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Sample records for abdominal ultrasound showed

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate ... for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ... is rarely needed for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare for an abdominal ultrasound exam? ... are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... How should we prepare for an abdominal ultrasound exam? Your child should be dressed in comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on the type of examination. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. What is ... within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound examination. ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real- ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the ... of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys ... as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an inflamed appendix guide procedures such as biopsies, in which needles, ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do we get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  7. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography

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    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Benedeti, Augusto Cesar Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge, E-mail: fernando@fatesa.edu.br [Faculdade de Tecnologia em Saude (FATESA), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departmento de Radiologia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departmento de Medicina Clinica; Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Objective: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods: Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Results: Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Conclusion: In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility. (author)

  8. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography

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    Fernando Marum Mauad

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods: Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6% were men and 62 (61.4% were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years. The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Results: Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest. We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Conclusion: In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility.

  9. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escribano, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Alvarez, M.; Rivero, S.; Raya, J.L.; Ruza, M.

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  14. Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberger, Stephan; Rosso, Raffaele; Sarti, Manuela; Del Grande, Filippo; Canevascini, Reto; van den Berg, Jos C; Prouse, Giorgio; Giovannacci, Luca

    2017-03-21

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptance and costs of an ultrasound scan screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the elderly male population resident in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. The target population were male patients aged 65-80 years who attended the outpatient clinics of the Lugano Regional Hospital in 2013. The patients showing interest were contacted by phone to verify their eligibility and fix the appointment for the ultrasound scan of the abdominal aorta. Patients with recent examinations suitable for AAA detection were excluded. Aneurysm was defined as an abdominal aorta with sagittal and/or axial diameter  30 mm. Patients' characteristics and study results were presented as descriptive statistics. The chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables with p rate was 68.3%. A previously unknown AAA was diagnosed in 31 patients (4.2%, 95% confidence interval 2.8-5.9%). Age and area of residence had a statistically significant impact on patient's acceptance rate (p <0.05). The mean cost per screened patient was CHF 88. AAA screening of male patients aged 65-80 years is feasible with limited financial and organisational effort. Adherence might be improved by a larger community-based programme and involvement of general practitioners.

  15. Plain abdominal film and abdominal ultrasound in intestine occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amodio, C.; Antico, E.; Montesi, A.; Zaccarelli, A.

    1991-01-01

    Plain film of the abdomen is widely used in the diagnostic evaluation of intestinal occlusion. Even though this technique can yield a panoramic and high-resolution view of gas-filled intestinal loops, several factors, such as type and duration of occlusion, neurovascular status of the intestine and general patient condition, may reduce the diagnostic specificy of the plain film relative to the organic or functional nature of the occlusion. From 1987 to 1989, fifty-four patients with intestinal occlusion were studied combining plain abdominal film with abdominal ultrasound (US). This was done in order to evaluate whether the additional information obtained from US could be of value in better determining the nature of the ileus. US evaluation was guided by the information already obtained from plain film which better demonstrates gas-filled loops. The results show that in all 27 cases of dynamic ileus (intestinal ischemia, acute appendicitis, acute cholecistis, acute pancreatitis or blunt abdominal trauma) US demonstrates: intestinal loops slightly increased in caliber, with liquid content, or loops containing rare hyperechoic particles, intestinal wall thickening and no peristalsis. In 27 cases of acute, chronic or complicated mechanical ileus (adhesions, internal hernia, intestinal neoplasm, peritoneal seedings) US shows: 1) in acute occlusion: hyperperistaltic intestinal loops containing inhomogeneous liquid; 2) in chronic occlusion: liquid content with a solid echigenic component; 3) in complicated occlusion: liquid stasis, frequent increase in wall thickness, moderate peritoneal effusion and inefficient peristalsis. In conclusion, based on the obtained data, the authors feel that the combination of plain abdominal film and abdominal US can be useful in the work-up of patient with intestinal occlusion. The information provided by US allows a better definition of the nature of the ileus

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a clear picture of the internal organs and blood vessels within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help ... tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed ... ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide the insertion of a catheter or other drainage device and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of vomiting ... and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor if there are specific instructions for eating and drinking prior to the exam. Your child ... for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine ... places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on the type of examination. For some scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... can be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect ... biopsies, in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. ... child should be dressed in comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an ... sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide the ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted ... you at the conclusion of your examination. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and congenital vascular malformations reduced or absent blood ... vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, ... the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top ... waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... an area of tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Once the imaging ...

  9. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of the abdominal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Gill, Norman W; Whittaker, Jackie L; Henry, Sharon M; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) of the abdominal muscles is increasingly being used in the management of conditions involving musculoskeletal dysfunctions associated with the abdominal muscles, including certain types of low back and pelvic pain. This commentary provides an overview of current concepts and evidence related to RUSI of the abdominal musculature, including issues addressing the potential role of ultrasound imaging in the assessment and training of these muscles. Both quantitative and qualitative aspects associated with clinical and research applications are considered, as are the possible limitations related to the interpretation of measurements made with RUSI. Research to date has utilized a range of methodological approaches, including different transducer placements and imaging techniques. The pros and cons of the various methods are discussed, and guidelines for future investigations are presented. Potential implications and opportunities for clinical use of RUSI to enhance evidence-based practice are outlined, as are suggestions for future research to further clarify the possible role of RUSI in the evaluation and treatment of abdominal muscular morphology and function.

  10. The therapeutic impact of abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute abdominal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, S.; Halligan, S.; Goh, V.; Matravers, P.; Chambers, A.; Remedios, D.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The technical performance of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain has been thoroughly investigated but its therapeutic effects are less well understood. We aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of abdominal ultrasound for acute abdominal pain. Referring clinicians completed a pre-ultrasound questionnaire that detailed their leading diagnosis, confidence in this and intended management in 100 consecutive adult patients. Following ultrasound a second questionnaire was completed. This again detailed the leading diagnosis, confidence in this and their intended management. Clinicians quantified the management contribution of ultrasound both for the individual case in question and in their clinical experience generally. RESULTS: The leading diagnosis was either confirmed or rejected in 72 patients and a new diagnosis provided where no prior differential diagnosis existed in 10. Diagnostic confidence increased significantly following ultrasound (mean score 6·5 pre-ultrasound vs 7·6 post-ultrasound, P < 0·001). Intended management changed following ultrasound in 22 patients; 15 intended laparotomies were halted and a further seven patients underwent surgery where this was not originally intended. Ultrasound was rated either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful in 87% of patients, with 99% of clinicians finding it either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful generally. CONCLUSION: Abdominal ultrasound has considerable diagnostic and therapeutic effect in the setting of acute abdominal pain. Dhillon, S. et al. (2002)

  11. Basic ultrasound training assessment in the initial abdominal trauma screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUAN GERALDO OCAÑA OLIVEIRA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to verify the efficiency and usefulness of basic ultrasound training in trauma (FAST - Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma for emergency physicians in the primary evaluation of abdominal trauma. Methods: a longitudinal and observational study was carried out from 2015 to 2017, with 11 emergency physicians from Hospital Universitário do Oeste do Paraná, submitted to ultrasound training in emergency and trauma (USET® - SBAIT. FAST results started to be collected two months after the course. These were compared with a composite score of complementary exams and surgical findings. Information was stored in a Microsoft Excel program database and submitted to statistical analysis. Results: FAST was performed in 120 patients. In the study, 38.4% of the assessed patients had a shock index ≥0.9. The composite score detected 40 patients with free peritoneal fluid, whereas FAST detected 27 cases. The method sensitivity was 67.5%, specificity was 98.7%, the positive predictive value was 96.4%, the negative predictive value was 85.39% and accuracy was 88%. All those with a positive FAST had a shock index ≥0.9. Fifteen patients with positive FAST and signs of instability were immediately submitted to surgery. Conclusions: the basic training of emergency physicians in FAST showed efficiency and usefulness in abdominal trauma assessment. Due to its low cost and easy implementation, this modality should be considered as a screening strategy for patients with abdominal trauma in health systems.

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid

  13. Diagnostic value of urinalysis combine with abdominal ultrasound in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the yield of both urinalysis and abdominal ultrasound in diagnosing renal colic and abdominal pain at King Hassein Medical Centre in Amman, Capital city of Jordan. Methods: Eight hundred and forty three successive patients presented to the emergency room at King Hussein Medical Centre Hospital between ...

  14. Frequency of Chest Radiography and Abdominal Ultrasound in The Netherlands: 1999-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speets, Anouk M.; Kalmijn, Sandra; Hoes, Arno W.; Graaf, Yolanda der; Smeets, Hugo M.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.

    2005-01-01

    Chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound are two widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in Western societies. However, little is known about the frequency of these examinations and its determinants. The aim of this descriptive study was to provide detailed information on the number of chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound examinations by age, gender, referring physician and ethnicity. We used data of approximately 3,000,000 sick fund insured persons of the Health Insurance Company Agis in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2003. We calculated annual numbers and corresponding 95% confidence intervals for different age, gender and ethnicity categories. The mean age of the population was 38±22 years and 46% were male. Chest radiographs were ordered in 130 per 1000 persons per year and abdominal ultrasound examinations in 39 per 1000 persons per year; these frequencies did not change noticeable over the five-year period. Chest radiography was performed more often in males (156 vs. 109 per 1,000 persons/year in females; p<0.05) and abdominal ultrasound more often in females (43 vs. 34 per 1000 persons/year in males; p<0.05). Frequencies were highest in persons aged 70-79 years. Compared to medical specialists, general practitioners more frequently referred younger patients and females, especially for abdominal ultrasound. Up to the age of 60 years the frequencies of both chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound were higher in Turks and Moroccans compared to other persons. In conclusion, this study showed marked differences in the frequencies of chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound according to age, gender and ethnicity in The Netherlands

  15. Wavelet compression algorithm applied to abdominal ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Hsun; Pan, Su-Feng; LU, Chin-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Che

    2006-01-01

    We sought to investigate acceptable compression ratios of lossy wavelet compression on 640 x 480 x 8 abdominal ultrasound (US) images. We acquired 100 abdominal US images with normal and abnormal findings from the view station of a 932-bed teaching hospital. The US images were then compressed at quality factors (QFs) of 3, 10, 30, and 50 followed outcomes of a pilot study. This was equal to the average compression ratios of 4.3:1, 8.5:1, 20:1 and 36.6:1, respectively. Four objective measurements were carried out to examine and compare the image degradation between original and compressed images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also introduced for subjective assessment. Five experienced and qualified radiologists as reviewers blinded to corresponding pathological findings, analysed paired 400 randomly ordered images with two 17-inch thin film transistor/liquid crystal display (TFT/LCD) monitors. At ROC analysis, the average area under curve (Az) for US abdominal image was 0.874 at the ratio of 36.6:1. The compressed image size was only 2.7% for US original at this ratio. The objective parameters showed the higher the mean squared error (MSE) or root mean squared error (RMSE) values, the poorer the image quality. The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) values indicated better image quality. The average RMSE, PSNR at 36.6:1 for US were 4.84 ± 0.14, 35.45 dB, respectively. This finding suggests that, on the basis of the patient sample, wavelet compression of abdominal US to a ratio of 36.6:1 did not adversely affect diagnostic performance or evaluation error for radiologists' interpretation so as to risk affecting diagnosis

  16. Ruling out intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma patients using clinical criteria and abdominal ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Helena Barbosa Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify victims of blunt abdominal trauma in which intra-abdominal injuries can be excluded by clinical criteria and by complete abdominal ultrasonography. Methods: retrospective analysis of victims of blunt trauma in which the following clinical variables were analyzed: hemodynamic stability, normal neurologic exam at admission, normal physical exam of the chest at admission, normal abdomen and pelvis physical exam at admission and absence of distracting lesions (Abbreviated Injury Scale >2 at skull, thorax and/or extremities. The ultrasound results were then studied in the group of patients with all clinical variables evaluated. Results: we studied 5536 victims of blunt trauma. Intra-abdominal lesions with AIS>1 were identified in 144 (2.6%; in patients with hemodynamic stability they were present in 86 (2%; in those with hemodynamic stability and normal neurological exam at admission in 50 (1.8%; in patients with hemodynamic stability and normal neurological and chest physical exam at admission, in 39 (1.5%; in those with hemodynamic stability, normal neurological, chest, abdominal and pelvic physical exam at admission, in 12 (0.5%; in patients with hemodynamic stability, normal neurological, chest, abdominal and pelvic physical exam at admission, and absence of distracting lesions, only two (0.1% had intra-abdominal lesions. Among those with all clinical variables, 693 had normal total abdominal ultrasound, and, within this group, there were no identified intra-abdominal lesions. Conclusion: when all clinical criteria and total abdominal ultrasound are associated, it is possible to identify a group of victims of blunt trauma with low chance of significant intra-abdominal lesions.

  17. role of abdominal ultrasound in evaluation of children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-16

    Mar 16, 2011 ... ROLE OF ABDOMINAL ULTRASOUND IMAGING IN EVALUATION OF CHILDREN WITH SUSPECTED UPPER. GASTROINTESTINAL ... of US in the diagnosis of HPS. The typically thickened pyloric muscle measures > ..... Colour Doppler assessment of the intussusception cases detected blood flow in 10 ...

  18. Role of abdominal ultrasound imaging in evaluation of children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the sonographic abdominal findings in children with suspected upper gastrointestinal disease, establish indications for sonography and describe the gastrointestinal disease patterns that can be evaluated by ultrasound. Design: Descriptive prospective study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital and ...

  19. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  20. Echogenic rim of hepatic hemangioma on abdominal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Chul Joong; Cheong, In Joo; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the association between the size of the hepatic hemangioma and the shape and thickness of the echogenic rim of hepatic hemangioma on abdominal ultrasound. We examined 47 cases (M:F=24:23, mean age 47.1) of hepatic hemangiomas with echogenic rim on abdominal ultrasound during the past 2 years. Radiologic findings were retrospectively reviewed in terms of completeness and thickness of echogenic rim. If echogenic rim showed even thickness, it was measured. But if not, the maximum and minimum thickness of the rim was measured. The association between the size of hemangioma and the completeness and thickness of the echogenic rim were analyzed statistically. Of the 47 cases, complete echogenic rim and incomplete echogenic rim were obtained in 29 (62%) and 18 (38%) cases, respectively. Twenty-two cases of hemangioma were less than 2 cm in diameter, and their distribution according to echogenic rim were as follows: complete echogenic rim (17/20, 91% mean thickness 2.2 cm) and uneven thickness with complete echogenic rim (3/20, 15%, range:2.0-6.1 mm). Twenty-five hemangiomas were larger than 2 cm in diameter and their distribution according to echogenic rim were as follows: complete echogenic rim (n=9, 34%), incomplete echogenic rim (n=16, 64%0,even thickness with complete echogenic rim (3/9, 33%, mean thickness 2.2 mm) and uneven thickness with complete echogenic rim (6/9,67%, range: 2.0-7.6 mm). In statistical analysis, hemangiomas more than 2 cm in diameter were more likely to have incomplete echogenic rim (p<0.05) than those of less than 2 cm; hemangiomas more than with more than 2 cm in diameter and complete echogenic rim showed uneven thickness of echogenic rim (p<0.05), more often than those of less than 2 cm diameter. Hemangiomas with more than 2 cm in diameter showed more frequent incomplete echogenic rim than those of less than 2 cm in diameter, which had more frequent complete echogenic rim. Hemangiomas with complete echogenic rim and even rim

  1. A 10-year restrospective evaluation of ultrasound in pregnant abdominal trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Quinn C; Brown, Michele A; Dehqanzada, Zia A; Doucet, Jay; Coimbra, Raul; Casola, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    The pregnant abdominal trauma patient presents a unique diagnostic challenge. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of abdominal sonography for the detection of clinically important injuries in pregnant abdominal trauma patients. A retrospective review was performed of a trauma center database from 2001 to 2011. Medical records were reviewed to determine initial abdominal imaging test results and clinical course. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of ultrasound for detection of traumatic injury were calculated. Of 19,128 patients with suspected abdominal trauma, 385 (2 %) were pregnant. Of these, 372 (97 %) received ultrasound as the initial abdominal imaging test. All 13 pregnant patients who did not receive ultrasound received abdominal CT. Seven pregnant patients underwent both ultrasound and CT. Seven ultrasound examinations were positive, leading to one therapeutic Cesarean section and one laparotomy. One ultrasound was considered false positive (no injury was seen on subsequent CT). There were 365 negative ultrasound examinations. Of these, 364 were true negative (no abdominal injury subsequently found). One ultrasound was considered false negative (a large fetal subchorionic hemorrhage seen on subsequent dedicated obstetrical ultrasound). Sensitivity and positive predictive value were 85.7 %. Specificity and negative predictive value were 99.7 %. Abdominal sonography is an effective and sufficient imaging examination in pregnant abdominal trauma patients. When performed as part of the initial assessment using an abbreviated trauma protocol with brief modifications for pregnancy, ultrasound minimizes diagnostic delay, obviates radiation risk, and provides high sensitivity for injury in the pregnant population.

  2. Elderly Woman with Abdominal Pain: Bedside Ultrasound Diagnosis of Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D. Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old otherwise healthy female presented to the emergency department with two weeks of worsening abdominal pain. She was afebrile with normal vital signs. Her physical examination was notable for moderate abdominal tenderness without rebound to the left and suprapubic regions of the abdomen. Laboratory studies were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 13,000/mm3. A focused bedside ultrasound over the patient’s region of maximal discomfort revealed a thickened bowel wall and several small contiguous hypoechoic projections surrounding a hyperechoic center, suggestive of diverticulitis (Figure. She was given metronidazole and ciprofloxacin and her diagnosis of uncomplicated colonic diverticulitis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT.

  3. Widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity and ultrasound imaging evaluation of abdominal area after colon cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Antonio; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Molina-Barea, Rocio; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the presence of widespread pressure pain sensitivity in cancer patients following partial colorectal resection in the abdominal and lower back area and to describe the presence of abnormalities in abdominal and lower back muscle morphology. Twenty colon cancer survivors (eight females, mean age 56.60 ± 7.76 years) and 20 matched healthy controls (10 females, mean age 54.22 ± 8.12 years) participated. Abdominal and lower back pain was assessed after undergoing surgery using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were bilaterally assessed over the supraumbilical, infraumbilical, and lower back areas and the second metacarpal. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the depth of the abdominal muscles, the width of the midline abdominal fascia and the width of the lumbar multifidus. Ten months after finishing oncological treatments, patients who underwent partial colorectal resection reported significantly higher pain levels in the low-back area (P = 0.003) but not in the abdominal area (P = 0.426) compared with the matched controls. After surgery, the colon patients reported significantly higher BPI-intensity (P ultrasound imaging of the depth of the internal oblique muscle (F = 4.887, P = 0.035) but not in the other ultrasound imaging measurements. Ten months after oncology treatment, colon cancer survivors show widespread pressure pain muscle hyperalgesia and reduced depths of dominant-side internal oblique muscles compared with matched controls. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Intra-abdominal adhesions in ultrasound. Part II: The morphology of changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite their frequent appearance, intra-abdominal adhesions are rarely the subject of clinical studies and academic discussions. For many years the operators have been trying to reduce such unfavourable consequences of interventions in the abdominal structures. The aim of this article is to present the possibilities of intra-abdominal adhesion diagnostics by means of ultrasound imaging based on authors’ own experience and information included in pertinent literature. The anatomy and examination technique of the abdominal wall were discussed in Part I of the article. In order to evaluate intraperitoneal adhesions, one should use a convex transducer with the frequency of 3.5–6 MHz. The article provides numerous examples of US images presenting intra-abdominal adhesions, particularly those which appeared after surgical procedures. The significance of determining their localisation and extensiveness prior to a planned surgical treatment is emphasized. Four types of morphological changes in the ultrasound caused by intra-abdominal adhesions are distinguished and described: visceroperitoneal adhesions, intraperitoneal adhesions, adhesive obstructions as well as adhesions between the liver and abdominal wall with a special form of such changes, i.e. hepatic pseudotumour. Its ultrasound features are as follows: 1. The lesion is localised below the scar in the abdominal wall after their incision. 2. The lesion is localised in the abdominal part of the liver segments III, IV and V. 3. With the US beam focus precisely set, the lack of fascia – peritoneum complex may be noticed. An uneven liver outline or its ventral displacement appears. 4. A hepatic adhesion-related pseudotumour usually has indistinct margins, especially the posterior one, and, gradually, from top to bottom, loses its hypoechogenic nature. 5. In a respiration test, this liver fragment does not present the sliding movement – a neoplastic tumour rarely shows such an effect

  5. Simulation-Based Abdominal Ultrasound Training – A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mia L.; Ewertsen, Caroline; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim is to provide a complete overview of the different simulation-based training options for abdominal ultrasound and to explore the evidence of their effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines and Medline, Embase, Web...... of Science, and the Cochrane Library was searched. Articles were divided into three categories based on study design (randomized controlled trials, before-and-after studies and descriptive studies) and assessed for level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) system....... CONCLUSION: The included studies were heterogeneous in the choice of simulator, study design, participants, and outcome measures, and the level of evidence for effect was inadequate. In all studies simulation training was equally or more beneficial than other instructions or no instructions. Study designs...

  6. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eScaife

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs (EVAR has increased the need for repeat imaging especially in the post-operative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While CTA and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, ultrasound technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D or 4D contrast enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume and most importantly it can detect endoleaks post EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post EVAR follow-up, techniques and diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Ultrasound Assessment of Abdominal Muscle Thickness in Women With and Without Low Back Pain During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Carol Ann; Nash, Jennifer; Triano, John J; Barrett, Jon

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to determine the differences in abdominal musculature thickness, within 1 month of delivery, in women who experienced back pain during pregnancy compared with those who did not. B-mode ultrasound imaging was used to measure abdominal muscle thickness on 76 postpartum participants who participated in a larger study; 47 women experienced back pain during pregnancy, and 29 did not. Participant data were stratified by group, and primary comparisons were based on these grouping across the abdominal muscles, including rectus abdominis (upper and lower fibers), external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis. Means and standard deviations were also used to set parameters for future studies. In the present study, there was no difference in any abdominal muscle thickness between groups. Women with low back pain were significantly shorter (165.19 ± 6.64 cm) than women who did not have from back pain during pregnancy (169.38 ± 7.58 cm). All other demographics, such as age, weight, and date tested postpartum, were not significantly different between groups. The results of this study showed no variation in abdominal muscle thickness in women who had back pain during pregnancy and those who did not. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  9. [Ultrasound screening of abdominal aortic aneurysm: Lessons from Vesale 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, J P; Becker, F; Baud, J M; Miserey, G; Jaussent, A; Picot, M C; Bura-Rivière, A; Quéré, I

    2015-12-01

    Although aneurysm of the abdominal infra-renal aorta (AAA) meets criteria warranting B mode ultrasound screening, the advantages of mass screening versus selective targeted opportunistic screening remain a subject of debate. In France, the French Society of Vascular Medicine (SFMV) and the Health Authority (HAS) published recommendations for targeted opportunistic screening in 2006 and 2013 respectively. The SFMV held a mainstream communication day on November 21, 2013 in France involving participants from metropolitan France and overseas departments that led to a proposal for free AAA ultrasound screening: the Vesalius operation. Being a consumer operation, the selection criteria were limited to age (men and women between 60 and 75 years); the age limit was lowered to 50 years in case of direct family history of AAA. More than 7000 people (as many women as men) were screened in 83 centers with a 1.70% prevalence of AAA in the age-based target population (3.12% for men, 0.27% for women). The median diameter of detected AAA was 33 mm (range 20 to 74 mm). The prevalence of AAA was 1.7% in this population. Vesalius data are consistent with those of the literature both in terms of prevalence and for cardiovascular risk factors with the important role of smoking. Lessons from Vesalius to take into consideration are: screening is warranted in men 60 years and over, especially smokers, and in female smokers. Screening beyond 75 years should be discussed. Given the importance of screening, the SFMV set up a year of national screening for AAA (Vesalius operation 2014/2015) in order to increase public and physician awareness about AAA detection, therapeutic management, and monitoring. AAA is a serious, common, disease that kills 6000 people each year. The goal of screening is cost-effective reduction in the death toll. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Is It Worthwhile to Fully Evaluate the Stomach in Every Ultrasound Examination of the Abdominal Cavity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, M.; Navabi, J.; Salimi, Gh.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of abdominal sonography in the fasting state with no hypotonic agents in the detection and exclusion of gastric lesions. One-hundred patients with normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 94 patients with a major gastric abnormality (including 59 intraluminal tumors, three submucosal masses, 29 ulcers, two polyps and one hypertrophied gastric mucosa) and 75 patients with minor gastric abnormalities (mainly gastritis) were enrolled into the study. Of the 100 normal patients, ultrasound showed four false positive results with 96% specificity of the examination. Within the major gastric lesion group, ultrasound was true positive in 55 of 59 tumors, 15 of 29 ulcers, three of three submucosal masses and the case of giant gastric mucosa. It was negative in the detection of gastric polyps. It could detect only 8% of minor gastric abnormalities. Abdominal sonography in the fasting state, if carefully performed, is sufficiently accurate in detection and exclusion of major gastric lesions. Therefore, although it cannot replace endoscopic and barium studies of the stomach, careful evaluation of the stomach is recommended in every sonographic evaluation of the abdominal cavity

  11. Abdominal ultrasound-scanning versus non-contrast computed tomography as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liisberg, Mads; Diederichsen, Axel C.; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Validating non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (nCT) compared to ultrasound sonography (US) as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. Methods: Consecutively attending men (n = 566) from the pilot study of the randomized Danish CardioVascular Screening...

  12. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen......The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice...... are presented covering indications, contraindications, safety and efficacy of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic...

  13. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice...... are presented covering indications, contraindications, and safe and effective performance of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous...

  14. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yang [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Wei, E-mail: wangyang301301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  15. Reliability of the ultrasound measurements of abdominal muscles activity when activated with and without pelvic floor muscles contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Nahid; Rasouli, Omid; Arab, Amir Massoud; Khademi, Khosro; Samani, Elham Neisani

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic co-activation of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been shown in literature. Some studies have assessed the reliability of ultrasound measures of the abdominal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of ultrasound measurements of transverses abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) muscles during different conditions (PFM contraction, abdominal hollowing manoeuvre (AHM) with and without PFM contraction) in participants with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). 21 participants (9 with LBP, 12 healthy) participated in the study. The reliability of thickness measurements at rest and during each condition and thickness changes and percentage of this changes at different conditions were assessed. The results showed high reliability of the thickness measurement at rest and during each condition of TrA and OI muscles, moderate to substantial reliability for the thickness change and percentage of thickness change of TrA, and fair to moderate reliability of the thickness change and percentage of thickness change of OI in both groups. Ultrasound imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscle activity with and without PFM contraction.

  16. Acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy: MR imaging as a valuable adjunct to ultrasound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Brunelli, Roberto; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Bertini, Luca; Laghi, Francesca; Anceschi, Maurizio; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of pregnant women with acute abdominal and pelvic pain after sonographically (US) indeterminate findings. Forty pregnant patients with acute abdominal and/or pelvic pain, in whom ultrasound was indeterminate, were included in this study. Multiplanar MR images of the abdomen and pelvis were obtained and independently reviewed by two radiologists with discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Correlation of prospective clinical MR interpretations with surgical and obstetric records and clinical follow-up showed correct identification of disease entities in all 40/40 patients. The following disease processes were correctly identified using MRI in 21/40 patients: appendicitis (n = 5), ileal volvulus (n = 1), common bile duct lithiasis (n = 2), pubic chondrosarcoma (n = 1), uterine dehiscence (n = 1), placental hematoma (n = 3), iliac venous thrombosis (n = 2), ulcerative colitis (n = 1), acute pancreatitis (n = 1), hydronephrosis (n = 1), ovarian dermoid (n = 1), and ovarian torsion (n = 2). 19 of the 40 patients had normal findings on MR examinations and unremarkable follow-up. Interobserver agreement for lesion detection was excellent (0.95 k). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an accurate investigation in detecting the cause of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during pregnancy and should be considered after US indeterminate findings.

  17. Ultrasound surface probe as a screening method for evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasr-Esfahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the causes of mortality in emergency department. Free fluid in the abdomen due to intra-abdominal blunt trauma can be determined by the surface probe of ultrasound. Since the importance of this free fluid in hemodynamic stable patients with blunt trauma is associated with the unknown outcome for surgeons, this study was performed to evaluate the role of ultrasound surface probe as a screening method in evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods: A descriptive-analytical study was done on 45 patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. The patients were evaluated twice during the three-hours, including repeated ultrasound surface probe and clinical examinations. Computerized tomography was also performed. The patients were divided based on the amount of the free fluid in the abdomen during the evaluations into two groups: Fixed or increased, and decreased free fluid. The results of the different evaluated methods were compared using the sensitivity and specificity. Results: From 17 patients with CT abnormalities, free fluid increased in 14 patients (82.4%. Free fluid was decreased in three patients who were discharged well from the surgery service without any complication. Surface probe in prognosis detection had a sensitivity of 82.4% and specificity of 92.9%. The percentage of false positive and negative ultrasound compared with CT scan was 7.1% and 17.6%. Also, positive and negative predictive value of the ultrasound with surface probe was 87.5% and 89.7% respectively. Conclusion: The use of the ultrasound with surface probe in the diagnosis of free fluid in blunt abdominal trauma in hemodynamic stable patients can be considered as a useful screening method.

  18. Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C L; Trought, W S; von Ramm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1980-05-01

    Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasonic system are described. This work was performed utilising both the Thaumascan (two-dimensional, high resolution, actual time, ultrasound, multi-element array scanner) and the first commercial unit based on this system, the Grumman RT-400. Examples of normal and pathological anatomy are presented from over 300 examinations performed to date, including a series of 28 abdominal aortic aneurysms studied with the RT-400. Following electronic alterations in the Thaumascan with resultant improvement in the grey scale, prospective analyses in 86 obstetric and 23 abdominal examinations were undertaken. These studies indicate that fetal, intra-uterine, and abdominal structures can be rapidly and consistently imaged. The value of real time ultrasonic scanning in obstetric and abdominal examinations is illustrated. The principles of dynamically focused phased arrays are described, and the merits and limitations of these systems are discussed.

  19. Standardized cine-loop documentation in abdominal ultrasound facilitates offline image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormagen, Johann Baptist; Gaarder, Mario; Drolsum, Anders

    2015-01-01

    -loop documentation enables accurate offline reading in abdominal ultrasound and shows high agreement with immediate bedside reading. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-09-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-01-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries. (orig.)

  2. Utility of chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound for stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, M. T. W.; Holm, J.; Rødgaard, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current Danish Melanoma Guidelines suggest that stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma receive chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound to exclude lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of chest X-ray and...

  3. Measurement of abdominal muscle thickness using M-mode ultrasound imaging during functional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, Steve M; Hough, Alan D; Moore, Ann P

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been previously utilized in the measurement of muscle thickness and cross-sectional area in research studies, and advocated as a clinical biofeedback tool in the rehabilitation of transversus abdominis function following episodes of low back pain. This paper describes how the thickness of the abdominal muscles can be quantified with a new measurement technique using M-mode ultrasound. The technique uses a custom-made transducer holder that facilitates measurement of muscle thickness changes during functional activity. Limitations of the technique and potential future applications are discussed. The M-mode ultrasound technique may provide an effective method for the non-invasive measurement of abdominal muscle thickness during functional activities.

  4. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound study of the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana D. Guimarães

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the ultrasound characterization of the abdominal and pelvic regions of five maned wolves kept in captivity at the Triage Center of Wild Animals of the Federal University of Viçosa (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres, Universidade Federal de Viçosa. This characterization included descriptions of ultrasonographic aspects and measurements of various structures using B-mode ultrasound. Biometric data were collected to assess the existence of significant linear correlations between these measurements and the measurements obtained by ultrasound. Additionally, hematological and serum biochemistry evaluations of the animals were performed. The ultrasound findings were similar to those available in the literature on domestic dogs, which were used for comparison as a result of the lack of published data regarding maned wolves. The latter species showed characteristics closely resembling those of the former, differing in the spleen and left renal cortex echogenicities, in the appearance of the prostatic and testicular regions and in the hepatic portal vein morphology. In the current study, the biometric values were similar to those previously published; however, no data regarding thoracic perimeter, modified crown-rump length or thoracic depth were found in the literature for this Canidae species. Statistical analysis showed the existence of a strong negative correlation between the modified crown-rump length and left renal length, between the modified crown-rump length and the right renal volume, between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the cranial pole of the left adrenal gland and between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the caudal pole of the left adrenal gland. Laboratory findings, including segmented neutrophil, eosinophil, monocyte and lymphocyte counts and the serum levels of glucose, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, urea, total protein, globulin, creatine phosphokinase, triglyceride, sodium

  5. role of abdominal ultrasound in evaluation of children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-16

    Mar 16, 2011 ... for an upper gastrointestinal contrast study, which exposes the growing child to ionising radiation increasing the risk for neoplasia. It is for this reason that ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality of choice in paediatrics. In the evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract, bowel gas reduces the usefulness of ...

  6. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  7. Influence of the abdominal wall on the nonlinear propagation of focused therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen-Bo, Liu; Ting-Bo, Fan; Dong, Zhang; Xiu-Fen, Gong

    2009-01-01

    This article theoretically studies the influence of inhomogeneous abdominal walls on focused therapeutic ultrasound based on the phase screen model. An inhomogeneous tissue is considered as a combination of a homogeneous medium and a phase aberration screen. Variations of acoustic parameters such as peak positive pressure, peak negative pressure, and acoustic intensity are discussed with respect to the phase screen statistics of human abdominal walls. Results indicate that the abdominal wall can result in energy loss of the sound in the focal plane. For a typical human abdominal wall with correlation length of 7.9 mm and variance of 0.36, the peak acoustic intensity radiated from a 1 MHz transmitter with a radius of 30 mm can be reduced by about 14% at the focal plane. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  8. Point-of-Care Ultrasound Diagnosis of Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Lori B; Bellew, Shawna D; Kummer, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernias due to blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients can pose a diagnostic challenge because of spontaneous hernia reduction. Ultrasonography may be superior to computed tomography for this indication in some cases because of the ability to dynamically and repeatedly assess the area of injury. Herniation can be induced or exaggerated via Valsalva maneuvers, which can facilitate its detection during dynamic assessment. We present the case of a 3-year-old boy who sustained blunt abdominal trauma, with a resultant abdominal wall hernia that was diagnosed using point-of-care ultrasound imaging. This hernia was not visualized with computed tomography, and point-of-care ultrasonography expedited admission for operative repair.

  9. Ultrasound Assessment of the Abdominal Muscles at Rest and During the ASLR Test Among Adolescents With Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Paweł; Saulicz, Edward; Kuszewski, Michał; Wolny, Tomasz

    2017-05-01

    Observational study. Are there deviations in the thickness of abdominal muscles at rest in individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS)? Are there deviations in abdominal muscular activity in people with AIS during the active straight leg raise (ASLR) test? Ultrasound imaging can be used to assess the lateral abdominal muscle. Some authors suggest that scoliosis develops through a weakness or improper functioning of the abdominal muscles that cannot provide adequate support to the spinal segments. However, the literature lacks studies on the functioning of the abdominal muscles in individuals with spinal deviations. This study focuses on the evaluation of the thickness of the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominalis (TrA) muscles of individuals with AIS. Seventy-one healthy adolescents and 71 patients with AIS, all aged 10-16 years, were studied. The thickness of the muscles at rest was measured at the end of normal exhalation in millimeters. Muscular activity during the ASLR test was measured in the final position, and the standards were normalized with the thickness produced at rest. Muscular activity during the ASLR test was represented as a percentage change in the muscle thickness. The AIS group demonstrated a smaller resting thickness of all tested muscles of both sides (Pmuscles on the right side of the body showed higher activity in the AIS group during the ASLR test (Pactivity of the EO, IO, and TrA muscles on the right side.

  10. Comparative study between ultrasound guided tap block and paravertebral block in upper abdominal surgeries. Randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya M. Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block and thoracic paravertebral block were safe and effective anesthetic technique for upper abdominal surgery with longer and potent postoperative analgesia in thoracic paravertebral block than transversus abdominis block.

  11. Can sonographers offer an accurate upper abdominal ultrasound service in a district general hospital?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongola, N.A.; Guy, R.L.; Giles, J.A.; Ward, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of upper abdominal ultrasound (US) scanning performed by sonographers in a district general hospital, to identify potential areas of weakness and to make recommendations to improve the service. Materials and methods: Upper abdominal US examinations performed and reported by sonographers over a 4-week period were retrospectively reviewed. The accuracy of the imaging findings and reports were assessed against other imaging, surgical, histological or laboratory findings and against clinical outcome. Results: A heterogenous group of 104 patients were included in the study, 62 of whom had an US abnormality. Errors of scanning or interpretation were identified in 10 patients (9.6%) of whom five (4.8%) were felt to be potentially significant. Conclusions: The sonographers' accuracy in reporting upper abdominal US scans was 90%. However, on the basis of this study we have implemented specific recommendations to improve the quality of the service

  12. Reliability of ultrasound imaging for the measurement of abdominal muscle thickness in typically developing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Unger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A bdominal muscles are key to both posture andgait in both children with typical development (TD and with disabilities.Ultrasound (US imaging is a potential non-invasive method for investigatingactivity in these muscles. This study therefore aimed to determine the inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of B-mode US for investigating transverseabdominus (TrA , rectus abdominus (RA and external- (EO and internaloblique (IO muscle activity in children with TD. Design: A  prospective cor-relational descriptive study.  Participants:  Eighty six, 6-13year old children from one private and one public mainstream school. Outcome measures: Two sets of B-mode US images where captured per subject during rest and during head-up, resisted head-up and resisted sling activities. Intra-class Correlation Coefficients (ICC and standard error of measurement (SEM were used to analyse the data. Results: Good correlation was found for both test - retest condi-tions for all four muscles tested during rest: 0.91(TrA ; 0.90(IO; 0.91(EO; 0.94(RA for intra-tester reliability and0.74(TrA ; 0.88(IO; 0.74(EO; 0.83(RA for inter-tester reliability. Repeatability of thickness measures during activity however showed variation in recruitment patterns. A  significant correlation was found between age and BMI andresting abdominal muscle thickness (p<0.001. Conclusion: The study supports the reliability of US measurement of resting abdominal muscles and of the RA  under active conditions in children aged six to 13. However the stability o measurement of the other muscles under active conditions still needs to be established.

  13. Diagnosis of constipation does not correlate with trans-abdominal ultrasound of rectal distention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Matthew D; Ching, Christina B; Clayton, Douglass B; Thomas, John C; Pope, John C; Adams, Mark C; Brock, John W; Tanaka, Stacy T

    2015-06-01

    Constipation has been shown to have a significant impact on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in children, and treatment of constipation in children with bowel bladder dysfunction (BBD) has been shown to improve or completely resolve LUTS in many cases. Recent studies utilizing trans-abdominal ultrasound (US) to assess stool burden have correlated diagnosis of constipation with US appearance of rectal stool. An US scoring tool was published in 2008 to assess stool burden, showing linear correlation with constipation severity by symptom questionnaire in an outpatient pediatric constipation clinic population. We hypothesized that this US scoring tool would correlate with constipation symptoms in our outpatient pediatric urology population. In 2010, our pediatric urology outpatient clinic began administering a previously published validated BBD questionnaire to new toilet-trained patients, containing three questions addressing bowel function. Patients in our clinic undergoing trans-abdominal US of the bladder also have assessment of their stool burden by the previously published US scoring tool. We retrospectively reviewed patient charts beginning in June 2013 who had undergone trans-abdominal US of the bladder, gathering data on the first 100 patients with a complete BBD questionnaire and a completed stool burden US scoring tool. Chart review of 272 consecutive patients was required to enroll 100 patients with a completed US scoring of stool burden and a completed BBD questionnaire. Of these 272 patients, 225 (82%) had a complete scoring of stool burden during their US examination. BBD questionnaires were complete in 107 of 272 patients (39%). Median patient age was 8.2 years, with 69% of patients being female. The most common diagnosis was incontinence or bladder dysfunction (41%). Only one patient (1%) had constipation as the primary diagnosis for their visit. Linear regression analysis showed no correlation of US score to patient reported frequency of bowel

  14. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying; Herman, Joseph; Wong, John; Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ji, Tianlong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Iordachita, Iulian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tutkun Sen, H.; Kazanzides, Peter; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A. [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion. The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer ABC

  15. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying; Herman, Joseph; Wong, John; Ding, Kai; Ji, Tianlong; Iordachita, Iulian; Tutkun Sen, H.; Kazanzides, Peter; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion. The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer ABC

  16. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Wytze; Boermeester, Marja A.; Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van; Ramshorst, Bert van; Hove, Wim ten; Bouma, Willem H.; Leeuwen, Maarten S. van; Keulen, Esteban M. van; Bossuyt, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  17. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (suite G1-227), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze; Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ramshorst, Bert van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hove, Wim ten [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Bouma, Willem H. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Maarten S. van [University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keulen, Esteban M. van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  18. Transfer Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks for Classification of Abdominal Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Phillip M; Malhi, Harshawn S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate transfer learning with deep convolutional neural networks for the classification of abdominal ultrasound images. Grayscale images from 185 consecutive clinical abdominal ultrasound studies were categorized into 11 categories based on the text annotation specified by the technologist for the image. Cropped images were rescaled to 256 × 256 resolution and randomized, with 4094 images from 136 studies constituting the training set, and 1423 images from 49 studies constituting the test set. The fully connected layers of two convolutional neural networks based on CaffeNet and VGGNet, previously trained on the 2012 Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge data set, were retrained on the training set. Weights in the convolutional layers of each network were frozen to serve as fixed feature extractors. Accuracy on the test set was evaluated for each network. A radiologist experienced in abdominal ultrasound also independently classified the images in the test set into the same 11 categories. The CaffeNet network classified 77.3% of the test set images accurately (1100/1423 images), with a top-2 accuracy of 90.4% (1287/1423 images). The larger VGGNet network classified 77.9% of the test set accurately (1109/1423 images), with a top-2 accuracy of VGGNet was 89.7% (1276/1423 images). The radiologist classified 71.7% of the test set images correctly (1020/1423 images). The differences in classification accuracies between both neural networks and the radiologist were statistically significant (p ultrasound images.

  19. Reproducibility of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging for the measurement of abdominal muscle activity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Smeets, Rob J E M

    2009-08-01

    Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) measures of abdominal wall muscles are used to indirectly measure muscle activity. These measures are used to identify suitable patients and to monitor progress of motor control exercise treatment of people with low back pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically review reproducibility studies of RUSI for measuring thickness of abdominal wall muscles. Eligible studies were identified via searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. The authors also searched personal files and tracked references of the retrieved studies via the Web of Science Index. Studies involving any type of reliability and or agreement of any type of ultrasound measurements (B or M mode) for any of the abdominal wall muscles were selected. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Due to heterogeneity of the studies' designs, pooling the data for a meta-analysis was not possible. Twenty-one studies were included, and these studies were typically of low quality and studied subjects who were healthy rather than people seeking care for low back pain. The studies reported good to excellent reliability for single measures of thickness and poor to good reliability for measures of thickness change (reflecting the muscle activity). Interestingly, no studies checked reliability of measures of the difference in thickness changes over time (representing improvement or deterioration in muscle activity). The current evidence of the reproducibility of RUSI for measuring abdominal muscle activity is based mainly on studies with suboptimal designs and the study of people who were healthy. The critical question of whether RUSI provides reliable measures of improvement in abdominal muscle activity remains to be evaluated.

  20. Value of Abdominal Radiography, Colonic Transit Time, and Rectal Ultrasound Scanning in the Diagnosis of Idiopathic Constipation in Children: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Marjolein Y.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Kurver, Miranda J.; Boluyt, Nicole; Benninga, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review evaluating the value of abdominal radiography, colonic transit time (CTT), and rectal ultrasound scanning in the diagnosis of idiopathic constipation in children. Study design Eligible studies were those assessing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal radiography,

  1. Value of Abdominal Radiography, Colonic Transit Time, and Rectal Ultrasound Scanning in the Diagnosis of Idiopathic Constipation in Children : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Marjolein Y.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Kurver, Miranda J.; Boluyt, Nicole; Benninga, Marc A.

    Objective To perform a systematic review evaluating the value of abdominal radiography, colonic transit time (CTT), and rectal ultrasound scanning in the diagnosis of idiopathic constipation in children. Study design Eligible studies were those assessing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal radiography,

  2. Abdominal ultrasound referred by the Emergency department – Can sonographer findings help guide timely patient management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Michal; Bloesch, Justin; Lombardo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sonographer findings with radiologists' reports regarding the level of agreement, ability to answer the clinical question, and the use of hedging (descriptive words that do not commit to a definitive diagnosis) in abdominal ultrasound cases referred by the Emergency department. Other criteria compared included caveats of image quality and requests for further investigations. Methods: Abdominal ultrasound examinations referred by the Emergency department at a large regional tertiary hospital were retrospectively reviewed and sonographer findings compared with radiologists' reports. A consultant Intensivist scored all examinations into one of four categories according to the level of diagnostic agreement between the sonographer and associated radiologists. The same rater also identified where hedging terminology was used, whether the clinical question posed was answered and when further requests for investigations (including imaging) were made. The proportion of scores between sonographers and radiologists for each outcome variable were analysed using Fisher Exact tests. Results: Eighty-six cases were identified for this study. Of those, 73 (84.9%) were in complete agreement. In 12 cases (14.0%) a minor discrepancy was reported and only one case (1.1%) was scored as moderately discrepant between sonographers findings and radiologists' reports. There were no significant differences in the use of hedging, ability to answer the clinical question, requests for further investigations or interpretation of image quality. Conclusion: Sonographer findings for cases of abdominal ultrasound referred by the Emergency department have a high level of agreement with radiologists' reports and could form the basis for acute patient care when radiologists' reports are unavailable

  3. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of a performance improvement intervention to address physician documentation deficiencies in abdominal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vivek V; Delman, Bradley N; Wilck, Eric J; Simpson, William L

    2014-06-01

    For ultrasound reports to meet criteria for coding as abdomen complete (USABC), 8 elements are required: liver, bile ducts, gallbladder, spleen, kidneys, pancreas, inferior vena cava (IVC), and aorta. Failure to document all 8 results in coding as ultrasound abdomen limited. The purposes of our study were to identify deficiencies in documentation, implement a performance improvement intervention to address deficiencies, and evaluate the intervention. In the first phase, 50 consecutive USABC reports performed as part of routine medical care were retrospectively analyzed for the presence or absence of the 8 elements required for USABC coding. Subsequently, education regarding current procedural terminology coding in abdominal ultrasound and standardized macros was provided to radiologists. In the second, postintervention phase, an additional 50 consecutive USABC reports were analyzed for the presence or absence of the 8 elements. In the first phase, none (0%) of 50 reports met criteria for USABC. The most commonly omitted elements were IVC (present in 2% of reports) and aorta (present in 6%). After intervention, there was an increase to 37 reports (74%) meeting criteria for USABC. The most commonly omitted elements were IVC (present in 76%) and aorta (present in 86%). Lack of 100% compliance was secondary to failure to update a macro and inaccurately scheduled studies (focused right lower quadrant/appendicitis study scheduled as USABC). We improved USABC documentation from 0% to 74%. Our compliance rate after intervention was similar to the 75.1% of previously published larger studies. Our study illustrates the efficacy of simple performance improvement interventions to improve abdominal ultrasound documentation.

  5. Is Abdominal Fetal Electrocardiography an Alternative to Doppler Ultrasound for FHR Variability Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezewski, Janusz; Wrobel, Janusz; Matonia, Adam; Horoba, Krzysztof; Martinek, Radek; Kupka, Tomasz; Jezewski, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Great expectations are connected with application of indirect fetal electrocardiography (FECG), especially for home telemonitoring of pregnancy. Evaluation of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability, when determined from FECG, uses the same criteria as for FHR signal acquired classically—through ultrasound Doppler method (US). Therefore, the equivalence of those two methods has to be confirmed, both in terms of recognizing classical FHR patterns: baseline, accelerations/decelerations (A/D), long-term variability (LTV), as well as evaluating the FHR variability with beat-to-beat accuracy—short-term variability (STV). The research material consisted of recordings collected from 60 patients in physiological and complicated pregnancy. The FHR signals of at least 30 min duration were acquired dually, using two systems for fetal and maternal monitoring, based on US and FECG methods. Recordings were retrospectively divided into normal (41) and abnormal (19) fetal outcome. The complex process of data synchronization and validation was performed. Obtained low level of the signal loss (4.5% for US and 1.8% for FECG method) enabled to perform both direct comparison of FHR signals, as well as indirect one—by using clinically relevant parameters. Direct comparison showed that there is no measurement bias between the acquisition methods, whereas the mean absolute difference, important for both visual and computer-aided signal analysis, was equal to 1.2 bpm. Such low differences do not affect the visual assessment of the FHR signal. However, in the indirect comparison the inconsistencies of several percent were noted. This mainly affects the acceleration (7.8%) and particularly deceleration (54%) patterns. In the signals acquired using the electrocardiography the obtained STV and LTV indices have shown significant overestimation by 10 and 50% respectively. It also turned out, that ability of clinical parameters to distinguish between normal and abnormal groups do not depend on

  6. Follow-up on Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Three Dimensional Ultrasound: Volume Versus Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulam, Q M; Bredahl, K K; Lönn, L; Rouet, L; Sillesen, H H; Eiberg, J P

    2017-10-01

    Rupture risk in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is assessed using AAA diameter; yet 10% of ruptures occur in a small aneurysm. This underlines the inadequacy of diameter as a standalone parameter. In this prospective follow-up study, ultrasound determined aneurysm diameter was compared with aneurysm volume determined by three dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) in a group of 179 AAAs. This was a prospective cohort study with repeated diameter and volume measurements by 3D-US. In total, 179 patients with small infrarenal AAAs (diameter 30-55 mm) were enrolled consecutively. At enrolment and at 12 month follow-up, maximum diameter, using dual plane technique, and three dimensional volume were measured. Based on a previous accuracy study, significant change in diameter and volume were defined as an increase exceeding the known range of variability (ROV) of each US technique; ±3.7 mm and ±8.8 mL, respectively. Post-hoc Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to estimate time to conversion to treatment after the conclusion of the follow-up period between two groups. In total, 125 patients (70%) had an unchanged diameter during follow-up. In this group, 50 patients (40%) had an increasing aortic volume. Forty-five (83%) of the 54 patients with an increasing aortic diameter showed a corresponding volume increase. During a median follow-up of 367 days (364-380 days), a mean increase in diameter of 2.7 mm (±2.6 mm) and a mean increase in volume of 11.6 mL (±9.9 mL) were recorded. In post-hoc analysis, it was found that more AAAs with a stable diameter and a growing volume than AAAs with a stable diameter and volume were undergoing aortic repair during follow-up, based on the maximum diameter. In this cohort of small AAAs, 40% of patients with a stable diameter had an increasing volume at 12 month follow-up. From this perspective, 3D-US could have a future supplemental role in AAA surveillance programmes. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published

  7. Is Abdominal Fetal Electrocardiography an Alternative to Doppler Ultrasound for FHR Variability Evaluation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Jezewski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Great expectations are connected with application of indirect fetal electrocardiography (FECG, especially for home telemonitoring of pregnancy. Evaluation of fetal heart rate (FHR variability, when determined from FECG, uses the same criteria as for FHR signal acquired classically—through ultrasound Doppler method (US. Therefore, the equivalence of those two methods has to be confirmed, both in terms of recognizing classical FHR patterns: baseline, accelerations/decelerations (A/D, long-term variability (LTV, as well as evaluating the FHR variability with beat-to-beat accuracy—short-term variability (STV. The research material consisted of recordings collected from 60 patients in physiological and complicated pregnancy. The FHR signals of at least 30 min duration were acquired dually, using two systems for fetal and maternal monitoring, based on US and FECG methods. Recordings were retrospectively divided into normal (41 and abnormal (19 fetal outcome. The complex process of data synchronization and validation was performed. Obtained low level of the signal loss (4.5% for US and 1.8% for FECG method enabled to perform both direct comparison of FHR signals, as well as indirect one—by using clinically relevant parameters. Direct comparison showed that there is no measurement bias between the acquisition methods, whereas the mean absolute difference, important for both visual and computer-aided signal analysis, was equal to 1.2 bpm. Such low differences do not affect the visual assessment of the FHR signal. However, in the indirect comparison the inconsistencies of several percent were noted. This mainly affects the acceleration (7.8% and particularly deceleration (54% patterns. In the signals acquired using the electrocardiography the obtained STV and LTV indices have shown significant overestimation by 10 and 50% respectively. It also turned out, that ability of clinical parameters to distinguish between normal and abnormal groups do not

  8. Abdominal ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sound waves that reflect off body structures. A computer receives these waves and uses them to create ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6 who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US guidance group (n=75. All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3% and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7% and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7% major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%. The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%. Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening program using hand-held ultrasound in primary healthcare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Sisó-Almirall

    Full Text Available We determined the feasibility of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA screening program led by family physicians in public primary healthcare setting using hand-held ultrasound device. The potential study population was 11,214 men aged ≥ 60 years attended by three urban, public primary healthcare centers. Participants were recruited by randomly-selected telephone calls. Ultrasound examinations were performed by four trained family physicians with a hand-held ultrasound device (Vscan®. AAA observed were verified by confirmatory imaging using standard ultrasound or computed tomography. Cardiovascular risk factors were determined. The prevalence of AAA was computed as the sum of previously-known aneurysms, aneurysms detected by the screening program and model-based estimated undiagnosed aneurysms. We screened 1,010 men, with mean age of 71.3 (SD 6.9 years; 995 (98.5% men had normal aortas and 15 (1.5% had AAA on Vscan®. Eleven out of 14 AAA-cases (78.6% had AAA on confirmatory imaging (one patient died. The total prevalence of AAA was 2.49% (95%CI 2.20 to 2.78. The median aortic diameter at diagnosis was 3.5 cm in screened patients and 4.7 cm (p<0.001 in patients in whom AAA was diagnosed incidentally. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified coronary heart disease (OR = 4.6, 95%CI 1.3 to 15.9 as the independent factor with the highest odds ratio. A screening program led by trained family physicians using hand-held ultrasound was a feasible, safe and reliable tool for the early detection of AAA.

  12. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma;O valor da ultra-sonografia na avaliacao do traumatismo abdominal fechado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-07-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  13. Abdominal circumference measurement by ultrasound does not enhance estimating the association of visceral fat with cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Helena; Pereira, Aline Maria L; Ajzen, Sergio A; Nogueira, Paulo C Koch

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the association between visceral fat and cardiovascular risk factors and to compare the ultrasonographic measurements of abdominal visceral fat with abdominal circumference (AC). This observational cross-sectional study categorized pubertal and postpubertal adolescents into a control group (n = 49) and an obese group (n = 46). Weight, height, AC, blood pressure, biochemical tests (lipid profile, triacylglycerols, fasting glucose for insulinemia, and serum uric acid), and ultrasound to measure visceral fat were assessed. We found significant differences in the vascular risk variables between the groups, except for total cholesterol and fasting blood glucose level. We also observed that 31 subjects in the control group presented abnormalities in cardiovascular risk factors. The correlations between abdominal visceral fat (measured by ultrasound or the AC) and cardiovascular risk factors were significant. In the entire sample, AC presented better sensitivity and specificity than the ultrasound-measured abdominal visceral fat for identifying the presence of a cluster of at least three cardiovascular risk factors (areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve 0.87 and 0.73, respectively). Ultrasonographic measurements of visceral fat were correlated with cardiovascular risk factors, but this association was also demonstrable with AC measurements. Our results suggest that the measurement of visceral fat by ultrasound is unnecessary for the diagnosis of cardiovascular risk in well-nourished or obese adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection and measurement of fetal abdominal contour in ultrasound images via local phase information and iterative randomized Hough transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Qin, Jing; Zhu, Lei; Ni, Dong; Chui, Yim-Pan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Due to the characteristic artifacts of ultrasound images, e.g., speckle noise, shadows and intensity inhomogeneity, traditional intensity-based methods usually have limited success on the segmentation of fetal abdominal contour. This paper presents a novel approach to detect and measure the abdominal contour from fetal ultrasound images in two steps. First, a local phase-based measure called multiscale feature asymmetry (MSFA) is de ned from the monogenic signal to detect the boundaries of fetal abdomen. The MSFA measure is intensity invariant and provides an absolute measurement for the signi cance of features in the image. Second, in order to detect the ellipse that ts to the abdominal contour, the iterative randomized Hough transform is employed to exclude the interferences of the inner boundaries, after which the detected ellipse gradually converges to the outer boundaries of the abdomen. Experimental results in clinical ultrasound images demonstrate the high agreement between our approach and manual approach on the measurement of abdominal circumference (mean sign difference is 0.42% and correlation coef cient is 0.9973), which indicates that the proposed approach can be used as a reliable and accurate tool for obstetrical care and diagnosis.

  15. Discriminative and reliability analyses of ultrasound measurement of abdominal muscles recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L; Nascimento, Dafne P; Pinto, Rafael Z; Franco, Marcia R; Hodges, Paul W

    2011-10-01

    Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging has a great potential to be used as a tool in the assessment of trunk muscle function in patients with low back pain (LBP). However, a further investigation of the discriminative ability of this tool as well as the effect of operators' levels of training on reliability is warranted. Discriminative analysis of ultrasound and electromyography (EMG) measurements of transversus abdominus (TrA), obliquus internus (OI), and obliquus externus (OE) muscles function between people with and without LBP and the effect of operator's training on reliability of TrA muscle function of chronic LBP patients were conducted. For the discriminative study, measurements were collected from 10 subjects with LBP and 10 matched controls during isometric low load tasks with their limbs suspended. For the reliability study, in stage 1 the reliability of single ultrasonographic static images involved 4 operators (1 trained and 3 non-trained), whereas, in stage 2, two operators (1 trained and 1 non-trained) were used to determine the reliability of TrA thickness change. Methods used in the statistical analysis were pearson correlation and receiver operating characteristic curve for the discriminative study and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the reliability study. While ultrasound measures of OE muscle function showed poor association with EMG (r = 0.28, p = 0.22), TrA and OI function showed moderate to excellent association (TrA: r = 0.74, p Ultrasound and EMG measures of TrA and OI function discriminated LBP patients from controls. Reliability of the assessment of TrA function with a trained operator (ICC = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.81-0.97) was substantially higher than a non-trained one (ICC = 0.44; 95% CI: -0.41-0.78). In conclusion, ultrasound measures of deep trunk function is a valid discriminative tool in LBP but highly dependent on operator's level of training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging reveals no delay in abdominal muscle feed-forward activity during rapid arm movements in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, Deborah; Mannion, Anne F; Schenk, Peter; Gorelick, Mark; Helbling, Daniel; Gerber, Hans; Toma, Valeriu; Sprott, Haiko

    2010-07-15

    Cross-sectional study. Comparison of the timing of onset of lateral abdominal muscle activity during rapid arm movements in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (cLBP) and back-pain-free controls. Rapid movements of the arm are normally associated with prior activation of trunk-stabilizing muscles in readiness for the impending postural perturbation. Using invasive intramuscular electromyography techniques, studies have shown that this feed-forward function is delayed in some patients with low back pain (LBP). Ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) provides an ultrasound method for quantifying muscle activation in a noninvasive manner, allowing investigation of larger groups of patients and controls. Ninety-six individuals participated (48 patients with cLBP and 48 matched LBP-free controls). During rapid shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension, surface electromyographic signals from the deltoid and motion-mode TDI images from the contralateral lateral abdominal muscles were recorded simultaneously. The onset of muscle activity was given by changes in the tissue velocity of the abdominal muscles, as measured with TDI. Pain and disability in the patients were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. In both groups, feed-forward activity of the lateral abdominal muscles was recorded during arm movements in all directions. The main effect of "group membership" revealed no significant difference between the groups for the earliest onset of abdominal muscle activity (P = 0.398). However, a significant "group x body side" interaction (P = 0.015) was observed, and this was the result of earlier onsets in the cLBP group than controls for the abdominal muscles on the right (but not left) body side. No relationship was found between the time of onset of the earliest abdominal muscle activity and pain intensity, pain frequency, pain medication usage, or Roland Morris disability scores. Patients

  17. [Contrast enhanced ultrasound can show symptomatic carotid lesions not visualized with magnetic resonance angiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, J-M; Becker, F; Maurizot, A; Pico, F

    2013-12-01

    We report the cases of two patients who presented symptoms focused on a wall of the common carotid: carotidodynia in one patient and a transient ischemic attack in the other. The B-mode ultrasound showed an enlarged thickened medio-adventitial echostructure with a slightly heterogeneous and iso or hypoechoic appearance. There was no narrowing. Injection of ultrasound contrast led to significant enhancement in the wall reflecting neovascularization secondary to inflammation. Other imaging methods (MR and CT angiography) found no abnormality. At the 3-month follow-up visit, the surface area of the lesions was greatly decreased and the ultrasound contrast enhancement had disappeared. These two cases illustrate how focal lesions of the carotid wall missed on MR and CT angiography can be detected and visualized with B-mode ultrasound contrast enhancement. Contrast enhanced ultrasound leads to the concept of "active lesions" resulting from inflammatory processes that can be readily monitored without radiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The use of ultrasound imaging of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver in subjects with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Miltenberger, Chad E; Deiters, Henry M; Del Toro, Yadira M; Pulliam, Jennifer N; Childs, John D; Boyles, Robert E; Flynn, Timothy W

    2005-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial among patients with low back pain (LBP). (1) Determine the reliability of real-time ultrasound imaging for assessing activation of the lateral abdominal muscles; (2) characterize the extent to which the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) results in preferential activation of the transverse abdominis (TrA); and (3) determine if ultrasound biofeedback improves short-term performance of the ADIM in patients with LBP. Ultrasound imaging is reportedly useful for measuring and training patients to preferentially activate the TrA muscle. However, research to support these claims is limited. Thirty patients with LBP referred for lumbar stabilization training were randomized to receive either traditional training (n = 15) or traditional training with biofeedback (n = 15). Ultrasound imaging was used to measure changes in thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. Differences in preferential changes in muscle thickness of the TrA between groups and across time were assessed using analysis of variance. Intrarater reliability measuring lateral abdominal muscle thickness exceeded 0.93. On average, patients in both groups demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the thickness of the TrA during the ADIM. Performance of the ADIM did not differ between the groups. These data provide construct validity for the notion that the ADIM results in preferential activation of the TrA in patients with LBP. Although, the addition of biofeedback did not enhance the ability to perform the ADIM at a short-term follow-up, our data suggest a possible ceiling effect or an insufficient training stimulus. Further research is necessary to determine if there is a subgroup of patients with LBP who may benefit from biofeedback.

  19. Sagittal abdominal diameter shows better correlation with cardiovascular risk factors than waist circumference and BMI

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Natalia Cavalheri; de Oliveira, Erick Prado

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity (abdominal adiposity) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and the most used methods to measure the adiposity are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD). Objective To correlate BMI, WC, and SAD with biochemical parameters and blood pressure in adults. Methods A non-experimental exploratory/descriptive and cross sectional study was developed and it was assessed 133 subjects (59 men and 74 women) aging between 18 and 87?...

  20. Value of liver elastography and abdominal ultrasound for detection of complications of allogeneic hemopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, T; Weber, J; Nehring, C; Kronenberger, R; Tenckhoff, H; Mössner, J; Niederwieser, D; Tröltzsch, M; Lange, T; Keim, V

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic complications contribute to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hemopoietic SCT. Liver Doppler ultrasound and elastography represent promising methods for pretransplant risk assessment and early detection of complications. Ultrasound (liver and spleen size, liver perfusion) and elastography (transient elastography (TE); right liver lobe acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (r-ARFI); left liver lobe ARFI (l-ARFI)) were prospectively evaluated in patients with indications for allo-SCT. Measurements were performed before and repeatedly after SCT. Results were compared with the incidence of life-threatening complications and death during the first 150 days after SCT. Of 59 included patients, 16 suffered from major complications and 9 of them died within the follow-up period. At baseline, liver and spleen size, liver perfusion, TE and r-ARFI did not differ significantly between patients with and without severe complications. In contrast, l-ARFI was significantly elevated in patients who later developed severe complications (1.58±0.30 m/s vs 1.37±0.27 m/s, P=0.030). After SCT, l-ARFI values remained elevated and TE showed increasing liver stiffness in patients with complications. The value of conventional liver ultrasound for prediction of severe SCT complications is limited. Increased values for TE and l-ARFI are associated with severe SCT complications and demand further evaluation.

  1. Changes in recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with low back pain: ultrasound measurement of muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L; Hodges, Paul W

    2004-11-15

    Ultrasound and electromyographic (EMG) measures of trunk muscle activity were compared between low back pain (LBP) and control subjects in a cross-sectional study. To compare the recruitment of the abdominal muscles (measured as a change in thickness with ultrasound imaging) between people with and without low back pain and to compare these measurements with EMG recordings made with intramuscular electrodes. Although ultrasonography has been advocated as a noninvasive measure of abdominal muscle activity, it is not known whether it can provide a valid measure of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in LBP. Ten subjects with recurrent LBP and 10 matched controls were tested during isometric low load tasks with their limbs suspended. Changes in thickness from resting baseline values were obtained for transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI), and obliquus externus (OE) using ultrasonography. Fine wire EMG was measured concurrently. Study participants with LBP had a significantly smaller increase in TrA thickness with isometric leg tasks compared with controls. No difference was found between groups for OI or OE. Similar results were found for EMG. People with LBP had less TrA EMG activity with leg tasks, and there was no difference between groups for EMG activity for OI or OE. This study reinforces evidence for changes in automatic control of TrA in people with LBP. Furthermore, the data establish a new test of recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with LBP. This test presents a feasible noninvasive test of automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles.

  2. Abdominal Adiposity Distribution Quantified by Ultrasound Imaging and Incident Hypertension in a General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seven, Ekim; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for hypertension. However, different distributions of abdominal adipose tissue may affect hypertension risk differently. The main purpose of this study was to explore the association of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue...

  3. The role of routine post-natal abdominal ultrasound for newborns in a resource-poor setting: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omokhodion Samuel I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Neonatal abdominal ultrasound is usually performed in Nigeria to investigate neonatal symptoms rather than as a follow up to evaluate fetal abnormalities which were detected on prenatal ultrasound. The role of routine obstetric ultrasonography in the monitoring of pregnancy and identification of fetal malformations has partly contributed to lowering of fetal mortality rates. In Nigeria which has a high maternal and fetal mortality rate, many pregnant women do not have ante-natal care and not infrequently, women also deliver their babies at home and only bring the newborns to the clinics for immunization. Even when performed, most routine obstetric scans are not targeted towards the detection of fetal abnormalities. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the benefit of routinely performing abdominal scans on newborns with a view to detecting possible abnormalities which may have been missed ante-natally. Methods- This was a longitudinal study of 202 consecutive, apparently normal newborns. Routine clinical examination and abdominal ultrasound scans were performed on the babies by their mother's bedside, before discharge. Neonates with abnormal initial scans had follow-up scans. Results- There were 108 males and 94 females. There were 12 (5.9% abnormal scans seen in five male and seven female neonates. Eleven of the twelve abnormalities were in the kidneys, six on the left and five on the right. Three of the four major renal anomalies- absent kidney, ectopic/pelvic kidney and two cases of severe hydronephrosis were however on the left side. There was one suprarenal abnormality on the right suspected to be a possible infected adrenal haemorrage. Nine of the abnormal cases reported for follow- up and of these, two cases had persistent severe abnormalities. Conclusions- This study demonstrated a 5.9% incidence of genito urinary anomalies on routine neonatal abdominal ultrasound in this small population. Routine obstetric USS

  4. Sagittal abdominal diameter shows better correlation with cardiovascular risk factors than waist circumference and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Natalia Cavalheri; de Oliveira, Erick Prado

    2013-01-01

    Obesity (abdominal adiposity) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and the most used methods to measure the adiposity are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD). To correlate BMI, WC, and SAD with biochemical parameters and blood pressure in adults. A non-experimental exploratory/descriptive and cross sectional study was developed and it was assessed 133 subjects (59 men and 74 women) aging between 18 and 87 years. It was registered the patients' weight (kg), height (m), BMI (kg/m(2)), WC (cm) and SAD (cm), and these parameters were correlated with glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c and blood pressure. After adjustment for gender and age, it was observed a positive correlation between SAD and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.20), glycemia (r = 0.20), triglycerides (r = 0.32), LDL (r = 0.26), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.33), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.21) (p correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = -0.24) (p correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20), and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p correlated with almost all the cardiovascular risk factors analyzed and it might be considered the best predictor of abdominal fat and cardiovascular risk.

  5. Diagnosis of Intra-Abdominal Extralobar Pulmonary Sequestration by means of Ultrasound in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Rodrigues Pires

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary sequestration is a congenital abnormality consisting of a mass of pulmonary tissue that presents an abnormal connection with the tracheobronchial tree, with a blood supply coming from an anomalous artery derived from the systemic circulation. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration is characterized by having pleural coverings that are independent of the normal lungs, with vascular supply usually coming from the aorta or from one of its branches. This diagnosis can be suspected prenatally if an abdominal mass, generally below the diaphragm, is seen. Here, we present a case of a neonate on the second day of life, with ultrasonography showing extralobar pulmonary sequestration located above the left adrenal gland that prenatally simulated a neuroblastoma.

  6. Superior Reproducibility of the Leading to Leading Edge and Inner to Inner Edge Methods in the Ultrasound Assessment of Maximum Abdominal Aortic Diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Bøgsted, Martin; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy exists regarding optimal caliper placement in ultrasound assessment of maximum abdominal aortic diameter. This study aimed primarily to determine reproducibility of caliper placement in relation to the aortic wall with the three principal methods: leading to leading edge......: Radiologists (n=18) assessed the maximum antero-posterior abdominal aortic diameter by completing repeated caliper placements with the OTO, LTL, and ITI methods on 50 still abdominal aortic images obtained from an AAA screening program. Inter-observer reproducibility was calculated as the limit of agreement...... compared with the OTO method of caliper placement in ultrasound determination of maximum abdominal aortic diameter, and the choice of caliper placement method significantly affects the prevalence of AAAs in screening programs....

  7. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of abdominal viscera: Tips to ensure safe and effective biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications.

  8. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21 mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n = 31, 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL saline in Group B (n = 31, and 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL dexmedetomidine (100 µg in Group BD (n = 31. Results Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p 0.05. Conclusions The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement.

  10. Daily ultrasound-based image-guided targeting for radiotherapy of upper abdominal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Martin; Salter, Bill J; Cavanaugh, Sean X; Fuss, Cristina; Sadeghi, Amir; Fuller, Clifton D; Ameduri, Ardow; Hevezi, James M; Herman, Terence S; Thomas, Charles R

    2004-07-15

    Development and implementation of a strategy to use a stereotactic ultrasound (US)-based image-guided targeting device (BAT) to align intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) target volumes accurately in the upper abdomen. Because the outlines of such targets may be poorly visualized by US, we present a method that uses adjacent vascular guidance structures as surrogates for the target position. We assessed the potential for improvement of daily repositioning and the feasibility of daily application. A total of 62 patients were treated by sequential tomotherapeutic IMRT between October 2000 and June 2003 for cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma (n = 10), hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 10), liver metastases (n = 11), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 20), neuroblastoma (n = 3), and other abdominal and retroperitoneal tumors (n = 8). The target volumes (TVs) and organs at risk were delineated in contrast-enhanced CT data sets. Additionally, vascular guidance structures in close anatomic relation to the TV, or within the TV, were delineated. Throughout the course of IMRT, US BAT images were acquired during daily treatment positioning. In addition to the anatomic structures typically used for US targeting (e.g., the TV and dose-limiting organs at risk), CT contours of guidance structures were superimposed onto the real-time acquired axial and sagittal US images, and target position adjustments, as indicated by the system, were performed accordingly. We report the BAT-derived distribution of shifts in the three principal room axes compared with a skin-mark-based setup, as well as the time required to perform BAT alignment. The capability of the presented method to improve target alignment was assessed in 15 patients by comparing the organ and fiducial position between the respective treatment simulation CT with a control CT study after US targeting in the CT suite. A total of 1,337 BAT alignments were attempted. US images were not useful in 56 setups (4.2%), mainly

  11. Ultrasound measurement of abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests in women with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; ShahAli, Shiva; Rahmani, Nahid; Negahban, Hossein; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Bahmani, Andia

    2018-02-26

    The present study investigated group differences between the thickness changes of the transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles, during performance of the isometric supine chest raise and the supine double leg-straight leg raise tests in women with and without low back pain (LBP). Twenty women with LBP and 20 women without LBP participated in this case-control study. The thickness of the right TrA, IO, and EO muscles was measured using B-mode ultrasound (US) at rest, immediately at the beginning of performing the tests and when participants in both groups self-reported fatigue. The percentage of change in thickness of the abdominal muscles from rest to the initiation and fatigue stages of both tests was measured. The results indicate a statistically significant difference in the pattern of changes in deep (TrA) and superficial (EO) abdominal muscles thickness at the fatigue stage of the supine double straight-leg raise (SDSLR) test between groups (P abdominal muscles thicknesses change at rest or during stages of the clinical isometric endurance tests (P > 0.05). An altered activation pattern in the deep (TrA) and superficial (EO) muscles of LBP participants during fatigue stage of the SDSLR test as compared to controls indicates motor control dysfunction in the LBP group. Comparison of the activity of TrA and EO muscles during fatigue stage of SDSLR test can be used to assess alterations in motor control of abdominal muscles.

  12. Ultrasound Estimates of Visceral and Subcutaneous-Abdominal Adipose Tissues in Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuella De Lucia Rolfe

    2013-01-01

    % between ages 3 and 12 months ( and at both ages were lower in infants breast-fed at 3 months than in other infants. US-visceral depths at both 3 and 12 months were inversely related to skinfold thickness at birth ( and at 3 and 12 months, resp.; adjusted for current skinfold thickness. In contrast, US-subcutaneous-abdominal depth at 3 months was positively related to skinfold thickness at birth (. US measures can rank infants with higher or lower IA-AT and SCA-AT. Contrasting patterns of association with visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal adiposities indicate that they may be differentially regulated in infancy.

  13. Development of a Fetal Weight Chart Using Serial Trans-Abdominal Ultrasound in an East African Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Christentze; Scheike, Thomas; Oesterholt, Mayke

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To produce a fetal weight chart representative of a Tanzanian population, and compare it to weight charts from Sub-Saharan Africa and the developed world. Methods: A longitudinal observational study in Northeastern Tanzania. Pregnant women were followed throughout pregnancy with serial...... trans-abdominal ultrasound. All pregnancies with pathology were excluded and a chart representing the optimal growth potential was developed using fetal weights and birth weights. The weight chart was compared to a chart from Congo, a chart representing a white population, and a chart representing...... a white population but adapted to the study population. The prevalence of SGA was assessed using all four charts. Results: A total of 2193 weight measurements from 583 fetuses/newborns were included in the fetal weight chart. Our chart had lower percentiles than all the other charts. Most importantly...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  16. Percutaneous drainage of abdominal fluid collections that require laparotomy or relaparotomy with ultrasound guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miletic, D.; Topljak-Polic, D.; Uravic, M.; Fuckar, Z.; Glavas, R.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to determine efficacy and reliability of percutaneous abdominal drainage in surgical patients and to evaluate intercostal approach to drain subphrenic collections. Material and methods. Eighty-seven patients aged from 29 to 84 years (mean, 55.5 years) were percutaneously drained under the sonographic guidance due to the postoperative or nonoperated abdominal collection that would otherwise require laparotomy. Intercostal, subcostal, lateral and anterior approach with eight to 14 French catheters were used to evacuate abdominal collection. Results. The intercostal approach was used to drain 31 (60.8%) of 51 subphrenic collections. The mean duration of drainage was independent of the intercostal or subcostal drainage route, but was significantly prolonged (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) for purulent collections (median, 18 days; range 7-73 days) in comparison to hematomas, bilomas and other nonpurulent collections (median, 11 and 6 days, respectively). Sonographically guided percutaneous drainage was a definitive method in 92% patients, with 9.2% minor complications. Successful rate for subphrenic collections was even greater (96%). Conclusions. Sonographically guided percutaneous drainage is the method of choice in the treatment of abdominal collections that require laparotomy. If the puncture site is at least two intercostal spaces lower than the dome of diaphragm and catheter is not introduced through the pleural effusion, intercostal drainage is equally efficient and not less secure than subcostal approach. (author)

  17. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. SETTING: Hvidovre...

  18. Focused Ultrasound Lipolysis in the Treatment of Abdominal Cellulite: An Open-Label Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Akbari, Zahra; Mohammadian, Shahrzad; Razzaghi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing popularity of noninvasive ultrasonic lipolysis procedure, there is a lack of evidence about the efficacy of this method. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of focused ultrasonic lipolysis on abdominal cellulite treatment. Twenty-eight consecutive subjects (age: 37.8 ± 8 years) underwent weekly transdermal focused ultrasonic lipolysis (Med Contour, General Project Ltd., Florence, Italy) and vacuum drainage for a maximum of eight sessions. Largest abdominal girth and 2 lines at 4 cm to 7 cm distance above and under it were located as fixed points of measurements. The mean value of the three fixed lines was considered as the abdominal circumference. Subjects were evaluated using measurements of circumference, immediately after and 3 weeks after the final treatment and compared using paired t test. One hundred ninety-four ultrasonic lipolysis procedures were performed on 28 subjects. A statistically significant (P cellulite, although some amount of circumference reduction reversal may be observed in long term follow-up visit.

  19. Ultrasound Evaluation of an Abdominal Aortic Fluid-Structure Interaction Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Marie Sand; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    . Spectral Doppler velocity data from 3 healthy male volunteers were used to construct inlet profiles for the FSI model. Simultaneously, wall movement was tracked and used for comparison to FSI model results. Ultrasound data were acquired using a scanner equipped with a research interface. The wall...... agreement except for 1 volunteer (Male, 23 yrs.). The magnitude of the displacement in simulation, u fsi , and in vivo , u iv , is within the same order of magnitude for the young ( u iv = 1 : 48 mm, u fsi = 1 : 12 mm) and middle-aged volunteer ( u iv = 0 : 783 mm, u fsi = 1 : 31 mm). For the elderly...

  20. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child...... reviews the literature with respect to 2 specific applications of CEUS in children: 1) identification of parenchymal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, and 2) classification of focal liver lesions. Applications were chosen through the CEUS guidelines published by the European Federation...

  1. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  2. Ultrasound imaging in children with acute abdominal pain - can it help to decrease the rate of negative appendectomies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, J.; Miodek, M.; Kucharski, P.; Sokal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of high-resolution ultrasound (US) with graded compression in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis.Material/Methods: The medical records of 664 consecutive children with acute abdominal pain treated between 2007 and 2009 were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed; 408 children (61.4 %) underwent appendectomy and 256 patients were treated conservatively (38.6 %). High-resolution US was performed in 570 out of 664 patients (85.8 %). The US data were verified by intraoperative findings or by clinical follow-up. Results: Out of 664 children, 408 underwent appendectomy and 256 were treated conservatively. US was performed in 570 out of 664 children (85.8 %); in 327/408 children (80.1 %) with AA and in 243/256 children (94.9 %) with negative diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity for US was 66.6% and 77.4%, respectively. If histopathological diagnosis of catarrhal appendicitis was considered a negative (unnecessary) appendectomy, the sensitivity was 68.6 % (p=0.87), and specificity was 67 % (p=0.29). Positive and negative predictive values of US were 79.9 % and 63.1 %, respectively. After recalculating results, positive predictive value decreased to 59.8% (p=0.036) and negative predictive value increased to 74.8 % (p=0.2). The rate of false negative results was 13.1 % (75/572) and the rate of false positives was 19.2 % (110/572). The negative appendectomy rate was 27.4 % (112/408). Conclusions: High-resolution ultrasonography provides an accurate and specific test for acute appendicitis and is recommended by the authors as an examination of choice in children with acute abdominal pain. (authors)

  3. Wave intensity analysis in mice: an ultrasound-based study in the abdominal aorta and common carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lascio, N.; Kusmic, C.; Stea, F.; Faita, F.

    2017-03-01

    Wave Intensity Analysis (WIA) can provide parameters representative of the interaction between the vascular network and the heart. It has been already demonstrated that WIA-derived biomarkes have a quantitative physiological meaning. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for performing non-invasive WIA in mice and correlate commonly used cardiac function parameters with WIA-derived indexes. Sixteen wild-type male mice (8 weeks-old) were imaged with high-resolution ultrasound (Vevo 2100). Abdominal aorta and common carotid pulse wave velocities (PWVabd, PWVcar) were obtained processing B-Mode and PW-Doppler images and employed to assess WIA. Amplitudes of the first (W1abd, W1car) and the second (W2abd, W2car) local maxima and minimum (Wbabd,Wbcar) were evaluated; areas under the negative part of the curve were also calculated (NAabd, NAcar). Cardiac output (CO), ejection fraction (EF) fractional shortening (FS) and stroke volume (SV) were estimated; strain analysis provided strain and strain rate values for longitudinal, radial and circumferential directions (LS, LSR, RS, RSR, CS, CSR). Isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT) was calculated from mitral inflow PW-Doppler images; IVRT values were normalized for cardiac cycle length. W1abd was correlated with LS (R=0.65) and LSR (R=0.59), while W1car was correlated with CO (R=0.58), EF (R=0.72), LS (R=0.65), LSR (R=0.89), CS (R=0.71), CSR (R=0.70). Both W2abd and W2car were not correlated with IVRT. Carotid artery WIA-derived parameters are more representative of cardiac function than those obtained from the abdominal aorta. The described US-based method can provide information about cardiac function and cardio-vascular interaction simply studying a single vascular site.

  4. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    The adipose tissue metabolism is dependent on its blood perfusion. During lipid mobilization e.g. during exercise and during lipid deposition e.g. postprandial, adipose tissue blood flow is increased. This increase in blood flow may involve capillary recruitment in the tissue. We investigated...... of ultrasound contrast agent to establish the reproducibility of the technique. In nine subjects, the effect of an oral glucose load on blood flow and microvascular volume was measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and forearm skeletal muscle. ¹³³Xe washout and venous occlusion strain......-gauge plethysmography was used to measure the adipose tissue and forearm blood flow, respectively. Ultrasound signal intensity of the first plateau phases was 27 ± dB in the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and 18 ± 2 dB (P

  5. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Mandai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient’s condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab.

  6. Ultrasound detection of abdominal lymph nodes in chronic liver diseases. A retrospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soresi, M.; Bonfissuto, G.; Magliarisi, C.; Riili, A.; Terranova, A.; Di Giovanni, G.; Bascone, F.; Carroccio, A.; Tripi, S.; Montalto, G. E-mail: gmontal@unipa.it

    2003-05-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of lymph nodes of the hepato-duodenal ligament in a group of patients with chronic liver disease of various aetiologies and to investigate what clinical, aetiological and laboratory data may lead to their appearance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One thousand and three patients (554 men, 449 women) were studied, including 557 with chronic hepatitis and 446 with liver cirrhosis. The presence of lymph nodes near the trunk of the portal vein, hepatic artery, celiac axis, superior mesenteric vein and pancreas head was investigated using ultrasound. RESULTS: Lymph nodes were detected in 394 out of the 1003 study patients (39.3%); their number ranged from one to four, with a diameter ranging between 0.8 and 4 cm. The highest prevalence was in the subgroup of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (87.5%), followed by patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV; 42%), patients with HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV; 41.3%), autoimmune hepatitis (40%), and HBV alone (21.2%). In the alcoholic and idiopathic subgroups prevalence was 9.5%, while in the non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and haemochromatosis subgroups it was 0%. HCV RNA was present in 97 out of 103 lymph node-positive patients and in 141 out of 168 lymph node-negative HCV-negative patients (p<0.003). Lymphadenopathy frequency increased as the liver disease worsened ({chi}{sup 2} MH=74.3; p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: Despite the limitations of a retrospective study, our data indicate a high prevalence of lymphadenopathy in liver disease patients; ultrasound evidence of lymph nodes of the hepato-duodenal ligament in a given liver disease may most likely suggest a HCV or an autoimmune aetiology and a more severe histological picture.

  7. Echinococcus multilocularis Detection in Live Eurasian Beavers (Castor fiber Using a Combination of Laparoscopy and Abdominal Ultrasound under Field Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róisín Campbell-Palmer

    Full Text Available Echinococcus multilocularis is an important pathogenic zoonotic parasite of health concern, though absent in the United Kingdom. Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber may act as a rare intermediate host, and so unscreened wild caught individuals may pose a potential risk of introducing this parasite to disease-free countries through translocation programs. There is currently no single definitive ante-mortem diagnostic test in intermediate hosts. An effective non-lethal diagnostic, feasible under field condition would be helpful to minimise parasite establishment risk, where indiscriminate culling is to be avoided. This study screened live beavers (captive, n = 18 or wild-trapped in Scotland, n = 12 and beaver cadavers (wild Scotland, n = 4 or Bavaria, n = 11, for the presence of E. multilocularis. Ultrasonography in combination with minimally invasive surgical examination of the abdomen by laparoscopy was viable under field conditions for real-time evaluation in beavers. Laparoscopy alone does not allow the operator to visualize the parenchyma of organs such as the liver, or inside the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract, hence the advantage of its combination with abdominal ultrasonography. All live beavers and Scottish cadavers were largely unremarkable in their haematology and serum biochemistry with no values suspicious for liver pathology or potentially indicative of E. multilocularis infection. This correlated well with ultrasound, laparoscopy, and immunoblotting, which were unremarkable in these individuals. Two wild Bavarian individuals were suspected E. multilocularis positive at post-mortem, through the presence of hepatic cysts. Sensitivity and specificity of a combination of laparoscopy and abdominal ultrasonography in the detection of parasitic liver cyst lesions was 100% in the subset of cadavers (95%Confidence Intervals 34.24-100%, and 86.7-100% respectively. For abdominal ultrasonography alone sensitivity was only 50% (95%CI 9

  8. The effect of morphine added to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia following lower abdominal cancer surgery, a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Mohamed, Sahar Abdel-Baky; Kamal, Shereen Mamdouh

    2017-06-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block used for management of surgical abdominal pain by injecting local anesthetics into the plane between the internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. We aimed to explore the effect of adding morphine to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided TAP-block in patients undergoing lower abdominal cancer surgery. Randomized, double-blind, prospective study. Clinical trial identifier: NCT02566096. Academic medical center. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study after ethical committee approval. Patients divided into 2 groups (30 each): Bupivacaine group (GB): given ultrasound guided TAP-block 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine diluted in 20ml saline; Morphine group (GM): given ultrasound guided TAP-block with 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine+10mg morphine sulphate diluted in 20ml saline. Patients were observed for total morphine consumption, time for first request of rescue analgesia, sedation scores, hemodynamics and side effects for 24h postoperatively. Morphine added to bupivacaine in TAP block compared to bupivacaine alone reduced total morphine consumption (5.33±1.28mg) (10.70±3.09mg) respectively (p0.05). Addition of morphine to bupivacaine in TAP block is effective method for pain management in patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery without serious side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of fundal height and handheld ultrasound-measured abdominal circumference to screen for fetal growth abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haragan, Adriane F.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Hawk, Angela F.; Newman, Roger B.; Chang, Eugene Y.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to compare fundal height and handheld ultrasound–measured fetal abdominal circumference (HHAC) for the prediction of fetal growth restriction (FGR) or large for gestational age. STUDY DESIGN This was a diagnostic accuracy study in nonanomalous singleton pregnancies between 24 and 40 weeks’ gestation. Patients underwent HHAC and fundal height measurement prior to formal growth ultrasound. FGR was defined as estimated fetal weight less than 10%, whereas large for gestational age was defined as estimated fetal weight greater than 90%. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared using methods described elsewhere. RESULTS There were 251 patients included in this study. HHAC had superior sensitivity and specificity for the detection of FGR (sensitivity, 100% vs 42.86%) and (specificity, 92.62% vs 85.24%). HHAC had higher specificity but lower sensitivity when screening for LGA (specificity, 85.66% vs 66.39%) and (sensitivity, 57.14% vs 71.43%). CONCLUSION HHAC could prove to be a valuable screening tool in the detection of FGR. Further studies are needed in a larger population. PMID:25818672

  10. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    The adipose tissue metabolism is dependent on its blood perfusion. During lipid mobilization e.g. during exercise and during lipid deposition e.g. postprandial, adipose tissue blood flow is increased. This increase in blood flow may involve capillary recruitment in the tissue. We investigated...... the basic and postprandial microvascular volume in adipose tissue using real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging in healthy normal weight subjects. In nine subjects, CEU was performed in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the underlying skeletal muscle after a bolus injection...... constant. It is concluded that the microvascular volume and changes in volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue can be assessed using CEU with good reproducibility. Postprandial capillary recruitment takes place in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue....

  11. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  12. Test-retest reliability of measurements of abdominal and multifidus muscles using ultrasound imaging in adults aged 50-79 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, W A; Blizzard, L; Callisaya, M L; Hides, J A; Jones, G; Ding, C; Winzenberg, T M

    2017-04-01

    Test-retest reliability of the combined process of ultrasound imaging (USI) and image measurement of thickness of abdominal and upper lumbar multifidus (MF) muscles and MF cross sectional area (CSA) of older adults has not been established. Imaging muscles of older adults can be challenging due to age-related changes in the spine and skeletal muscle so establishing test-retest reliability in this population is important. This study aimed to evaluate test-retest reliability of USI of abdominal and MF muscle thickness and MF CSA for adults aged 50-79 years. One operator took single sets of ultrasound images of abdominal and MF muscles of 23 adults aged 50-79 years participating in a clinical trial of vitamin D supplementation for knee osteoarthritis, on two occasions, one week apart. Images were subsequently measured by a single examiner. Test-retest reliability for abdominal muscle thickness and MF CSA was substantial (intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) > 0.81) and for MF thickness ranged from fair to substantial (ICC 0.55-0.86). The standard error of measurement (SEM) was low (0.02-0.21) in every case. ICCs were low and SEM values were high for percentage thickness change. The substantial test-retest reliability of abdominal and MF (L4-L5) muscle thickness and of MF CSA supports the use of USI as a clinical and research tool to assess abdominal and MF muscle thickness and MF CSA of older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms.

  14. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziech, Manon L.W.; Smets, Anne M.J.B.; Lavini, Cristina; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelofs, Joris J.T.H. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  15. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziech, Manon L.W.; Smets, Anne M.J.B.; Lavini, Cristina; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Roelofs, Joris J.T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  16. Characterization of the mechanical behavior and pathophysiological state of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on 4D ultrasound strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Andreas; Blase, Christopher; Derwich, Wojciech; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a degenerative disease of the human aortic wall that may lead to weakening and eventually rupture of the wall with high mortality rates. Since the currently established criterion for surgical or endovascular treatment of the disease is imprecise in the individual case and treatment is not free of complications, the need for additional patient-individual biomarkers for short-term AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making. Time resolved 3D ultrasound combined with speckle tracking algorithms is a novel non-invasive medical imaging technique that provides full-field displacement and strain measurements of aortic and aneurysmal wall motion. This is patient-individual information that has not been used so far to assess wall strength and rupture risk. The current study uses simple statistical indices of the heterogeneous spatial distribution of in-plane strain components as biomarkers for the pathological state of the aortic and aneurysmal wall. The pathophysiological rationale behind this approach are the known changes in microstructural composition of the aortic wall with progression of AAA development that results in increased stiffening and heterogeneity of the walls mechanical properties and in decreased wall strength. In a comparative analysis of the aortic wall motion of young volunteers without known cardiovascular diseases, aged arteriosclerotic patients without AAA, and AAA patients, mean values of all in-plane strain components were significantly reduced, and the heterogeneity of circumferential strain was significantly increased in the AAA group compared to both other groups. The capacity of the proposed method to differentiate between wall motion of aged, arteriosclerotic patients and AAA patients is a promising step towards a new method for in vivo assessment of AAA wall strength or stratification of AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making on surgical or endovascular

  17. Intra­‑abdominal adhesions in ultrasound. Part I: The visceroperitoneal bordeline, anatomy and the method of examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It needs to be emphasized that ultrasonography is a primary test performed in order to evaluate the abdominal wall and structures located in their vicinity. It allows for the determination of the anatomy and lesions in this localization. Thorough knowledge con‑ cerning the ultrasound anatomy of the tested structures constitutes a basis of all diagnos‑ tic successes. Therefore, this part of the article is devoted to this subject matter. The pos‑ sibility to diagnose intra-abdominal adhesions with ultrasound is underestimated and rarely used. The aim of this paper is to discuss and document the ultrasound anatomy of the posterior surface of the abdominal wall as well as to present techniques directed at the detection of adhesions, in particular the visceroperitoneal ones. The posterior surface of the abdominal wall constitutes an extensive tissue area of complex structure, with folds and ligaments surrounded by various amounts of the epiperitoneal fat. In some places, this tissue separates the components of the fascia and peritoneum complex. The ultra‑ sound manifestation of this complex is two hyperechogenic lines placed parallelly to each other in the places where they are not separated by the accumulated adipose tissue. Another factor which separates the peritoneum from the viscera is of dynamic character. It is a so-called visceral slide induced by easy or deep breathing. Its size should not be lower than 1 cm and the deflections gradually and symmetrically diminish from the epi‑ gastric to hypogastric region. Last but not least, the evaluation of the reciprocal relation of the abdominal wall with viscera may be aided by rhythmical manual compressions on the abdominal wall (ballottement sign performed below the applied ultrasound trans‑ ducer. During this test, the size of the visceral slide in relation to the abdominal wall is observed. The maneuver is usually performed in uncooperative patients or those with shallow breath. The

  18. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound study of the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus Estudo ultrassonográfico abdominal e pélvico de lobo-guará (Chrysocyon brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana D. Guimarães

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the ultrasound characterization of the abdominal and pelvic regions of five maned wolves kept in captivity at the Triage Center of Wild Animals of the Federal University of Viçosa (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres, Universidade Federal de Viçosa. This characterization included descriptions of ultrasonographic aspects and measurements of various structures using B-mode ultrasound. Biometric data were collected to assess the existence of significant linear correlations between these measurements and the measurements obtained by ultrasound. Additionally, hematological and serum biochemistry evaluations of the animals were performed. The ultrasound findings were similar to those available in the literature on domestic dogs, which were used for comparison as a result of the lack of published data regarding maned wolves. The latter species showed characteristics closely resembling those of the former, differing in the spleen and left renal cortex echogenicities, in the appearance of the prostatic and testicular regions and in the hepatic portal vein morphology. In the current study, the biometric values were similar to those previously published; however, no data regarding thoracic perimeter, modified crown-rump length or thoracic depth were found in the literature for this Canidae species. Statistical analysis showed the existence of a strong negative correlation between the modified crown-rump length and left renal length, between the modified crown-rump length and the right renal volume, between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the cranial pole of the left adrenal gland and between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the caudal pole of the left adrenal gland. Laboratory findings, including segmented neutrophil, eosinophil, monocyte and lymphocyte counts and the serum levels of glucose, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, urea, total protein, globulin, creatine phosphokinase, triglyceride, sodium

  19. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 66. Cosgrove DO, Eckersley RJ, Harvey CJ, Lim A. Ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. ... by: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also ...

  20. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  1. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. (a) Definitions: As used in this section, the following definitions apply: Eligible beneficiary means an individual who— (1) Has received a referral for an ultrasound... supplier that is authorized to provide covered ultrasound diagnostic services. (c) Limitation on coverage...

  2. Within-day and between-day reliability of thickness measurements of abdominal muscles using ultrasound during abdominal hollowing and bracing maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboufazeli, Mahnaz; Afshar-Mohajer, Nima

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonography imaging has been used as a non-invasive method to estimate the thickness and relative activities of the abdominal muscles in patients with lower back pain (LBP). However, the statistical reliability of US thickness measurements of abdominal muscles, including transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles during abdominal hollowing (AH) and abdominal bracing (AB) maneuvers has not been well-investigated. This study was performed on a total of 20 female subjects (10 with LBP and 10 without LBP) in the age range of 25-55 years to assess within-day and between-day reliability of the measurements. US measurements on maneuvers were repeated after two hours for the within-day reliability and after five days for the between-day reliability assessment. High intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) values (>0.75) for within-day and between-day reliability assessments during AH maneuver were concluded. The ICC values were moderate for reliability assessment during AB. The ICC values for AH were greater than AB both for within- and between-day reliabilities. The small standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change values (0.16-0.78 and 0.44 to 2.15, respectively) were found for both AH and AB. We recommend real-time US imaging as a reliable way of determining the thicknesses of the TrA and IO muscle (and to some extent, EO muscle) for both healthy and LBP patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasound measurement of deep and superficial abdominal muscles thickness during standing postural tasks in participants with and without chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Salavati, Mahyar

    2016-06-01

    Activity of deep abdominal muscles increases the lumbar stability. Majority of previous studies indicated abdominal muscle activity dysfunction during static activity in patients with low back pain (LBP). However, the number of studies that evaluated deep abdominal muscle activity in dynamic standing activities in patients is limited, while this assessment provides better understanding of pain behavior during these activities. Investigation of superficial and deep abdominal muscles activity in participants with chronic LBP as compared to healthy individuals during standing tasks. Case control study. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the thickness of transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles in female participants with (N = 45) and without chronic LBP (CLBP) (N = 45) during tests. The Biodex Balance System was used to provide standing tasks. The thickness of each muscle in a standing task was normalized to actual thickness at rest in the supine lying position to estimate its activity. The results indicate increases in thickness of all muscles in both groups during dynamic as compared to static standing tasks (P  0.5). Lower percentages of thickness change for TrA muscle and higher for EO muscle were found in the patients as compared to healthy individuals during all tests (P  1.28). Higher activity of superficial than deep abdominal muscles in patients as compared to healthy individuals during standing tasks indicates motor control dysfunction in patients with CLBP. Standing tasks can discriminate the individuals with and without LBP and can be progressively used in training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96–0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC2,1 = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC2,1 = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation. PMID:19415347

  5. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W; Shirley, Debra

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC(2,1) = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96-0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC(2,1) = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65-0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC(2,1) = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33-0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation.

  6. Effect of body mass index on shifts in ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy for abdominal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D.; Wang, Samuel J.; Siddiqi, Ather; Wong, Adrian; Thomas, Charles R.; Fuss, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated whether corrective shifts determined by daily ultrasound-based image-guidance correlate with body mass index (BMI) of patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for abdominal malignancies. The utility of daily image-guidance, particularly for patients with BMI > 25.0, is examined. Materials and methods: Total 3162 ultrasound-directed shifts were performed in 86 patients. Direction and magnitude of shifts were correlated with pretreatment BMI. Bivariate statistical analysis and analysis of set-up correction data were performed using systematic and random error calculations. Results: Total 2040 daily alignments were performed. Average 3D vector of set-up correction for all patients was 12.1 mm/fraction. Directional and absolute shifts and 3D vector length were significantly different between BMI cohorts. 3D displacement averaged 4.9 mm/fraction and 6.8mm/fraction for BMI ≤ 25.0 and BMI > 25.0, respectively. Systematic error in all axes and 3D vector was significantly greater for BMI > 25.0. Differences in random error were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Set-up corrections derived from daily ultrasound-based IG-IMRT of abdominal tumors correlated with BMI. Daily image-guidance may improve precision of IMRT delivery with benefits assessed for the entire population, particularly patients with increased habitus. Requisite PTV margins suggested in the absence of daily image-guidance are significantly greater in patients with BMI > 25.0.

  7. Changes in abdominal muscle thickness measured by ultrasound are not associated with recovery in athletes with longstanding groin pain associated with resisted hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J A C G; Mens, J M A; Backx, Frank J G; Stam, Henk J

    2009-10-01

    Longitudinal single-cohort study. Athletes with longstanding groin pain associated with resisted hip adduction have been shown to have abnormal activation of the transversus abdominis (TA). Therefore, exercises targeting the TA to help stabilize the lumbopelvic area are generally used in the rehabilitation of these athletes. To investigate if (1) changes in abdominal muscle resting thickness and changes in relative thickness during lower extremity tasks after 14 weeks of intervention are related to changes in clinical status and (2) the changes in abdominal muscle resting/relative thickness are significant postintervention. In 21 athletes with longstanding groin pain associated with resisted hip adduction, ultrasound imaging of the abdominal musculature on the right side was performed at rest, during the active straight-leg raise (left and right), and during bilateral isometric hip adduction. Athletes then followed a 14-week rehabilitation protocol. Clinical outcome measured by self-reported sports restriction and change in abdominal muscle resting and relative thickness during lower extremity tasks were evaluated. There was an overall significant decrease in self-reported sports restriction after intervention for this group of athletes. Apart from a significant negative correlation for changes in TA resting thickness, no significant association between changes in abdominal muscle thickness and change in self-reported sports restriction were found. Postintervention, TA resting thickness was significantly increased but relative thickness during the lower extremity tasks was found not to be statistically different for all muscles, except for a decreased relative thickness of obliquus externus abdominus (OE) during the active straight-leg raise for the left lower extremity. There was no association between changes in abdominal muscle resting thickness and relative thickness during lower extremity tasks, and change in self-reported sports restriction after a period of

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... GI) contrast exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, ... exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or ...

  12. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bladder abdominal masses such as tumors, cysts, or abscesses abnormal fluid in the abdomen Abdominal ultrasounds can ... on this topic for: Parents Pyloric Stenosis Appendicitis CAT Scan: Abdomen X-Ray Exam: Abdomen View more ...

  13. A 4D ultrasound real-time tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihono, Dwi Seno Kuncoro; Vogel, Lena; Thoelking, Johannes; Wenz, Frederik; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wertz, Hansjoerg [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Weiss, Christel [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Struttura Complessa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under computer-controlled deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). The tracking accuracy of the research 4D US system was evaluated using two motion phantoms programmed with sinusoidal and breathing patterns to simulate free breathing and DIBH. Clinical performance was evaluated with five healthy volunteers. US datasets were acquired in computer-controlled DIBH with varying angular scanning angles. Tracked structures were renal pelvis (spherical structure) and portal/liver vein branches (non-spherical structure). An external marker was attached to the surface of both phantoms and volunteers as a secondary object to be tracked by an infrared camera for comparison. Phantom measurements showed increased accuracy of US tracking with decreasing scanning range/increasing scanning frequency. The probability of lost tracking was higher for small scanning ranges (43.09% for 10 and 13.54% for 20 ).The tracking success rates in healthy volunteers during DIBH were 93.24 and 89.86% for renal pelvis and portal vein branches, respectively. There was a strong correlation between marker motion and US tracking for the majority of analyzed breath-holds: 84.06 and 88.41% of renal pelvis target results and 82.26 and 91.94% of liver vein target results in anteroposterior and superoinferior directions, respectively; Pearson's correlation coefficient was between 0.71 and 0.99. The US system showed a good tracking performance in 4D motion phantoms. The tracking capability of surrogate structures for upper abdominal lesions in DIBH fulfills clinical requirements. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients is underway. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines neuen vierdimensionalen (4D) Ultraschall(US)-Tracking-Systems fuer die externe Strahlentherapie von Oberbauchlaesionen unter computergesteuertem tiefem Atemanhalt (DIBH). Die Tracking-Genauigkeit des 4D

  14. Ultrasound-Derived Abdominal Muscle Thickness Better Detects Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Obese Patients than Skeletal Muscle Index Measured by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Ido

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia has never been diagnosed based on site-specific muscle loss, and little is known about the relationship between site-specific muscle loss and metabolic syndrome (MetS risk factors. To this end, this cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between site-specific muscle size and MetS risk factors. Subjects were 38 obese men and women aged 40-82 years. Total body fat and lean body mass were assessed by whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA scan. Muscle thickness (MTH was measured using B-mode ultrasound scanning in six body regions. Subjects were classified into general obesity (GO and sarcopenic obesity (SO groups using the threshold values of one standard deviation below the sex-specific means of either MTH or skeletal muscle index (SMI measured by DXA. MetS risk score was acquired by standardizing and summing the following continuously distributed variables: visceral fat area, mean blood pressure, HbA1c, and serum triglyceride / high density lipoprotein cholesterol, to obtain the Z-score. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the MetS risk score was independently associated with abdominal MTH in all subjects, but not with MTH in other muscle regions, including the thigh. Although HbA1c and the number of MetS risk factors in the SO group were significantly higher than those in the GO group, there were no significant differences between GO and SO groups as defined by SMI. Ultrasound-derived abdominal MTH would allow a better assessment of sarcopenia in obese patients and can be used as an alternative to the conventionally-used SMI measured by DXA.

  15. Semi-automatic motion compensation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound images from abdominal organs for perfusion analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schafer, S.; Nylund, K.; Saevik, F.; Engjom, T.; Mézl, M.; Jiřík, Radovan; Dimcevski, G.; Gilja, O.H.; Tönnies, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, AUG 1 (2015), s. 229-237 ISSN 0010-4825 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2380 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ultrasonography * motion analysis * motion compensation * registration * CEUS * contrast-enhanced ultrasound * perfusion * perfusion modeling Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2015

  16. The effect of core stability and general exercise on abdominal muscle thickness in non-specific chronic low back pain using ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, MohammadBagher; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Jamshidi, Aliashraf; Zarabi, Vida; Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    There is a controversy regarding whether core stability exercise (CSE) is more effective than general exercise (GE) for chronic LBP. To compare different exercises regarding their effect on improving back strength and stability, performance of abdominal muscles is a useful index. Ultrasound imaging for measuring muscle thickness could be used to assess muscle performance. The aim of this study was to compare CSE and GE in chronic LBP using ultrasound imaging for measurement of thickness of the deep stabilizing and main global trunk muscles in non-specific chronic LBP. Each program included 16 training sessions three times a week. Using ultrasound imaging, four transabdominal muscle thickness were measured before and after the intervention. Disability and pain were measured as secondary outcomes. After the intervention on participants (n = 43), a significant increase in muscle thickness (hypertrophy) was seen only in right and left rectus abdominis in the GE group, but significant difference to the CSE group was only on the right side. Disability and pain reduced within the groups without a significant difference in the change between them. The present results provided evidence that only GE increased right and left rectus muscle thickness. The only significant difference between CSE and GE groups was the right rectus thickness. As rectus is a global muscle, the effect of GE on strength improvement (one side stronger than the other) may have a negative effect on motor control of lumbopelvic muscles and possibly increase the risk of back pain occurring or becoming worse, though this was not observed in the present study.

  17. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rogers, B; Walsh, N. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  18. Prevalence and sonographic changes compatible with fatty liver disease in patients referred for abdominal ultrasound examination in Aracaju, SE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josilda Ferreira Cruz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To estimate the prevalence and evaluate sonographic findings compatible with changes consistent with hepatic steatosis in patients referred for abdominal ultrasonography at four reference centers in Aracaju, SE, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Prospective, descriptive survey, with analytical and quantitative approach, comprising abdominal ultrasonography scans performed with a convex, dynamic 3.75 MHz transducer. Liver dimensions and parenchymal echotexture were evaluated, classifying hepatic steatosis into grades (1, 2 or 3. The SPSS® 22.0 software was used for statistical analysis, adopting p < 0.05 as significance level. Results: A total of 800 individuals (561 women and 239 men were evaluated. The prevalence of steatosis was 29.1%, and the male patients were most affected, presenting with more advanced grades of disease (p = 0.021, as follows: 119 grade 1 (51.0%; 94 grade 2 (40.4%; and 20 grade 3 (8.6%. The median age patients' was 46 years. Conclusion: In the present study sample, the prevalence of hepatic steatosis was high, particularly in the male patients. Ultrasonography is suggested as a first choice for the diagnosis of this condition, considering its wide availability, low cost and absence of side effects or risks to the patient.

  19. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abdelsalam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US-guided rectus sheath (RS and transversus abdominis plane (TAP blocks for better perioperative analgesia. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20 received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20 received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA. The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients′ experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Results: Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. Conclusion: The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery.

  20. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    perform valid abdominal ultrasound examinations of patients referred with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: Patients referred with acute abdominal pain had an ultrasound examination by a surgeon in training as well as by an experienced consultant radiologist whose results served as the gold standard. All...... examinations. CONCLUSION: Surgeons in training without pre-existing ultrasound experience and only a minimum of formal ultrasound education can perform valid and reliable ultrasound examinations of the gallbladder in patients admitted with acute abdominal pain...

  1. Trauma Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and organs in the lower abdomen and pelvis. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ...

  3. Abdominal tuberculosis. On-going challenge to gastroenterologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Mahgoub; Osuba, Abimbola

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to record the observations and experience on the diagnosis and management of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to highlight the difficulties in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Two hundred consecutive patients attending the Gastroenterology Department of the King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between May 1991 and May 2001, suspected with abdominal TB were investigated. A detailed clinical history and physical examination were obtained. Data of 75 confirmed cases of abdominal TB were analyzed. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculosis granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculous granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. A high index of clinical suspicion is

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams are also used to ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... abnormal growth within the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of ... show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  9. Sonographic Findings of Abdominal Tuberculosis in Children With Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bélard, Sabine; Heller, Tom; Orie, Viyanti; Heuvelings, Charlotte C.; Bateman, Lindy; Workman, Lesley; Grobusch, Martin P.; Zar, Heather J.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound reports of 102 children with microbiologically confirmed or clinically diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) showed that 23 of 37 (64%) and 23 of 65 (36%) had TB suggestive abdominal lymphadenopathy, and 16 of 37 (44%) and 8 of 65 (13%) had splenic microabscesses, respectively. Splenic

  10. Estudo prospectivo do derrame pleural pós-cirurgia abdominal e dos fatores de risco associados: avalição por ultra-sonografia Pleural effusion following abdominal surgery and associated risk factors: ultrasound assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2005-04-01

    ós-operatório de cirurgia abdominal eletiva é muito freqüente. A maioria dos DPPO é autolimitada, evoluindo de modo assintomático. A ecografia na constatação do DPPO mostrou-se efetiva e sua utilização merece ser difundida.BACKGROUND: Pleural effusion is frequently seen on imaging examinations following elective abdominal surgery and has no clinical significance in most patients. This condition should be distinguished from pulmonary complications that require treatment. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively determine the incidence of pleural effusion in patients submitted to elective abdominal surgery using ultrasound (US, and to assess the possible association with risk factors related to the patients and anesthetic-surgical procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-seven patients, 21 (56.8% female, and 16 (43.2% male aged 29 to 76 years submitted to elective abdominal surgery were evaluated. US was performed preoperatively and 48 hours after surgery in all patients. Associated risk factors were also assessed - age > 60 years, sex, obesity, smoking history, alcoholism and associated diseases -, and anesthetic-surgical procedure - cancer resection, class ASA > 2, duration of surgery, longitudinal incision and incision > 15 cm. Biliar lithiasis (43.2% and gastrointestinal cancer (43.2% were the main causes leading to surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of postoperative pleural effusion (PPE detected by US was 70.3% (26/37. Two of these patients (5.4% developed pulmonary complications, and one died. The risk factors age > 60 years, smoking history, alcoholism, obesity and associated diseases had no influence on the development of the PPE whereas cancer resection, class ASA > 2, longitudinal incision and incision > 15 cm were significantly statistically associated with the presence of PPE. PPE developed even during antibiotic therapy. The duration of hospitalization was more than 2.4 longer in the patients with PPE. CONCLUSION: PPE is a very frequent condition observed in patients

  11. Malformações detectadas pelo ultrassom abdominal em crianças com cardiopatia congênita Malformations detected by abdominal ultrasound in children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Cardoso Manique Rosa

    2012-12-01

    and types of abdominal abnormalities detected in children with and without CHD through abdominal ultrasound (AUS, compare the patients in relation to their dysmorphic/cytogenetic findings and perform an estimative of the cost-effectiveness of the screening through AUS. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with a control cohort. The cases consisted of patients with CHD admitted for the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit; the controls consisted of children without CHD who underwent AUS at the hospital shortly thereafter a case. All patients with CHD underwent AUS, high-resolution karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for microdeletion 22q11.2. RESULTS: AUS identified clinically significant abnormalities in 12.2% of the cases and 5.2% of controls (p= 0.009, with a power of significance of 76.6%. Most malformations with clinical significance were renal anomalies (10.4% in cases and 4.9% in controls; p= 0.034. In Brazil, the cost of an AUS examination for the Unified Health System is US$ 21. Since clinically significant abnormalities were observed in one in every 8.2 CHD patients, the cost to identify an affected child was calculated as approximately US$ 176. CONCLUSION: Patients with CHD present a significant frequency of abdominal abnormalities detected by AUS, an inexpensive and noninvasive diagnostic method with good sensitivity. The cost of screening for these defects is considerably lower than the cost to treat the complications of late diagnoses of abdominal malformations such as renal disease.

  12. Malformações detectadas pelo ultrassom abdominal em crianças com cardiopatia congênita Malformations detected by abdominal ultrasound in children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Cardoso Manique Rosa

    2012-01-01

    and types of abdominal abnormalities detected in children with and without CHD through abdominal ultrasound (AUS, compare the patients in relation to their dysmorphic/cytogenetic findings and perform an estimative of the cost-effectiveness of the screening through AUS. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with a control cohort. The cases consisted of patients with CHD admitted for the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit; the controls consisted of children without CHD who underwent AUS at the hospital shortly thereafter a case. All patients with CHD underwent AUS, high-resolution karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for microdeletion 22q11.2. RESULTS: AUS identified clinically significant abnormalities in 12.2% of the cases and 5.2% of controls (p= 0.009, with a power of significance of 76.6%. Most malformations with clinical significance were renal anomalies (10.4% in cases and 4.9% in controls; p= 0.034. In Brazil, the cost of an AUS examination for the Unified Health System is US$ 21. Since clinically significant abnormalities were observed in one in every 8.2 CHD patients, the cost to identify an affected child was calculated as approximately US$ 176. CONCLUSION: Patients with CHD present a significant frequency of abdominal abnormalities detected by AUS, an inexpensive and noninvasive diagnostic method with good sensitivity. The cost of screening for these defects is considerably lower than the cost to treat the complications of late diagnoses of abdominal malformations such as renal disease.

  13. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old male with poorly controlled hypertension presented with 1 hour of severe low back pain that radiated to his abdomen. The patient was tachycardic and had an initial blood pressure of 70/40. He had a rigid and severely tender abdomen. The patient’s history of hypertension, abnormal vital signs, severity and location of his pain were suspicious for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Therefore, a computed tomography angiogram (CTA was ordered. Significant findings: CTA demonstrated a ruptured 7.4 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a large left retroperitoneal hematoma. Discussion: True abdominal aortic aneurysm is defined as at least a 3cm dilatation of all three layers of the arterial wall of the abdominal aorta.1 An estimated 15,000 people die per year in the US of this condition.2 Risk factors for AAA include males older than 65, tobacco use, and hypertension.1,3,4 There are also congenital, mechanical, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious causes of AAA.3 Rupture is often the first manifestation of the disease. The classic triad of abdominal pain, pulsatile mass, and hypotension is seen in only 50% of ruptured AAAs.5 Pain (abdominal, groin, or back is the most common symptom. The most common misdiagnoses of ruptured AAAs are renal colic, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.6 Bedside ultrasonography is the fastest way to detect this condition and is nearly 100% sensitive.1 One study showed that bedside ultrasounds performed by emergency physicians had a sensitivity of .94 [95% CI = .86-1.0] and specificity of 1 [95% CI = .98-1.0] for detecting AAAs.7 CTA has excellent sensitivity (approximately 100% and yields the added benefit of facilitating surgical planning and management.1 Without surgical treatment, a ruptured AAA is almost uniformly fatal, and 50% of those who undergo surgery do not survive.1 Early resuscitation and coordination with vascular surgery should be

  14. Distinguishing intrauterine foetal demise versus abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy always poses a clinical dilemma. Transvaginal ultrasound is the ideal radiological procedure in locating these pregnancies. However in resource limited setting, abdominal and pelvic ultrasounds can be the only available yet unreliable modalities for distinguishing intrauterine versus ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ovarian abnormalities, the evaluation and diagnosis ...

  16. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. top of page This page was reviewed on ... ACR and RSNA are not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor if there are specific instructions for eating and drinking prior to the exam. Your child ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ... necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. In some ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water- ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ... improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ... the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. In ...

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    Full Text Available ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... absent blood flow to various organs greater than normal blood flow to different areas, which is sometimes ... exam, children should be able to resume their normal activities. top of page Who interprets the results ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture ...

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ... message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here will not be used for ...

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... composition of body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... guide the insertion of a catheter or other drainage device and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact ...

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    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... various organs greater than normal blood flow to different areas, which is sometimes seen in infections Doppler ... scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are captured. There may be minimal discomfort from pressure as the transducer is pressed against the area ... an area of tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a ...

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with expertise ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | ...

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    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ... information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures ... Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

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    Full Text Available ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure ...

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    Full Text Available ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or within various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some ... is performed to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

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    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body ... children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and ...

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ... Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... imaging of the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's appointment. For ... you may be asked to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by ...

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, ... physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and ...

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the ...

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... examination table that can be tilted or moved. Patients may be turned to either side to improve ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your ... Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that is used to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached to the scanner ...

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor if there are specific instructions for eating and drinking prior to the exam. Your child ... capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... then listens for the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to ... type of body structure and composition of body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount ...

  13. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child...

  14. Establishing the accuracy and acceptability of abdominal ultrasound to define the foetal head position in the second stage of labour: a validation study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramphul, Meenakshi

    2012-09-01

    To compare the diagnosis of the foetal head position in the second stage of labour by ultrasound scan performed by a novice sonographer and by clinical assessment, to that of an expert sonographer (gold standard); and to evaluate the acceptability of ultrasound in the second stage of labour to women and clinicians.

  15. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  16. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  17. Abdominal tap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... You then receive a local numbing medicine. The tap needle is inserted 1 to 2 inches (2. ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  19. Development of a reliable simulation-based test for diagnostic abdominal ultrasound with a pass/fail standard usable for mastery learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mia L; Nielsen, Kristina R; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    training can benefit from competency-based education based on reliable tests. • This simulation-based test can differentiate between competency levels of ultrasound examiners. • This test is suitable for competency-based education, e.g. mastery learning. • We provide a pass/fail standard without false...... from The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Four groups of experience levels were constructed: Novices (medical students), trainees (first-year radiology residents), intermediates (third- to fourth-year radiology residents) and advanced (physicians with ultrasound...

  20. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Ultrasound and traditional diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beluffi, G.; Fiori, P.; D'Allocchio, T.; Chiara, A.; Rondini, G.; Bragheri, G.

    1986-01-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) is the most fraquent cause of abdominal surgery during the first month of life. A new diagnostic approach to this type of pathology is given by ultrasound examination which offers the opportunity to perform a precise study of pyloric muscle thickness, pyloric diameter width and pyloric muscle lenght. Ultrasound provides a quick diagnostic tool sparing radiation exposure to the patient. X-ray study is only to be reserved to the few cases in which clinical and ultrasound data are doubtful and, in all instances, to rule-out other possible causes of gastric outlet obstruction. We report 20 infants (14 males and 6 females) referred by ultrasound in 12 cases, suspected in 1 and excluded in 7 cases. Upper gastrointestinal tract series confirmed the presence of HPS in 13 cases; discovered a huge gastroesophageal reflux in one and showed normal findings in 6 cases

  1. Hereditary angioderma: an uncommon cause of acute abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound findings; Angioedema hereditario: una causa infrecuente de abdomen agudo. Hallazgos en la TC e ecografia abdominal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, R.A. de la; Oliver, J. M.; Bueno, A.; Albillos, J. C. [Fundacion Hospital Alcorcon. Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    We present an uncommon case of acute abdomen in a patient with hereditary angioderma. The ultrasound and CT findings described may suggest this diagnosis, thus avoiding useless surgical interventions in patients in whom the disease has not been previously diagnosed. (Author) 19 refs.

  2. Adult Female with Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Frasure

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old female presented to the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, vaginal discharge, and a fever of 102°F. She described multiple recent male sexual partners, with inconsistent condom use. Her vital signs were unremarkable. Her physical exam was notable for moderate right lower quadrant tenderness to palpation. There was no cervical motion tenderness. The emergency physician performed a bedside abdominal ultrasound (Video, and subsequently ordered a computed tomography (Figure, which confirmed the diagnosis.

  3. The value of the abdominal radiograph in the assessment of the acute abdomen- work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.; Kew, J.; Davies, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The value of the abdominal radiograph in the assessment of the acute abdomen was evaluated for those patients who also had abdominal ultrasound and/or CT. The value of each modality in patient management is reviewed. Retrospective review of 52 consecutive patients presented to a tertiary hospital emergency department with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal radiographs (AXR) and abdominal ultrasound (US) and / or computed tomography (CT) within 24 hours of presentation was undertaken. There were 37 males and 15 females. The mean age was 53 years (range 18-95y). Abdominal radiographs were reviewed by two radiologists.Two patients had two separate admissions one week apart. There were 35 normal abdominal radiographs. 19 studies showed clinically relevant abnormalities. Of the normal group, 14 out of 21 patients had abnormal findings on CT and 8 out of 16 had abnormal US examinations. Of the 19 patients with abnormal AXR, 17 out of 19 patients had abnormal CT and 2 out of 5 had abnormal ultrasound examinations. There were 5 cases where both CT scan and US was performed. The positive and negative predictive value for AXR vs CT scan was 89% and 33% respectively and for AXR vs US scan was 40% and 50% respectively. For patients with normal AXR and abnormal CT, there was only one case (a non calcified abdominal aortic aneurysm) which might have required immediate surgical intervention. The preliminary results suggest that the abnormal radiograph is sensitive in the detection of relevant abnormalities in the acute abdomen in the context of appropriate clinical selection. Both CT and ultrasound provide additional diagnostic accuracy for some indications.A further 50 patients are being reviewed and the combined results will be presented. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Trans-abdominal ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlation for conformal intracavitary brachytherapy in carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Khanna, Nehal; Swamidas, Jamema; Engineer, Reena; Thakur, Meenakshi H.; Merchant, Nikhil H.; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Trans-abdominal ultrasonography (US) is capable of determining size, shape, thickness, and diameter of uterus, cervix and disease at cervix or parametria. To assess the potential value of US for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy, we compared US-findings relevant for brachytherapy to the corresponding findings obtained from MR imaging. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with biopsy proven cervical cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy with/without concomitant Cisplatin chemotherapy and suitable for brachytherapy were invited to participate in this study. US and MR were performed in a similar reproducible patient positioning after intracavitary application. US mid-sagittal and axial image at the level of external cervical os was acquired. Reference points D1 to D9 and distances were identified with respect to central tandem and flange, to delineate cervix, central disease, and external surface of the uterus. Results: Thirty-two applications using CT/MR compatible applicators were evaluable. The D1 and D3 reference distances which represent anterior surface had a strong correlation with R = 0.92 and 0.94 (p < 0.01). The D2 and D4 reference distances in contrast, which represent the posterior surface had a moderate (D2) and a strong (D4) correlation with R = 0.63 and 0.82 (p < 0.01). Of all, D2 reference distance showed the least correlation of MR and US. The D5 reference distance representing the fundal thickness from tandem tip had a correlation of 0.98. The reference distances for D6, D7, D8, and D9 had a correlation of 0.94, 0.82, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Conclusions: Our study evaluating the use of US, suggests a reasonably strong correlation with MR in delineating uterus, cervix, and central disease for 3D conformal intracavitary brachytherapy planning.

  5. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture.......Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  6. Ultrasound Measurement of Abdominal Muscle Thickness With and Without Transducer Fixation During Standing Postural Tasks in Participants With and Without Chronic Low Back Pain: Intrasession and Intersession Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Fatemeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Salavati, Mahyar; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Hajihasani, Abdolhamid

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging can be used for the measurement of trunk muscle activity. The displacements of US transducer, especially during more dynamic situations, however, may disturb the measurement results. To control this variable, some studies have used transducer fixator (TF), but no study evaluated the effect of using TF on US reliability in dynamic situations. The present study discriminated this issue. To investigate the intrasession and intersession reliability of lateral abdominal muscle thickness measurement in dynamic standing postural tasks by using US with and without TF in participants with and without chronic low back pain (CLBP). An intersession and intrasession reliability study. Biomechanics laboratory, Neuromuscular Rehabilitation Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran. Twenty-three patients with CLBP and 23 healthy matched individuals. Abdominal muscle thickness of all the subjects was evaluated with use of US imaging with the patient in the supine position and double-leg stance at different levels of platform stability of BBS (static, levels 6 and 3), with and without using TF. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement, minimal metrically detectable changes, and coefficients of variation were calculated to determine intersession and intrasession reliability of muscle activity measure. Lateral abdominal muscle thickness. The intersession ICCs in the conditions with TF ranged from 0.93 to 0.98 and 0.97 to 0.99 in CLBP and healthy individuals, respectively. The intersession ICCs in the conditions without TF ranged from 0.67 to 0.79 and 0.7 to 0.86 in CLBP and healthy groups, respectively. In addition, smaller standard errors of measurement and minimal metrically detectable change values were observed with US measurement in both the groups when TF was used. US imaging appears to have acceptable reliability for the assessment of abdominal muscle thickness during dynamic standing tasks in

  7. Ultrassonografia e ressonância magnética: estudo comparativo no diagnóstico da esteatose em obesos grau III Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging: a comparative study on the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosis in morbidly obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Villaça Chaves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a concordância entre a ressonância magnética (RM e a ultrassonografia abdominal (USG no diagnóstico da doença hepática gordurosa não-alcoólica (DHGNA, bem como a concordância entre cada método com o exame padrão-ouro histopatológico. MÉTODOS: A população estudada foi constituída por 145 pacientes com obesidade grau III (IMC > 40 Kg/m², de ambos os sexos. O diagnóstico da DHGNA foi realizado por ultrassonografia e ressonância magnética. Em uma subamostra foi realizado o diagnóstico por biópsia hepática (n=40. Para avaliar a concordância entre os diagnósticos por USG e RM, utilizou-se o coeficiente Kappa. RESULTADOS: Observou-se uma concordância fraca entre os dois métodos (Kappa ajustado= 0,27; IC 95%= 0,07-0,39. Foi encontrada uma concordância moderada entre o diagnóstico da doença por USG e biópsia hepática, com 83,3% de resultados concordantes e Kappa ajustado de 0,67. Já a concordância entre o diagnóstico por RM e histopatológico foi ausente, com 53,6% de resultados concordantes e Kappa ajustado de 0,07. CONCLUSÃO: A boa concordância encontrada entre o diagnóstico realizado pela USG e a biópsia hepática reforça a necessidade de condução de mais estudos como os que vêm recomendando uma padronização da avaliação diagnóstica por USG como forma de minimizar a necessidade da realização da biópsia hepática para diagnóstico de formas mais graves da doença.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the concordance between abdominal ultrasound and an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and concordance of these two methods with the histopathological exam. METHODS: The population studied was comprised of 145 patients with morbid obesity (BMI > 40 Kg/m², of both genders. NAFLD diagnosis was performed by MRI and Ultrasound. Liver biopsy was performed in a sub-sample (n=40. To evaluate the concordance of these two methods, the kappa

  8. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  11. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.  Rec...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  14. Abdominal pain in physical therapy practice: 3 patient cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeghero, Jason R; Denninger, Thomas R; Ross, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Resident's case problem. Abdominal pain is a common symptom, but not a common diagnosis, of patients referred to physical therapists for examination and intervention. For patients with primary symptoms of abdominal pain, a thorough evaluation must be performed to determine if symptoms are musculoskeletal in nature or of a nonmusculoskeletal origin that would warrant a referral to a different healthcare provider. This report describes the management of 3 adults with primary complaints of abdominal pain who were referred for physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Two of the patients had secondary symptoms of hip and/or low back pain and had previously undergone extensive medical testing for their chronic abdominal pain, without a definitive diagnosis having been determined. A physical therapy evaluation was conducted, and treatment, including manual physical therapy and exercise, was administered to address all relative impairments, once the physical therapist had determined that the patients' symptoms were of musculoskeletal origin. The third patient included in this series was referred to a physical therapist with a diagnosis of greater trochanteric versus iliopsoas bursitis. However, the patient had abdominal pain that was more acute in nature and a history and physical examination findings that were concerning for abdominal pain of nonmusculoskeletal origin. Both patients with abdominal pain of musculoskeletal origin showed marked improvement in pain and disability after 7 treatment sessions. The third patient was referred to her primary care physician, and ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed several intrauterine masses that were consistent with uterine fibroids. Following uterine fibroid embolization, the patient was symptom free. Although not routinely managed by physical therapists, abdominal pain is a relatively common patient symptom that can have several causes, both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal. This paper emphasizes the importance

  15. Peripheral blood leucocytes show differential expression of tumour progression-related genes in colorectal cancer patients who have a postoperative intra-abdominal infection: a prospective matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, S; Mayol, X; Nonell, L; Salvans, S; Pascual, M; Pera, M

    2017-05-01

    Anastomotic leak is associated with higher rates of recurrence after surgery for colorectal cancer. However, the mechanisms responsible are unknown. We hypothesized that the infection-induced inflammatory response may induce overexpression of tumour progression-related genes in immune cells. The aim was to investigate the effect of postoperative intra-abdominal infection on the gene expression patterns of peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) after surgery for colorectal cancer. Prospective matched cohort study. Patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer were included. Patients who had anastomotic leak or intra-abdominal abscess were included in the infection group (n = 23) and matched with patients without complications for the control group (n = 23). PBL were isolated from postoperative blood samples. Total RNA was extracted and hybridized to the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarray. Patients in the infection group displayed 162 upregulated genes and 146 downregulated genes with respect to the control group. Upregulated genes included examples coding for secreted cytokines involved in tumour growth and invasion (S100P, HGF, MMP8, MMP9, PDGFC, IL1R2). Infection also upregulated some proangiogenic genes (CEP55, TRPS1) and downregulated some inhibitors of angiogenesis (MME, ALOX15, CXCL10). Finally, some inhibitors (HP, ORM1, OLFM4, IRAK3) and activators (GNLY, PRF1, FGFBP2) of antitumour immunity were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, suggesting that the inflammatory environment caused by a postoperative infection favours immune evasion mechanisms of the tumour. Analysis of PBL shows differential expression of certain tumour progression-related genes in colorectal cancer patients who have a postoperative intra-abdominal infection, which in turn may promote the growth of residual cancer cells to become recurrent tumours. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Endometrioma de parede abdominal Abdominal wall endometrioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Accetta

    2011-03-01

    : Retrospective analysis of patients operated for abdominal wall endometrioma with emphasis on data relating to age, symptoms, previous cesarean, relation of symptoms with the menstrual cycle, physical examinations and additional surgical treatment, postoperative course and histopathological results of specimens. RESULTS: Forteen patients were operated during the study period, aged between 28 and 40 years. The presence of local mass and pain that worsened during menstruation were the main complaints. Ultrasound and CT examinations were important to precisely localize the disease. Surgical excision was a wide excision of the tumor and affected tissues. The patient progressed satisfactorily and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal wall endometrioma in all cases. CONCLUSION: Exists a clear relationship between cesarean operation and abdominal wall endometrioma; ultrasound studies and CT scans help to plan the surgical resection allowing resection of tumor and all affected adjacent tissues.

  17. Aggressive malignant abdominal mesothelioma: Clinical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hassan, Ahmad M.; Al-Saigh, Abdulrehman A.

    2004-01-01

    A 32-year-old Filipino female, working as an x-ray technician, presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with acute abdominal pain for one day. The pain was mainly on the left side and left hypochondrium. She had recurring abdominal pain before but not significant to worry her. She also complained of abdominal distension, which she noticed one week ago. Abdominal examination revealed fullness in the left hypochondrium with marked tenderness but negative rebound. Abdominal ultrasound (US) showed a huge mass mainly in the left hypochondrium. The origin of the mass cannot be identified by US. A computerized tomography scan showed a mass in the left side of the abdomen crossing the midline with a necrotic centre. The hospital course of the patient runs smoothly, and she was discharged after 7-days and referred to an Oncology Center. Abdominal mesothelioma is a neoplasm arising from the mesothelial surface lining the abdominal cavity. It is less frequent than that of the pleura. It is a rapidly growing and fatal malignancy with a median survival of less than 1-year. The relation between pleural malignant mesothelioma and asbestos is well recognized since it was described in 19602 but implication of asbestos exposure in the etiology of the peritoneal type is less obvious. This patient history is giving no obvious exposure to asbestos but as she is working in the Radiology Department as an x-ray technician she is well exposed to x-ray, but the effect of radioactivity on induction of mesothelioma is still disputed.4 There are several reports linking malignant mesothelioma to radioactivity due to radiation therapy.The fibrous mesothelioma (sarcomatous), as in this case, which is difficult to diagnose microscopically, looks like a fibroma, unless helped by tissue culture. The treatment options of malignant mesothelioma include surgery, intraperitoneal chemotherapy and whole abdominal radiation or multimodality therapy, which were suggested that might prolong the survival in

  18. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  19. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  20. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anshus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An elderly female with no history of prior abdominal surgeries presented to the emergency department (ED with acute onset of abdominal pain and distention. Upon arrival, she began having large volume bilious emesis. While waiting for a computed tomography (CT scan of her abdomen and pelvis, a point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed which showed evidence of a small bowel obstruction (SBO. The patient had a nasogastric tube placed that put out over two liters of bilious contents. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of SBO from a left inguinal hernia and the patient was admitted to the surgical service. Significant findings: The POCUS utilizing the low frequency curvilinear probe demonstrates fluid-filled, dilated bowel loops greater than 2.5cm with to-and-fro peristalsis, and thickened bowel walls greater than 3mm, concerning for SBO. Discussion: Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common diagnosis in the ED, accounting for approximately 15% of all ED visits for acute abdominal pain.1 SBO accounts for approximately 80% of all obstructions.2 In the diagnosis of SBO, studies show that abdominal x-rays have a sensitivity of 66-77% and specificity of 50-57%,3 CT scans have a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%,4 and ultrasound has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 96%.5 While CT scan remains a widely accepted modality for diagnosing SBO, ultrasound is more cost effective, well tolerated, does not involve ionizing radiation, and can be done in a timely manner at the patient’s bedside. Ultrasound can also identify transition points as well as distinguish between functional and mechanical obstruction.6 In addition to SBO, ultrasound can be used to diagnose external hernias, intussusception, tumors, superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome, foreign bodies, bezoars, and ascariasis.7

  1. Ultrasound measurement of deep abdominal muscle activity in sitting positions with different stability levels in subjects with and without chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Omid; Arab, Amir Massoud; Amiri, Mohsen; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in three sitting postures with different levels of stability. The technique of ultrasound imaging was used for individuals with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). A sample of 40 people participated in this study. Subjects were categorised into two groups: with LBP (N = 20) and without LBP (N = 20). Changes in the thickness of tested muscles were normalized under three different sitting postures to actual muscle thickness at rest in the supine lying position and were expressed as a percentage of thickness change. The percentage of thickness change in TrA and IO increased as the stability of the sitting position decreased in both groups. However, the percentages of thickness change in all positions were less in subjects with LBP. There was a significant difference in thickness change in TrA when sitting on a gym ball between subjects with and without LBP but no difference was found when sitting on a chair. There was no significant difference in thickness change in IO in all positions between the two groups. Our findings indicate that difference in the percentage of thickness change in TrA between subjects with and without LBP increases as the stability of sitting position decreases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  3. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at greater risk of having anxiety as young adults [2] . Abdominal pain or bellyaches in children What ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ...

  4. Abdominal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diverticulitis ) Inflammation of the pancreas ( acute or chronic pancreatitis ) Liver abscess Pockets of infection (retroperitoneal abscess, abdominal abscess , pelvic abscess) Pregnancy outside of the uterus ( ectopic pregnancy ) Scar tissue ...

  5. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to ease your pain. For instance, eat smaller meals if your pain is accompanied by indigestion. Avoid ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/abdominal-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050728 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  6. Abdominal ultrasound in the evaluation of fibrosis and portal hypertension in an area of schistosomiasis low endemicity Ultra-sonografia abdominal na avaliação de fibrose e hipertensão portal em área de baixa endemicidade de esquistossomose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Carvalho do Espírito Santo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in the municipality of Bananal, São Paulo, an endemic area for schistosomiasis with a prevalence under 10% and low parasite load among infected individuals. Our objective was to identify the clinical forms of schistosomiasis among 109 patients in whom the disease had been diagnosed through direct fecal analysis and who had been medicated with oxamniquine at the time of the Plan for the Intensification of Schistosomiasis Control Actions (1998-2000. These patients were submitted to an abdominal ultrasonography and fecal analysis by Kato-Katz method, four years, on average, after the end of the Plan. Five patients, whose abdominal ultrasound images were compatible with either peripheral or central periportal fibrosis and portal hypertension, were identified. None of the 109 patients presented Schistosoma mansoni eggs at fecal analysis. Ultrasonography is a sensitive, noninvasive diagnostic method that allows a better identification of the extent of liver involvement in schistosomiasis cases.Este estudo desenvolveu-se no município de Bananal, São Paulo, uma área endêmica para esquistossomose com prevalência menor que 10% e baixa carga parasitária nos infectados. Teve como objetivo a identificação de formas clínicas da esquistossomose mansoni através do exame ultra-sonográfico, em 109 pacientes diagnosticados parasitologicamente e medicados com oxamniquine, durante a realização do Plano de Intensificação das Ações de Controle da Esquistossomose mansônica (1998-2000. Foram utilizadas a ultra-sonografia abdominal e exames de fezes (Kato-Katz realizados após o término do plano, quatro anos em média. Nesta casuística, foram identificados cinco pacientes com imagens ultra-sonográficas abdominais compatíveis com fibrose periportal periférica ou central e hipertensão portal, além da negatividade de todos os exames parasitológicos nos 109 pacientes. A ultra-sonografia, um método de diagnóstico sens

  7. An Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumor, Embedded in the Pancreas, Preoperatively Diagnosed as an Extragastric Growing Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Mizuno

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old woman was found to have a pancreatic tumor by abdominal ultrasound performed for a medical check-up. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a hypovascular tumor measuring 30 mm in diameter in the pancreatic tail. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was performed. An extragastric growing gastrointestinal stromal tumor was thereby diagnosed preoperatively, and surgical resection was planned. Laparoscopic surgery was attempted but conversion to open surgery was necessitated by extensive adhesions, and distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy, and partial gastrectomy were performed. The histological diagnosis was an intra-abdominal desmoid tumor. A desmoid tumor is a fibrous soft tissue tumor arising in the fascia and musculoaponeurotic tissues. It usually occurs in the extremities and abdominal wall, and only rarely in the abdominal cavity. We experienced a case with an intra-abdominal desmoid tumor that was histologically diagnosed after laparotomy, which had been preoperatively diagnosed as an extragastric growing gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Although rare, desmoid tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intra-abdominal tumors. Herein, we report this case with a literature review.

  8. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common cause of abdominal trauma is blunt trauma, gunshot wounds and stab wounds are rare. Most commonly injured organs in abdominal cavity are the spleen and the liver.Conclusions. Early diagnosis is very important and include precise phisical examination and all available diagnostic methods. The final decission about the method of treatmet depends on patients clinical condition, surgeon’s experience and other local conditions.

  9. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Abdominal Wall and Lumbar Multifidus Muscles in Participants Who Practice Pilates: A 1-year Follow-up Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala-Alarcón, Paula; Calvo-Lobo, César; Serrano-Imedio, Ana; Garrido-Marín, Alejandro; Martín-Casas, Patricia; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo

    2018-04-18

    The purpose of this study was to describe ultrasound (US) changes in muscle thickness produced during automatic activation of the transversus abdominis (TrAb), internal oblique (IO), external oblique (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA), as well as the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the lumbar multifidus (LM), after 1 year of Pilates practice. A 1-year follow-up case series study with a convenience sample of 17 participants was performed. Indeed, TrAb, IO, EO, and RA thickness, as well as LM CSA changes during automatic tests were measured by US scanning before and after 1 year of Pilates practice twice per week. Furthermore, quality of life changes using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and US measurement comparisons of participants who practiced exercises other than Pilates were described. Statistically significant changes were observed for the RA muscle thickness reduction during the active straight leg raise test (P = .007). Participants who practiced other exercises presented a larger LM CSA and IO thickness, which was statistically significant (P .05). A direct moderate correlation was observed (r = 0.562, P = .019) between the TrAb thickness before and after a 1-year follow-up. Long-term Pilates practice may reduce the RA thickness automatic activation during active straight leg raise. Furthermore, LM CSA and IO thickness increases were observed in participants who practice other exercise types in conjunction with Pilates. Despite a moderate positive correlation observed for TrAb thickness, the quality of life did not seem to be modified after long-term Pilates practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. [Abdominal catastrophe--surgeon's view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnánek, F

    2010-07-01

    Abdominal catastrophe is a serious clinical condition, usually being a complication arising during treatment of intraabdominal nontraumatic disorders or abdominal injuries. Most commonly, inflamation- secondary peritonitis, is concerned. Abdominal catastrophe also includes secondary signs of sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and enterocutaneous fistules. Most septic abdominal disorders which show signs of abdominal catastrophy, require surgical intervention and reinterventions--planned or "on demand" laparotomies. During the postoperative period, the patient requires intensive care management, including steps taken to stabilize his/hers condition, management of sepsis and metabolic and nutritional support measures, as well as adequate indication for reoperations. New technologies aimed at prevention of complications in laparostomies and to improve conditions for final laparotomy closure are used in phase procedures for surgical management of intraabdominal infections. Despite the new technologies, abdominal catastrophe has higher morbidity and lethality risk rates.

  11. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of ... What are the limitations of Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? Obstetric ultrasound cannot identify all fetal abnormalities. Consequently, when ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  16. Fetal abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prefumo, Federico; Izzi, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    The most common fetal abdominal wall defects are gastroschisis and omphalocele, both with a prevalence of about three in 10,000 births. Prenatal ultrasound has a high sensitivity for these abnormalities already at the time of the first-trimester nuchal scan. Major unrelated defects are associated with gastroschisis in about 10% of cases, whereas omphalocele is associated with chromosomal or genetic abnormalities in a much higher proportion of cases. Challenges in management of gastroschisis are related to the prevention of late intrauterine death, and the prediction and treatment of complex forms. With omphalocele, the main difficulty is the exclusion of associated conditions, not all diagnosed prenatally. An outline of the postnatal treatment of abdominal wall defects is given. Other rarer forms of abdominal wall defects are pentalogy of Cantrell, omphalocele, bladder exstrophy, imperforate anus, spina bifida complex, prune-belly syndrome, body stalk anomaly, and bladder and cloacal exstrophy; they deserve multidisciplinary counselling and management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Abdominal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  18. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma Arising from Abdominal Wall Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thouraya Achach

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a frequent benign disorder. Malignancy arising in extraovarian endometriosis is a rare event. A 49-year-old woman is presented with a large painful abdominal wall mass. She underwent a myomectomy, 20 years before, for uterus leiomyoma. Computed tomography suggested that this was a desmoid tumor and she underwent surgery. Histological examination showed a clear cell adenocarcinoma associated with endometriosis foci. Pelvic ultrasound, computed tomography, and endometrial curettage did not show any malignancy or endometriosis in the uterus and ovaries. Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended, but the patient was lost to follow up. Six months later, she returned with a recurrence of the abdominal wall mass. She was given chemotherapy and then she was reoperated.

  19. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA- CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja Ratnakumari Billa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent times there has been increased incidence of abdominal trauma cases due to several causes. Quick and prompt intervention is needed to decrease the mortality of the patients. So we conducted a study to assess the cause and the management of abdominal trauma cases in our institution. The aim of this study was to know the incidence of blunt and penetrating injuries and their causes, age and sex incidence, importance of various investigations, mode of treatment offered and post-operative complications. To study the cause of death and evolve better management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprises of patients admitted to and operated in various surgical units in the Department of Surgery at Government General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College Guntur, from August 2014 to October 2016. RESULTS Increase incidence seen in age group 20-29 years (30%. Male predominance 77.5%. Mechanism of injury–road traffic accidents 65%. Isolated organ injury–colon and rectum 40%. Other associated injuries–chest injuries with rib fractures 7.5%. Complications–wound infection 17.5%. Duration of hospital stay 8–14 days. Bowel injury management–closure of perforation 84.6%. Resection anastomosis 15.38%. CONCLUSION Thorough clinical examination, diagnostic paracentesis, plain X-ray erect abdomen and ultrasound proved to be very helpful in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries. Spleen is the commonest organ involved in blunt trauma and colon is the commonly injured organ in penetrating abdominal trauma, many patients have associated extremity and axial skeleton injuries. With advances in diagnosis and intensive care technologies, most patients of solid visceral injuries with hemodynamic stability can be managed conservatively. Surgical site infection is the most common complication following surgery. The mortality is high; reason might be patient reaching the hospital late, high incidence of postoperative septic

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. ... not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  3. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive

  4. Internal Mammary Vessels’ Impact on Abdominal Skin Perfusion in Free Abdominal Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Nergård, MD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions:. Using the IMV in free abdominal flap breast reconstruction had a significant effect on abdominal skin perfusion and may contribute to abdominal wound healing problems. The reperfusion of the abdominal skin was a dynamic process showing an increase in perfusion in the affected areas during the postoperative days.

  5. Use of ultrasound imaging for the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding in the bonnet macaque ( Macaca radiata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Uddhav K; Imran, M; Manjramkar, Dhananjay D; Metkari, Siddhanath M; Sable, Nilesh P; Gavhane, Dnyaneshwar S; Katkam, Rajendra R; Sachdeva, Geetanjali; Thakur, Meenakshi H; Kholkute, Sanjeeva D

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound is a powerful, low-cost, non-invasive medical tool used by laboratory animal veterinarians for diagnostic imaging. Sonohysterography and transvaginal ultrasound are frequently used to assess uterine anomalies in women presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB). In the present study, we have evaluated the abdominal ultrasound of bonnet monkeys ( n = 8) showing spontaneous ovulatory ( n = 5) and anovulatory ( n = 3) AUB. The ovulatory ( n = 5) macaques showed cyclic AUB for 7-8 days. The anovulatory ( n = 3) macaques had irregular AUB with menstrual cycles of 40-45 days. The B-mode abdominal, colour Doppler and 3D ultrasound scans were performed during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Ultrasound examination revealed endometrial polyps in five macaques and endometrial hyperplasia in three animals. The width and length of endometrial polyps was around 0.5-1 cm (average 0.51 ± 0.23 cm × 0.96 ± 0.16 cm) with significant increase in endometrial thickness ( P uterine cavity and colour Doppler ultrasound showed increased vascularity in the endometrial polyps. Endometrial hyperplasia characteristically appeared as a thickened echogenic endometrium ( P < 0.0002). This study demonstrates the use of non-invasive ultrasound techniques in the diagnosis of AUB in macaques.

  6. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing, T.M.Y.; Young, N.; O'Rourke, I.C.; Tomlinson, P.

    1994-01-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogens. 11 refs., 2 figs

  7. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  8. 52 Elective Abdominal Ultrasonography by Surgeons at MNH, Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... Conclusion: Pain is the most frequent reason for requesting abdominal ultrasound scanning but it has a low yield of sonographic findings. Scanning for abdominal swelling/mass gave the highest proportion of abnormal findings. USS of a surgical patient done by surgeons expedites diagnostic workup ...

  9. Eighty-two year old female with long term abdominal pain, fever and skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz Nicolás, G; Zafar Iqbal-Mirza, S; Gonzáles Carhuancho, J A; Mollejo Villanueva, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an old woman, consulting for fever, abdominal pain and constitutional symptoms one year of evolution. The differential diagnosis is between infectious, tumoral, or inflammatory disease, which may be located at the abdominal level, performing additional tests to rule out abdominal process. The existence of pain in the legs and level scan left thigh of a mass of hard consistency, makes us raise another diagnosis. Finally show on ultrasound soft tissue inflammatory changes regarding panniculitis. From this finding aetiologies of panniculitis are reviewed. Skin biopsy that shows the final diagnosis is made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. The abdominal circumference of neonates at birth and established ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Accurate estimation of Gestational age is important in obstetrics. The abdominal circumference is a tool in foetal biometry used to predict gestational age with ultrasound. Objective: To determine the accuracy of established ultrasound values in estimating Gestational age of foetuses in Nigeria by comparing with ...

  11. Associations between ultrasound measures of abdominal fat distribution and indices of glucose metabolism in a population at high risk of type 2 diabetes: the ADDITION-PRO study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelotte Philipsen

    Full Text Available Visceral adipose tissue measured by CT or MRI is strongly associated with an adverse metabolic risk profile. We assessed whether similar associations can be found with ultrasonography, by quantifying the strength of the relationship between different measures of obesity and indices of glucose metabolism in a population at high risk of type 2 diabetes.A cross-sectional analysis of 1342 participants of the ADDITION-PRO study. We measured visceral adipose tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue with ultrasonography, anthropometrics and body fat percentage by bioelectrical impedance. Indices of glucose metabolism were derived from a three point oral glucose tolerance test. Linear regression of obesity measures on indices of glucose metabolism was performed.Mean age was 66.2 years, BMI 26.9kg/m2, subcutaneous adipose tissue 2.5cm and visceral adipose tissue 8.0cm. All measures of obesity were positively associated with indicators of glycaemia and inversely associated with indicators of insulin sensitivity. Associations were of equivalent magnitude except for subcutaneous adipose tissue and the visceral/subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio, which showed weaker associations. One standard deviation difference in BMI, visceral adipose tissue, waist circumference, waist/height ratio and body fat percentage corresponded approximately to 0.2mmol/l higher fasting glucose, 0.7mmol/l higher 2-hr glucose, 0.06-0.1% higher HbA1c, 30 % lower HOMA index of insulin sensitivity, 20% lower Gutt's index of insulin sensitivity, and 100 unit higher Stumvoll's index of beta-cell function. After adjustment for waist circumference visceral adipose tissue was still significantly associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, whereas there was a trend towards inverse or no associations with subcutaneous adipose tissue. After adjustment, a 1cm increase in visceral adipose tissue was associated with ~5% lower insulin sensitivity (p≤0.0004 and ~0.18mmol/l higher 2-hr

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams ... to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is ... in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  19. Preoperative abdominal muscle elongation with botulinum toxin A for complex incisional ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Faisal; Jacombs, Anita S W; Roussos, Emmanouel; Read, John W; Dardano, Anthony N; Edye, Michael; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repair of recurrent abdominal incisional hernia(s) can be challenging due to complex operative conditions, intense post-operative pain, potential respiratory compromise and lateral muscle traction predisposing to early recurrence. We report our preliminary results with botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection causing flaccid paralysis (relaxation) of the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to surgery. A prospective pilot study measured the effect of preoperative BTA prior to elective repair of recurrent abdominal hernias. Under ultrasound control, 2 weeks prior to surgery, 50 units of BTA was injected into the external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles at three sites on each side of the lateral abdominal wall (total dose 300 units). Pre- and post-BTA abdominal computed tomography measured changes in abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. All hernias were repaired with laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted mesh techniques in a single or two-staged procedure. Eight patients received BTA injections which were tolerated with no complications. Post-BTA preoperative computed tomography showed a significant increase in mean length of lateral abdominal wall from 18.5 cm pre-BTA to 21.3 cm post-BTA (P = 0.017) with a mean unstretched length gain of 2.8 cm per side (range 0.8-6.0 cm). All hernias were surgically reduced with mesh with no early recurrence. Preoperative BTA injection prior to complex abdominal hernia repair is a safe procedure that causes flaccid relaxation, elongation and thinning of the lateral abdominal muscles and decrease in hernia defect. Although further evaluation is required, BTA injections may be a useful adjunct to surgical repair of complex incisional hernias. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Primary segmental omental infarction as a rare cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Tepeneu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary omental infarction (POI has a low incidence worldwide, with most cases occurring in adults. This condition is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Material and methods: We present 2 cases of omental infarction in an obese 8-year-old boy and a 5-year-old boy who presented with acute abdominal pain in the right abdomen. Both patients were initially treated with intravenous fluids and analgesics with no improvement. Abdominal ultrasound of the first patient showed free intraperitoneal fluid, meteorism and distended bowel loops. The appendix was not visualized. With a presumptive clinical diagnosis of appendicitis the child underwent laparotomy.On entering the peritoneal cavity an omental infarction was seen and a portion of the omentum was resected. Appendectomy was performed.The second patient presented with acute abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant, which started 2 days before. There was a history of possible abdominal trauma about 3 weeks earlier. The patient had repeated ultrasound examinations and a CT scan of the abdomen which showed a omental infarction. He underwent laparoscopy and resection of the omental infarction, as well as incidental appendectomy. Results: The postoperative period was uneventful. The first patient was discharged on day 3, the second patient on day 4 after surgery. Histology showed a normal vermiform appendix and an omental infarction in both cases. Conclusion and discussion: Since the omental infarction as etiology of acute abdominal pain is uncommon in children, we emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of omental infarction. Keywords: Primary segmental omental infarction (POI, Appendicitis, Childhood

  1. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  2. Unusual cause of abdominal pain in the second trimester in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 26-year-old primigravida, at 22 weeks gestation by dates, was admitted to our institution after having presented with a two-day history of abdominal pain and vaginal spotting. An abdominal ultrasound revealed an abdominal pregnancy with fetal demise at 20 weeks and an empty uterus. Intra-operatively, the placenta was ...

  3. Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Young Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young nonsmoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal AAA that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock. The patient had acute aortic surgery and survived. Five months before this incident, the patient had uneventful elective aortic root replacement (ad modum David) due to an enlarged aortic root. At that time, his abdominal aorta was assessed with a routine ultrasound scan that showed a normal-sized abdominal aorta. This documents that the aneurysm had evolved very rapidly despite young age and absence of risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aortic Dissection and Thrombosis Diagnosed by Emergency Ultrasound in a Patient with Leg Pain and Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann H. Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombosis in a 78-year-old male who presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of lower extremity and paralysis for the past 1.5 hours. The initial vital signs in the ED were as follows: blood pressure (BP 132/88 mmHg, heart rate (HR 96, respiratory rate (RR 14, and an oxygen saturation of 94% at room air. Physical exam was notable for pale and cold left leg. The ED physician was unable to palpate or detect a Doppler signal in the left femoral artery. Bedside ultrasound was performed which showed non-pulsatile left femoral artery and limited flow on color Doppler. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening ultrasound was performed showing a 4.99 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and an intra-aortic thrombus with an intimal flap. Vascular surgery was promptly contacted and the patient underwent emergent aorto-bi-femoral bypass, bilateral four compartment fasciotomy, right common femoral artery endarterectomy with profundoplasty, and subsequent left leg amputation. Emergency physicians should utilize bedside ultrasound in patients who present with risk factors or threatening signs and symptoms that may suggest aortic dissection or aneurysm. Bedside ultrasound decreases time to definitive treatment and the mortality of the patients.

  5. Effect of the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre in combination with ankle dorsiflexion in strengthening the transverse abdominal muscle in healthy young adults: a preliminary, randomised, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Seung-Chul; Chang, Ki-Yeon; You, Joshua Sung H

    2010-06-01

    To compare the effect of the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre with the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre in combination with ankle dorsiflexion on changes in muscle thickness and associated muscle activity in abdominal muscles. A preliminary, randomised, controlled study. University laboratory. Forty healthy adults (18 males, 22 females) were allocated at random to the experimental group [mean age (SD) 24 (1.6) years, n=20] or the control group [mean age (SD) 24 (1.9) years, n=20]. The experimental group performed the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre in combination with ankle dorsiflexion, and the control group performed the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre alone, five times a day. Ultrasonography and electromyography were used to determine the intervention-related changes in muscle activity and the thickness of abdominal muscles during the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre or the abdominal draw-in manoeuvre in combination with ankle dorsiflexion. A significant difference was found in the thickness of the transverse abdominal muscle between the groups [mean difference 0.24 cm, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.40, P=0.005. On electromyography, a significant difference was demonstrated in the amplitude of the transverse abdominal muscle contraction between the two techniques in the experimental group (mean difference 68.76 mV, 95% CI 53.16 to 84.36, P=0.000. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC(2,1)) showed excellent test-retest reliability of ultrasound measurement of the abdominal muscles: 0.96 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.99) for the transverse abdominal muscle, 0.87 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.98) for the internal oblique muscle and 0.77 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.96) for the external oblique muscle. This is the first study to demonstrate the additive effect of ankle dorsiflexion on deep core muscle thickness and activity, thus contributing to existing knowledge about therapeutic exercise for the effective management of low back pain. Copyright 2009 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by

  6. Torsion of abdominal appendages presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaberi, Tareq M.; Gharabeih, Kamal I.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2000-01-01

    Diseases of abnormal appendages are rare causes of abdominal pain in all age groups. Nine patients with torsion and infraction of abdominal appendages were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients had torsion and infarction of the appendices epiploicae, four patients had torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament. The patient with falciform ligament disease represents the first reported case of primary torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament, and the patient with the transverse colon epiplocia represents the first reported case of vibration-induced appendix epiplocia torsion and infarction. The patient with the falciform ligament disease presented with a tender upper abdominal mass and the remaining patients were operated upon with the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The presence of normal appendix with free serosanguinous fluid in the peritoneal cavity should raise the possibility of a disease and calls for further evaluation of the intra-abdominal organs. If the diagnosis is suspected preoperatively, CT scan and ultrasound may lead to a correct diagnosis and possibly conservative management. Laparoscopy is playing an increasing diagnostic and therapeutic role in such situations. (author)

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... women, a pelvic ultrasound exam can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  10. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unusual presentation of antenatal ovarian torsion: free-floating abdominal cysts. Our experience and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Nicola; Scirè, Gabriella; Zambon, Carla; Ottolenghi, Alberto; Camoglio, Francesco Saverio

    2009-04-01

    Abdominal cystic formations in newborns are relatively common and often diagnostic suspicion arises before birth as a result of ultrasound scans carried out during pregnancy. Prenatal ovarian torsion is a rare condition very difficult to manage in the first days of life. We report and discuss the management of prenatal ovarian torsion with a free-floating abdominal cyst detected on prenatal ultrasound. We recorded the cases of antenatal abdominal cysts detected on ultrasound at the Department of Antenatal Diagnosis between January 2003 and January 2007. Only patients with a free-floating cyst were included in the study. Clinical and surgical findings were then recorded. Two out of 57 patients underwent surgery for a free-floating abdominal cyst during the second day of life. Postnatal ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, and laparoscopic exploration were useful to identify an unusual presentation of antenatal ovarian torsion with a complete atresia of the Fallopian tube. The cases reported in this study suggest that a good clinical approach to all cases of abdominal cysts detected on prenatal ultrasound scans require postnatal Doppler and abdominal ultrasound with a laparoscopic exploration. Free-floating abdominal cysts are rare but, at the same time, strictly correlated with autoamputation of the ovary/Fallopian tube complex.

  12. Abdominal wall muscle elasticity and abdomen local stiffness on healthy volunteers during various physiological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D; Podwojewski, F; Beillas, P; Ottenio, M; Voirin, D; Turquier, F; Mitton, D

    2016-07-01

    The performance of hernia treatment could benefit from more extensive knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the abdominal wall in a healthy state. To supply this knowledge, the antero-lateral abdominal wall was characterized in vivo on 11 healthy volunteers during 4 activities: rest, pullback loading, abdominal breathing and the "Valsalva maneuver". The elasticity of the abdominal muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus, obliquus internus and transversus abdominis) was assessed using ultrasound shear wave elastography. In addition, the abdomen was subjected to a low external load at three locations: on the midline (linea alba), on the rectus abdominis region and on lateral muscles region in order to evaluate the local stiffness of the abdomen, at rest and during "Valsalva maneuver". The results showed that the "Valsalva maneuver" leads to a statistically significant increase of the muscle shear modulus compared to the other activities. This study also showed that the local stiffness of the abdomen was related to the activity. At rest, a significant difference has been observed between the anterior (0.5N/mm) and the lateral abdomen locations (1N/mm). Then, during the Valsalva maneuver, the local stiffness values were similar for all locations (ranging from 1.6 to 2.2N/mm). This work focuses on the in vivo characterization of the mechanical response of the human abdominal wall and abdomen during several activities. In the future, this protocol could be helpful for investigation on herniated patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, M S; Larson, M M; Grant, D C; Monroe, W E; Troy, G C; Panciera, D L; Rossmeisl, J H; Werre, S R

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is common in dogs and has many causes. Ultrasonographic descriptions of many gastrointestinal diseases have been published, but the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea has not been investigated. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasound will be highest in dogs with GI neoplasia and lowest in those with inflammatory disorders. 87 pet dogs with chronic diarrhea. Prospective study in which medical records were reviewed and contribution of abdominal ultrasound toward making diagnosis was scored. In 57/87 (66%) of dogs, the same diagnosis would have been reached without ultrasonography. In 13/87 (15%) of dogs, the ultrasound examination was vital or beneficial to making the diagnosis. Univariable analysis identified that increased diagnostic utility was associated with weight loss (P = .0086), palpation of an abdominal or rectal mass (P = .0031), diseases that commonly have mass lesions visible on ultrasound examination (P dogs in which an abdominal or rectal mass was palpated (odds ratio 30.5, 95% CI 5.5-169.6) (P dogs without a palpable mass. In 15/87 (17%) of dogs, additional benefits of ultrasonography to case management, independent of the contribution to the diagnosis of diarrhea, were identified. Overall, the diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography was low in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Identification of factors associated with high diagnostic utility is an indication to perform abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... as detailed as with the transrectal probe. An MRI of the pelvis may be obtained as an ... Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... your knees toward your chest. To obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... right in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ... ultrasound to clean out the bowel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. In ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed ... ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: ... fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ... pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most ... child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Transvaginal ultrasound is performed very much like a gynecologic exam and involves the insertion of the transducer ... with your feet in stirrups similar to a gynecologic exam. Transrectal: For a transrectal ultrasound, a protective ...

  20. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning may be able to give a ...

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of common clinical tests for assessing abdominal muscle function after motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, A; Squair, J W; Malik, R; Lam, T; Chen, Z; Carpenter, M G

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostic study. The objective of this study was to compare patterns of electromyography (EMG) recordings of abdominal muscle function in persons with motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) above T6 and in able-bodied controls, and to determine whether manual examination or ultrasound measures of muscle activation can be accurate alternatives to EMG. Research center focused on SCI and University laboratory, Vancouver, Canada. Thirteen people with SCI (11 with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A and 2 AIS B; C4-T5), and 13 matched able-bodied participants volunteered for the study. Participants completed trunk tasks during manual examination of the abdominal muscles and then performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions, while EMG activity and muscle thickness changes were recorded. The frequency of muscle responses detected by manual examination and ultrasound were compared with detection by EMG (sensitivity and specificity). All individuals with SCI were able to elicit EMG activity above resting levels in at least one abdominal muscle during one task. In general, the activation pattern was task specific, confirming voluntary control of the muscles. Ultrasound, when compared with EMG, showed low sensitivity but was highly specific in its ability to detect preserved abdominal muscle function in persons with SCI. Conversely, manual examination was more sensitive than ultrasound but showed lower specificity. The results from this study confirm preserved voluntary abdominal muscle function in individuals classified with motor-complete SCI above T6 and highlight the need for further research in developing more accurate clinical measures to diagnose the level of trunk muscle preservation in individuals with SCI.

  5. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Feasibility and Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Abdominal Sonography by Pocket-Sized Imaging Devices, Performed by Medical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjesbu, Ingunn E; Laursen, Christian B; Graven, Torbjørn; Holden, Hans Martin; Rømo, Bjørnar; Newton Andersen, Garrett; Mjølstad, Ole Christian; Lassen, Annmarie; Dalen, Håvard

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to study the feasibility and diagnostic performance of bedside ultrasound by examination of the liver, gallbladder, kidneys, and abdominal aorta performed by medical residents with limited experience in ultrasound, on emergency admissions using pocket-sized imaging devices (PSIDs). A total of 199 patients admitted acutely to the medical department at the non-university Levanger Hospital, Norway, during the period from April 4 to June 23, 2011, were consecutively included. Six medical residents, selected by drawing, examined these patients with a PSID at admission. Reference imaging was performed and/or judged at the Department of Radiology. Each resident performed a median of 28 examinations (interquartile range 24-46). Imaging of the kidneys and liver were feasible in 85 and 82% of the cases, and the corresponding values for the gallbladder and abdominal aorta were 79 and 50%, respectively. The sensitivity of medical residents to detect organ pathology with the aid of PSID, ranged between 54% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 29-77%) and 74% (95% CI: 51-88%). Assessment of the aortic dimension showed moderate correlation, with r = 0.38. Examination by PSID by inexperienced residents may allow for early detection of abdominal pathology, but do not appear to be accurate enough to rule out pathology in the abdominal organs. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Uncommon Solid Pancreatic Neoplasm: The Role of New Modalities of Ultrasound Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Leitão

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like cells is a rare pancreatic neoplasm with unique ultrasound endoscopic features. A 59-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a large pancreatic tumor with a heterogeneous echotexture and liver metastasis. Endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration was used to establish the diagnosis. In this case report, we review the endoscopic, clinical, and pathological features of this type of tumor and describe for the first time the endoscopic features of real-time elastography and contrast enhancement. Real-time elastography revealed a heterogeneous predominantly blue pattern suggestive of pancreatic malignancy, and the contrast-enhanced endosonography showed a hypervascular mass and distinctive vascular (solid and avascular (liquid/necrotic components of the lesion, guiding the fine needle aspiration.

  8. Treatment of Abdominal Segmental Hernia, Constipation, and Pain Following Herpes Zoster with Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) most commonly occurs in elderly patients and involves sensory neurons resulting in pain and sensory changes. Clinically significant motor deficits and visceral neuropathies are thought to be relatively rare. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal segmental hernia, constipation, and pain following HZ in the left T9-10 dermatome. Sixteen days before presentation, he had developed a painful herpetic rash in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Approximately 10 days after the onset of the rash, constipation occurred and was managed with daily oral medication with bisacodyl 5 mg. In addition, 14 days after the onset of HZ, the patient noticed a protrusion of the left upper abdominal wall. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, and electrolyte analysis showed no abnormalities. General physical examination revealed a reducible bulge in his left upper quadrant and superficial abdominal reflexes were diminished in the affected region. Electromyographic testing revealed denervational changes limited to the left thoracic paraspinal muscles and supraumbilical muscles, corresponding to the affected dermatomes. He was prescribed with 500 mg of famciclovir 3 times a day for 7 days, and pregabalin 75 mg twice a day and acetaminophen 650 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. However, his pain was rated at an intensity of 5 on the numerical analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). A paravertebral block was performed at T9-10 with a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine 3 mL and triamcinolone 40 mg. One day after the procedure, the abdominal pain disappeared. In addition, 5 days after the intervention, the abdominal protrusion and constipation were resolved. He currently remains symptom free at a 6 month follow-up.

  9. Ultrasonography of anterior abdominal wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.N.; Lee, S. K.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, B. H. [Maryrnoll Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    The anterior abdominal wall has received little attention in the ultrasonic evaluation. However recently the improved resolution of ultrasound scanning devices has made possible routine examination of the anterior abdominal wall. The authors evaluated ultrasonographic findings of anterior abdominal wall lesions in 27 cases for 1 year(from July '82 to Aug. '83), which were finally diagnosed pathologically and clinically. The results were as follows: 1. Well defined peritoneal line and layers of the anterior abdominal wall made it possible to localize the lesions accurately from adjacent structures. 2. Abscess and hematoma were lower in echogenecity than adjacent tissues, such as muscle layer or subcutaneous fat space and were well delineated from normal structures. 3. In hernia, easy differentiation was made due to oval shape, poor or decreased echo pattern and protrustion from skin layer. Conclusively, in the doubtful cases of palpable mass in the abdominal wall, postoperative complications of sequele, such as accurately but also the guide of treatment. Ultrasonography of anterior abdominal wall is useful to demonstrate the exact location, extent of the lesions and to decrease the frequency of useless laparatomy

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  12. Computed tomographic diagnosis of abdominal abscess in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, J.P.; Berger, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-eight children suspected clinically of having an abdominal abscess were examined by CT. Eighteen had gallium 67 citrate scans and 22 had ultrasound studies. Computed tomography was found to be the most accurate test for diagnosis and evaluation of an abscess and the computed tomographic appearance of abscess is illustrated. However, because of cost factors, radiation dose, and clinical considerations, computed tomography is not always the first modality of choice in evaluating a suspected abdominal abscess [fr

  13. Robotically assisted velocity-sensitive triggered focused ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Florian; Brunner, Alexander; Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) of abdominal organs is challenging due to breathing motion and limited patient access in the MR environment. In this work, an experimental robotically assisted FUS setup was combined with a MR-based navigator technique to realize motion-compensated sonications and online temperature imaging. Experiments were carried out in a static phantom, during periodic manual motion of the phantom without triggering, and with triggering to evaluate the triggering method. In contrast to the non-triggered sonication, the results of the triggered sonication show a confined symmetric temperature distribution. In conclusion, the velocity sensitive navigator can be employed for triggered FUS to compensate for periodic motion. Combined with the robotic FUS setup, flexible treatment of abdominal targets might be realized.

  14. Serial fetal abdominal circumference measurements in predicting normal birth weight in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neff, Karl J

    2013-06-24

    To construct a clinical management matrix using serial fetal abdominal circumference measurements (ACMs) that will predict normal birth weight in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) and reduce unnecessary ultrasound examination in women with GDM.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening during transthoracic echocardiography in an unselected population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C. A. M.; Habets, Jos H. M.; Cheriex, E. C.; Palmans, Andrea; Pinto, Yigal; Hofstra, Leo; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the echocardiographic prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in an unselected group of patients referred for regular transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). METHODS: Prospectively, during a 3-month period, a limited ultrasound examination of the infrarenal

  16. Aferição simultânea da pressão abdominal na avaliação ultra-sonográfica de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço Intraabdominal pressure measurement during ultrasound assessment of female patients with stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Teixeira Brandt

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a influência da aferição da pressão intra-abdominal na avaliação ultra-sonográfica da junção uretrovesical (JUV e da uretra proximal (UP em pacientes com incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de corte transversal realizado na Unidade de Pesquisa em Incontinência Urinária da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, de janeiro de 2002 a janeiro de 2005. Trinta e seis pacientes com queixas de IUE foram submetidas a ultra-sonografia perineal para avaliação da JUV e da UP com a bexiga praticamente vazia (OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of intraabdominal pressure in the ultrasonographic evaluation of the urethrovesical junction (UVJ and proximal urethra (PU in patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted at the Urinary Incontinence Research Unit of "Universidade Federal de Pernambuco", Brazil, from January 2002 to January 2005. Perineal ultrasounds of the UVJ and PU were performed in thirty-six women complaining of SUI with the bladder virtually empty (< 50 ml; simultaneous measurement of the intraabdominal pressure was also performed. An ultrasound machine with a computer chip and a high-resolution photographic camera connected to a 7 MHz vaginal probe was used for the evaluation. In order to measure the intraabdominal pressure, an urodynamic equipment with a 10fr rectal catheter connected to a pressure sensitive balloon was used. RESULTS: The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean 46.4 ± 10.2 years. On Valsava maneuver, the intra-abdominal pressure ranged from 7 to 193 cmH2O (mean: 99.3 ± 51.8 cmH2O; median: 99.5 cmH2O. Eight out of 31 (25.8% patients with UVJ hypermobility had an intraabdominal pressure lower than 60 cmH2O. There was no statistically significant association between intraabdominal pressure and the ultrasound parameters studied. CONCLUSION: There is a specific

  17. Ultrasound In Diagnosis Of Herniae In Pregnancy: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 26-year old trader presented with abdominal pain with a four month old pregnancy and was diagnosed clinically, (wrongly of course) as a case of peptic ulcer in pregnancy, with co-existing uterine fibroid. Ultrasound scan (USS) revealed an incarcerated supra-umblical (anterior abdominal wall) hernia as the cause of her ...

  18. Are there sex differences in Fetal Abdominal Subcutaneous Tissue (FAST) measurements?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farah, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if Fetal Abdominal Subcutaneous Tissue (FAST) measurements using antenatal ultrasound differ between male and female fetuses. STUDY DESIGN: Women who had an ultrasound examination for fetal growth between 20 and 40 weeks gestation were studied. Women with diabetes mellitus were excluded. The fetal anterior abdominal subcutaneous tissue was measured on the anterior abdominal wall in millimetres anterior to the margins of the ribs, using magnification at the level of the abdominal circumference. The fetal sex was recorded after delivery. RESULTS: A total of 557 fetuses were measured, 290 male and 267 female. The FAST measurements increased with gestational age. The FAST increased at the same rate for both male and female fetuses and at any given week there was no sex difference. CONCLUSIONS: The increased fat composition in females reported after birth was not found in abdominal wall subcutaneous fat measurements using ultrasound during pregnancy. Antenatal centile charts for FAST do not need to be based on sex.

  19. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Abdominal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person’s anus. The large intestine is filled with barium, making signs of underlying problems show up more ... include the injection of a special dye, called contrast medium. The person will lie on a table ...

  1. Computational fluid dynamics using in vivo ultrasound blood flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Marie Sand; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model environment for construction of patient-specific computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models for the abdominal aorta (AA). Realistic pulsatile velocity waveforms are employed by using in vivo ultrasound blood flow measurements. Ultrasound is suitable for acquisition...

  2. Experience with the use of Ultrasound at Queen Elizabeth Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultrasound in 76% of cues. Burkitt s lymphoma accounted for 28% of these abdominal tumours. The. mOlt usual indication for ultrasound of the heart was for determining the cause of 70 patients had cardiomegaly on chat radiography; of these 42 had pericardia! effu- sions. 14 had constrictive pericarditis with fibrinous exu-.

  3. Bulky abdominal masses in pediatrics: iconographic essay; Massas abdominais volumosas em pediatria: ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fabiano; Faria, Andreia V.; Kluge, Patricia D.; Volpato, Ricardo G.; Santos, Sergio L.M. dos; Caserta, Nelson M.G. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas]. E-mail: fabiano97@bol.com.br

    2005-04-15

    The ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance findings of 19 patients with abdominal bulky masses diagnosed as hydronephrosis, Wilms' tumor, neuroblastoma, adrenal carcinoma, sarcoma, hemangioendothelioma, hepatoblastoma, mesenchymal hamartoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, choledochal cyst, splenic cyst, lymphoma, enteric cyst, teratoma, hydrometrocolpos and lipoma are presented. Imaging findings (including ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are important tools for the evaluation of abdominal masses in pediatric patients and can contribute to the diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of these diseases. (author)

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ... kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of trauma. ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alternate imaging techniques such as plain films, gastrointestinal (GI) contrast exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation ... and Media Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Colorectal ...

  8. Abdominal imaging in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Yuan Chunwang; Jia Cuiyu; Zhao Xuan; Zhang Tong; Ma Daqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate abdominal imaging in AIDS. Methods: The imaging examinations (including US, CT and MR) of 6 patients with AIDS associated abdominal foci were analysed retrospectively. All the cases were performed US, and CT scan, of which 4 performed enhanced CT scan and 1 with MR. Results: Abdominal tuberculosis were found in 4 patients, including abdominal lymph nodes tuberculosis (3 cases) and pancreatic tuberculosis (1 case). The imaging of lymph nodes tuberculosis typically showed enlarged peripheral tim enhancement with central low-attenuation on contrast-enhanced CT. Pancreatic tuberculosis demonstrated low-attenuation area in pancreatic head and slightly peripheral enhancement. Disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 1 case: CT and MRI scan demonstrated tumour infiltrated along hepatic portal vein and bronchovascular bundles. Pelvic tumor was observed in 1 case: CT scan showed large mass with thick and irregular wall and central low attenuation liquefacient necrotic area in the pelvic cavity. Conclusion: The imaging findings of AIDS with abdominal foci is extraordinarily helpful to the diagnosis of such disease. Tissue biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. (authors)

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  11. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Intra-Abdominal Bleeding Rate Using Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    for intra-abdominal bleeding are either impractical for field use (MRI/CT), non-specific (pulse, blood pressure) operator dependent (ultrasound/ DPL ...or invasive ( DPL ) Thus, EIT is a potentially highly sensitive and useful technique for detecting and monitoring intra- abdominal bleeding. The aim of

  12. Ultrasound in the management of thoracic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A

    2007-05-01

    Using simple and standardized semiology, the lung appears accessible to ultrasound, despite previous opinions otherwise. Lung ultrasound allows the intensivist to quickly answer to a majority of critical situations. Not only pleural effusion but also pneumothorax, alveolar consolidation, and interstitial syndrome will have accurate ultrasound equivalents, the recognition of which practically guides management. Combined with venous, cardiac, and abdominal examination, ultrasound investigation of this vital organ provides a transparent overview of the critically ill, a kind of stethoscope for a visual medicine. It is believed that by using this tool, the intensivist may more confidently manage acute dyspnea and make emergency therapeutic decisions based on reproducible data. Further benefits include reduced requirements for computed tomographic scans, therefore decreasing delay, irradiation, cost, and above all, discomfort to the patient. Thus, ultrasound of the lung can also be added to the classic armamentarium as a clinical tool for emergency use.

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the ... is specialized and is best performed by a technologist and physician with experience in vascular ultrasound imaging. top of page Additional Information and Resources ...

  19. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, E.G.; Doherty, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound was used as early as 1950 in attempts to detect malignant tumors within the human breast and brain. In the years following, however, little attention was paid to this method of imaging by the radiologic community. Extensive work with this technique was not begun until the 1960s, when bistable ultrasound enabled sonographers to display organ outlines for the first time. Prior to the development of bistable ultrasound, sonographic images were limited to A-mode displays, which were merely a series of amplitude spikes on a graph. Over the past 20 or so years, major advances in ultrasound technology have gradually taken us from the simple graphic A-mode display, through bistable organ outlines, to gray-scale images with excellent parenchymal detail, and finally to real-time ultrasound

  20. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that

  1. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, J.P.K.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author) [pt

  2. Diagnostic Value of Abdominal Ultrasonography in Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control of the cervical spine, ensuring adequate breathing and maintenance of the circulation with intravenous normal saline and blood transfusion when necessary. All patients studied had abdominal US done in the ultrasound scan room in the radiology department. A 3.5 MHz convex probe was used. DPL was performed ...

  3. Non-operative management of abdominal stab wounds -an analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with abdominal stab wounds presenting with peritonitis, haemodynamic instability, organ evisceration and high spinal cord injury underwent emergency laparotomy. No local wound exploration, diagnostic peritoneal lavage or ultrasound was used. Haematuria in patients without an indication for emergency surgery ...

  4. Dissecção espontânea da aorta abdominal infrarrenal Spontaneous dissection of the infrarenal aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otacílio de Camargo Junior

    2012-09-01

    , nuclear magnetic resonance and angiography, with a high suspicious index. We describe two cases of spontaneous rupture of the infrarenal aorta that were treated surgically. We report two cases of patients who were admitted to the emergency room of Celso Pierro Hospital with infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection and were treated by the vascular surgery group. They have presented sudden abdominal pain, no signs of peritoneal irritation and pulses were presents and simmetrics in physical examination The two patients during the examination were hypertensive and the ultrasound showed abnormal compliance of the abdominal aorta who were treated surgically. One patient was treated surgically with dissected plaque endarterectomy of infrarenal abdominal aorta of 2.2 cm in diameter and 2.0 cm in length. The other patient underwent revascularization of the abdominal aorta with bi-iliac Dacron graft 16 × 8 mm due to distal abdominal aortic dissection. Both patients had good postoperative evolution and they were discharged in good general condition.

  5. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into the body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then gently presses the transducer against ... performed on an infant, a nurse or radiologic technologist may assist with keeping the ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most ...

  6. Diagnostic performance of ultrasound in acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alejandro Ortega

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: acute appendicitis (AA is the acute surgical abdominal disease more common in the Hospital Susana López de Valencia Popayán, Colombia; its diagnosis is one of the most common problems in emergency. Objective: to determined the operating performance of emergency ultrasound in suspected acute appendicitis. Methods: retrospective study conducted with data obtained from the first of January to 31 December 2011, including patients with presumed diagnosis of AA and abdominal ultrasound before surgery. Results: a total of 134 individuals who underwent surgery, with pre-procedure ultrasound report and pathology report. The performance of ultrasound resulted in a sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity 86.3%, positive predictive value of 96.4%, negative predictive value of 38.7%. Conclusion: the overall performance of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in our hospital is acceptable. But its usefulness is poor in excluding the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Because of its accessibility and low cost is the best test available for diagnosis in doubtful cases in emergency or difficult diagnosis.

  7. [Ultrasound findings in rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Galván-Talamantes, Yazmin; Meza-Ayala, Cynthia Margarita; Cruz-Santana, Julio Alberto; Bonilla-Reséndiz, Luis Ignacio

    Rhabdomyolysis is defined as skeletal muscle necrosis. Ultrasound assessment has recently become a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of muscle diseases, including rhabdomyolysis. A case is presented on the ultrasound findings in a patient with rhabdomyolysis. To highlight the importance of ultrasound as an essential part in the diagnosis in rhabdomyolysis, to describe the ultrasound findings, and review the literature. A 30 year-old with post-traumatic rhabdomyolysis of both thighs. Ultrasound was performed using a Philips Sparq model with a high-frequency linear transducer (5-10MHz), in low-dimensional scanning mode (2D), in longitudinal and transverse sections at the level of both thighs. The images obtained showed disorganisation of the orientation of the muscle fibres, ground glass image, thickening of the muscular fascia, and the presence of anechoic areas. Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal imaging findings in gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicek, Kristina T; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; De Petris, Giovanni D; Johnson, C Daniel

    2015-02-01

    To describe the abdominal imaging findings of patients with gastrointestinal Basidiobolus ranarum infection. A literature search was performed to compile the abdominal imaging findings of all reported worldwide cases of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB). In addition, a retrospective review at our institution was performed to identify GIB cases that had imaging findings. A radiologist aware of the diagnosis reviewed the imaging findings in detail. Additional information was obtained from the medical records. A total of 73 GIB cases have been published in the medical literature. The most common abdominal imaging findings were masses in the colon, the liver, or multiple sites and bowel wall thickening. Initially, many patients were considered to have either a neoplasm or Crohn disease. We identified 7 proven cases of GIB at our institution, of which 4 had imaging studies (4 computed tomography [CT] examinations, 4 abdominal radiographs, and an upper gastrointestinal study). Imaging studies showed abnormalities in all 4 cases. Three-fourths of our study patients had an abdominal mass at CT. Two of 3 masses involved the kidneys and included urinary obstruction. All masses showed an inflammatory component with adjacent soft tissue stranding, with or without abscess formation. Radiologists should consider GIB when a patient from an arid climate presents with abdominal pain, weight loss, and an inflammatory abdominal mass on CT. Abdominal masses of the colon or liver, bowel wall thickening, and abscesses are the most common imaging findings.

  9. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome are causes of morbidity and mortality in critical care patients. Timely diagnosis and treatment may improve organ functions. Intra-abdominal pressure monitoring is vital during evaluation of the patients and in the management algorithms. The incidence, definition and risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome were reviewed here.

  10. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs  5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  13. Transvaginal ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding and menstrual problems Certain types of infertility Ectopic pregnancy Pelvic pain Transvaginal ultrasound is also used during ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's ( ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a nodule found during a rectal exam, detect abnormalities, and determine whether the gland is enlarged. Ultrasound ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  1. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... both sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... performed to detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal discomfort. If no biopsy is ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a more in-depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ... ask for your child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. top ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable ... biopsy is planned. An enema may be taken two to four hours before the ultrasound to clean ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have had the tail end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery ... or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... These exams are frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and ... identify and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries in planes that ... a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted ... you at the conclusion of your examination. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  12. Thyroid ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid physiology and diagnostic evaluation of patients with thyroid disorders. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. ... Thyroid Tests Read more Ultrasound ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... to investigate a nodule found during a rectal exam, detect abnormalities, and determine whether the gland is ... a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically requires insertion of an ultrasound probe into ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...