatory mediators and peripheral muscle mass and strength in COPD patients. Fifty-five patients (69% male; age: 64±9 years with mild/very severe COPD (defined as forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] =54%±23% were evaluated. We evaluated serum concentrations of IL-8, CRP, and TNF-α. Peripheral muscle mass was evaluated by computerized tomography (CT; midthigh cross-sectional muscle area (MTCSA and midarm cross-sectional muscle area (MACSA were obtained. Quadriceps, triceps, and biceps strength were assessed through the determination of the one-repetition maximum. The multiple regression results, adjusted for age, sex, and FEV1%, showed positive significant association between MTCSA and leg extension (0.35 [0.16, 0.55]; P=0.001, between MACSA and triceps pulley (0.45 [0.31, 0.58]; P=0.001, and between MACSA and biceps curl (0.34 [0.22, 0.47]; P=0.001. Plasma TNF-α was negatively associated with leg extension (-3.09 [-5.99, -0.18]; P=0.04 and triceps pulley (-1.31 [-2.35, -0.28]; P=0.01, while plasma CRP presented negative association with biceps curl (-0.06 [-0.11, -0.01]; P=0.02. Our results showed negative association between peripheral muscle mass (evaluated by CT and muscle strength and that systemic inflammation has a negative influence in the strength of specific groups of muscles in individuals with stable COPD. This is the first study showing association between systemic inflammatory markers and strength in upper limb muscles. Keywords

  8. Effect of strength training with blood flow restriction on muscle power and submaximal strength in eumenorrheic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana L S; Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Dias, Ingrid; Vianna, Jeferson; Nunes, Rodolfo A M; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2017-03-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training stimulates muscle size and strength by increasing muscle activation, accumulation of metabolites and muscle swelling. This method has been used in different populations, but no studies have evaluated the effects of training on muscle power and submaximal strength (SS) in accounted for the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of strength training (ST) with BFR on the muscle power and SS of upper and lower limbs in eumenorrheic women. Forty untrained women (18-40 years) were divided randomly and proportionally into four groups: (i) high-intensity ST at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI + BFR), (iii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM (LI) and d) control group (CG). Each training group performed eight training sessions. Tests with a medicine ball (MB), horizontal jump (HJ), vertical jump (VJ), biceps curls (BC) and knee extension (KE) were performed during the 1st day follicular phase (FP), 14th day (ovulatory phase) and 26-28th days (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference among groups in terms of the MB, HJ, VJ or BC results at any time point (P>0·05). SS in the KE exercise was significantly greater in the LI + BFR group compared to the CG group (P = 0·014) during the LP. Therefore, ST with BFR does not appear to improve the power of upper and lower limbs and may be an alternative to improve the SS of lower limbs of eumenorrheic women.

  9. Isokinetic Evaluation of Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscle Strength in Behcet’s Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Durmus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behçet’s disease (BD is an idiopathic, multisystemic, progressive disease. The purpose of this study is to compare the knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths of Behcet’s patients with that of healthy subjects. Methods: Twenty-five (13 male and 12 female patients with BD and 25 (15 male and 10 female healthy individuals were included in the study. Velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec, and 150°/sec were used for the isokinetic muscle strength testing. Patients with active inflammatory knee arthritis were excluded. Peak torque (Nm and peak torque adjusted to body weight (% were taken into consideration for comparison between study groups. Results: Compared to healthy controls, there was a statistically significant decrease in both the bilateral knee extensor and flexor muscle isokinetic peak torques(Nm as well as the peak torques adjusted to body weight (% at velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec and 150°/sec in patients with BD (p < 0.05. However, there was no significant difference in the agonist-antagonist ratio of the isokinetic peak torques of knee muscles between the two groups. Conclusion: In light of these findings, we have concluded that both knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths are lower in BD. We therefore recommend careful monitoring of patients with BD in terms of muscle strength.

  10. Adductor pollicis muscle and hand grip strength: potential methods of nutritional assessment in outpatients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Rocha Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of different methods used for nutritional assessment of outpatients who had hemiplegic stroke. Methods: A cross-section study with adult and elderly patients of both genders enrolled in a rehabilitation center. The analyzed variables were anthropometric measurements, bioelectrical impedance, hand grip strength and thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle. The Pearson χ2 test was used to check the association between variables with a significance level of α = 5%. Results: When evaluating the association between indicators of muscle mass, it was observed that the hand grip strength in both genders was positively correlated with arm muscle circumference (p = 0.0196 and lean mass (p = 0.0002. Fat mass measured by the bioelectrical impedance method already showed a significant inverse relationship with the grip (r = -0.3879. The thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle showed significant association with lean mass (p = 0.0052 and hand grip (p = 0.0024. Conclusion: In this study, the hand grip strength and thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle were well correlated with measurements determined by anthropometry and bioimpedance. The results show the applicability of grip strength and thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle in clinical practice as nutritional assessment methods for this population, especially elderly patients, since they detect functional changes not captured by other parameters in the short term and are important for early identification of risk nutrition.

  11. Strength improvement of knee extensor muscles in patients with chronic heart failure by neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittan, M; Sochor, A; Wiesinger, G F; Kollmitzer, J; Sturm, B; Pacher, R; Mayr, W

    1999-05-01

    Patients with severe chronic heart failure (CHF) suffer from marked weakness of skeletal muscles. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) proved to be an alternative to active strength training. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of NMES in patients with chronic heart failure. Seven patients (56.0 +/- 5.0 years, CHF for 20 +/- 4 months, left ventricular ejection fraction 20.1 +/- 10.0%) finished an 8 week course of NMES of the knee extensor muscles. The stimulator delivered biphasic, symmetric, constant voltage impulses of 0.7 ms pulse width with a frequency of 50 Hz, 2 s on and 6 s off. No adverse effects occurred. After the stimulation period, the isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensor muscles increased by 13% from 101.0 +/- 8.7 Nm to 113.5 +/- 7.2 Nm (p = 0.004). The maximal isometric strength increased by 20% from 294.3 +/- 19.6 N to 354.14 +/- 15.7 N (p = 0.04). This increased muscle strength could be maintained in a 20 min fatigue test indicating decreased muscle fatigue. These results demonstrate that NMES of skeletal muscles in patients with severe chronic heart failure is a promising method for strength training in this group of patients.

  12. Longer Interset Rest Periods Enhance Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Pope, Zachary K; Benik, Franklin M; Hester, Garrett M; Sellers, John; Nooner, Josh L; Schnaiter, Jessica A; Bond-Williams, Katherine E; Carter, Adrian S; Ross, Corbin L; Just, Brandon L; Henselmans, Menno; Krieger, James W

    2016-07-01

    Schoenfeld, BJ, Pope, ZK, Benik, FM, Hester, GM, Sellers, J, Nooner, JL, Schnaiter, JA, Bond-Williams, KE, Carter, AS, Ross, CL, Just, BL, Henselmans, M, and Krieger, JW. Longer interset rest periods enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy in resistance-trained men. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1805-1812, 2016-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short rest intervals normally associated with hypertrophy-type training versus long rest intervals traditionally used in strength-type training on muscular adaptations in a cohort of young, experienced lifters. Twenty-one young resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a group that performed a resistance training (RT) program with 1-minute rest intervals (SHORT) or a group that employed 3-minute rest intervals (LONG). All other RT variables were held constant. The study period lasted 8 weeks with subjects performing 3 total body workouts a week comprised 3 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM) of 7 different exercises per session. Testing was performed prestudy and poststudy for muscle strength (1RM bench press and back squat), muscle endurance (50% 1RM bench press to failure), and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, triceps brachii, and quadriceps femoris by ultrasound imaging. Maximal strength was significantly greater for both 1RM squat and bench press for LONG compared to SHORT. Muscle thickness was significantly greater for LONG compared to SHORT in the anterior thigh, and a trend for greater increases was noted in the triceps brachii (p = 0.06) as well. Both groups saw significant increases in local upper body muscle endurance with no significant differences noted between groups. This study provides evidence that longer rest periods promote greater increases in muscle strength and hypertrophy in young resistance-trained men.

  13. Impact of backpack type on respiratory muscle strength and lung function in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana Christina; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We examine the influence of backpack type on lung function and respiratory muscle strength in children. Thirty-seven children were assessed for lung function and inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength under four randomly determined conditions: unloaded erect standing and three conditions carrying 15% of the child's body weight. In these three conditions, children carried the weight on a backpack with bilateral shoulder straps carried over both shoulders, on a backpack with bilateral shoulder straps carried over one shoulder and on a backpack with a mono shoulder strap. Significantly lower forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second and maximal expiratory pressure were observed when children carried a backpack with a mono shoulder strap compared to the unloaded standing position. In conclusion, the restrictive effect and the decrease in expiratory muscle strength were more pronounced for the backpack with a mono shoulder strap, suggesting that a double strap backpack is preferable to a mono shoulder strap backpack. Practitioner summary: There is little known about the effect of schoolbags on respiratory muscle function. We investigated the influence of backpack type on lung function and respiratory muscle strength. A backpack with a mono shoulder strap created a restrictive effect and a decrease in strength, suggesting that a double strap backpack is preferable to a mono shoulder strap backpack.

  14. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  15. Core muscle strength and endurance measures in ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis: validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Donna K; Huang, Min; Rodda, Becky J

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the test-retest reliability and validity of three core muscle strength tests in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Twenty-one ambulatory individuals with MS completed the curl-up, flexor endurance, and pelvic tilt stabilization tests of core muscle strength. They were retested 1-2 weeks after the first test. The sit-to-stand (STS) test was also conducted on the first test. Descriptive statistics, intraclass correlation coefficients, SEM, and minimal detectable change (MDC) were calculated for each test. Pearson's correlations were calculated between all variables for the first test date. The curl-up test demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.995), requiring 3.4 additional repetitions in 60 s to demonstrate a detectable change. The curl-up test was moderately correlated with the STS. The flexor endurance and pelvic tilt stabilization tests demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability, with relatively large SEMs and MDCs and only a low correlation with the STS. The curl-up test is recommended as a valid and reliable test of core muscle strength in individuals with MS. The flexor endurance test and the pelvic tilt stabilization test of core muscle strength are not recommended due to large SEM and MDC scores. Further study of core muscle strength and endurance measures is indicated to seek additional tests that are valid and reliable in the MS population.

  16. Skeletal muscle strength in older adults. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE genotype affects: an UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA PEREIRA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement : Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE with variability inthe skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations.Approach: The purpose of this study was to review the most important studies that have been exanimate thepossible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and femaleathletes involved in elderly populations. This research is needed because the possibility that the DD genotypemay be associated with a greater proportion of fast twitch fibers could explain the influence of the ACE D alleleupon strength/ power, particularly at high velocities, but this evidence remains equivocal in older people becausemore studies are necessary.Results: Thus, according to scientific evidence, changes in muscle strength with exercise training in olderindividuals may be dependent on ACE I/D genotype. Of note, the results provide a novel insight that thesegenetic variations may interact to determine muscle mass in older women specially. The determination of thispredisposition in this population, highlighting the interest of study, for the prophylactic attitude on the factorsand causes of aging (sarcopenia, osteoporosis, risk of falls, reduction of functional physical go through thisanalysis.Conclusions/Recommendations: In this work, the state of the art related to the influence of the ACE genotypeon skeletal muscle strength was presented and some important relations were reported

  17. Self directed home based electrical muscle stimulation training improves exercise tolerance and strength in healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Brian; Prendergast, Ann; Rainsford, Gary; Minogue, Conor

    2013-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with a gradual decline in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and subsequent capacity for activities of daily living. It is important that we develop effective strategies to halt this process of gradual decline in order to enhance functional ability and capacity for independent living. To achieve this, we must overcome the challenge of sustaining ongoing engagement in physical exercise programmes in the sedentary elderly population, particularly those who experience barriers to exercise participation. Recent developments in electrical muscle stimulation technology could provide a potential solution. In this pilot case-control study we investigated the effects of a self-directed home based programme of electrical muscle stimulation training on muscle strength and exercise tolerance in a group of 16 healthy elderly volunteers (10f, 6m). Study participants completed 30 separate 1-hour electrical muscle stimulation sessions at home over a 6-week period. We observed significant improvements in quadriceps muscle strength and 6-minute walk distance, suggesting that this form of electrical muscle stimulation training has promise as an exercise modality in the elderly population.

  18. Isometric hip muscle strength in posttraumatic below-knee amputees

    OpenAIRE

    Jandrić Slavica

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Traumas and war injuries, next to chronic occlusive artery disease and diabetes mellitus-derived complications, are the most frequent cause of the lower limbs amputation. They affect mostly younger population that need a higher level of activities as compared with the elderly. Medical rehabilitation is very significant for the muscle performance improvement in this population providing their social reintegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of below-kne...

  19. Cognitive status, muscle strength, and subsequent disability in older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Mukaila A; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Snih, Soham Al; Markides, Kyriakos S; Peek, M Kristen; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2005-09-01

    To examine the association between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score and subsequent muscle strength (measured using handgrip strength) and to test the hypothesis that muscle strength will mediate any association between impaired cognition and incident activity of daily living (ADL) disability over a 7-year period in elderly Mexican Americans who were initially not disabled. A 7-year prospective cohort study (1993-2001). Five southwestern states (Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California). Two thousand three hundred eighty-one noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 and older with no ADL disability at baseline. In-home interviews in 1993/1994, 1995/1996, 1998/1999, and 2000/2001 assessed social and demographic factors, medical conditions (diabetes mellitus, stroke, heart attack, and arthritis), body mass index (BMI), depressive symptomatology, handgrip muscle strength, and ADLs. MMSE score was dichotomized as less than 21 for poor cognition and 21 or greater for good cognition. Main outcomes measures were mean and slope of handgrip muscle strength over the 7-year period and incident disability, defined as new onset of any ADL limitation at the 2-, 5-, or 7-year follow-up interview periods. In mixed model analyses, there was a significant cross-sectional association between having poor cognition (MMSEMexican Americans with poor cognition had steeper decline in handgrip muscle strength over 7 years than those with good cognition, independent of other demographic and health factors. A possible mediating effect of muscle strength on the association between poor cognition and subsequent ADL disability was also indicated.

  20. Decreased neck muscle strength in patients with the loss of cervical lordosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpayci, Mahmut; Şenköy, Emre; Delen, Veysel; Şah, Volkan; Yazmalar, Levent; Erden, Metin; Toprak, Murat; Kaplan, Şeyhmus

    2016-03-01

    The loss of cervical lordosis is associated with some negative clinical outcomes. No previous study has examined cervical muscle strength, specifically in patients with the loss of cervical lordosis. This study aims to investigate whether there is weakness of the cervical muscles or an imbalance between cervical flexor and extensor muscle strength in patients with the loss of cervical lordosis compared with healthy controls matched by age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and employment status. Thirty-two patients with the loss of cervical lordosis (23 F, 9 M) and 31 healthy volunteers (23 F, 8 M) were included in the study. Maximal isometric neck extension and flexion strength, and the strength ratio between extension and flexion were used as evaluation parameters. All measurements were conducted by a blinded assessor using a digital force gauge. The participants were positioned on a chair in a neutral cervical position and without the trunk inclined during measurements. Maximal isometric neck extension and flexion strength values were significantly lower in the patients versus healthy controls (Plordosis have reduced neck muscle strength, especially in the extensors. These findings may be beneficial for optimizing cervical exercise prescriptions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationships between muscle power output using the stretch-shortening cycle and eccentric maximum strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Demura, Shinichi

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationships between muscle power output using the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) and eccentric maximum strength under elbow flexion. Eighteen young adult males pulled up a constant light load (2 kg) by ballistic elbow flexion under the following two preliminary conditions: 1) the static relaxed muscle state (SR condition), and 2) using the SSC with countermovement (SSC condition).Muscle power was determined from the product of the pulling velocity and the load mass by a power measurement instrument that adopted the weight-loading method. We assumed the pulling velocity to be the subject's muscle power parameters as a matter of convenience, because we used a constant load. The following two parameters were selected in reference to a previous study: 1) peak velocity (m x s(-1)) (peak power) and 2) 0.1-second velocity during concentric contraction (m x s(-1)) (initial power). Eccentric maximum strength by elbow flexion was measured by a handheld dynamometer.Initial power produced in the SSC condition was significantly larger than that in the SR condition. Eccentric maximum strength showed a significant and high correlation (r = 0.70) with peak power in the SSC condition but not in the SR condition. Eccentric maximum strength showed insignificant correlations with initial power in both conditions. In conclusion, it was suggested that eccentric maximum strength is associated with peak power in the SSC condition, but the contribution of the eccentric maximum strength to the SSC potentiation (initial power) may be low.

  2. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius.

  3. Effects of functional exercise training on performance and muscle strength after meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ericsson, Y B; Dahlberg, L E; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    Muscular deficits and functional limitations have been found years after meniscectomy of the knee. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the effect of functional exercise training on functional performance and isokinetic thigh muscle strength in middle-aged patients...... subsequent to meniscectomy for a degenerative tear. Four years after meniscectomy, 45 patients (29 men, 16 women) were randomized to functional exercise training, supervised by a physical therapist, three times weekly for 4 months or to no intervention. The exercise program comprised of postural stability...... training and functional strength and endurance exercises for leg and trunk muscles. Outcomes were three functional performance tests and isokinetic muscle strength. Thirty patients (16 exercisers/14 controls) completed the study. Compared with control patients, the exercise group showed significant...

  4. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, P; Knudsen, H K; Juul-Kristensen, B

    2015-01-01

    for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study were firstly to determine the association between muscle strength and power, aerobic capacity and 100 m freestyle time (FT) in young, competitive......Swim time performance is affected by physiological factors such as muscle strength and power of the upper and lower extremities as well as aerobic capacity (Smith et al., 2002). The association between these factors and swim time performance may plausibly identify some of the determinants....... Conclusion Muscle strength and power tests for upper and lower extremities, expressed as GS and VJ, were found to be significantly and negatively associated with 100 m FT in the current study. Also, increasing aerobic capacity was found to improve swim time performance. These simple and low-cost tests...

  5. Relationships between the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, tender point count, and muscle strength in female patients with fibromyalgia: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Lund, Hans; Christensen, Robin;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia (FM) patients with reduced lower extremity strength are more symptomatic and tender than FM patients with normal muscle strength. METHODS: A total of 840 FM patients and 122 healthy subjects were evaluated between 1998 and 2005. All of the patie......OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that fibromyalgia (FM) patients with reduced lower extremity strength are more symptomatic and tender than FM patients with normal muscle strength. METHODS: A total of 840 FM patients and 122 healthy subjects were evaluated between 1998 and 2005. All...... of the patients completed version 1 of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and were assessed for tender points and knee muscle strength. All subjects underwent bilateral isokinetic knee muscle strength testing in flexion and extension. Normative knee muscle strength values were calculated from the healthy...

  6. Relationships between core strength, hip external rotator muscle strength, and star excursion balance test performance in female lacrosse players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Angela T; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Shane V

    2013-04-01

    PURPOSEBACKGROUND: Female athletes have high rates of lower extremity (LE) injuries. Core strength (CS) and hip external rotator (HER) strength have been suggested to be factors that influence LE injury risk. Better balance has also been shown to decrease LE injury risk. Still, little research has examined whether core strength and hip muscle strength can influence LE balance. Therefore the purpose of the current study was to examine the relationships between core strength, hip ER strength and lower extremity balance as measured by the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). CS was examined via the bent knee lowering test (BKLT) (grades 1-5). Hip external rotator (HER) strength was measured singularly (HERL and HERR and combined (HERCOM) assessed via hand held dynamometry (reported in Newtons), and balance assessed via the SEBT expressed as % leg length, bilaterally in the postero-medial, postero-lateral, anterior directions and as a combined score (SEBTCOM). All outcomes were assessed in 45 female lacrosse players (16.0 ± 5.9 yrs, 65.1 ± 2.4 cm, 57.3 ± 7.4 kgs, experience=5.9 ± 2.9 yrs). Pearson product-moment correlations examined relationships between the BKLT, HER and SEBT. Linear regression analyses examined possible influences of CS and HER on balance (p ≤ .05). SEBTCOM was not correlated with BKLT [r(45)=-.20, p=.18] or HERCOM [r(45)=.20, p=.18]. There was no correlation between HER strength and CS (BKLT) [r(45)=.20, p=.20]. Overall scores on the BKLT were not correlated with any of the three balance SEBT scores. HERL [r(45)=.36, p=.02] and HERR [r(45)=.30, p=.05] were moderately positively correlated with left posteromedial SEBT direction. HERCOM and BKLT did not predict overall SEBTCOM balance scores (r(2)=.068, p=.23). BKLT scores and combined HER strength did not correlate with LE balance, as measured by the SEBT, in female lacrosse players. However, HER strength of both the left and right LE's (singularly) was moderately correlated with scores on one

  7. Effect of abdominal bracing training on strength and power of trunk and lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayashiki, Kota; Maeo, Sumiaki; Usui, Seiji; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    It is unknown whether maximal voluntary co-contraction of abdominal muscles, called abdominal bracing, can be a training maneuver for improving strength and power of trunk and lower limb muscles. The present study aimed to elucidate this. Twenty young adult men (23.3 ± 1.8 years) were allocated to training (TG, n = 11) or control (CG, n = 9) group. TG conducted an 8-week training program (3 days/week) consisting of 2-s maximal abdominal bracing followed by 2-s muscle relaxation (5 × 10 repetitions/day). Maximal voluntary isometric strength during trunk flexion and extension, hip extension, and knee extension, maximal lifting power from sitting position, and the thicknesses of abdominal muscles were measured before and after the intervention. In addition, surface electromyograms from trunk and lower limb muscles and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during the maximal abdominal bracing and maximal lifting tasks were also determined. After the intervention, TG showed significant increases in isometric trunk extension (+14.4 %) and hip extension (+34.7 %) strength and maximal lifting power (+15.6 %), while CG did not show any changes in strength and power variables. Furthermore, TG had significant gains in the muscle thickness of the oblique internal (+22.4 %), maximal IAP during abdominal bracing (+36.8 %), and the rate of IAP rise during lifting task (+58.8 %), without corresponding changes in CG. The current study indicates that a training style with maximal voluntary co-contraction of abdominal muscles can be an effective maneuver for increasing strength and power during movements involving trunk and hip extensions, without using external load.

  8. An investigation of the association between grip strength and hip and knee joint moments in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Dinesh; Rowe, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Grip strength is a predictor of health outcomes but with differing rates of age-related decline in muscle strength, it is unclear whether handgrip is a reliable indicator of lower limb moments. This study investigated the relationship between grip strength and lower extremity moments in community-dwelling older adults. Eighty-two healthy volunteers aged 60-82 years (mean age 73.2 years) performed maximal voluntary contractions of knee and hip extensors and flexors at three positions and at neutral position for hip abductors and adductors using a custom-built dynamometer. Grip strength was measured using an electronic Jamar dynamometer. The relative reduction in muscle strength of 80s age category compared to 60-year-olds ranged from 14% for grip strength to 27% for hip abductors. Peak torque of flexors and extensors of the knee and hip joints were significantly correlated with grip strength and Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.56 to 0.78 with the highest correlations observed between knee moments and grip strength. "Good" correlation was found but only 31-60% of the variation in grip strength could be related to changes in joint torques. Hence the assumption that grip strength is an indicator of strength in the lower limb would seem unjustified in the healthy older adult.

  9. EMG and strength in trunk and hip muscles : particular the iliopsoas

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Eva A.

    1997-01-01

    EMG AND STRENGTH IN TRUNK AND HIP MUSCLES - PARTICULARLY THE ILIOPSOAS Eva A. Andersson Dissertation from the Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, and the Department of Human Biology, University College of Physical Education and Sports, Box 5626, S-l 14 86, Stockholm, Sweden. . The overall aim of this thesis was to study the myoelectric activity of all major muscles involved in the movements and stabilization of the trunk, pelvis and hips ...

  10. Isokinetic and Isometric Muscle Strength in a Healthy Population – with Special Reference to Age and Gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Bartels, E M; Bülow, P M

    2009-01-01

    was subgrouped according to age and gender. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strength was measured in each subject across the main joints in the body. A statistical model was developed that encompassed the three main muscle groups: upper limbs, trunk and lower limbs. Results: Muscle strength in healthy men...... decreases in a linear fashion from the age of 25 years down to between 54% and 89% at the age of 75 years, and seems not highly dependent on any other parameter than age. For women, the muscle strength is dependent on weight and is only related to age from around 40 years of age. The decrease in muscle...

  11. Respiratory Muscle Strength as a Predictive Biomarker for Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkey, Michael I; Lyall, Rebecca A; Yang, Ke; Johnson, Erin; Leigh, P Nigel; Moxham, John

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers for survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) would facilitate the development of novel drugs. Although respiratory muscle weakness is a known predictor of poor prognosis, a comprehensive comparison of different tests is lacking. To compare the predictive power of invasive and noninvasive respiratory muscle strength assessments for survival or ventilator-free survival, up to 3 years. From a previously published report respiratory muscle strength measurements were available for 78 patients with ALS. Time to death and/or ventilation were ascertained. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the cutoff point of each parameter. Each respiratory muscle strength assessment individually achieved statistical significance for prediction of survival or ventilator-free survival. In multivariate analysis sniff trans-diaphragmatic and esophageal pressure, twitch trans-diaphragmatic pressure (Tw Pdi), age, and maximal static expiratory mouth pressure were significant predictors of ventilation-free survival and Tw Pdi and maximal static expiratory mouth pressure for absolute survival. Although all measures had good specificity, there were differing sensitivities. All cutoff points for the VC were greater than 80% of normal, except for prediction of 3-month outcomes. Sequential data showed a linear decline for direct measures of respiratory muscle strength, whereas VC showed little to no decline until 12 months before death/ventilation. The most powerful biomarker for mortality stratification was Tw Pdi, but the predictive power of sniff nasal inspiratory pressure was also excellent. A VC within normal range suggested a good prognosis at 3 months but was of little other value.

  12. Decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity correlates with strength loss after an endurance run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Tarperi, Cantor; Rosso, Valeria; Festa, Luca; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring surface electromyographic (EMG) signals can provide useful insights for characterizing muscle fatigue, which is defined as an exercise-induced strength loss. This experiment investigated the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) changes induced by an endurance run. The day before and immediately after a half-marathon run (21.097 km) 11 amateur runners performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of knee extensor muscles. During the MVC, multichannel EMG was recorded from the vastus lateralis and EMG amplitude and CV were calculated. After the run, knee extensors showed a decreased strength (-13  ±  9%, p  =  0.001) together with a reduction in EMG amplitude (-13  ±  10%, p  =  0.003) and in CV (-6  ±  8%, p  =  0.032). Knee extensor strength loss positively correlated with vastus lateralis CV differences (r  =  0.76, p  =  0.006). Thus, the exercises-induced muscle fatigue was associated not only with a decrease in EMG amplitude, but also with a reduction in CV. This finding suggests that muscle fibers with higher CV (i.e. those with greater fiber size) were the most impaired during strength production after an endurance run.

  13. The associations between pain sensitivity and knee muscle strength in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1...... as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r > 0.72) and with cuff PPT (r > 0.4). Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r > 0.......39) and with all PPTs (r...

  14. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients...... groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, with a progressively increasing intensity. The WBV groups performed unloaded static WBV exercise. The following were measured: knee muscle strength (extension/flexion) and proprioception (threshold for detection of passive movement (TDPM)). Self-reported disease...

  15. Shoulder muscle strength in paraplegics before and after kayak ergometer training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Jansson, Anna; Thorstensson, Alf

    2006-07-01

    The purpose was to investigate if shoulder muscle strength in post-rehabilitated persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) was affected by kayak ergometer training and to compare shoulder strength in persons with SCI and able-bodied persons. Ten persons with SCI (7 males and 3 females, injury levels T3-T12) performed 60 min kayak ergometer training three times a week for 10 weeks with progressively increased intensity. Maximal voluntary concentric contractions were performed during six shoulder movements: flexion and extension (range of motion 65 degrees ), abduction and adduction (65 degrees ), and external and internal rotation (60 degrees ), with an angular velocity of 30 degrees s(-1). Position specific strength was assessed at three shoulder angles (at the beginning, middle and end of the range of motion) in the respective movements. Test-retests were performed for all measurements before the training and the mean intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.941 (95% CI 0.928-0.954). There was a main effect of kayak ergometer training with increased shoulder muscle strength after training in persons with SCI. The improvements were independent of shoulder movement, and occurred in the beginning and middle positions. A tendency towards lower shoulder muscle strength was observed in the SCI group compared to a matched reference group of able-bodied persons. Thus, it appears that post-rehabilitated persons with SCI have not managed to fully regain/maintain their shoulder muscle strength on a similar level as that of able-bodied persons, and are able to improve their shoulder muscle strength after a period of kayak ergometer training.

  16. [Association of muscle strength with early markers of cardiovascular risk in sedentary adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana-Reina, Héctor Reynaldo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2013-10-01

    To assess the association between muscle strength and early cardiovascular risk (CVR) markers in sedentary adults. A total of 176 sedentary subjects aged 18-30 years were enrolled. Body mass index and fat percentage were calculated, and waist circumference, grip strength by dynamometry, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake by VO2max were measured as CVR markers. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations between muscle strength and CVR markers. Inverse correlations were found between muscle strength and adiposity (r=-.317; P=.001), waist circumference (r=-.309; P=.001), systolic blood pressure (r=-.401; P=.001), and mean arterial pressure (r=-.256; P=.001). Subjects with lower levels of muscle strength had a 5.79-fold (95% CI 1.57 to 9.34; P=.008) risk of having higher adiposity levels (≥25%) and a 9.67-fold (95% CI=3.86 to 19.22; Pcardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Respiratory muscle strength in healthy infants and those with surgically correctable anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Zainab; Moxham, John; Davenport, Mark; Nicolaides, Kypros; Greenough, Anne; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of respiratory muscle strength provides important diagnostic and prognostic information. Normative data in healthy, term infants is, however, limited. Surgically correctable birth defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and abdominal wall defects (AWD), commonly have impaired diaphragm function. The study aims were to obtain normative data for respiratory muscle strength in healthy, term born infants at birth and at 6 weeks postnatal age (PNA) and to investigate the influence of growth and maturation on inspiratory muscle strength in CDH/AWD infants. Maximal inspiratory (cPimax) and expiratory (cPemax) pressures during crying were measured at birth in 67 healthy, term born infants (mean (SD) gestational age (GA) 39.4 (1.7) weeks) and reassessed in 27 at 6 weeks PNA. cPimax and functional residual capacity (FRC) (22.3 (4.2) ml/kg) were also measured in 23 infants with AWD/CDH (mean (SD) GA 36.9 (2.1) weeks) and reassessed in 16 at median (range) 6.5 (1.5-15) months PNA. In healthy infants, mean (SD) cPimax was 88.8 (19.33) cmH2 O and cPemax 61.8 (13.5) cmH2 O at birth, increasing significantly at followup to 100.9 (15.2) cmH2 O (P muscle strength compared to healthy term born infants but strength increases markedly in early life.

  18. Improved skeletal muscle mass and strength after heavy strength training in very old individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus Leidesdorff; Malmgaard-Clausen, Nikolaj Mølkjær; Gliese, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass and function represents personal and socioeconomic challenges. The purpose of this study was to determine the adaptation of skeletal musculature in very old individuals (83 + years) performing 12 weeks of heavy resistance training (3 ×/week) (HRT) compared to a non...

  19. Handgrip strength does not represent an appropriate measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength during an exercise intervention program in frail elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieland, C.A.B.; Verdijk, L.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Although handgrip strength is considered a strong predictor of negative health outcomes, it is unclear whether handgrip strength represents a useful measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength following resistance-type exercise training in elderly people. We assessed whether measuring handgrip st

  20. Handgrip strength does not represent an appropriate measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength during an exercise intervention program in frail elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieland, C.A.B.; Verdijk, L.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Although handgrip strength is considered a strong predictor of negative health outcomes, it is unclear whether handgrip strength represents a useful measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength following resistance-type exercise training in elderly people. We assessed whether measuring handgrip

  1. Effects of whole body vibration training on body composition, skeletal muscle strength, and cardiovascular health

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Song-Young; Son, Won-Mok; Kwon, Oh-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Whole body vibration training (WBVT) has been used as a supplement to conventional exercise training such as resistance exercise training to improve skeletal muscle strength, specifically, in rehabilitation field. Recently, this exercise modality has been utilized by cardiovascular studies to examine whether WBVT can be a useful exercise modality to improve cardiovascular health. These studies reported that WBVT has not only beneficial effects on muscular strength but also cardiovascular heal...

  2. Comparison of muscle strength imbalance in powerlifters and jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Hui-Ying; Winter, Christa; O'Neill, Elizabeth; Thompson, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the bilateral and unilateral force production difference in powerlifters (bilateral) and field jumpers (unilateral) to determine the existence of leg dominance. Nineteen powerlifters (PL; n = 11) and field jumpers (J; n = 8) were included in the study. Five different no arm swing countermovement jumps were randomized for testing: (a) double-leg jump; (b) dominant leg-specified double-leg jump; (c) nondominant leg-specified double-leg jump; (d) dominant leg-specified single-leg jump; and (e) nondominant leg-specified single-leg jump. The force, velocity, and power were measured via a forceplate. The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI% = (1 - ND limb/D limb) × 100%) was calculated for force imbalance between the dominant (N) and nondominant (ND) limb between PL and J. Based on the analysis, PL (mean = 2.75 ± 2.45%) had a lower LSI (p imbalance force production between limbs. This phenomenon is important for the strength coach to acknowledge, to perform an appropriate strength balance test during the off-season, and to implement a training program to reduce the force disparity between limbs. Neglecting the development of force imbalance between limbs may predispose healthy players to injury.

  3. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf)—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only. PMID:28133549

  4. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usa, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf )-the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity-from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm ) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  5. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.’s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Usa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  6. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations in nulliparous and primiparous women: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Orsi Gameiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength of nulliparous and primiparous women. METHODS: A total of 100 women were prospectively distributed into two groups: Group 1 (G1 (n = 50 included healthy nulliparous women, and Group 2 (G2 (n = 50 included healthy primiparous women. Pelvic floor muscle strength was subjectively evaluated using transvaginal digital palpation. Pelvic floor muscle strength was objectively assessed using a portable perineometer. All of the parameters were evaluated simultaneously in G1 and were evaluated in G2 during the 20th and 36th weeks of pregnancy and 45 days after delivery. RESULTS: In G2, 14 women were excluded because they left the study before the follow-up evaluation. The median age was 23 years in G1 and 22 years in G2; there was no significant difference between the groups. The average body mass index was 21.7 kg/m² in G1 and 25.0 kg/m² in G2; there was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.0004. In G2, transvaginal digital palpation evaluation showed significant impairments of pelvic floor muscle strength at the 36th week of pregnancy (p = 0.0006 and 45 days after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001 compared to G1. Objective evaluations of pelvic floor muscle strength in G2 revealed a significant decrease 45 days after vaginal delivery compared to nulliparous patients. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause weakness of the pelvic floor muscles.

  7. Strength training's chronic effects on muscle architecture parameters of different arm sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Thiago; Simão, Roberto; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Spineti, Juliano; Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes

    2011-06-01

    Strength training generates alterations in muscle geometry, which can be monitored by imaging techniques as, for example, the ultrasound (US) technique. There is no consensus about the homogeneity of hypertrophy in different muscle sites. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the muscle thickness (MT) and pennation angle (PA) in 3 different sites (50, 60, and 70% of arm length) of the biceps brachii and triceps brachii after 12 weeks of strength training. Forty-nine healthy untrained men were divided into 2 groups: Training Group ([TG, n = 40] 29.90 ± 1.72 years; 79.53 ± 11.84 kg; 173 ± 0.6 cm) and Control Group (n = 9 25.89 ± 3.59 years; 73.96 ± 9.86 kg; 171 ± 6 cm). The TG underwent a strength training program during 12 weeks, which included exercises such as a free-weight bench press, machine lat pull-down, triceps extension in lat pull-down, and standing free-weight biceps curl with a straight bar. A US apparatus was used to measure the PA and MT at the 3 sites. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) test was conducted for each muscle group. After 12 weeks of training, a significant difference was observed between MT in biceps brachii, with an improvement of 12% in the proximal site, whereas the distal site increased by only 4.7% (p MVC increased significantly for both muscle groups. The results indicated that the strength training program was efficient in promoting hypertrophy in both muscles, but with dissimilar responses of the pennated and fusiform muscle architecture at different arm sites.

  8. A mass-length scaling law for modeling muscle strength in the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Tomas A; Pandy, Marcus G

    2011-11-10

    Musculoskeletal computer models are often used to study muscle function in children with and without impaired mobility. Calculations of muscle forces depend in part on the assumed strength of each muscle, represented by the peak isometric force parameter, which is usually based on measurements obtained from cadavers of adult donors. The aim of the present study was twofold: first, to develop a method for scaling lower-limb peak isometric muscle forces in typically-developing children; and second, to determine the effect of this scaling method on model calculations of muscle forces obtained for normal gait. Muscle volumes were determined from magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from ten children aged from 7 to 13yr. A new mass-length scaling law was developed based on the assumption that muscle volume and body mass are linearly related, which was confirmed by the obtained volume and body mass data. Two musculoskeletal models were developed for each subject: one in which peak isometric muscle forces were estimated using the mass-length scaling law; and another in which these parameters were determined directly from the MR-derived muscle volumes. Musculoskeletal modeling and quantitative gait analysis were then used to calculate lower-limb muscle forces in normal walking. The patterns of muscle forces predicted by the model with scaled peak isometric force values were similar to those predicted by the MR-based model, implying that assessments of muscle function obtained from these two methods are practically equivalent. These results support the use of mass-length scaling in the development of subject-specific musculoskeletal models of children.

  9. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish ventilator

  10. Recovery in mechanical muscle strength following resurfacing vs standard total hip arthroplasty - a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Aagaard, Per; Overgaard, S

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of resurfacing vs standard total hip replacement on post-surgery hip and knee muscle strength recovery in a prospective randomised controlled trial at the Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. METHODS: Forty-three patients were......-29%) with the affected side being weakest (P ≤ 0.05) and hip flexors being most affected. Asymmetry was present in half of the muscle groups at 26 wks (P ≤ 0.05), and remained present for the hip flexors and hip adductors at 52 wks (P ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: R-THA patients showed an attenuated and delayed recovery...... in maximal lower limb muscle strength (in 2/6 muscle groups) compared to S-THA. Notably, the attenuated strength recovery following R-THA was most markedly manifested in the late phase (1 yr) of post-surgical recovery, and appeared to be due to the detachment of the lower half of the gluteus maximus muscle...

  11. Effects of 5 weeks of lower limb suspension on muscle size and strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, P. A.; Ploutz, L. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Lack of weight-bearing, as occurs in space, appears to be associated with reductions in strength and mass of skeletal muscle. Very limited data, however, is at hand describing changes in skeletal muscle size and function following manned space missions. Our current knowledge therefore is mainly based on studies of space flown rats. It is obvious though that this information, only in part can be extrapolated to humans. A few bed rest studies have demonstrated that decreases in strength and muscle size are substantial. At this time, however, the magnitude or time course of such changes either in response to space flight or simulations of microgravity have not been defined. In the last few years we have employed a human model to simulate unloading of lower limb skeletal muscles that occurs in microgravity. This model was essentially adopted from the rat hindlimb suspension technique. The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of decreases in muscle strength and size as a result of five weeks of unilateral lower limb suspension.

  12. Effect of Expiratory Resistive Loading in Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Orbicularis Oris Muscle Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshimi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of expiratory resistive loading on orbicularis oris muscle activity. [Subjects] Subjects were 23 healthy individuals (11 males, mean age 25.5±4.3 years; 12 females, mean age 25.0±3.0 years). [Methods] Surface electromyography was performed to measure the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during maximum lip closure and resistive loading at different expiratory pressures. Measurement was performed at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 100% of maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) for all subjects. The t-test was used to compare muscle activity between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP, and analysis of variance followed by multiple comparisons was used to compare the muscle activities observed at different expiratory pressures. [Results] No significant difference in muscle activity was observed between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP. Analysis of variance with multiple comparisons revealed significant differences among the different expiratory pressures. [Conclusion] Orbicularis oris muscle activity increased with increasing expiratory resistive loading. PMID:24648644

  13. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  14. Strength Exercise Improves Muscle Mass and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Wang, Zhiyue J.; Chu, Zili; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2010-01-01

    VAN DER HEIJDEN, G.-J., Z. J. WANG, Z. CHU, G. TOFFOLO, E. MANESSO, P. J. J. SAUER, and A. L. SUNEHAG. Strength Exercise Improves Muscle Mass and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Youth. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 42, No. 11, pp. 1973-1980, 2010. Introduction: Data on the metabolic effects of

  15. Isometric muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Rameckers, Eugene A.; Houdijk, Han; de Groot, Sonja; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between isometric leg muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to typically developing (TD) peers. Method: Participants were 62 children with CP (6-13 years), able to walk with (n=10) or without (n=52) walking aids,

  16. COMPARISON OF MUSCLE STRENGTH, SPRINT POWER AND AEROBIC CAPACITY IN ADULTS WITH AND WITHOUT CEREBRAL PALSY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Bessems, Paul J. C.; Lamberts, Marcel L.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare: (i) muscle strength, sprint power and maximal aerobic capacity; and (ii) the correlations between these variables in adults with and without cerebral palsy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Twenty adults with and 24 without cerebral palsy. Methods: Isometric and isokin

  17. Is leg muscle strength correlated with functional balance and mobility among inpatients in geriatric rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselgren, Låtta; Olsson, Lillemor Lundin; Nyberg, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Determinants of functional balance and mobility have rarely been investigated in geriatric wards. This study examined if leg muscle strength correlates to functional balance and mobility among geriatric inpatients. Fifty inpatients, 29 women and 21 men (mean age 79.6 years) were included. Functional balance was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and mobility was assessed with the Physiotherapy Clinical Outcome Variable Scale (COVS). Strength in the leg extension muscles was measured as 1 Repetition Maximum (1RM) in a leg press and strength in the ankle muscles was measured with Medical Research Council grades (MRC, 0-5). The sum scores, and most of the single items, of the BBS and the COVS significantly correlated to 1RM/body weight, ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion. In a stepwise multiple regression, ankle dorsiflexion and 1RM/body weight together accounted for 39% of the variance of the BBS and 41% of the variance of the COVS. Estimated values of the BBS and the COVS can be calculated from the equation. In clinical work, the knowledge about how leg muscle strength associates with balance and mobility may be useful in analyzing underlying causes of reduced balance and mobility function, and in planning rehabilitation programs.

  18. Strength Exercise Improves Muscle Mass and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Wang, Zhiyue J.; Chu, Zili; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2010-01-01

    VAN DER HEIJDEN, G.-J., Z. J. WANG, Z. CHU, G. TOFFOLO, E. MANESSO, P. J. J. SAUER, and A. L. SUNEHAG. Strength Exercise Improves Muscle Mass and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Youth. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 42, No. 11, pp. 1973-1980, 2010. Introduction: Data on the metabolic effects of

  19. The twitch interpolation technique for the estimation of true quadriceps muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørregaard, J; Lykkegaard, J J; Bülow, P M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1997-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of the twitch interpolation technique when used to estimate the true isometric knee extensor muscle strength. This included an examination of whether submaximal activation causes any bias in the estimation of the true muscle strength and an examination of the precision of the method. Twenty healthy subjects completed three contraction series, in which the subjects were told to perform as if their voluntary strength was 60%, 80% or 100% of that determined by a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Electrical muscle stimulations were given at each of five different contraction levels in each series. At torque levels above 25% of MVC the relationship between torque and twitch size could be approximated to be linear. The true muscle strength (TMS) could therefore be estimated using linear regression of the twitch-torque relationship to the torque point of no twitch in each of the three series, termed TMS60, TMS80 and TMS100. The TMS80 was slightly lower (P estimated central activation of below 40-50% were excluded. The only moderate precision and the slightly lower estimations in subjects applying submaximal does, however, limit its usefulness.

  20. Tramadol Overdose Induced Transient Paresthesia and Decreased Muscle Strength: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosrow Ghasempouri

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Transient paresthesia and transient symmetrical decline in muscle strength of upper and lower limbs are potential neurologic complications following tramadol abuse and overdose. Further studies are needed to fully clarify the pathogenesis and mechanism of these complications following tramadol overdose.

  1. Motor Performance in Children with Generalized Hypermobility : The Influence of Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanewinkel-van Kleef, Yvonne B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Takken, Tim; Engelbert, Raoul H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether muscle strength and functional exercise capacity (FEC) influence motor performance in children with generalized joint hypermobility. Methods: Forty-one children (mean age: 8.1 years) with symptomatic generalized hypermobility were included. M

  2. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  3. Motor Performance in Children with Generalized Hypermobility : The Influence of Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanewinkel-van Kleef, Yvonne B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Takken, Tim; Engelbert, Raoul H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether muscle strength and functional exercise capacity (FEC) influence motor performance in children with generalized joint hypermobility. Methods: Forty-one children (mean age: 8.1 years) with symptomatic generalized hypermobility were included. M

  4. The Effects of a 10-Kilometer Run on Muscle Strength and Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Ana L.; Radzwich, Robert J.; Denegar, Craig R.; Volek, Jeff S.; Rubin, Martyn R.; Bush, Jill A.; Doan, Brandon K.; Wickham, Robbin B.; Mazzetti, Scott A.; Newton, Robert U.; French, Duncan N.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Ratamess, Nicholas A.; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated recovery of maximal force and power following a 10-km race. Data collected on 10 healthy male distance runners pre-race, immediately post-race, and 48 hours later indicated that strength and power capabilities of these 10-km runners were for the most part restored 48 hours after the race. Only the hamstring muscle group was not fully…

  5. COMPARISON OF MUSCLE STRENGTH, SPRINT POWER AND AEROBIC CAPACITY IN ADULTS WITH AND WITHOUT CEREBRAL PALSY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Bessems, Paul J. C.; Lamberts, Marcel L.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare: (i) muscle strength, sprint power and maximal aerobic capacity; and (ii) the correlations between these variables in adults with and without cerebral palsy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Twenty adults with and 24 without cerebral palsy. Methods: Isometric and

  6. Muscle strength and soccer practice as major determinants of bone mineral density in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabra, André; Marques, Elisa; Brito, João

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the relationship between isokinetic strength of the lower limb muscles and bone mineral density and content (BMD, BMC) of adolescent male soccer players and age-matched controls not involved in sport (12-15years). METHODS: A random sample of 151 young males was divided...

  7. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m(2)) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

  8. Relationships between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Daily Living Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Shih-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common childhood disorder characterized by motor disability. Children with CP are at risk of developing significant respiratory problems associated with insufficient respiratory muscle strength. It is crucial to identify important factors which are associated with the limitations in daily living function in such children.…

  9. Use of isokinetic muscle strength as a measure of severity of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Lyngberg, K; Keiding, N

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the association between isokinetic muscle strength (IMS) and other clinical indicators of disability and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A cohort of 36 RA patients was followed over a 1-year period with five measurements of disease a...

  10. Is Walking Capacity in Subjects with Multiple Sclerosis Primarily Related to Muscle Oxidative Capacity or Maximal Muscle Strength? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Walking capacity is reduced in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS. To develop effective exercise interventions to enhance walking capacity, it is important to determine the impact of factors, modifiable by exercise intervention (maximal muscle strength versus muscle oxidative capacity, on walking capacity. The purpose of this pilot study is to discriminate between the impact of maximal muscle strength versus muscle oxidative capacity on walking capacity in subjects with MS. Methods. From 24 patients with MS, muscle oxidative capacity was determined by calculation of exercise-onset oxygen uptake kinetics (mean response time during submaximal exercise bouts. Maximal muscle strength (isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque was assessed on dynamometer. All subjects completed a 6-minute walking test. Relationships between walking capacity (as a percentage of normal value and muscle strength (of knee flexors and extensors versus muscle oxidative capacity were assessed in multivariate regression analyses. Results. The expanded disability status score (EDSS showed a significant univariate correlation (r=-0.70, P<0.004 with walking capacity. In multivariate regression analyses, EDSS and mean response time, but not muscle strength, were independently related to walking capacity (P<0.05. Conclusions. Walking distance is, next to disability level and not taking neurologic symptoms/deficits into account, primarily related to muscle oxidative capacity in subjects with MS. Additional study is needed to further examine/verify these findings.

  11. A combination of resistance and endurance training increases leg muscle strength in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Ringbæk, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    improvements in HRQoL, walking distance and exercise capacity. However, we found moderate quality evidence of a significant increase in leg muscle strength favouring a combination of RT and ET (standardized mean difference of 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.39-0.98). In conclusion, we found significantly...... increased leg muscle strength favouring a combination of RT with ET compared with ET alone. Therefore, we recommend that RT should be incorporated in rehabilitation of COPD together with ET.......Resistance training (RT) is thought to be effective in preventing muscle depletion, whereas endurance training (ET) is known to improve exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our objectives were to assess the efficiency...

  12. The correlation of respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Myeong-Rae; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-two stroke patients were assigned to 2 different groups (intervention group=21, control group=21). Both groups participated in a conventional stroke rehabilitation program, with the intervention group also receiving respiratory muscle training for 20 to 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure), forced vital capacity, and cough capacity were measured. [Results] The intervention group showed significant increases in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, forced vital capacity, and cough capacity. The change in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, and forced vital capacity showed a significant correlation with cough capacity, with maximal expiratory pressure showing the highest correlation. [Conclusion] The present study showed that the increase in maximal expiratory pressure plays an important role in improving the cough capacity of stroke patients.

  13. Age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis angles in an elderly Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryouta; Ono, Yuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar kyphosis and the decreased mobility of the lumbar spine increase the risk of falls and impair both the quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. However, in the elderly Japanese population, little is known about the age-related changes and sex-related differences in muscle strength, including of the upper and lower extremities and back extensors. An adequate kyphotic or lordotic angle has also not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis in 252 males and 320 females ≥50 years of age. Grip, back extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor strength; thoracic and lumbar kyphosis; and spinal inclination in the neutral standing position were assessed, together with the range of motion of the thoracic and lumbar spine and spinal inclination. Grip strength, back extensor strength, and the strength of the hip flexors and knee extensors decreased significantly with aging, both in males (Pstrength and the thoracic kyphosis angle were significant variables influencing the lumbar kyphosis angle in both sexes. Spinal inclination correlated significantly with both the lumbar kyphosis angle and hip flexor strength in males, as well as with the lumbar kyphosis angle in females.

  14. Heritability estimates of muscle strength-related phenotypes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, H; Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Kikuchi, N; Fuku, N; Miyachi, M; Murakami, H

    2016-11-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the heritability estimates of human muscle strength-related phenotypes (H(2) -msp). A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed (through August 22, 2016). Studies reporting the H(2) -msp for healthy subjects in a sedentary state were included. Random-effects models were used to calculate the weighted mean heritability estimates. Moreover, subgroup analyses were performed based on phenotypic categories (eg, grip strength, isotonic strength, jumping ability). Sensitivity analyses were also conducted to investigate potential sources of heterogeneity of H(2) -msp, which included age and sex. Twenty-four articles including 58 measurements were included in the meta-analysis. The weighted mean H(2) -msp for all 58 measurements was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.48-0.56), with high heterogeneity (I(2) =91.0%, Pstrength, other isometric strength, isotonic strength, isokinetic strength, jumping ability, and other power measurements was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.46-0.67), 0.49 (0.47-0.52), 0.49 (0.32-0.67), 0.49 (0.37-0.61), 0.55 (0.45-0.65), and 0.51 (0.31-0.70), respectively. The H(2) -msp decreased with age (Pstrength-related phenotypes is comparable. Moreover, the role of environmental factors increased with age. These findings may contribute toward an understanding of muscle strength-related phenotypes.

  15. Muscle strength and function before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using semitendonosus and gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, S L; Bullock-Saxton, J; Keays, A C; Newcombe, P

    2001-10-01

    This study assessed the quadriceps and hamstring strength before and 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery using the hamstrings and related the findings to functional performance. Six months after surgery is a critical time for assessment as this is when players are returning to sport. Maximum isokinetic strength of 31 patients with complete unilateral ACL ruptures was measured at speeds of 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second. Functional assessment included the single hop, the triple hop, the shuttle run, side-step and carioca tests. All patients underwent a controlled quadriceps emphasized home-based physiotherapy program both before and after surgery. Results show that before surgery there was a 7.3% quadriceps strength deficit at 60 degrees per second compared to the uninjured leg but no hamstring strength deficit. After surgery there was a statistically significant but relatively small loss of muscle strength. The quadriceps strength deficit had increased to 12% and there was a 10% hamstring deficit. Post-operatively there was an 11% and 6.3% improvement in the hop tests, a 9% (P < 0.01) improvement in the shuttle run, a 15% (P < 0.001) improvement in the side step and a 24% (P < 0.001) improvement in the carioca tests (P < 0.001) despite the loss of muscle strength.

  16. Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals

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    Cribb Paul J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the effects of short-term consumption of whey protein isolate on muscle proteins and force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. Methods Seventeen untrained male participants (23 ± 5 yr, 180 ± 6 cm, 80 ± 11 kg were randomly separated into two supplement groups: i whey protein isolate (WPH; n = 9; or ii carbohydrate (CHO; n = 8. Participants consumed 1.5 g/kg.bw/day supplement (~30 g consumed immediately, and then once with breakfast, lunch, in the afternoon and after the evening meal for a period of 14 days following a unilateral eccentric contraction-based resistance exercise session, consisting of 4 sets of 10 repetitions at 120% of maximum voluntary contraction on the leg press, leg extension and leg flexion exercise machine. Plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels were assessed as blood markers of muscle damage. Muscle strength was examined by voluntary isokinetic knee extension using a Cybex dynamometer. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05. Results Isometric knee extension strength was significantly higher following WPH supplementation 3 (P Conclusions The major finding of this investigation was that whey protein isolate supplementation attenuated the impairment in isometric and isokinetic muscle forces during recovery from exercise-induced muscle injury.

  17. Strength characterization of knee flexor and extensor muscles in Prader-Willi and obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baccalaro Gabriele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background despite evidence of an obesity-related disability, there is a lack of objective muscle functional data in overweight subjects. Only few studies provide instrumental strength measurements in non-syndromal obesity, whereas no data about Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are reported. The aim of our study was to characterize the lower limb muscle function of patients affected by PWS as compared to non-syndromal obesity and normal-weight subjects. Methods We enrolled 20 obese (O females (age: 29.1 ± 6.5 years; BMI: 38.1 ± 3.1, 6 PWS females (age: 27.2 ± 4.9 years; BMI: 45.8 ± 4.4 and 14 healthy normal-weight (H females (age: 30.1 ± 4.7 years; BMI: 21 ± 1.6. Isokinetic strength during knee flexion and extension in both lower limbs at the fixed angular velocities of 60°/s, 180°/s, 240°/s was measured with a Cybex Norm dynamometer. Results the H, O and PWS populations appear to be clearly stratified with regard to muscle strength.: PWS showed the lowest absolute peak torque (PT for knee flexor and extensor muscles as compared to O (-55% and H (-47% (P = 0.00001. O showed significantly higher strength values than H as regard to knee extension only (P = 0.0014. When strength data were normalised by body weight, PWS showed a 50% and a 70% reduction in PT as compared to O and H, respectively. Knee flexors strength values were on average half of those reported for extension in all of the three populations. Conclusion the novel aspect of our study is the determination of objective measures of muscle strength in PWS and the comparison with O and H patients. The objective characterization of muscle function performed in this study provides baseline and outcome measures that may quantify specific strength deficits amendable with tailored rehabilitation programs and monitor effectiveness of treatments.

  18. How does back muscle strength change after posterior lumbar interbody fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Won-Hah; Shin, Won-Ju; Seo, Yong-Gon

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE There is a lack of evidence of how back muscle strength changes after lumbar fusion surgery and how exercise influences these changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in back muscle strength after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to measure the effects of a postoperative exercise program on muscle strength and physical and mental health outcomes. METHODS This prospective study enrolled 59 women (mean age 58 years) who underwent PLIF at 1 or 2 spinal levels. To assess the effects of a supervised lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE), the authors allocated the patients to an LSE (n = 26) or a control (n = 33) group. The patients in the LSE group performed the LSEs between 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Back extensor strength, visual analog scale (VAS) scores in back pain, and physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores on the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey were determined for the both groups. RESULTS Mean strength of the back muscles tended to slightly decrease by 7.5% from preoperatively to 3 months after PLIF (p = 0.145), but it significantly increased thereafter and was sustained until the last follow-up (38.1%, p muscle strength was similar in the LSE and control groups preoperatively, but it increased significantly more in the LSE group (64.2%) than in the control group (21.7%) at the last follow-up 12 months after PLIF (p = 0.012). At the last follow-up, decreases in back pain VAS scores were more significant among LSE group patients, who had a pain reduction on average of 58.2%, than among control group patients (reduction of 26.1%) (p = 0.013). The patients in the LSE group also had greater improvement in both PCS (39.9% improvement) and MCS (20.7% improvement) scores than the patients in the control group (improvement of 18.0% and 1.1%, p = 0.042 and p = 0.035, respectively). CONCLUSIONS After PLIF, strength in back muscles decreased until 3 months postoperatively but significantly increased

  19. Effect of core training on inspiratory muscle strength in well-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSTAFA ÖZDAL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effects of core strength training program (Ct on inspiratory muscle strength (IMs in well-trained men. twenty four well-trained male athletes participated in the present study as subject, and they divided randomly two groups as the experimental (Ex, and control (Con. ten-weeks Ct program was administered on the Ex. the subjects were recruited to perform 2 times maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP pre- (t1 and post- (t2 10-weeks program. significant increase was found in the MIP (10.92 cmH2O of the Ex group after 10-weeks Ct program (p 0.05. Percent change in the MIP of the Ex was by 6.13%, and in the MIP of the Con was by 1.38%. When compared percent change in the MIP of groups, the increment of the Ex was found significantly higher than the Con (p < 0.05. In summary, respiratory muscle strength significantly increased after 10-weeks Ct program. as a conclusion, it could be said that core strength training causes improvement of respiratory muscle strength.

  20. Restorative Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency on Knee Pain and Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Heidari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Both vitamin D deficiency and quadriceps muscle weakness are associated with kneeosteoarthritis (KOA and pain. The aim of this study was to determine the restorative effect of vitamin Ddeficiency on pain and quadriceps muscle strength in knee osteoarthritis. Patients with KOA aged≥30years, the presence of knee pain for at least one month or longer and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25-OHDdeficiencies were recruited in the study. Participants with KOA compatible with Kellgren-Lawrence grade4, joint instability, and effusion, history of surgery or inflammatory arthropathies were excluded. Serum25-OHD was assessed by ELISA method and concentrationsQuadriceps muscle strength was measured by dynamometry method and intensity of knee pain by WesternOntario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis index scored by Likert scale and visual analog scale. Allparticipants received 50.000 IU oral cholecalciferol weekly for at least two months. The influence ofraising serum 25-OHD on quadriceps muscle strength and pain was assessed by calculation of meanchanges from baseline at the end of the treatment period using paired t-test. A total of 67 patients withmean age of 50±6.6 years of age were treated for 2 months. Serum 25-OHD reached to sufficient levels inall except one patient. At the end of the study period, serum 25-OHD and quadriceps muscle strengthincreased significantly as compared with baseline (P=0.007 and P=0.002, respectively, whereas knee paindecreased significantly based on Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (P=0.001as well as visual analogue scale scores (P=0.001.These findings indicated that correction of vitamin Ddeficiency in patients with KOA exerts a significant favorable effect on quadriceps muscle strength andknee pain.

  1. Strength training improves muscle quality and insulin sensitivity in Hispanic older adults with type 2 diabetes

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    Naomi Brooks, Jennifer E. Layne, Patricia L. Gordon , Ronenn Roubenoff , Miriam E. Nelson , Carmen Castaneda-Sceppa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hispanics are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality due to their high prevalence of diabetes and poor glycemic control. Strength training is the most effective lifestyle intervention to increase muscle mass but limited data is available in older adults with diabetes. We determined the influence of strength training on muscle quality (strength per unit of muscle mass, skeletal muscle fiber hypertrophy, and metabolic control including insulin resistance (Homeostasis Model Assessment –HOMA-IR, C-Reactive Protein (CRP, adiponectin and Free Fatty Acid (FFA levels in Hispanic older adults. Sixty-two community-dwelling Hispanics (>55 y with type 2 diabetes were randomized to 16 weeks of strength training plus standard care (ST group or standard care alone (CON group. Skeletal muscle biopsies and biochemical measures were taken at baseline and 16 weeks. The ST group show improved muscle quality (mean±SE: 28±3 vs CON (-4±2, p2 and type II fiber cross-sectional area (720±285µm2 compared to CON (type I: -164±290µm2, p=0.04; and type II: -130±336µm2, p=0.04. This was accompanied by reduced insulin resistance [ST: median (interquartile range -0.7(3.6 vs CON: 0.8(3.8, p=0.05]; FFA (ST: -84±30µmol/L vs CON: 149±48µmol/L, p=0.02; and CRP [ST: -1.3(2.9mg/L vs CON: 0.4(2.3mg/L, p=0.05]. Serum adiponectin increased with ST [1.0(1.8µg/mL] compared to CON [-1.2(2.2µg/mL, p

  2. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K. K.; Kjær, Michael; Jorgensen, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Methods Ten patients with VIH and ten...... healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self......-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test–retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Results Truncal flexion...

  3. Quantitative analysis of the features of fasciculation potentials and their relation with muscle strength in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokuda, Kota; Shimizu, Toshio; Kimura, Hideki; Yamazaki, Toshihiro; Kamiyama, Tsutomu; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Kawata, Akihiro; Hayashi, Masaharu; Isozaki, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze fasciculation potentials (FPs) and to investigate their relationship with muscle strength in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Fifty-one patients with sporadic ALS or progressive muscular atrophy (25 men, 26 women, mean age of 68 years) underwent needle EMG. We determined the duration, phase number, and amplitude of FPs from three muscles (upper trapezius, biceps brachii, and tibialis anterior) and examined their relations with muscle strength. In total, 878 FPs were analyzed. FP duration displayed a significant negative relation with the strength of all three muscles; the weaker muscles showed longer durations of FPs than the muscles with normal strength. The amplitude and phase number were not related with muscle strength, but there were significant correlations between the duration and amplitude of FPs in the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles. The longer duration of FPs in muscles with weak strength suggests that the morphological changes of FPs were caused by temporal dispersion through progressively degenerating and/or immature reinnervating motor branches, and were observed uniformly in different muscles along with disease progression.

  4. Effects of combined endurance and strength training on muscle strength, power and hypertrophy in 40-67-year-old men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavirta, L; Häkkinen, A; Sillanpää, E; García-López, D; Kauhanen, A; Haapasaari, A; Alen, M; Pakarinen, A; Kraemer, W J; Izquierdo, M; Gorostiaga, E; Häkkinen, K

    2011-06-01

    Both strength and endurance training have several positive effects on aging muscle and physical performance of middle-aged and older adults, but their combination may compromise optimal adaptation. This study examined the possible interference of combined strength and endurance training on neuromuscular performance and skeletal muscle hypertrophy in previously untrained 40-67-year-old men. Maximal strength and muscle activation in the upper and lower extremities, maximal concentric power, aerobic capacity and muscle fiber size and distribution in the vastus lateralis muscle were measured before and after a 21-week training period. Ninety-six men [mean age 56 (SD 7) years] completed high-intensity strength training (S) twice a week, endurance training (E) twice a week, combined training (SE) four times per week or served as controls (C). SE and S led to similar gains in one repetition maximum strength of the lower extremities [22 (9)% and 21 (8)%, Pmuscle fibers only increased in S [26 (22)%, P=0.002], while SE showed an inconsistent, non-significant change [8 (35)%, P=0.73]. Combined training may interfere with muscle hypertrophy in aging men, despite similar gains in maximal strength between the strength and the combined training groups. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Associations between Muscle Strength Asymmetry and Impairments in Gait and Posture in Young Brain-Injured Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijkoningen, D.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Linden, C. van der; Herpe, K. Van; Duysens, J.; Swinnen, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to deficits in gait and posture, which are often asymmetric. A possible factor mediating these deficits may be asymmetry in strength of the leg muscles. However, muscle strength in the lower extremities has rarely been investigated in (young) TBI patients. Here,

  6. Associations between Muscle Strength Asymmetry and Impairments in Gait and Posture in Young Brain-Injured Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijkoningen, D.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Linden, C. van der; Herpe, K. Van; Duysens, J.; Swinnen, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to deficits in gait and posture, which are often asymmetric. A possible factor mediating these deficits may be asymmetry in strength of the leg muscles. However, muscle strength in the lower extremities has rarely been investigated in (young) TBI patients. Here,

  7. Knee extensor muscle strength in middle-aged and older individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Juhl, Carsten B; Lund, Hans

    2015-01-01

    for a meniscal tear and used either a healthy control group or the contralateral leg to compare knee extensor muscle strength were included. Methodological quality was assessed using guidelines from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. RESULTS: Eleven studies, including predominately males were included (n......OBJECTIVE: People with meniscal tears are at high risk to develop or progress knee osteoarthritis. Knee extensor weakness is considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and is often reported in these individuals. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate knee...... extensor strength in people undergoing an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM). METHODS: Six databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, SportDISCUS, EMBASE, PEDro and AMED) were searched up to June 22(nd) , 2014. Studies that measured knee extensor muscle strength in people aged 30 years and older undergoing APM...

  8. The effect of regular strength training on telomere length in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadi, F.; Ponsot, Elodie; Piehl-Aulin, Karin;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The length of DNA telomeres is an important parameter of the proliferative potential of tissues. A recent study has reported abnormally short telomeres in skeletal muscle of athletes with exercise-associated fatigue. This important report raises the question of whether long-term practice...... of sports might have deleterious effects on muscle telomeres. Therefore, we aimed to compare telomere length of a group of power lifters (PL; N = 7) who trained for 8 +/- 3 yr against that of a group of healthy, active subjects (C; N = 7) with no history of strength training. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were...... taken from the vastus lateralis, and the mean and minimum telomeric restriction fragments (TRF) (telomere length) were determined, using the Southern blot protocol previously used for the analysis of skeletal muscle. RESULTS: There was no abnormal shortening of telomeres in PL. On the contrary, the mean...

  9. Effect of Expiratory Resistive Loading in Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Orbicularis Oris Muscle Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of expiratory resistive loading on orbicularis oris muscle activity. [Subjects] Subjects were 23 healthy individuals (11 males, mean age 25.5±4.3 years; 12 females, mean age 25.0±3.0 years). [Methods] Surface electromyography was performed to measure the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during maximum lip closure and resistive loading at different expiratory pressures. Measurement was performed at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 100% o...

  10. Amplitude and strength of muscle contraction are reduced in experimental tears of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian; Von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Wirth, Stephan H; Farshad, Mazda

    2011-07-01

    Chronic tendon tears lead to retraction, fatty infiltration, and atrophy of the respective muscle. These muscle changes are decision-making criteria in rotator cuff tear management. To investigate the functional implications of these morphological changes in a sheep rotator cuff tear model. Controlled laboratory study. The authors established chronic retraction of the musculotendinous unit accompanied with fatty infiltration and atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle in 20 sheep. The contractile force and passive tension of the muscle as a function of its length were measured and the active work capacity determined. After tendon release and chronic retraction (by 5.7 ± 0.9 cm), fatty infiltrated and atrophied infraspinatus muscles (with a density of 22.4 ± 10.4 Hounsfield units [HU] and a cross-sectional area of 65% ± 16% of the contralateral control side) had a mean contractile amplitude and strength of 2.7 ± 0.4 cm and 235 ± 71 N compared with the contralateral control shoulder of 4.1 ± 0.7 cm and 485 ± 78 N (P muscle was 2.8 ± 0.9 N·m for retracted and 8.8 ± 2.4 N·m for control muscles (P tears are associated not only with retraction, fatty infiltration, and atrophy but also with loss of strength and contractile amplitude. The functional changes can only indirectly and approximately be predicted by computed tomography imaging findings. The current criteria (atrophy, retraction, and fatty infiltration) may help to quantify the structural reparability of a chronically retracted musculotendinous unit after rotator cuff tendon tear but may only approximately predict the remaining function of the muscle.

  11. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on lung volumes, respiratory muscle strength, and quality of life in patients with ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Erika; Gimenes, Ana Cristina; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2014-03-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome caused by a mutation of chromosome 11. The clinical features are cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, and progressive loss of muscular coordination, including an inefficient cough secondary to progression of neurological disease. To evaluate the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilation, lung volume, dyspnoea, respiratory muscle strength, and quality of life in patients with AT. A longitudinal study was conducted with 11 AT patients and nine healthy volunteers. Ventilometry, subjective sensation of dyspnoea, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), and quality of life were assessed before and after a 24-week IMT program. The IMT load used was set at 60% of the MIP, and the training was performed for 20 min daily. Patients with AT had lower height and weight and also had lower respiratory muscle strength and lung volume compared with healthy volunteers. Furthermore, patients with AT showed a significant improvement when pre- and post-IMT were compared for ventilatory pattern: Vt (476.5 ± 135 ml vs. 583.3 ± 66 ml, P = 0.015) and f (23.3 ± 6 rpm vs. 20.4 ± 4 rpm, P = 0.018), and VC (1,664 ± 463 ml/kg vs. 2,145 ± 750 ml/kg, P = 0.002). IMT also significantly improved the sensation of dyspnoea (median 0.5; minimum 0; maximum 1.0; P = 0.022) and respiratory muscle strength: MIP (-22.2 ± 2 cmH2O vs. -38 ± 9 cmH2O, P < 0.001) and MEP (29 ± 7 cmH2O vs. 40 ± 8 cmH2O, P = 0.001). The health and vitality domains of the SF-36 also showed significant improvement (P = 0.009 and P = 0.014, respectively) post-IMT. IMT was effective in improving ventilatory pattern, lung volume, respiratory muscle strength, and the health and vitality domains for quality of life in patients with AT. IMT may be an effective adjunct therapy to drug treatment for patients with AT. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of knee extensor muscle strength on the incidence of osteopenia and osteoporosis after 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yasumoto; Takemura, Marie; Harada, Atsushi; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The association of knee extensor muscle strength with bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in cross-sectional epidemiological studies, but it remains unclear whether or not this is the case with longitudinal change. Thus, we investigated whether or not the knee extension strength can predict the incidence of osteopenia or osteoporosis after 6 years, then compared the difference between sexes. Subjects were 1255 community-dwelling Japanese men and menopaused women, aged 40-81 years. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry twice at 6-year intervals. Subjects were divided into three groups, normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis, depending on their young adult mean BMD % value. In the cross-sectional analysis the correlations between the knee extension strength and BMD of the two regions were examined, using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Longitudinal analyses were then conducted to determine the odds ratio, controlled for age and BMI, given that those who were normal in the initial stage developed osteopenia or osteoporosis after 6 years, for every 1 SD decrease in knee extension strength, as well as those who first had normal or osteopenia and then developed osteoporosis. Cross-sectional analysis showed a statistically significant relation between knee extensor muscle strength and BMD at both the lumbar spine (p = 0.02) and the femoral neck (p muscle strength on the loss of femoral neck BMD from normal to osteopenia or osteoporosis both in men (OR 1.84, 95 % CI 1.36-2.48, p strength to maintain the bone health of the proximal femur and spine in aging particularly in men.

  13. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Kjaer, M.; Andersen, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    ) (luring selected strengthening exercises in women undergoing rehabilitation for chronic neck muscle pain (defined as a clinical diagnosis of trapezins myalgia). Subjects. The subjects were 12 female workers (age = 30-60 years) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia and a mean baseline pain...

  14. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2008-01-01

    selected strengthening exercises in women undergoing rehabilitation for chronic neck muscle pain (defined as a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia). SUBJECTS: The subjects were 12 female workers (age=30-60 years) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia and a mean baseline pain intensity of 5...

  15. Modeling and Simulation to Muscle Strength Training of Lower Limbs Rehabilitation Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Yi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the issues of lower limb rehabilitation robots with single control strategies and poor training types, a training method for improving muscle strength was put forward in this paper. Patients’ muscle strength could be achieved by targeted exercises at the end of rehabilitation. This approach could be realized through programming wires’ force. On the one hand, each wires force was measured by tension sensor and force closed loop control was established to control the value of wires’ force which was acted on trainees. On the other hand, the direction of output force was changed by detecting the trainees’ state of motion and the way of putting load to patient was achieved. Finally, the target of enhancing patients’ muscle strength was realized. Dynamic model was built by means of mechanism and training types of robots. Force closed loop control strategy was established based on training pattern. In view of the characteristics of the redundance and economy of wire control, the process for simple wire's load changes was discussed. In order to confirm the characteristics of robot control system, the controller was simulated in Matlab/Simulink. It was verified that command signal could be traced by control system availably and the load during muscle training would be provided effectively.

  16. Muscle strength and exercise intensity adaptation to resistance training in older women with knee osteoarthritis and total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze muscle strength and exercise intensity adaptation to resistance training in older women with knee osteoarthritis and total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Twenty-three community-dwelling women were divided into the following groups: older, with knee osteoarthritis and total knee arthroplasty in the contralateral limb (OKG; N= 7; older, without symptomatic osteoarthritis (OG; N= 8; and young and healthy (YG; N= 8. Muscle strength (1-repetition maximum strength test and exercise intensity progression (workload increases of 5%-10% were made whenever adaptation occurred were compared before and after 13 weeks of a twice-weekly progressive resistance-training program. RESULTS: At baseline, OKG subjects displayed lower muscle strength than those in both the OG and YG. Among OKG subjects, baseline muscle strength was lower in the osteoarthritic leg than in the total arthroplasty leg. Muscle strength improved significantly during follow-up in all groups; however, greater increases were observed in the osteoarthritic leg than in the total knee arthroplasty leg in OKG subjects. Greater increases were also seen in the osteoarthritic leg of OKG than in OG and YG. The greater muscle strength increase in the osteoarthritic leg reduced the interleg difference in muscle strength in OKG subjects, and resulted in similar posttraining muscle strength between OKG and OG in two of the three exercises analyzed. Greater exercise intensity progression was also observed in OKG subjects than in both OG and YG subjects. CONCLUSIONS: OKG subjects displayed greater relative muscle strength increases (osteoarthritic leg than subjects in the YG, and greater relative exercise intensity progression than subjects in both OG and YG. These results suggest that resistance training is an effective method to counteract the lower-extremity strength deficits reported in older women with knee osteoarthritis and total knee arthroplasty.

  17. Effects of Vibration Training and Detraining on Balance and Muscle Strength in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Pedro J.; Martín-López, Aurora; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Angulo-Carrere, MT; García-Pastor, Teresa; Garatachea, Nuria; Chicharro, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of 2 days/week versus 4 days/week of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) during eight weeks of WBV training on health-related quality of life (SF-36), balance and lower body strength, as well as short-term detraining (3 weeks) on balance and lower body strength among older adults. Thirty-four older adults were randomly assigned to a control group (Control; n = 11) or to one of the vibration training groups: WBV 2 days/week (WBV_2d; n = 11) or WBV 4 days/week (WBV_4d; n = 12). The WBV groups exercised for 8 weeks, following 3 weeks of detraining. Lower body strength increased significantly (p < 0.05) for both groups, WBV_2d and WBV_4d, after 8-week training. A significant reduction in strength was observed following 3 weeks of detraining only in WBV_2d group (p < 0.05). All variables of the SF-36 and the balance test did not change after intervention in any group. 2 days/week and 4 days/week of WBV during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV. Key points 2 days and 4 days per week of WBV training during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV exercise. 3 weeks of detraining did reverse the gains in strength made during 16 sessions of WBV exercise. PMID:24150633

  18. Effects of vibration training and detraining on balance and muscle strength in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Pedro J; Martín-López, Aurora; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Angulo-Carrere, Mt; García-Pastor, Teresa; Garatachea, Nuria; Chicharro, José L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of 2 days/week versus 4 days/week of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) during eight weeks of WBV training on health-related quality of life (SF-36), balance and lower body strength, as well as short-term detraining (3 weeks) on balance and lower body strength among older adults. Thirty-four older adults were randomly assigned to a control group (Control; n = 11) or to one of the vibration training groups: WBV 2 days/week (WBV_2d; n = 11) or WBV 4 days/week (WBV_4d; n = 12). The WBV groups exercised for 8 weeks, following 3 weeks of detraining. Lower body strength increased significantly (p < 0.05) for both groups, WBV_2d and WBV_4d, after 8-week training. A significant reduction in strength was observed following 3 weeks of detraining only in WBV_2d group (p < 0.05). All variables of the SF-36 and the balance test did not change after intervention in any group. 2 days/week and 4 days/week of WBV during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV. Key points2 days and 4 days per week of WBV training during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength.3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV exercise.3 weeks of detraining did reverse the gains in strength made during 16 sessions of WBV exercise.

  19. Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Muscle Strength, Pain, or Physical Performance in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Isabel A C; Meeus, Mira; Mahmoudian, Armaghan; Luyten, Frank P; Nijs, Jo; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of psychosocial factors, namely, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and maladaptive coping strategies, with muscle strength, pain, and physical performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related symptoms. A total of 109 women (64 with knee OA-related symptoms) with a mean age of 65.4 years (49-81 years) were recruited for this study. Psychosocial factors were quantified by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and Pain Coping Inventory. Clinical features were assessed using isometric and isokinetic knee muscle strength measurements, visual analog scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and functional tests. Associations were examined using correlation and regression analysis. In knee OA patients, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and coping strategy explained a significant proportion of the variability in isometric knee extension and flexion strength (6.3%-9.2%), accounting for more overall variability than some demographic and medical status variables combined. Psychosocial factors were not significant independent predictors of isokinetic strength, knee pain, or physical performance. In understanding clinical features related to knee OA, such as muscle weakness, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and coping strategy might offer something additional beyond what might be explained by traditional factors, underscoring the importance of a biopsychosocial approach in knee OA management. Further research on individual patient characteristics that mediate the effects of psychosocial factors is, however, required in order to create opportunities for more targeted, personalized treatment for knee OA.

  20. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra M. Germain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL, ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment.

  1. Effects of age and regular exercise on muscle strength and endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, S; St-Pierre, D M; Cyr, J; Gayton, D

    1990-01-01

    Twenty male and 20 female non-professional tennis players were classified into two different age groups (n = 10 per group): young active men (30.4 +/- 3.3 years), young active women (27.5 +/- 4.3 years), elderly active men (64.4 +/- 3.7 years), and elderly active women (65.3 +/- 4.5 years). These individuals were matched (n = 10 per group) according to sex, age, height and mass to sedentary individuals of the same socio-economical background: young sedentary men (29.2 +/- 3.4 years), young sedentary women (25.6 +/- 4.4 years), elderly sedentary men (65.2 +/- 3.2 years) and elderly sedentary women (65.6 +/- 4.4 years). An isokinetic dynamometer was used to measure the strength of the knee extensors and flexors (two separate occasions) and the endurance of the extensors. Vastus lateralis electromyogram (EMG) was measured concomitantly. Significant sex, age and exercise effects (P less than 0.001) were observed for peak torque of both muscle groups. The effect of age on extensor strength was more pronounced at high speeds where men were also able to generate larger relative torques than women. No age or sex effects were noted for muscle endurance. However, muscles of active individuals demonstrated a greater resistance to fatigue than those of sedentary individuals. In conclusion, men were found to be stronger than women, age was associated with a decrease in muscle strength, but not of muscle endurance, and tennis players were stronger and had muscles that were more resistant to fatigue than their sedentary pairs in both age groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. RAPID HAMSTRINGS/QUADRICEPS STRENGTH CAPACITY IN PROFESSIONAL SOCCER PLAYERS WITH DIFFERENT CONVENTIONAL ISOKINETIC MUSCLE STRENGTH RATIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila C. Greco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle strength imbalance can be an important factor in hamstrings muscle strain. A hamstrings/quadriceps (H/Q strength ratio based on concentric peak torque values (Hcon:Qcon has traditionally been used to describe the potential for knee-joint destabilization. Because certain standard actions in soccer are explosive, the analysis of the H/Q strength ratio based on the rate of torque development (Hrtd:Qrtd might also be useful in the evaluation of joint stability. The objective of this study was to compare the Hrtd:Qrtd between professional soccer players with heterogeneous values of Hcon:Qcon. Thirty-nine professional soccer players took part in the following procedures on different days: 1 Familiarization session with the isokinetic dynamometer, and 2 Two maximal isometric actions and five maximal concentric actions at 60°·s-1 for hamstrings (H and quadriceps (Q. Participants were ranked according to their Hcon:Qcon ratio. The median third was excluded to form a high torque group (HTG, and a low torque group (LTG. Peak isometric (H and concentric (H and Q torques and rate of torque development (H were significantly greater in the HTG group. Similarly, Hcon:Qcon (0.68 ± 0.02 vs. 0.52 ± 0.03 and Hrtd:Qrtd (0.54 ± 0.12 vs. 0.43 ± 0.16 were significantly greater in the HTG group than in the LTG group. There was no significant correlation between Hcon:Qcon and Hrtd:Qrtd. It can be concluded that Hcon:Qcon and Hrtd:Qrtd are determined, but not fully defined, by shared putative physiological mechanisms. Thus, the physiologic and clinical significance of Hcon:Qcon and Hrtd:Qrtd to an athlete's individual evaluation might be different

  3. The dance’s influence on muscle strength of lower limbs on the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseane Rodrigues da Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of dance in the lower limb muscle strength on the elderly. This research has a qualitative-quantitative aproach. The sample was composed by ten elderly of both sexes, who practiced ballroom dancing classes during twelve weeks. The evaluation was performed before and after the classes and it was composed by a questionnaire with personal data and medical history, “test stand and sit in 30 seconds” and a semi-structured interview with a guiding question regarding the perception of muscular strength of the elderly. The quantitative analysis was performed using the Student’s t-test with a significance level of p<0,05%. The qualitative analysis was made according directions proposed by Minayo (1994. The evaluation of muscle strength measured by the test of sitting and standing up, showed that four participants had a decreased and six had an increase in the number of movements executed, but not existed a significant statistical difference between the values before and after intervention (p=0,1934. However, the speech of the participants showed an improvement on the perception in relation muscle strength, mobility, joviality and self-esteem. It suggests that the effect of the dance, performed in the frequency used in this study, has an effect on the well-being and psychosocial sphere of the elderly. Playful activities in physical therapy performed by groups, bringing benefits, however, it should not be an isolated activity, it should be associated with a specific training to improve muscle strength related to the needs of each elderly.

  4. Muscle strength, body composition, and performance of an elite shot-putter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Kyriazis, Thomas; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2012-12-01

    Although muscle mass and strength are thought to be closely related to throwing performance, there are few scientific data about these parameters in elite shot-putters. The purpose of this case report was to present longitudinal data for muscle strength and body composition in relation to performance of an elite male shot-putter. A male national champion with the best rotational shot-put performance of 20.36 m (in 2010) was followed from 2003 to 2011 (current age: 29 y). Data regarding body composition (dual X-ray absorptiometry), as well as 1-repetition-maximum muscle strength (bench press, squat, snatch) and rotational shot-put performance, were collected every February for the last 9 y, 4 wk before the national indoor championship event. The athlete's personal-best performances in squat, bench press, and snatch were 175 kg, 210 kg, and 112.5 kg, respectively. His peak total lean body mass was 92.4 kg, bone mineral density 1.55 g/cm2, and lowest body fat 12.9%. His shot-put performance over these 9 years was significantly correlated with 1-repetition-maximum squat strength (r = .93, P snatch (r = .92, P < .01). In contrast, shot-put performance was not significantly correlated with any of the body-composition parameters. The results of this case study suggest that elite rotational shot-put performance may not be directly correlated with lean body mass. Instead, it seems that it is closely related with measures of muscle strength.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype affects skeletal muscle strength in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno; Louro, Hugo; Marinho, Daniel Almeida; Cardoso Marques, Mário; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) D allele with variability in the skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and female athletes involved in different event expertise. A group of 58 elite athletes, designated as Olympic candidates, were studied: 35 swimmers (19 males and 16 females, 18.8 ± 3.2 years) and 23 triathletes (15 males and 8 females, 18.7 ± 3.0 years). The athletes were classified as: short (≤ 200m) and middle (400m to 1500m) distance athletes, respectively. For each subject the grip strength in both hands was measure using an adjustable mechanical hand dynamometer. The maximum height in both squat jump (SJ) and counter movement jump (CMJ) were also assessed, using a trigonometric carpet (Ergojump Digitime 1000; Digitest, Jyvaskyla, Finland). DNA extraction was obtained with Chelex 100(®) and genotype determination by PCR-RFLP methods. Both males and females showed significantly higher right grip strength in D allele carriers compared to II homozygote's. We found that allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance specialization in both genders (p sprinter D allele carriers showed the superior scores in nearly all strength measurements (p < 0.05), in both genders. Among endurance athletes, the results also demonstrated that female D allele carriers exhibited the higher performance right grip and CMJ scores (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ACE D allele seems associated with skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite athletes, being easily identified in females. Key pointsDD homozygote's and D allele carriers from both genders shows significantly higher right grip strength.Right grip strength remains significantly higher in the D allele carrier's female endurance group.Female's D allele carriers exhibited the higher

  6. Muscle mechanical properties of strength and endurance athletes and changes after one week of intensive training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Simola, Rauno Álvaro; Raeder, Christian; Wiewelhove, Thimo; Kellmann, Michael; Meyer, Tim; Pfeiffer, Mark; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The study investigates whether tensiomyography (TMG) is sensitive to differentiate between strength and endurance athletes, and to monitor fatigue after either one week of intensive strength (ST) or endurance (END) training. Fourteen strength (24.1±2.0years) and eleven endurance athletes (25.5±4.8years) performed an intensive training period of 6days of ST or END, respectively. ST and END groups completed specific performance tests as well as TMG measurements of maximal radial deformation of the muscle belly (Dm), deformation time between 10% and 90% Dm (Tc), rate of deformation development until 10% Dm (V10) and 90% Dm (V90) before (baseline), after training period (post1), and after 72h of recovery (post2). Specific performance of both groups decreased from baseline to post1 (Ptraining, Dm, V10, and V90 were reduced in the ST (Pstrength and endurance athletes, and to monitor fatigue and recovery especially in strength training.

  7. MUSCLE STRENGTH AND DAMAGE FOLLOWING TWO MODES OF VARIABLE RESISTANCE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Jalal Aboodarda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nautilus Machine (NM and Elastic Resistance (ER have gained considerable popularity among athletes and recreational lifters seeking to increase muscle strength. However, there is controversy concerning the use of ER for increasing muscle hypertrophy and strength among healthy-trained individuals. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of repeated near maximal contractions by ER/NM on indicators of muscle damage including: maximal strength decrement (MVIC, rate of muscle soreness (DOMS, concentration of plasma creatine kinase (CK and increased high muscle signal on T2 weighted images using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Nine healthy male subjects completed two modalities of exercise (5 sets × 10RM ER/NM in a counterbalance cross-over study design with three weeks "wash-out" period between experiments. The MVIC was measured and DOMS rated and recorded for 4 consecutive days while blood samples were collected on day 1, 3, 5 and 7. Prior to and forty eight hours after completion of each mode of exercise, subjects underwent MRI scanning. The average of applied forces demonstrated significantly higher value for NM compared with ER (362 ± 34.2 N vs 266.73 ± 44.6 N respectively throughout the 5 sets of dynamic exercise (all p < 0.05. However, the indicators of muscle damage (T2 relaxation time, DOMS, MVIC and serum CK exhibited a very similar response across both modes of training. Plasma CK increased significantly following both modes of training with the peak value on Day 3 (p < 0.05. The time course of muscle soreness reached a significant level after both modes of exercise and showed a peak value on the 2nd day (p < 0.05. The T2 relaxation time demonstrated a statistically significant increase following ER and NM compared with the pre-test value (p < 0.05. The similarity of these responses following both the ER and NM exercise training session suggests that both modes of training provide a similar training stress; despite a considerably

  8. Age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis angles in an elderly Japanese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryouta; Ono, Yuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar kyphosis and the decreased mobility of the lumbar spine increase the risk of falls and impair both the quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. However, in the elderly Japanese population, little is known about the age-related changes and sex-related differences in muscle strength, including of the upper and lower extremities and back extensors. An adequate kyphotic or lordotic angle has also not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis in 252 males and 320 females ≥50 years of age. Grip, back extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor strength; thoracic and lumbar kyphosis; and spinal inclination in the neutral standing position were assessed, together with the range of motion of the thoracic and lumbar spine and spinal inclination. Grip strength, back extensor strength, and the strength of the hip flexors and knee extensors decreased significantly with aging, both in males (P<0.0001) and in females (P=0.0015 to P<0.0001). The lumbar but not the thoracic kyphosis angle decreased significantly with aging, only in females (P<0.0001). Spinal inclination increased significantly with aging in both males (P=0.002) and females (P<0.0001). Back extensor strength and the thoracic kyphosis angle were significant variables influencing the lumbar kyphosis angle in both sexes. Spinal inclination correlated significantly with both the lumbar kyphosis angle and hip flexor strength in males, as well as with the lumbar kyphosis angle in females.

  9. ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENOTYPE AFFECTS SKELETAL MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Matos Costa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE D allele with variability in the skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and female athletes involved in different event expertise. A group of 58 elite athletes, designated as Olympic candidates, were studied: 35 swimmers (19 males and 16 females, 18.8 ± 3.2 years and 23 triathletes (15 males and 8 females, 18.7 ± 3.0 years. The athletes were classified as: short (< 200m and middle (400m to 1500m distance athletes, respectively. For each subject the grip strength in both hands was measure using an adjustable mechanical hand dynamometer. The maximum height in both squat jump (SJ and counter movement jump (CMJ were also assessed, using a trigonometric carpet (Ergojump Digitime 1000; Digitest, Jyvaskyla, Finland. DNA extraction was obtained with Chelex 100® and genotype determination by PCR-RFLP methods. Both males and females showed significantly higher right grip strength in D allele carriers compared to II homozygote's. We found that allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance specialization in both genders (p < 0.05. In fact, sprinter D allele carriers showed the superior scores in nearly all strength measurements (p < 0.05, in both genders. Among endurance athletes, the results also demonstrated that female D allele carriers exhibited the higher performance right grip and CMJ scores (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the ACE D allele seems associated with skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite athletes, being easily identified in females

  10. Treadmill Training with Virtual Reality Improves Gait, Balance, and Muscle Strength in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chunhee; Hwang, Wonjeong; Hwang, Sujin; Chung, Yijung

    2016-03-01

    Independent walking is an important goal of clinical and community-based rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Virtual reality-based rehabilitation therapy is effective in motivating children with CP. This study investigated the effects of treadmill training with virtual reality on gait, balance, muscular strength, and gross motor function in children with CP. Eighteen children with spastic CP were randomly divided into the virtual reality treadmill training (VRTT) group (9 subjects, mean age, 10.2 years) and treadmill training (TT) group (9 subjects, mean age, 9.4 years). The groups performed their respective programs as well as conventional physical therapy 3 times/week for 8 weeks. Muscle strength was assessed using a digitalized manual muscle tester. Gross motor function was assessed using the Gross Motor Functional Measure (GMFM). Balance was assessed using the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS). Gait speed was assessed using the 10-meter walk test (10MWT), and gait endurance was assessed using the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). After training, gait and balance was improved in the VRTT compared to the TT group (P strength was significantly greater in the VRTT group than the TT group, except for right hamstring strength. The improvements in GMFM (standing) and PBS scores were greater in the VRTT group than the TT group (P strength, and gross motor function in children with CP.

  11. Apple Pomace Extract Improves Endurance in Exercise Performance by Increasing Strength and Weight of Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji-Woong; Shim, Jae-Jung; Choi, Il-Dong; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ra, Jehyeon; Ku, Hyung Keun; Lee, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae-Youl; Jeung, Woonhee; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Huh, Chul-Sung; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Ursolic acid is a lipophilic pentacyclic triterpenoid found in many fruits and herbs and is used in several herbal folk medicines for diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the effects of apple pomace extract (APE; ursolic acid content, 183 mg/g) on skeletal muscle atrophy. To examine APE therapeutic potential in muscle atrophy, we investigated APE effects on the expression of biomarkers associated with muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. We found that APE inhibited atrophy, while inducing hypertrophy in C2C12 myotubes by decreasing the expression of atrophy-related genes and increasing the expression of hypertrophy-associated genes. The in vivo experiments using mice fed a diet with or without APE showed that APE intake increased skeletal muscle mass, as well as grip strength and exercise capacity. In addition, APE significantly improved endurance in the mice, as evidenced by increased exhaustive running time and muscle weight, and reduced the expression of the genes involved in the development of muscle atrophy. APE also decreased the concentration of serum lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, inorganic phosphate, and creatinine, the indicators of accumulated fatigue and exercise-induced stress. These results suggest that APE may be useful as an ergogenic functional food or dietary supplement.

  12. Effects of a shoulder injury prevention strength training program on eccentric external rotator muscle strength and glenohumeral joint imbalance in female overhead activity athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederbracht, Yvonne; Shim, Andrew L; Sloniger, Mark A; Paternostro-Bayles, Madeline; Short, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Imbalance of the eccentrically-activated external rotator cuff muscles versus the concentrically-activated internal rotator cuff muscles is a primary risk factor for glenohumeral joint injuries in overhead activity athletes. Nonisokinetic dynamometer based strength training studies, however, have focused exclusively on resulting concentric instead of applicable eccentric strength gains of the external rotator cuff muscles. Furthermore, previous strength training studies did not result in a reduction in glenoumeral joint muscle imbalance, thereby suggesting that currently used shoulder strength training programs do not effectively reduce the risk of shoulder injury to the overhead activity athlete. Two collegiate women tennis teams, consisting of 12 women, participated in this study throughout their preseason training. One team (n = 6) participated in a 5-week, 4 times a week, external shoulder rotator muscle strength training program next to their preseason tennis training. The other team (n = 6) participated in a comparable preseason tennis training program, but did not conduct any upper body strength training. Effects of this strength training program were evaluated by comparing pre- and posttraining data of 5 maximal eccentric external immediately followed by concentric internal contractions on a Kin-Com isokinetic dynamometer (Chattecx Corp., Hixson, Tennessee). Overall, the shoulder strength training program significantly increased eccentric external total work without significant effects on concentric internal total work, concentric internal mean peak force, or eccentric external mean peak force. In conclusion, by increasing the eccentric external total exercise capacity without a subsequent increase in the concentric internal total exercise capacity, this strength training program potentially decreases shoulder rotator muscle imbalances and the risk for shoulder injuries to overhead activity athletes.

  13. Intramuscular sex steroid hormones are associated with skeletal muscle strength and power in women with different hormonal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöllänen, Eija; Kangas, Reeta; Horttanainen, Mia; Niskala, Paula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2015-04-01

    Estrogen (E2 )-responsive peripheral tissues, such as skeletal muscle, may suffer from hormone deficiency after menopause potentially contributing to the aging of muscle. However, recently E2 was shown to be synthesized by muscle and its systemic and intramuscular hormone levels are unequal. The objective of the study was to examine the association between intramuscular steroid hormones and muscle characteristics in premenopausal women (n = 8) and in postmenopausal monozygotic twin sister pairs (n = 16 co-twins from eight pairs) discordant for the use of E2 -based hormone replacement. Isometric skeletal muscle strength was assessed by measuring knee extension strength. Explosive lower body muscle power was assessed as vertical jump height. Due to sequential nature of enzymatic conversion of biologically inactive dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to testosterone (T) and subsequently to E2 or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), separate linear regression models were used to estimate the association of each hormone with muscle characteristics. Intramuscular E2 , T, DHT, and DHEA proved to be significant, independent predictors of strength and power explaining 59-64% of the variation in knee extension strength and 80-83% of the variation of vertical jumping height in women (P strength and power regulation in female muscle providing novel insight to the field of muscle aging.

  14. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Kromann; Henriksen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers Henriksen, P.1, 2, Kromann Knudsen, H.2, Juul-Kristensen, B.3, 4, Junge, T.2, 5, 6 1Inter-Faculty Educational Resources, University College Lillebaelt, Odense, Denmark 2Department...... Services, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 6Health Sciences Research Centre, University College Lillebaelt, Odense, Denmark Introduction Swim time performance is affected by physiological factors such as muscle strength and power of the upper and lower extremities as well as aerobic capacity...... (Smith et al., 2002). The association between these factors and swim time performance may plausibly identify some of the determinants for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study...

  15. Experience in resistance training does not prevent reduction in muscle strength evoked by passive static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Andrey J; Silva, José A; Marcolongo, Alessandra A; Manchini, Martha T; Oliveira, João V A; Santos, Luis F N; Rica, Roberta L; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2013-08-01

    This study examined whether passive static stretching reduces the maximum muscle strength achieved by different body segments in untrained and resistance-trained subjects. Twenty adult men were assigned to 1 of the following groups: untrained (UT, N = 9) and resistance-trained (RT, N = 11) groups. The subjects performed six 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load tests of the following exercises: horizontal bench press, lat pull-downs, bicep curls, and 45° leg press. The results achieved in the last two 1RM tests were used for statistical analyses. A passive static stretching program was incorporated before the sixth 1RM test. The body fat content was significantly higher in the UT group compared with the RT group (p stretching (p stretching program was detrimental to upper- and lower-body maximal muscle strength performance in several body segments. The negative effects of stretching were similar for subjects participating in resistance training regimens.

  16. High-dose inhaled terbutaline increases muscle strength and enhances maximal sprint performance in trained men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Kalsen, Anders; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of high-dose inhaled terbutaline on muscle strength, maximal sprinting, and time-trial performance in trained men. METHODS: Nine non-asthmatic males with a [Formula: see text] of 58.9 ± 3.1 ml min(-1) kg(-1) (mean ± SEM......) participated in a double-blinded randomized crossover study. After administration of inhaled terbutaline (30 × 0.5 mg) or placebo, subjects' maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) of m.quadriceps was measured. After MVC, subjects performed a 30-s Wingate test. Sixty minutes following the Wingate test...... was not different between treatments (P = 0.236). CONCLUSION: High-dose inhaled terbutaline elicits a systemic response that enhances muscle strength and sprint performance. High-dose terbutaline should therefore continue to be restricted in competitive sport....

  17. A combination of resistance and endurance training increases leg muscle strength in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Ringbæk, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of combining RT with ET compared with ET alone. We identified eligible studies through a systematic multi-database search. One author checked titles and abstracts for relevance using broad inclusion criteria, whilst two independent authors checked the full-text copies for eligibility. Two authors independently...... improvements in HRQoL, walking distance and exercise capacity. However, we found moderate quality evidence of a significant increase in leg muscle strength favouring a combination of RT and ET (standardized mean difference of 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.39-0.98). In conclusion, we found significantly...... increased leg muscle strength favouring a combination of RT with ET compared with ET alone. Therefore, we recommend that RT should be incorporated in rehabilitation of COPD together with ET....

  18. Multimedia-Based Therapy Model for Non-Pharmacological Stroke with Decrease Impaired Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar Puji Sejati, Rr; Muhimmah, Izzati; Mahtarami, Affan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients who experience a decrease in muscle strength need to do exercises so that they can increase their muscle strength. In order to enable the patient does exercise independently the multimedia-based stroke therapy model is needed. These exercises can be done independently, with supervision of the family member at home. So, we develop prototype of the multimedia-based therapy for the family member so that they can assist patients performing exercises without attending therapy session in hospital. This model was built according to the advices from physiotherapist and a medical rehabilitation doctor. This model has been evaluated through focused group discussion by physiotherapists. And they gave positive responses to this proposed model.

  19. Protein-containing nutrient supplementation following strength training enhances the effect on muscle mass, strength, and bone formation in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Olesen, J.L.; Matsumoto, K.

    2008-01-01

    following each training session. At inclusion, each woman was randomly and double-blindedly assigned to a nutrient group or a placebo (control) group. Muscle hypertrophy was evaluated from biopsies, MRI, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans, and muscle strength was determined in a dynamometer......We evaluated the response of various muscle and bone adaptation parameters with 24 wk of strength training in healthy, early postmenopausal women when a nutrient supplement (protein, carbohydrate, calcium, and vitamin D) or a placebo supplement (a minimum of energy) was ingested immediately....... Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using DEXA scans, and bone turnover was determined from serum osteocalcin and collagen type I cross-linked carboxyl terminal peptide. The nutrient group improved concentric and isokinetic (60°/s) muscle strength from 6 to 24 wk by 9 ± 3% (P

  20. Protein-containing nutrient supplementation following strength training enhances the effect on muscle mass, strength, and bone formation in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Olesen, Jens L; Matsumoto, Keitaro

    2008-01-01

    following each training session. At inclusion, each woman was randomly and double-blindedly assigned to a nutrient group or a placebo (control) group. Muscle hypertrophy was evaluated from biopsies, MRI, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans, and muscle strength was determined in a dynamometer......We evaluated the response of various muscle and bone adaptation parameters with 24 wk of strength training in healthy, early postmenopausal women when a nutrient supplement (protein, carbohydrate, calcium, and vitamin D) or a placebo supplement (a minimum of energy) was ingested immediately....... Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using DEXA scans, and bone turnover was determined from serum osteocalcin and collagen type I cross-linked carboxyl terminal peptide. The nutrient group improved concentric and isokinetic (60 degrees /s) muscle strength from 6 to 24 wk by 9 +/- 3% (P

  1. Effects of phosphatidic acid supplementation on muscle thickness and strength in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Sell, Katie M; Ghigiarelli, Jamie J; Kelly, Christopher F; Shone, Edward W; Accetta, Matthew R; Baum, Jamie B; Mangine, Gerald T

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of phosphatidic acid (PA) supplementation on muscle thickness and strength following an 8 week supervised resistance-training program. Fifteen resistance trained men (22.8 ± 3.5 years; 80.6 ± 8.7 kg; 178.1 ± 5.6 cm; 14.6% ± 8.8% body fat) were randomly assigned to a group that either consumed 750 mg of PA or a placebo (PL). Testing was carried out before (PRE) and after (POST) training/supplementation for muscle thickness and strength. Muscle thickness of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps brachii (BB), and triceps brachii (TB) muscles were measured via ultrasonography, along with 1 repetition maximum (1RM) of squat, deadlift, and bench press. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using PRE values as the covariate, did not reveal any group differences for measures of muscle thickness in the RF (PA: 3.6% ± 5.2%; PL: 3.2% ± 4.2%, p = 0.97), VL (PA: 23.4% ± 18.1%, PL: 12.5% ± 15.4%, p = 0.37), BB (PA: 3.7% ± 6.4%, PL: 9.6% ± 12.4%, p = 0.86), or TB (PA: 15.1% ± 17.9%, PL: 10.7% ± 19.3%, p = 0.79). Likewise, no group differences were observed in changes in squat (PA: 8.4% ± 4.1%, PL: 8.1% ± 4.2%, p = 0.79), deadlift (PA: 10.1% ± 10.1%, PL: 8.9% ± 9.5%, p = 0.66), or bench press (PA: 5.7% ± 5.5%, PL: 5.1% ± 3.0%, p = 0.76) exercises. Collectively, however, all participants experienced significant (p muscle thickness and strength. Results of this study suggest that PA supplementation, in combination with a 3 days·week(-1) resistance-training program for 8 weeks, did not have a differential effect compared with PL on changes in muscle thickness or 1RM strength.

  2. Relationship between muscle strength parameters and functional capacity in persons with mild to moderate degree multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Tue; Vissing, Kristian; Langeskov-Christensen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maximal muscle strength has been shown to be an important predictor of functional capacity for persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Another muscle strength parameter known to be important for functional capacity in other patient groups is rate of force development (RFD) in knee...... is the better predictor of walking performance in persons with mild to moderate multiple sclerosis. RFD, although also important for functional capacity, is a less strong predictor. Maximal strength of the knee extensors, rather than the knee flexors, predicted performance in the stairclimb and 5STS tests........ Multiple linear regressions were performed to determine which muscle strength parameter would serve as a stronger predictor of walking performance. RESULTS: Both RFD and maximal muscle strength correlated with functional capacity. Correlations were strongest for knee extensors and flexors of the weaker leg...

  3. Training-induced changes in muscle CSA, muscle strength, EMG, and rate of force development in elderly subjects after long-term unilateral disuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Aagaard, Per; Rosted, Anna

    2004-01-01

    , the present study examined the effect of three types of training regimes after unilateral prolonged disuse and subsequent hip-replacement surgery on maximal muscle strength, rapid muscle force [rate of force development (RFD)], muscle activation, and muscle size. Thirty-six subjects (60-86 yr) were randomized......The ability to develop muscle force rapidly may be a very important factor to prevent a fall and to perform other tasks of daily life. However, information is still lacking on the range of training-induced neuromuscular adaptations in elderly humans recovering from a period of disuse. Therefore...

  4. Hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with acetabular labral tears compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, M Dilani; Wilson, Stephen J; Hayes, David A; Watts, Mark C; Hides, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a source of hip pain and are considered to be a precursor to hip osteoarthritis. Hip flexor muscles contribute to hip joint stability and function but it is unknown if their size and function is altered in the presence of labral pathology. This study aimed to investigate hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with hip labral pathology compared to control subjects. 12 subjects diagnosed with an unilateral acetabular labral tear were compared to 12 control subjects matched for age and gender. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their lumbo-pelvic region. Average muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius, tensor fascia latae and rectus femoris muscles were measured. Hip flexion strength was measured by an externally fixed dynamometer. Individual muscle recruitment pattern during a resisted hip flexion exercise task was measured by muscle functional MRI. Hip flexor muscle strength was found to be decreased in patients with labral pathology compared to control subjects (p muscle size (all p > 0.17) and recruitment pattern (all p > 0.53). Decreased hip flexor muscle strength may affect physical function in patients with hip labral pathology by contributing to altered gait patterns and functional tasks. Clinical rehabilitation of these patients may need to include strengthening exercises for the hip flexor muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in muscle architecture of biceps femoris induced by eccentric strength training with nordic hamstring exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Fernandez, D; Docampo-Blanco, P; Martinez-Fernandez, J

    2017-03-17

    Eccentric strength training alters muscle architecture, but it is also an important factor for the prevention of hamstring injuries. The purpose was to determine the architectural adaptations of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) after eccentric strength training with nordic hamstring exercise (NHE), followed by a subsequent detraining period. The participants in this intervention (n=23) completed a period of 13 weeks consisting of a first week of control and prior training, followed by 8 weeks of eccentric strength training with NHE, and concluding with a 4-week period of detraining. The architectural characteristics of the BFlh were measured at rest using two-dimensional ultrasound before (M1-week 1) and after (M2-week 9) the eccentric strength training, and at the end of the detraining period (M3-week 13). The muscle fascicle length significantly increased (t=-7.73, d=2.28, P<.001) in M2 compared to M1, as well as the muscle thickness (t=-5.23, d=1.54, P<.001), while the pennation angle presented a significant decrease (t=7.81, d=2.3, P<.001). The muscle fascicle length decreased significantly (t=6.07, d=1.79, P<.001) in M3 compared to M2, while the pennation angle showed a significant increase (t=-4.63, d=1.36, P<.001). The results provide evidence that NHE may cause alterations in the architectural conditions of the BFlh and may have practical implications for injury prevention and rehabilitation programs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, E.; Memarzadeh, A.; Raut, P.; Arora, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on measurement of muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and other pathologies and to suggest guidelines to standardise protocols for future research in the field. Methods The Cochrane and PubMed libraries were searched for any publications using the terms ‘hip’, ‘muscle’, ‘strength’, and ‘measurement’ in the ‘Title, Abstract, Keywords’ field. A further search was performed using the terms ‘femoroacetabular’ or ‘impingement’. The search was limited to recent literature only. Results A total of 29 articles were reviewed to obtain information on a number of variables. These comprised the type of device used for measurement, rater standardisation, the type of movements tested, body positioning and comparative studies of muscle strength in FAI versus normal controls. The studies found that hip muscle strength is lower in patients with FAI; this is also true for the asymptomatic hip in patients with FAI. Conclusions Current literature on this subject is limited and examines multiple variables. Our recommendations for achieving reproducible results include stabilising the patient, measuring isometric movements and maximising standardisation by using a single tester and familiarising the participants with the protocol. Further work must be done to demonstrate the reliability of any new testing method. Cite this article: E. Mayne, A. Memarzadeh, P. Raut, A. Arora, V. Khanduja. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0081. PMID:28108483

  7. Muscle Strength Enhancement Following Home-Based Virtual Cycling Training in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n = 13) or a…

  8. Muscle Strength Enhancement Following Home-Based Virtual Cycling Training in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n = 13) or a…

  9. Assessing the accuracy of subject-specific, muscle-model parameters determined by optimizing to match isometric strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmitt, Holly J; Domire, Zachary J

    2016-12-01

    Biomechanical models are sensitive to the choice of model parameters. Therefore, determination of accurate subject specific model parameters is important. One approach to generate these parameters is to optimize the values such that the model output will match experimentally measured strength curves. This approach is attractive as it is inexpensive and should provide an excellent match to experimentally measured strength. However, given the problem of muscle redundancy, it is not clear that this approach generates accurate individual muscle forces. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate this approach using simulated data to enable a direct comparison. It is hypothesized that the optimization approach will be able to recreate accurate muscle model parameters when information from measurable parameters is given. A model of isometric knee extension was developed to simulate a strength curve across a range of knee angles. In order to realistically recreate experimentally measured strength, random noise was added to the modeled strength. Parameters were solved for using a genetic search algorithm. When noise was added to the measurements the strength curve was reasonably recreated. However, the individual muscle model parameters and force curves were far less accurate. Based upon this examination, it is clear that very different sets of model parameters can recreate similar strength curves. Therefore, experimental variation in strength measurements has a significant influence on the results. Given the difficulty in accurately recreating individual muscle parameters, it may be more appropriate to perform simulations with lumped actuators representing similar muscles.

  10. Self-regulatory strength depletion and muscle-endurance performance: a test of the limited-strength model in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Steven R; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Woodgate, Jennifer

    2011-07-01

    Self-regulation consumes a form of strength or energy. The authors investigated aftereffects of self-regulation depletion on muscle-endurance performance in older adults. Participants (N = 61, mean age = 71) were randomized to a self-regulation-depletion or control group and completed 2 muscle-endurance performance tasks involving isometric handgrip squeezing that were separated by a cognitive-depletion task. The depletion group showed greater deterioration of muscle-endurance performance than controls, F(1, 59) = 7.31, p = .009. Results are comparable to those of younger adults in a similar study and support Baumeister et al.'s limited-strength model. Self-regulation may contribute to central-nervous-system fatigue; however, biological processes may allow aging muscle to offset depletion of self-regulatory resources affecting muscle-endurance performance.

  11. Reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Lexell, Jan

    2010-06-01

    To assess the reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio. A test-retest reliability study. Thirty men and women (mean age 63 (standard deviation 6.4) years) with verified late effects of polio. Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength in both lower limbs were measured twice 7 days apart using a Biodex dynamometer (isokinetic concentric contractions at 60 degrees /sec and isometric contractions with knee flexion angle 90 degrees) and a Leg Extension/Curl Rehab exercise machine with pneumatic resistance (HUR) (isotonic contractions). Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1,1), the mean difference between the test sessions (d) together with the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%), the smallest real difference (SRD and SRD%) and Bland-Altman graphs. Test-retest agreements were high, (ICC1,1 0.93-0.99) and measurement errors generally small. The SEM% was 4-14% and the SRD% 11-39%, with the highest values for the isokinetic measurements. Knee muscle strength can be measured reliably and can be used to detect real changes after an intervention for a group of persons with late effects of polio, whereas the values may be too high for single individuals or to detect smaller short-term changes over time for a group of individuals.

  12. The effects of accentuated eccentric loading on strength, muscle hypertrophy, and neural adaptations in trained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jason P; Docherty, David

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the strength and neuromuscular adaptations for dynamic constant external resistance (DCER) training and dynamic accentuated external resistance (DAER) training (resistance training employing an accentuated load during eccentric actions). Male subjects active in resistance training were assigned to either a DCER training group (n = 10) or a DAER training group (n = 8) for 9 weeks. Subjects in the DCER group performed 4 sets of 10 repetitions with a load of 75% concentric 1 repetition maximum (RM). Subjects in the DAER group performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions with a concentric load of 75% of 1RM and an eccentric load of approximately 120% of concentric 1RM. Three measures reflecting adaptation of elbow flexors and extensors were recorded pretraining and posttraining: concentric 1RM, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), and specific tension. Strength was assessed at midtraining periods. No significant changes in muscle CSA were observed in either group. Both training groups experienced significant increases in concentric 1RM and specific tension of both the elbow flexors and extensors, but compared with DCER training, DAER training produced significantly greater increases in concentric 1RM of the elbow extensors. These results suggest that, for some exercises, DAER training may be more effective than DCER training in developing strength within a 9-week training phase. However, for trained subjects, neither protocol is effective in eliciting muscle hypertrophy.

  13. Depression Is Associated With Muscle Mass And Strength In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rim Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common psychiatric complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle mass and strength, is expected to be associated with depression, because both are closely linked to physical inactivity and functional impairment. We investigated the association of sarcopenia with depression in patients with ESRD. A total of 115 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD were included in this study. Muscle mass was assessed by lean tissue index (LTI using portable whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, and muscle strength was measured with handgrip strength (HGS. Depression was defined as Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II score ≥16. About 60% of prevalent HD patients had depression. Compared to subjects without depression, depressed patients had a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (45.5 vs. 8.2%, p<0.001 and significantly increased serum IL-6 and hs-CRP level. However, (prealbumin and body mass index (BMI failed to correlate with BDI-II. HGS and LTI had a consistent negative effect on BDI-II even after adjusting other parameters including inflammation. In multivariate analysis, lower , increased IL-6 and β2-microglobulin,and sarcopenia were significant predictors for depression; sarcopenia was most powerful [odds ratio 9.01, 95% CI 3.60-12.22, p=0.001]. In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia and depression was considerably high and and the presence of sarcopenia was an important predictor for depression.

  14. Effects of mate tea consumption on muscle strength and oxidative stress markers after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, Vilma Pereira; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; Tamborindeguy, Aline Cavalheiro; Camargo, Carolina de Quadros; de Moura, Bruno Monteiro; Brunetta, Henver Simionato; Sakugawa, Raphael Luiz; de Oliveira, Marina Vieira; Puel, Emiliana de Oliveira; Nunes, Everson Araújo; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2016-04-01

    Dietary phytochemical supplementation may improve muscle recovery from exercise. In this study, we investigated the effect of mate tea (MT) consumption - a phenol-rich beverage - on muscle strength and oxidative stress biomarkers after eccentric exercise. In a randomised, cross-over design, twelve men were assigned to drink either MT or water (control; CON) for 11 d. On the 8th day, subjects performed three sets of twenty maximal eccentric elbow flexion exercises. Maximal isometric elbow flexion force was measured before and at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise. Blood samples were obtained before and at 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise and analysed for total phenolics, GSH, GSSG, GSH:GSSG ratio and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH). After eccentric exercise, muscle strength was significantly reduced over time, regardless of treatments. However, MT improved the rate of strength recovery by 8·6 % on the 1st day after exercise (Pexercise in both trials (Pexercise in CON (Pexercise. MT also favoured the concentration of blood antioxidant compounds.

  15. Effects of Egg White Protein Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Serum Free Amino Acid Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Kawano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of egg white protein compared to carbohydrate intake prior to exercise on fat free mass (FFM, one repetition maximum (1RM muscle strength and blood biochemistry in female athletes. Thirty healthy female collegiate athletes were recruited for this study and matched by sport type, body fat percentage and 1RM leg curl muscle strength. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: protein group (15.0 g egg white protein; 75 kcal and carbohydrate group (17.5 g maltodextrin, 78 kcal. Supplements were administered daily at the same time in a double-blind manner prior to training during an 8-week period. Measurements were performed before and after the 8-week regimen. The mean dietary energy intake did not change throughout the study period. FFM and 1RM assessments (i.e., leg curl, leg extension, squat, and bench press increased in both groups. Furthermore, serum urea and serum citrulline levels after the 8-week regimen increased significantly only in the protein group. Our findings indicated that compared to the carbohydrate supplement, the protein supplement was associated with some changes in protein metabolites but not with changes in body composition or muscle strength.

  16. Improved knee extensor strength with resistance training associates with muscle specific miRNAs in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L; Marsh, Anthony P; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-02-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age=70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1 gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults.

  17. Isokinetic imbalance of hip muscles in soccer players with osteitis pubis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Walaa Sayed; Abdelraouf, Osama Ragaa; Elhafez, Salam Mohamed; Abdel-Aziem, Amr Almaz; Nassif, Nagui Sobhi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the isokinetic torques of hip flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors in soccer players suffering from osteitis pubis (OP), with normal soccer players. Twenty soccer male athletes with OP and 20 normal soccer athletes were included in this study. Peak torque/body weight (PT/BW) was recorded from hip flexor/extensor and abductor/adductor muscles during isokinetic concentric contraction modes at angular velocity of 2.1 rad · s(-1), for both groups. The results showed a significant difference between the normal and OP groups for hip flexors (P muscles (P > 0.05). Regarding the hip adductor/abductor PT ratio, there was no significant difference between the normal and OP groups of athletes (P > 0.05). The OP group displayed increase in hip flexor strength that disturbed the hip flexor/extensor torque ratio of OP. Therefore, increasing the hip extensor strength should be part of rehabilitation programmes of patients with OP.

  18. Effect of high-intensity home-based respiratory muscle training on strength of respiratory muscles following a stroke: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Kênia Kiefer Parreiras De; Nascimento, Lucas Rodrigues; Polese, Janaine Cunha; Ada, Louise; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2017-07-03

    Respiratory muscle training has shown to increase strength of the respiratory muscles following a stroke. However, low duration and/or intensity of training may be responsible for the small effect size seen and/or absence of carry-over effects to an activity, e.g., walking. Therefore, an investigation of the effects of long-duration, high-intensity respiratory muscle training is warranted. This proposed protocol for a randomized clinical trial will examine the efficacy of high-intensity respiratory muscle training to increase strength and improve activity following a stroke. This study will be a two-arm, prospectively registered, randomized controlled trial, with blinded assessors. Thirty-eight individuals who have suffered a stroke will participate. The experimental group will undertake a 40-min of respiratory muscle training program, seven days/week, for eight weeks in their homes. Training loads will be increased weekly. The control group will undertake a sham respiratory muscle training program with equivalent duration and scheduling of training. The primary outcome will be the strength of the inspiratory muscles, measured as maximal inspiratory pressure. Secondary outcomes will include expiratory muscle strength, inspiratory muscle endurance, dyspnea, respiratory complications, and walking capacity. Outcomes will be collected by a researcher blinded to group allocation at baseline (Week 0), after intervention (Week 8), and one month beyond intervention (Week 12). High-intensity respiratory muscle training may have the potential to optimize the strength of the respiratory muscles following a stroke. If benefits are carried over to activity, the findings may have broader implications, since walking capacity has been shown to predict physical activity and community participation on this population. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    of the muscle and finally how will this affect the performance of the athlete. In addition, the review will deal with muscle hypertrophy and how it develops with strength training. Overall, it is not the purpose of this review to give a comprehensive up-date of the area, but to pin-point a few issues from which...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...

  20. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the ACL group, at 70° at baseline and retest for the degenerative meniscus group, and at 60° at baseline and at 50° at retest for the cartilage group. Conclusion: This study underlines the importance of including torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from isokinetic assessments to identify the most severe quadriceps muscle

  1. Gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Michael B; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J Preston; Ferber, Reed

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) have described a history of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This leads to speculation that the underpinning mechanical causes of PFPS and PFOA may be similar. Although alterations in gait biomechanics and hip strength have been reported in PFPS, this relationship has not yet been explored in PFOA. Therefore the purpose of this study was compare gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength between PFOA patients and a healthy control group. Fifteen patients with symptomatic, radiographic PFOA and 15 controls participated. All patients underwent a walking gait analysis and maximal hip strength testing. Biomechanical variables of interest included the peak angular values of contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation during the stance phase. Hip abduction and external rotation strength were assessed using maximal voluntary isometric contractions. The PFOA group demonstrated significantly lower hip abduction strength compared to controls but no difference in hip external rotation strength. There were no statistical differences between the PFOA and control groups for contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation angles during walking. Despite patients with PFOA exhibiting weaker hip abductor muscle strength compared to their healthy counterparts they did not demonstrate alterations in pelvis or hip biomechanics during gait. These preliminary data suggests that weaker hip abductor strength does not result in biomechanical alterations during gait in this population.

  2. Effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery: respiratory muscle strength, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela Cangussu Barbalho-Moulim; Gustavo Peixoto Soares Miguel; Eli Maria Pazzianotto Forti; Flavio do Amaral Campos; Dirceu Costa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. SUBJECTS: Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle trainin...

  3. Basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb: comparison of suture button versus abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, Kristopher R; Nydick, Jason A; White, Brian D; Vaccaro, Lisa; Hess, Alfred V; Stone, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Our purpose was to compare the outcomes of patients with severe basilar thumb osteoarthritis treated with trapeziectomy and suspensionplasty using abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon versus a suture button device. A retrospective study was performed for patients undergoing trapeziectomy and suspensionplasty with APL tendon or suture button fixation. Outcome measures included disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH); visual analog score (VAS); grip strength; key pinch; tip pinch; and thumb opposition. Radiographic measurements, surgical times, and complications were recorded. Thirty-three patients in the APL tendon group and 27 patients in the suture button group had a minimum 6-month follow-up. VAS, DASH, and functional measurements improved after surgery for both groups. Mean operative time was 68 min for the APL tendon group and 48 min for the suture button group. Complications were similar between groups. The use of suture button fixation when compared to APL tendon suspensionplasty offers similar clinical outcomes. Therapeutic III.

  4. 25(OHD3 Levels Relative to Muscle Strength and Maximum Oxygen Uptake in Athletes

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    Książek Anna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is mainly known for its effects on the bone and calcium metabolism. The discovery of Vitamin D receptors in many extraskeletal cells suggests that it may also play a significant role in other organs and systems. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between 25(OHD3 levels, lower limb isokinetic strength and maximum oxygen uptake in well-trained professional football players. We enrolled 43 Polish premier league soccer players. The mean age was 22.7±5.3 years. Our study showed decreased serum 25(OHD3 levels in 74.4% of the professional players. The results also demonstrated a lack of statistically significant correlation between 25(OHD3 levels and lower limb muscle strength with the exception of peak torque of the left knee extensors at an angular velocity of 150°/s (r=0.41. No significant correlations were found between hand grip strength and maximum oxygen uptake. Based on our study we concluded that in well-trained professional soccer players, there was no correlation between serum levels of 25(OHD3 and muscle strength or maximum oxygen uptake.

  5. Neck and shoulder muscle strength in patients with tension-type headache: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L; Skotte, Jørgen H; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is highly prevalent in the general population, and it is characterized by increased muscle tenderness with increasing headache frequency and intensity. The aim of this case-control study was to compare muscle strength in neck and shoulder muscles in TTH patients and healthy controls by examining maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) during shoulder abduction, neck flexion and extension as well as the extension/flexion strength ratio of the neck. Sixty TTH patients and 30 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included. Patients were included if they had TTH ≥8 days per month. The MVC neck extensor and flexor muscles were tested with the participant seated upright. MVC shoulder abduction was tested with the individual lying supine. Compared to controls TTH patients had significantly weaker muscle strength in neck extension (p = 0.02), resulting in a significantly lower extension/flexion moment ratio (p = 0.03). TTH patients also showed a tendency toward significantly lower muscle strength in shoulder abduction (p = 0.05). Among the 60 TTH patients, 25 had frequent episodic TTH (FETTH), and 35 had chronic TTH (CTTH). Patients with TTH exhibited decreased muscle strength in the neck extensor muscles, inducing a reduced cervical extension/flexion ratio compared to healthy people. © International Headache Society 2015.

  6. The level of effort, rather than muscle exercise intensity determines strength gain following a six-week training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang-Hao; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of voluntary motor effort during a low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) muscle exercise training program on increasing muscle strength. Eighteen young and healthy individuals were randomly assigned to one of three groups: high mental effort (HME), low mental effort (LME), or a no-training control (CTRL) group. Training lasted for 6weeks (15min/day, 5days/week). The participants' right-elbow flexor muscle strength was measured before and after the training program. After training, the HME group gained 20.47±8.33% (P=0.01) strength while the LME and CTRL groups had negligible strength changes (1.89±0.96% and -3.27±2.61%, respectively; P>0.05) despite muscle contraction intensity (30% MVC) sustained during training was the same for the HME and LME groups. These results suggest that the level of effort involved in resistance exercise training plays a critical role in determining the amount of strength augmentation. The finding that high effort combined with low-level physical exercise training can significantly increase muscle strength has rehabilitation applications as many patients and frail older adults have difficulties in participating in high-intensity exercise training such as lifting heavy weights. High effort plus low-level muscle exercise might serve as a safe training regimen for effective muscle strengthening in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer for lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wang, Min-Hung; Lin, Hsiu-Ching

    2013-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer (HDD) for measuring lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities (ID). The other purposes were to: (1) compare the lower-limb muscle strength between children with and without ID; (2) probe the relationship between the muscle forces and agility performance in ID; and (3) explore the factors associated with muscle strength in ID. Sixty-one participants (30 boys and 31 girls; mean age=14.1 ± 3.3 year) were assessed by the HDD using a "make" test. The comparative group consisted of 63 typically developing children (33 boys and 30 girls; mean age=14.9 ± 2.1 year). The ID group demonstrated lower muscle groups than in typically developing group. Except for the ankle plantarflexors (ICC=0.69, SEM=0.72), test-retest analysis showed good intrarater reliability with ICC ranging from 0.81 to 0.96, and intrarater SEM values ranged from 0.40 to 0.57. The HDD has the potential to be a reliable tool for strength measurement in ID. Muscle strength was positively related to agility performance. Regression analysis indicated that height, weight, BMI, and activity level were significant predictors of muscle strength in ID.

  8. Preoperative muscle weakness as defined by handgrip strength and postoperative outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Pervez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced muscle strength- commonly characterized by decreased handgrip strength compared to population norms- is associated with numerous untoward outcomes. Preoperative handgrip strength is a potentially attractive real-time, non-invasive, cheap and easy-to-perform "bedside" assessment tool. Using systematic review procedure, we investigated whether preoperative handgrip strength was associated with postoperative outcomes in adults undergoing surgery. Methods PRISMA and MOOSE consensus guidelines for reporting systematic reviews were followed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (1980-2010 were systematically searched by two independent reviewers. The selection criteria were limited to include studies of preoperative handgrip strength in human adults undergoing non-emergency, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Study procedural quality was analysed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment score. The outcomes assessed were postoperative morbidity, mortality and hospital stay. Results Nineteen clinical studies (17 prospective; 4 in urgent surgery comprising 2194 patients were identified between1980-2010. Impaired handgrip strength and postoperative morbidity were defined inconsistently between studies. Only 2 studies explicitly ensured investigators collecting postoperative outcomes data were blinded to preoperative handgrip strength test results. The heterogeneity of study design used and the diversity of surgical procedures precluded formal meta-analysis. Despite the moderate quality of these observational studies, lower handgrip strength was associated with increased morbidity (n = 10 studies, mortality (n = 2/5 studies and length of hospital stay (n = 3/7 studies. Conclusions Impaired preoperative handgrip strength may be associated with poorer postoperative outcomes, but further work exploring its predictive power is warranted using prospectively acquired, objectively defined

  9. Effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery: respiratory muscle strength, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cangussu Barbalho-Moulim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. SUBJECTS: Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training (inspiratory muscle training group or usual care (control group. MAIN MEASURES: Respiratory muscle strength (maximal static respiratory pressure - maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion. RESULTS: After training, there was a significant increase only in the maximal inspiratory pressure in the inspiratory muscle training group. The maximal expiratory pressure, the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion did not show any significant change with training. In the postoperative period there was a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressure in both the groups. However, there was a decrease of 28% in the inspiratory muscle training group, whereas it was 47% in the control group. The decrease in maximal expiratory pressure and in lung volumes in the postoperative period was similar between the groups. There was a significant reduction in the measures of diaphragmatic excursion in both the groups. CONCLUSION: The preoperative inspiratory muscle training increased the inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure and attenuated the negative postoperative effects of open bariatric surgery in obese women for this variable, though not influencing the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion.

  10. Muscle strength, physical performance and physical activity as predictors of future knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Wise, Barton L; Lewis, Cora E;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between lower levels of muscle strength, physical performance and physical activity and the risk of knee replacement (KR) in older adults with frequent knee pain. METHOD: Participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) with knee pain on most...... of the past 30 days at baseline were included (n=1,257; mean (SD) age of 62.2 (8.2)). We examined the association between 1) baseline peak isokinetic knee extensor strength, (60°/sec, maximum out of 4 trials), 2) best time to stand in timed chair stand (2 trials of 5 repetitions), and 3) baseline Physical......% CI) 0.99 (0.99 to 1.00)), but not when adjusting for Kellgren-Lawrence grade (p = 0.97). CONCLUSION: Lower levels of chair stand performance and self-reported physical activity are not associated with an increased risk of KR within 7 years, while the independent effect of knee extensor strength...

  11. Vitamin D: A Review on Its Effects on Muscle Strength, the Risk of Fall, and Frailty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Halfon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is the main hormone of bone metabolism. However, the ubiquitary nature of vitamin D receptor (VDR suggests potential for widespread effects, which has led to new research exploring the effects of vitamin D on a variety of tissues, especially in the skeletal muscle. In vitro studies have shown that the active form of vitamin D, calcitriol, acts in myocytes through genomic effects involving VDR activation in the cell nucleus to drive cellular differentiation and proliferation. A putative transmembrane receptor may be responsible for nongenomic effects leading to rapid influx of calcium within muscle cells. Hypovitaminosis D is consistently associated with decrease in muscle function and performance and increase in disability. On the contrary, vitamin D supplementation has been shown to improve muscle strength and gait in different settings, especially in elderly patients. Despite some controversies in the interpretation of meta-analysis, a reduced risk of falls has been attributed to vitamin D supplementation due to direct effects on muscle cells. Finally, a low vitamin D status is consistently associated with the frail phenotype. This is why many authorities recommend vitamin D supplementation in the frail patient.

  12. Live strong and prosper: the importance of skeletal muscle strength for healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Michael; Breen, Leigh; Hamilton, D Lee; Philp, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Due to improved health care, diet and infrastructure in developed countries, since 1840 life expectancy has increased by approximately 2 years per decade. Accordingly, by 2050, a quarter of Europe's population will be over 65 years, representing a 10 % rise in half a century. With this rapid rise comes an increased prevalence of diseases of ageing and associated healthcare expenditure. To address the health consequences of global ageing, research in model systems (worms, flies and mice) has indicated that reducing the rate of organ growth, via reductions in protein synthetic rates, has multi-organ health benefits that collectively lead to improvements in lifespan. In contrast, human pre-clinical, clinical and large cohort prospective studies demonstrate that ageing leads to anabolic (i.e. growth) impairments in skeletal muscle, which in turn leads to reductions in muscle mass and strength, factors directly associated with mortality rates in the elderly. As such, increasing muscle protein synthesis via exercise or protein-based nutrition maintains a strong, healthy muscle mass, which in turn leads to improved health, independence and functionality. The aim of this review is to critique current literature relating to the maintenance of muscle mass across lifespan and discuss whether maintaining or reducing protein synthesis is the most logical approach to support musculoskeletal function and by extension healthy human ageing.

  13. EFFECTS OF VIBRATION TRAINING AND DETRAINING ON BALANCE AND MUSCLE STRENGTH IN OLDER ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Marín

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of 2 days/week versus 4 days/week of Whole Body Vibration (WBV during eight weeks of WBV training on health-related quality of life (SF-36, balance and lower body strength, as well as short-term detraining (3 weeks on balance and lower body strength among older adults. Thirty-four older adults were randomly assigned to a control group (Control; n = 11 or to one of the vibration training groups: WBV 2 days/week (WBV_2d; n = 11 or WBV 4 days/week (WBV_4d; n = 12. The WBV groups exercised for 8 weeks, following 3 weeks of detraining. Lower body strength increased significantly (p < 0.05 for both groups, WBV_2d and WBV_4d, after 8-week training. A significant reduction in strength was observed following 3 weeks of detraining only in WBV_2d group (p < 0.05. All variables of the SF-36 and the balance test did not change after intervention in any group. 2 days/week and 4 days/week of WBV during 8 weeks showed the same improvements on muscle strength. 3 weeks of detraining did not reverse the gains in strength made during 32 sessions of WBV

  14. Abductor weakness and stresses around acetabular components of total hip arthroplasty: a finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherland, A. G.; D’Arcy, S.; Smart, D; Ashcroft, G. P.

    1999-01-01

    Abductor weakness, and the resulting Trendelenburg gait, after total hip arthroplasty is believed to be associated with a poor long-term outcome. We have constructed a two-dimensional finite element analysis using load cases to mimic this abductor weakness. The finite element analysis demonstrates slightly increased stresses, particularly at the bone-cement interface in the DeLee-Charnley zone I, which does not seem sufficient to explain the adverse effect of abductor weakness.

  15. Effect of resistance and aerobic exercises on bone mineral density, muscle strength and functional ability in children with hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Eid

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Based on obtained data, it can be concluded that, resistance and aerobic exercise training program is effective in increasing BMD, muscle strength and functional ability in children with hemophilia.

  16. Characteristics of Body Composition and Muscle Strength of North Korean Refugees during South Korean Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate the changes of body composition and muscle strength of North Korean refugees (NKRs according to their duration of stay in South Korea.MethodsNKRs who volunteered and were living in South Korea, aged 20 to 75 years were recruited. Body compositions were analyzed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Muscle strength was measured with the hand grip test. Demographic and migration information was obtained with a questionnaire.ResultsA total of 158 volunteers were recruited at a mean age of 48.3±11.4 years. The mean time from when they escaped from North Korea and arrived in South Korea was 5.8±4.3 years. Height, weight, and body surface area were significantly smaller in all NKRs compared to South Korean controls, except for women aged over 50 years. In females of younger ages (<50 years, NKRs with more than a 4-year stay in South Korea had a higher weight and fat mass than that of those who had a shorter stay (less than 4 years in South Korea. All NKRs had a weaker grip strength than that of the age-matched controls from South Korea.ConclusionThe NKRs showed relatively smaller physiques and weaker muscle strength than that of the South Korean controls. In younger female NKRs, shorter South Korean stay group showed small body weight and fat mass than that of longer South Korean stay group. Specific health support programs might be needed.

  17. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2016-12-01

    To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Ten patients with VIH and ten healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test-retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Truncal flexion and extension showed excellent test-retest reliability for both patients with VIH (ICC 0.91 and 0.99) and healthy controls (ICC 0.97 and 0.96). Bland and Altman plots showed that no systematic bias was present for neither truncal flexion nor extension when assessing reliability. For patients with VIH, no significant correlations between objective measures of truncal strength and IPAQ or SATS were found. For healthy controls, both truncal flexion (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) and extension (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) correlated significantly with SATS, while no other significant correlation between truncal strength measures and IPAQ was found. The Good Strength dynamometer provided a reliable, low-cost measure of truncal flexion and extension in patients with VIH.

  18. Surgical repair of chronic tears of the hip abductor mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Hywel; Zhaeentan, Sohelia; Tavakkolizadeh, Adel; Janes, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Lateral sided hip pain frequently presents to the orthopaedic clinic. The most common cause of this pain is trochanteric bursitis. This usually improves with conservative treatment. In a few cases it doesn't settle and warrants further investigation and treatment. We present a series of 28 patients who underwent MRI scanning for such pain, 16 were found to have a tear of their abductors. All 16 underwent surgical repair using multiple soft tissue anchors inserted into the greater trochanter of the hip to reattach the abductors. There were 15 females and 1 male. All patients completed a self-administered questionnaire pre-operatively and 1 year post-operatively. Data collected included: A visual analogue score for hip pain, Charnley modification of the Merle D'Aubigne and Postel hip score, Oxford hip score, Kuhfuss score of Trendelenburg and SF36 scores.Of the 16 patients who underwent surgery 5 had a failure of surgical treatment. There were 4 re ruptures, 3 of which were revised and 1 deep infection which required debridement. In the remaining 11 patients there were statistically significant improvements in hip symptoms. The mean change in visual analogue score was 5 out of 10 (p=0.0024) The mean change of Oxford hip score was 20.5 (p=0.00085). The mean improvement in SF-36 PCS was 8.5 (P=0.0020) and MCS 13.7 (P=0.134). 6 patients who had a Trendelenburg gait pre-surgery had normal gait 1 year following surgery.We conclude that hip abductor mechanism tear is a frequent cause of recalcitrant trochanteric pain that should be further investigated with MRI scanning. Surgical repair is a successful operation for reduction of pain and improvement of function. However there is a relatively high failure rate.

  19. Reduced Appendicular Lean Body Mass, Muscle Strength, and Size of Type II Muscle Fibers in Patients with Spondyloarthritis versus Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Kristine Røren Nordén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate body composition, muscle function, and muscle morphology in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA. Methods. Ten male SpA patients (mean ± SD age 39±4.1 years were compared with ten healthy controls matched for sex, age, body mass index, and self-reported level of physical exercise. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Musculus quadriceps femoris (QF strength was assessed by maximal isometric contractions prior to test of muscular endurance. Magnetic resonance imaging of QF was used to measure muscle size and calculate specific muscle strength. Percutaneous needle biopsy samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results. SpA patients presented with significantly lower appendicular lean body mass (LBM (p=0.02, but there was no difference in bone mineral density, fat mass, or total LBM. Absolute QF strength was significantly lower in SpA patients (p=0.03 with a parallel trend for specific strength (p=0.08. Biopsy samples from the SpA patients revealed significantly smaller cross-sectional area (CSA of type II muscle fibers (p=0.04, but no difference in CSA type I fibers. Conclusions. Results indicate that the presence of SpA disease is associated with reduced appendicular LBM, muscle strength, and type II fiber CSA.

  20. Effects of aquatic exercise on muscle strength and functional performance of individuals with osteoarthritis: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda de Mattos; Neiva Leite; Arthur Pitta; Paulo Cesar Barauce Bento

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Water-based exercises are recommended for people with osteoarthritis (OA), due to the beneficial effects on physical function, quality of life and symptom reduction. However, the effects on muscle strength are still controversial. The aim of this review was to assess and compare the effects of aquatic exercise programs on muscle strength and physical function in people with OA. A systematic search was performed at Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science databases. Clinical trials with inte...

  1. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength in nulliparous women and those with normal vaginal delivery and cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Poorandokht; Dabagh, Fariba; Iravani, Mina; Abedi, Parvin

    2017-08-01

    Weakness of the pelvic floor is quite common among women, and may occur following childbirth. The aim of this study was to compare pelvic floor muscle strength in women of reproductive age who were nulliparous or who had a cesarean section or normal vaginal delivery. In this cross-sectional study, 341 women including 96 nulliparous women, 73 women with a history of normal vaginal delivery with and without episiotomy, and 172 women with a history of elective or emergency cesarean section were recruited randomly from public health centers in Ahvaz, Iran. Data were collected using a sociodemographic questionnaire and a checklist was used to record weight, height, body mass index, and pelvic floor muscle strength. Pelvic floor muscle strength was measured with the woman in the lithotomy position using a Peritron 9300 V perineometer. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, the least significant difference test and the chi-squared test. The nulliparous women had the highest mean pelvic muscle strength (55.62 ± 15.86 cm H2O). Women who had vaginal delivery with episiotomy had the lowest pelvic muscle strength (32.71 ± 14 cm H2O). In nulliparous women pelvic floor muscle strength was higher than in women who had normal vaginal delivery with episiotomy (p cesarean section (elective or emergency, p = 0.245). Nulliparous women had the highest pelvic floor muscle strength and there was no significant difference in pelvic floor muscle strength between women with normal vaginal delivery and those with cesarean section.

  2. Associations between Muscle Strength Asymmetry and Impairments in Gait and Posture in Young Brain-Injured Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijkoningen, David; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Vander Linden, Catharine; Van Herpe, Katrin; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to deficits in gait and posture, which are often asymmetric. A possible factor mediating these deficits may be asymmetry in strength of the leg muscles. However, muscle strength in the lower extremities has rarely been investigated in (young) TBI patients. Here, we investigated associations between lower-extremity muscle weakness, strength asymmetry, and impairments in gait and posture in young TBI patients. A group of young patients with moderate-to-severe TBI (n=19; age, 14 years 11 months ±2 years) and a group of typically developing subjects (n=31; age, 14 years 1 month±3 years) participated in this study. A force platform was used to measure postural sway to quantify balance control during normal standing and during conditions of compromised visual and/or somatosensory feedback. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were assessed during comfortable and fast-speed walking, using an electronic walkway. Muscle strength in four lower-extremity muscle groups was measured bilaterally using a handheld dynamometer. Findings revealed that TBI patients had poorer postural balance scores across all sensory conditions, as compared to typically developing subjects. During comfortable and fast gait, TBI patients demonstrated a lower gait velocity, longer double-support phase, and increased step-length asymmetry. Further, TBI patients had a reduced strength of leg muscles and an increased strength asymmetry. Correlation analyses revealed that asymmetry in muscle strength was predictive of a poorer balance control and a more variable and asymmetric gait. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to measure strength asymmetry in leg muscles of a sample of TBI patients and illustrate the importance of muscular asymmetry as a potential marker and possible risk factor of impairments in control of posture and gait.

  3. Effect of isokinetic training on muscle strength and postural balance in children with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed A; Aly, Sobhy M; Huneif, Mohamed A; Ismail, Dina K

    2017-06-01

    Children with Down's syndrome (DS) often have greater postural sway and delay in motor development. Muscle weakness and hypotonia, particularly of the lower extremities, are theorized to impair their overall physical health and ability to perform daily activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of isokinetic training on muscle strength and postural balance in children with DS. Thirty-one children with DS ranging in age from 9 to 12 years were assigned randomly into two groups. The control group received the conventional physical therapy, whereas the study group received the same therapy as the control group in addition to the isokinetic training 3 days a week for 12 weeks. Measurement of stability indices using the Biodex Stability System as well as peak torque of knee flexors and extensors of both sides using the isokinetic dynamometer was performed before and after 12 weeks of the treatment program. Each group showed significant improvements in postural balance and peak torque of knee flexors and extensors (Ptraining program induced greater improvements in muscle strength and postural balance in children with DS.

  4. Low-load Slow Movement Squat Training Increases Muscle Size and Strength but Not Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, S; Maeo, S; Tayashiki, K; Nakatani, M; Kanehisa, H

    2016-04-01

    We tested a hypothesis that low-load squat training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) would increase muscle size and strength but not necessarily power. Healthy young men were assigned to LST [50% one-repetition maximum (1-RM) load, 3 s for lowering/lifting without pause: n=9] or low-load normal speed (LN: 50% 1-RM load, 1 s for lowering/lifting with 1-s pause; n=7) groups. Both groups underwent an 8-week squat training program (10 repetitions/set, 3 sets/day, and 3 days/week) using the assigned methods. Before and after the intervention, quadriceps femoris muscle thickness, maximal torque during isometric hip extension and knee extension, 1-RM squat, lifting power from squatting position and rate of electromyography rise (RER) in knee extensors during the task, leg extension power and vertical jump height were measured. After the intervention, the LN group showed no changes in all the variables. The LST group significantly (Pmuscle thickness (6-10%), isometric hip extension torque (18%) and 1-RM squat (10%), but not isometric knee extension torque, lifting power and RER, leg extension power and vertical jump height. These results suggest that LST can increase muscle size and task-related strength, but has little effect on power production during dynamic explosive movements.

  5. Modeling and experiments on the drive characteristics of high-strength water hydraulic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengmeng; Hou, Jiaoyi; Ning, Dayong; Gong, Xiaofeng; Gong, Yongjun

    2017-05-01

    Fluidic artificial muscles are popular in robotics and function as biomimetic actuators. Their pneumatic version has been widely investigated. A novel water hydraulic artificial muscle (WHAM) with high strength is developed in this study. WHAMs can be applied to underwater manipulators widely used in ocean development because of their environment-friendly characteristics, high force-to-weight ratio, and good bio-imitability. Therefore, the strength of WHAMs has been improved to fit the requirements of underwater environments and the work pressure of water hydraulic components. However, understanding the mechanical behaviors of WHAMs is necessary because WHAMs use work media and pressure control that are different from those used by pneumatic artificial muscles. This paper presents the static and dynamic characteristics of the WHAM system, including the water hydraulic pressure control circuit. A test system is designed and built to analyze the drive characteristics of the developed WHAM. The theoretical relationships among the amount of contraction, pressure, and output drawing force of the WHAM are tested and verified. A linearized transfer function is proposed, and the dynamic characteristics of the WHAM are investigated through simulation and inertia load experiments. Simulation results agree with the experimental results and show that the proposed model can be applied to the control of WHAM actuators.

  6. EFFECT OF TREADMILL TRAINING ON QUADRICEPS AND HAMSTRING MUSCLES STRENGTH IN CHILDREN WITH KNEE HEAMARTHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Mahmoud Abd-Elmonem,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heamarthrosis is the most disabling complication of hemophilia causing pain, swelling, limited joint range, and weakness. Without appropriate treatment, chronic heamarthrosis remains a serious problem with permanent disability. The Purpose of this work was to study the effect of treadmill training on quadriceps and hamstring muscles strength in children with knee heamarthrosis. Material and methods: Thirty hemophilic male children with unilateral knee heamarthrosis, their ages ranged from 8 to 12 years. They were divided randomly into two groups in equal numbers, control (A and study (B, 15 patients each. Both groups received traditional treatment program for one hour 5 days / weak, in addition the study group received treadmill training for 15 minutes. Peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles was measured by Biodex Isokinetic Dynamometer. Knee swelling was measured by tape measurement. Assessment was performed before and after three successive months of treatment. Results: The results revealed significant difference in all tested variables (p<0.05 after three months of treatment in both groups in favor to the study group. Conclusion: Treadmill training is beneficial in increasing muscle strength and reducing joint swelling in children with knee heamarthrosis.

  7. Recovery of Muscle Strength After Intact Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair According to Preoperative Rotator Cuff Tear Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jaeyoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recovery of muscle strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size has not yet been well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recovery period of muscle strength by a serial assessment of isometric strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size. The hypothesis was that muscle strength in patients with small and medium tears would recover faster than that in those with large-to-massive tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 164 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included. Isometric strength in forward flexion (FF), internal rotation (IR), and external rotation (ER) was evaluated preoperatively and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to evaluate the quality of the rotator cuff muscle, including fatty infiltration, occupation ratio, and tangent sign. Patient satisfaction as well as visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Constant scores were assessed at every follow-up. Muscle strength demonstrated the slowest recovery in pain relief and the restoration of shoulder function. To reach the strength of the uninjured contralateral shoulder in all 3 planes of motion, recovery took 6 months in patients with small tears and 18 months in patients with medium tears. Patients with large-to-massive tears showed continuous improvement in strength up to 18 months; however, they did not reach the strength of the contralateral shoulder at final follow-up. At final follow-up, mean strength in FF, IR, and ER was 113.0%, 118.0%, and 112.6% of the contralateral shoulder in patients with small tears, respectively; 105.0%, 112.1%, and 102.6% in patients with medium tears, respectively; and 87.6%, 89.5%, and 85.2% in patients with large-to-massive tears, respectively. Muscle strength in any direction did not significantly correlate with

  8. Muscle Strength, Power, and Morphologic Adaptations After 6 Weeks of Compound vs. Complex Training in Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Gloumis, Giorgos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Blazevich, Anthony J; Zaras, Nikolaos; Georgiadis, Giorgos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of compound vs. complex resistance training on strength, high-speed movement performance, and muscle composition. Eighteen young men completed compound (strength and power sessions on alternate days) or complex training (strength and power sets within a single session) 3 times per week for 6 weeks using bench press, leg press, Smith machine box squat, and jumping exercises. Pre- and posttraining, jumping and throwing performance and maximum bench press, leg press, and Smith machine box squat strength were evaluated. The architecture of vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle was assessed using ultrasound imaging. Vastus lateralis morphology was assessed from muscle biopsies. Jumping (4 ± 3%) and throwing (9 ± 8%) performance increased only with compound training (p power training on alternate days is more effective for enhancing lower-limb and whole-body power, whereas training on the same day may induce greater increases in strength and fiber hypertrophy.

  9. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period.

  10. Ageing influence in the evolution of strength and muscle mass in women with fibromyalgia: the al-Ándalus project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Aparicio, Virginia A; Santos E Campos, María Aparecida; García-Pinillos, Felipe; Herrador-Colmenero, Manuel; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with physical disabilities in daily activities. Moreover, patients with fibromyalgia present similar levels of functional capacity and physical condition than elderly people. The aim of this study was to analyse the evolution of strength and muscle mass in women with fibromyalgia along ageing. A total sample of 492 fibromyalgia patients and 279 healthy control women were included in the study. Participants in each group were further divided into four age subgroups: subgroup 1: 30-39 years old, subgroup 2: 40-49 years old, subgroup 3: 50-59 years old and subgroup 4: 60-69 years old. Standardized field-based fitness tests were used to assess muscle strength (30-s chair stand, handgrip strength and arm curl tests). Fibromyalgia patients did not show impairment on muscle mass along ageing, without values of skeletal muscle mass index below 6.76 kg/m(2) in any group. However, in all variables of muscle strength, the fibromyalgia group showed less strength than the healthy group (p fibromyalgia group (p fibromyalgia showed a reduction in muscle strength along ageing process, with significantly lower scores than healthy women for each age group, representing a risk of dynapenia.

  11. The Influence of Radiographic Severity on the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Joint Loading in Obese Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Aaboe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between knee muscle strength and the external knee adduction moment during walking in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and whether disease severity influences this relationship. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 136 elderly obese (BMI>30 adults with predominant medial knee osteoarthritis. Muscle strength, standing radiographic severity as measured by the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, and the peak external knee adduction moment were measured at self-selected walking speed. Results. According to radiographic severity, patients were classified as “less severe” (KL 1-2, N=73 or “severe” (KL 3-4, N=63. A significant positive association was demonstrated between the peak knee adduction moment and hamstring muscle strength in the whole cohort (P=.047. However, disease severity did not influence the relationship between muscle strength and dynamic medial knee joint loading. Severe patients had higher peak knee adduction moment and more varus malalignment (P<.001. Conclusion. Higher hamstring muscle strength relates to higher estimates of dynamic knee joint loading in the medial compartment. No such relationship existed for quadriceps muscle strength. Although cross sectional, the results suggest that hamstrings function should receive increased attention in future studies and treatments that aim at halting disease progression.

  12. Role of the nervous system in sarcopenia and muscle atrophy with aging: strength training as a countermeasure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, P; Suetta, C; Caserotti, P

    2010-01-01

    and size (sarcopenia), resulting in impaired mechanical muscle performance that in turn leads to a reduced functional capacity during everyday tasks. Concurrently, maximum muscle strength, power, and rate of force development are decreased with aging, even in highly trained master athletes. The impairment...

  13. COMPARISON OF CONCENTRIC AND ECCENTRIC HAMSTRING STRENGTH TRAINING IN IMPROVING MUSCLE STRENGTH AND POWER AMONG FUTSAL PLAYERS A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar Nedunchezhiyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hamstring injury is a common problem in many sports, especially those involving acceleration and maximal sprints. Hamstring strains are both common and painful. During sprinting the hip flexor and knee extensor torques are frequently produced and is opposed by the hamstring muscles, hence there are numerous studies done on the muscle strength training to prevent the hamstring strain injury as it is statistically stated as the highest rate involved injury in the contact sport. This study has been focused to evaluate the effectiveness of concentric and eccentric exercises in improving hamstring muscle strength and power among futsal players. Method: Thirty recreational futsal players were recruited for the study and were randomly divided into two groups. Each group received either hamstring curl exercise (concentric or Nordic hamstring exercise (eccentric twice a week for 4 weeks. The manual muscle test (MMT and 40-yard dash test was used to evaluate the muscle strength and power respectively by comparing the pretest and posttest values for both groups. Results: Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that there is no statistically significant difference between pre and post test values of MMT (Concentric (right side, z=.317; left side, z=.157, Eccentric (right side, z=.157; left side, z=.317 in both groups. Based on paired 't' test there is a significant difference between the pre and post test on improving muscle power [Concentric group, P=.020; Eccentric Group, P=.000]. Mann–Whitney U test and unpaired 't' test showed that there is no significant difference between both groups of MMT (z=.775 and 40-yard dash test (P=.707 respectively. Conclusion: The concentric strength training and eccentric strength training have a similar effect in improving hamstring muscle power in futsal players.

  14. Adaptations to long-term strength training of ankle joint muscles in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Emilie; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to enquire whether older adults, who continue plantar-flexion (PF) strength training for an additional 6-month period, would achieve further improvements in neuromuscular performance, in the ankle PFs, and in the antagonist dorsi-flexors (DFs). Twenty-three healthy older volunteers (mean age 77.4 +/- 3.7 years) took part in this investigation and 12 of them followed a 1-year strength-training program. Both neural and muscular factors were examined during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques in ankle PF and DF pre-training, post 6 and post 12 months. The main finding was that 6 months of additional strength training of the PFs, beyond 6 months, allowed further improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults. Indeed, during the first 6 months of progressive resistance training, there was an increase in the PF MVC torque of 11.1 +/- 19.9 N m, and then of 11.1 +/- 17.9 N m in the last 6-month period. However, it was only after 1 year that there was an improvement in the evoked contraction at rest in PF (+ 8%). The strength training of the agonist PF muscles appeared to have an impact on the maximal resultant torque in DF. However, it appeared that this gain was first due to modifications occurring in the trained PFs muscles, then, it seemed that the motor drive of the DFs per se was altered. In conclusion, long-term strength training of the PFs resulted in continued improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults, beyond the initial 6 months.

  15. COMPARISON OF CONCENTRIC AND ECCENTRIC HAMSTRING STRENGTH TRAINING IN IMPROVING MUSCLE STRENGTH AND POWER AMONG FUTSAL PLAYERS A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Arunkumar Nedunchezhiyan; Syed Abudaheer Kajamohideen; Ilayaraja AlagiaThiruvevenkadam; Karthikeyan Rajendran; Lorrian Shin Chee Lim; Anithabhavani Nedunchezhiyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hamstring injury is a common problem in many sports, especially those involving acceleration and maximal sprints. Hamstring strains are both common and painful. During sprinting the hip flexor and knee extensor torques are frequently produced and is opposed by the hamstring muscles, hence there are numerous studies done on the muscle strength training to prevent the hamstring strain injury as it is statistically stated as the highest rate involved injury in the contact sport. This...

  16. Motor unit synchronization in FDI and biceps brachii muscles of strength-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fling, Brett W; Christie, Anita; Kamen, Gary

    2009-10-01

    Motor unit (MU) synchronization is the simultaneous or near-simultaneous firing of two MUs which occurs more often than would be expected by chance. The present study sought to investigate the effects of exercise training, muscle group, and force level, by comparing the magnitude of synchronization in the biceps brachii (BB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of untrained and strength-trained college-aged males at two force levels, 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 80% MVC. MU action potentials were recorded directly via an intramuscular needle electrode. The magnitude of synchronization was assessed using previously-reported synchronization indices: k', E, and CIS. Synchronization was significantly higher in the FDI than in the BB. Greater synchronization was observed in the strength-trained group with CIS, but not with E or k'. Also, synchronization was significantly greater at 80% MVC than at 30% MVC with E, but only moderately greater with CIS and there was no force difference with k'. Synchronization prevalence was found to be greater in the BB (80.1%) than in the FDI (71.5%). Thus, although the evidence is a bit equivocal, it appears that MU synchronization is greater at higher forces, and greater in strength-trained individuals than in untrained subjects.

  17. Eccentric hip abductor weakness in patients with symptomatic external snapping hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Thorborg, Kristian; Søballe, K;

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic external snapping hip can be a long-standing condition affecting physical function in younger people between 15-40 years. Gluteal weakness has been suggested to be associated with the condition. The aim of this study was to investigate whether eccentric hip abduction strength is decre......Symptomatic external snapping hip can be a long-standing condition affecting physical function in younger people between 15-40 years. Gluteal weakness has been suggested to be associated with the condition. The aim of this study was to investigate whether eccentric hip abduction strength...... is decreased in patients with external snapping hip compared with healthy matched controls, and to examine isometric hip abduction, adduction, extension, flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation in patients with external snapping hip and matched controls. Thirteen patients with external snapping hip....... Eccentric hip abduction strength was 16% lower in patients with external snapping hip compared with healthy matched controls (1.50 ± 0.47 Nm/kg versus 1.82 ± 0.48 Nm/kg, P = 0.01). No other strength differences were measured between patients and controls (P > 0.05). Eccentric hip abductor weakness...

  18. Effects of functional movement strength training on strength, muscle size, kinematics, and motor function in cerebral palsy: a 3-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ah; You, Joshua H; Kim, Dong A; Lee, Min Jin; Hwang, Pil Woo; Lee, Nam Gi; Park, Jeong Joon; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the long-term effects of comprehensive hand repetitive intensive strengthening training (CHRIST) on strength, morphological muscle size, kinematics, and associated motor functional changes in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Ten children (5 boys, 5 girls; age range, 6-11 years, mean age, 8.6 years) participated in the study. The children were classified according to the Manual Ability Classification System: 5 were Level II, 2 were Level III, and 3 were Level IV. Quantitative biomechanical measurements were performed to determine muscle strength, muscle size, kinematics (normalized jerk score), and motor function using a dynamometer, ultrasound, Vicon motion analysis, and standardized clinical tests (Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Functional Independence Measure, and Pediatric Motor Activity Log), respectively. Muscle strength, muscle size, kinematics, and motor function significantly improved after a 10-week intervention (3 times a week), and the long-term effects remained even at the 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the long-term efficacy of upper extremity strength training using the novel CHRIST system in children with CP, which will potentially open up new horizons for effective management in pediatric neurorehabilitation.

  19. Muscle stiffness, strength loss, swelling and soreness following exercise-induced injury in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J N; Chleboun, G; Conatser, R

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to study injury-related changes in muscle stiffness, injury to the elbow flexors of thirteen human subjects was induced by a regimen of eccentric exercise. 2. Passive stiffness over an intermediate range of elbow angles was measured with a device which held the relaxed arm of the subject in the horizontal plane and stepped it through the range of elbow angles from 90 deg to near full extension at 180 deg. The relation between static torque and elbow angle was quite linear over the first 50 deg and was taken as stiffness. 3. Stiffness over this range of angles more than doubled immediately after exercise and remained elevated for about 4 days, and may result from low level myofibrillar activation induced by muscle stretch. 4. Arm swelling was biphasic; arm circumference increased by about 3% immediately after exercise, fell back toward normal, then increased by as much as 9% and remained elevated for as long as 9 days. 5. Ultrasound imaging showed most of the swelling immediately following the exercise to be localized to the flexor muscle compartment; subsequent swelling involved other tissue compartments as well. 6. Muscle strength declined by almost 40% after the exercise and recovery was only slight 10 days later; the half-time of recovery appeared to be as long as 5-6 weeks. PMID:8229798

  20. Androgen signaling in myocytes contributes to the maintenance of muscle mass and fiber type regulation but not to muscle strength or fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophoff, Jill; Van Proeyen, Karen; Callewaert, Filip; De Gendt, Karel; De Bock, Katrien; Vanden Bosch, An; Verhoeven, Guido; Hespel, Peter; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2009-08-01

    Muscle frailty is considered a major cause of disability in the elderly and chronically ill. However, the exact role of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in muscle remains unclear. Therefore, a postmitotic myocyte-specific AR knockout (mARKO) mouse model was created and investigated together with a mouse model with ubiquitous AR deletion. Muscles from mARKO mice displayed a marked reduction in AR protein (60-88%). Interestingly, body weights and lean body mass were lower in mARKO vs. control mice (-8%). The weight of the highly androgen-sensitive musculus levator ani was significantly reduced (-46%), whereas the weights of other peripheral skeletal muscles were not or only slightly reduced. mARKO mice had lower intra-abdominal fat but did not demonstrate a cortical or trabecular bone phenotype, indicating that selective ablation of the AR in myocytes affected male body composition but not skeletal homeostasis. Furthermore, muscle contractile performance in mARKO mice did not differ from their controls. Myocyte-specific AR ablation resulted in a conversion of fast toward slow fibers, without affecting muscle strength or fatigue. Similar results were obtained in ubiquitous AR deletion, showing lower body weight, whereas some but not all muscle weights were reduced. The percent slow fibers was increased, but no changes in muscle strength or fatigue could be detected. Together, our findings show that myocyte AR signaling contributes to the maintenance of muscle mass and fiber type regulation but not to muscle strength or fatigue. The levator ani weight remains the most sensitive and specific marker of AR-mediated anabolic action on muscle.

  1. Characteristics of upper extremity’s muscle strength in Turkish national wheelchair basketball players team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akınoğlu, Bihter; Kocahan, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reveal characteristics of muscle strength of upper extremities of wheelchair (WC) basketball players and to ensure more-specific training program preparation. Isokinetic muscle strength of 12 WC basketball players were assessed by ISOMED 2000 device. The assessment protocol was evaluated at 60°/sec velocity with 5 times repeated force and at 240°/sec with 15 times repeated force. This protocol was carried out individually for shoulder flexion-extension and wrist flexion-extension movements at the right and left extremities. The flexion/extension ratio was determined to be outside of the ratios accepted as normal for primarily shoulder joint and for wrist joint. The extension movement was stronger than flexion movement in the shoulders at both velocities and the flexion movement was stronger than ex-tension movement in the wrist. The repeat times where the peak torque occurred were 2–3 repeats at 60°/sec velocity during flexion and extension movements for the wrist and shoulders, and the peak torque occurred at an average of 5–6 repeats in the shoulders at 240°/sec velocity and it occurred at 3–4 repeats in the wrist. The angles where the peak torque of the shoulder flexion and extension occurred varied between 80°–115° at both velocities, and it varied between 5°–30° angles for the wrist. As this study revealed, determination of muscle strength characteristics of WC athletes and especially using objective isokinetic devices will guide the planning of the appropriate training and exercise programs and preventing sports injuries in long term.

  2. Effects of statin use on muscle strength, cognition, and depressive symptoms in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Joseph V; Tinetti, Mary E; Han, Ling; McAvay, Gail; Foody, Joanne M; Concato, John

    2007-03-01

    To determine the relationship between hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) use and proximal muscle strength, cognition, and depression in older adults. Observational cohort study. Outpatient primary care clinics. Seven hundred fifty-six community-dwelling veterans aged 65 and older. Timed chair stands (a measure of proximal muscle strength), Trail Making Test Part B (a measure of cognition), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score were measured at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Participants were assessed for statin prescriptions (and indications for or contraindications to their use), concomitant medication use, comorbidities, and other potential confounders. Statin users (n=315) took a mean 6.6 medications, versus 4.6 for nonusers (n=441), and had a median duration of statin use of 727 days. Statin users were more likely to be white and had (as expected) more cardiac, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular disease. Based on multivariable models adjusting for pertinent covariates, statin users performed modestly better than nonusers for timed chair stands (-0.5 seconds; P=.04), Trail Making Test Part B (-7.7 seconds; P=.08), and depression scores (-0.2 points; P=.49) at follow-up. Of potentially high-risk participants (based on age, comorbidity, and number of medications), statin users also showed similar 1-year changes as nonusers, although worsened depression scores were found in those with greater comorbidity (+0.88 points; P=.10). Older, community-dwelling male participants taking maintenance statin therapy had similar outcomes to those of nonusers in tests of muscle strength, cognition, and depression, but further examination of benefits and harms in different subgroups is warranted.

  3. Intrinsic muscle strength and voluntary activation of both lower limbs and functional performance after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Astrid M; Beltman, Marijke J; Gerrits, Karin H; Koppe, Peter; Janssen, Thomas W; Elich, Peter; de Haan, Arnold

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nature of muscle weakness in both legs after stroke compared with able-bodied control individuals and to examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of muscle weakness and coactivation of knee extensors and flexors as well as voluntary activation capacity of knee extensors of both paretic and non-paretic legs and indices of functional performance. Maximal voluntary isometric torques of knee extensors (MVCe) and flexors (MVCf) were determined in 14 patients (bilaterally) and 12 able-bodied controls. Simultaneous measurements were made of torque and surface EMG from agonist and antagonist muscles. Coactivation was calculated. Supramaximal triplets were evoked with electrical stimulation to estimate maximal torque capacity and degree of voluntary activation of knee extensors. MVCs, activation and coactivation parameters were correlated to scores of seven functional performance tests. MVCe, MVCf and voluntary activation were lower in paretic lower limb (PL) compared with both non-paretic lower limb (NL) and control. Besides, all these parameters of NL were also lower than control. Electrically evoked torque capacity of knee extensors of PL was about 60% of both NL and control, which were not significantly different from each other. Strong significant correlations between strength, as well as voluntary activation, and functional performance were found. Coactivation did not correlate well with functional performance. Thus, whereas for NL activation failure can explain weakness, for PL both activation failure and reduced intrinsic torque capacity are responsible for the severe weakness. Activation capacity and muscle strength correlated strongly to functional performance, while coactivation did not.

  4. Supplementation with a polyphenolic blend improves post-exercise strength recovery and muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli A. Herrlinger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise can initiate a cascade of inflammatory and oxidative stress–related events leading to delayed onset muscle soreness. Polyphenols possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective: The current study examined the effects of a proprietary polyphenolic blend (PB, containing catechins and theaflavins, on exercise performance and recovery following an eccentric exercise challenge. Design: Male participants (18–35 years of age received placebo or PB at a low dose (PB-L, 1,000 mg/d or high dose (PB-H, 2,000 mg/d for 13 weeks. During the 13th week of supplementation, participants completed an eccentric exercise (40 min downhill treadmill run followed by a strength assessment (peak torque on isokinetic leg extensions pre-exercise, and 24, 48, and 96 h post-exercise. Muscle soreness (subjective questionnaire, markers of muscle stress (cortisol and creatine phosphokinase [CK], and antioxidant capacity (ferric reducing ability of plasma [FRAP] were also assessed. Results: PB-H attenuated the decrease in peak torque observed in the placebo group from pre-exercise to 48 h (p=0.012 and 96 h (p=0.003 post-exercise. At 48 h post-exercise, PB-H reduced whole body and hamstring soreness (p=0.029 versus placebo. Chronic consumption of PB improved serum FRAP (p=0.039. As expected, serum cortisol and CK increased from pre- to post-exercise in all groups; however, by 96 h, cortisol and CK levels returned to pre-exercise levels following PB supplementation. At 96 h, the change in cortisol from pre- to post-exercise was significantly greater in placebo versus PB-H (p=0.039. Conclusion: These findings show that chronic consumption of PB improved antioxidant status, reduced markers of muscle stress, and promoted strength recovery post-exercise.

  5. Effects of resistance training under hypoxic conditions on muscle hypertrophy and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Kazumichi; Huang, Zhong; Nishiwaki, Masato; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Ogita, Futoshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been reported that exercise under hypoxic conditions elevates acute growth hormone secretion after exercise compared with that under normoxic conditions. This study examined the influence of resistance training under moderate hypoxic conditions on muscle thickness, strength and hormonal responses. Thirteen healthy men were assigned into two groups matched for physical fitness level and then randomized into two groups that performed exercise under normoxic (FiO2  = 20·9%) or hypoxic (FiO2  = 12·7%) conditions. Three sets of elbow extensions with unilateral arm were performed to exhaustion at a workload of a 10 repetition maximum with 1-minute intervals for 3 days per week for 8 weeks. The thickness of the biceps and triceps brachii was determined using B-mode ultrasound before and after training. Blood sampling was carried out before and after exercise, as well as during the first and last training sessions. Increase in the thickness of the triceps brachii in trained arm was significantly greater in the hypoxic group than in the normoxic group. The 10 repetition maximum was significantly increased not only in the trained arm but also in the untrained arm in both groups. Serum growth hormone concentrations after exercise were significantly higher in the hypoxic group than in the normoxic group on both the first and last training sessions. These findings suggest that hypoxic resistance training elicits more muscle hypertrophy associated with a higher growth hormone secretion, but that the greater muscle hypertrophy did not necessarily contribute a greater gain of muscle strength.

  6. ANODAL TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION (TDCS) INCREASES ISOMETRIC STRENGTH OF SHOULDER ROTATORS MUSCLES IN HANDBALL PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazime, Fuad Ahmad; da Cunha, Ronaldo Alves; Soliaman, Renato Rozenblit; Romancini, Ana Clara Bezerra; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2017-06-01

    Weakness of the rotator cuff muscles can lead to imbalances in the strength of shoulder external and internal rotators, change the biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint and predispose an athlete to injury. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that has demonstrated promising results in a variety of health conditions. However few studies addressed its potential approach in the realm of athletics. The purpose of this study was to investigate if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) technique increases the isometric muscle strength of shoulder external and internal rotators in handball athletes. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Eight female handball players aged between 17 and 21 years (Mean=19.65; SD=2.55) with 7.1 ± 4.8 years of experience in training, participating in regional and national competitions were recruited. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of shoulder external and internal rotator muscles was evaluated during and after 30 and 60 minutes post one session of anodal and sham current (2mA; 0.057mA/cm(2)) with a one-week interval between stimulations. Compared to baseline, MVIC of shoulder external and internal rotators significantly increased after real but not sham tDCS. Between-group differences were observed for external and internal rotator muscles. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of external rotation increased significantly during tDCS, and 30 and 60 minutes post-tDCS for real tDCS compared to that for sham tDCS. For internal rotation MVIC increased significantly during and 60 minutes post-tDCS. The results indicate that transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily increases maximal isometric contractions of the internal and external rotators of the shoulder in handball players. 2.

  7. Influences of Fascicle Length During Isometric Training on Improvement of Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishishita, Satoru; Fujita, Kosuke; Araki, Kojiro; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-11-01

    Tanaka, H, Ikezoe, T, Umehara, J, Nakamura, M, Umegaki, H, Kobayashi, T, Nishishita, S, Fujita, K, Araki, K, and Ichihashi, N. Influences of fascicle length during isometric training on improvement of muscle strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3249-3255, 2016-This study investigated whether low-intensity isometric training would elicit a greater improvement in maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at the same fascicle length, rather than the joint angle, adopted during training. Sixteen healthy women (21.8 ± 1.5 years) were randomly divided into an intervention group and a control group. Before (Pre) and after (Post) training, isometric plantarflexion MVCs were measured every 10° through the range of ankle joint position from 20° dorsiflexion to 30° plantarflexion (i.e., 6 ankle angles). Medial gastrocnemius fascicle length was also measured at each position, using B-mode ultrasound under 3 conditions of muscle activation: at rest, 30%MVC at respective angles, and MVC. Plantarflexion resistance training at an angle of 20° plantarflexion was performed 3 days a week for 4 weeks at 30%MVC using 3 sets of twenty 3-second isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary contraction in the intervention group increased at 0 and 10° plantarflexion (0°; Pre: 81.2 ± 26.5 N·m, Post: 105.0 ± 21.6 N·m, 10°; Pre: 63.0 ± 23.6 N·m, Post: 81.3 ± 20.3 N·m), which was not the angle used in training (20°). However, the fascicle length adopted in training at 20° plantarflexion and 30%MVC was similar to the value at 0 or 10° plantarflexion at MVC. Low-intensity isometric training at a shortened muscle length may be effective for improving MVC at a lengthened muscle length because of specificity of the fascicle length than the joint angle.

  8. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; da Silva, Renata Luana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. Methods: this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. Results: the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. Conclusion: pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. PMID:27533267

  9. Comparison of Lower Extremity Strength, Power and Muscle Area between Healthy Subjects and Mobility-Limited Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared muscle strength, power and cross sectional area (CSA) in healthy middle-aged adults (mean age: 47.3 +/- 5 yrs, n = 26), healthy older adults (73.8 +/- 4 yrs, n = 21), and older adults with mobility impairments (77.1 +/- 5 yrs, n = 21). One repetition maximum strength (1RM) and pe...

  10. Differences in muscle strength after ACL reconstruction do not influence cardiorespiratory responses to isometabolic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília S. Andrade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate whether the muscle strength decrease that follows anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction would lead to different cardiorespiratory adjustments during dynamic exercise. Method: Eighteen active male subjects were submitted to isokinetic evaluation of knee flexor and extensor muscles four months after ACL surgery. Thigh circumference was also measured and an incremental unilateral cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed separately for both involved and uninvolved lower limbs in order to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, and ventilatory pattern (breath rate, tidal volume, inspiratory time, expiratory time, tidal volume/inspiratory time at three different workloads (moderate, anaerobic threshold, and maximal. Results: There was a significant difference between isokinetic extensor peak torque measured in the involved (116.5±29.1 Nm and uninvolved (220.8±40.4 Nm limbs, p=0.000. Isokinetic flexor peak torque was also lower in the involved limb than in the uninvolved limb (107.8±15.4 and 132.5±26.3 Nm, p=0.004, respectively. Lower values were also found in involved thigh circumference as compared with uninvolved limb (46.9±4.3 and 48.5±3.9 cm, p=0.005, respectively. No differences were found between the lower limbs in any of the variables of the incremental cardiopulmonary tests at all exercise intensities. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that, four months after ACL surgery, there is a significant deficit in isokinetic strength in the involved limb, but these differences in muscle strength requirement do not produce differences in the cardiorespiratory adjustments to exercise. Based on the hypotheses from the literature which explain the differences in the physiological responses to exercise for different muscle masses, we can deduce that, after 4 months of a rehabilitation program after an ACL reconstruction, individuals probably do not present differences in muscle oxidative and

  11. Mobility-Related Fatigue, Walking Speed, and Muscle Strength in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rantanen, Taina

    2012-01-01

    Background. Fatigue is an important early marker of functional decline among older people, but the mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between mobility-related fatigue and walking speed and to test...... the degree to which muscle strength accounts for this association. Methods. The study is based on baseline (n = 523) and 5-year follow-up data (n = 292) from a cohort of 75-year-old persons. Standardized assessments include self-report measures of mobility-related fatigue (score range 0–6) and medical...

  12. Immediate effect of manual therapy on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Yelvar GD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gul Deniz Yilmaz Yelvar,1 Yasemin Çirak,2 Yasemin Parlak Demir,3 Murat Dalkilinç,1 Bülent Bozkurt4 1Department of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, 2Department of Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy, 3Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, School of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Turgut Özal University, Ankara, Turkey Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of manual therapy (MT on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD.Participants and methods: Thirty patients with severe COPD (eight females and 22 males; mean age 62.4±6.8 years referred to pulmonary physiotherapy were included in this study. The patients participated in a single session of MT to measure the short-term effects. The lung function was measured using a portable spirometer. An electronic pressure transducer was used to measure respiratory muscle strength. Heart rate, breathing frequency, and oxygen saturation were measured with a pulse oximeter. For fatigue and dyspnea perception, the modified Borg rating of perceived exertion scale was used. All measurements were taken before and immediately after the first MT session. The ease-of-breathing visual analog scale was used for rating patients’ symptoms subjectively during the MT session.Results: There was a significant improvement in the forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and vital capacity values (P<0.05. The maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values increased significantly after MT, compared to the pre-MT session (P<0.05. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate (P<0.05, and dyspnea and fatigue perception (P<0.05.Conclusion: A single MT session immediately improved pulmonary function, inspiratory muscle strength, and oxygen saturation and reduced dyspnea, fatigue, and heart and respiratory rates in patients with

  13. Physical Performance, Balance, Mobility, and Muscle Strength Decline at Different Rates in Elderly People

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Márcia Mariko; Otonari, Thais Satie; Takara, Kelly Sayuri; Carmo, Carolina M; Tanaka, Clarice

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify the decline in functionality of elderly people. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised 152 individuals (96 women; 56 men) divided into 3 groups: G1 (60 to 69 years, n=53); G2 (70 to 79 years, n=65); and G3 (80 years or older, n=34). Physical performance, balance, mobility, and muscle strength were assessed using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale (BERG), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and leg press test, respec...

  14. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, P; Knudsen, H K; Juul-Kristensen, B

    2015-01-01

    for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study were firstly to determine the association between muscle strength and power, aerobic capacity and 100 m freestyle time (FT) in young, competitive...... swimmers, and secondly to determine reference values for these physiological factors. Methods In total, 119 competitive swimmers aged 11-15 years were assessed with Grip Strength (GS), Vertical Jump (VJ) and an intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, the Andersen Test (AT). Swim time......, including data on reference values for each test, may be considered in order to improve dry-land training prescription, thereby supporting the enhancing swimming performance in young, competitive swimmers...

  15. Precarious manhood and muscularity: Effects of threatening men's masculinity on reported strength and muscle dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, David A; Shapiro, Lily M; Williams, Tonicia R; Seoane, Christiana M; McIntosh, Rachel T; Fischer, Emily W

    2017-09-01

    The precarious manhood perspective proposes that men respond with aggression when they experience threats to their masculinity. Consistent with this view, we hypothesized that men would represent themselves as stronger and more formidable after their masculinity was threatened. A recent study, however, found that men reported less physical strength when threatened (Hunt, Gonsalkorale, & Murray, 2013). In the current two studies (Ns=193; 450), men were given false feedback about whether they were substantially less masculine (masculinity threatened) or more masculine than average (masculinity reassured). Men reported how much weight they could curl, how many push-ups they could complete, and/or measures of satisfaction with muscularity. In most analyses, threatened men reported greater strength than reassured men. Effects of masculinity threat on muscle dissatisfaction varied by outcome measure. The studies highlight the importance of replication studies, and of using experimental approaches to understand connections between precarious manhood and male body image. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of age and sex on neuromuscular-mechanical determinants of muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; Delahunt, Eamonn; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Lowery, Madeleine; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to concurrently assess the effect of age on neuromuscular and mechanical properties in 24 young (23.6 ± 3.7 years) and 20 older (66.5 ± 3.8 years) healthy males and females. Maximal strength of knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF), contractile rate of torque development (RTD) and neural activation of agonist-antagonist muscles (surface EMG) were examined during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Tissue stiffness (i.e. musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) and muscle stiffness (MS)) was examined via the free-oscillation technique, whereas muscle architecture (MA) of the vastus lateralis and subcutaneous fat were measured by ultrasonography. Males exhibited a greater age-related decline for KE (47.4 %) and KF (53.1 %) MVIC, and RTD (60.4 %) when compared to females (32.9, 42.6 and 34.0 %, respectively). Neural activation of agonist muscles during KE MVIC falls markedly with ageing; however, no age and sex effects were observed in the antagonist co-activation. MAS and MS were lower in elderly compared with young participants and in females compared with males. Regarding MA, main effects for age (young 23.0 ± 3.3 vs older 19.5 ± 2.0 mm) and sex (males 22.4 ± 3.5 vs females 20.4 ± 2.7 mm) were detected in muscle thickness. For fascicle length, there was an effect of age (young 104.6 ± 8.8 vs older 89.8 ± 10.5 mm), while for pennation angle, there was an effect of sex (males 13.3 ± 2.4 vs females 11.5 ± 1.7°). These findings suggest that both neuromuscular and mechanical declines are important contributors to the age-related loss of muscle strength/function but with some peculiar sex-related differences.

  17. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2° group and the above 2° group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis.

  18. The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Henriksen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs were obtained from 1 computer-controlled pressure algometry on the vastus lateralis and deltoid muscles and on the infrapatellar fat pad and 2 computerized cuff pressure algometry applied on the lower leg. Deep-tissue pain sensitivity (intensity and duration was assessed by hypertonic saline injections into the vastus lateralis, deltoid, and infrapatellar fat pad. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength was assessed isometrically at 60-degree knee flexion using a dynamometer. Associations between pain sensitivity and muscle strength were investigated using multiple regressions including age, gender, and body mass index as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r>0.72 and with cuff PPT (r>0.4. Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r>0.39 and with all PPTs (r<-0.41. Conclusions. Pressure pain thresholds at the vastus lateralis are positively associated with knee extensor muscle strength. Different pain sensitivity assessment methods are generally correlated. The cuff PPT and evoked infrapatellar pain seem to reflect the general pain sensitivity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351558.

  19. Effect of traditional resistance and power training using rated perceived exertion for enhancement of muscle strength, power, and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro; Dias, Caroline Pieta; Radaelli, Regis; Massa, Jéssica Cassales; Bortoluzzi, Rafael; Schoenell, Maira Cristina Wolf; Noll, Matias; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2016-04-01

    The present study compared the effects of 12 weeks of traditional resistance training and power training using rated perceived exertion (RPE) to determine training intensity on improvements in strength, muscle power, and ability to perform functional task in older women. Thirty healthy elderly women (60-75 years) were randomly assigned to traditional resistance training group (TRT; n = 15) or power training group (PT; n = 15). Participants trained twice a week for 12 weeks using six exercises. The training protocol was designed to ascertain that participants exercised at an RPE of 13-18 (on a 6-20 scale). Maximal dynamic strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limb muscles were assessed. Maximal dynamic strength muscle strength leg press (≈58 %) and knee extension (≈20 %) increased significantly (p training. Muscle power also increased with training (≈27 %; p training period (≈13 %; p strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limbs in elderly women.

  20. Effects of a Fall Prevention Exercise Program on Muscle Strength and Balance of the Old-old Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Il; An, Duk-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week balance exercise and elastic-resistance exercise program on muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly (over the age of 75). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five elderly persons were recruited from the community and assigned to three groups for convenience: balance exercise (intervention group 1; INT 1), resistance exercise (intervention group 2; INT 2), and control (CON) groups. The intervention was performed twice a week at a senior center and three times a week at home for 8 weeks. Muscle strength and balance were evaluated before and at the end of the trial, using a PowertrackIIand Tetrax. [Results] There were significant improvements in the strength of all seven muscle groups and balance in the INT 2 group. In the INT 1 group, there were significant improvements in the strength of all muscle groups except for the knee flexor and ankle plantar flexor muscle groups. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that an intervention using balance exercises or elastic-resistance exercises is effective at improving the muscle strength and balance of the old-old elderly. These type of exercises should be appropriate for the physical characteristics of the subjects. PMID:25435697

  1. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme P. T. Areas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elastic resistance bands (ERB combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. OBJECTIVES: The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. METHOD: Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10 or the control group (CG, n=10. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and inspiratory pressure (MIP were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. RESULTS: PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05. In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01 and ∆MEP (p=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength.

  2. Polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody prolongs the effective duration time of botulinum toxin in decreasing muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Pan, Lizhen; Liu, Wuchao; Pan, Yougui; Nie, Zhiyu; Jin, Lingjing

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate if the effective duration time of botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) could be prolonged by polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody (P-NCAM-Ab). 175 male SD rats were randomly divided into three major groups: control group (n = 25), Btx-A group (n = 25), and P-NCAM-Ab groups. P-NCAM-Ab groups were composed of five sub-groups, with 25 rats each in the dose-response study. Muscle strength of rat lower limbs was determined using a survey system. The expressions of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blotting (WB). The muscle strength was significantly decreased by Btx-A in Btx-A/P-NCAM-Ab groups compared with normal control group. Besides, the muscle strength of P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly decreased compared with the Btx-A group. The recovery time of muscle strength in P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly longer compared with Btx-A group. RT-PCR and WB assay showed that PNCAM-Ab delayed the increase of MuSK and NCAM after Btx-A injection. P-NCAM-Ab prolongs the effective duration time of Btx-A in decreasing muscle strength, which could provide a novel enhancement in clinical application.

  3. Syngeneic B16F10 Melanoma Causes Cachexia and Impaired Skeletal Muscle Strength and Locomotor Activity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício A. Voltarelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle wasting has been emerging as one of the principal components of cancer cachexia, leading to progressive impairment of work capacity. Despite early stages melanomas rarely promotes weight loss, the appearance of metastatic and/or solid tumor melanoma can leads to cachexia development. Here, we investigated the B16F10 tumor-induced cachexia and its contribution to muscle strength and locomotor-like activity impairment. C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with 5 × 104 B16F10 melanoma cells or PBS as a Sham negative control. Tumor growth was monitored during a period of 28 days. Compared to Sham mice, tumor group depicts a loss of skeletal muscle, as well as significantly reduced muscle grip strength and epididymal fat mass. This data are in agreement with mild to severe catabolic host response promoted by elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Tumor implantation has also compromised general locomotor activity and decreased exploratory behavior. Likewise, muscle loss, and elevated inflammatory interleukin were associated to muscle strength loss and locomotor activity impairment. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumor-driven catabolic state in response to a pro-inflammatory environment that is associated with impaired skeletal muscle strength and decreased locomotor activity in tumor-bearing mice.

  4. Effect of vibration on muscle strength imbalance in lower extremity using multi-control whole body vibration platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Seo, Shin Bae; Kang, Seung Rok; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study shows the improvement of muscle activity and muscle strength imbalance in the lower extremities through independent exercise loads in vibration platform. Twenty females of age 20 participated in this study. The subjects were divided into WBV group, with more than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities, and control group, with less than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities. As the prior experiment showed, different exercise postures provide different muscular activities. As a result, the highest muscular activity was found to be in the low squat posture. Therefore, the LS posture was selected for the exercise in this experiment. Vibration intensities were applied to dominant muscle and non-dominant muscle, and the vibration frequency was fixed at 25Hz for the WBV group. The control group was asked to perform the same exercise as the WBV group, without stimulated vibration. This exercise was conducted for a total of 4 weeks. As a result, the WBV group which showed an average deviation of 16% before the experiment, tended to decrease approximately to 5%. In this study, vibration exercise using load deviation is shown to be effective in improving the muscle strength imbalance.

  5. The Influence of Radiographic Severity on the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Joint Loading in Obese Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning; Alkjær, Tine;

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between knee muscle strength and the external knee adduction moment during walking in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and whether disease severity influences this relationship. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 136 elderly obese (BMI > 30...... strength and dynamic medial knee joint loading. Severe patients had higher peak knee adduction moment and more varus malalignment (P relationship existed......) adults with predominant medial knee osteoarthritis. Muscle strength, standing radiographic severity as measured by the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, and the peak external knee adduction moment were measured at self-selected walking speed. Results. According to radiographic severity, patients were...

  6. Effectiveness of Traditional Strength vs. Power Training on Muscle Strength, Power and Speed with Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G; Young, James D; Whitten, Joseph H D; Reid, Jonathan C; Quigley, Patrick J; Low, Jonathan; Li, Yimeng; Lima, Camila D; Hodgson, Daniel D; Chaouachi, Anis; Prieske, Olaf; Granacher, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Numerous national associations and multiple reviews have documented the safety and efficacy of strength training for children and adolescents. The literature highlights the significant training-induced increases in strength associated with youth strength training. However, the effectiveness of youth strength training programs to improve power measures is not as clear. This discrepancy may be related to training and testing specificity. Most prior youth strength training programs emphasized lower intensity resistance with relatively slow movements. Since power activities typically involve higher intensity, explosive-like contractions with higher angular velocities (e.g., plyometrics), there is a conflict between the training medium and testing measures. This meta-analysis compared strength (e.g., training with resistance or body mass) and power training programs (e.g., plyometric training) on proxies of muscle strength, power, and speed. A systematic literature search using a Boolean Search Strategy was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, SPORT Discus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and revealed 652 hits. After perusal of title, abstract, and full text, 107 studies were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed small to moderate magnitude changes for training specificity with jump measures. In other words, power training was more effective than strength training for improving youth jump height. For sprint measures, strength training was more effective than power training with youth. Furthermore, strength training exhibited consistently large magnitude changes to lower body strength measures, which contrasted with the generally trivial, small and moderate magnitude training improvements of power training upon lower body strength, sprint and jump measures, respectively. Maturity related inadequacies in eccentric strength and balance might influence the lack of training specificity with the unilateral

  7. Effectiveness of Traditional Strength vs. Power Training on Muscle Strength, Power and Speed with Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Behm

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous national associations and multiple reviews have documented the safety and efficacy of strength training for children and adolescents. The literature highlights the significant training-induced increases in strength associated with youth strength training. However, the effectiveness of youth strength training programs to improve power measures is not as clear. This discrepancy may be related to training and testing specificity. Most prior youth strength training programs emphasized lower intensity resistance with relatively slow movements. Since power activities typically involve higher intensity, explosive-like contractions with higher angular velocities (e.g., plyometrics, there is a conflict between the training medium and testing measures. This meta-analysis compared strength (e.g., training with resistance or body mass and power training programs (e.g., plyometric training on proxies of muscle strength, power, and speed. A systematic literature search using a Boolean Search Strategy was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, SPORT Discus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and revealed 652 hits. After perusal of title, abstract, and full text, 107 studies were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed small to moderate magnitude changes for training specificity with jump measures. In other words, power training was more effective than strength training for improving youth jump height. For sprint measures, strength training was more effective than power training with youth. Furthermore, strength training exhibited consistently large magnitude changes to lower body strength measures, which contrasted with the generally trivial, small and moderate magnitude training improvements of power training upon lower body strength, sprint and jump measures, respectively. Maturity related inadequacies in eccentric strength and balance might influence the lack of training specificity with

  8. Effect of recovery from muscle strength imbalance in lower limb using four point weight bearing reduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Jeong, Ho Choon; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the improvement of muscle strength imbalance in the lower limbs using a four point weight bearing reduction system with a two-belt treadmill. Participants, each having differences in muscle function of the left and right legs of over 20%, were divided into two groups of ten. The participants were involved in experiments progressing 40 minutes per day, 3 days per week, during a period of 4 weeks. The maximal peak torque and average power were measured for testing joint torque in the hip, knee and ankle. The results showed the improvement of muscle imbalance as assessed by the maximal muscle strength was the most effective in the hip joint, while the improvement of muscular reaction was the most effective in the knee joint. We suggest that the method of weight bearing reduction could be sufficient to reduce muscle imbalance in the lower limbs.

  9. Effect of Vitamin D Supplement Consumption on Muscle Strength, Muscle Function and Body Composition in Vitamin D-deficient Middle-aged Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Abiri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sarcopenia is explained as the loss of muscle strength and muscle mass with aging‚ and is one of the major risk factors for metabolic diseases. Cross-sectional studies demonstrate that vitamin D is associated with sarcopenia in both men and women. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vitamin D supplement consumption on muscle strength, muscle function and body composition in middle-aged women. Materials and Methods: In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 71 women aged 40-55 years old, with the serum 25(OH-D <25 ng/ml, were divided in two groups randomly, and received a 1000 IU vitamin D tablet (n=37 or a placebo (n=34, daily for 12 weeks. At the beginning and at the end of the study, dietary intake, anthropometric indices, muscle strength and function, serum 25(OH-D, physical activity level and sun exposure were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 20. Results: A significant difference in serum 25(OH-D was found between the intervention and placebo groups at the end of the study (P<0.001. In the vitamin D group, handgrip strength was improved, while hand grip strength (P=0.233 and knee extension strength (P=0.337 between the two groups did not differ significantly after 12 weeks. The mean of timed get up and go test, decreased significantly in the vitamin D group compared to the controls (P<0.001. Within the intervention group, body fat content decreased significantly after 12 weeks (P<0.001, but did not result a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.051. Conclusions: It seems in this vitamin D-deficient middle-aged women group, 1000 IU vitamin D consumption daily for 12 weeks resulted in improvement of muscle function and body composition, but had no significant effect on muscle strength. Keywords: Vitamin D, Muscle strength, Muscle function, Middle-aged women

  10. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...... of the muscle and finally how will this affect the performance of the athlete. In addition, the review will deal with muscle hypertrophy and how it develops with strength training. Overall, it is not the purpose of this review to give a comprehensive up-date of the area, but to pin-point a few issues from which...

  11. Decreased muscle strength is associated with impaired long-term functional outcome after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsøe, Rasmus; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    -up with clinical examination of 48 patients treated with intramedullary nailing after femoral shaft fracture between 2007 and 2010. The patients underwent a clinical examination and assessment of walking ability, maximal muscle strength during knee flexion and extension and hip abduction. Hip disability...... strength of knee flexion with the injured leg (226.0 N) was significantly lower then knee flexion with the non-injured leg (259.5 N, P abduction (129.2 vs 156.0 N, P ... in the difference in muscle strength were observed as well as between worse HOOS outcome and increasing body mass index. CONCLUSION:This study showed that decreased muscle strength for knee flexion, knee extension and hip abduction was associated with worse long-term functional outcome measured with a disease...

  12. Effects of strength and endurance training of superficial and deep neck muscles on muscle activities and pain levels of females with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisut, Sudarat; Vongsirinavarat, Mantana; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Sakulsriprasert, Prasert

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] To compare muscle activities and pain levels of females with chronic neck pain receiving different exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred females with chronic neck pain participated in this study. They were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n = 25) on the basis of the exercises performed as follows: strength-endurance exercise, craniocervical flexion exercise, combination of strength-endurance and craniocervical flexion exercise and control groups. Pain, disability levels and changes in the muscle activities of the cervical erector spinae (CE), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), anterior scalenes (AS) and upper trapezius (UT) muscles were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] After 12 weeks of exercise intervention, all three exercise groups showed improvements in pain and disability. The muscle activities during the typing task were significantly different from the control group in all three exercise groups for all muscles except those of the extensor muscles in the craniocervical flexion exercise group. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that exercises for the cervical muscles improve pain and disability. The exercise programs reduced the activities of almost all cervical muscles.

  13. PEAK AND END RANGE ECCENTRIC EVERTOR/CONCENTRIC INVERTOR MUSCLE STRENGTH RATIOS IN CHRONICALLY UNSTABLE ANKLES: COMPARISON WITH HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Komurcu

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations in eccentric evertor/concentric invertor strength ratio and their importance in the chronically unstable ankle. Eight patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI and nine healthy individuals participated in this study. Isokinetic concentric and eccentric invertor and evertor muscle strength measurement was carried out at an angular velocity of 120°·sec-1 by measuring maximal force moments (torque during isokinetic ankle inversion and eversion movements. Functionally, evertor/invertor muscle strength ratios (E/I strength ratio were calculated separately based on peak moment and angle-specific moments obtained at 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20° ankle joint angles. Peak and angle-specific eccentric evertor strength values at 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20° were significantly lower in the chronic ankle instability (CAI group. In spite of this, no differences were obtained for peak and angle-specific concentric invertor torque values. Eccentric evertor/concentric invertor strength (Eecc/Icon ratios were also significantly lower in the CAI group, but only at 15° and 20°. Eccentric evertor muscle torque and end range (15°-20° Eecc/Icon strength ratio for the chronically unstable ankle were significantly different from those for the healthy ankle. For this reason, measurements of end range eccentric/concentric strength ratios are more valuable in monitoring chronic ankle injuries and rehabilitation should include not only concentric muscle strengthening but also eccentric muscle strengthening, particularly for the evertor muscles

  14. Eldecalcitol improves muscle strength and dynamic balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: an open-label randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kimio; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    The antifracture efficacy of vitamin D in osteoporosis is due to its direct action on bones and indirect extraskeletal effects to prevent falls. Eldecalcitol is an analog of active vitamin D3 that improves bone mineral density and reduces the risk of osteoporotic fractures. However, the effects of eldecalcitol on muscle strength and static and dynamic postural balance are unclear. In this open-label randomized controlled study, we assessed the effects of eldecalcitol on muscle strength and static and dynamic postural balance in 50 postmenopausal women (mean age 74 years) with osteoporosis treated with bisphosphonate. Participants were randomly divided into a bisphosphonate group (alendronate at 35 mg/week; n = 25) or an eldecalcitol group (eldecalcitol at 0.75 μg/day and alendronate at 35 mg/week; n = 25) and were followed up for 6 months. Trunk muscle strength, including back extensor strength and iliopsoas muscle strength, was measured. Static standing balance was evaluated and the one leg standing test was performed to assess static postural balance. Dynamic sitting balance was evaluated and the 10-m walk test, functional reach test, and timed up and go test were performed to assess dynamic postural balance. At 6 months, there were no significant changes in any measure of muscle strength or balance in the bisphosphonate group, whereas eldecalcitol significantly increased back extensor strength (p = 0.012) and iliopsoas muscle strength (p = 0.035). Eldecalcitol also significantly improved findings on the timed up and go test (p = 0.001) and dynamic sitting balance (p = 0.015) at 6 months. These results with eldecalcitol may have an impact on prevention of falls.

  15. Effect of training on the muscle strength and dynamic balance ability of adults with down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimaras, Vassilios K; Fotiadou, Eleni G

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training on the muscle strength and dynamic balance ability of adults with Down syndrome (DS). Twenty-five adults with DS were separated into 2 groups. Fifteen subjects (mean age, 24.5 years) constituted the experiment group, whereas 10 subjects (mean age, 24.7 years) were in the control group of the study. Parameters measured were peak torque, isokinetic muscle endurance, and dynamic balance ability. All subjects performed a leg strength test on a Cyber II isokinetic dynamometer. In addition, the subjects' dynamic balance ability was measured by means of a balance deck (Lafayette). The experimental group followed a 12-week training program. As the results indicated, the experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in all measured values when compared with the control group. It is concluded that adults with DS can improve their physical and kinetic abilities with the application of a systematic and well-designed training program.

  16. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements.

  17. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  18. Rectus Femoris Echo Intensity Correlates with Muscle Strength, but Not Endurance, in Younger and Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Jacob A; Stock, Matt S

    2017-08-01

    We examined correlations between echo intensity and muscle strength and endurance. Rectus femoris echo intensity, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force and time to task failure during a 50% MVC task were determined for 12 younger (mean age = 25 y) and 13 older (mean age = 74 y) men. Bivariate correlations between echo intensity and normalized MVC force were similar for younger and older men, but was only statistically significant for the latter (younger r = -0.559, p = 0.059; older r = -0.580, p = 0.038). When all patients were combined, the correlation was significant (r = -0.733, p correlations were not observed for time to task failure (younger r = -0.382, p = 0.221; older r = -0.347, p = 0.246; all patients r = -0.229, p = 0.270). Rectus femoris echo intensity is associated with muscle strength, but not endurance, in younger and older men. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decreased functional capacity and muscle strength in elderly women with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira DCL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Denis Cesar Leite Vieira,1 Ramires Alsamir Tibana,1 Vitor Tajra,1 Dahan da Cunha Nascimento,1 Darlan Lopes de Farias,1 Alessandro de Oliveira Silva,1 Tatiane Gomes Teixeira,1 Romulo Maia Carlos Fonseca,2 Ricardo Jacó de Oliveira,2 Felipe Augusto dos Santos Mendes,2 Wagner Rodrigues Martins,2 Silvana Schwerz Funghetto,2 Margo Gomes de Oliveira Karnikowski,2 James Wilfred Navalta,3 Jonato Prestes11Graduate Program on Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil; 2University of Brasilia, UnB, Brasilia, Brazil; 3Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USAPurpose: To compare the metabolic parameters, flexibility, muscle strength, functional capacity, and lower limb muscle power of elderly women with and without the metabolic syndrome (MetS.Methods: This cross-sectional study included 28 older women divided into two groups: with the MetS (n = 14; 67.3 ± 5.5 years; 67.5 ± 16.7 kg; 1.45 ± 0.35 m; 28.0 ± 7.6 kg/m2, and without the MetS (n = 14; 68.7 ± 5.3 years; 58.2 ± 9.9 kg; 1.55 ± 0.10 m; 24.3 ± 3.8 kg/m2. Body composition was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and dynamic muscle strength was assessed by one-maximum repetition (1RM tests in leg press, bench press and biceps curl exercises. Six-minute walk test, Timed Up and Go (TUG; 30-second sitting-rising; arm curl using a 2-kg dumbbell, sit-and-reach (flexibility, and vertical jump tests were performed.Results: There was no difference between groups regarding age (P = 0.49, height (P = 0.46, body fat (% (P = 0.19, systolic (P = 0.64, diastolic (P = 0.41 and mean blood pressure (P = 0.86, 30-second sitting-rising (P = 0.57, 30-s arm curl (P = 0.73, leg press 1RM (P = 0.51, bench press 1RM (P = 0.77, and biceps curl 1RM (P = 0.85. However, women without the MetS presented lower body mass (P = 0.001, body mass index (BMI (P = 0.0001, waist circumference (P = 0.02, waist-to-height ratio (P = 0.02, fat body

  20. Elderly women with metabolic syndrome present higher cardiovascular risk and lower relative muscle strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Darlan Lopes; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Teixeira, Tatiane Gomes; Vieira, Denis César Leite; Tarja, Vitor; Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Silva, Alessandro de Oliveira [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Funghetto, Silvana Schwerz [Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Coura, Maritza Alves de Sousa; Valduga, Renato [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira [Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Prestes, Jonato [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To compare the metabolic, anthropometric, arterial blood pressure, and muscle strength parameters of elderly women with and without metabolic syndrome. A case-control study with 27 (67.3±4.8 years of age, 31.0±5.0kg/m{sup 2}) elderly women with metabolic syndrome and 33 (68.8±5.6 years of age, 27.2±5.3kg/m{sup 2}) sedentary control elderly women. They were submitted to an evaluation of body composition by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle strength testing with 10 maximal repetitions of knee extension. When compared to the elderly women without metabolic syndrome, those with the metabolic syndrome had higher levels for body mass (72.2±13.5 versus 63.4±14.6kg, p=0.03), body mass index (31.0±5.0 versus 27.2±5.3kg/m{sup 2,} p=0.007), fat mass (30.9±9.9 versus 24.4±8.5kg, p=0.01), systolic arterial pressure (125.1±8.2 versus 119.3±8.7mmHg, p=0.01), diastolic arterial pressure (75.5±6.9 versus 71.4±6.7mmHg, p=0.03), mean arterial pressure (92.5±6.2 versus 87.1±6.7mmHg, p=0.004), blood glucose (103.8±19.1 versus 91.1±5.9mg/dL, p=0.001), triglycerides (187.1±70.2 versus 116.3±36.7mg/dL, p=0.001), and creatine kinase (122.6±58.6 versus 89.8±32.5U/L, p=0.01); lower levels were found for fat-free mass (55.9±5.8 versus 59.3±6.7%; p=0.05), HDL-C (40.7±5.0 versus 50.5±10.1mg/dL, p=0.001), and relative muscle strength (0.53±0.14 versus 0.62±0.12, p=0.01). Elderly women with metabolic syndrome have a higher cardiovascular risk and less relative muscle strength when compared to those without metabolic syndrome. Relative muscle strength may be related to the cardiovascularr risk factors of the metabolic syndrome.

  1. A Randomized Trial on the Effect of Bone Tissue on Vibration-induced Muscle Strength Gain and Vibration-induced Reflex Muscle Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whole-body vibration (WBV) induces reflex muscle activity and leads to increased muscle strength. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance. Tonic vibration reflex is the most commonly cited mechanism to explain the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance, although there is no conclusive evidence that tonic vibration reflex occurs. The bone myoregulation reflex is another neuro...

  2. Increases in muscle volume after plantarflexor strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNee, Anne E; Gough, Martin; Morrissey, Matt C; Shortland, Adam P

    2009-06-01

    Children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) have small, weak muscles. However, change in muscle size due to resistance training in this group is unknown. We investigated the effect of plantarflexor strengthening on muscle volume, gait, and function in 13 ambulant children with spastic CP (seven males, six females; mean age 10 y 11 mo, SD 3 y 0 mo, range 6 y 11 mo-16 y 11 mo; eight with diplegia, five with hemiplegia; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, six; level II, five; level III, two). Assessments were performed before training, 5 and 10 weeks into training, and at a 3-month follow-up. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes were computed from three-dimensional ultrasound images. The number of unilateral heel raises able to be achieved on each side was assessed. Function was measured using three-dimensional gait analysis, the 'timed up and go' test, the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire, and the Functional Mobility Scale. Training involved heel raises or Thera-Band resistance, 4 times a week for 10 weeks. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes increased by 17 and 14% at week 5 (p=0.03, p=0.028). This increase was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (medial gastrocnemius p=0.001, ptraining in children with spastic CP. The role of progressive strength training in maintaining long-term function is discussed.

  3. Stair descending exercise increases muscle strength in elderly males with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Anastasios A; Panayiotou, George; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Kyparos, Antonios; Mademli, Lida; Grivas, Gerasimos V; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2013-03-08

    Previous studies from our group have shown that "pure" eccentric exercise performed on an isokinetic dynamometer can induce health-promoting effects that may improve quality of life. In order to investigate whether the benefits of "pure" eccentric exercise can be transferred to daily activities, a new and friendlier way to perform eccentric exercise had to be invented. To this end, we have proceeded to the design and construction of an automatic escalator, offering both stair descending (eccentric-biased) and stair ascending (concentric-biased) exercise. Twelve elderly males (60-70 yr) with chronic heart failure participated in the present study. Participants carried out six weeks of stair descending or ascending training on the novel SmartEscalator device. Muscle damage and performance indices were evaluated before and at day 2 post exercise at the first and sixth week of training. Both training regimes increased, albeit not significantly in some cases, eccentric, concentric and isometric torque. After six weeks of stair descending exercise, eccentric, concentric and isometric peak torque increased 12.3%, 7.7% and 8.8%, respectively, whereas after stair ascending exercise eccentric, concentric and isometric peak torque increased 7.1%, 9.6% and 5.9%, respectively. Stair descending exercise appears to be a pleasant and mild activity that can be easily followed by the elderly. Compared to the more demanding stair ascending exercise, changes in muscle strength are similar or even greater. Elderly or people with impaired endurance wishing to increase their muscle strength may be benefited by participating in activities with strong eccentric component, such as stair descending.

  4. Effects of short-term detraining following blood flow restricted low-intensity training on muscle size and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Ogasawara, Riki; Abe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3 weeks of detraining on muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and one-repetition maximum strength (1-RM) in young men who had previously participated in 6 weeks (3 days week(-1) ) of bench press training [blood flow restricted low-intensity (LI-BFR; n = 10, 20% 1-RM) or high-intensity (HI; n = 7, 75% 1-RM)]. Bench press 1-RM and muscle CSA of triceps brachii (TB) and pectoralis major (PM) were evaluated before (pre) and after training period (post) as well as after detraining period (detraining). Bench press 1-RM was higher at both post and detraining than at pre for LI-BFR (Pmuscle CSA were higher at both post and detraining than at pre for the HI group (Pmuscle CSA) was higher at both post and detraining than at pre for the HI group (Pmuscle strength following 6 weeks of training with LI-BFR as well as HI was well preserved at 3 weeks of detraining. HI-induced muscle strength appears to be dependent upon both neural adaptations and muscle hypertrophy with training and detraining. On the other hand, LI-BFR-induced muscle strength appears to be related primarily to muscle hypertrophy with training and to neural adaptations with detraining.

  5. Changes in Muscle Strength in U19 Soccer Players During an Annual Training Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Michal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the seasonal variation in isokinetic strength of the knee flexors and extensors, and conventional (H/QCONV and functional (H/QFUNC hamstring to quadriceps strength ratios in highly trained adolescent soccer players. The players (n=11; age 17.8±0.3 were measured at the end of the competitive season (autumn, at the beginning and the end of pre-season (winter and during the sixth week of a new competitive season. Isokinetic peak torque (concentric and eccentric was measured at 60°•s-1 in a sitting position with the hip flexed at 100°. The testing range of motion was set from 10 - 90° of knee flexion. The players performed a set of five maximum repetitions for both the dominant and non-dominant leg. Statistically significant differences (p<0.001 between the four seasonal measurements were noted for peak torque of the dominant leg knee flexors in concentric muscle action only. A post hoc analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in peak torque from the 1st to the 4th measurement (p<0.001; d=0.692 and from the 2nd to the 4th (p<0.01; d=0.564. The differences in the changes of peak torque of the knee flexors and extensors depending on type of muscle action and tendencies found in the H/Q ratios throughout the annual training cycle indicate that strength assessment of the knee flexors and extensors and their balance throughout the annual training cycle could be beneficial for elite male adolescent soccer players both in terms of performance and risk of injury.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injury after more than 20 years. II. Concentric and eccentric knee muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengman, E; Brax Olofsson, L; Stensdotter, A K; Nilsson, K G; Häger, C K

    2014-12-01

    The long-term consequences on knee muscle strength some decades after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are not established. The aims of our study were to examine peak torque more than 20 years after ACL injury and to compare their knee muscle strength to that of healthy controls. We tested 70 individuals with unilateral ACL injury 23 ± 2 years after injury, whereof 33 (21 men) were treated with physiotherapy in combination with ACL reconstruction (ACLR ) and 37 (23 men) with physiotherapy alone (ACLPT ). These were compared with 33 age- and gender-matched controls (21 men). A Kin-Com(®) dynamometer (90°/s) was used to measure peak torque in knee flexion and extension in both concentric and eccentric contractions. Knee extension peak torque, concentric and eccentric, was ∼10% lower for the injured leg compared with the non-injured leg for both ACLR (P < 0.001; P < 0.001) and ACLPT (P = 0.007; P = 0.002). The ACLPT group also showed reduced eccentric knee flexion torque of the injured leg (P = 0.008). The strength of the non-injured leg in both ACL groups was equal to that of controls. No difference was seen for those with no-or-low degree of knee osteoarthritis compared to those with moderate-to-high degree of osteoarthritis. ACL injury may lead to a persistent reduction of peak torque in the injured leg, which needs to be considered across the lifespan.

  7. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos de; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; Silva, Renata Luana da

    2016-08-15

    to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. comparar a força muscular do assoalho pélvico em primíparas no pós-parto normal e cesariana, relacionando-a às características sociodemográficas, estado nutricional, incontinência urinária, dispareunia, exercício perineal na gestação, condição perineal e peso do recém-nascido. estudo transversal realizado entre 50 e 70 dias de pós-parto, com 24 primíparas submetidas à cesariana e 72 ao parto normal. Utilizou-se PeritronTM 9301 para análise da força muscular. Comparou-se as médias da força muscular entre os

  8. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with fibrositis syndrome. New characteristics for a difficult definable category of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1987-01-01

    A common complaint among patients with fibrositis syndrome is exhaustion and fatique. It was therefore felt desirable to evaluate the muscle strength of these patients compared with normal subjects. Maximum isometric and isokinetic strength of knee extension was measured in 15 patients and 15...... healthy matched subjects, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Cybex II). Maximum isometric strength at various knee extension angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees degrees) was significantly (p less than 0.001) lower in the fibrositis group than in controls, a reduction of approximately 58......-66%. Maximum isokinetic strength at various knee extension velocities (30-240 degrees per second) was also significantly (p less than 0.01) lower in the fibrositis group than in controls, the reduction being approximately 41-51%. In conclusion, isometric and isokinetic muscle strength is found to be lower...

  9. Core stability, knee muscle strength, and anterior translation are correlated with postural stability in anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar-Medeni, Ozge; Baltaci, Gul; Bayramlar, Kezban; Yanmis, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of postural stability and lower extremity performance with core stability, knee laxity, and muscle strength in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Twenty-eight anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed subjects were included in the study. Anterior knee laxity tests, isokinetic knee muscle strength tests, and core stability tests were performed. Single-limb postural stability was assessed in both eyes-open and eyes-closed positions on a static surface and an eyes-open condition on a foam surface. A single-legged hop test was performed to assess lower extremity performance. To detect differences between the operated and healthy leg, a Mann-Whitney U test was performed, and a correlation analysis was performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Knee muscle strength and laxity were different between the operated and healthy legs (P stability scores correlated with core stability tests (P core stability, decreased knee muscle strength, and increased knee laxity correlated with single-limb postural stability. Better hop performance was demonstrated with better knee flexor and extensor muscle strength and was independent from core stability.

  10. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  11. Strength training induces muscle hypertrophy and functional gains in black prostate cancer patients despite androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Erik D; Sheaff, Andrew K; Sood, Suchi; Ma, Lei; Francis, Jack D; Goldberg, Andrew P; Hurley, Ben F

    2013-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with weakness, fatigue, sarcopenia, and reduced quality of life (QoL). Black men have a higher incidence and mortality from PCa than Caucasians. We hypothesized that despite ADT, strength training (ST) would increase muscle power and size, thereby improving body composition, physical function, fatigue levels, and QoL in older black men with PCa. Muscle mass, power, strength, endurance, physical function, fatigue perception, and QoL were measured in 17 black men with PCa on ADT before and after 12 weeks of ST. Within-group differences were determined using t tests and regression models. ST significantly increased total body muscle mass (2.7%), thigh muscle volume (6.4%), power (17%), and strength (28%). There were significant increases in functional performance (20%), muscle endurance (110%), and QoL scores (7%) and decreases in fatigue perception (38%). Improved muscle function was associated with higher functional performance (R (2) = 0.54) and lower fatigue perception (R (2) = 0.37), and both were associated with improved QoL (R (2) = 0.45), whereas fatigue perception tended to be associated with muscle endurance (R (2) = 0.37). ST elicits muscle hypertrophy even in the absence of testosterone and is effective in counteracting the adverse functional consequences of ADT in older black men with PCa. These improvements are associated with reduced fatigue perception, enhanced physical performance, and improved QoL. Thus, ST may be a safe and well-tolerated therapy to prevent the loss of muscle mass, strength, and power commonly observed during ADT.

  12. Effects of Different Types of Exercise on Body Composition, Muscle Strength, and IGF-1 in the Elderly with Sarcopenic Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Ting; Chung, Yu-Chun; Chen, Yu-Jen; Ho, Sung-Yen; Wu, Huey-June

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the influence of resistance training (RT), aerobic training (AT), or combination training (CT) interventions on the body composition, muscle strength performance, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) of patients with sarcopenic obesity. Randomized controlled trial. Community center and research center. Sixty men and women aged 65-75 with sarcopenic obesity. Participants were randomly assigned to RT, AT, CT, and control (CON) groups. After training twice a week for 8 weeks, the participants in each group ceased training for 4 weeks before being examined for the retention effects of the training interventions. The body composition, grip strength, maximum back extensor strength, maximum knee extensor muscle strength, and blood IGF-1 concentration were measured. The skeletal muscle mass (SMM), body fat mass, appendicular SMM/weight %, and visceral fat area (VFA) of the RT, AT, and CT groups were significantly superior to those of the CON group at both week 8 and week 12. Regarding muscle strength performance, the RT group exhibited greater grip strength at weeks 8 and 12 as well as higher knee extensor performance at week 8 than that of the other groups. At week 8, the serum IGF-1 concentration of the RT group was higher than the CON group, whereas the CT group was superior to the AT and CON groups. Older adults with sarcopenic obesity who engaged in the RT, AT, and CT interventions demonstrated increased muscle mass and reduced total fat mass and VFA compared with those without training. The muscle strength performance and serum IGF-1 level in trained groups, especially in the RT group, were superior to the control group. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.