WorldWideScience

Sample records for abdominal pain syndrome

  1. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome.

  2. Cauda equina syndrome presenting as abdominal pain: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-09-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is an uncommon entity. Symptoms include bowel and bladder dysfunction, saddle anesthesia, and varying degrees of lower limb motor and sensory disturbances. The consequences of delayed diagnosis can be devastating, resulting in bowel and bladder incontinence and lower limb paralysis. There is little in literature regarding abdominal pain as a significant feature of the initial presentation of CES. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman with CES who presented to the emergency department with gradually worsening lower abdominal pain.

  3. [Cyriax's syndrome. A cause of diagnostic error in abdominal pains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, J L; Pierrugues, R; Bories, P; Michel, H

    The slipping rib syndrome is characterized by upper abdominal pain due to irritation of the intercostal nerve by incomplete dislocation of the costal cartilage of the 8th, 9th, or 10th ribs. Twenty-three new cases are reported and the literature is reviewed. Diagnosis is only clinical. The pain is precipitated by movement and certain postures; it is faithfully reproduced by pressure on one particular point of the costal margin and is relieved by local injection of an anaesthetic. Pain from a slipping rib is usually attributed to visceral causes, which is a source of diagnostic errors.

  4. Abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is does not always reflect the seriousness ...

  5. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management.

  6. Recurrent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recurrent abdominal pain continues to be one of the most ubiquitous conditions faced by the healthcare team, and has a significant emotional and economic impact. We have moved from considering it a psychological condition to recognizing the physiological and environmental contributions, and consider...

  7. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  9. Investigation of psychological traits in patients with chronic abdominal pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tokareva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects of the study were 100 chronic abdominal pain syndrome inpatients assigned to subgroups of different level of significance of psychological factors for the development of pain syndrome, different self-assessed pain level (utilizing visual analog scale, and different type of attitude towards disease (by the Bekhterev Institute Personality Inventory. Character and psychodynamic specialties were assessed in the aforementioned subgroups following to assignment. Proved by clinical and psychometric methods diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder was used as an indicator of high importance of psychological determinants. Differences between subgroups were assessed by the kit of questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger Anxiety Scales, Wasserman Social Frustration Inventory, TAS, MCMI-III and projective tests (Luscher and Szondi tests. Interference between psychosomatic and demographic characteristics within the sample, and accuracy of assigning subjects to subgroups were discussed. Interpretation of the acquired data with implications for psychotherapists was offered.

  10. Gut-directed hypnotherapy in children with irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain (syndrome): A randomized controlled trial on self exercises at home using CD versus individual therapy by qualified therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.T.M. Rutten (Juliette); A.M. Vlieger (Arine M.); C. Frankenhuis (Carla); E.K. George (Elvira K.); M. Groeneweg (Michael); O.F. Norbruis (Obbe); W.E. Tjon A ten; H. Van Wering (Herbert); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); M.P. Merkus; M.A. Benninga (Marc)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (syndrome) (FAP(S)) are common pediatric disorders, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain. Treatment is challenging, especially in children with persisting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT)

  11. Acute abdominal pain in a man with Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian, M; Nedooshan, J J; Rafat, S; Rafie, R; Rafiei, M; Moghadam, R N

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis or emboli have rarely been reported in Cushing syndrome (CS). Here we describe the first case of mesenteric ischaemia secondary to ventricular emboli in a patient with CS. Laboratory evaluation showed increased fibrinogen and factor VIII. Previous studies showed that venous thromboembolism (VTE) increases in CS. This case for the first time described arterial system thrombosis and emboli in a patient with adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent CS.

  12. Gastrointestinal causes of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsicano, Elizabeth; Vuong, Giao Michael; Prather, Charlene M

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal causes of abdominal pain are numerous. These causes are reviewed in brief here, divided into 2 categories: acute abdominal pain and chronic abdominal pain. They are further subcategorized by location of pain as it pertains to the abdomen.

  13. Mobile Right Colon Syndrome: Obscure Cause of Lower Right Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bains

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context The mobile right colon is a developmental aberration. During the development and rotation of the gut, the cecum and ascending colon are the last to take their final position and fuse with the posterior abdominal wall. Evidence Acquisition Though a mobile right colon may be present in 20% - 30% of the population but causes symptoms in very few. The patients present intermittent colicky right lower quadrant abdominal pain with associated abdominal distention and symptomatic relief after passing flatus or having a bowel movement. Results Non fixation along with heavy load of the right colon drags the cecum and ascending colon down and leads to stasis, obstruction or volvulus. The diagnosis of this entity is very difficult as radiological studies are not conclusive. Conclusions The mobile colon syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right lower quadrant pain from obscure causes. A proper detailed history is a must to consider this as differential diagnosis. Laparoscopy offers diagnostic and therapeutic treatment. Colopexy provides dramatic relief in carefully selected patients.

  14. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  15. Churg-Strauss Syndrome Leading to Small Bowel Infarction: An Unusual Case of Abdominal Pain in a Young Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sookram

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man with a history of severe asthma presented to the emergency department with a week-long history of severe unrelenting abdominal pain, nausea and decreased appetite. He was admitted to hospital, and routine gastrointestinal investigations were performed, which did not elucidate the cause of his abdominal pain. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated patchy infarction of the entire small bowel, characteristic of Churg-Strauss syndrome. The patient subsequently underwent 12 separate laparotomies to salvage surviving small bowel. The patient is maintained on total parenteral nutrition.

  16. Pain symptoms and stooling patterns do not drive diagnostic costs for children with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in primary or tertiary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to (1) compare the cost of medical evaluation for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome brought to a pediatric gastroenterologist versus children who remained in the care of their pediatrician, (2) compare symptom characteristics for th...

  17. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  18. HRV biofeedback for pediatric irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain: a clinical replication series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mark J; Guiles, Robert A F; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and Functional Abdominal Pain (FAP) are among the most commonly reported Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Both have been associated with varying autonomic dysregulation. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) has recently begun to show efficacy in the treatment of both IBS and FAP. The purpose of this multiple clinical replication series was to analyze the clinical outcomes of utilizing HRVB in a clinical setting. Archival data of twenty-seven consecutive pediatric outpatients diagnosed with IBS or FAP who received HRVB were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were self-report and categorized as full or remission with patient satisfaction, or no improvement. Qualitative reports of patient experiences were also noted. Full remission was achieved by 69.2 % and partial remission was achieved by 30.8 % of IBS patients. Full remission was achieved by 63.6 % and partial remission was achieved by 36.4 % of FAP patients. No patients in either group did not improve to a level of patient satisfaction or >50 %. Patient's commonly reported feeling validated in their discomfort as a result of psychophysiological education. Results suggest that HRVB is a promising intervention for pediatric outpatients with IBS or FAP. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to accurately determine clinical efficacy of HRVB in the treatment of IBS and FAP.

  19. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  20. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  1. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation.

  2. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov V.А.; Sokolov V.А.

    2013-01-01

    We considered one of the most complicated problems of surgery and intensive care — abdominal compartment syndrome. It is a severe, and in some cases lethal complication developing in major injuries and pathology of abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space, as well as in extra-abdominal pathology. In addition, compartment syndrome can be the complication of a number of surgical procedures accompanied primarily by laparotomy wound closure with tissue tension. We demonstrated the classificatio...

  3. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome are causes of morbidity and mortality in critical care patients. Timely diagnosis and treatment may improve organ functions. Intra-abdominal pressure monitoring is vital during evaluation of the patients and in the management algorithms. The incidence, definition and risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome were reviewed here.

  4. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-02

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain.

  5. Negative correlation of cortical thickness with the severity and duration of abdominal pain in Asian women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chian Sem; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Shiao, Chen-Yu; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Cheng, Chiao-Wen; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Chiu, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Jung-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) manifests as chronic abdominal pain. One pathophysiological theory states that the brain-gut axis is responsible for pain control in the intestine. Although several studies have discussed the structural changes in the brain of IBS patients, most of these studies have been conducted in Western populations. Different cultures and sexes experience different pain sensations and have different pain responses. Accordingly, we aimed to identify the specific changes in the cortical thickness of Asian women with IBS and to compare these data to those of non-Asian women with IBS. Thirty Asian female IBS patients (IBS group) and 39 healthy individuals (control group) were included in this study. Brain structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed. We used FreeSurfer to analyze the differences in the cortical thickness and their correlations with patient characteristics. The left cuneus, left rostral middle frontal cortex, left supramarginal cortex, right caudal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral insula exhibited cortical thinning in the IBS group compared with those in the controls. Furthermore, the brain cortical thickness correlated negatively the severity as well as duration of abdominal pain. Some of our findings differ from those of Western studies. In our study, all of the significant brain regions in the IBS group exhibited cortical thinning compared with those in the controls. The differences in cortical thickness between the IBS patients and controls may provide useful information to facilitate regulating abdominal pain in IBS patients. These findings offer insights into the association of different cultures and sexes with differences in cortical thinning in patients with IBS.

  6. Abdominal epilepsy in chronic recurrent abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Y Kshirsagar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal epilepsy (AE is an uncommon cause for chronic recurrent abdominal pain in children and adults. It is characterized by paroxysmal episode of abdominal pain, diverse abdominal complaints, definite electroencephalogram (EEG abnormalities and favorable response to the introduction of anti-epileptic drugs (AED. We studied 150 children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain and after exclusion of more common etiologies for the presenting complaints; workup proceeded with an EEG. We found 111 (74% children with an abnormal EEG and 39 (26% children with normal EEG. All children were subjected to AED (Oxcarbazepine and 139 (92% children responded to AED out of which 111 (74% children had an abnormal EEG and 27 (18% had a normal EEG. On further follow-up the patients were symptom free, which helped us to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Context: Recurrent chronic abdominal pain is a common problem encountered by pediatricians. Variety of investigations are done to come to a diagnosis but a cause is rarely found. In such children diagnosis of AE should be considered and an EEG will confirm the diagnosis and treated with AED. Aims: To find the incidence of AE in children presenting with chronic recurrent abdominal pain and to correlate EEG findings and their clinical response to empirical AEDs in both cases and control. Settings and Design: Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences University, Karad, Maharashtra, India. Prospective analytical study. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain were studied by investigations to rule out common causes of abdominal pain and an EEG. All children were then started with AED oxycarbamezepine and their response to the treatment was noted. Results: 111 (74% of the total 150 children showed a positive EEG change suggestive of epileptogenic activity and of which 75 (67.56% were females and 36 (32.43% were male, majority of children were in the age of group of 9

  7. Family history of irritable bowel syndrome is the major determinant of persistent abdominal complaints in young adults with a history of pediatric recurrent abdominal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Pace; Giovanna Zuin; Stefania Di Giacomo; Paola Molteni; Valentina Casini; Massimo Fontana; Gabriele Bianchi Porro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the late outcome of teen-agers with a previous history of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS: A group of 67 children with RAP referred to the department from January 1986 to December 1995was followed up between 5 and 13 years after the initial diagnosis by means of a structured telephone interview.We hypothesized that those patients with persistent adult IBS-like symptoms would be significantly more likely to report a family history of IBS in comparison with adults with no persistent abdominal complaint.RESULTS: Out of the 52 trackable subjects, 15 were found to present IBS-like symptoms at follow-up (29%)whereas the majority (37 subjects) did not. Subjects with IBS-like symptoms were almost three times more likely to present at least one sibling with similar symptoms compared to subjects not complaining (40.0% vs 16.0%), respectively (P < 0.05 at Student t test).Subjects with IBS-like symptoms also reported a higher prevalence of extra-intestinal symptoms, such as back pain, fibromyalgia, headache, fatigue and sleep disturbances.CONCLUSION: The study confirms previous observations indicating that pediatric RAP can predict later development of IBS. The latter appears to be greatly influenced by intrafamilial aggregation of symptoms,possibly through the learning of a specific illness behavior.

  8. Abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a review of putative psychological, neural and neuro-immune mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of great clinical significance in several areas of medicine. In many cases no organic cause can be established resulting in the classification as functional gastrointestinal disorder. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most common of these conditions and is considered an important public health problem because it can be disabling and constitutes a major social and economic burden given the lack of effective treatments. IBS aetiology is most likely multi-factorial involving biological, psychological and social factors. Visceral hyperalgesia (or hypersensitivity) and visceral hypervigilance, which could be mediated by peripheral, spinal, and/or central pathways, constitute key concepts in current research on pathophysiological mechanisms of visceral hyperalgesia. The role of central nervous system mechanisms along the "brain-gut axis" is increasingly appreciated, owing to accumulating evidence from brain imaging studies that neural processing of visceral stimuli is altered in IBS together with long-standing knowledge regarding the contribution of stress and negative emotions to symptom frequency and severity. At the same time, there is also growing evidence suggesting that peripheral immune mechanisms and disturbed neuro-immune communication could play a role in the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia. This review presents recent advances in research on the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia in IBS, with a focus on the role of stress and anxiety in central and peripheral response to visceral pain stimuli. Together, these findings support that in addition to lower pain thresholds displayed by a significant proportion of patients, the evaluation of pain appears to be altered in IBS. This may be attributable to affective disturbances, negative emotions in anticipation of or during visceral stimulation, and altered pain-related expectations and learning processes. Disturbed "top-down" emotional and cognitive pain

  9. Symptom-association probability between meal ingestion and abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Does somatization play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsiè, E; Coletta, M; Cesana, B M; Basilisco, G

    2015-03-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) complain of postprandial abdominal pain, but it is still unknown how much of this association is due to chance. Somatization enhances the perception of symptoms after a meal. We assessed: (i) the proportion of meal-related pain periods and the symptom-association probability (SAP) between the two variables in IBS patients; and (ii) how this association is affected by somatization. Seventy IBS patients recorded the times of meals and abdominal pain in a 10-day diary card. The proportion of postmeal pain periods was calculated in relation to the total number of 90-min periods with pain. Fisher's exact test was used to calculate the probability (p) of an association within a time window of 90 min, and the SAP was calculated as (1 - p) × 100%. The IBS Symptom Severity Scale, the SCL90-R for psychological symptoms, and the SF-36 for the quality of life were completed. The proportion of postmeal pain periods was 42 ± 27%. SAP was significant (p ingestion and abdominal pain. Meal ingestion and abdominal pain are significantly associated in 45% of IBS patients. Somatization influences IBS severity and the patients' quality of life, but not the strength of the association between eating and pain. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Abdominal pain syndrome and quality of life in patients with cholelithiasis after cholecystectomy during a 10-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Yu V; Litvinova, N V; Osipenko, M F; Voloshina, N B

    To estimate the incidence of abdominal pain syndrome (APS) and to assess quality of life (QOL) in patients within 10 years after cholecystectomy (CE). This investigation is part of a long-term prospective follow-up study of patients after CE for cholelithiasis (CL). It enrolled 145 people: 30 (21.5%) patients with baseline asymptomatic CL and 115 (80.7%) with its clinical manifestations. The time course of changes in APS and QOL were analyzed. Over 10 years, all the patients showed a decrease in the incidence of APS from 84.1% (n=95) to 66.4% (n=75; p=0.004). In Group 1 (n=89), APS was at baseline detected in all the patients; 10 years later, its incidence declined to 67.4% (n=60; p < 0.001). Biliary pains were predominant; these had been identified significantly less frequently over the 10-year period in 47 (52.8%) patients; p<0.001). In Group 2 (n=24), pre-CE APS was generally detected in 6 (25%) patients; following 10 years, the incidence rates of pain significantly increased to 62.5% (n=15; p=0.035), among which there were predominant biliary pains (in 54.2%; p<0.001) and dyspepsia from 33.3% (n=8) up to 66.7% (n=16; p=0.039). QOL in the physical and mental health domains was found to decrease in both groups. Ten years after CE, the group with the baseline clinical manifestations of CL and poorer QOL showed a lower incidence of APS mainly due to the reduced incidence of biliary pains and the baseline asymptomatic group exhibited a rise in the incidence of APS due to the appearance of biliary pains and dyspepsia.

  11. Chronic Abdominal Pain in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F.M. Gijsbers (Carolien)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRecurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was first defined in 1958 by Apley as “at least 3 bouts of pain, severe enough to affect activities, over a period of at least 3 months” (1). This was a landmark publication with great impact, showing, that emotional disturbances played a role in many patie

  12. Recurrent abdominal pain: when an epileptic seizure should be suspected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franzon Renata C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain are common in childhood. Among the diagnostic possibilities are migraine and abdominal epilepsy (AE. AE is an infrequent syndrome with paroxystic episodes of abdominal pain, awareness disturbance, EEG abnormalities and positive results with the introduction of antiepileptic drugs. We present one 6 year-old girl who had short episodes of abdominal pain since the age of 4. The pain was followed by cry, fear and occasionally secondary generalization. MRI showed tumor in the left temporal region. As a differential diagnosis, we report a 10 year-old boy who had long episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by blurring of vision, vertigo, gait ataxia, dysarthria, acroparesthesias and vomiting. He received the diagnosis of basilar migraine. In our opinion, AE is part of a large group (partial epilepsies and does not require a special classification. Pediatric neurologists must be aware of these two entities that may cause abdominal pain.

  13. Acupuncture Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金生

    2002-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Li, a university student aged 23 years, paid his first visit on July 16, 2001, with the chief complaint of abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated that one day before when it happened to be the weekend, he got abdominal pain after supper, which went worse gradually and caused him to roll all over in bed. The pain was slightly alleviated half an hour later after he had taken some pain killers. Upon inquiry, the patient said that because of their newly graduation from the university, he and his classmates were so excited that they went to have a sumptuous lunch with alcoholic drinks. And in the evening he ate again a delicious supper cooked for him by his mother, after which he continued to have some fruit and dessert.

  14. Randomised clinical trial: otilonium bromide improves frequency of abdominal pain, severity of distention and time to relapse in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavé, P; Acalovschi, M; Triantafillidis, J K; Uspensky, Y P; Kalayci, C; Shee, V; Tack, J

    2011-08-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic agent that blocks L-Type Calcium channels in human colonic smooth muscle. To study the efficacy of OB in symptom control in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 356 patients (46.16±19years, 71% female) with IBS participated in a double-blind, randomised, parallel placebo-controlled phase IV study. OB (40mg t.d.s.) or placebo was administered for 15weeks, and follow-up was extended 10 additional weeks. Otilonium bromide (n=179) and placebo (n=177) groups had comparable demographics, symptom severity and IBS subtype. Both OB and placebo reduced abdominal pain and IBS symptoms. The effect of OB was significantly greater than placebo in the reduction of weekly frequency of episodes of abdominal pain at the end of treatment period (primary endpoint, -0.90±0.88 vs. -0.65±0.91, P=0.03), reduction of abdominal bloating (-1.2±1.2 vs. -0.9±1.1, P=0.02) and global efficacy by patient assessment (1.3±1.1 vs. 1.0±1.1, P=0.047). Intensity of abdominal pain, proportion of patient responders, safety and quality of life scores were similarly affected by OB and placebo. During follow-up, the therapeutic effect of OB remained greater than placebo in terms of withdrawal rate due to symptom relapse (10% vs. 27%, P=0.009), global efficacy of treatment and relapse-free probability (P=0.038). This placebo-controlled double-blind study shows that otilonium bromide is safe, well tolerated and superior to placebo in reducing the frequency of abdominal pain, severity of abdominal bloating and protecting from symptom relapse in IBS. These results further confirm that patients with IBS can improve during and following treatment with otilonium bromide. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  16. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  17. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is associated with trait anxiety in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAP and IBS affect 10-15% of school age children and bear many physiological similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress and increased GI permeability later in life...

  18. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Education & Resource Center GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist Video and ... Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Podcasts and ...

  19. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... belly Has had a recent injury to the abdomen Is having trouble breathing Call your provider if ...

  20. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous, and not associated with fever or diarrhea. The physical examination and the results of conventional blood tests were normal. The patient was treated with intravenous ketoprofen, metoclopramide, and ranitidine, obtaining a prompt relief of symptoms. She had a history of similar episodes in the last 15 years, with several ED visits, blood test examinations, ultrasonography of the abdomen, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies. Celiac disease, porphyry, sickle cell disease, and inflammatory bowel disease were all excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted to the ED with abdominal pain, especially when the attacks are recurrent and no alternative diagnosis can be clearly established.

  1. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  2. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Phillip D; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    With an aging population, emergency department clinicians can expect an increase in geriatric patients presenting with abdominal pain. Compared with younger patients, this patient population is less likely to present with classic symptoms, physical examination findings, and laboratory values of abdominal disease. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with elderly patients presenting with abdominal pathologic conditions are significant. For this reason, the clinician must be familiar with some subtle and not so subtle differences when caring for the geriatric patient with abdominal pain to ensure timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  3. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  4. Safety of early pain relief for acute abdominal pain.

    OpenAIRE

    Attard, A.R.; Corlett, M. J.; Kidner, N. J.; Leslie, A. P.; Fraser, I. A.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(a) to determine the efficacy of papaveretum in treating pain when administered early to patients presenting with acute abdominal pain and (b) to assess its effect on subsequent diagnosis and management. DESIGN--Prospective, randomised, placebo controlled study. SETTING--Walsgrave Hospital, Coventry. SUBJECTS--100 consecutive patients with clinically significant abdominal pain who were admitted as emergencies to a surgical firm. INTERVENTIONS--Intramuscular injection of up to 20 m...

  5. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome due to OHSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Veisi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal compartment syndrome is a dangerous clinical situation, usually following abdominal injuries&operations. It is seldom observed in patients with gynecologic and obstetric problems. Abdominalcompartment syndrome may be consequence ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. A 28-year-old womanpresented as a sever ovarian hyperstimulation.The increased IAP indicated that OHSS may beconsidered a compartment syndrome. Abdominal compartment syndrome needs laparotomy orparacentesis for reduction of pressure.

  6. Methyl-orvinol-Dual activity opioid receptor ligand inhibits gastrointestinal transit and alleviates abdominal pain in the mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Marta; Jarmuż, Agata; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Husbands, Stephen; Fichna, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The major IBS-D symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain and discomfort. High density of opioid receptors (ORs) in the GI tract and their participation in the maintenance of GI homeostasis make ORs ligands an attractive option for developing new anti-IBS-D treatments. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of methyl-orvinol on the GI motility and secretion and in mouse models mimicking symptoms of IBS-D. In vitro, the effects of methyl-orvinol on electrical field stimulated smooth muscle contractility and epithelial ion transport were characterized in the mouse colon. In vivo, the following tests were used to determine methyl-orvinol effect on mouse GI motility: colonic bead expulsion, whole GI transit and fecal pellet output. An antinociceptive action of methyl-orvinol was assessed in the mouse model of visceral pain induced by mustard oil. Methyl-orvinol (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) inhibited colonic smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist) and β-funaltrexamine (selective MOP antagonist). Experiments with a selective KOP receptor agonist, U50488 revealed that methyl-orvinol is a KOP receptor antagonist in the GI tract. Methyl-orvinol enhanced epithelial ion transport. In vivo, methyl-orvinol inhibited colonic bead expulsion and prolonged GI transit. Methyl-orvinol improved hypermotility and reduced abdominal pain in the mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Methyl-orvinol could become a promising drug candidate in chronic therapy of functional GI diseases such as IBS-D. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children: Causes and Development Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Romanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain syndrome in children at prehospital care units is vital and urgent problem which requires solution. Unfortunately, embarrassing mistakes are still followed by late or inadequate treatment and complications as a result. The problem solution requires both medical stuff alert and diagnosis algorithm revision and improvement. Improvement of technical equipment and availability of instrumental diagnostic methods at the out-hospital settings is a pressing need. The article provides a classification, detailed pathogenesis, and clinical presentation of acute abdominal pain in children under different nosologies (therapeutic and surgical. We considered the problem of adequate differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in children when the diagnostics is performed by primary care physicians and specialists of emergency medical services at the prehospital stage.

  8. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that surgeo

  9. Childhood abdominal pain in primary care : design and patient selection of the HONEUR abdominal pain cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Leo A A; van den Hurk, Arjan P J M; van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Benninga, Marc A; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Passchier, Jan; Berger, Marjolein Y

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood abdominal pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood abdomina

  10. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  11. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or hands. Central pain syndrome often begins shortly after the causative injury or damage, but may be delayed by months or even years, especially if it is related to post-stroke pain. × Definition Central pain syndrome is a neurological ...

  12. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  13. [Rome III classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children with chronic abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocek, Anna; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    The updated Rome III Classification of paediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) associated with abdominal pain comprises: functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain (FAP), functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS). To assess the value of the Rome criteria in identifying FGIDs in children with chronic abdominal pain. The study group consisted of 439 consecutive paediatric patients (192 boys and 247 girls) aged 4-18 years (mean age was 11.95 +/- 3.89 years) referred to the Paediatric Gastroenterology Department at Medical University of Lodz from January 2008 to June 2009 for evaluation of abdominal pain of at least 2 months' duration. After exclusion of organic disease children suspected of functional chronic abdominal pain were categorized with the use of Rome III criteria of FGIDs associated with abdominal pain (H2a-H2d1) and the Questionnaire on Paediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms (with the permission of doctor L. S. Walker). The patients with known nonabdominal organic disease, chronic illness or handicap were excluded. In 161 patients (36.58%) organic etiology was confirmed. Of the 278 children (63.42%) with functional chronic abdominal pain, 228 (82.02%) met the Rome III criteria for FGIDs associated with abdominal pain (FD, 15.5%; IBS, 21.6%; abdominal migraine, 5%; FAP 24.5%; FAPS, 15.9%). Fifty cases (17.98%) did not fulfill the criteria for subtypes of abdominal pain-related FGIDs--mainly due to different as defined by Rome III criteria (at least once per week) frequency of symptom presentation. (1) In the authors'investigations FGIDs was the most frequent cause of chronic abdominal pain in children. (2) The significant number of children with nonclassified FGIDs implies the need to modify the diagnostic criteria of Rome III classification concerning the prevalence of symptoms.

  14. Abdominal pain: a synthesis of recommendations for its correct management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Tirotta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain represents one of the most important diagnostic challenges for any physician and its correct interpretation and management require a proper systematic approach and sometimes an urgent action. Moreover the guidelines that can be referred to for indications about the most adequate management procedures are few and often focused only on radiologic management. Consequently, the approach to abdominal pain is often empirical. Therefore, we propose a review of the literature on the diagnosis of abdominal pain, which may contribute to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this complex condition through a systematic review of the evidences available in this field. As to our methodology, we conducted an extensive search in the main guideline databases (SIGN, ICSI, NICE, National Guideline Cleringhouse, CMA Infobase, NZ Guidelines Group, National System Guidelines, Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal, eGuidelines, using as key words abdominal pain and abdominalgia. The guidelines were assessed according to the 2010 Italian version of the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II methodology. Afterwards we formulated our main recommendations associated with the corresponding levels of evidence and focused our attention on some grey areas, which we investigated with further research using Medline and the main systematic review databases (Cochrane database. The four main grey areas investigated were: hospital admission criteria, prognostic stratification, need for analgesic treatment and possibility of attributing abdominalgia to an abdominal pain syndrome. We then formulated our consesus-based recommendations on the grey areas. Abdominal pain management remains a complex issue for internists. As with other diagnostic challenges, it would be advisable to develop additional guidelines based on a multidisciplinary approach and not only focused on radiological management.

  15. [Myofascial pain syndrome--fascial muscle pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Juhani; Ojala, Tuula; Arokoski, Jari P A

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome, i.e. fascial muscle pain may occur in several areas of the body, particularly in the neck-shoulder region. The muscle pain symptom in the neck-shoulder region is commonly termed tension neck pain or nonspecific neck pain, but myofascial pain syndrome can also be distinguished into its own diagnosis. This review deals with the clinical picture of myofascial pain syndrome along with pathophysiological hypotheses and treatment options.

  16. Abdominal compartment syndrome. Interesting aspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Rubio Silveira

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of the abdominal compartiment syndrome is still a controversial point nowadays. Its early diagnosis and treatment constitute a challenge for surgeons and physicians at the intensive care unit who have to face these cases . The physiopathologic changes that can occur can lead to the patients death, constituting pulmonary thromboembolism and multiorgan failure the principal causes of death. This paper presents the principal clinical parameters and technical procedures for its diagnosis and treatment with the aim of diminishing its morbi-mortality raits in our hospitals

  17. A New Etiology for the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: Pseudomyxoma Peritonei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Sabbagh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP is a rare diagnosis with an incidence of 1-2 per million. Most cases originate from an appendix which ruptures and releases mucin into the peritoneal cavity. The progression of the disease results in obstruction and cutaneous leak. Abdominal compartment syndrome is an uncommon complication of peritoneal pseudomyxoma. In the present article, we report the case of a patient with PMP and abdominal compartment syndrome. A laparotomy to decrease the abdominal pressure was performed. Three months later, a peritonectomy with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed. The patient was still alive 1 year after the procedure without any recurrence. In conclusion, acute abdominal pain and respiratory failure in patients with peritoneal PMP should lead to the measurement of the abdominal pressure but are not a contra indication for curative treatment of PMP.

  18. Unusual Differential Diagnosis of Upper Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanthaler Monika

    2009-01-01

    The peculiarity of this case is the rarity of toothpick ingestion and gastric perforation in a young and healthy white Caucasian followed by development of a liver abscess after primary uneventful endoscopic removal. In light of this case, gastric perforation due to ingested foreign bodies such as toothpicks can be considered a rare cause of upper abdominal pain.

  19. abdominal pain in adult sickle cell disease patients: a nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: Abdominal pain is a relatively frequent occurrence in sickle cell disease. The aetiology of abdominal pain in sickle cell disease is often ..... A59_9-en.pdf. 4. Ahmed S ... Research Clinical Gastroenterology. 2005;.

  20. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain may interfere with school attendance, participation in sports and other extra-curricular activities. Infrequently, it may affect appetite and sleep. The changes in the daily routine may affect the child’s mood and emotions, and in turn cause depression and anxiety. Screening/ ...

  1. Management of severe lower abdominal or inguinal pain in high-performance athletes. PAIN (Performing Athletes with Abdominal or Inguinal Neuromuscular Pain Study Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, W C; Foley, D P; Garrett, W E; Lohnes, J H; Mandlebaum, B R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the pathophysiologic processes of severe lower-abdominal or inguinal pain in high-performance athletes. We evaluated 276 patients; 175 underwent pelvic floor repairs. Of the 157 athletes who had not undergone previous surgery, 124 (79%) participated at a professional or other highly competitive level, and 138 patients (88%) had adductor pain that accompanied the lower-abdominal or inguinal pain. More patients underwent related adductor releases during the later operative period in the series. Evaluation revealed 38 other abnormalities, including severe hip problems and malignancies. There were 152 athletes (97%) who returned to previous levels of performance. The syndrome was uncommon in women and the results were less predictable in nonathletes. A distinct syndrome of lower-abdominal/adductor pain in male athletes appears correctable by a procedure designed to strengthen the anterior pelvic floor. The location and pattern of pain and the operative success suggest the cause to be a combination of abdominal hyperextension and thigh hyperabduction, with the pivot point being the pubic symphysis. Diagnosis of "athletic pubalgia" and surgery should be limited to a select group of high-performance athletes. The consideration of other causes of groin pain in the patient is critical.

  2. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: leandrocleite@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Departmento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2016-07-15

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  3. Mesenteric Fibromatosis: A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethune, R; Amin, A

    2006-01-01

    A 45-year-old man, with a previous history of astrocytoma, presented with diffuse abdominal pain. A CT scan was non-specific and the pain worsened; his abdomen became peritonitic on examination. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, and a large small bowel mesenteric mass was found together with an associated haematoma. Subsequent histology showed the tumour to be a benign fibromatosis, and the patient recovered uneventfully. There were no reports in the literature of any association between astrocytomas and fibromatosis. Mesenteric fibromatosis is a rare tumour often associated with Gardner's syndrome. It can present in a multitude of ways and the only definite treatment is surgical resection.

  4. Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal pain is the most common indication for OGD in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. We conducted the current study to examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and ...

  5. Young children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) followed in pediatric gastroenterology (PED-GI) vs primary pediatric care (PED): Differences in outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children with recurrent abdominal pain without alarm signs be managed in pediatric rather than specialty care. However, many of these children are seen in tertiary care. In a longitudinal examination of physical and psychological symptoms, we hypothes...

  6. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: pathophysiology and definitions

    OpenAIRE

    Cheatham Michael L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract "Intra-abdominal hypertension", the presence of elevated intra-abdominal pressure, and "abdominal compartment syndrome", the development of pressure-induced organ-dysfunction and failure, have been increasingly recognized over the past decade as causes of significant morbidity and mortality among critically ill surgical and medical patients. Elevated intra-abdominal pressure can cause significant impairment of cardiac, pulmonary, renal, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and central nervous ...

  7. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Hubbard

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC, whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease

  8. Gut-directed hypnotherapy in children with irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain (syndrome): a randomized controlled trial on self exercises at home using CD versus individual therapy by qualified therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Juliette M T M; Vlieger, Arine M; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F; Tjon a Ten, Walther; Van Wering, Herbert; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Merkus, Maruschka P; Benninga, Marc A

    2014-06-04

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain (syndrome) (FAP(S)) are common pediatric disorders, characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain. Treatment is challenging, especially in children with persisting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) performed by a therapist has been shown to be effective in these children, but is still unavailable to many children due to costs, a lack of qualified child-hypnotherapists and because it requires a significant investment of time by child and parent(s). Home-based hypnotherapy by means of exercises on CD has been shown effective as well, and has potential benefits, such as lower costs and less time investment. The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to compare cost-effectiveness of individual HT performed by a qualified therapist with HT by means of CD recorded self-exercises at home in children with IBS or FAP(S). 260 children, aged 8-18 years with IBS or FAP(S) according to Rome III criteria are included in this currently conducted RCT with a follow-up period of one year. Children are randomized to either 6 sessions of individual HT given by a qualified therapist over a 3-month period or HT through self-exercises at home with CD for 3 months.The primary outcome is the proportion of patients in which treatment is successful at the end of treatment and after one year follow-up. Treatment success is defined as at least 50% reduction in both abdominal pain frequency and intensity scores. Secondary outcomes include adequate relief, cost-effectiveness and effects of both therapies on depression and anxiety scores, somatization scores, QoL, pain beliefs and coping strategies. If the effectiveness of home-based HT with CD is comparable to, or only slightly lower, than HT by a therapist, this treatment may become an attractive form of therapy in children with IBS or FAP(S), because of its low costs and direct availability. Dutch Trial Register number NTR2725 (date of registration: 1 February

  9. Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Hervé; Fredericson, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome is a frequently encountered overuse disorder that involves the patellofemoral region and often presents as anterior knee pain. PFP can be difficult to diagnose. Not only do the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment remain challenging, but the terminology used to describe PFP is used inconsistently and can be confusing. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) seems to be multifactorial, resulting from a complex interaction among intrinsic anatomic and external training factors. Although clinicians frequently make the diagnosis of PFPS, no consensus exists about its etiology or the factors most responsible for causing pain. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of PFP.

  10. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Darren; Callister, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), commonly referred to as 'stitch', is an ailment well known in many sporting activities. It is especially prevalent in activities that involve repetitive torso movement with the torso in an extended position, such as running and horse riding. Approximately 70% of runners report experiencing the pain in the past year and in a single running event approximately one in five participants can be expected to suffer the condition. ETAP is a localized pain that is most common in the lateral aspects of the mid abdomen along the costal border, although it may occur in any region of the abdomen. It may also be related to shoulder tip pain, which is the referred site from tissue innervated by the phrenic nerve. ETAP tends to be sharp or stabbing when severe, and cramping, aching, or pulling when less intense. The condition is exacerbated by the postprandial state, with hypertonic beverages being particularly provocative. ETAP is most common in the young but is unrelated to sex or body type. Well trained athletes are not immune from the condition, although they may experience it less frequently. Several theories have been presented to explain the mechanism responsible for the pain, including ischemia of the diaphragm; stress on the supportive visceral ligaments that attach the abdominal organs to the diaphragm; gastrointestinal ischemia or distension; cramping of the abdominal musculature; ischemic pain resulting from compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament; aggravation of the spinal nerves; and irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Of these theories, irritation of the parietal peritoneum best explains the features of ETAP; however, further investigations are required. Strategies for managing the pain are largely anecdotal, especially given that its etiology remains to be fully elucidated. Commonly purported prevention strategies include avoiding large volumes of food and beverages for at least 2 hours

  11. Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminara, Caterina; El Malhany, Nadia; Roberto, Denis; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-12-09

    Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain is an unusual partial epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal episodes of abdominal or visceral pain, disturbance of awareness and electroencephalographic abnormalities. We describe a new case of ictal abdominal pain in which gastrointestinal complaints were the only manifestation of seizures and review the previously described pediatric patients. In our patient clinical findings, ictal EEG abnormalities, and a good response to antiepileptic drugs allowed us to make a diagnosis of focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain. This is a rare epileptic phenomenon that should be suspected in patients with unexplained paroxysmal abdominal pain and migraine-like symptoms. We suggest that, after the exclusion of more common etiologies, focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain should be considered in patients with paroxysmal abdominal pain and ictal EEG abnormalities.

  12. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Izadpanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery.

  13. [The groin pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S; Delimar, D; Hudetz, D

    2001-12-01

    Groin pain is defined as tendon enthesitis of adductor longus muscle and/or abdominal muscles that may lead to degenerative arthropathy of pubic symphises in an advanced stage. Pubic region is a point where kinematic forces cross. The balance between the adductor and abdominal muscles is of great importance, as well as the elasticity of pubic symphises which enables movement of up to 2 mm and rotation of up to 3 degrees. The weakness of the abdominal muscle wall, known as the sportsman's hernia, is the most common cause of painful groin. Groin pain is the most common in soccer players (6.24% in Croatia). Most authors believe that the main cause of groin pain is the adductor muscle overload. When active, sportsmen start to feel a dull pain in the groin region. The adductor test is of great importance for physical examination; the patient should be lying supine with his hips abducted and flexed at 80 degrees. The test is positive if the patient, while attempting to pull his/her legs against pressing in the opposite direction, feels a sharp pain in the groins. The treatment of groin pain is complex and individual, as its causes may vary from patient to patient. Gradual physical therapy combined with pharmacotherapy should be effective in most cases. The latter includes nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants. A physical therapy programme usually involves stretching and strengthening of adductor muscles, abdominal wall muscles, iliopsoas muscle, quadriceps, and hamstrings. In case that physical therapy and pharmacotherapy fail, surgery is needed, depending on the cause.

  14. [Pain originating from the abdominal wall: a forgotten diagnostic option].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Fernández, Miguel; Moreira Vicente, Víctor; Riesco López, José María; Rodríguez Gandía, Miguel Angel; Garrido Gómez, Elena; Milicua Salamero, José María

    2007-04-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common clinical problem in primary care, and is usually referred to gastroenterologists or general surgeons. Although up to 20% of cases of idiopathic abdominal pain arise in structures of the abdominal wall, this is frequently overlooked as a possible cause. It includes pain arising from structures of the abdominal wall including skin, parietal peritoneum, cellular subcutaneous tissue, aponeuroses, abdominal muscles and somatosensorial innervation from lower dorsal roots. The diagnosis is based on anamnesis and physical examination. Carnett's sign is a simple maneuver that discriminates between parietal and visceral pain. Management with topical anesthesia is effective in a majority of patients and can help to confirm the diagnosis.

  15. The efficacy of adhesiolysis on chronic abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerner-Rasmussen, Jonas; Burcharth, Jakob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Abdominal adhesions are a frequent reason for chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the evidence of performing laparoscopic adhesiolysis as a treatment for patients with chronic abdominal pain. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Cen...

  16. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  17. Pain in Down's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mafrica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a homeostatic mechanism that intervenes to protect the organism from harmful stimuli that could damage its integrity. It is made up of two components: the sensory-discriminative component, which identifies the provenance and characteristics of the type of pain; and the affective-motivational component, on which emotional reflexes, following the painful sensation, depend.There is a system for pain control at an encephalic and spinal level, principally made up of the periaqueductal grey matter, the periventricular area, the nucleus raphe magnus, and the pain-inhibition complex situated in the posterior horns of the spinal cord. Through the activation of these pain-control systems, the nervous system suppresses the afference of pain signals. Endogenous opioids represent another analgesic system.In the course of various studies on pain transmission in Down patients, the reduced tolerance of pain and the incapacity to give a qualitative and quantitative description emerged in a powerful way. All of these aspects cause difficulty in evaluating pain. This is linked to several learning difficulties. However, it cannot be excluded that in these anomalies of pain perception, both the anatomical and the neurotransmitter alteration, typical of this syndrome, may hold a certain importance.This fact may have important clinical repercussions that could affect the choice of therapeutic and rehabilitative schemes for treatment of pathologies in which pain is the dominant symptom, such as postoperative pain. It could influence research on analgesics that are more suitable for these patients, the evaluation of the depth of analgesia during surgical operation, and ultimately, absence of obvious pain manifestations. In conclusion, alterations of the central nervous system, neurotransmitters, pain transmission, and all related problems should be considered in the management of pain in patients with Down's syndrome, especially by algologists and

  18. Well Leg Compartment Syndrome After Abdominal Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Jens Krogh; Hove, Lars Dahlgaard; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is a complication to abdominal surgery. We aimed to identify risk factors for and outcome of WLCS in Denmark and literature. METHODS: Prospectively collected claims to the Danish Patient Compensation Association (DPCA) concerning WLCS after abdominal...

  19. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  20. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital-including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)-or compressive-including "nutcracker" syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. PMID:27777480

  1. Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Krogh, Klaus;

    2008-01-01

    /discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain.Conclusion:Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured.......Objectives:To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain.Study design:Postal survey.Setting:Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association.Methods:We mailed a questionnaire...

  2. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: abdominal pain in women of 26 years old Síndrome de Fitz-Hugh-Curtis: dolor abdominal en mujer de 26 años

    OpenAIRE

    Liseth Rivero-Sánchez; Elsa María López-Soriano; Luisa Guarner-Aguilar

    2011-01-01

    Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is an inflammation of the liver capsule as a complication of pelvic inflammatory disease, whose most common etiologic agent is the C. trachomatis. The acute phase of the Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome may present itself with pain in right upper abdomen, commonly confused with other hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tract diseases. Definitive diagnosis is now possible with non-invasive techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography, as well as techniques to isolate th...

  3. Midgut malrotation with chronic abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Wanjari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in midgut rotation occur during the physiological herniation of midgut between the 5 th and 10 th week of gestation. The most significant abnormality is narrow small bowel mesentery which is prone to volvulus. This occurs most frequently in the neonatal period, less commonly midgut malrotation presents in adulthood with either acute volvulus or chronic abdominal symptoms. It is the latter group that represents a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of a 17-year-old male patient who presented with 10-year history of nonspecific gastro-intestinal symptoms. After extensive investigation the patient was diagnosed with midgut malrotation following computed tomography of abdomen. The patient was treated with a laparoscopic Ladd′s procedure and at 3 months he was gaining weight and had stopped vomiting. A laparoscopic Ladd′s procedure is an acceptable alternative to the open technique in treating symptomatic malrotation in adults. Midgut malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly which may present as chronic abdominal pain. Abdominal CT is helpful for diagnosis.

  4. [Greater trochanteric pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollwitzer, H; Opitz, G; Gerdesmeyer, L; Hauschild, M

    2014-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain is one of the common complaints in orthopedics. Frequent diagnoses include myofascial pain, trochanteric bursitis, tendinosis and rupture of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon, and external snapping hip. Furthermore, nerve entrapment like the piriformis syndrome must be considered in the differential diagnosis. This article summarizes essential diagnostic and therapeutic steps in greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Careful clinical evaluation, complemented with specific imaging studies and diagnostic infiltrations allows determination of the underlying pathology in most cases. Thereafter, specific nonsurgical treatment is indicated, with success rates of more than 90 %. Resistant cases and tendon ruptures may require surgical intervention, which can provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in most cases.

  5. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...... can be challenging, and misdiagnosis as a psychological problem, overactive bladder, or chronic urinary infection has plagued patients with the problem....

  6. Diagnostic value of ultrasound in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, S B; Forget, P P; Arends, J W; Kuijten, R H; van Engelshoven, J M

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the diagnostic value of ultrasound in children with recurrent abdominal pain and to estimate the clinical relevance of rare organic causes of abdominal pain in these patients, we prospectively examined 93 children aged between 5.5 and 12 years by means of abdominal ultrasound. In 3 patients (3.2%) an anatomic abnormality was detected, which could not account for the abdominal pain. We conclude that many organic abnormalities, that could be diagnosed by ultrasound, are clinically irrelevant as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children and therefore ultrasound does not significantly contribute to the diagnosis. However, ultrasound can still play a role in the work-up of children with recurrent abdominal pain in avoiding unnecessary radiologic X-ray procedures.

  7. Transverse abdominal plane neurostimulation for chronic abdominal pain: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mayank; Goodson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Management of chronic abdominal pain can be challenging. Sometimes patients fail to get adequate response from multiple medications and nerve blocks. We present a patient case report of chronic abdominal pain with a history of multiple surgeries managed successfully by neuromodulation of the transverse abdominis plane (TAP). The TAP block is a procedure in which local anesthetic is injected into the abdominal fascial plane that carries sensory nerves to the abdominal wall in order to block pain sensation. It has been shown to reduce postoperative pain and analgesic dependence after abdominal and gynecological surgeries. A 60-year-old woman presented to us for chronic abdominal pain for which medications provided little relief. She had an extensive history of abdominal surgeries and was also treated for lower back pain with surgery and less invasive procedures in the past. Under our care, she underwent 2 TAP blocks with almost complete resolution of her abdominal pain. Her pain, however, came back within a few of weeks of the procedures. Since our patient found pain relief from the TAP blocks, we proceeded with neurostimulation of the TAP for long-term pain relief. We placed a dorsal column stimulator 16 contact lead for lower back and leg pain and 8 contact leads placed in the TAP under ultrasound guidance. She has had multiple follow-ups since her TAP lead placement procedure with continued and near complete resolution of her abdominal pain. The TAP lead stimulation was helping her abdominal pain and the dorsal column lead stimulation was helping her back and leg pain.

  8. Abdominal ultrasonography in the diagnostic work-up in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Strandberg, C; Pærregaard, Anders;

    1997-01-01

    We report on our experience with routine abdominal ultrasonography in 120 children (aged 3-15 years) with recurrent abdominal pain, in order to determine the diagnostic value of this investigation. Eight children (7%) revealed sonographic abnormalities: gallbladder stone (n = 2), splenomegaly (n...... = 1) and urogenital abnormalities (n = 5). The recurrent abdominal pain could be explained by these findings in only two (may be three) cases. CONCLUSION: The diagnostic value of abdominal ultrasonography in unselected children with recurrent abdominal pain is low. However, the direct visualization...... of the abdominal structures as being normal may be helpful to the parents and the child in their understanding and acceptance of the benign nature of recurrent abdominal pain....

  9. Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, John M; Ukpeh, Henry; Steinbok, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Spinal arachnoid cysts are an infrequently reported cause of abdominal pain in children. In this report, we describe the unusual case of an extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain in a pediatric patient without any signs of cord or nerve root compression. A 14-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain as the only symptom of a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst is reported. The patient was incidentally diagnosed with an intraspinal mass on abdominal computed tomography (CT) during the course of investigating her abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a T11-L2 extradural arachnoid cyst. After resection of the T11-L2 arachnoid cyst, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing abdominal pain as the sole presenting feature of a spinal arachnoid cyst in the pediatric population. This case illustrates that abdominal pain may be the first and only presentation of spinal arachnoid cysts in children. Spinal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained abdominal pain, even when there are no other symptoms of spinal disease.

  10. Multiple abdominal cysts in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenen, F; Hubens, G; Creytens, D; Vaneerdeweg, W

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of symptomatic mesenteric cysts in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, associated with various neoplasms, is presented. The patient, known with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, consulted with increasingly severe abdominal pain and large abdominal cysts. At surgery, the cysts were excised and the postoperative course was uneventful. In conclusion, this case reminds clinicians to always maintain a wide differential diagnosis when dealing with patients known with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  11. Validation of the Rome III criteria and alarm symptoms for recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Benninga, Marc A; Schweizer, Joachim J; Kneepkens, C M Frank; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Büller, Hans A

    2014-06-01

    Rome criteria were formulated to define functional gastrointestinal disorders (Rome III criteria, 2006) excluding organic diagnoses when alarm symptoms were absent. The aims of the study were to validate the Rome III criteria as to their capacity to differentiate between organic and functional abdominal pain and to assess the role of alarm symptoms in this differentiation. During 2 years all of the patients (ages 4-16 years) presenting with recurrent abdominal pain (Apley criteria) and referred to secondary care were included. Clinical diagnoses were based on protocolized evaluation and intervention with 6-month follow-up. Alarm symptoms were registered. Rome III criteria for functional pain syndromes were assigned independently. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. In 200 patients (87 boys, mean age 8.8 years), organic (17%), functional (40%), combined organic and functional (9%), spontaneous recovery (27%), and other (8%) clinical diagnoses were established. Alarm symptoms were found in 57.5% (organic causes 56%, functional causes 61%). The evaluation for Rome symptom clusters revealed symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in 27%, functional dyspepsia in 15%, functional abdominal pain in 28%, functional abdominal pain syndrome in 14.5%, and no pain syndrome in 15.5%. Rome diagnoses, based on symptoms and absence of alarm symptoms, predicted functional clinical diagnosis with sensitivity 0.35 (95% confidence interval 0.27-0.43), specificity 0.60 (0.46-0.73), positive predictive value 0.71 (0.61-0.82), and negative predictive value of 0.24 (0.17-0.32). The Rome III criteria for abdominal pain are not specific enough to rule out organic causes. Alarm symptoms do not differentiate between organic and functional abdominal pain.

  12. Prognosis of chronic or recurrent abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Passchier, Ban; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) or recurrent abdominal pain is common in childhood and is rarely associated with organic disease. With modern diagnostic technology, new organic abnormalities are found in children with CAP. Thus far a causal relation between these abnormalities and CAP has n

  13. Evidence-Based Medicine Approach to Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Sreeja; Lee, Jerry; Volkamer, Heather; Thoureen, Traci

    2016-05-01

    The chief complaint of abdominal pain accounts for 5% to 10% of all presentations in the emergency department. With such broad differential and diagnostic modalities available, this article focuses on a systematic approach to evaluating abdominal pain, essential to providing patients with efficient and accurate care.

  14. An exceptional cause of left lower quadrant abdominal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bassam Abboud; Ronald Daher

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is an exceptional cause of left lower quadrant abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan is the key to its diagnosis and helps to establish its early treatment. We present a case of a 35-year-old male patient who presented acute appendicitis with redundant and loosely attached cecum which was diagnosed based on his left lower quadrant abdominal pain.

  15. Acute abdominal pain : considerations on diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorenvliet, Boudewijn Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects on the diagnosing and management of patients with acute abdominal pain are investigated. 1; The efficacy and safety of standard outpatient re-evaluation for patients not admitted to the hospital after emergency department evaluation for acute abdominal pain. 2; The use

  16. Increased Auditory Startle Reflex in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J.; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Study design Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal pain

  17. [Myofascial pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, L B; Akopyan, A P

    2015-01-01

    To analyze clinical characteristics of pain syndrome in patients with dorsalgia. Authors studied 43 patients (mean age 41.9±1.2 years), 34 women and 9 men, with acute and subacute chronic back pain. The study included neurological examination, MRI and/or CT of the spine, measurement of anxiety and depression with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the McGill Pain Inventory. Chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MFPS) was frequently associated with anxiety-depressive disorders found in patients with cervical and cervical/pectoral pain, fibromyalgia with minimal neurological symptoms and no signs of neural structure compression according to MRI and CT. The results of the study of chronic MFPS should be taken into account in the choice of tactics of treatment of MFPS patients. The use of amelotex in the combination with compligam B in patients with dorsopathy and MFPS is effective together with correction of emotional disorders and treatment with chondroprotectors.

  18. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cabe, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with abdominal pain, diarrhoea, anorexia and haematemesis. The patient was previously diagnosed with latent tuberculosis (TB). On examination, his abdomen was diffusely tender, with localised guarding in the right iliac fossa. CT imaging of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a low volume of ascites, diffuse studding of the peritoneum, omental caking and several bulky low-density lymph nodes in the retroperitoneum. A laparoscopy was performed to obtain a peritoneal biopsy. Histology demonstrated fragments of peritoneum with necrotising granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate in keeping with an infectious process, favouring TB. He was commenced on rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and pyridoxine under the direct observed therapy by the infectious diseases team. In view of his extensive peritoneal involvement, he was empirically started on high-dose prednisolone for symptomatic control and to reduce complications related to peritoneal adhesions.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, S B; Forget, P P; Kuijten, R H; Arends, J W

    1992-02-01

    In this study we investigated the presence of gastroesophageal reflux in children with recurrent abdominal pain and its possible relationship to food intolerance-associated duodenal inflammation. Twenty-four-hour intra-esophageal pH monitoring, an endoscopic duodenal biopsy and a small bowel 51Cr-EDTA permeability test were performed in 25 children with recurrent abdominal pain. In 14 cases (56%) the pH monitoring was abnormal, pointing to the presence of pathological gastroesophageal reflux. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in the latter patients resulted in resolution or improvement of abdominal pain in 10 cases (71%). Gastroesophageal reflux did not appear to be associated with either intestinal permeability to 51Cr-EDTA or duodenal biopsy findings. We conclude that pathological gastroesophageal reflex is a frequent finding in children with recurrent abdominal pain, that it is unrelated to duodenal inflammation and that there might be a causal relationship between pathological gastroesophageal reflux and recurrent abdominal pain in children.

  20. Novel orally available salvinorin A analog PR-38 inhibits gastrointestinal motility and reduces abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sałaga, M; Polepally, P R; Sobczak, M; Grzywacz, D; Kamysz, W; Sibaev, A; Storr, M; Do Rego, J C; Zjawiony, J K; Fichna, J

    2014-07-01

    The opioid and cannabinoid systems play a crucial role in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Selective opioid as well as cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists exert a potent inhibitory action on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and pain. In this study, we examined (in vitro and in vivo) whether PR-38 (2-O-cinnamoylsalvinorin B), a novel analog of salvinorin A, can interact with both systems and demonstrate therapeutic effects. We used mouse models of hypermotility, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We also assessed the influence of PR-38 on the central nervous system by measurement of motoric parameters and exploratory behaviors in mice. Subsequently, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of PR-38 in mouse blood samples after intraperitoneal and oral administration. PR-38 significantly inhibited mouse colonic motility in vitro and in vivo. Administration of PR-38 significantly prolonged the whole GI transit time, and this effect was mediated by µ- and κ-opioid receptors and the CB1 receptor. PR-38 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking functional GI disorders. These data expand our understanding of the interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems and their functions in the GI tract. We also provide a novel framework for the development of future potential treatments of functional GI disorders.

  1. A rare case of febrile abdominal pain revealing Horton's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudet, Arnaud; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Ghazali, Aiham Daniel

    2017-07-08

    Horton's disease is a systemic inflammatory vasculitis, usually found in persons over 50years old. It affects medium and large-sized arteries stemming from the external carotid, especially the superficial temporal arteries. It can affect extracranial large vessels but only rarely the aorta. Diagnosis of aortitis is difficult and its incidence is probably underestimated. A 68-year-old Caucasian woman consulted in an emergency department for febrile abdominal pain with inflammatory syndrome. Abdomen was soft with right-side flank sensitivity. A contrast-enhanced CT scan showed aortitis from the descending aorta to the iliac arteries without complication. Because of age, clinical presentation and aortitis, Horton disease was suspected. The temporal artery biopsy showed a histological aspect of degenerative endarteritis with intimal thickening and luminal stenosis. High-dose corticosteroid therapy was introduced which improved clinical conditions and resulted in the amendment of the pain. In the present case, this patient had Horton's disease, based on 3 criteria of The American College of Rheumatology (age, temporal artery abnormalities and inflammatory syndrome) associated with aortitis. However, aortitis is a rare complication of Horton disease and is a major cause of mortality inasmuch as it can be complicated by aneurysm and dissection. It is unusual to diagnose Horton's disease from aortitis symptoms without complications. The aorta represents the most severe localization of Horton's disease. It should not be ignored in etiological hypotheses regarding febrile abdominal pain in the elderly. Corticosteroids should be started rapidly at high doses and temporal artery biopsy should be planned. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Myofascial pain syndrome treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Iaccarino, Mary Alexis

    2014-05-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional pain disorder caused by taut bands of muscle fibers in skeletal muscles called myofascial trigger points. MPS is a common disorder, often diagnosed and treated by physiatrists. Treatment strategies for MPS include exercises, patient education, and trigger point injection. Pharmacologic interventions are also common, and a variety of analgesics, antiinflammatories, antidepressants, and other medications are used in clinical practice. This review explores the various treatment options for MPS, including those therapies that target myofascial trigger points and common secondary symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  4. [Intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, M.; Hilligsø, Jens Georg

    2008-01-01

    Intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare conditions with high mortality. IAH is an intraabdominal pressure (IAP) above 12 mmHg and ACS an IAP above 20 mmHg with evidence of organ dysfunction. IAP is measured indirectly via the bladder or stomach. Various...

  5. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  6. Acute Postoperative Pain of Indonesian Patients after Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanif Chanif

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is the most common problem found in postoperative patients.Purpose: The study aimed to describe pain intensity and pain distress at the first 24-48 hours experienced by the patients after abdominal surgery.Method: The study employed a descriptive research design. The samples consisted of 40 adult patients older than 18 years who underwent major abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were admitted at Doctor Kariadi Hospital Semarang, Central Java Province Indonesia during November 2011 to February 2012. A Visual Numeric Rating Scale was used to measure the pain intensity scores and the pain distress scores at the 5th hour after subjects received 30 mg of Ketorolac injection intravenously, a major analgesic drug being used at the studied hospital. Minimum-maximum scores, mean, standard deviation, median and interquartile range were used to describe pain intensity and pain distress.Result: The findings revealed that on average, postoperative patients had experienced moderate to severe pain, both in their report of pain intensity and pain distress as evidenced by the range of scores from 4 to 9 out of 10 and median score of 5 and 6 (IQR = 2, respectively. It indicated that postoperative pain was common symptom found in patients after abdominal surgery.Keywords: pain intensity, pain distress, abdominal surgery.

  7. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  8. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Mass: Rapunzel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzullah Uçmak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bezoar is a condition in which foods or fibers that are not absorbed in the gastrointestinal system usually accumu­late in the stomach. It usually develops in persons with gastrointestinal motility disorders, anatomic changes or psychiatric disorders. Trichobezoar is the accumulation of hair in the gastric chamber among people with psychi­atric disorders such as trichotillomania and trichophagia. Rapunzel syndrome, however, is a rare form of trichobe­zoar extending from the stomach to the small intestine. In this paper, we present a rare case of 15-year old girl diagnosed with Rapunzel syndrome on admission due to abdominal pain and abdominal mass. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 87-90

  9. Recurrent abdominal pain in children: a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, S H

    2015-03-01

    The term 'recurrent abdominal pain', or RAP, refers mainly to the duration of painful period and frequency of pain. The commonly accepted duration is at least three months in the preceding period, and over this three-month period, there are at least three episodes of pain that are severe enough to affect the daily activities of the affected patients. Over the years, with advances in medical technology and better understanding of the pathophysiology of abdominal pain, more and more organic causes have been identified. However, the most common cause of RAP in children is still functional in origin.

  10. [Perioperative pain management for abdominal and thoracic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englbrecht, J S; Pogatzki-Zahn, E M

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures can result in significant acute postoperative pain. Present evidence shows that postoperative pain management remains inadequate especially after "minor" surgical procedures. Various therapeutic options including regional anesthesia techniques and systemic pharmacotherapy are available for effective treatment of postoperative pain. This work summarizes the pathophysiological background of postoperative pain after abdominal and thoracic surgery and discusses the indication, effectiveness, risks, and benefits of the different therapeutic options. Special focus is given to the controversial debate about the indication for epidural analgesia, as well as various alternative therapeutic options, including transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, paravertebral block (PVB), wound infiltration with local anesthetics, and intravenous lidocaine. In additional, indications and contraindications of nonopioid analgesics after abdominal and thoracic surgery are discussed and recommendations based on scientific evidence and individual risk and benefit analysis are made. All therapeutic options discussed are eligible for clinical use and may contribute to improve postoperative pain outcome after abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures.

  11. [Drug therapy of acute and chronic abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitberger, Konrad; Stüber, Frank; Kipfer Buchli, Irène; Stamer, Ulrike M

    2011-08-01

    For drug therapy a differentiation of acute and chronic pain is essential. In emergency situations of acute abdominal pain a fast diagnosis is mandatory. Analgesia should be provided as soon as possible. The different groups of analgesics should be used according to their known effects, side effects and contraindications. Postoperative pain after abdominal surgery has to be considered as a special condition of acute abdominal pain. Main treatment options are non opioid analgesics and opioids. Opioids can be administered intravenously via patient controlled analgesia (PCA) devices. In major abdominal surgery neuroaxial analgesia, preferentially administered via an epidural catheter provides excellent pain relief with positive impact on gastrointestinal motility and patients' recovery. Because of difficulties to allocate chronic abdominal pain to a specific organ, causal treatment often turns out to be difficult. Peripheral and central sensitization, as well as an alteration of the endogenous pain modulation comes to the fore in these chronic pain conditions. Co-analgesics like anticonvulsants and antidepressants are utilized to reduce sensitization and improve the endogenous pain modulating system. Non drug approaches and alternative treatment options might be useful. In contrast, orally or transcutaneously administered opioids are the principal corner stone for the treatment of cancer pain.

  12. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Tachamo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiploic appendagitis (EA is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome.

  13. Abdominal epilepsy and foreign body in the abdomen--dilemma in diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topno, Noor; Gopasetty, Mahesh S; Kudva, Annappa; B, Lokesh

    2005-12-31

    There are many medical causes of abdominal pain; abdominal epilepsy is one of the rarer causes. It is a form of temporal lobe epilepsy presenting with abdominal aura. Temporal lobe epilepsy is often idiopathic, however it may be associated with mesial temporal lobe sclerosis, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors and other benign tumors, arterio-venous malformations, gliomas, neuronal migration defects or gliotic damage as a result of encephalitis. When associated with anatomical abnormality, abdominal epilepsy is difficult to control with medication alone. In such cases, appropriate neurosurgery can provide a cure or, at least, make this condition easier to treat with medication. Once all known intra-abdominal causes have been ruled out, many cases of abdominal pain are dubbed as functional. If clinicians are not aware of abdominal epilepsy, this diagnosis is easily missed, resulting in inappropriate treatment. We present a case report of a middle aged woman presenting with abdominal pain and episodes of unconsciousness. On evaluation she was found to have an intra-abdominal foreign body (needle). Nevertheless, the presence of this entity was insufficient to explain her episodes of unconsciousness. On detailed analysis of her medical history and after appropriate investigations, she was diagnosed with temporal lobe epilepsy which was treated with appropriate medications, and which resulted in her pain being relieved.

  14. Enteral Feeding in Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V Grigoryev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to substantiate the choice of a gastrointestinal tract (GIT function support regimen as a mode for correction of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS. Subjects and methods. Forty-three patients with different causes of inadequate GIT function of various origin and ACS (disseminated peritonitis (45%, pancreatitis (24%, and severe concomitant injury (31% were examined. Group 1 (control received complete parenteral nutritional feeding (n=23; APACHE II scores, 21±4; calculated probability of fatal outcome, 33.5%. In Group II (study, complete parenteral feeding in the first 24 hours after stabilization was supplemented with GIT function support with Pepsisorb (Nutricia in doses of 500, 1000, and 1500 ml on days 1, 2, and 3, respectively (n=20; APACHE II scores, 20±6; calculated probability of fatal outcome, 37.1%. During early enteral nutritional support, the SOFA score was significantly less than that in Group 1 on days 2—3; the oxygenation index significantly increased on day 3; the value of intra-abdominal hypertension decreased to the control values. The positive effect of the GIT function support regimen on regression of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS was confirmed by the lowered levels of biological markers (von Willebrand factor (WF and endothelin-1 as markers of endothelial damage of MODS. Correlation analysis showed a direct correlation between the markers of endothelial damage and the SOFA scores (r=0.34; p=0.05 for WF and r=0.49;p=0.03 for endothelin. Conclusion. The GIT function support regimen via early enteral alimentation with Peptisorb, which was initiated in the first 24 hours after admission, is able to level off the manifestations of the early stages of the abdominal compartment syndrome, with the acceptable values of oxygen balance and water-electrolyte and osmotic homeostasis being achieved. Key words: abdominal compartment syndrome, nutritional support, biological markers, oxygenation index

  15. PAINFUL IRRITABLE-BOWEL-SYNDROME AND SIGMOID CONTRACTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RITSEMA, GH; THIJN, CJP

    Fifteen patients with abdominal pain compatible with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were examined by barium enema and pressure recording. Strong circular contractions of the sigmoid colon and pressure recordings correlated with the characteristic pain in 13 of the 15 patients. In 15 control

  16. PAINFUL IRRITABLE-BOWEL-SYNDROME AND SIGMOID CONTRACTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RITSEMA, GH; THIJN, CJP

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen patients with abdominal pain compatible with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were examined by barium enema and pressure recording. Strong circular contractions of the sigmoid colon and pressure recordings correlated with the characteristic pain in 13 of the 15 patients. In 15 control pati

  17. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain; Celiac Truncus Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Birkan

    2016-01-01

    In this case we presented a patient who were admitted to surgery department with complaints of abdominal pain and nausea. There were no pathological findings on physical examination, direct abdominal x-ray, chest radiograph and biochemical parameters. At proximal of the celiac trunk, it was shown approximately 3x2 cm in size fusiform aneurysmal dilatation on the patient%u2019s abdominal ultrasonography and turbulence, arterial flow on the patient%u2019s abdominal doppler ultrasonography subsequently. In abdominal computed tomography we detected dense calcifications, dilatation and hypodensities that may belong to a thrombus in the lumen superior mesenteric vein (SMV. At the same time, approximately 3.5 cm segment of trunk celiak we observed aneurysm dilatation which reaching 2 cm at the widest point. Celiac trunk aneurysm is a rare cause of abdominal pain and often noticed after the complicated, thus it must always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Functional abdominal pain causing Scurvy, Pellagra, and Hypovitaminosis A

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Severe vitamin deficiency disease is rarely seen in developed countries. We present an atypical case of a young man with scurvy, pellagra, and hypovitaminosis A, caused by longstanding functional abdominal pain that severely limited his ability to eat.

  19. Psychological Profile of Children with Headache and Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The psychological profile of 70 patients (age range 4-18 years; mean 11 years with headache, 70 with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP, and 70 controls was compared using the Child Behaviour Checklist 4-18 (CBCL.

  20. Pain following the repair of an abdominal hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Crawford, Michael Edward

    2010-01-01

    Pain and other types of discomfort are frequent symptoms following the repair of an abdominal hernia. After 1 year, the incidence of light to moderate pain following inguinal hernia repair is as high as 10% and 2% for severe disabling chronic pain. Postoperative chronic pain not only affects......, psychosocial characteristics, and surgical procedures) related to the postoperative pain conditions. Furthermore, the mechanisms for both acute and chronic pain are presented. We focus on inguinal hernia repair, which is the most frequent type of abdominal hernia surgery that leads to chronic pain. Finally...... the individual patient, but may also have a great impact on relatives and society, and may be a cause of concern for the responsible surgeon. This paper provides an overview of the anatomy, surgical procedures, and disposing factors (age, gender, ethnicity, genotype, previous hernia repair, pain prior to surgery...

  1. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children: Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özçeker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HA is a rare, autosomal-dominant genetic disorder presenting with recurrent attacks of angioedema. The most commonly involved organs include the extremites, face, neck, upper respiratory tract, genital region and the gastrointestinal tract. Edema of the intestinal mucosa can cause temporary obstruction and severe abdominal pain that can be confused with acute abdomen. Pediatricians and emergency physicians should keep in mind this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of severe abdominal pain.

  2. Abdominal separation in an adult male patient with acute abdominal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We report a male patient with prolonged post-prandial abdominal distension and a sudden onset of epigastric pain initially diagnosed as acute abdomen. The patient had no history of surgery. Physical examination revealed peritonitis and abdominal computed tomography scan showed upper abdominal mesentery intorsion. The patient then underwent surgical intervention. It was found that the descending mesocolon dorsal root was connected to the ascending colon and formed a membrane encapsulating the small intestine...

  3. Compartment syndrome without pain!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, M J

    2012-02-03

    We report the case of a young male patient who underwent intra-medullary nailing for a closed, displaced mid-shaft fracture of tibia and fibula. He was commenced on patient controlled analgesia post-operatively. A diagnosis of compartment syndrome in the patient\\'s leg was delayed because he did not exhibit a pain response. This ultimately resulted in a below-knee amputation of the patient\\'s leg. We caution against the use of patient controlled analgesia in any traumatised limb distal to the hip or the shoulder.

  4. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    . The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...

  5. Abdominal compartment syndrome from bleeding duodenal diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticuli are acquired false diverticuli of unknown etiology. Although mostly asymptomatic, they can occasionally cause upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, rarely with massive bleeding. In this report, we present (to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of duodenal diverticular bleeding, causing abdominal compartment syndrome. Albeit a rare event, duodenal diverticular bleeding should be included in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. As with our case, a multidisciplinary approach to managing such patients is crucial.

  6. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROSCOPY IN NONSPECIFIC CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN: EXPERIENCE OF 100 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND : Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are among the most challeng ing and demanding conditions to treat across the whole age spectrum. Potentially it can be unrewarding for both the patients and the medical team. Patients with chronic abdominal pain (CAP can undergo numerous diagnostic tests with failure to detect any s tructural or biochemical abnormality. This study was undertaken to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic role of laparoscopy in patients with unexplained chronic abdominal pain (UCAP. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed for 100 pati ents with UCAP not diagnosed by usual clinical examination and investigations . The pain in all patients was of unclear etiology despite all the investigative procedures. All patients were subjected to laparoscopic evaluation for their conditions. The findi ngs and outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: UCAP is common in females (62% than in males. The most frequent laparoscopic findings detected were abdominal adhesions ( 30% , followed by pelvic inflammatory disease ( 25%, abdomina l tuberculosis (12%, chronic appendicitis (8%, mesenteric lymphadenitis (5% and diverticulosis (2%. In 18% of cases no identifiable cause could be found. Follow after 2 months revealed pain relief in 84% irrespective of cause of pain. CONCLUSION: Lapa r oscopy is an effective diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the management of patients with chronic abdominal pain.

  7. Imaging and laboratory testing in acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Nova L; Jahnes, Katherine; Mills, Angela M

    2011-05-01

    When discussing which laboratory tests or imaging to order in the setting of acute abdominal pain, it is practical to organize information by disease process (eg, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis). Because studies on the accuracy of diagnostic tests are of necessity related to the presence or absence of specific diagnoses, and because clinicians frequently look to tests to help them rule in or rule out specific conditions, this article is organized by region of pain and common abdominal diagnoses. It focuses on the contributions that laboratory testing and imaging make in the emergency management of abdominal complaints. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal Aortic Dissection with Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Shyan Lay

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue, with various complications manifested primarily in the cardiovascular system. It potentially leads to aortic dissection and rupture, these being the major causes of death. We report a patient who complained of acute abdominal pain, which presented as acute mesenteric ischemia combined with abdominal aortic dissection. Echocardiography showed enlargement of the aortic root and mitral valve prolapse. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed acute mesenteric ischemia due to abdominal aortic dissection. Finally, the patient underwent surgery of aortic root replacement and had a successful outcome. Therefore, we suggest that for optimal risk assessment and monitoring of patients with Marfan syndrome, both aortic stiffness and the diameter of the superior mesenteric vein compared with that of the superior mesenteric artery are useful screening methods to detect acute mesenteric ischemia secondary to abdominal aortic dissection. Early diagnosis and early treatment can decrease the high mortality rate of patients with Marfan syndrome.

  9. Rome II versus Rome III classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders in pediatric chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Kari F; Anderson, Julia; Puzanovova, Martina; Walker, Lynn S

    2008-09-01

    The updated Rome III criteria for pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) include new FGID categories and changes to the Rome II criteria for various FGIDs. To our knowledge, the implications of these revisions for patient classification have not been identified. The purpose of this study was to compare classification results using Rome II versus Rome III criteria for FGIDs associated with chronic abdominal pain. Participants were 368 pediatric patients whose subspecialty evaluations for chronic abdominal pain yielded no evidence of organic disease. The children's gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed with the parent-report version of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms (QPGS). More patients met the criteria for a pediatric pain-related FGID according to the Rome III criteria (86.6%) than the Rome II criteria (68.0%). In comparison with the results from the Rome II criteria, the Rome III criteria classified a greater percentage of children as meeting criteria for Abdominal Migraine (23.1% vs 5.7%) and Functional Abdominal Pain (11.4% vs 2.7%). Irritable Bowel Syndrome was the most common diagnosis according to both Rome II (44.0%) and Rome III (45.1%). Changes to the Rome criteria make the Rome III criteria more inclusive, allowing classification of 86.6% of pediatric patients with medically unexplained chronic abdominal pain.

  10. Abdominal pain in a 70-year-old Danish population. An epidemiological study of the prevalence and importance of abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Jørgensen, Torben; Schultz-Larsen, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and importance of abdominal pain in the elderly, an epidemiological study of a 70-year-old Danish population was carried out. Seventy two percent of 1119 randomly selected persons answered a questionnaire concerning abdominal pain. One year prevalence of abdominal...... pain was 28% among women and 17% among men (p abdominal pain no significant sex difference was found as regards location, severity, frequency, or medicine consumption. Eleven percent of the men and 19% of the women had abdominal pain which they considered to be of importance...... to their well-being in terms of frequency, severity, or need of medicine (sex difference: chi 2 = 10.18, df = 2, p abdominal pain judged their general health to be better than those who had experienced abdominal pain (p abdominal pain is frequent...

  11. Perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen Lundorf, Luise; Korvenius Nedergaard, Helene; Møller, Ann Merete

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute postoperative pain is still an issue in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Postoperative pain and side effects of analgesic treatment, in particular those of opioids, need to be minimized. Opioid-sparing analgesics, possibly including dexmedetomidine, seem a promising avenue...

  12. [Diagnostic difficulties in pediatric abdominal pain with potential appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Stawarski, Andrzej; Czernik, Jerzy; Bronowickip, Krzysztof; Iwańczak, Franciszek; Pytrus, Tomasz; Klempous, Jan; Godziński, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain is one of the most common symptom of children brought to attention of primary care physicians and pediatric surgeons. In many children clinical symptoms may be uncharacteristic and may lead to diagnostic difficulties. Clinical analysis of children with right lower quadrant abdominal pain suspected of appendicitis or children with periappendicular mass. The histories of 14 children aged from 18 months to 17 years treated in Pediatric Clinic were analysed. All children were operated because of right lower quadrant abdominal pain or abdominal mass before admission to the Pediatric Clinic or during hospitalization in Pediatric Clinic. Intraoperatively in all children pathologies other than appendicitis were the cause of symptoms. The most often Crohn's disease were recognized (9 children), in 2 cases with concomitant other pathologies (fecal tumor of appendix in one case and with peritoneal abscess after perforation of intestinal wall). Sporadically the inflammation of the mesenterial lymph nodes caused by Yersinia infection suggested appendicitis. In one boy with ulcerative colitis, during exacerbation of the disease appendicitis complicated by rupture and peritonitis was observed. In 18-month old child with right lower quadrant abdominal mass invagination complicated by perforation of the ileum was recognized. In the case of 14-years old boy 6 months after appendectomy we observed mechanical intestinal obstruction complicated by perforation and peritonitis. Carcinoid of the appendix was the cause of abdominal pain in one child. 1. Appendicitis is the most frequent surgical etiology of the right lower quadrant pediatric abdominal pain. 2. Despite new diagnostic imagines there are no definite criteria to recognize appendicitis, in most cases physical examination and very carefull evaluation of abdominal pain are the most important. 3. All children with periappendipected of Crohn's disease. 4. All children with equivocal presentations of

  13. Supraspinal TRPV1 modulates the emotional expression of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurik, Angela; Ressle, Andrea; Schmid, Roland M; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2014-10-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type-1 (TRPV1) is critically involved in peripheral nociceptive processes of somatic and visceral pain. However, the role of the capsaicin receptor in the brain regarding visceral pain remains elusive. Here, we studied the contribution of TRPV1 to abdominal pain transmission at different nociceptive pathway levels using TRPV1 knock-out mice, resiniferatoxin-mediated deletion of TRPV1-positive primary sensory neurons, and intracerebral TRPV1 antagonism. We found that constitutive genetic TRPV1 deletion or peripheral TRPV1 deletion reduced acetic acid-evoked abdominal constrictions, without affecting referred abdominal hyperalgesia or allodynia in an acute pancreatitis model of visceral pain. Notably, intracerebral TRPV1 antagonism by SB 366791 significantly reduced chemical and inflammatory spontaneous abdominal nocifensive responses, as observed by reduced expressions of nociceptive facial grimacing, illustrating the affective component of pain. In addition to the established role of cerebral TRPV1 in anxiety, fear, or emotional stress, we demonstrate here for the first time that TRPV1 in the brain modulates visceral nociception by interfering with the affective component of abdominal pain.

  14. A case of abdominal compartment syndrome derived from simple elongated sigmoid colon in an elderly man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Masaaki; Kitajima, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroharu

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome or intra-abdominal hypertension may occur after intra-abdominal events, but their etiology and clinical signs remain unclear. We report a case of abdominal compartment syndrome in an elderly patient without other risk factors. An 86-year-old man had been admitted to our hospital several times for a dilated sigmoid colon with elongation, and had complained about abdominal pain and abdominal fullness. At every admission we decompressed the sigmoid colon gas by colonoscopy, resulting in early discharge the following day. Recently, the patient developed dementia and experienced reduced activities of daily living that are common with aging. He frequently complained of severe abdominal distension with hypotension, tachycardia and tachypnea, and finally entered hospital twice a week. We decided to perform elective surgery, which showed abdominal compartment syndrome caused by elongated sigmoid colon without volvulus (the first reported case). Considering the increase in the aging population, we must bear in mind that abdominal compartment syndrome may occur in simple elongated sigmoid colon without other risk factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Support Vector Machine Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Nalin, Kajsa; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Malmgren, Helge

    This study explores the feasibility of a decision-support system for patients seeking care for acute abdominal pain, and, specifically the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis. We used a linear support vector machine (SVM) to separate diverticulitis from all other reported cases of abdominal pain and from the important differential diagnosis non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). On a database containing 3337 patients, the SVM obtained results comparable to those of the doctors in separating diverticulitis or NSAP from the remaining diseases. The distinction between diverticulitis and NSAP was, however, substantially improved by the SVM. For this patient group, the doctors achieved a sensitivity of 0.714 and a specificity of 0.963. When adjusted to the physicians' results, the SVM sensitivity/specificity was higher at 0.714/0.985 and 0.786/0.963 respectively. Age was found as the most important discriminative variable, closely followed by C-reactive protein level and lower left side pain.

  16. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: abdominal pain in women of 26 years old Síndrome de Fitz-Hugh-Curtis: dolor abdominal en mujer de 26 años

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liseth Rivero-Sánchez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is an inflammation of the liver capsule as a complication of pelvic inflammatory disease, whose most common etiologic agent is the C. trachomatis. The acute phase of the Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome may present itself with pain in right upper abdomen, commonly confused with other hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tract diseases. Definitive diagnosis is now possible with non-invasive techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography, as well as techniques to isolate the responsible germ, available in most centers.El síndrome de Fitz-Hugh-Curtis es una inflamación de la cápsula hepática, como complicación de una enfermedad inflamatoria pélvica, cuyo agente etiológico más frecuente es la C. trachomatis. La fase aguda del síndrome de Fitz-Hugh-Curtis puede presentarse con dolor en cuadrante superior derecho del abdomen, confundiéndose comúnmente con otras enfermedades hepatobiliares y del tracto gastrointestinal. El diagnóstico definitivo es posible hoy en día por técnicas no invasivas como ecografía, tomografía computarizada, además de técnicas para el aislamiento del germen responsable disponibles en la mayoría de los centros.

  17. Dietary issues in recurrent abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many children and adults suffer from belly pain that comes and goes. This article reviews the scientific evidence that in some people, the type of diet they eat can cause pain. In some children, not having enough fiber in the diet can cause belly pain. Adding specific types of fiber can improve the ...

  18. Ascariasis as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Gerly Edson; Teves, Pedro Montes; Monge, Eduardo

    2010-04-01

    Ascariasis is the most common helminthic infection in developing countries. It may cause chronic abdominal pain, tenderness and bloating. Our aim is to report a case of acute episodic abdominal pain and pancreatitis associated with ascariasis. We report a 59-year-old female patient who was admitted for acute abdominal pain, having had several previous similar events before one of them was diagnosed as acute idiopathic pancreatitis. On admission, her physical exam was normal. Laboratory results showed hemoglobin 12.2 g/dL, white blood cell count 11 900 cells/mm(3), eosinophils 420 cells/mm(3), serum amylase 84 IU/mL, lipase 22 IU/mL and normal liver function tests. Abdominal ultrasound and a plain abdominal X-ray were also normal. An upper endoscopy showed round white worms in the duodenum and the stomach, some of them with bile in their intestines. The intestinal parasites were diagnosed as Ascaris lumbricoides, and the patient was started on albendazole, with full recovery within a week. We believe that ascariasis should be considered in patients with recurrent abdominal pain and idiopathic pancreatitis.

  19. Epidemiology, diagnosis and management of functional abdominal pain in children: A look beyond the belly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain represents a common problem in children. In almost 90% of children presenting with chronic abdominal pain, no organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain is made. Initially this condition was referred to as ‘recurrent abdominal pain’ by Apley and Naish

  20. Epidemiology, diagnosis and management of functional abdominal pain in children: A look beyond the belly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain represents a common problem in children. In almost 90% of children presenting with chronic abdominal pain, no organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain is made. Initially this condition was referred to as ‘recurrent abdominal pain’ by Apley and Naish

  1. A case of lipoma of parietal peritoneum causing abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Chang Seok; Kim, Yeon Soo; Baik, Gwang Ho; Han, Sang Hak

    2014-06-01

    Lipomas are common benign tumors of mature adipose tissue, enclosed by thin fibrous capsules. They can occur on any part of the body; however, peritoneal lipoma is extremely rare. We encountered a case of a 75-year-old man presenting with intermittent abdominal pain, who had undergone right hemicolectomy due to colon cancer. Abdominal computerized tomography showed a well-defined heterogenous fatty mass measuring 4.5 × 3.5 cm in size, suggesting fat necrosis located in the abdominal wall. Laparotomy showed a very large soft mass of peritoneum. Pathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as lipoma containing fat necrosis located in parietal peritoneum not fixed to any organs, but with small bowel adhesion. Due to its rare etiologic origin and obscure cause of development, we report on a case of lipoma of parietal peritoneum causing abdominal pain.

  2. [A young woman with acute abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, R.; Dillen, J. van

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old woman was operated in a Tanzanian hospital because of a suspected ruptured ectopic pregnancy. During laparatomy an interstitial ectopic pregnancy with an intact gestational sac was found. The ectopic pregnancy had ruptured into the abdominal cavity.

  3. Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebelitz KR

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Karl Rüdiger Wiebelitz, André-Michael BeerDepartment of True Naturopathy, Blankenstein Hospital, Hattingen, GermanyAbstract: A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case.Keywords: Iberis amara combination, early dumping syndrome, late dumping syndrome

  4. An unusual case of fever and abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati G Diwan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascariasis is one of the commonest parasitic infestations in tropical countries. Main symptoms are pain in abdomen, weight loss, diarrhea and passage of worms in stool. If acute, it may present as intestinal obstruction, perforation, cholangitis, appendicitis and pancreatitis. The incidence of hepato-biliary ascariasis is probably underestimated. We report a case which presented to us with fever, abdominal pain and weight loss of a month′s duration, mimicking abdominal tuberculosis. On investigations, patient was found to have ascariasis of gall bladder, terminal ileum, caecum and appendix, causing simultaneous inflammation of all these structures.

  5. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain: Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbanu Erkan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is a rare disease caused by torsion or spontaneous thrombosis of the central vein that drains epiploic appendages (EA. Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA is an ischemic infarction. Although PEA is a self-limiting disease and does not require surgical intervention in most cases, it may mimic diseases that require surgical intervention or aggressive medical therapy, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. In order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention, PEA should be kept in mind when patients present with acute abdominal pain. In this report, we present a PEA case admitted with abdominal pain.

  6. Acute abdominal pain in children: usefulness of three-view abdominal radiographs in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lulu; Park, Ellen; Vachhani, Neil; Vogelius, Esben; Thupili, Chakradhar; Udayasankar, Unni

    2016-10-01

    Diagnostic imaging is often an integral component in the workup of a pediatric patient with acute abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of a three-view acute abdominal series (AAS) with that of a single supine view (SSV) in children with acute abdominal pain. All subjects aged ≤18 years that underwent an emergency three-view AAS examination for acute abdominal pain at a single urban hospital system were included. Retrospective evaluation of radiological diagnosis, number of radiological images, further imaging, management, and clinical outcomes was performed. "Positive" AAS studies were compared with corresponding SSV images for direct comparison of diagnostic value. Standard nonparametric statistical evaluation was performed. Five hundred forty-one AAS studies were included in the study. Greater than three radiographs were acquired in 29 % (153/541) of the subjects. Two hundred ninety-nine out of 541 AAS studies included a technically adequate SSV of the abdomen and pelvis. Most AAS examinations were categorized as negative (n = 485; 90 %). Of the 56 examinations initially classified as positive, there was no significant statistical difference between diagnostic accuracy between the AAS and SSV on retrospective evaluation. For pediatric subjects with nontraumatic acute abdominal pain, the yield of conventional radiographic study is exceedingly low. If required, a technically adequate single supine anteroposterior (AP) view of the abdomen and pelvis is sufficient for initial radiographic evaluation while reducing unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient.

  7. Diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, Robert D

    2014-05-01

    Myofascial pain is one of the most common causes of pain. The diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is made by muscle palpation. The source of the pain in MPS is the myofascial trigger point, a very localized region of tender, contracted muscle that is readily identified by palpation. The trigger point has well-described electrophysiologic properties and is associated with a derangement of the local biochemical milieu of the muscle. A proper diagnosis of MPS includes evaluation of muscle as a cause of pain, and assessment of associated conditions that have an impact on MPS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [13-Year old boy with abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Irene; Klinkhamer, Paul J J M; van de Poll, Marcel C G

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year old boy presents with pain in the lower right abdomen, showing clinical signs of appendicitis. During McBurney' incision an appendix sana was seen. Histologic examination showed penetrating enterobiasis. This was treated with mebendazol.

  9. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el angioedema hereditario es un trastorno inflamatorio episódico, que se hereda de manera autosómica dominante y se caracteriza por episodios de edema periférico. Los pacientes pueden tener edema de la pared de cualquier víscera hueca, incluido el intestino. Caso clínico: se comunica el caso de un paciente masculino de 33 años de edad, sin antecedentes de importancia, con dolor abdominal, localizado en el epigastrio, irradiado al cuadrante inferior derecho, acompañado de 5 vómitos. La tomografía abdominal mostró engrosamiento de la pared de la segunda y tercera porción del duodeno, con infiltración de grasa y líquido libre. Los exámenes de laboratorio mostraron: concentraciones bajas del complemento C4 (5.5 mg/dL) y actividad del inhibidor de C1 del complemento de 30%. Conclusiones: el angioedema hereditario es consecuencia de la deficiencia (tipo I) o disfunción (tipo II) del inhibidor C1 del complemento. El dolor abdominal asociado con angioedema es de inicio súbito, como dolor cólico, recurrente y de intensidad moderada. En la actualidad existen dos medicamentos aprobados por la Food and Drug Administration para el tratamiento de pacientes con esta afección.

  10. [Professor WU Xu's clinical experiences on acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Liang; Lu, Bin; Sun, Jian-Hua; Ai, Bing-Wei; Bao, Chao; Wu, Wen-Zhong; Li, Jian-Bing; Liu, Lan-Ying; Wu, Wen-Yun; Pei, Li-Xia; Zhou, Jun-Ling; Li, Yan-Cai; Qin, Shan

    2014-03-01

    The clinical experiences and proven cases of distinguished doctor of TCM, professor WU Xu, on acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain is introduced. Professor WU's manipulation characteristics of acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain, including acute cholecystitis, kidney stone, acute stomach pain, are one-hand shape but both hands in nature, moving like Tai Chi, force on the tip of needle, movement of qi mainly. The main technique posture is one-hand holding needle with middle finger for pressing, the needle is hold by thumb and index finger, and is assisted by middle finger. The special acupuncture experience of emergency is treatment according to syndrome differentiation, combination of acupuncture and moxibustion, selecting acupoint based on experience, blood-letting acupuncture therapy and so on.

  11. Management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of developing of intra abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Aim: This review seeks to define IAH and ACS, identify the aetiology and presentation of IAH and ACS, identify IAP measurement techniques, identify current management and discuss the implications of IAH and ACS for nursing practice. A search of the electronic databases was supervised by a health librarian. The electronic data bases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Medline, EMBASE, and the World Wide Web was undertaken from 1996- January 2011 using MeSH and key words which included but not limited to: abdominal compartment syndrome, intra -abdominal hypertension, intra-abdominal pressure in adult populations met the search criteria and were reviewed by three authors using a critical appraisal tool. Data derived from the retrieved material are discussed under the following themes: (1) etiology of intra-abdominal hypertension; (2) strategies for measuring intra-abdominal pressure (3) the manifestation of abdominal compartment syndrome; and (4) the importance of nursing assessment, observation and interventions. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have the potential to alter organ perfusion and compromise organ function. PMID:24499574

  12. [Epiploic appendagitis: a rare cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marín, Andrés; Nofuentes-Riera, Carmen; Mella-Laborde, Mario; Pérez-López, Mercedes; Pérez-Bru, Susana; Rubio-Cerdido, José María

    2014-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is an atypical cause of abdominal pain whose knowledge could avoid diagnostic or treatment errors. Diagnosis has been performed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography with the only treatment being nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To analyze patients diagnosed in our hospital. We performed a 4-year retrospective and descriptive study (March 2009-March 2013) of patients diagnosed with epiploic appendagitis in our hospital. Seventeen patients were included, 14 females and three males with a median age of 57 years. Symptom delay was 72 h. Abdominal pains were located in the left lower quadrant in 64.7% and right lower quadrant in 35.3% of patients. Blood test demonstrated leukocytes 6,300 (5,000-9,500), neutrophils 61.6% (57-65.8), and C reactive protein 1.5 (0.85-2.92). Diagnosis was confirmed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography in 88.2% and intraoperatively in 11.8%. Epiploic appendagitis was more frequent in women. Abdominal pain was located in the lower quadrant, more predominant in left than right. Blood tests were normal except for increased levels of C-reactive protein. Diagnosis was made mostly preoperatively due to imaging tests, avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention.

  13. 灸法对肠易激综合征慢性内脏痛镇痛效应的研究与展望%Moxibustion therapy for chronic abdominal pain due to irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包春辉; 吴焕淦; 黄任佳; 王硕硕; 周志刚; 胡智海; 赵继梦; 王思瑶; 谭琳蓥; 刘世敏

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Chronic visceral pain is one of major complaints of irritable bowel syndrome which seriously affects patient’s quality of life. Recent researches have shown that moxibustion therapy has positive effects on aleviating chronic visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical utility of moxibustion in coping with chronic visceral pain of irritable bowel syndrome patients, and shed light on the theoretical basis of moxibustion analgesia, thereby to give insights into the further research and application on moxibustion. METHODS: With the key words of “moxibustion, irritable bowel syndrome, visceral pain, abdominal pain” in Chinese and in English, respectively, a computer-based search was performed in CNKI, VIP, Wanfang and PubMed databases for articles published from January 1990 to October 2014. After the initial screening, the remained articles went through further selection and categorization. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The result shows promising results of moxibustion on relieving chronic visceral pain for both two subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome patients, diarrhea type and constipation type. Moxibustion may exert an analgesic effect on chronic visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome patients through regulation of visceral hypersensitivity, gastrointestinal motility disorders, brain-gut axis and neuroendocrine system disorders, immune dysfunction and low-grade inflammation in the gut, psychological abnormalities, and alteration of intestinal flora. However, to fuly understand the analgesia effect of moxibustion and elucidate its mechanism, more standardized randomized controled trials employing advanced scientific techniques and equipments wil stil be needed in the future.%背景:慢性内脏痛是肠易激综合征患者最主要的临床表现之一,患者的生活质量受到严重影响。近年研究表明,灸法对肠易激综合征患者慢性内脏痛的治疗取得了一定

  14. Prognostic factors for persistence of chronic abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, M.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Y.; Passchier, J.; Berger, M.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for the persistence of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in children. Materials and Methods: For this systematic review, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched up to June 2008 for prospective follow-up studies of pediatric CAP as de

  15. Risk factors for chronic postsurgical abdominal and pelvic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijckevorsel, D.C.M. van; Vries, M. de; Schreuder, L.T.W.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) may develop after any surgical procedure, and is a common feature after abdominal and pelvic surgery with a prevalence varying between 10 and 40%. The pathological mechanisms leading to chronic CPSP are probably inflammation, tissue and nerve damage and alter

  16. EGD IN CHILDREN WITH ABDOMINAL PAIN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review to examine the diagnostic yield (endoscopic and histologic) of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for the evaluation of abdominal pain of unclear etiology in children. We also examined the effect of EGD on change in treatment, quality of life, change in abd...

  17. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  18. Prognostic factors for persistence of chronic abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, M.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Y.; Passchier, J.; Berger, M.Y.

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for the persistence of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in children. Materials and Methods: For this systematic review, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched up to June 2008 for prospective follow-up studies of pediatric CAP as

  19. Significance of Tomography and CRP in Abdominal Pain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Simsek

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on our study; in the event of abdominal pain, CRP can predict abnormal tomography finding and it is more valuable than leucocyte. When tomography was used with CRP, it affects the operation decision. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 766-773

  20. Risk factors for chronic postsurgical abdominal and pelvic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijckevorsel, D.C.M. van; Vries, M. de; Schreuder, L.T.W.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) may develop after any surgical procedure, and is a common feature after abdominal and pelvic surgery with a prevalence varying between 10 and 40%. The pathological mechanisms leading to chronic CPSP are probably inflammation, tissue and nerve damage and alter

  1. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  2. Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Treatment Review

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Mehul J.; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigge...

  3. Managing nonmalignant chronic abdominal pain and malignant bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicanovsky, Lesley K; Lagman, Ruth L; Davis, Mellar P; Walsh, Declan

    2006-03-01

    Evaluation of abdominal pain requires an understanding of the possible causes(benign or malignant) and recognition of typical patterns and clinical presentation. Abdominal pain has multiple causes; associated signs and symptoms may aid in the diagnosis. Remember that some patients will not have a textbook presentation, and unusual causes for pain must be considered. Those with chronic pancreatitis with structural complications should be operated on early, whereas those with other types of chronic pancreatitis should receive medical therapy focusing on alleviating symptoms. Control of the most troublesome symptoms will provide the best management for IBS. Pharmacologic success in bowel obstruction depends on the level and degree of obstruction. Decision making is based on reasonable expectations of survival, treatment-related success, performance status, and goals of care. Quality of life will be enhanced by appropriate symptom management.

  4. Prognosis of abdominal pain in children in primary care : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Spee, Leo A A; Benninga, Marc A; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Berger, Marjolein Y

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Abdominal pain is a common complaint in children. Because few data exist on its natural history, we wanted to investigate the prognosis of abdominal pain in children in general practice. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study of children (aged 4 to 17 years) complaining of abdominal pain, f

  5. Protozoa as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Schweizer, Joachim J; Büller, Hans A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether protozoa can be identified as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and whether protozoan infections can be recognized by a specific clinical presentation. For 2 years, all patients (ages 4-16 years) fulfilling the Apley criteria of RAP referred to secondary care were prospectively evaluated for protozoa (Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis, Blastocystis hominis) and treated if positive. Re-examination followed at least 10 days after treatment. Disappearance of pain with eradication and a pain-free follow-up of at least 6 months were considered to be indicative of a causal relation with RAP. The predictive value of the characteristics of the pain for protozoan infections was calculated. Of 220 included patients (92 boys, mean age 8.8 years), 215 brought a stool sample; 73 (34%) carried parasites, 10 of whom had 2 parasites, 2 had 3 parasites. Sixty-five patients were treated. Twenty-five (11%) were pain-free after eradication (21 had D fragilis, 8 B hominis, 4 G lamblia), of whom 11 had another infection (2) or constipation (9) as second diagnosis for the pain. Five had recurrence of infection with D fragilis and were again pain-free with eradication. Patients with protozoa as cause of their pain did not show differences with respect to their presentation when compared with patients with an asymptomatic infection and patients without protozoa. Protozoa were found as the cause of pain in 6% to 11% of children with RAP. These patients did not show a characteristic presentation when compared with patients with other causes of abdominal pain.

  6. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Hofker, H. S.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS, in

  7. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B; Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Hofker, H.S.; Zijlstra, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS

  8. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Hofker, H. S.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS, in particula

  9. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Sands, Daniel Z. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Edlow, Jonathan [Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  10. Characteristics of pain and stooling in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: To collect symptom data longitudinally from children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and control (asymptomatic) children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Children with RAP (n = 77) and controls (n = 33) 7 to 10 years of age completed daily diaries for 2 weeks tracking pain frequency and severi...

  11. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  12. Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome (MPDS)

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome (MPDS) is one of the most important causes of the orofacial pain. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate 40 related variables in this regard. Materials and Methods: Thirty nine patients with MPDS were evaluated in this study. Different factors including age, gender, occupation, marital status, sensitivity of masticatory muscles, maximum opening of the mouth, deviation, deflection, involvement of temporomandibular joint, habit, parafun...

  13. Excision of a large abdominal wall lipoma improved bowel passage in a Proteus syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Kusuda, Shinichi; Nagata, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2009-07-14

    Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder that produces multifocal overgrowth of tissue. This report presents a surgical case of a large lipoma in the abdominal wall of a patient with Proteus syndrome. She was diagnosed with Proteus syndrome based on certain diagnostic criteria. The neoplasm increased in size gradually, producing hemihypertrophy of her left lower extremity and trunk, and spread to her retroperitoneum and her left abdominal wall. She experienced gradually progressive constipation, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the left lower abdominal wall which measured 12 cm x 8 cm x 6 cm in diameter and encased the left colon. This mass in the abdominal wall was excised. The weight of the excised mass was 1550 g. The histopathological diagnosis of this mass was lipoma. After surgery, the encasement of the left colon was improved, and the patient was able to move her bowels twice per day. The excision of the large lipoma in the abdominal wall contributed to the improved bowel passage in this patient with Proteus syndrome.

  14. The abdominal compartment syndrome : A complication with many faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, P.; Nijsten, MWN; Paling, JC; Zwaveling, JH

    2001-01-01

    Background: Lately renewed attention has been given to the abdominal compartment syndrome. Despite of this there still remain a lot of controversies with regard to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this syndrome and the therapeutic options. Methods: Two cases of patients with this syndrom

  15. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  16. Myofascial pain syndrome: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Anudeep; Chansoria, Mayank; Tomar, Gaurav; Kumar, Abhyuday

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few decades, advances have been made in the understanding of myofascial pain syndromes (MPSs). In spite of its high prevalence in the society, it is not a commonly established diagnosis. MPS is said to be the great imitator. This article puts some light on the various clinical presentations of the syndrome, on the various tools to reach to a diagnosis for commencing the treatment and on the treatment modalities that have been used so far.

  17. Pain syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Sergeyevna Filatova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects and methods. One hundred and eighty-three patients with valid rheumatoid arthritis (RA were examined to study the specific fea tures of chronic pain syndrome. The DN4 neuropathic pain diagnostic questionnaire was used to divide all the patients into 2 groups: 1 78 patients with the neuropathic component of pain (NCP and 2 105 patients without the latter. Results. A clinical neurological examination could reveal peripheral nervous system lesion in 96% of Group 1 patients and in 4% of Group 2 ones. The patients with NCP were ascertained to be older, they were longer ill with RA, had higher clinical, X-ray stages and functional class, as well as higher pain intensity. However, no differences were found between the two groups in the values of disease activity (DAS 28 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. There was a high rate (71% of depressive disorders, the prevalence and degree of which in RA patients were determined by the characteristics of disease severity and did not depend on the presence of NCP. Discussion. The performed study demonstrated that, along with an obligate nociceptive mechanism, the patients with RA had neurogenic and psychogenic components of pain in 43 and 71% of cases, respectively. Consequently, chronic pain syndrome in RA is commonly mixed and both the activity of the inflammatory process and the magnitude of neurogenic and psychogenic components should be borne in mind for optimal pain control.

  18. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain: Primary Appendagitis Epiploica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Ergun

    2014-03-01

    Primary appendagitis epiploica – one of the causes of acute abdominal pain – is a self-limited rare benign inflammatory condition involving the colonic epiploic appendages. Their therapy is conservative and clinically mimics other conditions requiring surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. However, being a quite rare condition is the reason they are usually neglected by both the surgeon and the radiologist. However the computed tomography (CT findings are rather characteristic and pathognomonic. Thus, to consider CT as the diagnostic modality of choice is extremely important in order to diagnose the condition and to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.             This is a paper reporting an acute abdominal pain case of primary appendicitis epiploica diagnosed using computed tomography. 

  19. Myofascial pain syndrome: a treatment review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mehul J; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigger points and muscle pain. Through a critical evidence-based review of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, the authors aim to provide clinicians with a more comprehensive knowledge of the interventions for myofascial pain.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound for chronic abdominal pain and gallbladder disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, B; Dill, J E; Berkhouse, L; Palmer, S T

    1999-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a major advance in gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS, which is invaluable in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancer, is now being used in the diagnosis of chronic upper abdominal pain. EUS combined with stimulated biliary drainage (EUS/SBD) aids in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis, cholecystitis, microlithiasis, and various conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the EUS/SBD procedure and nursing care. Two case histories illustrating potential benefits to patients are presented.

  1. WITHDRAWN : Exercise therapy for patellofemoral pain syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintjes, Edith M; Berger, Marjolein; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita Ma; Bernsen, Roos Md; Verhaar, Jan An; Koes, Bart W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common problem among adolescents and young adults, characterised by retropatellar pain (behind the kneecap) or peripatellar pain (around the kneecap) when ascending or descending stairs, squatting or sitting with flexed knees. Etiology, structures

  2. WITHDRAWN : Exercise therapy for patellofemoral pain syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintjes, Edith M; Berger, Marjolein; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita Ma; Bernsen, Roos Md; Verhaar, Jan An; Koes, Bart W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common problem among adolescents and young adults, characterised by retropatellar pain (behind the kneecap) or peripatellar pain (around the kneecap) when ascending or descending stairs, squatting or sitting with flexed knees. Etiology, structures

  3. Imaging central pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S; Greenspan, Joel D; Kim, Jong H; Coghill, Robert C; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ohara, Shinji; Lenz, Frederick A

    2007-06-01

    Anatomic, functional, and neurochemical imaging studies have provided new investigative tools in the study of central pain. High-resolution imaging studies allow for precise determination of lesion location, whereas functional neuroimaging studies measure pathophysiologic consequences of injury to the central nervous system. Additionally, magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluates lesion-induced neurochemical changes in specific brain regions that may be related to central pain. The small number of studies to date precludes definitive conclusions, but the recent findings provide information that either supports or refutes current hypotheses and can serve to generate new ideas.

  4. Treatment of acute abdominal pain in the emergency room: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falch, C; Vicente, D; Häberle, H; Kirschniak, A; Müller, S; Nissan, A; Brücher, B L D M

    2014-08-01

    Appropriate pain therapy prior to diagnosis in patients with acute abdominal pain remains controversial. Several recent studies have demonstrated that pain therapy does not negatively influence either the diagnosis or subsequent treatment of these patients; however, current practice patterns continue to favour withholding pain medication prior to diagnosis and surgical treatment decision. A systematic review of PubMed, Web-of-Science and The-Cochrane-Library from 1929 to 2011 was carried out using the key words of 'acute', 'abdomen', 'pain', 'emergency' as well as different pain drugs in use, revealed 84 papers. The results of the literature review were incorporated into six sections to describe management of acute abdominal pain: (1) Physiology of Pain; (2) Common Aetiologies of Abdominal Pain; (3) Pre-diagnostic Analgesia; (4) Pain Therapy for Acute Abdominal Pain; (5) Analgesia for Acute Abdominal Pain in Special Patient Populations; and (6) Ethical and Medico-legal Considerations in Current Analgesia Practices. A comprehensive algorithm for analgesia for acute abdominal pain in the general adult population was developed. A review of the literature of common aetiologies and management of acute abdominal pain in the general adult population and special patient populations seen in the emergency room revealed that intravenous administration of paracetamol, dipyrone or piritramide are currently the analgesics of choice in this clinical setting. Combinations of non-opioids and opioids should be administered in patients with moderate, severe or extreme pain, adjusting the treatment on the basis of repeated pain assessment, which improves overall pain management.

  5. Comparison of ambulance dispatch protocols for nontraumatic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, R L; Roth, B A; Utecht, T

    1995-11-01

    To compare rates of undertriage and overtriage of six ambulance dispatch protocols for the presenting complaint of nontraumatic abdominal pain, and to identify the optimal protocol. Retrospective prehospital and emergency department chart review to classify patients' conditions as "emergency" or "nonemergency." Utility analysis was used to identify the preferred protocol and monetary cost-effectiveness analysis to identify the least expensive protocol. County emergency medical services (EMS) system with five receiving hospitals serving a mainly urban population of approximately 350,000. Records of 902 patients who called 911 for nontraumatic abdominal pain were reviewed; patients not transported were excluded. Twenty-seven county EMS medical directors completed questionnaires. Six ambulance dispatch protocols for nontraumatic abdominal pain were developed: indiscriminate-dispatch, four selective protocols, and no-dispatch. A dichotomous classification system was derived prospectively from the prehospital and medical records of patients who had activated the EMS system before the study period to define "emergency" and "nonemergency" conditions associated with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Emergency criteria identified patients with conditions requiring medical treatment within 1 hour. Reviewers determined, for each patient, whether an ambulance would have been dispatched by each of the protocols. Undertriage and overtriage rates were calculated for each protocol. County EMS medical directors assigned utility values to four potential outcomes of ambulance dispatch by the direct scaling method. The outcomes comprised correct and incorrect decisions to dispatch ambulances to patients with and without emergencies. The protocols were compared by decision analysis. A cost analysis was also performed, using an estimated marginal cost per transport of $302. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated the effect of varying the cost of an undertriage error and the cost per response. Of

  6. [Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate.

  7. A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Abdominal Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-10

    typically present with abdominal pain, vomiting, intractable constipation, abdominal distension, and failure to pass feces or flatus . The abdominal pain...obstruction. Diarrhea may be evident early and, if the obstruction is complete, followed by failure to pass either flatus or feces. The PHYSICAL

  8. Excision of a large abdominal wall lipoma improved bowel passage in a Proteus syndrome patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshifumi Nakayama; Shinichi Kusuda; Naoki Nagata; Koji Yamaguchi

    2009-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder that produces multifocal overgrowth tissue. This report presents a surgical case of a large lipoma in the abdominal wall of a patient with Proteus syndrome. She was diagnosed with Proteus syndrome based on certain diagnostic criteria. The neoplasm increased in size gradually, producing hemihypertrophy of her left lower extremity and trunk, and spread to her retroperitoneum and her left abdominal wall. She experienced gradually progressive constipation,nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen demonstrated large mass in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the cm x 6 cm in diameter and encased the left colon. This mass in the abdominal wall was excised. The weight of the excised mass was 1550 g. The histopathological diagnosis of this mass was lipoma. After surgery, the encasement of the left colon was improved, and the patient was able to move her bowels twice per day. The excision of the large lipoma in the abdominal wall contributed to the improved bowel passage in this patient with Proteus syndrome.

  9. Abdominal compartment syndrome successfully treated with neuromuscular blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris T Chiles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48 year old male admitted to the intensive care unit after a cardiac arrest complicated by a stroke intra-operatively during automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. He post-operatively developed a rigid abdomen, elevated peak and plateau pressures, hypoxia and renal insufficiency. He was diagnosed with abdominal compartment syndrome with an intra-abdominal compartment pressure of 40mmHg. The patient was administered 10 mg of intravenous cisatracuriumbesylate in preparation for bedside surgical abdominal decompression. Cisatracurium eliminated the patients need for surgical intervention by reducing his abdominal compartment pressures to normal and improving his hypoxia and renal function. This case illustrates that neuromuscular blockade should be attempted in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome prior to surgical intervention.

  10. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Tariq; Latif, Hina; Shabbir, Bilquis

    2014-07-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile viral disease caused by the bite of Aedes aegypti mosquito. It is a major health problem especially in tropical and subtropical areas including South East Asia and Pakistan. In the past few years, dengue fever has been endemic in Northern Punjab. Physicians managing dengue fever come across varied and uncommon complications of dengue fever. We report a case of dengue fever that developed severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain and induration after extreme retching and vomiting for 2 days. A rectus sheath hematoma was confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Rectus sheath hematoma as a complication of dengue fever has rarely been reported before and never from this part of the world. Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon and often clinically misdiagnosed cause of abdominal pain. It is the result of bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the superior or inferior epigastric artery or their branches or from a direct tear of the rectus muscle. It can mimic almost any abdominal condition (See Fig.) (See Table).

  11. Diagnostic approach and management of acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Murdani; Firmansyah, M Adi

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of acute abdominal pain ranges between 5-10% of all visits at emergency department. Abdominal emergencies of hospital visits may include surgical and non-surgical emergencies. The most common causes of acute abdomen are appendicitis, biliary colic, cholecystitis, diverticulitis, bowel obstruction, visceral perforation, pancreatitis, peritonitis, salpingitis, mesenteric adenitis and renal colic. Good skills in early diagnosis require a sound knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology of gastrointestinal tract, which are reflected during history taking and particularly, physical examination of the abdomen. Advanced diagnostic approaches such as radiography and endoscopy enhance the treatment for acute abdomen including pharmacological and surgical treatment. Therapeutic endoscopy, interventional radiology treatment and therapy using adult laparoscopy are the common modalities for treating patients with acute abdomen.

  12. Hereditary angioedema (HAE): a cause for recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Parita; Kumar, Vivek; Alliu, Samson; Shetty, Vijay

    2016-11-14

    A 44-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency room with a 2-day history of sudden onset of severe cramping left lower quadrant abdominal pain associated with ∼20 episodes diarrhoea. Abdominal CT scan exhibited bowel wall oedema and acute extensive colitis. On the basis of the preliminary diagnosis of acute abdomen, the patient was admitted under the surgical team and treated for acute colitis. Since her family history was significant for hereditary angioedema (HAE), complement studies were performed which revealed low complement C4 levels and abnormally low values of C1q esterase inhibitor. Thus, the diagnosis of HAE type I was established. This case report summarises that the symptoms of HAE are often non-specific, hence making the underlying cause difficult to diagnose.

  13. Elderly Woman with Abdominal Pain: Bedside Ultrasound Diagnosis of Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D. Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old otherwise healthy female presented to the emergency department with two weeks of worsening abdominal pain. She was afebrile with normal vital signs. Her physical examination was notable for moderate abdominal tenderness without rebound to the left and suprapubic regions of the abdomen. Laboratory studies were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 13,000/mm3. A focused bedside ultrasound over the patient’s region of maximal discomfort revealed a thickened bowel wall and several small contiguous hypoechoic projections surrounding a hyperechoic center, suggestive of diverticulitis (Figure. She was given metronidazole and ciprofloxacin and her diagnosis of uncomplicated colonic diverticulitis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT.

  14. Association Between Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Uzar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. Previous studies on the association of CTS and obesity have generally considered body mass index (BMI. However, the relationships between CTS and waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, which are known as more sensitive measures for abdominal obesity, have not been studied previously. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the role of BMI and abdominal obesity in patients with CTS. METHODS: Female patients who applied to the neurology outpatient clinics with pain, numbness, paresthesia, or dysesthesia in the hands were included. The patients were divided into two groups, according to the clinical evaluation, as CTS or non-CTS. CTS diagnosis was electrophysiologically confirmed in 44 patients. Thirty-one subjects who were not diagnosed as CTS electrophysiologically were recruited as the control group. Clinical findings, nerve conduction studies and anthropometric measurements (height, weight, BMI, hip circumference, waist circumference and WHR of CTS patients were compared with those of the control group. RESULTS: The CTS group had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference and WHR values compared to the control group (for each parameter, p< 0.0001. The rates of obesity in the CTS group were 55.8%, 47.7% and 34.9%, respectively, according to waist circumference, BMI and WHR measurements. In the CTS group, 16% of the patients, who were defined as non-obese according to BMI, were determined as obese according to waist circumference. In the CTS group, significant positive correlations were found between BMI and WHR and median-ulnar sensory interpeak latency of the fourth digit (r= 0.26, p< 0.05; r= 0.25, p< 0.05, respectively. CONCLUSION: In this study, it was found that abdominal obesity is an important risk factor for CTS, and nerve conduction may be affected by waist circumference, BMI and WHR. In addition to general obesity, abdominal obesity may

  15. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome in general Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Brinks (Tineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome. These patients suffer from local pain at the lateral side of the hip. The syndrome is characterized by chronic intermittent or continuous pain at and around the greater trochanter, sometimes radiating to the lateral

  16. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability correlates with trait anxiety and urinary norepinephrine/creatinine (CR)ratio in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP)and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but not in controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAP and IBS affect 10–15% of school age children and bear many similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress/anxiety and increased GI permeability later in life. We h...

  17. 5-羟色胺转运体在肠易激综合征腹痛机制中的研究%Research of serotonin transporter in the mechanism of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 徐萍; 诸琦

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of serotonin transporter (SERT) in pathogenesis of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods Neonatal SD rats were divided into control group and IBS abdominal pain model group which was established by colorectal distension.The colon, nucleus raphes dorsalis (NRD) and prefrontal cortex (FC) tissues were harvested when all rats grew into adults. Expressions of SERT and 5-HT were determined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results The expression of SERT mRNA in colon, NRD and FC tissues in model and control group were 13.95±2.05 vs 8.65±1.33, 52.69±22.59 vs 13.82±5.71 and0.48±0.17 vs 0.17±0.14, respectively, with significant differences (all P values <0.05). The protein expression of SERT in colon and NRD,but not FC tissues,decreased in model group compared with control group (13.19±3.82 vs 21.35±4.49,2.47±0.44 vs 4.55±0.92, respectively, P<0.05).Meanwhile, in comparison with control group, the expression of 5-HT in colon was significantly increased in model group (5.56±0.48 vs 2.68±0.22), but decreased in NRD and FC tissues (3.75±0.43 vs 7.46±0.72, 5.07 ± 0.80 vs 7.97 ±1.10, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions Low expression of SERT in brain and colon may attribute to the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in IBS.%目的 探究5-羟色胺转运体(SERT)在肠易激综合征腹痛机制中的作用.方法 构建新生大鼠肠易激综合征腹痛模型,在其成年后取其结肠、脑干、额前皮质组织,应用免疫组化及实时PCR法检测各组织SERT定位和表达,并对各组织中5-羟色胺进行半定量分析.结果 模型组与对照组大鼠结肠、脑干、额前皮质中SERT mRNA表达水平分别为13.95±2.05比8.65±1.33、52.69±22.59比13.82±5.71、0.48±0.17比0.17±0.14,结肠、脑干中SERT蛋白表达水平分别为13.19±3.82比21.35±4.49、2.47±0.44比4.55±0.92,差异均有统计学意义(P值均<0.05),额前皮质SERT蛋白表达

  18. Abdominal Computed Tomography Utilization and 30‐day Revisitation in Emergency Department Patients Presenting With Abdominal Pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patterson, Brian W; Venkatesh, Arjun K; AlKhawam, Lora; Pang, Peter S; Carpenter, Christopher R

    2015-01-01

    ...) visitation within 30 days of ED discharge for patients presenting with abdominal pain. A retrospective, observational study was conducted at a single, academic, urban ED with over 85,000 annual visits...

  19. Acute renal infarction: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Butt, Mohammed A; Syed, Yadullah; Carr, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and under-diagnosed disease. Its clinical presentation is nonspecific and often mimics other more common disease entities. The diagnosis is usually missed or delayed, which frequently results in irreversible renal parenchyma damage. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis, as timely intervention may prevent loss of kidney function. We report a case of acute renal infarction following coronary angiography in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who initially presented with acute abdominal pain mimicking appendicitis.

  20. Estudo prospectivo de pacientes pediátricos com dor abdominal crônica Prospective study of infants with chronic abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Kores Dorsa

    2007-09-01

    were seen in a tertiary pediatric gastroenterology outclinic. Organic diseases were excluded by physical examination and laboratory procedures, and clinical complaints were evaluated according to Rome II criteria for children abdominal pain. In order to establish definitive diagnosis, patients were followed for a mean of three years. RESULTS: Allocation of the 71 patients was: organic disease (n=12, complete remission of symptoms following first clinical presentation (n=7, and functional disease (n=52. Nine patients from the organic disease group, who had been diagnosed as having lactose intolerance, were re-allocated to the functional disease criteria since their symptoms did not relieve when lactose was excluded from their diet. Out of the 52 patients of the functional disease group (median age=9.3 years, 50% boys, nine children with initial diagnosis of functional abdominal pain were re-allocated to functional constipation diagnosis during follow-up, and other 43 patients fulfilled the functional disease diagnosis defined by Rome II: 24 with functional dyspepsia, 18 with functional abdominal pain and one with irritable bowel syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: In a group of children with chronic abdominal pain, functional diseases were found more frequently than organic diseases, and functional dyspepsia was the commonest subtype. Long term follow-up was useful to establish definitive diagnosis in children with chronic abdominal pain.

  1. Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome (MPDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome (MPDS is one of the most important causes of the orofacial pain. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate 40 related variables in this regard. Materials and Methods: Thirty nine patients with MPDS were evaluated in this study. Different factors including age, gender, occupation, marital status, sensitivity of masticatory muscles, maximum opening of the mouth, deviation, deflection, involvement of temporomandibular joint, habit, parafunction, malocclusion, neck pain, headache, earache and history of jaw involvement, etc were analyzed in this  evaluation. Results: In our study, 39 patients (32 females and 7 males, 20-40 years old, with the average age of 35 ± 13.32 years were studied. 51% were housewives and 74.4% were married. The most common involvements were Clicking (74.4%, pain in temporomandibular joint (54%, headache (46.2%, earache (41%, neck-pain (35.9%, trouble in the mouth opening (71.8%, malocclusion Class I (74.4%, cross bite and deep bite (25%, clenching (64.1% and involvement of masseter and lateral pterygoid muscle (84%. Conclusion: Since MPDS consists of variable symptoms, it might be very difficult to provide any definite diagnosis and treatment. Therefore the more the specialists extend their knowledge and information about this disorder, the more they will make the best decision in this regard.

  2. Meig’s Syndrome:A Triad of Pleural Effusion, Abdominal Ascites, and Benign Ovarian Fibroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaseen Ali; Amila M. Parekh; Rahul K. Rao; Taseen Ali; Linda S. Schneider; Jordan Garvey; Mirza R. Baig

    2015-01-01

    Background:Meig’s syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by a triad of recurrent pleural effusions, ascites, and the finding of a benign ovarian fibroma on diagnostic imaging and histopathological evaluation. Patients can present with any of the constellation of symptoms attributing to the disease state. With pleural effusions they can present with shortness of breath, chest pressure, dyspnea on exertion; symptoms that can be confused with the exacerbation of congestive heart failure. Ascites can present with abdominal tenseness, pain, bloating, cramping, constipation, and elevated liver enzymes. The ifnding of a benign ovarian ifbroma is found only during diagnostic imaging and histopathological evaluation. Case report:The patients was an 85-year-old female with a recent history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery for her severe coronary artery disease presented with the chief complaint of generalized malaise, abdominal pain, constipation of few days. She was initially scheduled to have her second therapeutic thoracentesis for her recurrent pleural effusion as an outpatient procedure but complained of the former symptoms and was admitted for observation and treatment of her abdominal symptoms. Her recurrent pleural effusions were initially attributed to the complications of her coronary artery bypass graft surgery for her severe coronary artery disease. During the admission and evaluation she was diagnosed with Meig’s syndrome. She underwent a left oophorectomy with total abdominal hysterectomy that led to the resolution of all her symptoms. Conclusion:Meig’s syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by the triad of recurrent pleural effusions, ascites, and the ifnding of a benign ovarian ifbroma. The diagnosis and knowledge of this syndrome holds the key to its treatment. The treatment generally involves the resection of the ovarian ifbroma. After the resection of the ovarian ifbroma patients recover from the inconvenient pleural effusions and

  3. Abdominal Pain: A Comparison between Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Møller Faaborg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most spinal-cord-injured patients have constipation. One-third develop chronic abdominal pain 10 years or more after injury. Nevertheless, very little is known about the nature of abdominal pain after spinal cord injury (SCI. It may be neuropathic or caused by constipation. Aim. To compare characteristics of abdominal pain in SCI with able-bodied with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC. Subjects and Methods. 21 SCI and 15 CIC patients were referred for treatment of bowel symptoms. Constipation-related symptoms were assessed with the Cleveland Constipation Scoring System and the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Bowel Function Data Set. Characteristics of abdominal pain were described using the Brief Danish Pain Questionnaire. Total gastrointestinal transit times (GITT were measured by radiopaque markers. Results. Seventeen (81% SCI and 14 (93% CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort within the last month (. Pain was considered more intense by CIC than by SCI patients (. Only minor differences were found in patient’s qualitative description of abdominal pain or in the location of pain. In neither SCI nor CIC was pain associated with GITT. Conclusion. Most characteristics of abdominal pain among SCI patients resemble those of CIC. This indicates that constipation is a major cause of pain after SCI.

  4. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Eze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. Materials and Methods: A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008. Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Results: Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer′s patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Conclusion: Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of

  5. Paediatric Rome III Criteria-Related Abdominal Pain Is Associated With Helicobacter pylori and Not With Calprotectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sýkora, Josef; Huml, Michal; Siala, Konrad; Pomahačová, Renáta; Jehlička, Petr; Liška, Jiří; Kuntscherová, Jana; Schwarz, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children include functional dyspepsia, functional abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, and abdominal migraine. We aimed to evaluate a possible association between functional abdominal pain disorders and Helicobacter pylori infection and faecal calprotectin level. Prospective observational study including consecutive children with functional gastrointestinal disorders fulfilling Rome III criteria (cases) and age/sex-matched healthy controls. H pylori has been detected by biopsy-based tests and stool-antigen detection, faecal calprotectin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total of 56 cases (27 with functional dyspepsia) and 56 controls were enrolled. H pylori being detected in 17 of 56 cases (30.4%) and 4 of 56 controls (7.1%, odds ratio: 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8-18.2, P = 0.003). H pylori was detected significantly more frequently in cases with functional dyspepsia (14/27, 51.9% odds ratio: 14.0; 95% CI: 3.9-49.7, P = 0.00001) than in controls and not in cases with other well-recognized functional gastrointestinal complaints (3/29, 10.3%). The median faecal calprotectin level was similar in cases (7.8 μg/g, 95% CI: 7.8-8.4) including those with gastritis, and controls (9.1 μg/g, 95% CI: 7.8-11.3). Gastritis features were more frequent in H pylori-infected and noninfected cases with functional dyspepsia (27/27, 100%) than in cases with other abdominal functional complaints (15/29, 51.7%, P = 0.007). H pylori gastritis and noninfectious gastritis were associated with functional dyspepsia in children referred for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders while faecal calprotectin is not a predictor of gastritis and is similar in children with functional abdominal pain symptoms and in controls.

  6. Diagnostic profiles of acute abdominal pain with multinomial logistic regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohmann, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Application of multinomial logistic regression for diagnostic support of acute abdominal pain, a diagnostic problem with many differential diagnoses. Methods: The analysis is based on a prospective data base with 2280 patients with acute abdominal pain, characterized by 87 variables from history and clinical examination and 12 differential diagnoses. Associations between single variables from history and clinical examination and the final diagnoses were investigated with multinomial logistic regression. Results: Exemplarily, the results are presented for the variable rigidity. A statistical significant association was observed for generalized rigidity and the diagnoses appendicitis, bowel obstruction, pancreatitis, perforated ulcer, multiple and other diagnoses and for localized rigidity and appendicitis, diverticulitis, biliary disease and perforated ulcer. Diagnostic profiles were generated by summarizing the statistical significant associations. As an example the diagnostic profile of acute appendicitis is presented. Conclusions: Compared to alternative approaches (e.g. independent Bayes, loglinear model there are advantages for multinomial logistic regression to support complex differential diagnostic problems, provided potential traps are avoided (e.g. α-error, interpretation of odds ratio.

  7. Abdominal syndromes and functional ability in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Avlund, K

    1994-01-01

    Data concerning a random cohort of 1,119 70-year-old subjects were analyzed to evaluate the association between Upper Dyspepsia and Irritable Bowel Syndrome and functional ability. Seven hundred and thirty-four subjects were interviewed about abdominal symptoms and were visited at home by an occu...... that abdominal syndromes are associated to functional ability, suggesting that there is a diffuse disorder affecting both smooth and striated muscles.......Data concerning a random cohort of 1,119 70-year-old subjects were analyzed to evaluate the association between Upper Dyspepsia and Irritable Bowel Syndrome and functional ability. Seven hundred and thirty-four subjects were interviewed about abdominal symptoms and were visited at home...

  8. The complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Horowitz, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the current consensus-derived name for a syndrome usually triggered by limb trauma. Required elements include prolonged, disproportionate distal-limb pain and microvascular dysregulation (e.g., edema or color changes) or altered sweating. CRPS-II (formerly "causalgia") describes patients with identified nerve injuries. CRPS-I (formerly "reflex sympathetic dystrophy") describes most patients who lack evidence of specific nerve injuries. Diagnosis is clinical and the pathophysiology involves combinations of small-fiber axonopathy, microvasculopathy, inflammation, and brain plasticity/sensitization. Females have much higher risk and workplace accidents are a well-recognized cause. Inflammation and dysimmunity, perhaps facilitated by injury to the blood-nerve barrier, may contribute. Most patients, particularly the young, recover gradually, but treatment can speed healing. Evidence of efficacy is strongest for rehabilitation therapies (e.g., graded-motor imagery), neuropathic pain medications, and electric stimulation of the spinal cord, injured nerve, or motor cortex. Investigational treatments include ketamine, botulinum toxin, immunoglobulins, and transcranial neuromodulation. Nonrecovering patients should be re-evaluated for neurosurgically treatable causal lesions (nerve entrapment, impingement, infections, or tumors) and treatable potentiating medical conditions, including polyneuropathy and circulatory insufficiency. Earlier impressions that CRPS represents malingering or psychosomatic illness have been replaced by evidence that CRPS is a rare complication of limb injury in biologically susceptible individuals. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An unusual abdominal pain in the emergency department: a delayed presentation of diaphragmatic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Paolillo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of delayed traumatic diaphragma rupture. The patient complained of a vague abdominal pain and left shoulder pain. Only the relevance of a remote trauma aroused the suspicion.

  10. Experiences of Indonesian mother managing preschool children's acute abdominal pain in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chiu-Lien; Huang, Chu-Yu; Park, Jeong-Hwan; Lin, Hung-Ru; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Cheng, Su-Fen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the Indonesian mothers' experiences of managing preschool children's acute abdominal pain. The descriptive qualitative research design comprises semi-structured interviews with 11 Indonesian mothers. The qualitative content analysis revealed three themes, including (1) insight of abdominal pain, (2) "inheritance of the strategies for assessment of management for abdominal pain from the family of origin", (3) "obstacles and insights related to cultural differences". The results presented that pain management was affected by family, environment, cultural background and religious beliefs. Healthcare providers should provide culturally competent pain management care for the patients of difference nationalities.

  11. Clinical features and associated factors of abdominal pain in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shiwen; Lian, Fan; Chen, Dongying; Li, Hao; Qiu, Qian; Zhan, Zhongping; Ye, Yujin; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-induced abdominal pain in a cohort in South China and identify the risk factors for SLE-induced abdominal pain. This is a retrospective cohort study of SLE patients with complaint of abdominal pain admitted to the first affiliated university hospital of Sun Yat-sen University between 2002 and 2011. Demographic information, clinical features, laboratory findings, SLE Disease Activity Index, and imaging characteristics were documented. Of the 3823 SLE patients reviewed, 213 patients complained of abdominal pain and 132 cases were considered SLE-induced. The most common causes were lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV; 73.5%, 97/132) and lupus pancreatitis (LP; 17.4%, 23/132). Other causes included appendicitis, acute gastroenteritis, and peritonitis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) score was significantly associated with lupus-induced abdominal pain (OR = 1.858, 95% CI: 1.441-2.394, p lupus-induced abdominal pain. Moderate and large amounts of ascetic fluid was significantly associated with lupus-induced abdominal pain and LMV. Elevated liver enzymes was a risk factor for LP (OR = 34.605, 95% CI: 3.591-333.472, p = 0.002). LMV and LP were the leading causes of SLE-induced abdominal pain. The serum D-dimer was a strongly associated factor for lupus-induced abdominal pain. ECLAM score was a reliable index in assessment of SLE-associated abdominal pain. Elevated liver enzymes, and moderate or large amounts of ascites, were positively associated with lupus-induced abdominal pain.

  12. Pain Outcomes in Patients Undergoing CT-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis for Intractable Abdominal Visceral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Mark R; Gabriel, Ryan T; Elbich, Jeffrey D; Wolfe, Luke G; Sydnor, Malcolm K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess outcomes in patients who have undergone celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) as treatment for refractory abdominal visceral pain at a tertiary care medical center. This study involved retrospective analysis of all patients who had undergone computed tomography (CT)-guided CPN over a 7-year period, as identified in the medical record. Cases were categorized into 1 of 3 groups-group 1: patients getting at least moderate improvement in pain but with improvements subsiding within 2 days; group 2: patients with some sustained pain relief but still requiring heavy doses of narcotics; group 3: patients with major or complete sustained reduction in pain where the narcotic dose was able to be reduced. One hundred thirty-eight cases were identified, 51 of which had no or insufficient follow-up, leaving 87 cases for analysis. Of the 87 cases, 31 (36%) were categorized as group 1, 21 (24%) as group 2, and 35 (40%) as group 3. There were no statistical differences in outcomes based on patient age, gender, time since diagnosis, or type of cancer. Documented postoperative complications were diarrhea (11 cases) and 1 case each of obtundation, hypotension, and presyncopal event. We conclude that patients undergoing CT-guided CPN for abdominal visceral pain achieve moderate or major short-term pain relief in a majority of cases. The procedure is safe with minimal complications.

  13. Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders based on Rome III criteria in a pediatric gastroenterology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talachian, Elham; Bidari, Ali; Zahmatkesh, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) entail several distinct conditions that collectively account for a sizeable proportion of patients complaining of abdominal pain. Physicians' awareness is fundamental to avoid unnecessary evaluations and to alleviate stress-related problems. This study aimed to assess the relative frequencies of FGIDs and related categories in a selected Iranian population. We conducted this cross-sectional study in a gastroenterology clinic of a tertiary care pediatric hospital in Iran. Children and adolescents between the age of 4 and 18 years referred to the clinic from October 2011 to February 2013 were enrolled if they were diagnosed with FGID according to the Rome III criteria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, pain location, duration and frequency, associated symptoms, and pertinent family history. We used descriptive analyses to show mean (±SD) and relative frequencies of categories of FGIDs. We diagnosed 183 (114 female) with FGIDs out of 1307 children and adolescents who were visited in the clinic. There was history of psychiatric disorders in 42 (22.9%) participants, and migraine headaches and gastrointestinal disorders were at least in one of the parents in 21 (11.5%) and 64 (34.9%) participants, respectively. We defined 84 (46%) patients under Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) category, 38 (21%) under Abdominal Migraine, 26 (14%) under Functional Abdominal Pain, 21 (11%) under Functional Dyspepsia, and 7 (4%) under Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome. Seven children (4%) had no defining feature for FGID categories and therefore labeled as unclassified. FGID was a prevalent diagnosis among children and adolescents with abdominal pain. IBS was the largest category. Only a minority were unclassifiable under the Rome III criteria, indicating improved differentiation characteristics of Rome III criteria compared to the Rome II version.

  14. Clinical Observation on the Effects of Bo's Abdominal Acupuncture in 40 Cases of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong; LIAO Xiao-ming; LI xiao-xi; SONG Yuan-bin

    2008-01-01

    objective;To observe the curative effect of Bo's abdominal acupuncture on chronic fatigue syndrome(CFS).Methods;Forty cases with CFS were treated by Bo's abdominal acupuncture at me points for conducting qi back to its origin and 4 points on the abdomen once a dav for 2 weeks.Scores for symptoms and scores for fatigue questionnaires were compared before and after treatment.Results;After treatment,the clinical symptoms of patients were differently alleviated,and scores for symptoms,mental condition and neural feeling in questionnaires on fatigue were obviously reduced(P<0.01-0.05).Conclusion;Bo's abdominal acupuncture has a good curative effect on general disease with complex symptoms,especially on lassitude,anorlexia,insomnia,amnesia,diarrhea,and general pain.

  15. Anterior throat pain syndromes: causes for undiagnosed craniofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankland, Wesley E

    2010-01-01

    It is not uncommon for practitioners who treat craniofacial pain to see patients with undiagnosed throat and submandibular pain. Usually, these patients will already have been seen by their primary care physician and frequently, several others doctors including otolaryngologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and even neurologists. Far too often these patients have three common features: 1. they have endured multiple expensive diagnostic tests; 2. they have received treatment of multiple courses of antibiotics; and 3. no specific diagnosis for their pain complaints has been determined and their pain persists. In this article, five disorders, Ernest syndrome, Eagle's syndrome, carotid artery syndrome, hyoid bone syndrome and superior pharyngeal constrictor syndrome are briefly described. All five produce common symptoms, making diagnosis difficult, which is often followed by ineffective or no treatment being provided to the patient. Diagnostic criteria and suggested treatment modalities are also presented.

  16. The course of mental health problems in children presenting with abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvone; Passchier, Jan; Koes, Bart W.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Leuwen, Y.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the course of mental health problems in children presenting to general practice with abdominal pain and to evaluate the extent to which abdominal pain characteristics during follow-up predict the presence of mental health problems at 12 months' follow-up. Design. A prospect

  17. Prevalence, characteristics, and management of childhood functional abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Leo A. A.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Benninga, Marc A.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To (i) describe the proportion of children presenting with abdominal pain diagnosed by the GP as functional abdominal pain (GPFAP); (ii) evaluate the association between patient and disease characteristics and GPFAP; (iii) describe diagnostic management by the GP in children presenting wi

  18. Prevalence, characteristics, and management of childhood functional abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.A. Spee (Leo); Y. Lisman-van Leeuwen (Yvonne); M.A. Benninga (Marc); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective. To (i) describe the proportion of children presenting with abdominal pain diagnosed by the GP as functional abdominal pain (GPFAP); (ii) evaluate the association between patient and disease characteristics and GPFAP; (iii) describe diagnostic management by the GP in children p

  19. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  20. Prevalence, characteristics, and management of childhood functional abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.A. Spee (Leo); Y. Lisman-van Leeuwen (Yvonne); M.A. Benninga (Marc); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective. To (i) describe the proportion of children presenting with abdominal pain diagnosed by the GP as functional abdominal pain (GPFAP); (ii) evaluate the association between patient and disease characteristics and GPFAP; (iii) describe diagnostic management by the GP in children

  1. Prevalence, characteristics, and management of childhood functional abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Leo A. A.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Benninga, Marc A.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To (i) describe the proportion of children presenting with abdominal pain diagnosed by the GP as functional abdominal pain (GPFAP); (ii) evaluate the association between patient and disease characteristics and GPFAP; (iii) describe diagnostic management by the GP in children presenting

  2. All in the family: headaches and abdominal pain as indicators for consultation patterns in families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, M.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Dijk, L. van; Bakker, D.H. de

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Headaches and abdominal pain are examples of minor ailments that are generally self-limiting. We examined the extent to which patterns of visits to family physicians for minor ailments, such as headaches or abdominal pain, cluster within families. METHODS: Using information from the Second

  3. All in the Family : Headaches and Abdominal Pain as Indicators for Consultation Patterns in Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, Mieke; Bosch, Wil J.H.M. van den; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Dijk, Liset van; Bakker, Dinny H. de

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Headaches and abdominal pain are examples of minor ailments that are generally self-limiting. We examined the extent to which patterns of visits to family physicians for minor ailments, such as headaches or abdominal pain, cluster within families. METHODS Using information from the Second Du

  4. Retropsoas hernia as a cause of chronic abdominal pain: CT diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.E. [Div. of Pediatric Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strauch, E.D. [Division of Pediatric Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Congenital retropsoas small bowel herniation is reported as the cause of long-standing recurrent abdominal pain in a teenage girl. Knowledge of this entity is important for differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, mass, or retroperitoneal gas and fluid, and for avoiding complications of percutaneous renal interventions. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  5. The role of plain radiographs in patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Randen, Adrienne; Lameris, Wytze; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Gorzeman, Michiel; Hesselink, Erik J.; Dolmans, Dennis E. J. G. J.; Peringa, Jan; van Geloven, Anna A. W.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the added value of plain radiographs on top of clinical assessment in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the emergency department (ED). Methods: In a multicenter prospective trial, patients with abdominal pain more than 2

  6. The role of plain radiographs in patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randen, A. van; Lameris, W.; Luitse, J.S.; Gorzeman, M.; Hesselink, E.J.; Dolmans, D.E.; Peringa, J.; Geloven, A.A. van; Bossuyt, P.M.; Stoker, J.; Boermeester, M.A.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the added value of plain radiographs on top of clinical assessment in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the emergency department (ED). METHODS: In a multicenter prospective trial, patients with abdominal pain more than 2

  7. Abdominal compartment syndrome in acute pancreatitis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunschot, S. van; Schut, A.J.; Bouwense, S.A.W.; Besselink, M.G.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Hofker, S.; Gooszen, H.G.; Boermeester, M.A.; Santvoort, H.C. van

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a lethal complication of acute pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review to assess the treatment and outcome of these patients.A systematic literature search for cohorts of patients with acute pancreatitis and ACS was performed. The main outcomes were num

  8. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Acute Pancreatitis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brunschot, Sandra; Schut, Anne Julia; Bouwense, Stefan A.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Hofker, Hendrik; Gooszen, Hein G.; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a lethal complication of acute pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review to assess the treatment and outcome of these patients. A systematic literature search for cohorts of patients with acute pancreatitis and ACS was performed. The main outcomes were nu

  9. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Acute Pancreatitis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brunschot, Sandra; Schut, Anne Julia; Bouwense, Stefan A.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Goor ,van Harry; Hofker, Hendrik; Gooszen, Hein G.; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a lethal complication of acute pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review to assess the treatment and outcome of these patients. A systematic literature search for cohorts of patients with acute pancreatitis and ACS was performed. The main outcomes were

  10. Abdominal compartment syndrome in acute pancreatitis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunschot, S. van; Schut, A.J.; Bouwense, S.A.W.; Besselink, M.G.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Hofker, S.; Gooszen, H.G.; Boermeester, M.A.; Santvoort, H.C. van

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a lethal complication of acute pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review to assess the treatment and outcome of these patients.A systematic literature search for cohorts of patients with acute pancreatitis and ACS was performed. The main outcomes were

  11. Subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting as left upper quadrant abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Ta Kao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a microbial infection of the endocardial surface of the heart. Its symptoms and signs are varied, and include fever, heart murmur, peripheral embolism, and heart failure. The diagnosis of subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE is suggested by a history of an indolent process characterized by fever, fatigue, anorexia, and unexplained weight loss. These patients may have had an invasive procedure, such as dental work, or abused intravenous drugs prior to the diagnosis of SBE. Although uncommon, the patients may present with nonspecific symptoms caused by peripheral embolic events. Herein, we report a 25-year-old male diagnosed with SBE, who presented with the unusual symptom of sudden onset of left upper quadrant abdominal pain for 2 days. His clinical history is also discussed.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus associated secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with an unusual presentation of abdominal compartment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lei; Camilla J. Cobb; Jeffrey Cao; Anwar S. Raza

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a cytokine storm syndrome caused by an overactive but ineffective immune reaction. Without prompt diagnosis and treatment, HLH is life-threatening. However, presenting symptoms are often nonspeciifc, with fatigue and fever being the most common. A high index of suspicion is therefore critical for early diagnosis and timely management. A previously healthy, 65-year-old female who initially presented with fever and abdominal pain developed abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) requiring decompressive laparotomy on hospital day 6. Intraoperative frozen sections of biopsied liver showed intense portal lymphohistiocytic inifltrates. Epstein-Barr virus DNA copy numbers escalated from 600 copies/ mL after admission to 134,000 copies/mL before death. The diagnostic criteria of HLH-2004 were met. Patient expired on hospital day 12. It is important to raise awareness of ACS being an unusual presentation of HLH. Recent changes in diagnostic criteria tailored to adult HLH cases are reviewed.

  13. Stress and visceral pain: focusing on irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudo, Shin

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in brain science have shown that the brain function encoding emotion depends on interoceptive signals such as visceral pain. Visceral pain arose early in our evolutionary history. Bottom-up processing from gut-to-brain and top-down autonomic/neuroendocrine mechanisms in brain-to-gut signaling constitute a circuit. Brain imaging techniques have enabled us to depict the visceral pain pathway as well as the related emotional circuit. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by chronic recurrent abdominal pain or abdominal discomfort associated with bowel dysfunction. It is also thought to be a disorder of the brain-gut link associated with an exaggerated response to stress. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, is an obvious candidate in the pathophysiology of IBS. Indeed, administration of CRH has been shown to aggravate the visceral sensorimotor response in IBS patients, and the administration of peptidergic CRH antagonists seems to alleviate IBS pathophysiology. Serotonin (5-HT) is another likely candidate associated with brain-gut function in IBS, as 5-HT3 antagonists, 5-HT4 agonists, and antidepressants were demonstrated to regulate 5-HT neurotransmission in IBS patients. Autonomic nervous system function, the neuroimmune axis, and the brain-gut-microbiota axis show specific profiles in IBS patients. Further studies on stress and visceral pain neuropathways in IBS patients are warranted. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone scintigraphy in painful os peroneum syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Jensen, Frank K; Falborg, Bettina;

    2011-01-01

    Lateral foot pain may be caused by various entities including the painful os peroneum syndrome. A case of a 68-year-old man is presented, who experienced a trauma with distortion of the right foot. Nine months later, he still had pain in the lateral part of the right foot. Bone scintigraphy showe...... uptake in the area where an os peroneum was located and thus confirmed the clinical assumption of painful os peroneum syndrome. Familiarity with the clinical and imaging findings can prevent undiagnosed lateral foot pain....

  15. Neuroimmunological mechanisms of chronic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vyshlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the mechanisms of chronic low back pain. Three pathophysiological mechanisms: nociceptive, neurogenic (neuropathic, and psychogenic are noted to be involved in the development of pain syndrome. The role of cellular and molecular changes in the posterior horn and in the somatosensory dysregulated mechanism of neuropathic pain is shown. Immunological processes, including neurohumoral (serotoninergic and hormonal (sex hormones and specific proteins ones, play an important role in the development of pain. The generalization and further study of these mechanisms are embodied in approaches to therapy for pain syndromes and hence these require analysis and further investigation. 

  16. Shared genetic factors underlie chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Zavos, Helena M. S.; Lachance, Genevieve; Hammond, Christopher J.; Williams, Frances M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain syndromes (CPS) are highly prevalent in the general population, and increasingly the evidence points to a common etiological pathway. Using a large cohort of twins (n = 8564) characterized for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP), chronic pelvic pain (PP), migraine (MIG), dry e

  17. Shared genetic factors underlie chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Zavos, Helena M. S.; Lachance, Genevieve; Hammond, Christopher J.; Williams, Frances M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain syndromes (CPS) are highly prevalent in the general population, and increasingly the evidence points to a common etiological pathway. Using a large cohort of twins (n = 8564) characterized for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP), chronic pelvic pain (PP), migraine (MIG), dry e

  18. Bone scintigraphy in painful os peroneum syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Jensen, Frank K; Falborg, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    Lateral foot pain may be caused by various entities including the painful os peroneum syndrome. A case of a 68-year-old man is presented, who experienced a trauma with distortion of the right foot. Nine months later, he still had pain in the lateral part of the right foot. Bone scintigraphy showed...

  19. Measuring episodic abdominal pain and disability in suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valerie; Durkalski; Walter; Stewart; Paulette; MacDougall; Patrick; Mauldin; Joseph; Romagnuolo; Olga; Brawman-Minzter; Peter; Cotton

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the reliability of an instrument that measures disability arising from episodic abdominal pain in patients with suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction(SOD).METHODS:Although several treatments have been utilized to reduce pain and associated disability,measurement tools have not been developed to reliably track outcomes.Two pilot studies were conducted to assess test-retest reliability of a newly developed instrument,the recurrent abdominal pain intensity and disability(RAPID) instrument.The...

  20. Case Study of an Old Woman With Complain of Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hormati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The evaluation of acute abdominal pain must be efficient to prevent any delay in the treatment of patients, who are seriously ill, and over treatment of patients with self-limited disorders. One of the uncommon reasons that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain, especially among elderly patients, who are under anti-coagulation therapy, is abdominal wall hematoma. Case Presentation The case was a 60-year-old female with abdominal pain in the left upper and lower quadrant, which was followed by a series of coughs. She was receiving subcutaneous heparin, which was then changed to warfarin. The patient also had an episode of similar pain, one month ago and was diagnosed as abdominal hematoma based on ultrasonography report. An abdominal CT scan showed a mass lesion and the patient was diagnosed as acute on chronic abdominal wall hematoma. Conclusions Anterior abdominal wall hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain among elderly patients, especially those who are under anti-coagulation therapy. Conservative treatment is conceivable in most cases and early diagnosis is compulsory to avoid morbidity or unnecessary surgery.

  1. Abdominal Pain: A Comparison between Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Christensen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Most spinal-cord-injured patients have constipation. One-third develop chronic abdominal pain 10 years or more after injury. Nevertheless, very little is known about the nature of abdominal pain after spinal cord injury (SCI). It may be neuropathic or caused by constipation. Aim. To compare characteristics of abdominal pain in SCI with able-bodied with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). Subjects and Methods. 21 SCI and 15 CIC patients were referred for treatment of bowel symptoms. Constipation-related symptoms were assessed with the Cleveland Constipation Scoring System and the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Bowel Function Data Set. Characteristics of abdominal pain were described using the Brief Danish Pain Questionnaire. Total gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) were measured by radiopaque markers. Results. Seventeen (81%) SCI and 14 (93%) CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort within the last month (P = 0.38). Pain was considered more intense by CIC than by SCI patients (P GITT. Conclusion. Most characteristics of abdominal pain among SCI patients resemble those of CIC. This indicates that constipation is a major cause of pain after SCI. PMID:24159329

  2. Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Fabrizio, Alessandra; Costantini, Raffaele

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews the available published knowledge about the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of myofascial pain syndromes from trigger points. Furthermore, epidemiologic data and clinical characteristics of these syndromes are described, including a detailed account of sensory changes that occur at both painful and nonpainful sites and their utility for diagnosis and differential diagnosis; the identification/diagnostic criteria available so far are critically reviewed. The key role played by myofascial trigger points as activating factors of pain symptoms in other algogenic conditions--headache, fibromyalgia and visceral disease--is also addressed. Current hypotheses on the pathophysiology of myofascial pain syndromes are presented, including mechanisms of formation and persistence of primary and secondary trigger points as well as mechanisms beyond referred pain and hyperalgesia from trigger points. Conventional and most recent therapeutic options for these syndromes are described, and their validity is discussed on the basis of results from clinical controlled studies.

  3. Abdominal intra-compartment syndrome - a non-hydraulic model of abdominal compartment syndrome due to post-hepatectomy hemorrhage in a man with a localized frozen abdomen due to extensive adhesions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ball, Chad G

    2016-09-15

    Postoperative hemorrhage is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following liver resection. It typically presents early within the postoperative period, and conservative management is possible in the majority of cases. We present a case of late post-hepatectomy hemorrhage associated with overt abdominal compartment syndrome resulting from a localized functional compartment within the abdomen. A 68-year-old white man was readmitted with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain, vomiting, and hemodynamic instability 8 days after an uneventful hepatic resection for metachronous colon cancer metastasis. A frozen abdomen with adhesions due to complicated previous abdominal surgeries was encountered at the first intervention, but the surgery itself and initial recovery were otherwise unremarkable. Prompt response to fluid resuscitation at admission was followed by a computed tomography of his abdomen that revealed active arterial hemorrhage in the liver resection site and hemoperitoneum (estimated volume abdomen, which we evacuated. Dramatic improvement in his ventilatory pressure was immediate. His abdomen was left open and a negative pressure device was placed for temporary abdominal closure. The fascia was formally closed after 48 hours. He was discharged home at postoperative day 6. Intra-abdominal pressure and radiologic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage should be carefully interpreted in patients with extensive intra-abdominal adhesions. A high index of suspicion and detailed understanding of abdominal compartment mechanics are paramount for the timely diagnosis of abdominal compartment syndrome in these patients. Clinicians should be aware that abnormal anatomy (such as adhesions) coupled with localized pathophysiology (such as hemorrhage) can create a so-named abdominal intra-compartment syndrome requiring extra vigilance to diagnose.

  4. DIAGNOSIS OF ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CHRONIC ABDO MINAL PAIN: LAPAROSCOPY AS AN EFFECTIVE DIAGNOSTIC TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chronic abdominal pain is a FREQUENTLY ENCOUNTERED pr oblem and abdominal tuberculosis is a very common cause of the same. Di agnostic laparoscopy is a highly sensitive, specific, and safe procedure for the early diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. The procedure is beneficial because it is minimally invasive and prov ides diagnostic benefit in terms of both visual appearances and tissue yield for histopathologi cal and cytological confirmation. We have performed an extensive retrospective study with 250 s ubjects and were able to justify the safety, sensitivity & early selection of laparoscopy as a procedure of choice to confirm tuberculosis in chronic abdominal pain.

  5. Relapsing edema, proteinuria with abdominal distension, abdominal pain and hemafecia%反复水肿、蛋白尿,伴腹胀、腹痛、便血

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    全军肾脏病研究所学术委员会

    2013-01-01

    A young male patient was admitted for hormone sensitive frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome,with each recurrence,the patient got abdominal distension,abdominal pain and hemafecia.These digestive symptoms were improved quickly with expectant treatment and the remission of the renal disease.The patitent was finally diagnosed as "IgA nephropathy(minimal change type) and ischemic bowel disease".%青年男性,临床表现激素依赖、反复复发的肾病综合征,每次复发均合并腹痛、腹胀、腹泻及血便等消化道症状.治疗后消化道症状随肾脏疾病的缓解而好转,最终诊断为IgA肾病(微小病变型)合并缺血性肠病.

  6. Open abdomen procedure in managing abdominal compartment syndrome in a child with severe fungal peritonitis and sepsis after gastric perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal compartment syndrome with increased abdominal pressure resulted in multi-organ dysfunctions can be lethal in children. The open abdomen procedure intentionally leaves the abdominal cavity open in patients with severe abdominal sepsis and abdominal compartment syndrome by temporarily relieving the abdominal pressure. We reported our experience of open abdomen procedure in successfully treating a 4-year old boy with abdominal compartment syndrome caused by severe fungal peritonitis and sepsis after gastric perforation.

  7. Functional Abdominal Pain in Childhood: Background Studies and Recent Research Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rona L Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review summarizes many of the major research trends investigated in the past five years regarding pediatric functional abdominal pain, and also summarizes the primary related findings from the authors’ research program. Specific areas discussed based on work within the authors’ group include familial illness patterns, genetics, traits, and mechanisms or processes related to abdominal pain. Topics covered from research published in the past five years include prevalence and cost, longitudinal follow-up, overlap with other disorders, etiology and mechanisms behind functional abdominal pain and treatment studies. It is hoped that findings from this work in abdominal pain will be interpreted as a framework for understanding the processes by which other pain phenomena and, more broadly, reactions to any physical state, can be developed and maintained in children. The present article concludes with recommendations for clinical practice and research.

  8. Patients with chronic pain after abdominal surgery show less preoperative endogenous pain inhibition and more postoperative hyperalgesia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Oliver Hamilton; Schreyer, Tobias; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-06-01

    Chronic pain is common and undesirable after surgery. Progression from acute to chronic pain involves altered pain processing. The authors studied relationships between presence of chronic pain versus preoperative descending pain control (diffuse noxious inhibitory controls; DNICs) and postoperative persistence and spread of skin and deep tissue hyperalgesia (change in electric/pressure pain tolerance thresholds; ePTT/pPTT) up to 6 months postoperatively. In 20 patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery under standardized anesthesia, we determined ePTT/pPTT (close to [abdomen] and distant from [leg] incision), eDNIC/pDNIC (change in ePTT/pPTT with cold pressor pain task; only preoperatively), and a 100 mm long pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst pain imaginable), both at rest and on movement preoperatively, and 1 day and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Patients reporting chronic pain 6 months postoperatively had more abdominal and leg skin hyperalgesia over the postoperative period. More inhibitory preoperative eDNIC was associated with less late postoperative pain, without affecting skin hyperalgesia. More inhibitory pDNIC was linked to less postoperative leg deep tissue hyperalgesia, without affecting pain VAS. This pilot study for the first time links chronic pain after surgery, poorer preoperative inhibitory pain modulation (DNIC), and greater postoperative degree, persistence, and spread of hyperalgesia. If confirmed, these results support the potential clinical utility of perioperative pain processing testing.

  9. Tufted angioma and myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Roberto Souto da; Bressan, Aline Lopes; Nascimento, Lívia Barbosa; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2011-01-01

    Tufted angioma is a rare acquired vascular tumor. It is characterized by painful purplish macules that may progress to plaques containing angiomatous papules. The condition is benign; however, it often affects extensive areas of the skin, leading to functional disability of the affected limb if painful. The present report describes a case of a tufted angioma associated with myofascial pain syndrome in which the predisposing element was the presence of this tumor since childhood. Pain at the site of the lesion affected muscle use and led to the onset of the associated syndrome. Complete relief from symptoms was achieved by blocking the trigger points of the affected limb with anesthesia.

  10. Chronic appendicitis as a cause of chronic rigth lower quadrant abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez Chacón, Jorge Luis

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a frequent problem in the medical and surgical consult. There has been written a big number of causes  of chronic abdominal pain, of which there is an estimate of 10-30% that can be explained by a structural or biochemical problems, and in the cases left (70-90%), even though the advances of diagnostic methods, will not be found an organic cause, and it defines as a functional type of abdominal pain. The chronic appendicitis it is always a topic of discussion, due to is not ...

  11. D-lactate is a valid biomarker of intestinal ischemia induced by abdominal compartment syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Casper; Kirkegård, Jakob; Erlandsen, Erland J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) often leads to abdominal compartment syndrome, which is followed by intestinal ischemia and associated with a high mortality. The diagnosis of abdominal compartment syndrome is difficult, and no valid biochemical markers are available. We conducted...

  12. The Management of Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    pain syndrome (MFPS) was attributed to an inflammation of fibrous tissue ... stimulating effect on the mechano- and nociceptive units and cause a .... longer interruption of blood supply induces bursting back- .... pay attention to the situation.

  13. Bowel perforation by crumpled paper in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshaeekia Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the abdominal foreign bodies are due to accidental ingestion. Our objective in this case report is to emphasize the importance of the enquiry about the foreign body in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. According to our knowledge, this is the first report of bowel perforation caused by paper ingestion. A 14-year-old boy with abdominal pain underwent exploratory laparotomy and was found to have abdominal pus and ileal perforation. A crumpled paper was found at the site of perforation. Postoperative enquiry revealed that the patient had ingested 10 crumpled papers. We highlight that recording the history is an important aspect in the management of patients with acute abdominal pain and that foreign bodies should be included in its differential diagnosis.

  14. Recognition and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; a survey among Dutch surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.D. Strang; E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); R.A. Verhoeven (Roelof A.); O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); Iah-Acs Study Group

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are relatively rare, but severe complications. Although many advances were made in recent years, the recognition and management remain subject of debate. The aim of this study was to determine the

  15. The association of mast cells and serotonin in children with chronic abdominal pain of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Ravi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal pain of unknown origin affects up to 20% of school-aged children. Evaluation of children is symptom-based without clear guidelines to investigate molecular mechanisms of abdominal pain. Aberrant molecular mechanisms may increase intestinal permeability leading to interactions between the immune and nervous systems, subclinical inflammation, and visceral pain. This study evaluated the association between interleukin-6 (IL-6, mast cell infiltrates, and serotonin (5-HT levels in gastrointestinal (GI biopsies, with perceived abdominal pain in a pediatric cohort. Methods Clinical data and biopsy samples from pediatric patients (n = 48 with chronic abdominal pain, with and without inflammation were included. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded GI biopsies were sectioned and immunohistochemistry performed for IL-6 and 5-HT; mast cells were identified with toluidine blue stain. Histological findings were compared to self-reported abdominal pain between groups. Results There was significantly greater IL-6 immunoreactivity in biopsies with confirmed histologic inflammation (p = 0.004. There was a greater number of mast cells per HPF in non-inflammatory biopsies (3.5 ± 2.9 compared to the inflammatory biopsies (2.6 ± 1.8 p = 0.049. The non-inflammatory biopsy group was significantly less likely to respond to standard treatment as evidenced by higher pain reports (p = .018. Mast cells (p = .022 and 5-HT (p = .02 were significantly related to abdominal pain scores. Conclusions A potential association between self-reported abdominal pain, number of mast cells, and 5-HT levels, which may contribute to perceived GI pain in pediatric patients may exist.

  16. Optimization of diagnostic imaging use in patients with acute abdominal pain (OPTIMA: Design and rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossuyt Patrick MM

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The acute abdomen is a frequent entity at the Emergency Department (ED, which usually needs rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. Diagnostic work-up with imaging can consist of plain X-ray, ultrasonography (US, computed tomography (CT and even diagnostic laparoscopy. However, no evidence-based guidelines exist in current literature. The actual diagnostic work-up of a patient with acute abdominal pain presenting to the ED varies greatly between hospitals and physicians. The OPTIMA study was designed to provide the evidence base for constructing an optimal diagnostic imaging guideline for patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED. Methods/design Thousand consecutive patients with abdominal pain > 2 hours and Discussion This study aims to provide the evidence base for the development of a diagnostic algorithm that can act as a guideline for ED physicians to evaluate patients with acute abdominal pain.

  17. The Impact of Upper Abdominal Pain During Pregnancy Following a Gastric Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Lauenborg, Jeannet; Svare, Jens

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to describe the risk of internal herniation (IH) and the obstetric outcome in pregnant women with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and episodes of upper abdominal pain. METHODS: The cohort included 133 women with RYGB: 94 with 113 pregnancies, from...... the local area referred for routine antenatal care (local cohort) and 39 with 40 pregnancies referred from other hospitals for specialist consultation due to RYGB. RYGB was mainly performed without closure of the mesenteric defects. Data collected from medical records were episodes of upper abdominal pain......, pregestational and gestational abdominal surgery and pregnancy outcome. The risk of upper abdominal pain was estimated in the local cohort. Surgical intervention, IH and obstetric outcome according to pain were evaluated for 139 pregnancies with delivery of a singleton after 24 weeks of gestation (birth cohort...

  18. The complaints and dietary habits of the patients with gastritis and undefined abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, E

    1985-02-01

    The complaints and dietary habits of sixteen patients with gastritis and fourteen with undefined abdominal pain were studied by recording method. The results showed that the symptoms of the patients with gastritis and undefined abdominal pain were similar and mostly postprandial and they can be regarded as local (abdominal pain, meteorism, discomfort and heartburn) and/or general (sweating, nausea and faintness). The patients have variations of the symptomatic and asymptomatic periods. The symptomatic patients with gastritis have significantly higher number of daily meals than the asymptomatic patients with gastritis. The daily intake of food, energy and nutrients are low especially in the symptomatic patients with gastritis. It is concluded that the symptoms experienced by the patients with gastritis or undefined abdominal pain are related to the eating so that the daily dietary habits are disturbed. The produced a low intake of food, energy and nutrients especially in the patients with symptomatic gastritis.

  19. Relative abdominal adiposity is associated with chronic low back pain: a preliminary explorative study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brooks, Cristy; Siegler, Jason C; Marshall, Paul W M

    2016-01-01

    ...) and adiposity, this relationship is poorly understood. No research has explored the relationship between abdominal-specific subcutaneous and visceral adiposity with pain and disability in cLBP individuals...

  20. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome and Exercise Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Linschoten (Robbart)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPatellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) can be considered as a clinical entity evolving during adolescence and young adult age.Though the complaints may be self-limiting and follow a benign course there are claims that exercise therapy may be beneficial for patients with patellofemoral pain

  1. Abdominal compartment syndrome – Intra-abdominal hypertension: Defining, diagnosing, and managing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavramidis, Theodossis S; Marinis, Athanasios D; Pliakos, Ioannis; Kesisoglou, Isaak; Papavramidou, Nicki

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are increasingly recognized as potential complications in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ACS and IAH affect all body systems, most notably the cardiac, respiratory, renal, and neurologic systems. ACS/IAH affects blood flow to various organs and plays a significant role in the prognosis of the patients. Recognition of ACS/IAH, its risk factors and clinical signs can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated. Moreover, knowledge of the pathophysiology may help rationalize the therapeutic approach. We start this article with a brief historic review on ACS/IAH. Then, we present the definitions concerning parameters necessary in understanding ACS/IAH. Finally, pathophysiology aspects of both phenomena are presented, prior to exploring the various facets of ACS/IAH management. PMID:21769216

  2. Ultrasonographic features of children presenting with abdominal pain : normal versus abnormal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Fraukje

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes five ultrasonogaphic studies in children with abdominal pain. The normal appendix can be visualized by ultrasound in 82% of the children without abdominal complaints, according to the first study. In cases of non-depiction of the appendix in children with a clinical suspicion o

  3. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    OpenAIRE

    Ozgur Kartal; Sevket Arslan; Mustafa Gulec; Ahmet Zafer Caliskaner; Abdullah Baysan; Nail Ersoz; Ugur Musabak; Osman Sener

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;ab...

  4. Low-dietary fiber intake as a risk factor for recurrent abdominal pain in children

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo, A. Z.; Amancio, Olga Maria Silverio; Morais,Mauro Batista de; Tabacow, K. M. M. D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dietary fiber intake in children with recurrent abdominal pain.Design: Cross-sectional study with control group.Setting: Outpatients of the Pediatric Gastroenterology public health clinic of the Darcy Vargas Children's Hospital, Brazil.Subjects: Forty-one patients with recurrent abdominal pain were evaluated and 41 children, as a control group.Interventions: Macronutrients and fiber intake evaluation by the Daily Food Intake method. Two tables of fiber composition in fo...

  5. 儿童功能性慢性腹痛的诊断与治疗%Diagnosis and treatment of functional chronic abdominal pain in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江米足

    2014-01-01

    Functional chronic abdominal pain is very common in pediatrics,but the understanding of the diagnosis and treatment in clinics are to be strengthened.The diagnosis,differential diagnosis and treatment progress of 4 kinds of main functional chronic abdominal pain in children are reviewed such as functional dyspepsia,irritable bowel syndrome,functional abdominal pain and functional abdominal pain syndrome,abdominal migraine according to Rome Ⅲ diagnostic criteria of functional gastrointestinal diseases in children.%功能性慢性腹痛在儿科非常多见,但临床上对其诊断与治疗的认识尚有待加强.现结合功能性胃肠病罗马Ⅲ诊断标准,主要就4种儿童功能性慢性腹痛(如功能性消化不良、肠易激综合征、功能性腹痛和功能性腹痛综合征、腹型偏头痛)的诊断、鉴别诊断与治疗进展作一阐述.

  6. Chronic abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury: a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen D; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Christensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    -reported constipation. The median intensity (numeric rating scale) was 6.0 (range 3-10) and it was often associated with autonomic symptoms. Nine (8%) of the 115 individuals who responded in both 2006 and 2015 had developed new abdominal pain or discomfort, 30 (26%) no longer reported it, and 28 (24%) reported......A longitudinal postal survey was carried to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury (SCI). In 2006, a questionnaire on chronic abdominal pain and discomfort was sent to the 284 members of the Danish SCI association who had been members...... abdominal pain. The mean time since injury was 30.5 (9.8) years. Chronic abdominal pain or discomfort was reported by 32.8% (41/125), and 23% (29/125) of responders had been at least moderately bothered by this in the past week. Abdominal pain or discomfort was more common in women and in those with self...

  7. Depression Is Associated with Repeat Emergency Department Visits in Patients with Non-specific Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Charles Meltzer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with abdominal pain often return multiple times despite no definitive diagnosis. Our objective was to determine if repeat emergency department (ED use among patients with non-specific abdominal pain might be associated with a diagnosis of moderate to severe depressive disorder. Methods: We screened 987 ED patients for major depression during weekday daytime hours from June 2011 through November 2011 using a validated depression screening tool, the PHQ-9. Each subject was classified as either no depression, mild depression or moderate/ severe depression based on the screening tool. Within this group, we identified 83 patients with non-specific abdominal pain by either primary or secondary diagnosis. Comparing depressed patients versus non-depressed patients, we analyzed demographic characteristics and number of prior ED visits in the past year. Results: In patients with non-specific abdominal pain, 61.9% of patients with moderate or severe depression (PHQ9≥10 had at least one visit to our ED for the same complaint within a 365-day period, as compared to 29.2% of patients with no depression (PHQ9<5, (p=0.013. Conclusion: Repeat ED use among patients with non-specific abdominal pain is associated with moderate to severe depressive disorder. Patients with multiple visits for abdominal pain may benefit from targeted ED screening for depression.

  8. [Unilateral atypical neck pain in Eagle syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonka, Matilde Mia; Schousboe, Lars Peter

    2012-04-30

    This article is an introduction to Eagle syndrome as a differential diagnosis in patients with lateral neck pain, a symptom, which is often difficult to diagnose and where the accepted treatment covers a variety of forms. This was the case for a 51 year-old man with lateral neck pain and a crunchy sensation/sound when he turned his head. After years of pain, the right examination and a computed tomography finally suggested Eagle syndrome. The patient had severe symptoms and was treated with an operation by which part of the ossificated stylohyoid ligament was removed. The operation relieved him of all his symptoms.

  9. Establishment and Application of Early Risk Stratification Method for Acute Abdominal Pain in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Tian, Ci; Xiao, Hong-Li; Wang, Bao-En

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute abdominal pain is a common symptom of emergency patients. The severity was always evaluated based on physicians’ clinical experience. The aim of this study was to establish an early risk stratification method (ERSM) for addressing adults with acute abdominal pain, which would guide physicians to take appropriate and timely measures following the established health-care policies. Methods: In Cohort 1, the records of 490 patients with acute abdominal pain that developed within the past 72 h were enrolled in this study. Measurement data and numeration data were compared with analysis of variance and Chi-square test, respectively. Multiple regression analysis calculated odd ratio (OR) value. P and OR values showed the impacts of factors. ERSM was established by clinical experts and statistical experts according to Youden index. In Cohort 2, data from 305 patients with acute abdominal pain were enrolled to validate the accuracy of the ERSM. Then, ERSM was prospectively used in clinical practice. Results: The ERSM was established based on the scores of the patient's clinical characteristics: right lower abdominal pain + 3 × diffuse abdominal pain + 3 × cutting abdominal pain + 3 × pain frequency + 3 × pain duration + fever + 2 × vomiting + 5 × stop defecation + 3 × history of abdominal surgery + hypertension history + diabetes history + hyperlipidemia history + pulse + 2 × skin yellowing + 2 × sclera yellowing + 2 × double lung rale + 10 × unconsciousness + 2 × right lower abdominal tenderness + 5 × diffuse abdominal tenderness + 4 × peritoneal irritation + 4 × bowel sounds abnormal + 10 × suspicious diagnosis + white blood cell count + hematocrit + glucose + 2 × blood urea nitrogen + 3 × creatine + 4 × serum albumin + alanine aminotransferase + total bilirubin + 3 × conjugated bilirubin + amylase. When the score was <18, the patient did not need hospitalization. A score of ≥18 and <38 indicated that the patient should be under

  10. Reduction of chronic abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel disease through transcranial direct current stimulation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Magdalena S; Farmer, Annabelle; Siegmund, Britta

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently associated with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proven to reduce chronic pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects of tDCS in patients with CAP due to IBD. This randomized, sham-controlled, double blind, parallel-designed study included 20 patients with either Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis with CAP (≥3/10 on the visual analog scale (VAS) in 3/6 months). Anodal or sham tDCS was applied over the primary motor cortex for 5 consecutive days (2 mA, 20 minutes). Assessments included VAS, pressure pain threshold, inflammatory markers, and questionnaires on quality of life, functional and disease specific symptoms (Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Severity Scoring System [IBS-SSS]), disease activity, and pain catastrophizing. Follow-up data were collected 1 week after the end of the stimulation. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of variance and t tests. There was a significant reduction of abdominal pain in the anodal tDCS group compared with sham tDCS. This effect was evident in changes in VAS and pressure pain threshold on the left and right sides of the abdomen. In addition, 1 week after stimulation, pain reduction remained significantly decreased in the right side of the abdomen. There was also a significant reduction in scores on pain catastrophizing and on IBS-SSS when comparing both groups. Inflammatory markers and disease activity did not differ significantly between groups throughout the experiment. Transcranial direct current stimulation proved to be an effective and clinically relevant therapeutic strategy for CAP in IBD. The analgesic effects observed are unrelated to inflammation and disease activity, which emphasizes central pain mechanisms in CAP.

  11. BACK PAIN SYNDROME: MODERN APPROACHES TO THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe management tactics in patients with back pain syndrome and to give recommendations for the choice of non-drug and drug treatments (with main drug groups and the duration of a treatment cycle. Materials and methods. The paper considers the basic mechanisms and causes of back pain syndromes (dorsalgias. It introduces the concept “dorsopathy” that characterizes the appearance of nonvisceral pain syndrome in the extremities and trunk, which is caused by degenerative processes in the vertebral motion segment. The authors provide a description of spondyloarthrosis, one of the main degenerative diseases of the spine, and give current principles of treatment for the major symptoms of the disease. Results. The main goal of treatment in patients with back pain is to relieve pain syndrome. Selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the medicaments of choice. Conclusion. This paper covers current approaches to managing patients with spondyloarthrosis and gives recommendations regarding the treatment of the major disease manifestation – pain syndrome

  12. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders;

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... of the abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...... in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children had...

  13. [Pain, from symptom to syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Virginie

    2017-05-01

    Acute pain is a symptom enabling us to implement a response when faced with an attack. Chronic pain is complex and multifactorial. The care of the patient by a multidisciplinary team comprises the diagnosis of the pain and the putting in place of a treatment for each of its components. This includes physical reconditioning, adaptation strategies and work on the psychological elements relating to the representation of the pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonspecificity of Chronic Soft Tissue Pain Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldon Tunks

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent (or chronic pain occurs with a prevalence of about 10% in the adult population, and chronic soft tissue pain is especially problematic. Criteria for diagnosis of these soft tissue pain disorders appear to suffer from specificity problems, even though they appear to be sensitive in distinguishing normal from soft tissue pain sufferers. A few decades ago the term 'neuraesthenia' was used as a diagnosis in individuals who now would probably be diagnosed as suffering from fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and anxiety disorders with fatigue. Soft tissue pain provokes skepticism, especially among third-party payers, and controversy among clinicians. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated sex differences in the prevalence of widespread pain and multiple tender points, which are distributed variably throughout the adult population and tend to be correlated with subjective symptoms. Although there is a tendency for these syndromes to persist, follow-up studies show that they tend to vary in extent and sometimes show remissions over longer follow-up, casting doubt about the distinctions between chronic diffuse pains and localized chronic soft tissue pains. Because both accidents and soft tissue pains are relatively prevalent problems, the possibility of chance coincidence of accident and chronic soft tissue pain in an individual creates the need to be cautious in attributing these syndromes to specific accidents in medicolegal situations. At the same time, the available evidence does not support a generally dismissive attitude towards these patients.

  15. Paroxysmal drastic abdominal pain with tardive cutaneous lesions presenting in Henoch-Sch(o)nlein purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Liang Chen; Hong Tian; Jian-Zhong Li; Jin Tao; Hua Tang; Yang Li; Bin Wu

    2012-01-01

    Henoch-Sch(o)nlein purpura (HSP) is a small-vessel vasculitis mediated by IgA-immune complex deposition.It is characterized by the clinical tetrad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura,abdominal pain,arthritis and renal involvement.The diagnosis of HSP is difficult,especially when abdominal symptoms precede cutaneous lesions.We report a rare case of paroxysmal drastic abdominal pain with gastrointestinal bleeding presented in HSP.The diagnosis was verified by renal damage and the occurrence of purpura.

  16. The adult cystic fibrosis patient with abdominal pain: what the radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liong, S.Y.; Awad, D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sukumar, S.A., E-mail: Sathi.Sukumar@uhsm.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    As the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients continues to increase, abdominal manifestations of CF are increasingly being encountered by clinicians and radiologists. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of adult CF patients with abdominal pain as a cause is often not discernable clinically. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in these patients as some causes may be managed conservatively, whilst others may require surgical intervention. In this review, we describe clinical presentation, imaging findings, and management of adult CF patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  17. [When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Sarasin, François

    2010-08-25

    When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward? The following goals must be achieved upon managing patients with acute abdominal pain: 1) identify vital emergency situations; 2) detect surgical conditions that require emergency referral without further diagnostic procedures; 3) in "non surgical acute abdomen patients" perform appropriate diagnostic procedures, or in selected cases delay tests and reevaluate the patient after an observation period, after which a referral decision is made. Clues from the history and physical examination are critical to perform this evaluation. A good knowledge of the most frequent acute abdominal conditions, and identifying potential severity criteria allow an appropriate management and decision about emergency referral.

  18. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain – A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunt Trevor M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1983, Graham Hughes described a condition of Antiphospholipid Syndrome in which there was a danger of thrombosis. The condition is readily detectable by blood tests and, once diagnosed; the risk of further thrombosis can be significantly reduced by anticoagulation treatments. Affected groups of patients can be distinguished by a specific blood test – the detection of antiphospholipid antibody (Ref-1. Patients with Hughes syndrome have hypercoaguable state with a markedly increased risk of both arterial and venous thrombosis and there is temporal persistence of antibody positivity. Case presentation A 44-year-old woman was admitted under the acute surgical "take" with left sided abdominal pain radiating to her back. She had a history of borderline thyrotoxicosis in the early 1990s. She was on etonogestrel-releasing implants for contraception and there was no history of previous deep venous thrombosis. She was very tender, locally, over the left side of the abdomen. Investigations showed haemoglobin of 13.2 g/dl, white cell count of 19.9 10*9/L, and platelets 214 10*9/L with neutrophilia. Amylase and renal function tests were found to be normal. Liver function tests were deranged with Gamma GT 244 u/l (twice normal. An abdominal Ultrasound Scan suggested a possible splenic infarction, which was confirmed by a CT scan of her abdomen. Tests were carried out to investigate the possibility of a post thrombotic state. Coagulation risk factors for thrombosis were within the normal limits; Protein S 67 %(60–140, Protein C 103 % (72–146, Antithrombin 3 110 %(80–120 and Activated P C Resistance was 1.9(2.0–4.3. The Hams test was negative but the Anticardiolipin antibody test was positive. IgM level was 52 (normal is up to 10 and IgG was 18.8 (normal is up to 10. She also had border line APC Sensitivity 1.9 (2 to 4.3. Kaolin time 49 sec (70–120 Ktmix 64 sec (70–120, thyroid function test revealed TSH 0.32 mu/L, fT4 20

  19. Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome - A Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain and fatigue associated to the musculoskeletal system are among the leading causes of patients to visit their physicians and nearly one-third of such patients suffer from fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a chronic debilitating disorder characterized by widespread pain with tenderness in specific areas, leading to fatigue, headache and sleep disorder. Myofaseial Pain Syndrome (NIPS, is also a localized musculoskeletal pain producing condition whose diagnostic and management criteria differ from FMS but still considered by many only a subtype of FMS.Till date no exact cause has been held responsible for these painful conditions, therefore treatment of these disorders is always a challenge. The therapies are not precise but multimodal including pharmacological and alternative ap-proaches. This article describes the existing knowledge pertaining to these conditions in regard of causative factors diagnosis and management.

  20. Routine use of modified CT Enterography in patients with acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion/Crete (Greece)], E-mail: sgty76@gmail.com; Zamboni, Giulia A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital GB Rossi, Verona (Italy); Romero, Janneth Y.; Raptopoulos, Vassilios D. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate routine use of CT Enterography (CTE) in patients presenting with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain with respect to patient tolerance, imaging of intestinal detail along with conventional abdominal evaluation. Materials and methods: Modified CTE was performed in 165 consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain: ingestion, as tolerated, of 900-1200 ml of 2% barium suspension + 5 ml of Gastrografin over 45 min; 150 ml of iv contrast given in two boluses (50 and 100 ml) 3 min apart (split bolus injection protocol). Axial, coronal and sagittal reformats were reviewed by two radiologists and graded on a 5-point scale (5 best) in regard to GI tract luminal opacification and distension and abdominal organ and vascular enhancement. Results: In 81 patients the cause of abdominal pain was identified (intestinal in 54 and extraintestinal in 27). Oral contrast reached cecum in 76% of the patients and the small bowel was well distended and opacified (medians = 4). Mucosa detail was good (median = 3) and there was significant (p < 0.0001) correlation between bowel opacification and distension for both jejunum and ileum. A combined nephrographic and excretory phase was achieved (medians 4 and 5, respectively), while the great vessels were well opacified, allowing for vascular evaluation (median = 5). The rest of the abdominal structures were well visualized. Conclusion: Modified CTE is well tolerated by patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain, and can be used routinely as a non-invasive examination informative of bowel, vessel and organ pathology in Emergency Department patients.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori infection itself, was associated with increased risk for abdominal pain.

  2. Evaluation of Women with Myofascial Abdominal Syndrome Based on Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitidieri, Andréia; Gurian, Maria Beatriz; Silva, Ana Paula; Tawasha, Kalil; Poli-Neto, Omero; Nogueira, Antônio; Reis, Francisco; Rosa-E-Silva, Júlio

    2015-12-01

    This study used semiology based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to investigate vital energy (Qi) behavior in women with abdominal myofascial pain syndrome (AMPS). Fifty women diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) secondary to AMPS were evaluated by using a questionnaire based on the theories of "yin-yang," "zang-fu", and "five elements". We assessed the following aspects of the illness: symptomatology; specific location of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs); onset, cause, duration and frequency of symptoms; and patient and family history. The patients tongues, lips, skin colors, and tones of speech were examined. Patients were questioned on various aspects related to breathing, sweating, sleep quality, emotions, and preferences related to color, food, flavors, and weather or seasons. Thirst, gastrointestinal dysfunction, excreta (feces and urine), menstrual cycle, the five senses, and characteristic pain symptoms related to headache, musculoskeletal pain, abdomen, and chest were also investigated. Patients were between 22 and 56 years old, and most were married (78%), possessed a elementary school (66%), and had one or two children (76%). The mean body mass index and body fat were 26.86 kg/ cm2 (range: 17.7 - 39.0) and 32.4% (range: 10.7 - 45.7), respectively. A large majority of women (96%) exhibited alterations in the kidney meridian, and 98% had an altered gallbladder meridian. We observed major changes in the kidney and the gallbladder Qi meridians in 76% and 62% of patients, respectively. Five of the twelve meridians analyzed exhibited Qi patterns similar to pelvic innervation Qi and meridians, indicating that the paths of some of these meridians were directly related to innervation of the pelvic floor and abdominal region. The women in this study showed changes in the behavior of the energy meridians, and the paths of some of the meridians were directly related to innervation of the pelvic floor and abdominal region.

  3. Evaluation of Women with Myofascial Abdominal Syndrome Based on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Mitidieri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study used semiology based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM to investigate vital energy (Qi behavior in women with abdominal myofascial pain syndrome (AMPS. Methods: Fifty women diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain (CPP secondary to AMPS were evaluated by using a questionnaire based on the theories of “yin-yang,” “zang-fu”, and “five elements”. We assessed the following aspects of the illness: symptomatology; specific location of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs; onset, cause, duration and frequency of symptoms; and patient and family history. The patients tongues, lips, skin colors, and tones of speech were examined. Patients were questioned on various aspects related to breathing, sweating, sleep quality, emotions, and preferences related to color, food, flavors, and weather or seasons. Thirst, gastrointestinal dysfunction, excreta (feces and urine, menstrual cycle, the five senses, and characteristic pain symptoms related to headache, musculoskeletal pain, abdomen, and chest were also investigated. Results: Patients were between 22 and 56 years old, and most were married (78%, possessed a elementary school (66%, and had one or two children (76%. The mean body mass index and body fat were 26.86 kg/ cm2 (range: 17.7 — 39.0 and 32.4% (range: 10.7 — 45.7, respectively. A large majority of women (96% exhibited alterations in the kidney meridian, and 98% had an altered gallbladder meridian. We observed major changes in the kidney and the gallbladder Qi meridians in 76% and 62% of patients, respectively. Five of the twelve meridians analyzed exhibited Qi patterns similar to pelvic innervation Qi and meridians, indicating that the paths of some of these meridians were directly related to innervation of the pelvic floor and abdominal region. Conclusion: The women in this study showed changes in the behavior of the energy meridians, and the paths of some of the meridians were directly related to innervation of the

  4. Conservative management of eosinophilic enteritis presenting with acute abdominal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bassi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic enteritis, an increasing recognized condition, is rare and often presents with non-specific symptoms. We report a case of a 46-year old female who presented with acute onset abdominal pain and nausea associated with ascites, small bowel thickening and peripheral eosinophilia. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsies taken at esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrating diffuse infiltration by inflammatory cells, mainly eosinophils. Appropriate therapy was instituted. The patient recovered well and was symptom-free at 1-month follow up. In this report, we discuss the clinical presentation and the diagnostic criteria of the eosinophilic enteritis, and examine the pathophysiological theories and therapeutic strategies. The relevant literature on eosinophilic enteritis is summarized.

  5. Myofascial Pain Syndrome in Chronic Back Pain Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizar, Abd Jalil

    2011-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional musculoskeletal pain disorder that is caused by myofascial trigger points. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of MPS among chronic back pain patients, as well as to identify risk factors and the outcome of this disorder. Methods This was a prospective observational study involving 126 patients who attended the Pain Management Unit for chronic back pain between 1st January 2009 and 31st December 2009. Data examined included demographic features of patients, duration of back pain, muscle(s) involved, primary diagnosis, treatment modality and response to treatment. Results The prevalence of MPS among chronic back pain patients was 63.5% (n = 80). Secondary MPS was more common than primary MPS, making up 81.3% of the total MPS. There was an association between female gender and risk of developing MPS (χ2 = 5.38, P = 0.02, O.R. = 2.4). Occupation, body mass index and duration of back pain were not significantly associated with MPS occurrence. Repeated measures analysis showed significant changes (P < 0.001) in Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and Modified Oswestry Disability Score (MODS) with standard management during three consecutive visits at six-month intervals. Conclusions MPS prevalence among chronic back pain patients was significantly high, with female gender being a significant risk factor. With proper diagnosis and expert management, MPS has a favourable outcome. PMID:21716607

  6. Ruptured Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery: A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalalludin Khoshnevis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs are rare (0.2-10.4%; however, they are the most common form of visceral artery aneurysms. Splenic artery aneurysms are important to identify, because up to 25% of the cases are complicated by rupture. Post- rupture mortality rate is 25% -70% based on the underlying cause. Herein we present a young patient with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma due to rupture of an SAA.Case Presentation: A 27-year-old male, without a remarkable medical history, who suffered from abdominal pain for 2 days after falling was admitted to the emergency department with hypovolemic shock. Upon performing emergency laparotomy a ruptured splenic artery aneurysm was found.Conclusions: It is important to consider rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm in patients with abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock.

  7. Fear of pain in children and adolescents with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Laura E

    2016-02-01

    A significant proportion of children and adolescents with chronic pain endorse elevated pain-related fear. Pain-related fear is associated with high levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and school impairment. Because of faulty nerve signaling, individuals with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome may be more prone to develop pain-related fear as they avoid use of and neglect the affected body area(s), resulting in exacerbated symptoms, muscle atrophy, maintenance of pain signaling, and ongoing pain-related disability. Not surprisingly, effective treatments for elevated pain-related fears involve exposure to previously avoided activities to downregulate incorrect pain signaling. In the context of intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment of youth with neuropathic pain, decreasing pain-related fear is associated with improved physical and psychological functioning, whereas high initial pain-related fear is a risk factor for less treatment responsiveness. An innovative approach to targeting pain-related fear and evidence of a neural response to treatment involving decoupling of the amygdala with key fear circuits in youth with complex regional pain syndrome suggest breakthroughs in our ability to ameliorate these issues.

  8. [Acute abdominal pain of the upper abdomen: which imaging to choose?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excoffier, S; Poletti, P-A; Brandstatter, H

    2013-09-25

    The aim of this article is to review the imaging modalities to be performed in patients with acute diffuse upper abdominal pain. Conventional radiography, ultrasound and computerized tomography (CT) are most often used in this setting. The choice of the initial imaging technique will depend from the localization of the pain and the probability of a particular pathology in the involved area.

  9. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...

  10. Effects of improper posture during work on lumbal pain syndrome of discogenic etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Kaljić

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar pain syndrome is the most common cause of why patients, especially the active ones, are reported to physicians. It is manifested as nonspecific or non-radicular lumbar pain syndrome which is not associated with neurological symptoms, and specific which is associated with spinal nerve root compression. Aims of this study were to determine correlation between inadequate equipment and improper position for work with disk caused lumbar pain syndrome.Methods: The study included 913 patients who have visited the Community-based rehabilitation ambulance "Praxis" due to low back pain syndrome and verified disc hernia in the five year period. Lumbar pain syndrome was diagnosed by clinical examination (history, inspection, palpation, Lasegue sign, neurologic and motoric dysfunction tests, then radiologic diagnostic methods (CT, MRI. The data about inadequate equipment and position during work were obtained in interview with  patients.Results: Lumbar pain syndrome is most common among workers (268 or 29.35%, followed by officials (239 or 26.17%. With the conducted research we determine that all the patients had inadequate equipment and the position of labor and weak abdominal and spinal muscles.Conclusion: Based on research conducted through the before mentioned variables, we can determine not only the association, but a strong influence of inadequate equipment and improper position for work to the occurrence of disk caused lumbar pain syndrome.

  11. Present state and future challenges in pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics research: Looking beyond the forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig; A; Friesen; Jennifer; V; Schurman; Susan; M; Abdel-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, it is nearly impossible to treat pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with pain in an evidence based fashion. This is due to the overall lack of controlled studies and, even more importantly, the complexity of the contributors to disease phenotype which are not controlled or accounted for in most therapeutic trials. In this manuscript, we review the challenges of defining entry criteria, controlling for the large number of biopsychosocial factors which may effect outcomes, and understanding pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors when designing therapeutic trials for abdominal pain in children. We also review the current state of pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics and discuss trial design considerations as we move forward.

  12. Treatment of Abdominal Segmental Hernia, Constipation, and Pain Following Herpes Zoster with Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) most commonly occurs in elderly patients and involves sensory neurons resulting in pain and sensory changes. Clinically significant motor deficits and visceral neuropathies are thought to be relatively rare. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal segmental hernia, constipation, and pain following HZ in the left T9-10 dermatome. Sixteen days before presentation, he had developed a painful herpetic rash in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Approximately 10 days after the onset of the rash, constipation occurred and was managed with daily oral medication with bisacodyl 5 mg. In addition, 14 days after the onset of HZ, the patient noticed a protrusion of the left upper abdominal wall. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, and electrolyte analysis showed no abnormalities. General physical examination revealed a reducible bulge in his left upper quadrant and superficial abdominal reflexes were diminished in the affected region. Electromyographic testing revealed denervational changes limited to the left thoracic paraspinal muscles and supraumbilical muscles, corresponding to the affected dermatomes. He was prescribed with 500 mg of famciclovir 3 times a day for 7 days, and pregabalin 75 mg twice a day and acetaminophen 650 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. However, his pain was rated at an intensity of 5 on the numerical analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). A paravertebral block was performed at T9-10 with a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine 3 mL and triamcinolone 40 mg. One day after the procedure, the abdominal pain disappeared. In addition, 5 days after the intervention, the abdominal protrusion and constipation were resolved. He currently remains symptom free at a 6 month follow-up.

  13. Unexplained lower abdominal pain associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man presented with chronic lower back pain and unexplained lower abdominal pain. Both patients had groin tenderness at the medial border of the anterior superior iliac spine. The results of radiographical and physical examinations suggested sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Sacroiliac joint injection relieved their symptoms, including groin tenderness. In our experience, groin tenderness is highly specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We speculate that spasm of the iliac muscle can cause groin pain and tenderness. Groin pain and a history of unexplained abdominal pain, with lower back pain, are symptoms that suggest sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Additionally, compression of the iliac muscle is a simple and useful maneuver; therefore, it can be used as a screening test for sacroiliac joint dysfunction, alongside other provocation tests.

  14. Effect of systematic relaxation techniques on anxiety and pain in older patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie

    2013-10-01

    Inadequate pain control in older patients who have undergone abdominal surgery can lead to many complications. This study investigates the effect of systematic relaxation techniques on pain and anxiety in older patients undergoing abdominal surgery. One hundred twenty-four patients were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. The systematic relaxation techniques consisted of older patients in the experimental group slowly reading relaxing sentences during recovery in ambulation after the surgery. Patients' satisfaction with pain and anxiety relief was recorded, as was their use of opioid analgesia. Statistically significant differences in pain and anxiety, and in analgesic use, were reported between the patients in experimental and control groups after the intervention. These relaxation techniques can be incorporated into the care plan to reduce pain and anxiety after surgery as well as offering a measure for increasing the patients' independence in pain management control. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Music Reduces Postoperative Pain Perception in Male Patients after Abdominal Surgery under General Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Varbanova MR; Neamtu A; Gaar E; Grigorov MV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perioperative pain after abdominal surgery is difficult to manage. Despite the advent of multimodal analgesia techniques, the opioids remain the cornerstone of treatment. Since the opioids’ adverse effects are of concern immediate postoperatively, music as a modality that would influence human behavior, is of interest as an adjunct for acute pain management. Our hypothesis was that listening to instrumental music during the perioperative period reduces the pain level and decreases...

  16. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Iranian Female Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Baradaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190, volleyball (103, running (42, fencing (45 and rock climbing (38. The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 % soccer players, 21/103(20.38 % volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 % runners, 6/45(13.33 % fencers and 10/38 (26.31% rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners.

  17. [Complex regional pain syndrome. Current status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Zuluaga, Paola Andrea; Plancarte-Sánchez, Ricardo; Tamayo-Valenzuela, Antonio César

    2004-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a disorder or group of disorders that develop as a consequence of previous trauma with or without evident nerve injury. The syndrome is characterized by presence of spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia, sensitive changes, blood flow changes, sweating, and trophic changes. The disease is characterized by symptoms of acute inflammatory states as well as by chronic neuropathic changes. Pain is associated with changes generated by the autonomic nervous system. Spinal neurons can increase their sensitivity to these autonomic changes. At a supraspinal level, reorganization of somatosensorial cortex is seen. Creation of diagnostic criteria has been difficult due to the plentiful symptoms of CRSP. Sympathetic blockade with phentolamine is the most commonly approved examination to diagnose sympathetic maintained pain. Several strategies have been used for treatment of CRPS, but with none of these has sufficient evidence of treatment effectiveness been afforded.

  18. The efficacy of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of chronic abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-labban Gouda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Chronic abdominal pain is a difficult complaint. It leads to evident suffering and disability, both physically and psychologically. Many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures have been described in literature, but with little proof or evidence of success. Laparoscopy is one of the modalities that could be of benefit in such cases. We aim to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of laparoscopy in cases with chronic abdominal pain. Materials and Methods : Thirty patients with chronic abdominal pain were included in this prospective descriptive cross-sectional study. The pain in all patients was of unclear etiology despite all the investigative procedures. All patients were subjected to laparoscopic evaluation for their conditions. The findings and outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and analyzed. Results : The most common site of pain was the periumbilical region (30%. A definitive diagnosis was made in 25 patients (83.3%, while five patients (16.7% had no obvious pathology. Adhesions were the most common laparoscopic findings (63.3% followed by appendiceal pathology (10%, hernia (3.3%, gall bladder pathology (3.3%, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (3.3%. Postoperatively, pain relief was achieved in 24 patients (80% after two months. Conclusion : Laparoscopy is an effective diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the management of patients with chronic abdominal pain.

  19. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1983-04-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5%) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinically useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure.

  20. Pain reported during prolonged standing is associated with reduced anticipatory postural adjustments of the deep abdominals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul W M; Romero, Rick; Brooks, Cristy

    2014-11-01

    Within the context of low back pain, the measurement of deep abdominal anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) during rapid limb movement has received much interest. There is dispute about the association between APAs and back pain. Moreover, there is limited evidence examining compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) in back pain. This study examined the relationship between APAs and CPAs with pain reported in the low back during 2 h of prolonged standing. Twenty-six participants with no history of severe back pain performed 2-h prolonged standing. APAs and CPAs of the deep abdominal muscles (transverse abdominis/internal obliques) were measured by surface electromyography during rapid shoulder flexion and extension. APAs and CPAs measured pre-standing revealed symmetrical anticipatory activity, but an asymmetry between the different sides of the abdominal wall for CPAs. APAs and CPAs measured pre-standing were not associated with pain reported during standing. For the whole group, APA amplitudes were reduced post-standing during shoulder flexion (p = 0.005). Pain reported during standing was associated with the changes in APA amplitudes post-standing (rs = 0.43, p = 0.002). These findings support previous research using hypertonic saline injections to induce back pain that showed reduced APA amplitudes, and extends findings to suggest pain does not effect compensatory postural adjustments.

  1. Interstitial Cystitis: Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Atuğ

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bladder of unknown etiology characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and suprapubic pain. The syndrome presents differently in many patients, with the unifying factor being chronic pelvic pain and disruption of daily life activities.Although there are abundance of theories, the etiology of the condition remains unclear. This review focuses on recently published literature on the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  2. Interstitial Cystitis: Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Atuğ; Naime Canoruç

    2005-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bladder of unknown etiology characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and suprapubic pain. The syndrome presents differently in many patients, with the unifying factor being chronic pelvic pain and disruption of daily life activities.Although there are abundance of theories, the etiology of the condition remains unclear. This review focuses on recently published literature on the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and ...

  3. Pubic inguinal pain syndrome: the so-called sports hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marta; Bombini, Grazia; Campanelli, Giampiero

    2014-03-01

    The "sportsman's hernia" commonly presents as a painful groin in those sports that involve kicking and twisting movements while running, particularly in rugby, football, soccer, and ice hockey players. Moreover, sportsman's hernia can be encountered even in normally physically active people. The pain experienced is recognized at the common point of origin of the rectus abdominis muscle and the adductor longus tendon on the pubic bone and the insertion of the inguinal ligament on the pubic bone. It is accepted that this chronic pain caused by abdominal wall weakness or injury occurs without a palpable hernia. We proposed the new name "pubic inguinal pain syndrome." In the period between January 2006 and November 2013 all patients afferent in our ambulatory clinic for chronic groin pain without a clinically evident hernia were assessed with medical history, physical examination, dynamic ultrasound, and pelvic and lumbar MRI. All patients were proposed for a conservative treatment and then, if it was not effective, for a surgical treatment. Our etiopathogenetic theory is based on three factors: (1) the compression of the three nerves of the inguinal region, (2) the imbalance in strength of adductor and abdominal wall muscles caused by the hypertrophy and stiffness of the insertion of rectus muscle and adductor longus muscle, and (3) the partial weakness of the posterior wall. Our surgical procedure includes the release of all three nerves of the region, the correction of the imbalance in strength with the partial tenotomy of the rectus and adductor longus muscles, and the repair of the partial weakness of the posterior wall with a lightweight mesh. This treatment reported excellent results with complete relief of symptoms after resumption of physical activity in all cases.

  4. Unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in a postmenopausal woman: adnexal torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Biler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adnexal torsion is an infrequent but significant cause of acute lower abdominal pain in women. While adnexal torsion is generally considered in premenopausal women presenting with acute abdominal pain and a pelvic mass, it is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain during postmenopausal period. The diagnosis of adnexal torsion is often challenging due to nonspesific clinical, laboratory and physical examination findings. Causes of adnexal torsion is also different in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. While a simple functional cyst is often the cause of torsion in premenopausal women, it is more rarely the cause in postmenopausal women. Adnexal torsion is a surgical emergency. The surgery of adnexal torsion is performed either via conventional exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery. Adnexal torsion in postmenopausal women should be considered not only in the setting of sudden onset pain, but also in long-term abdominal discomfort. In this article, we presented a case with adnexal torsion that rarely cause acute abdominal pain in postmenopausal women. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 167-170

  5. Relief of abdominal pain by morphine without altering physical signs in acute appendicitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yong; CHEN Jia-yong; GUO Hao; ZHANG Yi; LIANG Dao-ming; ZHOU Dong; ZHAO Hui; LIN Feng

    2010-01-01

    Background Abdominal pain is a common symptom among patients with acute appendicitis, yet these patients havelong been denied relief from suffering because of widespread misconceptions associated with the use of opioids. Wedetermined whether morphine hydrochloride masked the physical signs in adults with acute appendicitis and assessedthe efficacy of morphine in relieving abdominal pain.Methods A prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted with 106 adult patients between16 and 70 years old with acute appendicitis. Patients were randomly divided into a morphine group (n=54) or a normalsaline group (n=52). All patients presented with acute abdominal pain with onset within 3 days. The morphine groupreceived hypodermic injection of morphine (0.15 mg/kg; maximum 20 mg) and the control group members were given anequivalent volume of normal saline solution. The clinical symptoms, physical signs, and patients' cooperation duringphysical examination were assessed before and after 30 minutes of morphine or normal saline administration.Results Abdominal pain was significantly relieved and the patients' cooperation was improved in the morphine groupafter 30 minutes treatment compared with the control group and before morphine administration (P0.05).Conclusions Morphine relieved abdominal pain and improved the patients' cooperation for treatment and care.Furthermore, the morphine did not mask the physical signs of acute appendicitis.

  6. Menarche? A Case of Abdominal Pain and Vaginal Bleeding in a Preadolescent Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riney, Lauren C; Reed, Jennifer L; Kruger, Laura L; Brody, Alan J; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in the pediatric ED. Because of the broad range of potential diagnoses, it can pose challenges in diagnosis and therapy in the preadolescent girl. An 11-year-old previously healthy girl presented to our pediatric ED with fever, decreased appetite, vaginal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Initial evaluation yielded elevated creatinine levels, leukocytosis with bandemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and urine concerning for a urinary tract infection. She began receiving antibiotics for presumed pyelonephritis and was admitted to the hospital. After worsening respiratory status and continued abdominal pain, a computed tomography scan was obtained and a pelvic foreign body and abscess were identified. Adolescent gynecology was consulted for examination under anesthesia for abscess drainage and foreign body removal. A foreign body in the vagina or uterus can present as vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, dysuria, or hematuria. Because symptoms can be diverse, an intravaginal or uterine foreign body should be considered in the preteen female patient presenting to the ED with abdominal pain.

  7. A Review of Select Centralized Pain Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Spiegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain can be broadly divided into 3 classes, including nociceptive or inflammatory pain (protective, neuropathic (pathological, occurring after damage to the nervous system, or centralized (pathological, due to abnormal function but with no damage or inflammation to the nervous system. The latter has been posited to occur when descending analgesic pathways are attenuated and/or glutamatergic transmission is facilitated. Additionally, this “pain prone phenotype” can be associated with early life trauma and a suboptimal response to opiates. This article will review the relationships between centralized pain syndromes (ie, fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, childhood sexual abuse, and opiate misuse. Finally, treatment implications, potentially effecting primary care physicians, will be discussed.

  8. A Review of Select Centralized Pain Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Spiegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain can be broadly divided into 3 classes, including nociceptive or inflammatory pain (protective, neuropathic (pathological, occurring after damage to the nervous system, or centralized (pathological, due to abnormal function but with no damage or inflammation to the nervous system. The latter has been posited to occur when descending analgesic pathways are attenuated and/or glutamatergic transmission is facilitated. Additionally, this “pain prone phenotype” can be associated with early life trauma and a suboptimal response to opiates. This article will review the relationships between centralized pain syndromes (ie, fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, childhood sexual abuse, and opiate misuse. Finally, treatment implications, potentially effecting primary care physicians, will be discussed.

  9. Perioperative use of etoricoxib reduces pain and opioid side-effects after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Frenkl, Tara L; Hartrick, Craig T;

    2012-01-01

    -blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, we evaluated postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy over 5 days in patients receiving placebo or etoricoxib administered 90 min prior to surgery and continuing postoperatively. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n...... as primary endpoints. Conclusion: In patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy, etoricoxib 90 and 120 mg dosed preoperatively and then continued postoperatively significantly reduces both resting and movement-related pain, as well as reduced opioid (morphine) consumption that led to more rapid bowel......Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effects of two different doses of etoricoxib delivered perioperatively compared with placebo and standard pain management on pain at rest, pain with mobilization, and use of additional morphine/opioids postoperatively. Research design and methods: In this double...

  10. 38-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain, but no fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwata K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Kentaro Iwata1, Tomoko Toma2, Akihiro Yachie21Department of Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe, Japan; 2Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medical Science and School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, JapanAbstract: A 38-year-old woman presented with 2 days history of left-flank pain. She had similar episodes of abdominal pain as well as chest pain several times, but symptoms disappeared spontaneously. Each time she developed pain, there was no fever. After ruling out common causes of recurrent abdominal pain, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF was considered as a potential diagnosis. Genetic tests revealed multiple heterozygote mutations, which may be associated with FMF. Patients with Mediterranean fever mutations may present with atypical presentations without fever, like in this case. Astute clinical suspicion is required to make an accurate diagnosis.Keywords: familial Mediterranean fever, MEFV mutation, afebrile

  11. Intravenous phentolamine infusion alleviates the pain of abdominal visceral cancer, including pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Masako; Yasukawa, Ken'ichi; Kamiizumi, You; Yokoyama, Ryouji

    2007-01-01

    This case report series describes eight patients (four patients with pancreatic carcinoma, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, one patient with gastric and rectal carcinoma, one with sigmoid colon cancer, and one with rectal cancer), whose abdominal cancer pain was treated with intravenous phentolamine infusion at 80 mg x day(-1) for 2 days. All but one of the patients had already been treated with opioids. All eight patients complained of severe abdominal pain; in five patients the pain radiated to the back, and there was associated anal pain in two patients. Analgesia was achieved in three patients; pain alleviation was obtained in four patients, but was not sustained in two of these four patients; and the treatment in one patient could not be judged for efficacy because epidural morphine was used together with the phentolamine. Adverse effects of phentolamine were tachycardia and/or hypotension.

  12. Belly dancer's myoclonus and chronic abdominal pain: pain-related dysinhibition of a spinal cord central pattern generator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburin, Stefano; Idone, Domenico; Zanette, Giampietro

    2007-07-01

    We report on a patient with segmental rhythmic myoclonus resembling belly dance. This patient developed the myoclonus in temporal and anatomical association with chronic abdominal pain. No structural or metabolic abnormalities were found. EMG recordings suggested the presence of a spinal cord central pattern generator (CPG). We hypothesize that pain-related spinal plasticity might have contributed to the hyperactivity of a spinal CPG, thus leading to the myoclonic jerks in our patient.

  13. Relationships between psychological factors, pain, and disability in complex regional pain syndrome and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Kydd, Robert R

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive and emotional factors are known to influence peoples' pain experiences in many conditions, including low back pain. However, in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), their role is unclear. This study aimed to assess the relationships between psychological factors, pain, and disability in CRPS, compared with low back pain. This could help to identify target variables for psychological treatment. A total of 88 CRPS patients and 88 low back pain patients completed measures of pain, disability, depression, anxiety, and fear of movement and reinjury (kinesiophobia). Mean scores between the 2 groups were compared, and correlations between psychological factors, pain, and disability were compared between the 2 groups. Predictors of pain and disability were assessed using multiple regression analyses. The 2 groups had remarkably similar scores on measures of pain, disability, depression, anxiety, and kinesiophobia. In both groups, those who were more depressed, anxious, and kinesiophobic were more disabled. For the CRPS group (but not the low back pain group), pain intensity significantly correlated with distress. Multivariate analyses showed that the unique predictors of disability for the 2 groups were pain and depression, and that depression had a stronger relationship with disability for the CRPS group. For both groups, pain intensity was predicted by kinesiophobia, and anxiety was a unique predictor in the CRPS group only. In CRPS, disability and pain severity were more strongly associated with psychological factors than they were in low back pain. Cause and effect relationships could not be established by this cross-sectional study.

  14. Decompressive Abdominal Laparotomy for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in an Unengrafted Bone Marrow Recipient with Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick J. N. Dauplaise

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe a profoundly immunocompromised (panleukopenia child with septic shock who developed abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS and was successfully treated with surgical decompression. Design. Individual case report. Setting. Pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary children's hospital. Patient. A 32-month-old male with Fanconi anemia who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT 5 days prior to developing septic shock secondary to Streptococcus viridans and Escherichia coli ACS developed after massive fluid resuscitation, leading to cardiopulmonary instability. Interventions. Emergent surgical bedside laparotomy and silo placement. Measurements and Main Results. The patient's cardiopulmonary status stabilized after decompressive laparotomy. The abdomen was closed and the patient survived to hospital discharge without cardiac, respiratory, or renal dysfunction. Conclusions. The use of laparotomy and silo placement in an unengrafted BMT patient with ACS and septic shock did not result in additional complications. Surgical intervention for ACS is a reasonable option for high risk, profoundly immunocompromised patients.

  15. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Isaac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome.

  16. The prevalence of chronic postmastectomy pain syndrome in female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: breast cancer, chronic pain, postmastectomy pain syndrome. Introduction ... worldwide.1 In South Africa, a crude incidence rate of 18.5/100 000 ..... ongoing pain, response to blunt pressure and vibration, and skin changes.16.

  17. The effect of a preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Holst, Lars B; Jørgensen, Jørgen C;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methylprednisolone has been shown to have analgesic effects after orthopedic surgery. The objective of this trial was to compare the effect of 125 mg methylprednisolone with placebo on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. STUDY DESIGN: In this randomized double......-blinded placebo-controlled trial women scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy (n=59) were randomized to preoperatively receive either 125 mg methylprednisolone or saline intravenously. Primary outcome was postoperative pain measured on a 0.0-10.0 visual analog scale and assessed at rest and during...... group (P=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This trial showed no beneficial effect of methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methylprednisolone significantly lowered postoperative CRP levels. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrial.gov: www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01106547....

  18. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kartal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;abdominal pain and rdquo; is always important even though hereditary angioedema diagnosis exists. And the second; It can be hardy speculated that long term danazol treatment may cause different malignancies. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 567-569

  19. Colonoscopic diagnosis of appendiceal intussusception in a patient with intermittent abdominal pain: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Tavakkoli; Sayed Mohammad Sadrkabir; Parvin Mahzouni

    2007-01-01

    Intussusception of the appendix is a rare condition.Most cases are diagnosed during operation of the patients suspected to have appendicitis. In this report we present a seventy one year-old man with a history of periumbilical intermittent abdominal pain for several months. None of the paraclinical tests were useful for determining the diagnosis. Colonoscopy performed during the last episode of abdominal pain revealed the prolapsed appendix in the cecum and the patient was sent to the operating room. Macroscopic appearance of the appendix was normal and microscopic examination revealed follicular hyperplasia and acute focal appendicitis. Appendiceal intussusception should be considered in differential diagnosis of intermittent abdominal pain and colonoscopic diagnosis could be very important to avoid dangerous or unnecessary decision making.

  20. Evaluation and management of acute abdominal pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macaluso CR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Macaluso, Robert M McNamaraDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Evaluation of the emergency department patient with acute abdominal pain is sometimes difficult. Various factors can obscure the presentation, delaying or preventing the correct diagnosis, with subsequent adverse patient outcomes. Clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those life-threatening conditions that require timely intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. This article will review general information on abdominal pain and discuss the clinical approach by review of the history and the physical examination. Additionally, this article will discuss the approach to unstable patients with abdominal pain.Keywords: acute abdomen, emergency medicine, peritonitis

  1. Body posture and syndromes of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, Janusz; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Brzęk, Anna; Kowalczyk, Anna; Czupryna, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The effects of faulty postures include disturbances of the symmetric distribution of compressive and tensile forces acting on both sides of the body axis and the emergence of harmful shear forces. The torques of antigravity muscles also change unfavourably. This may lead to the development of a repetitive strain syndrome, stenosis of intervertebral foramina, compression of nerve roots and back pain. The development of back pain syndromes is significantly affected by the performance of various work-related tasks in non-ergonomic positions. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between back pain syndromes and the quality of body posture, especially in the context of work ergonomics. The study enrolled 125 persons: 39 adults with a childhood history of scoliosis, 39 midwives, and 47 physiotherapists. Body posture was assessed in all participants. In midwives and physiotherapists, body position during the performance of work-related tasks was also evaluated. The frequency and severity of pain was assessed with the Jackson-Moskowitz measure. The study revealed that over 80% of the participants suffered from spinal pain. In most cases, the pain was intermittent and was felt in the lumbar spine. The occurrence of pain among midwives and physiotherapists was not directly dependent on the predominant type of abnormal spinal position assumed during the performance of occupational tasks or the quality of body posture. The complaint was also reported by ca. 85% of persons with a history of scoliosis. An incorrect body posture (especially scoliosis) and performance of work-related tasks in non-ergonomic positions increase the probability of back pain.

  2. An oblique muscle hematoma as a rare cause of severe abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimodaira Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal wall hematomas are an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain and are often misdiagnosed. They are more common in elderly individuals, particularly in those under anticoagulant therapy. Most abdominal wall hematomas occur in the rectus sheath, and hematomas within the oblique muscle are very rare and are poorly described in the literature. Here we report the case of an oblique muscle hematoma in a middle-aged patient who was not under anticoagulant therapy. Case presentation A 42-year-old Japanese man presented with a painful, enlarging, lateral abdominal wall mass, which appeared after playing baseball. Abdominal computed tomography and ultrasonography showed a large soft tissue mass located in the patient’s left internal oblique muscle. A diagnosis of a lateral oblique muscle hematoma was made and the patient was treated conservatively. Conclusion Physicians should consider an oblique muscle hematoma during the initial differential diagnosis of pain in the lateral abdominal wall even in the absence of anticoagulant therapy or trauma.

  3. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la presión intraabdominal es el estado de equilibrio de la presión de la cavidad abdominal en reposo y puede presentar cambios durante la ventilación mecánica o espontánea. El objetivo fue determinar la presión intraabdominal como predictor de cirugía en el paciente con dolor abdominal agudo. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio de casos y controles anidado en una cohorte de pacientes con dolor abdominal agudo en el servicio de urgencias de un hospital de segundo nivel, en el periodo comprendido entre abril y diciembre de 2013. Se incluyeron 37 pacientes, todos fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente con previa toma de la presión intraabdominal. Se formaron los grupos con el resultado del estudio anatomopatológico: con evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 28) y sin evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 9). Resultados: en los casos el 100 % presentó presión intraabdominal alta con una p = 0.01, RM: 5 (IC 95 %: 2.578-9.699). En los casos la media de la presión intraabdominal fue de 11.46 y en los controles de 9.2 (p = 0.183). Conclusiones: el dolor abdominal que requiere cirugía para su resolución tiene relación directa con una presión intraabdominal > 5 mmHg.

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: An inflammatory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Dirckx (Maaike)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractThe pathophysiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is complex and still not completely understood. In addition to a convincing role of inflammation, there are a number of arguments why an involvement of the immune system has been suggested in the pathophysiology of CRPS. Th

  5. Evaluating the accuracy of emergency medicine resident interpretations of abdominal CTs in patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mun Ju; Sim, Min Seob; Shin, Tae Gun; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Hyoung Gon; Song, Keun Jeong; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2012-10-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) is widely used as a diagnostic tool in emergency medicine (EM) to accurately diagnose abdominal pain. EM residents must be able to offer preliminary interpretations of CT imaging. In this study, we evaluated the preliminary interpretation ability of a sample of emergency residents presented with adult abdominal CT images, and compared their results with those of radiology residents. We conducted a prospective observational study from November 16, 2008 to June 30, 2009. During this time, we gathered preliminary interpretations of consecutive abdominal CT made by emergency and radiology residents. We assessed the discrepancy rates of both samples by comparing their findings to the final reports from attending radiologists. A total of 884 cases were enrolled in the present study. The discrepancy rates of emergency and radiology residents were 16.7% and 12.2%, respectively. When female genital organs, peritoneum, adrenal glands, or the musculoskeletal system were abnormal, we found that emergency residents' preliminary interpretations of CT images were insufficient compared to those of radiology residents. Therefore more formal education is needed to emergency residents. If possible, the preliminary interpretations of radiology attending physicians are ideal until improving the ability of interpretations of emergency residents in abdomen CT.

  6. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Daniel E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04. There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05, and two (82% vs. 45%, P Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  7. Joint hypermobility syndrome and related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Sahin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypermobility is defined as an abnormally increased range of motion of a joint resulting from the excessive laxity of the soft tissues. This paper is focused on this commonly forgotten cause of several morbidities. The etiology of hypermobility is not very well known. One decade ago, joint hypermobility syndrome was considered as a benign condition, but now it is recognized as a significant contributor to chronic musculoskeletal pain, besides impacting on other organs. Patients with joint hypermobility syndrome often have diffuse, chronic complaints that are inconsistent with the musculoskeletal system. Chronic pain may cause loss of proprioception and so increased sensitivity to microtrauma, premature osteoarthritis de- velopment, soft tissue problems, psychosocial disorders, and neurophysiological deficiencies. Osteoarthritis, pes planus, mechanical low back pain, and soft tissue rheumatisms are frequent musculoskeletal findings as well as subluxations, thoracic outlet syndrome, rectal and uterine prolapses, hernias, and stress incontinence. Joint hypermobility syndrome's treatment is not easy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not usually effective or adequate. Proprioceptive and strengthening exercises have been reported to have supportive and therapeutic effects, but we have limited data on this issue. Joint hypermobility syndrome must be accepted as a multisystem connective tissue disorder rather than just joint laxities. As a result; clinicians must be aware of complexities of connective tissue disorders and comorbidities. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(2.000: 105-112

  8. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    disturbed in 22 patients with functional abdominal pain (functional group) as compared with 14 healthy controls (healthy group) and 26 patients with organic abdominal pain (organic group) due to duodenal ulcer (DU), gallstones, or urinary tract calculi. Plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and serum...... cortisol measurements were included, to assess the pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and plasma adrenaline increased significantly in all groups in response to a stress test (mental arithmetic). Plasma noradrenaline increased in the DU patients only, and plasma ACTH...

  9. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    possible, existing evidence was assessed and a level of recommendation was developed according to the Oxford system of classification. Results: The consultation decided to refer to the condition as "bladder pain syndrome" (BPS) because the designation is more descriptive of the clinical condition......Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature......, taxonomy, epidemiology, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, symptom scales, outcome assessment, principles of management, specific therapies, and future directions in research. Study Design, Materials, Methods: The emphasis was on new information developed since the last consultation 4 years previously. Where...

  10. Right Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Prior Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting: Consider the Tip!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Charalampoudis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunting is the treatment of choice for nonobstructive hydrocephalus. In patients with such a device, right lower quadrant abdominal pain can puzzle the surgeon, posing a differential diagnostic problem among appendicitis, nonsurgical colicky pain, and primary shunt catheter tip infection. Treatment is different in either case. Presentation of Case. We hereby present a case of a young woman with prior ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning who presented to our department with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. The patient underwent a 24-hour observation including a neurosurgery consult in order to exclude acute appendicitis and VP shunt tip infection. Twenty four hours later, the patient’s symptomatology improved, and she was discharged with the diagnosis of atypical colicky abdominal pain seeking a gastroenterologist consult. Discussion. This case supports that when a patient with prior VP shunting presents with right lower quadrant abdominal pain, differential diagnosis can be tricky for the surgeon. Conclusion. Apart from acute appendicitis, primary or secondary VP catheter tip infection must be considered because the latter can be disastrous.

  11. Untreatable Pain Resulting from Abdominal Cancer: New Hope from Biophysics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marineo G

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Visceral pain characterizing pancreatic cancer is the most difficult symptom of the disease to control and can significantly impair the quality of life which remains and increase the demand for euthanasia. AIM: To investigate a possible new method based on biophysical principles (scrambler therapy to be used in the effective treatment of drug-resistant oncological pain of the visceral/neuropathic type. SETTING: Eleven terminal cancer patients (3 pancreas, 4 colon, 4 gastric suffering from elevated drug resistant visceral pain. DESIGN: The trial program was related to the first ten treatment sessions. Subsequently, each patient continued to receive treatment until death. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain measures were performed using the visual analogue scale before and after each treatment session and accompanied by diary recordings of the duration of analgesia in the hours following each single application. Any variation in pain-killing drug consumption was also recorded. RESULTS: All patients reacted positively to the treatment throughout the whole reference period. Pain intensity showed a significant decrease (P less than 0.001, accompanied by a gradual rise both in the pain threshold and the duration of analgesia. Nine (81.8% of the patients suspended pain-killers within the first 5 applications, while the remaining two (18.2% considerably reduced the dosage taken prior to scrambler therapy. No undesirable side effects were observed. Compliance was found to be optimal. CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary results obtained using scrambler therapy are extremely encouraging, both in terms of enhanced pain control after each treatment session and in view of the possible maintenance of effectiveness over time.

  12. Evaluating the Patient with Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avegno, Jennifer; Carlisle, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Right upper quadrant (RUQ) pain is among the most common complaints in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis is broad and includes gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI causes for pain. Evaluation of patients requires a combination of history, physical examination, laboratory testing, and diagnostic imaging. This article details the anatomy and physiology of the right upper abdomen and approach to the history and physical examination of the most common diseases encountered in the emergency department. "Can't miss," non-GI diagnoses are discussed. Best practices of laboratory and imaging, and treatment of most common diagnoses of RUQ pain are reviewed.

  13. Pediatric case of acute right-sided abdominal pain: diagnosis is not always appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgharbawy F

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fawzia Elgharbawy,1 Khalil Salameh,1 Talal Al Rayes,2 Ibtihal S Abdelgadir3 1Pediatrics Division, Al Wakra Hospital, 2Hamad Medical Corporation, 3Sidra Medical and Research Centre, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Omental infarction (OI is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain occurring in 0.1% of children, which is typically diagnosed during surgery for suspected appendicitis. We present the case of a 7-year-old Pakistani girl. She presented with acute, severe, progressive, right-sided abdominal pain, which was present for 12 hours before presentation. No constitutional symptoms such as fever, anorexia, nausea or vomiting were present. Clinical examination revealed an adequately growing child following the 50th centile. She had severe generalized abdominal tenderness with rebound tenderness and guarding, mainly on the right lower abdominal quadrant, with all other system examinations normal. She had mildly increased inflammatory markers, and her initial abdominal ultrasound scan result was within normal limits. She had laparoscopic surgery following a diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis; however, an intraoperative diagnosis of OI was made. This was later confirmed by histopathology. This case report highlights the importance of including OI in the differential diagnosis list of acute abdominal pain in children, in addition to the importance of computed tomography (CT as the gold standard tool to aid diagnosis. In the presence of typical symptoms and signs of OI, a CT scan can assist and guide the management of similar cases. This course of action is suggested for the reason that OI typically runs a self-limited course and conservative care may be the most appropriate recommended course of action. Consequently, unnecessary operations could be avoided due to the diagnosis confirmation of studying images. Keywords: omentum, infarction, abdominal pain, child

  14. 脑源性神经营养因子在肠易激综合征患者腹痛中的作用%The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the abdominal pain of irritable bowel syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于岩波; 左秀丽; 陈飞雪; 董艳艳; 李延青

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the expression changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in colon mucosa and abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The density of nerve fiber in colon mucosa and ultrastructural alterations of nerve fiber in IBS were also observed. Methods From September 2008 to January 2010,the IBS patients who visited the department of gastroenterology of our hospital and met the Rome Ⅲ diagnosis criteria were selected and divided into IBS with diarrhea (D-IBS) and IBS with constipation (C-IBS) according to their clinical features. The patients with colon polyps detected by colonoscopy in our hospital were selected as control group. All subjects were asked to fill in Self-Rating abdominal pain or abdominal uncomfortable Scale according to abdominal symptom in the last 2 weeks before visit and underwent colonoscopy. Four biopsy specimens were taken from the colon mucosa of rectosigmoid junction. Ofwhich,two specimens were for protein isolation and detection of BDNF expression level,one specimen was used for PGP 9. 5 immunohistochemistry staining in paraffin slices. Another specimen was used to observe the ultrastructure changes of nerve fiber in colon mucosa under transmission electron microscopy. Results Total 40 IBS patients were enrolled in this study,of those 21 were D-IBS patients,19 were C-IBS patients,and 21 were controls. The abdominal pain severity score and frequency score of IBS patients were (2. 3±0. 8) and (2. 1±0. 7),which were significantly higher than those of control group (0. 4±0. 7 and 0. 3±0. 5,P<0. 001). Compared with the control group,the BDNF expression in colon mucosa was significantly elevated in IBS patients (P= 0. 003 ),and which correlated with the severity and frequency of abdominal pain/discomfort (r=0. 57,P<0. 001and r=0. 46,P= 0. 003,respectively). The immunohistochemistry result indicated that the nerve fiber density in colon mucosa of IBS patients was significantly

  15. [Intraabdominal hypertension syndrome in patients with abdominal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvoruchko, I A; Ivanova, Iu V; Povelichenko, M S; Andreieshchev, S A

    2014-05-01

    Investigations were conducted in 53 patients, operated on in 2013 yr for abdominal sepsis (AS). The patients state severity was determined in accordance to the systemic inflammatory reaction and the polyorgan insufficiency severity. In 28 patients (group I) AS was diagnosed, in 14 (group II)--severe AS, in 11 (group III)--a septic shock. Tactics of surgical management of the patients have included two main measures: the infection origin control (source control), and control of the affected organ function and systemic defense mechanisms (damage control). In all the patients in AS the intraabdominal pressure rising was revealed. Syndrome of intraabdominal hypertension was noted in 10 (18.9%) patients (in 4--while presence of severe AS, and in 6--in septic shock). Lethality was the highest in intraabdominal hypertension degrees III and IV (11 of 25 patients have died).

  16. Excision of a large abdominal wall lipoma improved bowel passage in a Proteus syndrome patient

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder that produces multifocal overgrowth of tissue. This report presents a surgical case of a large lipoma in the abdominal wall of a patient with Proteus syndrome. She was diagnosed with Proteus syndrome based on certain diagnostic criteria. The neoplasm increased in size gradually, producing hemihypertrophy of her left lower extremity and trunk, and spread to her retroperitoneum and her left abdominal wall. She experienced gradually progr...

  17. Idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia: two topographic facial pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado, María L; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gili, Pablo; Caminero, Ana B; Cebrián, José L

    2010-09-01

    To describe 2 topographic facial pain conditions with the pain clearly localized in the eye (idiopathic ophthalmodynia) or in the nose (idiopathic rhinalgia), and to propose their distinction from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Persistent idiopathic facial pain, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia, and facial arthromyalgia are idiopathic facial pain syndromes that have been separated according to topographical criteria. Still, some other facial pain syndromes might have been veiled under the broad term of persistent idiopathic facial pain. Through a 10-year period we have studied all patients referred to our neurological clinic because of facial pain of unknown etiology that might deviate from all well-characterized facial pain syndromes. In a group of patients we have identified 2 consistent clinical pictures with pain precisely located either in the eye (n=11) or in the nose (n=7). Clinical features resembled those of other localized idiopathic facial syndromes, the key differences relying on the topographic distribution of the pain. Both idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia seem specific pain syndromes with a distinctive location, and may deserve a nosologic status just as other focal pain syndromes of the face. Whether all such focal syndromes are topographic variants of persistent idiopathic facial pain or independent disorders remains a controversial issue.

  18. A comparison of the Accuracy of Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Randen, Adrienne; Lameris, Wytze; van Es, H. Wouter; van Heesewijk, Hans P. M.; van Ramshorst, Bert; ten Hove, Wim; Bouma, Willem H.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.; van Keulen, Esteban M.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2011-01-01

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for > 2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diag

  19. Cortical correlates of an attentional bias to painful and innocuous somatic stimuli in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Christiane; Zohsel, Katrin; Hohmeister, Johanna; Flor, Herta

    2008-06-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common gastrointestinal problem during childhood. It is not only a pediatric health problem, but may represent a risk factor for chronic pain, psychosomatic symptoms, and psychopathological problems later in life. Alterations in central pain processing and an attentional bias to potentially aversive somatic sensations could contribute to the unfavorable outcome of RAP during childhood. Fourteen children with RAP and 15 control children (age: 10-15 year) participated in an attentional task. Children had to respond to rare targets (tones) and ignore frequent either painful (pain threshold) or non-painful mechanical stimuli delivered at the hand. Event-related cortical potentials in response to the somatic stimuli and the tones were measured and stimulus intensity ratings, reaction time and number of errors were obtained. Painful as compared to non-painful stimuli elicited significantly larger N1, P2 and P3 components of the somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) in all children. The RAP children responded with a significantly larger P3 to both painful and non-painful stimuli. No group differences were found for the auditory-evoked potentials. Perceived stimulus and pain intensity, reaction time and number of errors did not differ between groups. Similar to findings in adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), children with RAP did not show somatic hyperalgesia as revealed by unaltered pain thresholds and middle latency pain-evoked SEPs. However, they displayed an attentional bias to painful and non-painful (innocuous) somatic stimuli as indicated by an enhanced P3. This may represent an important mechanism not only for the maintenance of RAP, but also for the development of psychosomatic symptoms.

  20. [Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25 mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Abdominal Pain in the Female Patient: A Case of Concurrent Acute Appendicitis and Ruptured Endometrioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Martine A.; Lin, Elizabeth; Baek, Ji Yoon; Andoni, Alda; Wang, Xiao Hui

    2016-01-01

    General surgeons are often asked to evaluate acute abdominal pain which has an expanded differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age. Acute appendicitis accounts for many surgical emergencies as a common cause of nongynecologic pelvic pain. In some rare instances, acute appendicitis has been shown to occur simultaneously with a variety of gynecologic diseases. We report a case of concurrent acute appendicitis and ruptured ovarian endometrioma. PMID:28097032

  3. A case of abdominal aortic thrombosis associated with the nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannet Labidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic disease is an important and frequent complication in patients with the nephrotic syndrome (NS, and the consequences are often severe. Usually, the venous system is affected. Arterial thrombosis has rarely been reported and occurs mainly in children. We report the case of a 27-year-old man with a history of NS due to focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis resistant to steroids and cyclosporine, admitted for bilateral pain in the calves. Aortogram revealed a suspended thrombus in the abdominal aorta just below the origin of the renal arteries with embolism into the left tibioperoneal trunk and the right anterior tibial artery. Endarterectomy was performed followed by systemic heparinization with a good outcome. Arterial thrombosis is rare and must be prevented.

  4. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R

    1998-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies continue to provide evidence that fibromyalgia is part of a spectrum of chronic widespread pain. The prevalence of chronic widespread pain is several times higher than fibromyalgia as defined by the 1990 American College of Rheumatology guidelines. There is now compelling evidence of a familial clustering of fibromyalgia cases in female sufferers; whether this clustering results from nature or nature remains to be elucidated. A wide spectrum of fibromyalgia-associated symptomatology and syndromes continues to be described. During the past year the association with interstitial cystitis has been explored, and neurally mediated hypotension has been documented in both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Abnormalities of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis have been also documented in both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. The commonly reported but anecdotal association of fibromyalgia with whiplash-type neck trauma was validated in a report from Israel. However, unlike North America, 100% of Israeli patients with posttraumatic fibromyalgia returned to work. Basic research in fibromyalgia continues to pinpoint abnormal sensory processing as being integral to understanding fibromyalgia pain. Drugs such as ketamine, which block N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (which are often upregulated in central pain states) were shown to benefit fibromyalgia pain in an experimental setting. The combination of fluoxetine and amitriptyline was reported to be more beneficial than either drug alone in patients with fibromyalgia. A high prevalence of autoantibodies to cytoskeletal and nuclear envelope proteins was found in chronic fatigue syndrome, and an increased prevalence of antipolymer antibodies was found in symptomatic silicone breast implant recipients who often have fibromyalgia.

  5. A rare cause of chronic abdominal pain, weight loss and anemia: Abdominal actinomycosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KAYA, Muhsin; SAKARYA, Mehmet Hamdi

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal aktinomikosis vücudun farklı bölgelerini tutan subakut veya kronik bir enfeksiyondur. Kırk altı yaşındaki kadın hasta aralıklı gelen karın ağrısı, bulantı, kusma, geçici barsak tıkanması, kilo kaybı...

  6. Cutaneous silent period in myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ozden; Sencan, Savas; Ercalik, Tulay; Koytak, Pinar Kahraman; Alibas, Hande; Gunduz, Osman Hakan; Tanridag, Tulin; Uluc, Kayihan

    2017-09-06

    An increased response to painful stimuli without spontaneous pain suggests a role of central hyperexcitability of pain pathways in the pathogenesis of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). In this study we aimed to test the hypothesis that spinal pain pathways are affected in MPS. We used cutaneous silent period (CSP) parameters to demonstrate the hyperexcitability of spinal pain pathways in MPS. Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with MPS and 30 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The CSP recordings were performed in the right upper and left lower extremities. In both upper and lower extremities, patients had prolonged CSP latencies (P = 0.034 and P = 0.049 respectively) and shortened CSP durations (P = 0.009 and P = 0.008, respectively). Delayed and shortened CSP in MPS patients implies dysfunction in the inhibitory mechanism of the spinal/supraspinal pain pathways, suggesting central sensitization in the pathogenesis of MPS and supporting our research hypothesis. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-ying Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Painful legs and moving toes syndrome (PLMT is a rare movement disorder with low diagnostic rate, which is characterized by lower limb pain with involuntary movements of feet or toes. Etiology and pathogenesis of this disease is still unclear. Patients have different clinical manifestations, so the diagnosis is difficult. Treatment methods for PLMT are numerous, but so far the treatment of this disease is still a major challenge for clinicians. Further research is still needed to guide clinical work. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.013

  8. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  9. Laparoscopic treatment of acute abdominal/pelvic pain for gynaecological condition in young female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Zampieri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to report our experience with acute abdominal/pelvic pain in young female. We recorded the cases of female patients aged between 3 and 16 years treated at our Institution for acute abdominal/pelvic pain between January 2005 and December 2013. During the study period data of 24 patients were considered. The overall mean age in our series was 10.6 years (range 3-16 years with a mean time of symptoms of 2.7 days (range 1-10 days. Pelvic abdominal ultrasound was used for all patients; only one patient had magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical findings: 7 (29% patients had a paraovarian/tubal cyst torsion, 3(12,5% patients had ovarian cyst torsion, 11 (46% patients had ovarian/tubal complex torsion and 3(12,5% patients had isolated tubal torsion.

  10. Optimization of diagnostic imaging use in patients with acute abdominal pain (OPTIMA): Design and rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laméris, Wytze; van Randen, Adrienne; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Bossuyt, Patrick MM; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

    2007-01-01

    Background The acute abdomen is a frequent entity at the Emergency Department (ED), which usually needs rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. Diagnostic work-up with imaging can consist of plain X-ray, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and even diagnostic laparoscopy. However, no evidence-based guidelines exist in current literature. The actual diagnostic work-up of a patient with acute abdominal pain presenting to the ED varies greatly between hospitals and physicians. The OPTIMA study was designed to provide the evidence base for constructing an optimal diagnostic imaging guideline for patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED. Methods/design Thousand consecutive patients with abdominal pain > 2 hours and < 5 days will be enrolled in this multicentre trial. After clinical history, physical and laboratory examination all patients will undergo a diagnostic imaging protocol, consisting of plain X-ray (upright chest and supine abdomen), US and CT. The reference standard will be a post hoc assignment of the final diagnosis by an expert panel. The focus of the analysis will be on the added value of the imaging modalities over history and clinical examination, relative to the incremental costs. Discussion This study aims to provide the evidence base for the development of a diagnostic algorithm that can act as a guideline for ED physicians to evaluate patients with acute abdominal pain. PMID:17683592

  11. Predictors of chronic abdominal pain affecting the well-being of children in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Leo A. A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Benninga, Marc A.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Abdominal pain is a frequent symptom among children but is rarely associated with organic disease. Although it may persist for years, no factors have been identified that predict its prognosis. Our aim was to determine whether patient characteristics at initial consultation can predict chro

  12. Efficacy of a Brief Relaxation Training Intervention for Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katrina M.; Meadows, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the efficacy of a brief intervention for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) via a multiple baseline across subjects design. The intervention consisted of a single 1-hour session including psychoeducation and coaching of breathing retraining; the length, duration, and content of the intervention were…

  13. Teaching Critical Decision-Making Skills to Students Concerning Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The clinical performance of junior hospital staff concerning the management of patients with acute abdominal pain may be enhanced by placing greater emphasis on teaching clinical decision-making skills during the preintern year. Final year medical students took part in a teaching session in which groups of six to eight rotated through six stations…

  14. Impact of Clinical Experience and Diagnostic Performance in Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Laurell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aims were to evaluate the importance of the formal competence of the emergency department physician, the patient’s time of arrival at the emergency department, and the use of a structured schedule for investigation of patients with acute abdominal pain. Methods. Patients attending the Mora Hospital with acute abdominal pain from 1997 to 2000 were registered prospectively according to a structured schedule. Registration included history, symptoms, signs, preliminary diagnosis, surgery and final diagnosis after at least one year.  Results. 3073 acute abdominal pain patients were included. The preliminary diagnosis, as compared with the final diagnosis, was correct in 54% (n=1659. Previously, during 1996, a base-line registration of 790 patients had a 58% correct diagnoses  (n=458. A majority of the patients (n=2699; 88% were managed by nonspecialists. The proportion of correct diagnoses was 54% (n=759 for pre-registrar house officers and 55% (n=443 for senior house officers. Diagnostic performance at the emergency department was independent of patient’s time of arrival. Conclusions. A structured schedule for investigation did not improve the diagnostic precision at the emergency department in patients with acute abdominal pain. The diagnostic performance was independent of the formal competence of the physician and the patient's time of arrival.

  15. [Ovarian tumour in a girl with chronic abdominal pain and distension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, J.L.C.M.; Wijnen, M.H.W.A.; Schijf, C.P.T.; Wieringen, P. van

    2006-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with chronic abdominal pain and distension that had persisted for 6 and 3 months, respectively. The cause was a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour originating in the left ovary. The cyst and ovary were resected. The patient recovered and was asymptomatic 2 years after the operat

  16. Dientamoeba fragilis and chronic abdominal pain in children: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marin J.; Korterink, Judith J.; Benninga, Marc A.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Widdershoven, J.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between Dientamoeba (D.) fragilis and the aetiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) in children is unclear. Aim The aim of this retrospective case–control study is to clarify the clinical relevance of D. fragilis in children with chronic abdominal pain.

  17. Constipation and Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Teenage Girls Referred for Emergency Surgical Consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buddingh, K. Tim; Wieselmann, Eva; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M. A.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the discharge diagnoses of children receiving surgical consultation for acute abdominal pain according to age and sex. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: Nine hundred forty-one children were included. Appendicitis was confirmed in 31% of

  18. Acute lower abdominal pain caused by adnexal torsion in a ten-year-old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Hansen, Lars Folmer; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    A ten-year-old girl presented with four days of lower abdominal pain. A diagnostic laparoscopy on the suspicion of acute appendicitis revealed left-sided adnexal torsion. The cyanotic ovary was detorsed and recovered. At three-month follow-up there were no clinical or ultrasonic signs of patholog...

  19. Descending colon interposition in a patient presenting with abdominal pain and acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiref SD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Interposition of the descending colon between the kidney and the psoas major muscle is a rare hindgut anatomic variant. Presented herein is a case of descending colon interposition in a patient admitted with abdominal pain and acute appendicitis. Internal hernia was ruled out by laparoscopy.

  20. Elderly patient with acute, left lower abdominal pain: perforated jejunal diverticulitis (2010:7b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Manuela; Certo, Manuela; Varzim, Pedro [Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Radiology Department, Porto (Portugal); Silva, Donzilia [Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Surgery Department, Porto (Portugal); Peixoto, Carlos [Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Pathology Department, Porto (Portugal)

    2010-10-15

    An elderly patient with acute, left, lower abdominal pain is described, for whom the diagnosis of perforated jejunal diverticulitis was established by computed tomography (CT). The presence of a jejunal segmental inflammatory process, with or without abscess or perforation, in the setting of jejunal diverticulosis, is very suggestive of jejunal diverticulitis. (orig.)

  1. Clinical and laboratory findings in 220 children with recurrent abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Gijsbers; M.A. Benninga; H.R. Büller

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and laboratory findings in children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Methods: Consecutive patients with RAP (Apley criteria), age 4-16 years, referred to a secondary medical centre were evaluated by a standardized history, physical examination and laboratory test

  2. Diffuse abdominal uptake of technetium-99m-HDP after colectomy in Gardner`s syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alber, T.R.; Scheidt, K.A.; Fajman, W.A. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A 37-yr-old man presented with increasing abdominal girth and multiple palpable intra-abdominal masses 3 yr after colectomy for polyposis coli. Whole-body skeletal scintigraphy performed prior to laparotomy demonstrated diffuse abdominal uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP consistent with mesenteric fibromatosis confirmed at surgery. When diffuse abdominal uptake of skeletal imaging agents occurs in patients with prior colectomy for polyposis coli, mesenteric fibromatosis as a manifestation of Gardner`s syndrome should be suspected. This case illustrates another cause of diffuse abdominal uptake of skeletal imaging agents. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Validity and reliability of a pain location tool for pediatric abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, James K; Cole, Alana M; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    For children with surgical problems, pain location conveys important clinical information. We developed a Location and Level of Intensity of Postoperative Pain (Lolipops) tool consisting of a body outline with a seven-sector abdominal grid, the International Association for the Study of Pain Revised Faces Pain Scale, and a recording chart. The aim of the study was to assess the validity and reliability of Lolipops. Children aged 5-14 years who had undergone laparoscopic appendectomy took both nurse- and investigator-administered Lolipops, and an investigator administered Varni Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaires, within 24 hours of surgery. The average age of the 42 participants was 10.7 years; 64% were boys; 24 (57.1%) had acute appendicitis, 13 (31%) had perforated appendicitis, and 5 (11.9%) were uninflamed. Pain scores were higher at the laparoscopic port incision sites than in upper abdominal sites distant from incisions or expected inflammation, mean (SD) 3.3 (2.3) and 1.1 (1.8), respectively (p Lolipops demonstrated a more widespread pain pattern. Correlations between nurse and investigator were fair to moderate with an overall intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.597. This study presents a new tool to measure the location of pain in pediatric surgical patients and shows it to be valid and reliable.

  4. Fascial components of the myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Antonio; Gesi, Marco; Stecco, Carla; Stern, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is described as the muscle, sensory, motor, and autonomic nervous system symptoms caused by stimulation of myofascial trigger points (MTP). The participation of fascia in this syndrome has often been neglected. Several manual and physical approaches have been proposed to improve myofascial function after traumatic injuries, but the processes that induce pathological modifications of myofascial tissue after trauma remain unclear. Alterations in collagen fiber composition, in fibroblasts or in extracellular matrix composition have been postulated. We summarize here recent developments in the biology of fascia, and in particular, its associated hyaluronan (HA)-rich matrix that address the issue of MPS.

  5. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Scicchitano B; Humphreys G; Mitton SG; Jaiganesh T

    2014-01-01

    Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome&...

  6. Analgesia for Older Adults with Abdominal or Back Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills, Angela M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association between age and analgesia for emergency department (ED patients with abdominal or back pain.Methods: Using a fully electronic medical record, we performed a retrospective cohort study of adults presenting with abdominal or back pain to two urban EDs. To assess differences in analgesia administration and time to analgesia between age groups, we used chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test respectively. To adjust for potential confounders, we used a generalized linear model with log link and Gaussian error.Results: Of 24,752 subjects (mean age 42 years, 65% female, 69% black, mean triage pain score 7.5, the majority (76% had abdominal pain and 61% received analgesia. The ≥80 years group (n=722; 3%, compared to the 65-79 years group (n=2,080; 8% and to the (n=21,950; 89%, was more often female (71 vs. 61 vs. 65%, black (72 vs. 65 vs. 69%, and had a lower mean pain score (6.6 vs. 7.1 vs. 7.6. Both older groups were less likely to receive any analgesia (48 vs. 59 vs. 62%, p<0.0001 and the oldest group less likely to receive opiates (35 vs. 47 vs. 44%, p<0.0001. Of those who received analgesia, both older groups waited longer for their medication (123 vs. 113 vs. 94 minutes; p<0.0001. After controlling for potential confounders, patients ≥80 years were 17% less likely than the <65 years group to receive analgesia (95% CI 14-20%.Conclusion: Older adults who present to the ED for abdominal or back pain are less likely to receive analgesia and wait significantly longer for pain medication compared to younger adults. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;43-50.

  7. Mapping of pain phenotypes in female patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripp, Dean A; Nickel, J Curtis; Wong, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Many bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) patients report multiple pain locations outside the pelvis. No research has examined pain using a whole-body diagram, pain-associated adjustment factors, or the impact of pain in multiple body areas on patients' quality of life (QoL)....

  8. Serum amylase and lipase in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, C W; Barker, D E; Russell, W L; Burns, R P

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine 1) the incidence and magnitude of elevation in admission serum amylase and lipase levels in extrapancreatic etiologies of acute abdominal pain, and 2) the test most closely associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase levels were obtained in 306 patients admitted for evaluation of acute abdominal pain. Patients were categorized by anatomic location of identified pathology. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare the enzyme levels between patient groups and to determine the correlation between elevation in serum amylase and lipase. Twenty-seven (13%) of 208 patients with an extrapancreatic etiology of acute abdominal pain demonstrated an elevated admission serum amylase level with a maximum value of 385 units (U)/L (normal range 30-110 U/L). Twenty-six (12.5%) of these 208 patients had an elevated admission serum lipase value with a maximum of 3685 U/L (normal range 5-208 U/L). Of 48 patients with abdominal pain resulting from acute pancreatitis, admission serum amylase ranged from 30 to 7680 U/L and lipase ranged from 5 to 90,654 U/L. Both serum amylase and lipase elevations were positively associated with a correct diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (P pancreatic disease processes. Serum amylase and lipase levels may be elevated in nonpancreatic disease processes of the abdomen. Significant elevations (greater than three times upper limit of normal) in either enzyme are uncommon in these disorders. The strong correlation between elevations in the two serum enzymes in both pancreatic and extrapancreatic etiologies of abdominal pain makes them redundant measures. Serum lipase is a better test than serum amylase either to exclude or to support a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

  9. Quadratus lumborum block in chronic pain after abdominal hernia repair: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The quadratus lumborum blockade was described by R. Blanco in its two approaches (I and II. The local anesthetic deposition in this location can provide blockade to T6-L1 dermatomes. We performed this fascia blockade guided by ultrasound for treating a chronic neuropathic pain in the abdominal wall. Case report: Male patient, 61 years old, 83 kg, with a history of thrombocytopenia due to alcoholic cirrhosis, among others; had chronic pain in the abdominal wall after multiple abdominal hernia repairs in the last year and a half, with poor response to treatment with neuromodulators and opioids. On clinical examination, he revealed a neuropathic pain, with prevalence of allodynia to touch, covering the entire anterior abdominal wall, from T7 to T12 dermatomes. We opted for a quadratus lumborum block type II, guided by ultrasound, with administration of 0.2% ropivacaine (25 mL and depot (vial methylprednisolone (20 mg on each side. The procedure gave immediate relief of symptoms and, after six months, the patient still had a significant reduction in allodynia without compromising the quality of life. Conclusions: We consider that performing the quadratus lumborum block type II was an important analgesic option in the treatment of a patient with chronic pain after abdominal hernia repair, emphasizing the effects of local anesthetic spread to the thoracic paravertebral space. The technique has proven to be safe and well tolerated. The publication of more clinical cases reporting the effectiveness of this blockade for chronic pain is desirable.

  10. Acute Abdominal Compartment Syndrome as a Complication of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: Two Cases Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL is a technique commonly used to remove large or multiple kidney stones and stones in the inferior calyx, with the advantages of lower morbidity rates, decrease in post-operative pain with faster recovery. Intra-abdominal irrigation fluid extravasation which leads to abdominal hypertension is a rare complication of PCNL with little reports. Early detection of intra-abdominal extravagation is very important to prevent morbidity and mortality. We present two cases and review the literature.

  11. Differential epidural block predicts the success of visceral block in patients with chronic visceral abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Maged K; Tolba, Reda; Kapural, Leonardo; Mitchell, Justin; Lopez, Rocio; Mahboobi, Ramatia; Vrooman, Bruce; Mekhail, Nagy

    2012-11-01

    Differential thoracic epidural regional block, also known as a differential neural block (DNB), involves the placement of an epidural catheter placed in the thoracic epidural space to achieve appropriate anesthesia in a dermatomal distribution. This is a retrospective case series evaluating how well a DNB may predict success of subsequent visceral blockade in patients with chronic abdominal pain of visceral origin. Of 402 patients who had a DNB performed for unexplained abdominal pain from January 2000 to January 2009, 81 patients were found to have results consistent with visceral pain and thus underwent subsequent visceral blockade. Basic demographic data, years of chronic pain, history of psychosocial issues, initial visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, pain location, and medication usage were documented in our electronic medical record database. Parameters regarding DNB and visceral blocks also were documented. Descriptive statistics were computed for all variables. The positive predictive value (PPV) for DNB for whom visceral block was successful (at least a 50% reduction in VAS) was calculated. Additionally, subjects with successful visceral blocks were compared to those with unsuccessful visceral blocks. All patients with chronic abdominal pain with normal gastrointestinal studies who underwent DNB. Tertiary Outpatient Pain Management Clinic.   Retrospective Cohort Study. Mean age of patients was 46 (± 15) years, 73% were female, and median duration of pain was 5 years. 67% of subjects were taking opioid analgesics. PPV of DNB was 70.4%. Only factor found to be statistically significant with visceral block success was baseline VAS with higher scores associated with DNB predictive success (6.8 ± 1.7 vs. 5.5, 1.8; P = 0.004). Use of membrane stabilizing medications was significantly more common in subjects for whom visceral block was not successful (46% vs. 25%; P = 0.058). Area underneath curve (AUC) for VAS was found to be 0.70 (95% CI: 0.57, 0

  12. Clinical approach to visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome - pathophysiology, symptoms, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prystupa, Andrzej; Mróz, Tomasz; Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Mróz, Katarzyna; Prystupa, Tomasz; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Załuska, Wojciech; Filip, Rafał

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain has been defined as a pain resulting from activation of pain receptors localized in mucous membrane, serous membrane, and smooth muscles of hollow organs. The great majority of these organs are innervated by parasympathetic and sympathetic outflows. Afferent nerve fibres are involved in conduction of both acute and persistent pain and hyperalgesia. Visceral pain differs significantly from other types of pain in the way it originates and in clinical presentation. It can be misleading as a symptom, producing several problems in the diagnostic process. Sometimes, severe visceral pain is observed in the course of non-lifethreatening functional gastrointestinal disorders, while slight abdominal discomfort may be a first symptom of malignant tumours. For many years, the treatment of visceral pain has been considered as not satisfactory enough and covered a wide variety of pharmacological substances. For example, the complex therapy of pain and other manifestations associated with irritable bowel syndrome include psychotherapy/behavioural therapy, bulk-forming agents, probiotics, laxatives, antidiarrheals, antibacterial agents, antispasmodics, and antidepressants. The current knowledge about the pathogenesis of visceral pain gives a rationale for the development of new, more efficacious drugs with a positive benefit/risk ratio. Unfortunately, experience gained so far with the use of some agents affecting serotoninergic transmission in the gastrointestinal tract have shown a serious danger associated with their administration for patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  13. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. PMID:28237944

  14. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  15. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-02-24

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, D

    2001-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic widespread pain in the general population in Israel was comparable with reports from the USA, UK, and Canada. Comorbidity with fibromyalgia (FM) resulted in somatic hyperalgesia in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. One sixth of the subjects with chronic widespread pain in the general population were also found to have a mental disorder. Mechanisms involved in referred pain, temporal summation, muscle hyperalgesia, and muscle pain at rest were attenuated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, ketamine, in FM patients. Delayed corticotropin release, after interleukin-6 administration, in FM was shown to be consistent with a defect in hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone neural function. The basal autonomic state of FM patients was characterized by increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic systems tones. The severity of functional impairment as assessed by the Medical Outcome Survey Short Form (SF-36) discriminated between patients with widespread pain alone and FM patients. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) occurred in about 0.42% of a random community-based sample of 28,673 adults in Chicago, Illinois. A significant clinical overlap between CFS and FM was reported. Cytokine dysregulation was not found to be a singular or dominant factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. A favorable outcome of CFS in children was reported; two thirds recovered and resumed normal activities. No major therapeutic trials in FM and CFS were reported over the past year.

  17. Persistent abdominal pain after exercise: an unexpected diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Ormeci

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Painful conditions of the musculoskeletal system are encountered quite frequently and are generally benign. However, clinicians should be careful to exclude rare malignant disorders and soft tissue sarcomas such as rhabdomyosarcoma, which have no specific symptoms or findings. This paper presents a case that was initially consistent with a hematoma but was then diagnosed as a rhabdomyosarcoma upon clinical examination and ultrasonography at follow-up shortly after.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of reflexology massage on pain severity after abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Rahimi Zarchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain caused by surgery is one of the major problems of the patients. Therefore, pain reduction through using noninvasive and simple methods is one of the nursing priorities. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of reflexology massage on pain intensity in the patients following the abdominal surgery. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients undergoing abdominal surgery, referring to the Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran, in 2016. The participants were selected using the purposive sampling technique, and then randomly divided into three groups of 30 cases. The a 30-minute session of reflexology and simple massage were applied by the researcher for the first and second groups, respectively, after transferring the patients to the ward and regaining full consciousness. The pain was measured immediately, 10 min, and 24 h after the massage (30 min after the pre-test using the visual analogue scale. The data analysis was performed in the SPSS version 19, using the one-way and repeated measures ANOVA as well as Chi-square test. Results: According to the results of this study, 24 h after the intervention, the foot reflexology group had lower mean score of pain intensity (1.9±1.6, compared to the simple massage (3.3±1.64 and control groups (3.8±02 (P<0.001. The decrease in the pain score was significant between the groups only 10 min and 24 h after the intervention (P<0.001 Conclusion: As the findings of the present study indicated, the reflexology massage could alleviate the pain in the patients after abdominal surgery. Given the simple and non-invasive nature of this method, it could be used to reduce the pain in the patients along with other healthcare measures.

  19. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, D

    2000-03-01

    Fibromyalgia and widespread pain were common in Gulf War veterans with unexplained illness referred to a rheumatology clinic. Increased tenderness was demonstrated in the postmenstrual phase of the cycle compared with the intermenstrual phase in normally cycling women but not in users of oral contraceptives. Patients with fibromyalgia had high levels of symptoms that have been used to define silicone implant-associated syndrome. Tender points were found to be a common transient finding associated with acute infectious mononucleosis, but fibromyalgia was an unusual long-term outcome. The common association of fibromyalgia with other rheumatic and systemic illnesses was further explored. A preliminary study revealed a possible linkage of fibromyalgia to the HLA region. Patients with fibromyalgia were found to have an impaired ability to activate the hypothalamic pituitary portion of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis as well as the sympathoadrenal system, leading to reduced corticotropin and epinephrine response to hypoglycemia. Much interest has been expressed in the literature on the possible role of autonomic dysfunction in the development or exacerbation of fatigue and other symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome. Mycoplasma genus and mycoplasma fermentans were detected by polymerase chain reaction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. It was reported that myofascial temporomandibular disorder does not run in families. No major therapeutic trials in fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myofascial pain syndrome were reported over the past year. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and behavior therapy for chronic pain in adults was emphasized. A favorable outcome of fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome in children and adolescents was reported.

  20. [Acute abdominal pain in the third trimester of pregnancy caused by adnexal torsion based on a small cystic adenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, W; Puylaert, J B C M; de Groot, C J M

    2007-09-08

    A 25-year-old woman presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with severe abdominal pain in the lower right abdominal quadrant. Differential diagnosis included urolithiasis, adnexal torsion and appendicitis. A definitive diagnosis could not be made based on clinical and laboratory examination. Ultrasonography revealed a 3-cm cyst in the lower right abdomen, which was considered unlikely to cause abdominal pain. During laparotomy, adnexal torsion was found, which was deemed to be the cause of the abdominal pain. The twisted portion was uncoiled and the dark-coloured cyst was extirpated. The cyst was determined to be a cystic adenoma. Adnexal torsion is rarely caused by cysts smaller than 5 cm, especially in the third trimester. Emergency laparoscopyllaparotomy should be performed if adnexal torsion is suspected to confirm the diagnosis and uncoil the twist to prevent ovarian damage. Adnexal torsion should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in the third trimester of pregnancy.

  1. Chronic Localized Back Pain Due to Posterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (POCNES): A New Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Oliver B; Maatman, Robert C; Scheltinga, Marc R; van Laarhoven, Kees; Roumen, Rudi M

    2017-03-01

    Most patients with chronic back pain suffer from degenerative thoracolumbovertebral disease. However, the following case illustrates that a localized peripheral nerve entrapment must be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic back pain. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman with continuous excruciating pain in the lower back area. Previous treatment for nephroptosis was to no avail. On physical examination the pain was present in a 2 x 2 cm area overlying the twelfth rib some 4 cm lateral to the spinal process. Somatosensory testing using swab and alcohol gauze demonstrated the presence of skin hypo- and dysesthesia over the painful area. Local pressure on this painful spot elicited an extreme pain response that did not irradiate towards the periphery. These findings were highly suggestive of a posterior version of the anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), a condition leading to a severe localized neuropathic pain in anterior portions of the abdominal wall. She demonstrated a beneficial albeit temporary response after lidocaine infiltration as dictated by an established diagnostic and treatment protocol for ACNES. She subsequently underwent a local neurectomy of the involved superficial branch of the intercostal nerve. This limited operation had a favorable outcome resulting in a pain-free return to normal activities up to this very day (follow-up of 24 months).We propose to name this novel syndrome "posterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome" (POCNES). Each patient with chronic localized back pain should undergo simple somatosensory testing to detect the presence of overlying skin hypo- and dysesthesia possibly reflecting an entrapped posterior cutaneous nerve.Key words: Chronic pain, back pain, posterior cutaneous nerve entrapment, peripheral nerve entrapment, surgical treatment for pain, anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment.

  2. A Sleeve Gastrectomy Complicated by Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis, Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Pulmonary Emboli: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Leung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is a growing problem all over the world, including the United States. Single-incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a surgery performed for patients who want to lose weight. The number of deaths resulting from thromboembolic complications from bariatric surgeries continues to be of major concern. Case Description: A 38-year-old female was admitted for single incision sleeve gastrectomy and was discharged home three days later. Subsequently she began to have abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. A CT scan revealed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis with small bowel ischemia, splenic infarction and main and right portal vein branch thrombosis. An exploratory laparotomy demonstrated necrotic bowel due to abdominal compartment syndrome, and an area of small bowel was resected due to internal hernia. Surgical management of the patient during her second hospital stay included a decompressive laparotomy, internal hernia reduction, a small bowel resection. Discussion: Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis can be a life-threatening complication and present with non-specific presentations; thus, it is imperative that it is identified and managed promptly as these cases carry significant morbidity and mortality. Obese patients who undergo bariatric surgery frequently have other co-morbidities; many of which can complicate a case further. Mesenteric vein thromboses are normally treated with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin.

  3. ‘Tell me about your pain’: abdominal pain and a history of bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Paola; Jenkner, Alessandro; De Vito, Rita; Boldrini, Renata; Chiodi, Patrizia; Celesti, Lucia; Giampaolo, Rosaria

    2011-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl was brought to our outpatient clinic to investigate recurrent abdominal pain. She was unwilling to attend the school. Her mother reported bullying at school and nosebleeds. The girl rated her pain 9 on a visual analogue score card ranging from 1 to 10. Physical examination disclosed painful bruising and haematomas. Emergency laboratory blood tests indicated by the history, physical examination and the pain intensity showed reduced numbers of white blood cells and platelets. A bone marrow smear on admission disclosed 100% blasts and suggested an initial diagnosis of leukaemia but also disclosed the pseudo-rosettes typically seen in neuro-ectodermic tumours. The diagnosis of stage IV primary neuroblastoma was confirmed by trephine biopsies and high urinary catecholamines. The girl died 10 months later. This unusual case underlines the need for outpatient paediatricians to involve children in their initial diagnostic work-up by asking them about their pain thus expediting the diagnosis. PMID:22699481

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) differs in tertiary vs. primary care and is related to mother's view of child disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    We sought to determine if CAM use was greater in children in tertiary vs. primary care, and whether child or parent report of pain characteristics, and/or child and mother's psychological characteristics differed between those who did/did not use CAM. We identified children 7-10 years of age with FA...

  5. A CASE OF DESMOID TUMOUR – ABDOMINAL FIBROMATOSIS IN A YOUNG FEMALE PRESENTING WITH ABDOMINAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achu Jacob Philip

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumours are rare; they account for about 0.03 percent of all neoplasms and less than 3 percent of all soft tissue tumours. The estimated incidence in the general population is two to four per million population per year. Here reporting a case of a 34-year-old female presenting with pain abdomen and swelling chest, excised mass diagnosed to be a desmoid tumour.

  6. Diagnosing pediatric functional abdominal pain in children (4-15 years old) according to the Rome III Criteria: results from a Norwegian prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeland, Helene; Flagstad, Gro; Grøtta, Jon; Vandvik, Per Olav; Kristensen, Hanne; Markestad, Trond

    2009-09-01

    To determine the proportion of referred children with nonorganic abdominal pain who meet the criteria for 1 or more diagnoses of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID), explore the distribution of diagnoses according to the revised pediatric Rome III criteria (PRC-III), and to investigate reasons for failure to meet these criteria. We recruited children (4-15 years) consecutively referred by general practitioners to 4 general pediatric outpatient clinics for the evaluation of recurrent abdominal pain. FGID diagnoses were based on the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III version, completed by parents. To exclude organic disease, all patients underwent medical investigations and were reevaluated at follow-up after 6 to 9 months. Of the 152 patients included, 142 (93%) had functional abdominal pain. Of these, 124 (87%) met the criteria for 1 or more diagnoses according to the PRC-III: 66% met the criteria for 1, 29% for 2, and 5% for 3 diagnoses. Irritable bowel syndrome was the most common diagnosis (43%) and overlapped with aerophagia in 16 children (38% of the children with overlapping diagnoses) and with abdominal migraine in 14 (33%). In the 18 patients (13%) not fulfilling the PRC-III for any FGID diagnosis, the main reason was insufficient pain frequency (83%). Of the referred children with functional abdominal pain, 87% met the PRC-III for specific diagnoses. This supports the use of these criteria as a diagnostic tool. The significant overlap between different FGIDs, however, makes it unclear whether some of the diagnoses represent distinct disorders or artificial categories.

  7. Intracranial hypertension secondary to abdominal compartment syndrome in a girl with giant ovarian cystic mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavras, Nick; Christianakis, E; Ereikat, K; Mpourikas, D; Velaoras, K; Alexandrou, J

    2012-04-01

    The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a potentially fatal entity that occurs as a result of an acute increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). The authors report on a girl with a giant ovarian cystic mass, and clinical signs of ACS and intracranial hypertension (ΙΗ). The possible mechanism of IH secondary to ACS is discussed.

  8. Hemorrhoid sclerotherapy with the complication of abdominal compartment syndrome: report of a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Peng; WANG Ya-jun; LI Fei; SUN Jia-bang

    2011-01-01

    The complications of injection sclerotherapy for hemorrhoid are always local. Herein, we report a case in which a female patient with abdominal compartment syndrome developed after receiving a local injection of a sclerosing agent for hemorrhoid.

  9. Neurolytic transversus abdominal plane block with alcohol for long-term malignancy related pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joseph C; Azam, Nyla; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek; Gulati, Amitabh

    2014-01-01

    There have been several case reports in the literature of neurolytic transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks being used for malignant abdominal wall pain. However, most used phenol as a neurolytic agent. We found only a single case report by Sakamoto using alcohol for TAP neurolysis. Unfortunately this patient passed away only 5 days after performance of the block. We attempt to extend upon the existing literature by describing neurolytic TAP blockade outcomes using alcohol on 3 cancer patients with metastatic disease to the abdominal wall. Two of our 3 patients had colorectal cancer invading the abdominal musculature. The third patient had a metastatic neuroendocrine nodule in the left rectus muscle. In our case series, all 3 patients had sustained and significant (greater than 50%) relief of abdominal wall pain after performing TAP neurolysis using alcohol. Ultrasound guidance was used for all blocks. The concentration of alcohol used varied from 33% to 77% between patients. Duration of relief lasted between 17 days and 6 months. Opioid use either decreased or remained relatively stable for prolonged periods of time after neurolysis. Other than one patient with transient post-procedure pain related to alcohol injection, there were no significant complications. Addition of a depo steroid for diagnostic TAP blockade prior to neurolysis did not appear to extend or provide additional analgesia. Based on our observations, TAP neurolysis using alcohol also offers a feasible option for long-term control of malignant abdominal wall pain. Further investigation is needed to determine if alcohol offers any significant advantage compared with phenol.

  10. Jejunal Choristoma: A Very Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Olajide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  11. Stroke, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom limb pain: can commonalities direct future management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerra, Nicole E; Souvlis, Tina; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2007-03-01

    Despite being different conditions, complex regional pain syndrome type 1, phantom limb pain and stroke share some potentially important similarities. This report examines experimental and clinical findings from each patient population. It identifies common aspects of symptomatic presentation, sensory phenomena and patterns of cortical reorganization. Based on these common findings, we argue that established principles of stroke rehabilitation are also applicable to rehabilitation of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and phantom limb pain. In addition, we contend that promising treatment approaches for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and phantom limb pain may be helpful in stroke rehabilitation. Examples of emerging supportive evidence for these hypotheses are provided and discussed.

  12. CASE REPORT An Unusual Case of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Following Resection of Extensive Posttraumatic Mesenteric Ossification

    OpenAIRE

    Nabulyato, William M.; Alsahiem, Hebah; Hall, Nigel R; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Heterotopic mesenteric ossification is an extremely rare condition, which often follows trauma and is frequently symptomatic. To date, there are no reports in the literature of abdominal compartment syndrome occurring after surgical resection of mesenteric calcification. The present report documents an unusual case of compartment syndrome complicating resection of extensive mesenteric calcification despite abdominal closure with the components-separation technique. Method: A 48-...

  13. Adrenal pseudocyst as a cause of postpartum abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghì, A; Di Vita, M; Lo Menzo, E; Fiorica, F; Cavallaro, A; Cimino, L; Piccolo, G; Palmucci, S; Cappellani, A

    2012-01-01

    Among adrenal masses only 0.06% to 0.18% are cysts and among them, pseudocysts are the second (39%) most common lesions. Due to the increased use of imaging studies their incidence seems to have increased. Most of these lesions are incidentally found during radiologic investigation or at the time of autopsy, and only rarely they are detected in pregnant women. The latter scenario warrants emergency surgery, due to the risk of rupture. We present a case of a 39-years old woman presenting with unrelenting left flank pain due to a large adrenal pseudocyst soon after her first delivery. Four months after, she presented to our surgical division for persistent pain and anemia so underwent an extensive work up that showed a large pseudocystic mass (8 x 8 cm ) of the left adrenal gland. Once the neoplastic and parasitic etiology of the lesion were excluded, she underwent uneventful laparoscopic adrenalectomy. She was discharged home three days postoperatively. This case is the 13th case in the English literature and at the same time is the first case of adrenal pseudocyst occurred four months after delivery.

  14. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months.

  15. Co-occurrence of Pain Symptoms and Somatosensory Sensitivity in Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisset, Xavier; Calbacho, Valentina; Torres, Pilar; Gremeau-Richard, Christelle; Dallel, Radhouane

    2016-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic and spontaneous oral pain with burning quality in the tongue or other oral mucosa without any identifiable oral lesion or laboratory finding. Pathogenesis and etiology of BMS are still unknown. However, BMS has been associated with other chronic pain syndromes including other idiopathic orofacial pain, the dynias group and the family of central sensitivity syndromes. This would imply that BMS shares common mechanisms with other cephalic and/or extracephalic chronic pains. The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine whether BMS is actually associated with other pain syndromes, and to analyze cephalic and extracephalic somatosensory sensitivity in these patients. Methods This report followed the PRISMA Statement. An electronic search was performed until January 2015 in PubMed, Cochrane library, Wiley and ScienceDirect. Searched terms included “burning mouth syndrome OR stomatodynia OR glossodynia OR burning tongue OR oral burning”. Studies were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria (report of an association between BMS and other pain(s) symptoms or of cutaneous cephalic and/or extracephalic quantitative sensory testing in BMS patients), and a descriptive analysis conducted. Results The search retrieved 1512 reports. Out of these, twelve articles met criteria for co-occurring pain symptoms and nine studies for quantitative sensory testing (QST) in BMS patients. The analysis reveals that in BMS patients co-occurring pain symptoms are rare, assessed by only 0.8% (12 of 1512) of the retrieved studies. BMS was associated with headaches, TMD, atypical facial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, post-herpetic facial pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, joint pain, abdominal pain, rectal pain or vulvodynia. However, the prevalence of pain symptoms in BMS patients is not different from that in the age-matched general population. QST studies reveal no or inconsistent evidence of abnormal cutaneous cephalic

  16. Imaging strategies for detection of urgent conditions in patients with acute abdominal pain: diagnostic accuracy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laméris, Wytze; van Randen, Adrienne; van Es, H Wouter; van Heesewijk, Johannes P M; van Ramshorst, Bert; Bouma, Wim H; ten Hove, Wim; van Leeuwen, Maarten S; van Keulen, Esteban M; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Boermeester, Marja A

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify an optimal imaging strategy for the accurate detection of urgent conditions in patients with acute abdominal pain. Design Fully paired multicentre diagnostic accuracy study with prospective data collection. Setting Emergency departments of two university hospitals and four large teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants 1021 patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain of >2 hours’ and <5 days’ duration. Exclusion criteria were discharge from the emergency department with no imaging considered warranted by the treating physician, pregnancy, and haemorrhagic shock. Intervention All patients had plain radiographs (upright chest and supine abdominal), ultrasonography, and computed tomography (CT) after clinical and laboratory examination. A panel of experienced physicians assigned a final diagnosis after six months and classified the condition as urgent or non-urgent. Main outcome measures Sensitivity and specificity for urgent conditions, percentage of missed cases and false positives, and exposure to radiation for single imaging strategies, conditional imaging strategies (CT after initial ultrasonography), and strategies driven by body mass index and age or by location of pain. Results 661 (65%) patients had a final diagnosis classified as urgent. The initial clinical diagnosis resulted in many false positive urgent diagnoses, which were significantly reduced after ultrasonography or CT. CT detected more urgent diagnoses than did ultrasonography: sensitivity was 89% (95% confidence interval 87% to 92%) for CT and 70% (67% to 74%) for ultrasonography (P<0.001). A conditional strategy with CT only after negative or inconclusive ultrasonography yielded the highest sensitivity, missing only 6% of urgent cases. With this strategy, only 49% (46% to 52%) of patients would have CT. Alternative strategies guided by body mass index, age, or location of the pain would all result in a loss of sensitivity. Conclusion Although CT is the most

  17. [Appendicitis versus non-specific acute abdominal pain: Paediatric Appendicitis Score evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Arias, Marcos; Salgado Barreira, Angel; Montero Sánchez, Margarita; Fernández Eire, Pilar; García Saavedra, Silvia; Gómez Veiras, Javier; Fernández Lorenzo, José Ramón

    2017-02-18

    Non-specific acute abdominal pain is the most common process requiring differential diagnosis with appendicitis in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the Paediatric Appendicitis Score in differentiating between these two entities. All patients admitted due to suspicion of appendicitis were prospectively evaluated in our hospital over a two-year period. Cases of non-specific acute abdominal pain and appendicitis were enrolled in the study. Several variables were collected, including Score variables and C-reactive protein levels. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses and diagnostic accuracy studies (ROC curves) were performed. A total of 275 patients were studied, in which there were 143 cases of non-specific acute abdominal pain and 132 cases of appendicitis. Temperature and right iliac fossa tenderness on palpation were the variables without statistically significant differences, and with no discrimination power between groups. Pain on coughing, hopping, and/or percussion tenderness in the right lower quadrant was the variable with greater association with appendicitis. The Score correctly stratified the patients into risk groups. Substitution of temperature for C-reactive protein in the Score increased diagnostic accuracy, although with no statistically significant differences. The Paediatric Appendicitis Score helps in differential diagnosis between appendicitis and non-specific acute abdominal pain. It would be advisable to replace the temperature in the Score, since it has no discrimination power between these groups. C-reactive protein at a cut-off value of 25.5mg/L value could be used instead. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. Lead intoxication due to ayurvedic medications as a cause of abdominal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Varun; Midha, Vandana; Mahajan, Ramit; Narang, Vikram; Wander, Praneet; Sood, Ridhi; Sood, Ajit

    2017-02-01

    Though a majority of cases of lead intoxication come from occupational exposures, traditional and folk remedies have also been reported to contain toxic amounts of lead. We present a large series of patients with lead poisoning due to intake of Ayurvedic medicines, all of whom presented with unexplained abdominal pain. This was a retrospective, observational case series from a tertiary care center in India. The charts of patients who underwent blood lead level (BLL) testing as a part of workup for unexplained abdominal pain between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. The patients with lead intoxication (BLLs >25 μg/dl) were identified and demographics, history, possible risk factors, clinical presentation and investigations were reviewed. Treatment details, duration, time to symptomatic recovery, laboratory follow-up and adverse events during therapy were recorded. BLLs were tested in 786 patients with unexplained abdominal pain and high levels were identified in 75 (9.5%) patients, of which a majority (73 patients, 9.3%) had history of Ayurvedic medication intake and only two had occupational exposure. Five randomly chosen Ayurvedic medications were analyzed and lead levels were impermissibly high (14-34,950 ppm) in all of them. Besides pain in abdomen, other presenting complaints were constipation, hypertension, neurological symptoms and acute kidney injury. Anemia and abnormal liver biochemical tests were observed in all the 73 patients. Discontinuing the Ayurvedic medicines and chelation with d-penicillamine led to improvement in symptoms and reduction in BLLs in all patients within 3-4 months. The patients presenting with severe recurrent abdominal pain, anemia and history of use of Ayurvedic medicines should be evaluated for lead toxicity. Early diagnosis in such cases can prevent unnecessary investigations and interventions, and permits early commencement of the treatment.

  19. Emotion awareness and coping in children with functional abdominal pain: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veek, Shelley M C; Derkx, H H F; de Haan, Else; Benninga, Marc A; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Literature on somatization suggests that patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms are less aware of their emotions and use maladaptive coping strategies when coping with everyday problems. In addition, coping is hypothesized to mediate between emotion awareness and medically unexplained symptoms. Scientific evidence for the relevance of this hypothesis for children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) is, however, lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate this hypothesis in Dutch children with functional abdominal pain (FAP), aged 7-18 years. Between April 2007 and April 2010, a total of 114 referred children with FAP, 235 schoolchildren without abdominal pain and 407 schoolchildren with some abdominal pain (AP) of diverse etiology filled out questionnaires concerning their pain, emotion awareness and coping. MANOVA was used to investigate group differences in emotional awareness and coping. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the mediational role of coping. The results showed that children with FAP scored significantly lower on most aspects of emotion awareness than children without AP, although these differences were small. Contrary to expectations, children with FAP were more aware of a link between emotions and bodily sensations than children without AP. As for coping, we found that children with FAP used avoidant coping more often than children without AP. Overall, children with FAP mostly did not differ in their emotional awareness and coping compared to children with some AP. Problem focused coping had a small mediating effect for two aspects of emotion awareness. We conclude that children with FAP show only small differences in emotion awareness and coping compared to children without AP, and are practically no different from children with some AP. Contrary to common belief, it can be questioned whether emotion awareness and general coping are useful targets for psychological treatments of FAP to

  20. [Mutual role of factors of endotoxicosis and intra-abdominal hypertension syndrome in pathogenesis of abdominal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliev, N A; Gasanova, D N; Ismailov, V F

    2013-10-01

    The mutual role of the main factors of endotoxicosis and intraabdominal hypertension syndrome (IHS) were studied in pathogenesis of abdominal sepsis, basing on analysis of the treatment results in 156 patients, suffering this disease. The contents of neutrophils, macrophages, interleukins (IL-6, IL-10) were studied in peritoneal exudate as the indices of the source of inflammation in abdominal cavity. There was established the mutual strengthening of the endotoxicosis and IHS factors, what causes the clinical signs of the organ dysfunction, determines the course severity and outcome of pathological process in the organism. Such approach to pathogenesis of abdominal sepsis permits in time and adequately to elaborate the certain program of treatment in the patients.

  1. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesentericpanniculitis treated successfully with endoscopicultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that ischaracterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteriesthat can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Paincontrol is a crucial component of the management plan.Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroidstreatment, however, some patients will require a trialof other immunosuppressive agents, and a minorityof patients will continue to have refractory disease.Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is usedfrequently to control abdominal pain in patients withpancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are nocase reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitispatients with refractory abdominal pain.

  2. AMELOTEX IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC BACK PAIN SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yuryevna Suvorova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a considerable increase in the number of patients with lingering recurrent and chronic pain syndromes of various origin. Forty-one patients with dorsopathies were examined. Two types of pain were identified; these were vertebrogenic and nonvertebrogenic pains. The appropriateness of this identification was confirmed by instrumental studies. Treatment was performed using a selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (Amelotex. Pain syndrome relief was noted during the therapy

  3. Childhood Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Family Practice: Incidence, Associated Factors, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Leeuwen, Yvonne Lisman-van; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is a common complaint in childhood. In specialist care, childhood NSAP is considered to be a complex and time-consuming problem, and parents are hard to reassure. Little is known about NSAP in family practice, but the impression is that family physicians consider it to be a benign syndrome needing little more than reassurance. This discrepancy calls for a better understanding of NSAP in family practice. METHODS Data were obtained from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (2001). Using registration data of 91 family practices, we identified children aged 4 to 17 years with NSAP. We calculated the incidence, and we studied factors associated with childhood NSAP, referrals, and prescriptions. RESULTS The incidence of NSAP was 25.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.7–26.3) per 1,000 person years. Most children (92.7%) with newly diagnosed NSAP (N = 1,480) consulted their doctor for this condition once or twice. Factors independently associated with NSAP were female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3–1.5), nongastrointestinal-nonspecific somatic symptoms (OR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1–1.5), and health care use (OR = 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03–1.05). When NSAP was diagnosed at the first visit, 3% of the patients were referred to specialist care, and 1% received additional testing. Family physicians prescribed medication in 21.3% of the visits for NSAP. CONCLUSIONS Childhood NSAP is a common problem in family practice. Most patients visit their doctor once or twice for this problem. Family physicians use little additional testing and make few referrals in their management of childhood NSAP. Despite the lack of evidence for effectiveness, family physicians commonly prescribe medication for NSAP. PMID:21747105

  4. A 33-year-old Haitian immigrant with 7 months of abdominal pain and progressive distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadian, Shelli; Shenoi, Sheela V; Villanueva, Merceditas S

    2014-07-09

    We report a case of a 33-year-old previously healthy Haitian immigrant with a 7-month history of abdominal pain, fever and ascites. He had a history of positive tuberculin skin test but never underwent treatment for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. Initial examination showed abdominal distension. Abdominal CT scan showed mild ascites, abnormal soft tissue in the greater omentum and small bowel mesentery, retroperitoneal adenopathy, peritoneal thickening and dilated loops of small bowel. Paracentesis and thoracentesis were initially non-diagnostic. HIV testing was negative. The differential diagnosis included lymphoma and TB peritonitis. The omental mass was biopsied under ultrasound guidance, and histopathology revealed non-necrotising granulomas. Sputum cultures and omental biopsy cultures subsequently grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and a diagnosis was made of pulmonary TB with TB peritonitis. The patient responded well to the initiation of anti-TB treatment.

  5. Angiograms of the Abdominal Aorta in a Patient of Middle Aortic Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yafeng; Yang Xiangjun; Song Jianping; Jiang Tingbo; Li Xun; Hui Jie; Liu Zhihua; Jiang Wenping

    2007-01-01

    A 42-year old woman of middle aortic syndrome presented with severe hypertension for 20 years, whose abdominal aorta angiography revealed long segment and nearly complete occlusion in the mid portion of abdominal aorta, and extensively enlarged collateral vascular supply to the lower portion of abdominal aorta. The pressures proximal and distal to stenosis were 185/110 and 95/70 mmHg, and the pressure gradient across the stenosis was 90/40 mmHg. After the operation of thoraco-abdominal bypass graft, the pressure difference between the upper and lower extremities eventually disappeared.

  6. Abdominal pain among children re-evaluation of a diagnostic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hona Zhou; Yi-Chen Chen; Jin-Zhe Zhana

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To re-evaluate the algorithm that has been used forover 40 years for diagnosis of acute abdominal pain amongchildren.METHODS: Among the 937 cases admitted to the surgicalemergency ward in 2000, 656 cases of acute appendicitiswere studied to evaluate the usefulness of the presentalgorithm for its colculated accuracy, false positive and falsenegative rates, the sensitivity and specificity in the instantdiagnosis of various types of acute appendicitis in differentage groups.The algorithm used was established in 1958and revisedror this study in 1999. It includes a 3-step analysisof clinical presentations, i.e.: firstly, a diagnosis of surgicalpain by definite organic abdominal signs; then a diagnosisof the subgroup of surgical condition by special signs; andfinally the diagnosis of the present disease by specific signs.A footnote describes a "comparative technique″ of abdominalexamination in non-cooperative children.RESULTS: The general accuracy of diagnosis was 92.8 %,overall mortality 0.1% among 973 cases of abdominal painin 2000. 373 attending surgeons and 241 residents includingtrainees joined the diagnosis and treatment with noremarkable difference in the results. The incidence of acuteappendicitis, 656 in 973 cases, was 67.4 % representingthe majority of abdominal pain. In the series of 656 cases,the accuracy of diagnosis of acute appendidtis was 93.6 %,false positive 6.4 %, false negative 0.9 %, sensitivity at firstvisit 82.7 %, specificity for appendicitis 98.0 %, no death ordocumentary complication.CONCLUSION: The present algorithm used for diagnosisof acute abdominal pain is effective and preferable inreducing misdiagnosis and maltreatment at emergency. Theuse of some modern technology should be further explored.

  7. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori serum antibodies in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, S B; Forget, P P; Loffeld, R J; Stobberingh, E; Kuijten, R H; Arends, J W

    1992-11-01

    As part of a large, prospective study we investigated the prevalence Helicobacter pylori serum antibodies in children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). All patients suffered from recurrent bouts of abdominal pain for at least 6 months and ranged in age from 6 to 12 years. H. pylori antibodies were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The prevalence of H. pylori antibodies in the RAP group was compared to that of a control group which consisted predominantly of pre-operative children. None of the control group suffered or had suffered from RAP. Antibodies to H. pylori were found in 7 of 82 (8.5%) RAP patients and in 2 of 39 (5.1%) control children. The latter difference is not significant and suggests that RAP is only rarely caused in children by H. pylori infection.

  8. [Abdominal pain and defecation disorders without a known organic origin: importance of the psychodiagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricardi, A; Faranda, F; Sicignano, G

    1995-05-01

    The authors submitted some children examined in the Division of Pediatric Surgery of the Ospedali Galliera in Genoa to a psychodiagnostic evaluation. They presented abdominal pain and defecation disorders, whose organic etiology was not demonstrated. The psychodiagnostic evaluation, consisting in colloquia, tests, drawings and plays, was completed in 11 of the 28 patients referred. A profoundly disturbed and protagonist mother-child relationship and a frequent "border position" of the father was focused. The symptoms disappeared in 8 of the 11 patients during the diagnostic evaluation, that resulted, its own, therapeutic. 3 patients were treated with psychotherapy and a remarkable improvement at 6 months from the beginning of therapy was noticed. Seventeen patients were lost because they didn't come to the outpatient dates or because they were already followed by other specialists in their residential zones. The authors believe that a psychodiagnostic evaluation is important in children with abdominal pain and defecation disorders whose organic origin has not been demonstrated.

  9. Diagnostic Value of Helicobacter Pylori Serologic Test in Pediatric Population with Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Maleknejad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available the aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of a serologic test for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in pediatric population presenting with abdominal pain suspected of peptic disease. We conducted a preospective cross sectional study. There were 202 children with abdominal pain. Serologic BM test using Helisual Quick test kit was performed. All patients then underwent endoscopic examination. The calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the applied serologic BM test were 72.4%, 64.8%, 44.6% and 85.7%, respectively. We concluded that a positive result from serologic test could not be judged independently. Thus, in symptomatic patients, other diagnostic methods (e.g. endoscopy and UBT should be applied prior to the therapeutic decisions.

  10. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm masquerading as isolated hip pain: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Wadhawan, Himanshu; Welch, Pedro; El-Salamani, Murad

    2008-05-01

    The rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a catastrophic event. Misdiagnosis by first-contact emergency physicians remains a serious concern. Varied and frequently nonspecific presentations lead to erroneous diagnostic impressions and cause significant delays in definitive intervention. We report the case of a 73-year-old man with a ruptured AAA presenting with isolated acute right hip pain without any classical features such as truncal pain or hypotension. Despite major advances in imaging and definitive treatment, a heightened awareness among emergency physicians remains the only effective means of improving detection and thereby survival.

  11. Screening for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recurrent headache or recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnes-Maayan, Ditti; Elazar, Maya; Apter, Alan; Zeharia, Avraham; Krispin, Orit; Eidlitz-Markus, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent pain symptoms in children are associated with psychiatric comorbidities that could complicate treatment. We investigated the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in children with recurrent headache or recurrent abdominal pain and evaluated the screening potential of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire compared with the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA). Eighty-three outpatients aged 5-17 years attending a tertiary medical center for a primary diagnosis of migraine (n = 32), tension-type headache (n = 32), or recurrent abdominal pain (n = 19), and 33 healthy matched controls completed the brief self-reporting Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire followed by the Development and Well-Being Assessment. Findings were compared among groups and between instruments. The pain groups were characterized by a significantly higher number of Development and Well-Being Assessment diagnoses (range 0-11) than controls and a significantly greater prevalence (by category) of Development and Well-Being Assessment diagnoses (P headache groups than the controls (P Children referred to specialized outpatient pediatric units for evaluation of recurrent pain are at high risk of psychopathology. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire may serve as a rapid cost-effective tool for initial screening of these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of diagnostic imaging use in patients with acute abdominal pain (OPTIMA): Design and rationale

    OpenAIRE

    Bossuyt Patrick MM; Dijkgraaf Marcel GW; van Randen Adrienne; Laméris Wytze; Stoker Jaap; Boermeester Marja A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The acute abdomen is a frequent entity at the Emergency Department (ED), which usually needs rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. Diagnostic work-up with imaging can consist of plain X-ray, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and even diagnostic laparoscopy. However, no evidence-based guidelines exist in current literature. The actual diagnostic work-up of a patient with acute abdominal pain presenting to the ED varies greatly between hospitals and physicians....

  13. An unusual cause of abdominal pain in an HIV-positive man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saing, Chit; Yoganathan, Kathir G

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an HIV-positive man on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who developed abdominal pain due to acute-on-chronic intestinal ischaemia secondary to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT) requiring emergency surgery. He was found to have persistently low levels of protein C on thrombophilia screening. To the best of our knowledge, the association linking SMVT to protein C deficiency in an HIV-infected patient has never been reported in the literature. PMID:25819818

  14. Increased Risk of Myofascial Pain Syndrome Among Patients with Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Chen; Shen, Cheng-Che; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Yang, Albert C

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk of developing myofascial pain syndrome among patients diagnosed with insomnia. We conducted a population-based longitudinal study of a matched cohort with 7,895 participants (1,579 patients with insomnia and 6,316 controls) who were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The patients were observed for a maximum of 10 years to determine the incidence of newly diagnosed myofascial pain syndrome. A Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with myofascial pain syndrome in patients with insomnia. During the 10-year follow-up period, 182 insomnia patients (14.9 per 1,000 person-years) and 379 controls (7.5 per 1,000 person-years) were diagnosed with myofascial pain syndrome. The incidence risk ratio of myofascial pain syndrome between the insomnia and control patients was 2.00 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.67-2.38, P  myofascial pain syndrome (95% CI = 1.62-2.31, P  myofascial pain syndrome in patients with insomnia. Patients with insomnia had a higher risk of developing myofascial pain syndrome than controls. This study adds to the understanding of the complex relationship between sleep disturbance and pain.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  16. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.S. Montenegro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 diferent days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test. There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women.

  17. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.S. Montenegro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 diferent days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test. There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women.

  18. A randomized controlled trial to compare pregabalin with gabapentin for postoperative pain in abdominal hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ghai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregabalin is a potent ligand for alpha-2-delta subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system, which exhibits potent anticonvulsant, analgesic and anxiolytic activity. The pharmacological activity of pregabalin is similar to that of gabapentin and shows possible advantages. Although it shows analgesic efficacy against neuropathic pain, very limited evidence supports its postoperative analgesic efficacy. We investigated its analgesic efficacy in patients experiencing acute pain after abdominal hysterectomy and compared it with gabapentin and placebo. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 90 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy who were anaesthetized in a standardized fashion. Patients received 300 mg pregabalin, 900 mg gabapentin or placebo, 1-2 hours prior to surgery. Postoperative analgesia was administered at visual analogue scale (VAS ≥3. The primary outcome was analgesic consumption over 24 hours and patients were followed for pain scores, time to rescue analgesia and side effects as secondary outcomes. Results: The diclofenac consumption was statistically significant between pregabalin and control groups, and gabapentin and control groups; however, pregabalin and gabapentin groups were comparable. Moreover, the consumption of tramadol was statistically significant among all the groups. Patients in pregabalin and gabapentin groups had lower pain scores in the initial hour of recovery. However, pain scores were subsequently similar in all the groups. Time to first request for analgesia was longer in pregabalin group followed by gabapentin and control groups. Conclusion: A single dose of 300 mg pregabalin given 1-2 hours prior to surgery is superior to 900 mg gabapentin and placebo after abdominal hysterectomy. Both the drugs are better than placebo.

  19. Relationships betveen pain intensity and heart rate variability in patients after abdominal surgery: a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Ling-hua; MA Tso-chiang; TSAY Shiow-luan; JONG Gwo-ping

    2012-01-01

    Background A link between postoperative pain intensity and heart rate variability (HRV) had not been well established.This study aimed to investigate the correlation between post-operative pain intensity and HRV.Methods The subjects in this cross-sectional correlation study comprised of patients who had undergone abdominal surgery in a regional teaching hospital in central Taiwan during the period July 2009-November 2009.The visual analogue scale (VAS) and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) were used to measure post-operative pain.HRV was measured as the standard deviation of normal RR interval,and by power spectral analysis that included high frequency (HF),low frequency (LF),very low frequency power,and LF/HF ratio.Results Atotal of 34 subjects were included in this study.We found that the day after the surgery,the mean VAS score was 47.50±20.98 and the mean SF-MPQ score was 18.06±8.90,indicating a moderate degree of pain.Moderate to severe degrees of tenderness were reported by 70.6% of the patients,moderate to severe degrees of gnawing pain were experienced by 67.7% of the patients,moderate to severe degrees of tiring-exhaustion pain were reported by 64.7% of the patients,and 41.2% of the patients who experienced moderate to severe pain believed that the pain was punishing-cruel.The standard deviation of normal RR interval and high frequency values obtained from male patients or married patients were higher than female patients or unmarried (P <0.05).The correlation of the standard deviation of normal RR interval,high frequency,very low frequency value and patient's age were negative (p <0.05).The total SF-MPQ pain scores positively correlated with the LF/HF ratio (P <0.05).Conclusions The multidimensional pain assessment tool (SF-MPQ) reflects better the patients' post-operative pain than the single-dimensional assessment tool (VAS).HRV positively correlated with SF-MPQ scores in patients after abdominal surgery.

  20. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease.

  1. Perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, B K; Bhattarai, B K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Regmi, R

    2010-12-01

    Due to unpleasant nature and physiological consequences of postoperative pain, search of safe and effective modalities for its management has remained a subject of interest to clinical researchers. Analgesic action of lidocaine infusion in patients with chronic neuropathic pain is well known but its place in relieving postoperative pain is yet to be established. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Sixty patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery were recruited in this randomized double blinded study. Thirty patients received lidocaine 2.0% (intravenous bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h), and 30 patients received normal saline according to randomization. The infusion started 30 min before skin incision and stopped 1 h after the end of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity and analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were assessed at the interval 15 minutes for 1 hour then 4 hourly up to 24 hours. The pain intensity at rest and movement as well as the total postoperative analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were significantly lower (142.50 +/- 37.80 mg vs.185.00 +/- 41.31 mg, Plidocaine group. The extubation time was significantly longer in lidocaine group (14.43 +/- 3.50 minutes vs. 6.73 +/- 1.76 minutes, Plidocaine group (60.97 +/- 18.05 minutes vs.15.73 +/- 7.46 minutes, Plidocaine decreases the intensity of postoperative pain, reduces the postoperative analgesic consumption, without causing significant adverse effects in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Dry Eye Patients With Chronic Pain Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Smitt-Kamminga, Nicole Sillevis; Kozareva, Diana; Nibourg, Simone A.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate clinical characteristics of dry eye disease (DED) patients with a chronic pain syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. study. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-five patients of a tertiary care DED patient cohort in the Netherlands were included. Chronic pain syndromes irritable bowel s

  3. Quantifying the usefulness of CT in evaluating seniors with abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lawrence M. [Campus Box 8072, Division of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)]. E-mail: lewisl@msnotes.wustl.edu; Klippel, Allen P. [Campus Box 8072, Division of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Bavolek, Rebecca A. [Campus Box 8072, Division of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Ross, Laura M. [Washington University, School of Arts and Science (United States); Scherer, Tara M. [Washington University, School of Arts and Science (United States); Banet, Gerald A. [Campus Box 8072, Division of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Objectives: (1) Determine if older patients with abdominal pain who receive emergency department (ED) abdominal CT have changes in diagnosis and/or disposition more often than similar patients without CT; (2) compare physician confidence in diagnosis and disposition for patients with versus without CT; (3) document factors that most influence physician's decision to order abdominal CT in this population. Methods: ED patients 60 years of age or older, with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain were enrolled over a 6-week period. Physicians documented a preliminary and final ED diagnosis and disposition, along with pre- and post-evaluation confidence levels. Decision to order CT, along with clinical information most influencing that decision, was noted. Physician confidence levels and percent change in diagnosis and disposition were compared for patients with versus without CT. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients comprised study sample. Abdominal CT rate was 59% (95%CI, 50-67%). CT was associated with an increased change in diagnosis (46%; 95%CI, 4-58% versus 29%; 95%CI, 16-42%), but no change in disposition between patients with versus without CT. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower for EPs who ordered a CT than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Patient history most influenced ordering CT, whereas prior lab/imaging results most influenced not ordering CT. Conclusion: Patients with CT had a change in diagnosis more often than those without. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower in CT group. Percent change in disposition did not differ between groups. Physicians most often ordered CT based on history and did not order CT when other diagnostic evaluation supported a specific diagnosis.

  4. Acceptance-based interoceptive exposure for young children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Nancy; Mauro, Christian; Craske, Michelle; Wagner, H Ryan; Datta, Nandini; Hopkins, Hannah; Caldwell, Kristen; Kiridly, Adam; Marsan, Samuel; Maslow, Gary; Mayer, Emeran; Egger, Helen

    2017-07-29

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common childhood somatic complaint that contributes to impairment in daily functioning (e.g., school absences) and increases risk for chronic pain and psychiatric illness. Cognitive behavioral treatments for FAP target primarily older children (9 + years) and employ strategies to reduce a focus on pain. The experience of pain may be an opportunity to teach viscerally hypersensitive children to interpret the function of a variety of bodily signals (including those of hunger, emotions) thereby reducing fear of bodily sensations and facilitating emotion awareness and self-regulation. We designed and tested an interoceptive exposure treatment for younger children (5-9 years) with FAP. Assessments included diagnostic interviews, 14 days of daily pain monitoring, and questionnaires. Treatment involved 10 weekly appointments. Using cartoon characters to represent bodily sensations (e.g., Gassy Gus), children were trained to be "FBI agents" - Feeling and Body Investigators - who investigated sensations through exercises that provoked somatic experience. 24 parent-child dyads are reported. Pain (experience, distress, and interference) and negative affect demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically significant change with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 71 for pain and from 0.38 to 0.61 for pain distress, total pain: X(2) (1, n = 24) = 13.14, p < 0.0003. An intervention that helps children adopt a curious stance and focus on somatic symptoms reduces pain and may help lessen somatic fear generally. NCT02075437. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and glycosaminoglycans replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating chronic disease characterized by discomfort or recurrent abdominal and pelvic pains in the absence of urinary tract infections. Its symptomatology includes discomfort, increased bladder pressure, sensitivity and intense pain in the bladder and pelvic areas, increased voiding frequency and urgency, or a combination of these symptoms. For these reasons, this pathology has a very negative impact on quality of life. The etiology of IC/BPS is still not well understood and different hypotheses have been formulated, including autoimmune processes, allergic reactions, chronic bacterial infections, exposure to toxins or dietary elements, and psychosomatic factors. The finding of an effective and specific therapy for IC/BPS remains a challenge for the scientific community because of the lack of a consensus regarding the causes and the inherent difficulties in the diagnosis. The last recent hypothesis is that IC/BPS could be pathophysiologically related to a disruption of the bladder mucosa surface layer with consequent loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This class of mucopolysaccharides has hydrorepellent properties and their alteration expose the urothelium to many urinary toxic agents. It has been hypothesized that when these substances penetrate the bladder wall a chain is triggered in the submucosa. In order to improve the integrity and function of the bladder lining, GAG layer replenishment therapy is widely accepted as therapy for patients with IC/BPS who have poor or inadequate response to conventional therapy. Currently, Chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and pentosan polysulphate (PPS), and combinations of two GAGs (CS and HA) are the available substances with different effectiveness rates in patients with IC/BPS. There are four different commercially available products for GAG replenishment including CS, heparin, HA and PPS. Each product has different concentrations and

  6. Differences in regional homogeneity between patients with Crohn's disease with and without abdominal pain revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chun-Hui; Liu, Peng; Liu, Hui-Rong; Wu, Lu-Yi; Jin, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Si-Yao; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Ye; Zeng, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Li-Li; Qin, Wei; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Calhoun, Vince D; Tian, Jie; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system may be related to abdominal pain in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in resting-state brain activity in patients with CD in remission and its relationship with the presence of abdominal pain. Twenty-five patients with CD and with abdominal pain, 25 patients with CD and without abdominal pain, and 32 healthy subjects were scanned using a 3.0-T functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to assess resting-state brain activity. Daily pain scores were collected 1 week before functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that patients with abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the insula, middle cingulate cortex (MCC), and supplementary motor area and higher ReHo values in the temporal pole. In contrast, patients without abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the hippocampal/parahippocampal cortex and higher ReHo values in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (all P pain scores for patients with abdominal pain (r = -0.53, P = 0.008 and r = -0.61, P = 0.002, respectively). These findings suggest that resting-state brain activities are different between remissive patients with CD with and without abdominal pain and that abnormal activities in insula and MCC are closely related to the severity of abdominal pain.

  7. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sugrue, Michael

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.

  8. A Case of Chronic Abdominal Neuropathic Pain and Burning after Female Genital Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Hadid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Female genital cutting is prevalent in the Middle Eastern and African countries. This ritual entails not only immediate complications such as infection, pain, and haemorrhage, but also chronic ones including dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. However, there is limited data on neuropathic pain secondary to female genital mutilation when searching the literature. Case. This case discusses a 38-year-old female with a history of infibulation who presented with a chronic burning abdominal and anterior vulvar pain including the related investigations and treatment. Discussion. This case brings to light the additional delayed complication of this ritual: sensory neuropathy. Our goal is to educate health professionals to be aware of these complications and to appropriately investigate and treat them in order to find a solution to relieve the patients’ symptoms.

  9. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, A. A.; O.L. Lapochkin; M.A. Lobov; M.N. Borisova

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases); neck pain was observed in 29.5% of ...

  10. Conditioned pain modulation in women with irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more vigilant to pain-associated stimuli. The aims of this study were to compare women with IBS (n = 20) to healthy control (HC, n = 20) women on pain sensitivity, conditioned pain modulation (CPM) efficiency, and salivary corti...

  11. Rethinking the psychogenic model of complex regional pain syndrome: somatoform disorders and complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Renee J; Chopra, Pradeep; Richardi, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Explaining the etiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from the psychogenic model is exceedingly unsophisticated, because neurocognitive deficits, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and distortions in cognitive mapping are features of CRPS pathology. More importantly, many people who have developed CRPS have no history of mental illness. The psychogenic model offers comfort to physicians and mental health practitioners (MHPs) who have difficulty understanding pain maintained by newly uncovered neuro inflammatory processes. With increased education about CRPS through a biopsychosocial perspective, both physicians and MHPs can better diagnose, treat, and manage CRPS symptomatology.

  12. Rethinking the Psychogenic Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Somatoform Disorders and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Renee J.; Chopra, Pradeep; Richardi, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Explaining the etiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from the psychogenic model is exceedingly unsophisticated, because neurocognitive deficits, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and distortions in cognitive mapping are features of CRPS pathology. More importantly, many people who have developed CRPS have no history of mental illness. The psychogenic model offers comfort to physicians and mental health practitioners (MHPs) who have difficulty understanding pain maintained by newly uncovered neuro inflammatory processes. With increased education about CRPS through a biopsychosocial perspective, both physicians and MHPs can better diagnose, treat, and manage CRPS symptomatology. PMID:24223338

  13. CASE REPORT An Unusual Case of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Following Resection of Extensive Posttraumatic Mesenteric Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabulyato, William M.; Alsahiem, Hebah; Hall, Nigel R.; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Heterotopic mesenteric ossification is an extremely rare condition, which often follows trauma and is frequently symptomatic. To date, there are no reports in the literature of abdominal compartment syndrome occurring after surgical resection of mesenteric calcification. The present report documents an unusual case of compartment syndrome complicating resection of extensive mesenteric calcification despite abdominal closure with the components-separation technique. Method: A 48-year-old man undergoing components-separation technique for posttraumatic laparostomy hernia repair (ileostomy reversal and sigmoid stricture correction) was found to have extensive heterotopic mesenteric calcification, which needed resection. Results: Resection of the mesenteric calcification was complicated by intraoperative hemorrhage and unplanned small bowel resection. Later the patient developed secondary hemorrhage leading to an abdominal compartment syndrome, which was successfully treated by decompression, hemostasis, and Permacol-assisted laparotomy wound closure. The patient remains symptom-free more than 2 years after surgery. Discussion: The case herein reported gives an account of the rare occurrence of abdominal compartment syndrome following resection of posttraumatic ectopic mesenteric ossifications. It is highly unusual in that it occurred because of “secondary hemorrhage” and despite abdominal closure with the components-separation technique, which had been undertaken precisely to prevent compartment syndrome with direct closure. It therefore highlights the need for continued clinical vigilance in complex posttraumatic cases. PMID:23573333

  14. Functional abdominal pain patient subtypes in childhood predict functional gastrointestinal disorders with chronic pain and psychiatric comorbidities in adolescence and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Sherman, Amanda L; Bruehl, Stephen; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2012-09-01

    Although pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP) has been linked to abdominal pain later in life, childhood predictors of long-term outcomes have not been identified. This study evaluated whether distinct FAP profiles based on patterns of pain and adaptation in childhood could be identified and whether these profiles predicted differences in clinical outcomes and central sensitization (wind-up) on average 9years later. In 843 pediatric FAP patients, cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups at initial FAP evaluation based on profiles of pain severity, gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms, pain threat appraisal, pain coping efficacy, catastrophizing, negative affect, and activity impairment. Three profiles were identified: high pain dysfunctional, high pain adaptive, and low pain adaptive. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and sex showed that, compared with pediatric patients with the low pain adaptive profile, those with the high pain dysfunctional profile were significantly more likely at long-term follow-up to meet criteria for pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) (odds ratio: 3.45, confidence interval: 1.95 to 6.11), FGID with comorbid nonabdominal chronic pain (odds ratio: 2.6, confidence interval: 1.45 to 4.66), and FGID with comorbid anxiety or depressive psychiatric disorder (odds ratio: 2.84, confidence interval: 1.35 to 6.00). Pediatric patients with the high pain adaptive profile had baseline pain severity comparable to that of the high pain dysfunctional profile, but had outcomes as favorable as the low pain adaptive profile. In laboratory pain testing at follow-up, high pain dysfunctional patients showed significantly greater thermal wind-up than low pain adaptive patients, suggesting that a subgroup of FAP patients has outcomes consistent with widespread effects of heightened central sensitization. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Pain-related bias in the classification of emotionally ambiguous facial expressions in mothers of children with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liossi, Christina; White, Paul; Croome, Natasha; Hatira, Popi

    2012-03-01

    This study sought to determine whether mothers of young people with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) compared to mothers of pain-free children show a pain recognition bias when they classify facial emotional expressions. One hundred demographically matched mothers of children with CAP (n=50) and control mothers (n=50) were asked to identify different emotions expressed by adults in 2 experiments. In experiment 1, participants were required to identify the emotion in a series of facial images that depicted 100% intensity of the following emotions: Pain, Sadness, Anger, Fear, Happiness, and Neutral. In experiment 2, mothers were required to identify the predominant emotion in a series of computer-interpolated ("morphed") facial images. In this experiment, pain was combined with Sad, Angry, Fearful, Happy, and Neutral facial expressions in different proportions-that is, 90%:10%, 70%:30%, 50%:50%, 30%:70%, 10%:90%. All participants completed measures of state and trait anxiety, depression, and anxiety sensitivity. In experiment 1, there was no difference in the performance of the 2 groups of mothers. In experiment 2, it was found that overall mothers of children with CAP were classifying ambiguous emotional expressions predominantly as pain. Mean response times for CAP and control groups did not differ significantly. Mothers of children with CAP did not report more anxiety, depression, and anxiety sensitivity compared to control mothers. It is concluded that mothers of children with CAP show a pain bias when interpreting ambiguous emotional expressions, which possibly contributes to the maintenance of this condition in children via specific parenting behaviours.

  16. An 88-Year-Old Man with Sudden Onset Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Manouchehrifar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An 88-year-old man presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of abdominal pain since 6 hours before. He was a known case of chronic renal failure that underwent hemodialysis three times a week. He also suffered from hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The patients’ on-arrival vital signs were as follows: systolic blood pressure: 100/60 mmHg, pulse rate: 88/minute, respiratory rate: 25/minute, oral temperature: 36◦C, oxygen saturation 93% in room air.  He had severely ill appearance on admission. Distended abdomen was considerable but had normal bowel sound and clearly, pain was disproportionate to physical examination. His electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm and venous blood gas analysis revealed the following: pH=6.96, PaCO2=49 mmHg, HCO3=11 mEq/L, Base excess= -20.  The bedside ultrasonography showed echogenic particles in hepatic parenchyma and same findings that were passing through the portal vein. Chest and abdominal X-rays were reported as normal. The patient underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT scan with oral contrast.What is your diagnosis?

  17. Preliminary study on attitudes, opinions and knowledge of Italian veterinarians with regard to abdominal visceral pain in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzaro, Alice; Di Salvo, Alessandra; Steagall, Paulo V; Zampini, Danilo; Polisca, Angela; Della Rocca, Giorgia

    2016-07-01

    To determine the attitudes, opinions and knowledge of Italian veterinarians regarding abdominal visceral pain in canine practice. Prospective online survey. An online questionnaire was created on a Google Form spreadsheet and the weblink was circulated to Italian veterinarians on several mailing lists. The questionnaire, which was available between November 2012 and July 2013, comprised 18 closed, semi-closed and open questions divided into five sections (aetiology, recognition and assessment, drug choices for canine visceral pain, general knowledge about pain management and desire for further education, and demographic information). A total of 527 responses to the questionnaire were completed. Pancreatitis (19%), gastroenteritis (17%) and gastrointestinal obstructions or foreign bodies (9%) were highlighted as the most frequent causes of abdominal visceral pain. Posture, gait and movement changes (32%) and physiological changes (31%) were commonly quoted for pain recognition and assessment. Most respondents (74%) did not use pain scoring systems. Pancreatitis and peritonitis were considered the most painful abdominal conditions. Opioids (40%), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (21%) and tramadol (20%) were cited as drugs for the management of visceral pain. A large percentage of respondents (97%) believed that their knowledge regarding pain management required improvement. There is practitioner interest for more continuing education in the subject. Most respondents were women (66%), aged between 25 and 40 years (57%). Internal medicine (56%), surgery (34%) and anaesthesiology (29%) were the main three speciality areas of interest in this study. This online survey represents the opinion of a small number of Italian veterinarians regarding the assessment and treatment of canine abdominal visceral pain. The results show that Italian veterinarians are aware of the main causes and clinical signs of canine visceral pain. Pain-scoring systems are not often used for

  18. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to the Treatment of Chronic Abdominal Visceral Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Patrizi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic abdominal visceral pain (CAVP has a significant clinical impact and represents one of the most frequent and debilitating disorders in the general population. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost, reduced productivity, and long-term use of medications with their associated side effects. Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, the management of patients with CAVP is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This may in part be explained by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain; in contrast with acute pain in which the pathophysiology is relatively well known and has several satisfactory therapeutic options. Recently, the development of tools for brain investigation, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided new insights on the pathophysiology of chronic pain. These new data have shown that plastic changes in the central and peripheral nervous system might play an important role in the maintenance of chronic pain. Therefore, approaches aimed at the modulation of the nervous system, rather than the ones interfering with the inflammatory pathways, may be more effective for chronic pain treatment. We propose that noninvasive central nervous system stimulation, with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, might be a novel therapeutic option for CAVP. This paper will present an overview of the pathophysiology and the available therapies for CAVP, focusing on the recent advances in the treatment of this pathology.

  19. Attentional bias to pain and social threat in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and pain-free youth before and after performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joy E; Lipani, Tricia A; Baber, Kari F; Dufton, Lynette; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated attentional biases for pain and social threat versus neutral stimuli in 54 youth with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 53 healthy control subjects (ages 10 to 16 years). We assessed attentional bias using a visual probe detection task (PDT) that presented pain and social threat words in comparison to neutral words at conscious (1250 ms) and preconscious (20 ms) presentation rates. We administered the PDT before and after random assignment of participants to a laboratory stressor--failure versus success feedback regarding their performance on a challenging computer game. All analyses controlled for trait anxiety. At the conscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients exhibited preferential attention toward pain compared with neutral stimuli and compared with the control group. FAP patients maintained preferential attention toward conscious pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. At the preconscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients' attention was neutral at baseline but increased significantly toward pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. FAP patients' somatic symptoms increased in both failure and success conditions; control youth's somatic symptoms only increased after failure. Regarding social threat, neither FAP nor control youth exhibited attentional bias toward social threat compared with neutral stimuli at baseline, but both FAP and control youth in the failure condition significantly increased attention away from social threat after failure feedback. Results suggest that FAP patients preferentially attend to pain stimuli in conscious awareness. Moreover, performance evaluation may activate their preconscious attention to pain stimuli.

  20. Yoga intervention and functional pain syndromes: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutar, Roshan; Yadav, Suresh; Desai, Geetha

    2016-06-01

    The definition of functional pain syndromes is varied across literature. No effort has been made to see all functional pain disorder groups under broad nomenclature which would exclude conditions for which pathophysiology is strongly known. Since these disorders are commonly treated with alternative treatment modalities and impose significant burden on health utilization, an effort to look into studies on yoga-based interventions on 'functional pain syndromes' (FPS) was made. This study defined FPS as 'Chronic relapsing remitting pain conditions, the origin of which is difficult to trace with no definite physical pathology on clinical suspicion or available laboratory measures and are valid based on subjective pain reporting, associated distress and socio-occupational dysfunction'. Chronic headache, neck pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, pelvic pain, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and somatoform pain disorders were included for this review. The review found four meta-analyses on the selected topic both indicating modest efficacy and benefit of yoga in these disorders. Future efforts should be directed to do a large meta-analysis of functional pain syndromes.

  1. Familial Mediterranean fever--a not so unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is a hereditary syndrome characterised by recurrent episodes of fever and serositis, resulting in pain in the abdomen, chest, joints and muscles. It is primarily diagnosed in people of Jewish, Arabic, Turkish or Armenian ancestry and is caused by mutations in the gene

  2. Sprue-like histology in patients with abdominal pain taking olmesartan compared with other angiotensin receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Stephen M; Braunstein, Eric D; Arguelles-Grande, Carolina; Bhagat, Govind; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    A severe syndrome characterised by life-threatening diarrhoea and severe sprue-like histology has been described in patients taking the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan. It is unknown whether there are any histopathological changes in patients without severe diarrhoea exposed to this medication. It is also unknown whether other ARBs cause sprue-like histology. Retrospective cohort study of patients with abdominal pain undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy who were taking ARBs. Patients taking olmesartan (n=20) and a non-olmesartan ARB (n=20) were compared with age and sex-matched controls. Histological features (classic sprue-like and other inflammatory changes) were analysed. No single histopathological finding was significantly more common in olmesartan-using patients than controls. However, 10 of 20 olmesartan patients had one or more sprue-like histological features compared with 4 of 20 age-matched and sex-matched controls not taking ARBs (p=0.10). Patients taking ARBs other than olmesartan were not more likely than controls to have one or more of these sprue-like histological features (9/20 vs. 12/20, p=0.34). There were no statistically significant differences between olmesartan users with abdominal pain and controls for any single histopathological abnormality. However, there were trends towards significance for individual abnormalities as well as for a composite outcome of sprue-like changes. This raises the possibility that there is a spectrum of histological changes associated with olmesartan use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. McKusick-Kaufman syndrome: the diagnostic challenge of abdominal distension in the neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, C; de Die-Smulders, C E; Kuijten, R H; Fryns, J P

    1992-08-01

    We report a newborn girl with McKusick-Kaufman syndrome who presented at birth with severe life-threatening abdominal distension due to hydrometrocolpos. In children with polydactyly and cystic masses in the lower abdomen should hydrometrocolpos be especially considered. Ultrasonography is of great value in the correct assignment of lower abdominal tumours, but should be completed by vagino(cysto)scopy when hydrometrocolpos is suspected.

  4. The role of routine measurement of intra-abdominal pressure in preventing abdominal compartment syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Raghavendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Routine measure of IAP facilitates early recognition of IAH. This facilitates therapeutic measures to be initiated to reduce IAP. Early decision to decompress by laparotomy/laparostomy saves lives. Hence, routine IAP measurement should be a part of standard care in pediatric abdominal surgery.

  5. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Zaidi, Habib; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) can be used to assess acute abdominal pain. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess acute abdominal pain in obese patients. • LDCT-IR-FBP (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess patients with acute abdominal pain.

  6. Abdominal CT scanning in reproductive-age women with right lower quadrant abdominal pain: does its use reduce negative appendectomy rates and healthcare costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Bryan C; Roettger, Richard H; Kalbaugh, Corey A; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Hines, William B

    2007-06-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most frequent cause of the acute abdomen in the United States, its accurate diagnosis in reproductive-age women remains difficult. Problems in making the diagnosis are evidenced by negative appendectomy rates in this group of 20 per cent to 45 per cent. Abdominal CT scanning has been used in diagnosing acute appendicitis, but its reliability and usefulness remains controversial. There is concern that the use of CT scanning to make this diagnosis leads to increased and unwarranted healthcare charges and costs. The purpose of our study is to determine if abdominal CT scanning is an effective test in making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women (age, 16-49 years) with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and to determine if its use is cost-effective. From January 2003 to December 2006, 439 patients were identified from our academic surgical database and confirmed by chart review as undergoing an appendectomy with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data, including age, presence and results of preoperative abdominal CT scans, operative findings, and pathology reports were reviewed. Comparison of patients receiving a preoperative CT scan with those who did not was performed using chi-squared analysis. In the subgroup of reproductive-age women, there was a significant difference in negative appendectomy rates of 17 per cent in the group that received abdominal CT scans versus 42 per cent in the group that did not (P accounting for the patient and insurance company costs, abdominal CT scan savings averaged $1412 per patient. Abdominal CT scanning is a reliable, useful, and cost-effective test for evaluating right lower quadrant abdominal pain and making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women.

  7. Anomalies of abdominal organs in polysplenia syndrome: Multidetector computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok; Jung, Jin Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University School of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare situs ambiguous anomaly associated with multiple spleens and anomalies of abdominal organs. Because most of the minor anomalies do not cause clinical symptoms, polysplenia syndrome is detected incidentally in the adults. Anomalies of abdominal organs may include multiple spleens of variable size or right-sided spleen, large midline or left-sided liver, midline gallbladder, biliary tract anomalies, short pancreas, right-sided stomach, intestinal malrotation, inferior vena cava interruption with azygos or hemiazygos continuation, and a preduodenal portal vein. As the multidetector computed tomography is increasingly used, situs anomalies will likely to be found with greater frequency in the adults. Therefore, radiologists should become familiar with these rare and peculiar anomalies of abdominal organs in polysplenia syndrome.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Complicated with Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶京; 王春友; 陈立波; 杨智勇; 许逸卿; 熊炯炘; 周峰

    2003-01-01

    Presented in this paper is our experience in the diagnosis and management of abdominal compartment syndrome during severe acute pancreatitis. On the basis of the history of severe acute pancreatitis, after effective fluid resuscitation, if patients developed renal, pulmonary and cardiac insufficiency after abdominal expansion and abdominal wall tension, ACS should be considered.Cystometry could be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Emergency decompressive celiotomy and temporary abdominal closure with a 3 liter sterile plastic bag must be performed. It is also critical to prevent reperfusion syndrome. In 23 cases of ACS, 18 cases received emergency decompressive celiotomy and 5 cases did not. In the former, 3 patients died (16.7 %) while in the later, 4 (80%)died. Total mortality rate was 33.3% (7/21). In 7 death cases, 4 patients developed acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis (AOSC). All the patients who received emergency decompressive celiotomy 5 h after confirmation of ACS survived. The definitive abdominal closure took place mostly 3 to 5 days after emergency decompressive celiotomy, with longest time being 8 days. 6 cases of ACS at infection stage were all attributed to infected necrosis in abdominal cavity and retroperitoneum. ACS could occur in SIRS stage and infection stage during SAP, and has different pathophysiological basis. Early diagnosis, emergency decompressive celiotomy and temporary abdominal closure with a 3L sterile plastic bag are the keys to the management of the condition.

  9. Pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: time for specific pain treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, J.; Crombez, G.; Meeus, M.; Knoop, H.; Damme, S.V.; Cauwenbergh, V.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides chronic fatigue, patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have debilitating widespread pain. Yet pain from CFS is often ignored by clinicians and researchers. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether pain is a unique feature of CFS, or does it share the same underlying mechanisms as ot

  10. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The same level

  11. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The

  12. Pain in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Claudio; Del Papa, Nicoletta

    2015-02-01

    Joint and muscle pain are commonly observed in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Different types of pain can be distinguished, that is, articular pain, neuropathic pain and widespread pain. Articular pain is due to more or less evident synovitis, usually involving peripheral joints such as hand joints, wrists, knees and ankles. Drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, or lupus synovitis, are also employed for articular involvement in pSS. Pure sensory neuropathies and, more often, small fibre neuropathies are responsible for neuropathic pain in pSS. This is usually localised in the legs and arms with a characteristic glove or sock distribution. Widespread pain, often assuming the features of fibromyalgia, has also been reported in patients with pSS. The pathological mechanisms underlying both neuropathic pain and widespread (fibromyalgia) pain in pSS have not been so far completely clarified.

  13. Biofeedback therapy for chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang-QunYE; DanCAI; Ru-ZhuLAN; Guang-HuiDU; Xiao-YiYUAN; ZhongCHEN; Yang-ZhiMA; You-MingHU; Gui-YunZENG

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome(CPPS). Methods: From November 2001 to April 2002, patients visiting the Urological Outpatient Clinic of this Hospital were evaluated by means of the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI)and classified by the NIH classification standard. Sixty-two patients of CPPS category Ⅲ were involved in this study. All patients had been treated by conventional approaches such as antibiotics and alpha-blockers for more than half a year without any improvement. The expressed prostatic secretion results were as follows: WBC 5 to 9/high power field, lipid +-+++ and bacterial culture negative. Their NIH-CPSI were 12-40. All the 62 cases complained of micturitional irritation (frequency, urgency, splitted stream and sense of residual urine), 32 cases, of pain or discomfort at the testicular, penile, scrotal, pelvic or rectal region and 13 cases, of white secretion-dripping. The patients were treated by the Urostym Biofeedback equipment (Laborie Co., Canada) 5 times a week for 2 weeks with a stimulus intensity of 15 mA-23 mA and duration of 20 minutes. Results: Sixty patients were significantly improved or cured, while no significant improvement in the remaining 2. No apparent side effect was observed. The NIH-CPSI dropped to 6 to 14 with an average reduction of 21 (P<0.01). In the 60 improved cases, pain was relieved after 2-3treatment courses and other symptoms disappeared after 4-5 courses. Conclusion: Biofeedback therapy is a safe and effective treatment for CPPS. Large randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm its efficacy and to explore the mechanism of action. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5:155-158 )

  14. Paniculitis mesentérica como causa poco frecuente de dolor abdominal agudo Mesenteric panniculitis as a rare cause of acute abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luiza Fatahi Bandpey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La paniculitis mesentérica es un proceso inflamatorio poco habitual que afecta al tejido graso del mesenterio y, con menor frecuencia, al mesocolon o al retroperitoneo. Puede cursar con dolor abdominal, diarrea, pérdida de peso o masa palpable, y rara vez se presenta con un cuadro de dolor abdominal agudo. En la mayoría de los casos es asintomática. La etiología es desconocida, aunque se han descrito como posibles agentes causales la isquemia, la infección, el traumatismo abdominal, los antecedentes quirúrgicos y los procesos autoinmunes. También se ha planteado su asociación con determinados fármacos, procesos inflamatorios idiopáticos y neoplasias. La tomografía computada (TC es la técnica de imagen de elección para su diagnóstico y los hallazgos pueden variar desde el incremento de la atenuación en el mesenterio hasta la presencia de una masa sólida en relación con el componente tisular predominante (grasa, tejido inflamatorio o fibrosis. Presentamos 3 pacientes que acudieron al Servicio de Urgencias con dolor abdominal agudo y cuyo diagnóstico final fue paniculitis mesentérica como causa del cuadro.Mesenteric panniculitis is an unusual inflammatory disorder involving the adipose tissue of the mesentery and, less frequently, the mesocolon and the retroperitoneum. Patients may present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss or abdominal mass, and only rarely with symptoms of acute abdominal pain. In most cases, it is asymptomatic. Although the etiology of mesenteric panniculitis is unknown, ischemia, infection, abdominal trauma, previous abdominal surgery, and autoimmune disorders have been reported as possible causative agents. It has also been suggested its association with certain drugs, idiopathic inflammatory processes, and malignancy. Computed tomography (CT is the gold standard imaging technique for its diagnosis; computed tomography findings may vary from increased attenuation of the mesentery to a solid soft

  15. Descending pain modulation in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakiath, Rosemary J; Siddall, Philip J; Kellow, John E; Hush, Julia M; Jones, Mike P; Marcuzzi, Anna; Wrigley, Paul J

    2015-12-10

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder. While abdominal pain is a dominant symptom of IBS, many sufferers also report widespread hypersensitivity and present with other chronic pain conditions. The presence of widespread hypersensitivity and extra-intestinal pain conditions suggests central nervous dysfunction. While central nervous system dysfunction may involve the spinal cord (central sensitisation) and brain, this review will focus on one brain mechanism, descending pain modulation. We will conduct a comprehensive search for the articles indexed in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial (CENTRAL) from their inception to August 2015, that report on any aspect of descending pain modulation in irritable bowel syndrome. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias and extract relevant data. Results will be tabulated and, if possible, a meta-analysis will be carried out. The systematic review outlined in this protocol aims to summarise current knowledge regarding descending pain modulation in IBS. PROSPERO CRD42015024284.

  16. A case of abdominal pain with dyslipidemia: difficulties diagnosing cholesterol ester storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, S J; Daimee, U; Block, R C

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol ester storage disease is an exceptionally rare dyslipidemia with less than 150 cases reported in the medical literature. The diagnosis of Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is often missed by virtue of the fact that the symptoms mimic both inborn metabolic defects and hepatic steatosis. Patients with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease usually present with atypical complaints including abdominal pain from altered gut motility. Blood analysis typically reveals abnormal liver function tests with coincident dyslipidemia. We present a case of a young woman with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease who was followed over two decades. We discuss issues common to her initial protracted diagnosis with management options over time.

  17. New Insights in Abdominal Pain in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH: A MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Cobelli

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain in PNH has never been investigated by in-vivo imaging studies. With MRI, we aimed to assess mesenteric vessels flow and small bowel wall perfusion to investigate the ischemic origin of abdominal pain.Six PNH patients with (AP and six without (NOP abdominal pain underwent MRI. In a blinded fashion, mean flow (MF, quantity of blood moving through a vessel within a second, in mL·s-1 and stroke volume (SV, volume of blood pumped out at each heart contraction, in mL of Superior Mesenteric Vein (SMV and Artery (SMA, areas under the curve at 60 (AUC60 and 90 seconds (AUC90 and Ktrans were assessed by two operators.Mean total perfusion and flow parameters were lower in AP than in NOP group. AUC60: 84.81 ± 11.75 vs. 131.73 ± 18.89 (P < 0.001; AUC90: 102.33 ± 14.16 vs. 152.58 ± 22.70 (P < 0.001; Ktrans: 0.0346 min-1 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.0521 ± 0.0015 (P = 0.093 duodenum, 0.009 jejunum/ileum. SMV: MF 4.67 ml/s ± 0.85 vs. 8.32 ± 2.14 (P = 0.002; SV 3.85 ml ± 0.76 vs. 6.55 ± 1.57 (P = 0.02. SMA: MF 6.95 ± 2.61 vs. 11.2 ± 2.32 (P = 0.07; SV 6.52 ± 2.19 vs. 8.78 ± 1.63 (P = 0.07. We found a significant correlation between MF and SV of SMV and AUC60 (MF:ρ = 0.88, P < 0.001; SV: ρ = 0.644, P = 0.024, AUC90 (MF: ρ = 0.874, P < 0.001; SV:ρ = 0.774, P = 0.003 and Ktrans (MF:ρ = 0.734, P = 0.007; SV:ρ = 0.581, P = 0.047.Perfusion and flow MRI findings suggest that the impairment of small bowel blood supply is significantly associated with abdominal pain in PNH.

  18. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Paediatric mesenteric lipoma, an unusual cause of repeated abdominal pain. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaniklides, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Frykberg, T.; Lundkvist, K. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-11-01

    Fatty masses, especially solid lipomas, in the paediatric abdomen are very rare. We present such a case, that of an 11-year-old boy who was admitted with abdominal pain and distension. The pre-operative diagnosis of lipoma was suggested by US and CT. The diagnosis of simple lipoma arising in the leaves of the small bowel mesentery, without immature cells, was verified microscopically after the operation. The tumour was enucleated from the mesenterium leaving the intestine intact. We underline the importance of US and CT as pre-operative diagnostic tools. (orig.)

  20. PARASITIC INFECTION IN A YOUNG MAN PRESENTING WITH NON-SPECIFIC ABDOMINAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARNAZA A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man presented with a two-week history of central colicky abdominal pain associated with loose stools. Further history revealed that he had been exposed to contaminated waters. Stool investigation by direct wet stool smears revealed the presence of Entamoeba histolytica and Blastocystis hominis cysts. A diagnosis of amoebiasis secondary to E. histolytica and concurrent B. hominis infestation was made. We would like to emphasise the importance of clinical history including recent travel to endemic areas. Any suspicion of parasitic infection should prompt the clinician to investigate. Early diagnosisand management would prevent serious complications associated with E. Histolytica infection.

  1. Multicystic benign mesothelioma of the pelvic peritoneum presenting as acute abdominal pain in a young woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung-Hee; Jeon, Seob; Lee, Ji-Hye; Nam, Kye-Hyun; Bae, Dong-Han

    2013-03-01

    Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM) of the peritoneum is a very rare condition. Since the first description of MBM in 1979, approximately 100 cases have been reported. This is a case report of MBM of the pelvic peritoneum presenting as acute abdominal pain in a young woman. Laparoscopy confirmed multiple grapelike clusters of cysts that originated in the peritoneum of the rectouterine pouch and histopathologic diagnosis was confirmed as MBM of the pelvic peritoneum. We hope to alert gynaecologists of the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to MBM which can be accomplished by laparoscopy.

  2. Acute renal failure due to abdominal compartment syndrome: report on four cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleva Roberto de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 4 cases of abdominal compartment syndrome complicated by acute renal failure that were promptly reversed by different abdominal decompression methods. Case 1: A 57-year-old obese woman in the post-operative period after giant incisional hernia correction with an intra-abdominal pressure of 24 mm Hg. She was sedated and curarized, and the intra-abdominal pressure fell to 15 mm Hg. Case 2: A 73-year-old woman with acute inflammatory abdomen was undergoing exploratory laparotomy when a hypertensive pneumoperitoneum was noticed. During the surgery, enhancement of urinary output was observed. Case 3: An 18-year-old man who underwent hepatectomy and developed coagulopathy and hepatic bleeding that required abdominal packing, developed oliguria with a transvesical intra-abdominal pressure of 22 mm Hg. During reoperation, the compresses were removed with a prompt improvement in urinary flow. Case 4: A 46-year-old man with hepatic cirrhosis was admitted after incisional hernia repair with intra-abdominal pressure of 16 mm Hg. After paracentesis, the intra-abdominal pressure fell to 11 mm Hg.

  3. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility. PMID:27821941

  4. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility.

  5. Intra-operative remifentanil might influence pain levels in the immediate post-operative period after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E G; Duedahl, T H; Rømsing, J;

    2005-01-01

    Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...... any impact on post-operative pain and opioid consumption after major abdominal surgery.......Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...

  6. Effect of levetiracetam on the postmastectomy pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, O J; Cold, S; Rasmussen, L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was to test whether levetiracetam relieves the postmastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS). METHODS: Postmastectomy pain syndrome was defined as pain of neuropathic character located in the area...... of the surgery and/or the ipsilateral arm. The inclusion criteria were: age more than 18 years, characteristic symptoms corresponding to PMPS more than 6 months after surgery for breast cancer, pain duration more than 3 months, peripheral nerve lesions confirmed by abnormal neurological and quantitative sensory...

  7. [The influence of modern plasma substitutes on the course of abdominal compartment syndrome in patients with abdominal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursov, S V

    2013-01-01

    The changes of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) were followed up in 244 patients with abdominal sepsis after operation. The influence of liquid "resuscitation" with different types of plasma substitutes on the rates of IAP was studied and the dependence of changes IAP from filling of vascular bed was investigated. The impedance technique was used to determine the circulating blood volume and its percentage from proper index was estimated according to the sex, age and constitution. The percentage of interstitial liquid in organism was calculated by analogy. The severity of manifestations of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) increases with the assessment of severity of the general condition to APACHE-II scale. The most severe ACS course was while using the crystalloid solutions in the complex of infusion therapy. The inclusion of colloids in the infusion therapy facilitated more full volume filling of vascular bed with the liquid, reduced the capillary leakage, accelerated the process of reduction of ACS. The advantage was shown by using the derivatives of hydroxyethylstarch, which promoted the elimination of deficiency of intravascular liquid in the best way.

  8. Current recognition and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome among tertiary Chinese intensive care physicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-cang ZHOU; Hong-chen ZHAO; Kong-han PAN; Qiu-ping XU

    2011-01-01

    This survey was designed to clarify the current understanding and clinical management of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH)/abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) among intensive care physicians in tertiary Chinese hospitals. A postal twenty-question questionnaire was sent to 141 physicians in different intensive care units (ICUs). A total of 108 (76.6%) questionnaires were returned. Among these, three quarters worked in combined medical-surgical ICUs and nearly 80% had primary training in internal or emergency medicine. Average ICU beds, annual admission,ICU length of stay, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) Ⅱ score, and mortality were 18.2 beds,764.5 cases, 8.3 d, 19.4, and 21.1%, respectively. Of the respondents, 30.6% never measured intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). Although the vast majority of the ICUs adopted the exclusively transvesicular method, the over-whelming majority (88.0%) only measured IAP when there was a clinical suspicion of IAH/ACS and only 29.3% measured either often or routinely. Moreover, 84.0% used the wrong priming saline volume while 88.0% zeroed at reference points which were not in consistence with the standard method for IAP monitoring recommended by the World Society of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome. ACS was suspected mainly when there was a distended ab-domen (92%), worsening oliguria (80%), and increased ventilatory support requirement (68%). Common causes for IAH/ACS were "third-spacing from massive volume resuscitation in different settings" (88%), "intra-abdominal bleed-ing", and "liver failure with ascites" (52% for both). Though 60% respondents would recommend surgical decompres-sion when the IAP exceeded 25 mmHg, accompanied by signs of organ dysfunction, nearly three quarters of re-spondents preferred diuresis and dialysis. A total of 68% of respondents would recommend paracentesis in the treatment for ACS. In conclusion, urgent systematic education is absolutely necessary for most intensive care physi

  9. Epidemlology of exercise-related transient abdominal pain at the Sydney City to Surf community run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D P; Richards, D; Callister, R

    2005-06-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 848 participants (76% runners, 24% walkers) at the conclusion of the 14 km City to Surf community run in order to investigate their experience of exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP). Twenty-seven percent of respondents reported experiencing ETAP during the event, with the condition reported more frequently (pnutritional content of the pre-event meal did not influence the experience of ETAP. Sufferers of ETAP were more likely to experience nausea (r = 0.12, p< 0.01) and report shoulder tip pain (r= 0.14, p< 0.01). The results indicate that ETAP is a commonly experienced problem and provide insights into the cause of the complaint.

  10. Low back pain and the post-laminectomy pain syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S AIr Med J 1989; 76: 20-23. Low back pain is a .... They break the cycle of muscle wasting, inactivity, more pain, more inactivity and ... Trigger points are areas of localised muscle spasm or of referred pain. .... Acupuncture. This needs to be ...

  11. Kidney Failure Due to Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Following Snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalzadeh, Mojgan; Ghadiani, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of snakebite complications is challenging, as it is difficult to distinguish what kind of antivenins should be used. Kidney failure as a result of rhabdomyolysis or hemolysis may happen due to accumulated fluids that increase the pressure in the abdomen. This case report describes acute kidney failure probably due to intra-abdominal hypertension following an unknown bite.

  12. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Smirnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases; neck pain was observed in 29.5% of cases; while thoracic pain syndromes were observed in 18.1% of cases. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was diagnosed in 16.19% of children; congenital abnormalities of the spine, in 15.2%; scoliosis (idiopathic and secondary, in 8.6%; and Scheuermann-Mau's disease, in 5.71%. The conclusion has been made about the high prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren. Muscular tonic syndromes were prevailing in the clinical structure in children; radicular syndromes were less frequent. Musculoskeletal disorders were the main causes of back pain. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was often observed, which was revealed as functional instability of the vertebral motor segment, spondylolisthesis due to weak ligaments, and disc protrusions. Congenital abnormalities of the spine, scoliosis, and Scheuermann-Mau' disease were observed less often. 

  13. Management of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery in Spain. A multicentre drug utilization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallano, Antonio; Aguilera, Cristina; Arnau, Josep Maria; Baños, Josep-Eladi; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    1999-01-01

    Participating centres: Hospital Universitario San Juan, Alicante: Maria Jesús Olaso, Javier Agulló, Clara Faura. Hospital Torrecárdenas, Almería: Carmen Fernández Sánchez, Miguel Lorenzo Campos, Juan Manuel Rodríguez Alonso. Hospital Quirúrgic Adriano, Barcelona: Carmen Alerany Pardo, Paquita Alvarez González, Teresa Martín Benito. Hospital Universitari del Mar-IMIM, Barcelona: Magí Farré, Maite Terán. Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, Sabadell: Montserrat Cañellas, Sergio Zavala, Josep Planell. Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau: Gonzalo Calvo, Rosa Morros, Silvia Mateo. Hospital General Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona: Carmen Bosch, María José Martínez. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga: Maribel Lucena, José Antonio González, Gabriel Carranque. Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid: Emilio Vargas, Amparo Gil López-Oliva, Míriam García Mateos. Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander: Mario González, Antonio Cuadrado. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla: Juan Antonio Durán, Pilar Máyquez, María Isabel Serrano. Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla: Jaume Torelló, Juan Ramón Castillo, María de las Nieves Merino. Aims Postoperative pain is common in hospital-admitted patients. Its management is determined by different therapeutic traditions and by the attitudes of health professionals in each hospital. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of prescription and administration of analgesic drugs used for postoperative pain after abdominal surgery in Spanish hospitals, to know the prevalence and the severity of postoperative pain, and to determine the extent of variability in the management of postoperative pain among the participating centres. Methods The study was a multicentre descriptive cross-sectional drug utilization study in 12 Spanish hospitals. The subjects were an unselected sample of consecutive patients undergoing abdominal

  14. CHOLECYSTITIS AS A CAUSE OF ABDOMINAL PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE VIRAL HEPATITIS A AND B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag Radunović

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute cholecystitis is an inflammation of the gallbladder wall, usually caused by gallstones in the cystic duct, which causes attacks of severe pain. At least 95% of the population with acute inflammation of the gallbladder have gallstones. Acute viral hepatitis is the liver inflammation accompanied by nausea, faintness, vomiting, pain below the right rib arch, jaundice. The presence of acute cholecystitis intensifies the existing symptoms. The aim of the paper was to show the incidence of the gallbladder inflammation in patients with acute hepatitis A or B. This retrospective-prospective study involved 110 patients treated for viral hepatitis A or B and had severe abdominal pain during hospitalization. The selected sample involved more male examinees - 63 (62% compared to female ones - 47 (38%. The most frequent age of examinees was 30-50 years, 82 (83%, and cholecystitis during hepatitis was also most common in the age group 30-50 years, 28 (73% patients. Cholecystitis was more common in patients with acute hepatitis B - 21 (55% examinees than in patients with acute hepatitis A - 17 (45% examinees. Ultrasound examination, performed in 24 (63% examinees showed gallstones in inflamed gallbladder, while 14 (37% examinees had the inflammation of the gallbladder without gallstones. The most common cause of severe abdominal pain in patients with acute liver infection caused by HAV and HBV infection was the gallbladder, 38 (34.5% patients. Cholecystitis was more common in patients with acute hepatitis B, 21 (55% examinees, than in those with an acute hepatitis A, 17 (45% examinees.

  15. Abdominal aortic thrombosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Ohnishi, T; Okamoto, S; Yamakado, T; Isaka, N; Nakano, T

    1998-01-01

    We report a patient who presented with severe nephrotic syndrome complicated with infrarenal aortic and right renal arterial thrombosis. The nephrotic syndrome frequently causes thromboembolic complications in veins, but arterial thrombosis is relatively rare, especially in the aorta. Various predisposing factors leading to thromboembolic complications are discussed. In this case, the thromboembolic complication may have some clinical association with the hypercoagulable state in nephrotic syndrome.

  16. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD and Neuropathic Pain: Role of Intravenous Bisphosphonates as Analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yanow

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a sequela of dysfunction, injuries, or diseases of the peripheral and/or central nervous system pain pathways, which has historically been extremely difficult to treat. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS types 1 and 2 are neuropathic pain conditions that have a long history in the medical literature but whose pathophysiology remains elusive and whose available treatment options remain few. While an exact animal model for CRPS doesn't yet exist, there are several animal models of neuropathic pain that develop behaviors of hypersensitivity, one of the hallmark signs of neuropathic pain in humans.

  17. Bilateral Simultaneous Femoral Neck Fracture Mimicking Abdominal Pain in a Cerebral Palsy Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mariani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are unusual lesions, generally associated with an underlying condition which causes impaired bone mineralization, triggered by an increased bone stress. We present a 24-year-old cerebral palsy patient, who was previously evaluated in another institution due to inability to walk, interpreted as abdominal pain. No alteration in blood analysis or abdominal X-rays was found. As no response to treatment was observed, a new abdominal X-ray was taken, which incidentally depicted bilateral medial femoral neck fracture. He was referred to our practice after a resection arthroplasty was offered in another institution. After admission, bilateral one-stage THA was performed. Several reports emphasize bone disease as a major precipitating factor, and there is an increased incidence of hip fractures in chronic epilepsy, renal osteodystrophy, and chronic steroid use. Femoral head resection has been proven to be effective in immobilized patients, whereas this was not a reasonable option in this patient who presented walking ability. Despite the treatment election, primary care physicians should be aware of and alert to the possibility of fractures in patients with neurological disorders and calcium metabolism alterations. Late diagnosis of orthopedic injuries in this type of patients may lead to permanent disability.

  18. Isolated superior mesenteric artery thrombosis: a rare cause for recurrent abdominal pain in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahshan, Ahmed; Donovan, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy was evaluated for recurrent abdominal pain and failure to thrive over a 1-year period in a pediatric subspecialty clinic. Results of the extensive workup mostly were unremarkable. Eventually, imaging studies of the abdominal aorta revealed an isolated thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery trunk and compensatory hypertrophy of the inferior mesenteric artery. He had been having abdominal angina symptoms and fear of eating. A detailed family history suggested a possible hypercoagulable state. However, an extensive hematologic evaluation did not reveal a recognizable defect that could produce thrombotic events. He was treated by arterial graft bypass surgery and started on conventional anticoagulants. Several months later, he developed repeat, near-total thrombosis of the graft with recurrence of his symptoms. After balloon dilation of the graft and starting him on appropriate anticoagulant maintenance regimen, he had good symptom relief, and the graft remained patent. This presentation was unusually prolonged for the type of vascular problem identified. The possibility of vascular problems in children, therefore, should be considered. Unidentified cause of hereditary clotting tendency is another challenging aspect of this case.

  19. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and contr...

  20. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  1. Abdominal Computed tomography of 25 patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrive, L.; Frija, J.; Couderc, L.J.; Clauvel, J.P.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1986-03-01

    An abdominal computed tomographic examination was performed to 20 patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and to 5 patients with Lymphadenopathy Syndrome (LAS). Intraabdominal lymph nodes were seen in 18 out of 20 cases of AIDS and in 5 cases of LAS. Lymph nodes have a normal size or are slightly enlarged but they are too numerous. Splenomegaly was found in 17 patients. Rectal modifications secondary to a proctitis were seen in the homosexual patients.

  2. Two similar cases of elderly women with moderate abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin: a surgeon's successful conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zumstein, Valentin; Bieg, Christian; Ackermann, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Patients presenting with abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum in radiological examination usually require emergency explorative laparoscopy or laparotomy. Pneumoperitoneum mostly associates with gastrointestinal perforation. There are very few cases where surgery can be avoided. We present 2 cases of pneumoperitoneum with unknown origin and successful conservative treatment. Both patients were elderly women presenting to our emergency unit, with moderate abdominal pain. There was neither medical intervention nor trauma in their medical history. Physical examination revealed mild abdominal tenderness, but no clinical sign of peritonitis. Cardiopulmonary examination remained unremarkable. Blood studies showed only slight abnormalities, in particular, inflammation parameters were not significantly increased. Finally, obtained CTs showed free abdominal gas of unknown origin in both cases. We performed conservative management with nil per os, nasogastric tube, total parenteral nutrition and prophylactic antibiotics. After 2 weeks, both were discharged home.

  3. What is new in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Nordling, J.; Ophoven, A. van

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is an important and poorly understood disorder. This review highlights current research findings that may be of benefit to the clinician who is responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of patients who suffer from this condition. Rec...... the world. In this review we hope to bring practicing healthcare providers up to date with the literature on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and the implications for their patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7....... Recent findings The perspective from which we view bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is evolving, as is apparent in the literature this year. It is best perceived as one of many chronic pain syndromes, some of which may be related. International efforts aimed at consistent definition...

  4. Factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.E. Lankhorst (Nienke); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractABSTRACT This review systematically summarises factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). A systematic literature search was conducted. Studies including ≥20 patients with PFPS that examined ≥1 possible factor associated with PFPS were included. A

  5. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugene Mun Wai Ong; Sudhakar Kundapur Venkatesh

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space ( n = 2) and subhepatic collections ( n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other in- flammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of written self-disclosure for functional recurrent abdominal pain in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallander, Jan L; Madan-Swain, Avi; Klapow, Josh; Saeed, Shehzad

    2011-04-01

    Written self-disclosure (WSD) has rarely been evaluated as an intervention for paediatric diseases. To test the efficacy of WSD for youths aged 11-18 years with a diagnosis of functional recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), 63 were randomly assigned to receive standard medical care (SMC) alone or WSD in addition to SMC. WSD was administered in three 20-min sessions, one in the clinic and two by phone in the home. Measures of self-reported pain frequency, somatisation severity and quality of life (QOL) were completed at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-up points. Blind review of electronic medical records provided data on clinic visit and phone consultation utilisation for the 6 months prior to and following baseline. Practice of WSD in addition to SMC was associated with significantly fewer activity-limiting gastrointestinal pain experiences (d = 0.61) and reduced health care utilisation (d = 0.59) 6 months later compared to SMC alone. There were no significant effects for somatisation severity or QOL in 6 months. WSD may be a useful treatment adjunct for reducing pain frequency and resulting health care utilisation in a portion of youths with functional RAP.

  7. Scalene Myofascial Pain Syndrome Mimicking Cervical Disc Prolapse: A Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Abd Jalil, Nizar; Awang, Mohammad Saufi; Omar, Mahamarowi

    2010-01-01

    Scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome wherein pain originates over the neck area and radiates down to the arm. This condition may present as primary or secondary to underlying cervical pathology. Although scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a well known medical entity, it is often misdiagnosed as being some other neck pain associated with radiculopathy, such as cervical disc prolapse, cervical spinal stenosis and thoracic outlet syndrome. Because scalene myofascial pain...

  8. [Evaluation of diagnostic scales for appendicitis in patients with lower abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Alvaro; Domínguez, Luis Carlos; Bermúdez, Charles; Serna, Adriana

    2007-09-01

    Diagnosis of apendicitis is difficult; however several clinical scales have been developed that attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy. The operational characteristics of Alvarado and Fenyö scales were defined in patients with abdominal pain suggestive of appendicitis and were compare with clinical and pathological diagnoses. A prospective trial assessed the diagnostic tests. Sign, symptoms, and laboratory tests were included in scales selected. Surgeon decision was maintained independent from the results of the scales. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and positive and negative likelihood ratio for each scale was compared with the surgeon evaluation. The sample included 374 patients with approximately equal sexes. Of these 269 patients underwent surgery. Howeve, 16.9% of the male and 31.4% of female patients did not have appendicitis. For men, a diagnosis made by the surgeon had better sensitivity than scales (86.2% vs. 73% for Alvarado and 67.2% for Fenyö) without significant differences in specificity. For women, surgeon and Alvarado scale diagnoses were similar, and better than Fenyö scale (77.1% vs. 79.5% for Alvarado and 47% for Fenyö), but specificity was higher for Fenyö scale (92.9% vs. 71.4% for Alvarado and 75.9% for surgeon). Accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis increases with a higher Alvarado score. For men with abdominal pain on right lower quadrant, surgeon diagnosis is more accurate than scales. For women, Fenyö scale offers a better sensitivity. Alvarado score can facilitate decision-making in patients with these abdominal symptoms.

  9. [Features of autonomic dysfunction in myofascial pain syndromes cervicobrachial localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Морозова, О Г; Ярошевский, А А; Липинская, Я В

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of this study is due to the prevalence of autonomic disorders and musculoskeletal pain, especially among the young people of working age. In recent years, many authors in scientific works have been highlighted aspects of mutual development myofascial and autonomic dysfunction, which is caused by neurophysiological preconditions and anatomical and topographical relationships that need to be considered in the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. To study the characteristics of the formation and flow of autonomic dysfunction syndrome with paroxysmal and permanent types of flow in patients with myofascial pain syndromes cervicobrachial localization. Using clinical neurological, vertebral neurological, neuropsychological methods of studying the severity of pain (visual analogue scale and Pain questionnaire of Mac Gill) examined 84 patients suffering from autonomic dysfunction on the background of myofascial pain syndromes cervicobrachial localization. To identify the features of vegetative regulation of patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (51 people) - with a permanent type of course; group 2 (33 patients) - a type of paroxysmal of course of autonomic dysfunction. It was found more pronounced disturbances in patients with paroxysmal type of course of autonomic dysfunction. The frequency and severity of autonomic paroxysms associated with the severity of musculo-tonic syndrome and location of active trigger points in the muscles of the neck and shoulder girdle, due to anatomic and topographic features of these muscles, namely the proximity of their location to the sympathetic formations neck. The formation and development of emotional and affective disorders in both groups played a significant role of pain and musculo-tonic syndrome. The syndrome of autonomic dysfunction, in particular its paroxysmal type of flow, on the one hand is a response to the development of myofascial pain syndromes cervicobrachial localization, with another - a factor

  10. Pain management in Guillain-Barre syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, L; Moreno, C B; Gutierrez-Alvarez, A M

    2015-09-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Intensity is moderate to severe in most cases and pain may persist after resolution of the disease. Identify the most appropriate analgesic therapy for pain management in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Systematic review and selection of scientific articles on treatment of pain in Guillain-Barre syndrome patients, published between January 1985 and December 2012. We included only randomised, double-blind, controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of drugs for pain management in these patients. Four articles met the inclusion criteria. One evaluated the use of gabapentin, another evaluated carbamazepine, a third compared gabapentin to carbamazepine, and the last evaluated use of methylprednisolone. Both carbamazepine and gabapentin were useful for pain management. Patients experienced lower-intensity pain with gabapentin treatment in the study comparing that drug to carbamazepine. Methylprednisolone was not shown to be effective for reducing pain. The published data did not permit completion of a meta-analysis. There is no robust evidence at present that would point to a single treatment option for this disorder. Further clinical studies of larger patient samples and with a longer duration are needed to characterise types of pain for each patient and measure pain intensity in an objective way. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic visceral pain secondary to ventral disc herniation: Development of visceral complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; de Oliveira, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    When an organ disease is ruled out as the origin of pelvic pain, the superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) injury and consequent dysfunction could be the mechanism of visceral chronic pain perpetuation. As much as a dorsal discus herniation may harm the dorsal or ventral roots, a ventral discus herniation at L4-L5 or L5-S1 may result in direct physical trauma to the SHP, maintaining chronic visceral pain mediated by sympathetic dysfunction, conceivably also afferent fibers dysfunction. We propose that similarly to nociceptive somatic dysfunction named complex regional pain syndrome, the maintained sympathetic pelvic pain secondary to straight physical damage to the SHP characterize in fact the same disease, but in nociceptive visceral tissue, named visceral complex regional pain syndrome, a concept constructed based on the International Association for the Study of Pain criteria (1994).

  12. Ischemic jejunal stenosis and blind loop syndrome after blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, P; Rendall, M; Hoskins, E O; Missen, G A; Sladen, G E

    1987-02-01

    One month after suffering blunt abdominal trauma a patient developed severe steatorrhea and profound weight loss in association with an ischemic distal jejunal stricture and blind loop syndrome. Evidence for a partial mesenteric tear was found at resection of the stricture, which resulted in complete cure.

  13. Transversus abdominal plane (TAP block for postoperative pain management: a review [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jakobsson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Transversus abdominal plane (TAP block has a long history and there is currently extensive clinical experience around TAP blocks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the present evidence on the effects of TAP block and to provide suggestions for further studies. There are several approaches to performing abdominal wall blocks, with the rapid implementation of ultrasound-guided technique facilitating a major difference in TAP block performance. During surgery, an abdominal wall block may also be applied by the surgeon from inside the abdominal cavity. Today, there are more than 11 meta-analyses providing a compiled evidence base around the effects of TAP block. These analyses include different procedures, different techniques of TAP block administration and, importantly, they compare the TAP block with a variety of alternative analgesic regimes. The effects of TAP block during laparoscopic cholecystectomy seem to be equivalent to local infiltration analgesia and also seem to be beneficial during laparoscopic colon resection. The effects of TAP are more pronounced when it is provided prior to surgery and these effects are local anaesthesia dose-dependent. TAP block seems an interesting alternative in patients with, for example, severe obesity where epidural or spinal anaesthesia/analgesia is technically difficult and/or poses a risk. There is an obvious need for further high-quality studies comparing TAP block prior to surgery with local infiltration analgesia, single-shot spinal analgesia, and epidural analgesia. These studies should be procedure-specific and the effects should be evaluated, both regarding short-term pain and analgesic requirement and also including the effects on postoperative nausea and vomiting, recovery of bowel function, ambulation, discharge, and protracted recovery outcomes (assessed by e.g., postoperative quality of recovery scale.

  14. Gangrenous appendicitis presenting as acute abdominal pain in a patient on automated peritoneal dialysis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekart Robert

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Presentations of abdominal pain in patients on peritoneal dialysis deserve maximal attention and careful differential diagnosis on admittance to medical care. In this case report a gangrenous appendicitis in a patient on automated peritoneal dialysis is presented. Case presentation We report the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian man with end-stage renal disease who was on automated peritoneal dialysis and developed acute abdominal pain and cloudy peritoneal dialysate. Negative microbiological cultures of the peritoneal dialysis fluid and an abdominal ultrasonography misleadingly led to a diagnosis of culture negative peritonitis. It was decided to remove the peritoneal catheter but the clinical situation of the patient did not improve. An explorative laparotomy was then carried out; diffuse peritonitis and gangrenous appendicitis were found. An appendectomy was performed. Myocardial infarction and sepsis developed, and the outcome was fatal. Conclusion A peritoneal dialysis patient with abdominal pain that persists for more than 48 hours after the usual antibiotic protocol for peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis should immediately alert the physician to the possibility of peritonitis caused by intra-abdominal pathology. Not only peritoneal catheter removal is indicated in patients whose clinical features worsen or fail to resolve with the established intra-peritoneal antibiotic therapy but, after 72 hours, an early laparoscopy should be done and in a case of correct indication (intra-abdominal pathology an early explorative laparotomy.

  15. [The treatment of the phantom pain syndrome with tizanidine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobeĭchik, Ia M; Kukushkin, M L; Reshetniak, V K; Ovechkin, A M; Gnezdilov, A V

    1997-01-01

    The authors carried out estimation of analgetic effect of tisanidin by double blind test in patients with phantom limb pain syndrome. 14 patients took the medicine in a dose of 12 mg/day and 5 patients took placebo at the same dose. Characteristics and intensity of pain were estimated in accordance with McGill pain questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Pain possessed more than one sensory characteristics in the majority of patients. Tisanidin had a significant analgetic influence on all type of phantom limb pain: "neuralgic"--acute, shooting, transitory, "causalgic"--hot, burning, searing, "cramping" pain. Pain sensation did not decrease only in one of 14 patients treated with tisanidin. The authors explain the effectivity of the drug for treatment of phantom limb pain of different sensory modality by variety of the mechanisms of its therapeutic action, the capacity to decrease the releasing of excitatory neurotransmitter amino acids and the influence on alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

  16. CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME – MODERN LOOK TO THE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Izvozchikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main causes of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS, and its pathogenetic mechanisms are described. The criteria of evaluation ofchronic pelvic stress pain are described .It is proposed to use ultidisciplinary approach for therapy CPPS with compulsory neurologists, chiropractic physicians, psychiatrists and therapists, urologists, gynecologists and proctologists involvement to improve diagnostic and quality of therapeutic measures.

  17. CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME – MODERN LOOK TO THE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Izvozchikov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main causes of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS, and its pathogenetic mechanisms are described. The criteria of evaluation ofchronic pelvic stress pain are described .It is proposed to use ultidisciplinary approach for therapy CPPS with compulsory neurologists, chiropractic physicians, psychiatrists and therapists, urologists, gynecologists and proctologists involvement to improve diagnostic and quality of therapeutic measures.

  18. Diffusely increased bone scintigraphic uptake in patellofemoral pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Naslund, J.; Odenbring, S; Naslund, U; Lundeberg, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Painful disorders of the patellofemoral joint are one of the most frequent complaints in orthopaedic and sports medicine. The aims of this study were to determine whether bone scintigrams of patients suffering from patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) show diffuse uptake and in what bony compartment of the knee uptake, if any, was localised.

  19. Genetic and epidemiological aspect of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, Annetje Monique de

    2010-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a painful disorder affecting one or more extremities. CRPS is characterized by various combinations of sensory, autonomic and motor disturbances. Genetic factors are suggested to play a role in CRPS, but this has not been extensively studied. Therefore the ai

  20. Bartter syndrome presenting as poor weight gain and abdominal mass in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Annie; Steffensen, Thora S; Gilbert-Barness, Enid; Perlman, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Bartter syndrome, a group of disorders that encompasses multiple genetic defects with similar clinical presentation, has been divided into six different genotypes, according to different genetic defects, and into three main clinical variants (or phenotypes). Classic laboratory findings in all variants include hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis with excessive excretion of chloride and potassium. Classic Bartter syndrome, neonatal Bartter syndrome, and Gitelman syndrome are the three main clinical variants. Classic Bartter syndrome and neonatal Bartter syndrome have defects in genes that affect transport channels in the ascending loop of Henle, where as in Gitleman syndrome the defect occurs in the transport channels of the distal convoluted tubule. Classic Bartter syndrome and neonatal Bartter syndrome have similar presenting symptoms, potential outcomes, and treatment, but different ages at presentation. Gitelman syndrome, a more benign condition than the other clinical variants, has the classic hallmark finding of hypomagnesemia and low to normal excretion of calcium. This differentiates it from the classic and neonatal variants of the disease. With early diagnosis and proper treatment, Bartter syndrome has a good prognosis. But failure to identify it can lead to tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal failure. We present a case of a 6-month-old boy with Bartter syndrome who presented with poor weight gain and an abdominal mass.